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Sample records for hilbertian gravitational repulsion

  1. Gravitational Repulsion and Dirac Antimatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowitt, Mark E.

    1996-03-01

    Based on an analogy with electron and hole dynamics in semiconductors, Dirac's relativistic electron equation is generalized to include a gravitational interaction using an electromagnetic-type approximation of the gravitational potential. With gravitational and inertial masses decoupled, the equation serves to extend Dirac's deduction of antimatter parameters to include the possibility of gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter. Consequences for general relativity and related “antigravity” issues are considered, including the nature and gravitational behavior of virtual photons, virtual pairs, and negative-energy particles. Basic cosmological implications of antigravity are explored—in particular, potential contributions to inflation, expansion, and the general absence of detectable antimatter. Experimental and observational tests are noted, and new ones suggested.

  2. Bipolar outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon — Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambuya, Golden Gadzirayi

    2010-11-01

    This paper is part of a series on the Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (ASTG). This theory is built on Laplace-Poisson's well known equation and it has been shown that the ASTG is capable of explaining, from a purely classical physics standpoint, the precession of the perihelion of solar planets as a consequence of the azimuthal symmetry emerging from the spin of the Sun. This symmetry has and must have an influence on the emergent gravitational field. We show herein that the emergent equations from the ASTG, under some critical conditions determined by the spin, do possess repulsive gravitational fields in the polar regions of the gravitating body in question. This places the ASTG on an interesting pedestal to infer the origins of outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon. Outflows are a ubiquitous phenomenon found in star forming systems and their true origin is a question yet to be settled. Given the current thinking on their origin, the direction that the present paper takes is nothing short of an asymptotic break from conventional wisdom; at the very least, it is a complete paradigm shift because gravitation is not at all associated with this process, but rather it is thought to be an all-attractive force that only tries to squash matter together onto a single point. Additionally, we show that the emergent Azimuthally Symmetric Gravitational Field from the ASTG strongly suggests a solution to the supposed Radiation Problem that is thought to be faced by massive stars in their process of formation. That is, at ~ 8-10 , radiation from the nascent star is expected to halt the accretion of matter. We show that in-falling material will fall onto the equatorial disk and from there, this material will be channeled onto the forming star via the equatorial plane, thus accretion of mass continues well past the value of ~ 8-10 , albeit via the disk. Along the equatorial plane, the net force (with the radiation force included) on any material there

  3. Studies of Structure Formation in Theories with a Repulsive Long-Range Gravitational Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohiya, D.; Batra, A.; Mehra, S.; Mahajan, S.; Mukherjee, A.

    This paper reports on the emergence of structures in a class of alternative theories of gravity. These theories do not have any horizon, flatness, initial cosmological singularity and (possibly) quantization problems. The model is characterized by a dynamically induced gravitational constant with a wrong sign corresponding to repulsive gravitation on the large scale. A non-minimal coupling of a scalar field in the model can give rise to non-topological solitons in the theory. This results in domains (gravity balls) inside which an effective, canonical, attractive gravitational constant is induced. We consider simulations of the formation and evolution of such solutions. Starting with a single gravity ball, we consider its fragmentation into smaller (lower mass) balls - evolving by mutual repulsion. After several runs, we have been able to identify two parameters: the strength of the long-range gravitational constant and the size of the gravity balls, which can be used to generate appropriate two-point correlations of the distribution of these balls.

  4. Conditional Validity of E = mc2 and the Repulsive Gravitation in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. Y.

    Currently, the formula E = mc2 is often misinterpreted as the unconditional equivalence between inertial mass and each type of energy (i.e., m = E/c2). However, according to Einstein's general relativity, such a claim is incorrect. Clearly, a necessary condition for any type of energy (or a combination of many types of energy) to be equivalent to mass is that the combined energy results in a tensor having a non-zero trace. For instance, the energy of photons include the energy of its gravitational wave component as demanded by E = mc2. It is pointed out that the Reissner-Nordstrom metric illustrated that electromagnetic energy and mass are different in terms of gravity. The misinterpretation of E = mc2 being unconditional is responsible for overlooking the repulsive charge-mass interaction. Such an interaction of repulsive gravitation implies that the unification of electromagnetism and gravitation is necessary and correct. Moreover, this analysis shows that both the interpretations of Wilczek and 't Hooft on m = E/c2 being unconditionally true is incorrect.

  5. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Luz M.; Moreno, Claudia; Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-10-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during the early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric on cosmological scales. This metric is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that it is possible to derive the dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity-antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  6. Gravitational repulsion within a black hole using the Stueckelberg quantum formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwin, D. M.; Horwitz, L. P.

    2011-01-15

    We wish to study an application of Stueckelberg's relativistic quantum theory in the framework of general relativity. We study the form of the wave equation of a massive body in the presence of a Schwarzschild gravitational field. We treat the mathematical behavior of the wavefunction also around and beyond the horizon (r= 2M). Classically, within the horizon, the time component of the metric becomes spacelike and distance from the origin singularity becomes timelike, suggesting an inevitable propagation of all matter within the horizon to a total collapse at r=0. However, the quantum description of the wavefunction provides a different understanding of the behavior of matter within the horizon. We find that a test particle can almost never be found at the origin and is more probable to be found at the horizon. Matter outside the horizon has a very small wavelength and therefore interference effects can be found only on a very small atomic scale. However, within the horizon, matter becomes totally 'tachyonic' and is potentially 'spread' over all space. Small location uncertainties on the atomic scale become large around the horizon, and different mass components of the wavefunction can therefore interfere on a stellar scale. This interference phenomenon, where the probability of finding matter decreases as a function of the distance from the horizon, appears as an effective gravitational repulsion.

  7. Hilbertian sine as an absolute measure of Bayesian inference in ISR, homeland security, medicine, and defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Wang, Wenjian; Hodelin, Juan; Forrester, Thomas; Romanov, Volodymyr; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, Bayesian Binary Sensing (BBS) is discussed as an effective tool for Bayesian Inference (BI) evaluation in interdisciplinary areas such as ISR (and, C3I), Homeland Security, QC, medicine, defense, and many others. In particular, Hilbertian Sine (HS) as an absolute measure of BI, is introduced, while avoiding relativity of decision threshold identification, as in the case of traditional measures of BI, related to false positives and false negatives.

  8. A unified study of projection algorithms for solving Hilbertian convex feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Combettes, P.

    1994-12-31

    Numerous problems in applied mathematics, science, and engineering can be reduced to finding a common point of a collection of closed and convex sets in a Hilbert space. This abstract formulation is known as the hilbertian convex feasibility problem. The goal of this work is to study the convergence of a broad class of projection methods for solving hilbertian convex feasibility problems with a countable number of sets. A general algorithm is proposed which provides a unifying formulation for existing projection-based methods. It proceeds by extrapolated iterations of convex combinations of approximate projections onto subfamilies of sets. The relaxation parameters can vary over iteration- dependent, extrapolated ranges that extend beyond the interval [0, 2] usually used in projection methods. Various strategies are considered to control the order in which the sets are activated (cyclic, coercive, quasi-cyclic, admissible, chaotic). In addition, general regularity conditions on the sets are used (Slater condition, Levitin-Polyak condition, locally uniformly convex condition, bounded compactness, bounded and strong regularity) to study strong convergence. Weak convergence results for more general iterative schemes involving firmly nonexpansive operators instead of projections are also be presented.

  9. A repulsive force in the Einstein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, Nick; Vasilkov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detection of gravitational waves that take away 5 per cent of the total mass of two merging black holes points out on the importance of considering varying gravitational mass of a system in the framework of the Einstein general theory of relativity. We calculate the acceleration of a particle in the non-stationary field of a quasi-spherical system composed of a large number of objects emitting gravitational waves. It is shown that reduction of the gravitational mass of the system due to emitting gravitational waves leads to a repulsive gravitational force that diminishes with time but never disappears. This repulsive force may be related to the observed expansion of the Universe.

  10. Law of Universal Repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2012-02-01

    All objects in the universe repel each other. Repulsion between two objects is directly proportional to the external energy (mv^2) of their relative motion and indirectly proportional to their relative motion radius (one object is in relative rest, while the other one is in relative motion). Application examples Suppose a man whose mass is 100 kg, runs on the earth at a speed of 10 meters per second. The radius of the earth is 637100 meters. The repulsion between the earth and the man is: F=mv^2/r=0.00157N; if his speed reaches the first cosmic speed ( 7.9 km per second ), then calculate: F=mv^2/r=980N, just overcome the gravity of the earth. A car with a certain velocity running in a straight highway ( actually with some slight curves ) can't fly up. However, if it encounters an arched bridge, it is possible for the car to fly. That is the consequence of the arch bridge has changed its movement radius, and the repulsion is increased. A aircraft's taking off and flying are not only because of the fluid - air, but also because of the change of its motion radius ( forming virtual arched bridge in the air ), which increases the repulsion.

  11. Repulsive gravity model for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Manuel; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2010-05-01

    We construct a multimetric gravity theory containing N≥3 copies of standard model matter and a corresponding number of metrics. In the Newtonian limit, this theory generates attractive gravitational forces within each matter sector and repulsive forces of the same strength between matter from different sectors. This result demonstrates that the recently proven no-go theorem that forbids gravity theories of this type in N=2 cannot be extended beyond the bimetric case. We apply our theory to cosmology and show that the repulsion between different types of matter may induce the observed accelerating expansion of the universe. In this way dark energy can be explained simply by dark copies of the well-understood standard model.

  12. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  13. Coulomb repulsion in short polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Norouzy, Amir; Assaf, Khaleel I; Zhang, Shuai; Jacob, Maik H; Nau, Werner M

    2015-01-01

    Coulomb repulsion between like-charged side chains is presently viewed as a major force that impacts the biological activity of intrinsically disordered polypeptides (IDPs) by determining their spatial dimensions. We investigated short synthetic models of IDPs, purely composed of ionizable amino acid residues and therefore expected to display an extreme structural and dynamic response to pH variation. Two synergistic, custom-made, time-resolved fluorescence methods were applied in tandem to study the structure and dynamics of the acidic and basic hexapeptides Asp6, Glu6, Arg6, Lys6, and His6 between pH 1 and 12. (i) End-to-end distances were obtained from the short-distance Förster resonance energy transfer (sdFRET) from N-terminal 5-fluoro-l-tryptophan (FTrp) to C-terminal Dbo. (ii) End-to-end collision rates were obtained for the same peptides from the collision-induced fluorescence quenching (CIFQ) of Dbo by FTrp. Unexpectedly, the very high increase of charge density at elevated pH had no dynamical or conformational consequence in the anionic chains, neither in the absence nor in the presence of salt, in conflict with the common view and in partial conflict with accompanying molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast, the cationic peptides responded to ionization but with surprising patterns that mirrored the rich individual characteristics of each side chain type. The contrasting results had to be interpreted, by considering salt screening experiments, N-terminal acetylation, and simulations, in terms of an interplay of local dielectric constant and peptide-length dependent side chain charge-charge repulsion, side chain functional group solvation, N-terminal and side chain charge-charge repulsion, and side chain-side chain as well as side chain-backbone interactions. The common picture that emerged is that Coulomb repulsion between water-solvated side chains is efficiently quenched in short peptides as long as side chains are not in direct contact with each

  14. Electromagnetic Repulsive Deicer for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A.; Lee, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    Scheme for removing ice from airfoils in flight adds little weight and demands relatively small amount of energy. Employing electromagnetic repulsion of conductors embedded in rubber covering on airfoil, scheme breaks up layer of ice by snapping it in manner of snapping rug to remove dust. Layer of elastomer conforms to shape of airfoil in relaxed state. When carrying large electrical currents, conductive ribbons in elastomer repel each other, creating ridged surface on airfoil. Sheet of ice on airfoil broken up in sudden transition from relaxed state to energized state.

  15. Repulsive Casimir Force using metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.; Mundru, Pattabhiraju C.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    We investigate conditions for Casimir Force (CF) reversal between two parallel half-space metamaterial plates separated by air or vacuum at ambient temperatures. Practically, the Casimir effect can lead to stiction in nanoscale devices, degradation and decreased performance. While material realizations of repulsive CF has been proposed for high dielectric host materials, so far the CF reversal with air/vacuum as intermediate medium remain challenging. Here, we propose a two plate design based on artificial electromagnetic materials known as metamaterials. This configuration allows a simple analytical treatment that accurately describes the large and short distance asymptotics of CF and allows extraction of important parameters such as lower and upper cutoff gap distances that define the repulsive force window. A parametric study has been performed in terms of the plate's dielectric and magnetic plasma frequencies, plate separation distance and temperature. The parametric domain for achieving CF reversal is identified. If successfully implemented the proposed design could potentially result in frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, quantum levitation and coating for ultra-clean room environment.

  16. Rheology and dynamics of repulsive clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, V. A.; Lazarev, Yu. F.

    2012-01-01

    The physical and thermodynamic properties of a repulsive clathrate used as a working body for the dissipation, storage, and conversion of energy in thermomechanical systems are studied. In repulsive clathrates, use is made for the first time of the molecular repulsive forces acting in large interfacial areas in a system consisting of a fluid and a capillary-porous matrix not wetted by this fluid. Based on experimental studies of a car damper with a repulsive clathrate, a rheological model of energy dissipation was developed which can be used to design compact high-performance dampers for different purposes and anti-seismic systems of new generation.

  17. Size scaling of self-gravitating polymers and strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Shoichi; Matsuo, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    We study a statistical ensemble of a single polymer with self-gravitational interaction. This is a model of a gravitating string-the precursor of a black hole. We analyze averaged sizes by mean field approximations with an effective Hamiltonian à la Edwards with a Newtonian potential as well as a contact repulsive interaction. We find that there exists a certain scaling region where the attractive and repulsive forces balance out. The repulsive interaction pushes the critical gravitational coupling to a larger value, at which the size of a polymer becomes comparable to its Schwarzschild radius, and, as a result, the size of the corresponding black hole increases considerably. We show phase diagrams in various dimensions that clarify how the size changes as the strengths of the repulsive and gravitational forces vary.

  18. Topographic mapping: organising by repulsion and competition?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D G

    2000-06-15

    The establishment of topographic maps of neuronal connections is believed to involve graded repulsion mediated by EphA receptors and ephrin-A ligands. Gene knockouts show that ephrin-A ligands do indeed have a crucial role in mapping, and that mechanisms in addition to graded repulsion must also be at work.

  19. Properties of fragmented repulsive condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2005-06-15

    Repulsive Bose-Einstein condensates immersed into a double-well trap potential are studied within the framework of the recently introduced mean-field approach which allows for bosons to reside in several different orthonormal orbitals. In the case of a one-orbital mean-field theory (Gross-Pitaevskii) the ground state of the system reveals a bifurcation scenario at some critical values of the interparticle interaction and/or the number of particles. At about the same values of the parameters the two-orbital mean field predicts that the system becomes twofold fragmented. By applying the three-orbital mean field we verify numerically that for the double-well external potential studied here the overall best mean field is achieved with two orbitals. The variational principle minimizes the energy at a vanishing population of the third orbital. To discuss the energies needed to remove a boson from and the energies gained by adding a boson to the condensate, we introduce boson ionization potentials and boson affinities and relate them to the chemical potentials. The impact of the finite number of bosons in the condensate on these quantities is analyzed. We recall that within the framework of the multiorbital mean-field theory each fragment is characterized by its own chemical potential. Finally, the stability of fragmented states is discussed in terms of the boson transfer energy which is the energy needed to transfer a boson from one fragment to another.

  20. Repulsion between Oppositely Charged Planar Macroions

    PubMed Central

    Jho, YongSeok; Brown, Frank L. H.; Kim, MahnWon; Pincus, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The repulsive interaction between oppositely charged macroions is investigated using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of an unrestricted primitive model, including the effect of inhomogeneous surface charge and its density, the depth of surface charge, the cation size, and the dielectric permittivity of solvent and macroions, and their contrast. The origin of the repulsion is a combination of osmotic pressure and ionic screening resulting from excess salt between the macroions. The excess charge over-reduces the electrostatic attraction between macroions and raises the entropic repulsion. The magnitude of the repulsion increases when the dielectric constant of the solvent is lowered (below that of water) and/or the surface charge density is increased, in good agreement with experiment. Smaller size of surface charge and the cation, their discreteness and mobility are other factors that enhance the repulsion and charge inversion phenomenons. PMID:23940518

  1. Equivalent Activities of Repulsive Axon Guidance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong; Yoshikawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on the growth cone at the leading edge of elongating axons play critical guidance roles by recognizing cues via their extracellular domains and transducing signals via their intracellular domains, resulting in changes in direction of growth. An important concept to have emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a major guidance mechanism. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are likely to be qualitative differences in the signals they transduce. However, the nature of these possible differences is unknown. By creating chimeras using the extracellular and intracellular domains of three different Drosophila repulsive receptors, Unc5, Roundabout (Robo), and Derailed (Drl) and expressing them in defined cells within the embryonic nervous system, we examined the responses elicited by their intracellular domains systematically. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative differences in growth cone response or axon growth, suggesting that, despite their highly diverged sequences, each intracellular domain elicits repulsion via a common pathway. In terms of the signaling pathway(s) used by the repulsive receptors, mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio strongly enhance the repulsive activity of all three intracellular domains, suggesting that repulsion by Unc5, Robo, and Drl, and perhaps repulsion in general, involves Trio activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A prevailing concept that has emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a guidance mechanism for steering axons to their appropriate targets. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are differences in the signals that they transduce. However, this has never been tested directly. We have used the advanced genetics of Drosophila to compare directly the outputs of different repulsive receptors. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative

  2. Enhancing Casimir repulsion via topological insulator multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ran; Chen, Liang; Nie, Wenjie; Bi, Meihua; Yang, Yaping; Zhu, Shiyao

    2016-08-01

    We propose to observe the enhanced Casimir repulsion between two parallel multilayer walls made of alternating layers of a topological insulator (TI) and a normal insulator. Based on the transfer matrix method, the Fresnel coefficients matrix is generalized to apply to the TI multilayer structure. The Casimir repulsion under the influence of the magnetization orientation in the magnetic coatings on TI layer surfaces, the layer thicknesses, and the topological magnetoelectric polarizability, is investigated. We show that, for the multilayer structures with parallel magnetization on the TI layer surfaces, it is possible to enhance the repulsion by increasing the TI layer number, which is due to the accumulation of the contribution to the repulsion from the polarization rotation effect occurring on each TI layer surface. Generally, in the distance region where there is Casimir attraction between semi-infinite TIs, the force may turn into repulsion in TI multilayer structure, and in the region of repulsion for semi-infinite TI, the repulsive force can be enhanced in magnitude, the enhancement tends to a maximum while the structure contains sufficiently many layers.

  3. Modified entropic gravitation in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2012-01-01

    Verlinde recently developed a theoretical account of gravitation in terms of an entropic force. The central element in Verlinde’s derivation is information and its relation with entropy through the holographic principle. The application of this approach to the case of superconductors requires to take into account that information associated with superconductor’s quantum vacuum energy is not stored on Planck size surface elements, but in four volume cells with Planck-Einstein size. This has profound consequences on the type of gravitational force generated by the quantum vacuum condensate in superconductors, which is closely related with the cosmological repulsive acceleration responsible for the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Remarkably this new gravitational type force depends on the level of breaking of the weak equivalence principle for cooper pairs in a given superconducting material, which was previously derived by the author starting from similar principles. It is also shown that this new gravitational force can be interpreted as a surface force. The experimental detection of this new repulsive gravitational-type force appears to be challenging.

  4. Thermal fluctuations and stability of a particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force in a liquid.

    PubMed

    Inui, Norio; Goto, Kosuke

    2013-11-01

    We study the vertical Brownian motion of a gold particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force to a silica plate immersed in bromobenzene. The time evolution of the particle distribution starting from an equilibrium position, where the Casimir force and gravitational force are balanced, is considered by solving the Langevin equation using the Monte Carlo method. When the gold particle is very close to the silica plate, the Casimir force changes from repulsive to attractive, and the particle eventually sticks to the surface. The escape rate from a metastable position is calculated by solving the Fokker-Plank equation; it agrees with the value obtained by Kramers' escape theory. The duration of levitation increases as the particle radius increases up to around 2.3 μm. As an example, we show that a 1-μm-diameter gold particle can be levitated for a significantly long time by the repulsive Casimir force at room temperature.

  5. Attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, David B.; Fontana, Richard R.

    1992-05-01

    Magnetic suspension systems can be used in a wide variety of applications. The decision of whether to use an attractive or repulsive suspension system for a particular application is a fundamental one which must be made during the design process. As an aid to the designer, we compare and contrast attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems and indicate whether and under what conditions one or the other system is preferred.

  6. Attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, David B.; Fontana, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic suspension systems can be used in a wide variety of applications. The decision of whether to use an attractive or repulsive suspension system for a particular application is a fundamental one which must be made during the design process. As an aid to the designer, we compare and contrast attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems and indicate whether and under what conditions one or the other system is preferred.

  7. Casimir repulsion between metallic objects in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Reid, M T Homer; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis. PMID:20868142

  8. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  9. The Attractive and Repulsive Gauche Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juaristi, Eusebio

    1979-01-01

    Reviews published material on conformational behavior in 1,2-disubstituted frameworks regulated by steric and polar factors and attractive and repulsive gauche effects. Reports on attraction in systems with small and strongly electronegative atoms. Suggests that cause is dominant nuclear-electron attraction between atoms or groups. (Author/SA)

  10. Optimal cooperative searching using purely repulsive interactions.

    PubMed

    Tani, Noriyuki P; Blatt, Alan; Quint, David A; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2014-11-21

    Foraging, either solitarily or collectively, is a necessary behavior for survival that is demonstrated by many organisms. Foraging can be collectively optimized by utilizing communication between the organisms. Examples of such communication range from high level strategic foraging by animal groups to rudimentary signaling among unicellular organisms. Here we systematically study the simplest form of communication via long range repulsive interactions between multiple diffusing Brownian searchers on a one-dimensional lattice. We show that the mean first passage time for any one of them to reach a fixed target depends non-monotonically on the range of the interaction and can be optimized for a repulsive range that is comparable to the average spacing between searchers. Our results suggest that even the most rudimentary form of collective searching does in fact lower the search time for the foragers suggesting robust mechanisms for search optimization in cellular communities.

  11. Electron attraction mediated by Coulomb repulsion.

    PubMed

    Hamo, A; Benyamini, A; Shapir, I; Khivrich, I; Waissman, J; Kaasbjerg, K; Oreg, Y; von Oppen, F; Ilani, S

    2016-07-21

    One of the defining properties of electrons is their mutual Coulomb repulsion. However, in solids this basic property may change; for example, in superconductors, the coupling of electrons to lattice vibrations makes the electrons attract one another, leading to the formation of bound pairs. Fifty years ago it was proposed that electrons can be made attractive even when all of the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic, by exploiting their repulsion from other electrons. This attraction mechanism, termed 'excitonic', promised to achieve stronger and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite an extensive search, experimental evidence for excitonic attraction has yet to be found. Here we demonstrate this attraction by constructing, from the bottom up, the fundamental building block of the excitonic mechanism. Our experiments are based on quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with cryogenic precision manipulation. Using this platform, we demonstrate that two electrons can be made to attract each other using an independent electronic system as the 'glue' that mediates attraction. Owing to its tunability, our system offers insights into the underlying physics, such as the dependence of the emergent attraction on the underlying repulsion, and the origin of the pairing energy. We also demonstrate transport signatures of excitonic pairing. This experimental demonstration of excitonic pairing paves the way for the design of exotic states of matter. PMID:27443742

  12. Electron attraction mediated by Coulomb repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamo, A.; Benyamini, A.; Shapir, I.; Khivrich, I.; Waissman, J.; Kaasbjerg, K.; Oreg, Y.; von Oppen, F.; Ilani, S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the defining properties of electrons is their mutual Coulomb repulsion. However, in solids this basic property may change; for example, in superconductors, the coupling of electrons to lattice vibrations makes the electrons attract one another, leading to the formation of bound pairs. Fifty years ago it was proposed that electrons can be made attractive even when all of the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic, by exploiting their repulsion from other electrons. This attraction mechanism, termed ‘excitonic’, promised to achieve stronger and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite an extensive search, experimental evidence for excitonic attraction has yet to be found. Here we demonstrate this attraction by constructing, from the bottom up, the fundamental building block of the excitonic mechanism. Our experiments are based on quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with cryogenic precision manipulation. Using this platform, we demonstrate that two electrons can be made to attract each other using an independent electronic system as the ‘glue’ that mediates attraction. Owing to its tunability, our system offers insights into the underlying physics, such as the dependence of the emergent attraction on the underlying repulsion, and the origin of the pairing energy. We also demonstrate transport signatures of excitonic pairing. This experimental demonstration of excitonic pairing paves the way for the design of exotic states of matter.

  13. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  14. Gravitational energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    Observers at rest in a stationary spacetime flat at infinity can measure small amounts of rest-mass + internal energies + kinetic energies + pressure energy in a small volume of fluid attached to a local inertial frame. The sum of these small amounts is the total 'matter energy', EM, for those observers. If Mc2 is the total mass energy, the difference Mc2 - EM is the binding gravitational energy. Misner, Thorne and Wheeler (MTW) evaluated the gravitational energy of a spherically symmetric static spacetime. Here we show how to calculate gravitational energy in any static and stationary spacetimes with isolated sources with a set of observers at rest. The result of MTW is recovered and we find that electromagnetic and gravitational 3-covariant energy densities in conformastatic spacetimes are of opposite signs. Various examples suggest that gravitational energy is negative in spacetimes with special symmetries or when the energy momentum tensor satisfies usual energy conditions.

  15. Global Solutions to Repulsive Hookean Elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xianpeng; Masmoudi, Nader

    2016-08-01

    The global existence of classical solutions to the three dimensional repulsive Hookean elastodynamics around an equilibrium is considered. By linearization and Hodge's decomposition, the compressible part of the velocity, the density, and the compressible part of the transpose of the deformation gradient satisfy Klein-Gordon equations with speed {√{2}} , while the incompressible parts of the velocity and of the transpose of the deformation gradient satisfy wave equations with speed one. The space-time resonance method combined with the vector field method is used in a novel way to obtain the decay of the solution and hence global existence.

  16. Coulomb Repulsion in Miniature Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1999-08-08

    We have undertaken a study of ion mobility resolution in a miniature ion mobility spectrometer with a drift channel 1.7 mm in diameter and 35 mm in length. The device attained a maximum resolution of 14 in separating ions of NO, O{sub 2}, and methyl iodine. The ions were generated by pulses from a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. Broadening due to Coulomb repulsion was modeled theoretically and shown experimentally to have a major effect on the resolution of the miniature device.

  17. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  18. Cellular cooperation with shift updating and repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Pavlogiannis, Andreas; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Adlam, Ben; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Population structure can facilitate evolution of cooperation. In a structured population, cooperators can form clusters which resist exploitation by defectors. Recently, it was observed that a shift update rule is an extremely strong amplifier of cooperation in a one dimensional spatial model. For the shift update rule, an individual is chosen for reproduction proportional to fecundity; the offspring is placed next to the parent; a random individual dies. Subsequently, the population is rearranged (shifted) until all individual cells are again evenly spaced out. For large population size and a one dimensional population structure, the shift update rule favors cooperation for any benefit-to-cost ratio greater than one. But every attempt to generalize shift updating to higher dimensions while maintaining its strong effect has failed. The reason is that in two dimensions the clusters are fragmented by the movements caused by rearranging the cells. Here we introduce the natural phenomenon of a repulsive force between cells of different types. After a birth and death event, the cells are being rearranged minimizing the overall energy expenditure. If the repulsive force is sufficiently high, shift becomes a strong promoter of cooperation in two dimensions. PMID:26602306

  19. Attraction by Repulsion: Pairing Electrons using Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilani, Shahal

    One of the fundamental properties of electrons is their mutual Columbic repulsion. If electrons are placed in a solid, however, this basic property may change. A famous example is that of superconductors, where coupling to lattice vibrations makes electrons attractive and leads to the formation of bound pairs. But what if all the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic? Is it possible to make electrons attract each other only by their repulsion to other electrons? Such an `excitonic' mechanism for attraction was proposed fifty years ago by W. A. Little, with the hope that it could lead to better and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite many efforts to synthesize materials that possess this unique property, to date there is still no evidence for electronic-based attraction. In this talk I will present our recent experiments that observe this unusual electronic attraction using a different, bottom-up approach. Our experiments are based on a new generation of quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with precision cryogenic manipulation. Using this setup we can now assemble the fundamental building block of the excitonic attraction and demonstrate that two electrons that naturally repel each other can be made attractive using an independent electronic system as the binding glue. I will discuss the lessons learned from these experiments on what is achievable with plain electrostatics, and on the possibility to use the observed mechanism for creating exotic states of matter.

  20. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  1. Repulsive Casimir force in magnetodielectric plate configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.; Mundru, Pattabhiraju C.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force between purely dielectric materials is generally attractive and can lead to increased friction and stiction effects in nanoscale devices. While prospective quantum levitating systems have been proposed for high dielectric constant host materials, reversal of the Casimir force with air/vacuum as the intermediate medium remains challenging. Here, the problem of quantum levitation is studied for a system consisting of two parallel magnetodielectric plates. A simple analytical treatment of the problem is provided through the introduction of an upper bound of the force. An explicit sufficient condition for the manifestation of Casimir force repulsion is derived in terms of the plate's material parameters and temperature. The sufficient condition can serve as a useful tool in designing quantum levitating systems with air as the intermediate medium, which is the natural environment for practical microscopic devices.

  2. Thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of repulsive clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, V. A.; Grosu, Ya. G.

    2013-09-01

    The range of the characteristic properties of repulsive clathrates (RCs), which are new working media used for efficient energy conversion in thermomechanical systems, has been extended. The dissipation, storage, and conversion of energy by means of RCs is based on the use of the intermolecular forces acting on the interface of the system of a liquid and a nonwetting solid capillaryporous matrix and leading to ejection of the liquid from the pores of the matrix. It has been shown that it is possible to control characteristics of RCs such as compressibility, amount of the dissipated (accumulated) mechanical energy, specific heat, and thermal parameters of the compression-expansion process. The properties of RCs providing unique operation modes of power systems that are not realizable with conventional working media (gas, steam).

  3. Horizontal vectorization of electron repulsion integrals.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Benjamin P; Chow, Edmond

    2016-10-30

    We present an efficient implementation of the Obara-Saika algorithm for the computation of electron repulsion integrals that utilizes vector intrinsics to calculate several primitive integrals concurrently in a SIMD vector. Initial benchmarks display a 2-4 times speedup with AVX instructions over comparable scalar code, depending on the basis set. Speedup over scalar code is found to be sensitive to the level of contraction of the basis set, and is best for (lAlB|lClD) quartets when lD  = 0 or lB=lD=0, which makes such a vectorization scheme particularly suitable for density fitting. The basic Obara-Saika algorithm, how it is vectorized, and the performance bottlenecks are analyzed and discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27620865

  4. Gravitational lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of gravitational-lens phenomena are reviewed, and sample numerical data are presented in tables. Particular attention is given to luminous arcs, radio rings, galaxy-quasar associations, the problem of deriving actually or practically unique models of individual lens systems, and time delays and the Hubble constant.

  5. Methodological Gravitism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaman, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the case of the exchange marriage system to delineate a model of methodological gravitism. Such a model is not a deviation from or alteration to the existing qualitative research approaches. I have adopted culturally specific methodology to investigate spouse selection in line with the Grounded Theory Method. This…

  6. The Electron-Pair Repulsion Model for Molecular Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Describes how the electron-pair repulsion model qualitatively explains the size and shape of molecular orbitals. Briefly discusses trigonal bipyramidal molecules, three-center bonds, and transition elements. Describes cluster compounds and finishes with a discussion of the exceptions to the model and effects of ligand-ligand repulsions. (RR)

  7. Repulsive Casimir interaction: Boyer oscillators at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Ojaghi Dogahe, Badrosadat; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of temperature on the repulsive Casimir interaction between an ideally permeable and an ideally polarizable plate in vacuo. At small separations or for low temperatures the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field give the main contribution to the interaction, while at large separations or for high temperatures the interaction is dominated by the classical thermal fluctuations of the field. At intermediate separations or finite temperatures both the quantum and thermal fluctuations contribute. For a system composed of one infinitely permeable plate between two ideal conductors at a finite temperature, we identify a stable mechanical equilibrium state, if the infinitely permeable plate is located in the middle of the cavity. For small displacements the restoring force of this Boyer oscillator is linear in the deviation from the equilibrium position, with a spring constant that depends inversely on the separation between the two conducting plates and linearly on temperature. Furthermore, an array of such oscillators presents an ideal Einsteinian crystal that displays a fluctuation force between its outer boundaries stemming from the displacement fluctuations of the Boyer oscillators.

  8. Hard-Core Repulsion and Supersolid Cluster Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boninsegni, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of a short-ranged hard-core repulsion on the stability and superfluid properties of the cluster crystal phase of two-dimensional (2D) soft-core bosons. Results of Quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a cogent test case suggest that the main physical properties of the phase remain unaltered if the range d of the inner repulsive core is sufficiently short, even if the strength of the repulsion is several orders of magnitude greater than the outer soft-core barrier. Only if d is an appreciable fraction of the size of the clusters ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] 5 %) does a sufficiently strong hard-core repulsion cause the crystal to break down into a homogeneous superfluid; a moderate inner core repulsion enhances the superfluid response of the crystalline phase.

  9. Gravitational Lensing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  10. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  11. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  12. Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Gravity bends light rays in a way analogous to, but quantitatively different from, the way it bends trajectories of passing particles. If light from some bright object passes close enough to some foreground mass, that object's image will be altered. The effect is more like a piece of bathroom glass in the sky than a precision-ground and well-focused lens, but the terms `gravitational lensing' or ...

  13. Experimental gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; di Virgilio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    100 years after the invention of General Relativity (GR) and 110 years after the development of Special Relativity (SR) we have to state that until now no single experiment or observation allows any doubt about the validity of these theories within the accuracy of the available data. Tests of GR can be divided into three categories: (i) test of the foundations of GR, (ii) tests of the consequences of GR, and (iii) test of the interplay between GR and quantum mechanics. In the first category, we have tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle and the structure of the Newton axioms, in the second category we have effects like the gravitational redshift, light defection, gravitational time delay, the perihelion shift, the gravitomagnetic effects as the Lense-Thirring and Schiff effect, and gravitational waves. Tests of the effects of gravity on quantum systems are a first step towards experiments searching for a quantum gravity theory. In this paper, we also highlight practical applications in positioning, geodesy, and the International Atomic Time. After 100 years, GR can now definitely be regarded also as practical and applied science.

  14. Universal three-body repulsion suggested by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsuka, T.; Nishizaki, S.; Tamagaki, R.

    2008-04-29

    Because of a serious inconsistency between theory and observation for the mass of hyperon-mixed neutron stars, it is suggested that some 'extra repulsion' is needed in hypernuclear systems. A 3-body force repulsion is tested for two cases, a 2{pi}-exchange via {delta}-excitation type (2{pi}{delta}) and a string-junction model (SJM) for the quark structure of baryons. It is found that the 2{pi}{delta} model generates an increasing repulsion with increasing density but cannot produce the 'extra repulsion' in hyperon-mixed neutron stars because it does not work on a {lambda} due to the lack of {lambda}{lambda}{pi} direct coupling. It is pointed out that the 'extra repulsion' should act universally, i.e., independent of baryon species. The SJM 3-body repulsion can satisfy the condition of universality because of the flavor-independence and the {l_brace}2{pi}{delta}+SJM{r_brace} scheme is shown to be a promising candidate for the 'extra repulsion', maintaining consistency with the empirical saturation property of nuclear matter.

  15. Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Moniez, M.; Horne, K.; Street, R.

    2012-04-01

    Gravitational microlensing is a well established and unique field of time-domain astrophysics. For two decades microlensing surveys have been regularly observing millions of stars to detect elusive events that follow a characteristic Paczyński lightcurve. This workshop reviewed the current state of the field, and covered the major topics related to microlensing: searches for extrasolar planets, and studies of dark matter. There were also discussions of issues relating to the organisation of follow-up observations for microlensing, as well as serendipitous scientific outcomes resulting from extensive microlensing data.

  16. On the possibility of Casimir repulsion using metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rosa, Felipe S

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the Casimir force between two half-spaces is dictated by their electromagnetic properties. In particular, when one of the half-spaces is mainly metallic or dielectric and the other is mainly magnetic, it is possible to show that the force is repulsive. This has attracted lots of interest towards the study of metamaterials (MMs) in the context of Casimir effect, as their magnetic activity might help bring the idea of Casimir repulsion from the theoretical realm to experimental verification. In this paper we investigate the possibility of repulsion when the MM magnetic permeability is given not by a Drude-Lorentz behavior, but by a model put forward by Pendry et al. [16]. After introducing the model and deriving the necessary formulas, we show that it is impossible to achieve repulsion with such a model and present a qualitative discussion of why this is so.

  17. Oscillation death in diffusively coupled oscillators by local repulsive link.

    PubMed

    Hens, C R; Olusola, Olasunkanmi I; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2013-09-01

    A death of oscillation is reported in a network of coupled synchronized oscillators in the presence of additional repulsive coupling. The repulsive link evolves as an averaging effect of mutual interaction between two neighboring oscillators due to a local fault and the number of repulsive links grows in time when the death scenario emerges. Analytical condition for oscillation death is derived for two coupled Landau-Stuart systems. Numerical results also confirm oscillation death in chaotic systems such as a Sprott system and the Rössler oscillator. We explore the effect in large networks of globally coupled oscillators and find that the number of repulsive links is always fewer than the size of the network.

  18. Multimetric extension of the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism: Experimental consistency of repulsive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Manuel; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2010-10-01

    Recently we discussed a multimetric gravity theory containing several copies of standard model matter each of which couples to its own metric tensor. This construction contained dark matter sectors interacting repulsively with the visible matter sector and was shown to lead to cosmological late-time acceleration. In order to test the theory with high-precision experiments within the solar system, we here construct a simple extension of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism for multimetric gravitational backgrounds. We show that a simplified version of this extended formalism allows the computation of a subset of the PPN parameters from the linearized field equations. Applying the simplified formalism we find that the PPN parameters of our theory do not agree with the observed values, but we are able to improve the theory so that it becomes consistent with experiments of post-Newtonian gravity and still features its promising cosmological properties.

  19. Multimetric extension of the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism: Experimental consistency of repulsive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Hohmann, Manuel; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2010-10-15

    Recently we discussed a multimetric gravity theory containing several copies of standard model matter each of which couples to its own metric tensor. This construction contained dark matter sectors interacting repulsively with the visible matter sector and was shown to lead to cosmological late-time acceleration. In order to test the theory with high-precision experiments within the solar system, we here construct a simple extension of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism for multimetric gravitational backgrounds. We show that a simplified version of this extended formalism allows the computation of a subset of the PPN parameters from the linearized field equations. Applying the simplified formalism we find that the PPN parameters of our theory do not agree with the observed values, but we are able to improve the theory so that it becomes consistent with experiments of post-Newtonian gravity and still features its promising cosmological properties.

  20. An anisotropic hydrogel with electrostatic repulsion between cofacially aligned nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingjie; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-01-01

    Machine technology frequently puts magnetic or electrostatic repulsive forces to practical use, as in maglev trains, vehicle suspensions or non-contact bearings. In contrast, materials design overwhelmingly focuses on attractive interactions, such as in the many advanced polymer-based composites, where inorganic fillers interact with a polymer matrix to improve mechanical properties. However, articular cartilage strikingly illustrates how electrostatic repulsion can be harnessed to achieve unparalleled functional efficiency: it permits virtually frictionless mechanical motion within joints, even under high compression. Here we describe a composite hydrogel with anisotropic mechanical properties dominated by electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged unilamellar titanate nanosheets embedded within it. Crucial to the behaviour of this hydrogel is the serendipitous discovery of cofacial nanosheet alignment in aqueous colloidal dispersions subjected to a strong magnetic field, which maximizes electrostatic repulsion and thereby induces a quasi-crystalline structural ordering over macroscopic length scales and with uniformly large face-to-face nanosheet separation. We fix this transiently induced structural order by transforming the dispersion into a hydrogel using light-triggered in situ vinyl polymerization. The resultant hydrogel, containing charged inorganic structures that align cofacially in a magnetic flux, deforms easily under shear forces applied parallel to the embedded nanosheets yet resists compressive forces applied orthogonally. We anticipate that the concept of embedding anisotropic repulsive electrostatics within a composite material, inspired by articular cartilage, will open up new possibilities for developing soft materials with unusual functions.

  1. An anisotropic hydrogel with electrostatic repulsion between cofacially aligned nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjie; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-01-01

    Machine technology frequently puts magnetic or electrostatic repulsive forces to practical use, as in maglev trains, vehicle suspensions or non-contact bearings. In contrast, materials design overwhelmingly focuses on attractive interactions, such as in the many advanced polymer-based composites, where inorganic fillers interact with a polymer matrix to improve mechanical properties. However, articular cartilage strikingly illustrates how electrostatic repulsion can be harnessed to achieve unparalleled functional efficiency: it permits virtually frictionless mechanical motion within joints, even under high compression. Here we describe a composite hydrogel with anisotropic mechanical properties dominated by electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged unilamellar titanate nanosheets embedded within it. Crucial to the behaviour of this hydrogel is the serendipitous discovery of cofacial nanosheet alignment in aqueous colloidal dispersions subjected to a strong magnetic field, which maximizes electrostatic repulsion and thereby induces a quasi-crystalline structural ordering over macroscopic length scales and with uniformly large face-to-face nanosheet separation. We fix this transiently induced structural order by transforming the dispersion into a hydrogel using light-triggered in situ vinyl polymerization. The resultant hydrogel, containing charged inorganic structures that align cofacially in a magnetic flux, deforms easily under shear forces applied parallel to the embedded nanosheets yet resists compressive forces applied orthogonally. We anticipate that the concept of embedding anisotropic repulsive electrostatics within a composite material, inspired by articular cartilage, will open up new possibilities for developing soft materials with unusual functions.

  2. An anisotropic hydrogel with electrostatic repulsion between cofacially aligned nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingjie; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-01-01

    Machine technology frequently puts magnetic or electrostatic repulsive forces to practical use, as in maglev trains, vehicle suspensions or non-contact bearings. In contrast, materials design overwhelmingly focuses on attractive interactions, such as in the many advanced polymer-based composites, where inorganic fillers interact with a polymer matrix to improve mechanical properties. However, articular cartilage strikingly illustrates how electrostatic repulsion can be harnessed to achieve unparalleled functional efficiency: it permits virtually frictionless mechanical motion within joints, even under high compression. Here we describe a composite hydrogel with anisotropic mechanical properties dominated by electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged unilamellar titanate nanosheets embedded within it. Crucial to the behaviour of this hydrogel is the serendipitous discovery of cofacial nanosheet alignment in aqueous colloidal dispersions subjected to a strong magnetic field, which maximizes electrostatic repulsion and thereby induces a quasi-crystalline structural ordering over macroscopic length scales and with uniformly large face-to-face nanosheet separation. We fix this transiently induced structural order by transforming the dispersion into a hydrogel using light-triggered in situ vinyl polymerization. The resultant hydrogel, containing charged inorganic structures that align cofacially in a magnetic flux, deforms easily under shear forces applied parallel to the embedded nanosheets yet resists compressive forces applied orthogonally. We anticipate that the concept of embedding anisotropic repulsive electrostatics within a composite material, inspired by articular cartilage, will open up new possibilities for developing soft materials with unusual functions. PMID:25557713

  3. Influence of the cosmic repulsion on the MOND model of the Magellanic Cloud motion in the field of Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Schee, J.; Stuchlík, Z.; Petrásek, M. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently shown that the cosmic repulsion can have a highly significant influence on the motion of Magellanic Clouds (MC) in the gravitational field of Milky Way, treated in the framework of the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halo model. However, there is an alternative to the CDM halo explanation of the rotation curves in the periphery of spiral galaxies, based on MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). Therefore, we study the role of the cosmic repulsion in the framework of the MOND theory applied to determine the MC motion. Our results demonstrate that in the MOND framework the influence of the cosmic repulsion on the motion of both Small and Large MC is also highly significant, but it is of a different character than in the framework of the CDM halo model. Moreover, we demonstrate that the MC motion in the framework of the CDM halo and MOND models is subtantially different and can serve as a test of these fundamentally different approaches to the explanation of the phenomena related to galaxies and the motion of satellite galaxies.

  4. Enhanced compressibility due to repulsive interaction in the Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Yaacov E.; Zilberberg, Oded; Berkovits, Richard

    2014-04-01

    We study the interplay between a repulsive interaction and an almost staggered on-site potential in one dimension. Specifically, we address the Harper model for spinless fermions with nearest-neighbor repulsion, close to half filling. Using the density matrix renormalization group, we find that, in contrast to standard behavior, the system becomes more compressible as the repulsive interaction is increased. By deriving a low-energy effective model, we unveil the effect of interactions using mean-field analysis: The density of a narrow band around half filling is anticorrelated with the on-site potential, whereas the density of lower occupied bands follows the potential and strengthens it. As a result, the states around half filling are squeezed by the background density, their band becomes flatter, and the compressibility increases.

  5. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    DOE PAGES

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G.  E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; et al

    2015-11-30

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. But, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. Here,more » we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states, in our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6.« less

  6. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G.  E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; Kim, Young-June

    2015-11-30

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. But, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. Here, we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states, in our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6.

  7. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G. E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; Kim, Young-June

    2016-03-01

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. However, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. In our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6, we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states.

  8. Gravitational lens time delays and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. Department of Astronomy Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Harari, D.D.; Surpi, G.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Using Fermat's principle, we analyze the effects of very long wavelength gravitational waves upon the images of a gravitationally lensed quasar. We show that the lens equation in the presence of gravity waves is equivalent to that of a lens with a different alignment between source, deflector, and observer in the absence of gravity waves. Contrary to a recent claim, we conclude that measurements of time delays in gravitational lenses cannot serve as a method to detect or constrain a stochastic background of gravitational waves of cosmological wavelengths, because the wave-induced time delay is observationally indistinguishable from an intrinsic time delay due to the lens geometry.

  9. Repulsion-based model for contact angle saturation in electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new model for contact angle saturation phenomenon in electrowetting on dielectric systems. This new model attributes contact angle saturation to repulsion between trapped charges on the cap and base surfaces of the droplet in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line, which prevents these surfaces from converging during contact angle reduction. This repulsion-based saturation is similar to repulsion between charges accumulated on the surfaces of conducting droplets which causes the well known Coulombic fission and Taylor cone formation phenomena. In our model, both the droplet and dielectric coating were treated as lossy dielectric media (i.e., having finite electrical conductivities and permittivities) contrary to the more common assumption of a perfectly conducting droplet and perfectly insulating dielectric. We used theoretical analysis and numerical simulations to find actual charge distribution on droplet surface, calculate repulsion energy, and minimize energy of the total system as a function of droplet contact angle. Resulting saturation curves were in good agreement with previously reported experimental results. We used this proposed model to predict effect of changing liquid properties, such as electrical conductivity, and system parameters, such as thickness of the dielectric layer, on the saturation angle, which also matched experimental results. PMID:25759748

  10. "Magic" surface clustering of borazines driven by repulsive intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Kervyn, Simon; Kalashnyk, Nataliya; Riello, Massimo; Moreton, Ben; Tasseroul, Jonathan; Wouters, Johan; Jones, Tim S; De Vita, Alessandro; Costantini, Giovanni; Bonifazi, Davide

    2013-07-15

    It's a kind of magic: Hydroxy pentaaryl borazine molecules self-assemble into small clusters (see structure) on Cu(111) surfaces, whereas with symmetric hexaaryl borazine molecules large islands are obtained. Simulations indicate that the observed "magic" cluster sizes result from long-range repulsive Coulomb forces arising from the deprotonation of the B-OH groups of the hydroxy pentaaryl borazine.

  11. Electron Pairing, Repulsion, and Correlation: A Simplistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Lars-Fride; Kloo, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The interplay between a nucleus and an electron pair is explained through a basic application of an electrostatic and balanced model to determine the correlated and repulsive movements of the electron pair. The stable correlation depends on the positive charge produced by the combined force, which in turn establishes a negative potential energy.

  12. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in vortex systems with two repulsive lengthscales.

    PubMed

    Curran, P J; Desoky, W M; Milosević, M V; Chaves, A; Laloë, J-B; Moodera, J S; Bending, S J

    2015-01-01

    Scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM) has been used to study vortex structures in thin epitaxial films of the superconductor MgB2. Unusual vortex patterns observed in MgB2 single crystals have previously been attributed to a competition between short-range repulsive and long-range attractive vortex-vortex interactions in this two band superconductor; the type 1.5 superconductivity scenario. Our films have much higher levels of disorder than bulk single crystals and therefore both superconducting condensates are expected to be pushed deep into the type 2 regime with purely repulsive vortex interactions. We observe broken symmetry vortex patterns at low fields in all samples after field-cooling from above Tc. These are consistent with those seen in systems with competing repulsions on disparate length scales, and remarkably similar structures are reproduced in dirty two band Ginzburg-Landau calculations, where the simulation parameters have been defined by experimental observations. This suggests that in our dirty MgB2 films, the symmetry of the vortex structures is broken by the presence of vortex repulsions with two different lengthscales, originating from the two distinct superconducting condensates. This represents an entirely new mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking in systems of superconducting vortices, with important implications for pinning phenomena and high current density applications. PMID:26492969

  13. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in vortex systems with two repulsive lengthscales

    PubMed Central

    Curran, P. J.; Desoky, W. M.; Milos̆ević, M. V.; Chaves, A.; Laloë, J.-B.; Moodera, J. S.; Bending, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM) has been used to study vortex structures in thin epitaxial films of the superconductor MgB2. Unusual vortex patterns observed in MgB2 single crystals have previously been attributed to a competition between short-range repulsive and long-range attractive vortex-vortex interactions in this two band superconductor; the type 1.5 superconductivity scenario. Our films have much higher levels of disorder than bulk single crystals and therefore both superconducting condensates are expected to be pushed deep into the type 2 regime with purely repulsive vortex interactions. We observe broken symmetry vortex patterns at low fields in all samples after field-cooling from above Tc. These are consistent with those seen in systems with competing repulsions on disparate length scales, and remarkably similar structures are reproduced in dirty two band Ginzburg-Landau calculations, where the simulation parameters have been defined by experimental observations. This suggests that in our dirty MgB2 films, the symmetry of the vortex structures is broken by the presence of vortex repulsions with two different lengthscales, originating from the two distinct superconducting condensates. This represents an entirely new mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking in systems of superconducting vortices, with important implications for pinning phenomena and high current density applications. PMID:26492969

  14. Teaching Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Neo, Choo Tong

    2013-01-01

    This "Science Note" looks at the way that the shapes of simple molecules can be explained in terms of the number of electron pairs in the valence shell of the central atom. This theory is formally known as valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory. The article explains the preferred shape of chlorine trifluoride (ClF3),…

  15. The Pauli Principle and Electronic Repulsion in Helium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Richard L.; Bills, James L.

    1974-01-01

    The authors indicate that several recent textbooks in quantum chemistry use a discussion of the excited states of the helium atom to demonstrate the importance of the Pauli principle in determining electronic repulsions. They present data suggesting "Pauli forces" do not keep electrons of parallel spins separated in space. (RH)

  16. Electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator using conductive substrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weimin; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao; Ma, Wenying; Qiu, Chuankai; Chen, Zexiang; Fan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A pseudo-three-layer electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator is proposed. It combines the advantages of two-layer and three-layer repulsive actuators, i.e., fabrication requirements and fill factor. A theoretical model for the proposed actuator is developed and solved through the numerical calculation of Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Theoretical and simulated results show that the pseudo-three-layer actuator offers higher performance than the two-layer and three-layer actuators with regard to the two most important characteristics of actuators, namely, driving force and theoretical stroke. Given that the pseudo-three-layer actuator structure is compatible with both the parallel-plate actuators and these two types of repulsive actuators, a 19-element two-layer repulsive actuated deformable mirror is operated in pseudo-three-layer electrical connection mode. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the pseudo-three-layer mode produces a larger displacement of 0–4.5 μm for a dc driving voltage of 0–100 V, when compared with that in two-layer mode. PMID:27713542

  17. Gravitation in Material Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  18. General continuum approach for dissipative systems of repulsive particles.

    PubMed

    Vieira, César M; Carmona, Humberto A; Andrade, José S; Moreira, André A

    2016-06-01

    We propose a general coarse-graining method to derive a continuity equation that describes any dissipative system of repulsive particles interacting through short-ranged potentials. In our approach, the effect of particle-particle correlations is incorporated to the overall balance of energy, and a nonlinear diffusion equation is obtained to represent the overdamped dynamics. In particular, when the repulsive interaction potential is a short-ranged power law, our approach reveals a distinctive correspondence between particle-particle energy and the generalized thermostatistics of Tsallis for any nonpositive value of the entropic index q. Our methodology can also be applied to microscopic models of superconducting vortices and complex plasma, where particle-particle correlations are pronounced at low concentrations. The resulting continuum descriptions provide elucidating and useful insights on the microdynamical behavior of these physical systems. The consistency of our approach is demonstrated by comparison with molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Thermodynamic curvature for attractive and repulsive intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    May, Helge-Otmar; Mausbach, Peter; Ruppeiner, George

    2013-09-01

    The thermodynamic curvature scalar R for the Lennard-Jones system is evaluated in phase space, including vapor, liquid, and solid state. We paid special attention to the investigation of R along vapor-liquid, liquid-solid, and vapor-solid equilibria. Because R is a measure of interaction strength, we traced out the line R=0 dividing the phase space into regions with effectively attractive (R<0) or repulsive (R>0) interactions. Furthermore, we analyzed the dependence of R on the strength of attraction applying a perturbation ansatz proposed by Weeks-Chandler-Anderson. Our results show clearly a transition from R>0 (for poorly repulsive interaction) to R<0 when loading attraction in the intermolecular potential.

  20. Repulsive Magnetic Bearing Using a Piezoelectric Actuator for Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Aizawa, Mitsunori

    A repulsive magnetic bearing system equipped with a piezoelectric actuator for the motion control of permanent magnets is studied experimentally. In this system, the radial motions of the rotor are passively supported by repulsive forces between permanent magnets. The motion in the axial direction is stabilized by moving the permanent magnets for radial suspension with a piezoelectric actuator. In the experiments, a piezoelectric actuator with a stroke of 200µm was installed first. PD and I-PD controllers were applied to achieve levitation without any mechanical contact. It was experimentally shown that the dynamic characteristics of the levitation system could be adjusted by pole assignment. Next the actuator was replaced by an actuator with a stoke of 90µm. Experimental results demonstrated that the rotor can follow stepwise command signal whose magnitude was within ±20µm.

  1. General continuum approach for dissipative systems of repulsive particles.

    PubMed

    Vieira, César M; Carmona, Humberto A; Andrade, José S; Moreira, André A

    2016-06-01

    We propose a general coarse-graining method to derive a continuity equation that describes any dissipative system of repulsive particles interacting through short-ranged potentials. In our approach, the effect of particle-particle correlations is incorporated to the overall balance of energy, and a nonlinear diffusion equation is obtained to represent the overdamped dynamics. In particular, when the repulsive interaction potential is a short-ranged power law, our approach reveals a distinctive correspondence between particle-particle energy and the generalized thermostatistics of Tsallis for any nonpositive value of the entropic index q. Our methodology can also be applied to microscopic models of superconducting vortices and complex plasma, where particle-particle correlations are pronounced at low concentrations. The resulting continuum descriptions provide elucidating and useful insights on the microdynamical behavior of these physical systems. The consistency of our approach is demonstrated by comparison with molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27415187

  2. General continuum approach for dissipative systems of repulsive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, César M.; Carmona, Humberto A.; Andrade, José S.; Moreira, André A.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a general coarse-graining method to derive a continuity equation that describes any dissipative system of repulsive particles interacting through short-ranged potentials. In our approach, the effect of particle-particle correlations is incorporated to the overall balance of energy, and a nonlinear diffusion equation is obtained to represent the overdamped dynamics. In particular, when the repulsive interaction potential is a short-ranged power law, our approach reveals a distinctive correspondence between particle-particle energy and the generalized thermostatistics of Tsallis for any nonpositive value of the entropic index q . Our methodology can also be applied to microscopic models of superconducting vortices and complex plasma, where particle-particle correlations are pronounced at low concentrations. The resulting continuum descriptions provide elucidating and useful insights on the microdynamical behavior of these physical systems. The consistency of our approach is demonstrated by comparison with molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Ferromagnetism in a repulsive atomic Fermi gas with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilati, S.; Fratini, E.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature ferromagnetic behavior of a two-component repulsive Fermi gas in the presence of a correlated random field that represents an optical speckle pattern. The density is tuned so that the (noninteracting) Fermi energy is close to the mobility edge of the Anderson localization transition. We employ quantum Monte Carlo simulations to determine various ground-state properties, including the equation of state, the magnetic susceptibility, and the energy of an impurity immersed in a polarized Fermi gas (repulsive polaron). In the weakly interacting limit, the magnetic susceptibility is found to be suppressed by disorder. However, it rapidly increases with the interaction strength, and it diverges at a much weaker interaction strength compared to the clean gas. Both the transition from the paramagnetic phase to the partially ferromagnetic phase, and the one from the partially to the fully ferromagnetic phase, are strongly favored by disorder, indicating a case of order induced by disorder.

  4. On the repulsion of energy eigenstates in the time domain.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, R D; Kinsey, J L

    1991-01-01

    The rate and extent of the exploration of the available phase space of a bound quantum mechanical system are shown to depend on the repulsion of energy eigenstates. Central to the argument is the Fourier transform relating the survival probability (in time) of an initially prepared nonstationary state and the (frequency) autocorrelation function of the excitation spectrum. Strong repulsion of states, as in the Wigner surmise, leads to a rapid dephasing of the initially coherently prepared state. The rate and extent of sampling of phase space depend not only on the spacing distribution but also on the intensity fluctuations. The rate of dephasing is equal to that inferred from the width of the spectral autocorrelation function. PMID:11607247

  5. Monodisperse Clusters in Charged Attractive Colloids: Linear Renormalization of Repulsion.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Štěpán; Allen, Michael P

    2015-08-11

    Experiments done on polydisperse particles of cadmium selenide have recently shown that the particles form spherical isolated clusters with low polydispersity of cluster size. The computer simulation model of Xia et al. ( Nat. Nanotechnol. 2011 , 6 , 580 ) explaining this behavior used a short-range van der Waals attraction combined with a variable long-range screened electrostatic repulsion, depending linearly on the volume of the clusters. In this work, we term this dependence "linear renormalization" of the repulsive term, and we use advanced Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the kinetically slowed down phase separation in a similar but simpler model. We show that amorphous drops do not dissolve and crystallinity evolves very slowly under linear renormalization, and we confirm that low polydispersity of cluster size can also be achieved using this model. The results indicate that the linear renormalization generally leads to monodisperse clusters.

  6. Modeling and strain gauging of eddy current repulsion deicing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samuel O.

    1993-01-01

    Work described in this paper confirms and extends work done by Zumwalt, et al., on a variety of in-flight deicing systems that use eddy current repulsion for repelling ice. Two such systems are known as electro-impulse deicing (EIDI) and the eddy current repulsion deicing strip (EDS). Mathematical models for these systems are discussed for their capabilities and limitations. The author duplicates a particular model of the EDS. Theoretical voltage, current, and force results are compared directly to experimental results. Dynamic strain measurements results are presented for the EDS system. Dynamic strain measurements near EDS or EIDI coils are complicated by the high magnetic fields in the vicinity of the coils. High magnetic fields induce false voltage signals out of the gages.

  7. One-loop quantum gravity repulsion in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Broda, Bogusław

    2011-03-11

    Perturbative quantum gravity formalism is applied to compute the lowest order corrections to the classical spatially flat cosmological Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker solution (for the radiation). The presented approach is analogous to the approach applied to compute quantum corrections to the Coulomb potential in electrodynamics, or rather to the approach applied to compute quantum corrections to the Schwarzschild solution in gravity. In the framework of the standard perturbative quantum gravity, it is shown that the corrections to the classical deceleration, coming from the one-loop graviton vacuum polarization (self-energy), have (UV cutoff free) opposite to the classical repulsive properties which are not negligible in the very early Universe. The repulsive "quantum forces" resemble those known from loop quantum cosmology.

  8. A magnetic bearing based on eddy-current repulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolajsen, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a new type of electromagnetic bearing, called the Eddy-Current Bearing, which works by repulsion between fixed AC-electromagnets and a conducting rotor. The following advantages are expected: inherent stability, higher load carrying capacity than DC-electromagnetic bearings, simultaneous radial, angular and thrust support, motoring and generating capability, and backup mode of operation in case of primary power failure. A prototype is under construction.

  9. Attractive and repulsive Fermi polarons in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Vogt, Enrico; Fröhlich, Bernd; Feld, Michael; Köhl, Michael

    2012-05-31

    The dynamics of a single impurity in an environment is a fundamental problem in many-body physics. In the solid state, a well known case is an impurity coupled to a bosonic bath (such as lattice vibrations); the impurity and its accompanying lattice distortion form a new entity, a polaron. This quasiparticle plays an important role in the spectral function of high-transition-temperature superconductors, as well as in colossal magnetoresistance in manganites. For impurities in a fermionic bath, studies have considered heavy or immobile impurities which exhibit Anderson's orthogonality catastrophe and the Kondo effect. More recently, mobile impurities have moved into the focus of research, and they have been found to form new quasiparticles known as Fermi polarons. The Fermi polaron problem constitutes the extreme, but conceptually simple, limit of two important quantum many-body problems: the crossover between a molecular Bose-Einstein condensate and a superfluid with BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) pairing with spin-imbalance for attractive interactions, and Stoner's itinerant ferromagnetism for repulsive interactions. It has been proposed that such quantum phases (and other elusive exotic states) might become realizable in Fermi gases confined to two dimensions. Their stability and observability are intimately related to the theoretically debated properties of the Fermi polaron in a two-dimensional Fermi gas. Here we create and investigate Fermi polarons in a two-dimensional, spin-imbalanced Fermi gas, measuring their spectral function using momentum-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. For attractive interactions, we find evidence for a disputed pairing transition between polarons and tightly bound dimers, which provides insight into the elementary pairing mechanism of imbalanced, strongly coupled two-dimensional Fermi gases. Additionally, for repulsive interactions, we study novel quasiparticles--repulsive polarons--the lifetime of which determines the

  10. When do we need attractive-repulsive intermolecular potentials?

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2014-12-09

    The role of attractive-repulsive interactions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations is studied by comparing with traditional purely repulsive interactions. The larger collision cross section of the long-range LJ potential is shown to result in a higher collision frequency and hence a lower mean free path, by at least a factor of two, for given conditions. This results in a faster relaxation to equilibrium as is shown by comparing the fourth and sixth moments of the molecular velocity distribution obtained using 0-D DSMC simulations. A 1-D Fourier-Couette flow with a large temperature and velocity difference between the walls is used to show that matching transport properties will result in identical solutions using both LJPA and VSS models in the near-continuum regime. However, flows in the transitional regime with Knudsen number, Kn ∼ 0.5 show a dependence on the intermolecular potential in spite of matching the viscosity coefficient due to differences in the collision frequency. Attractive-repulsive potentials should be used when both transport coefficients and collision frequencies should be matched.

  11. Molecular analysis of axon repulsion by the notochord.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher N G; Ohta, Kunimasa; Quick, Marie M; Fleming, Angeleen; Keynes, Roger; Tannahill, David

    2003-03-01

    During development of the amniote peripheral nervous system, the initial trajectory of primary sensory axons is determined largely by the action of axon repellents. We have shown previously that tissues flanking dorsal root ganglia, the notochord lying medially and the dermamyotomes lying laterally, are sources of secreted molecules that prevent axons from entering inappropriate territories. Although there is evidence suggesting that SEMA3A contributes to the repellent activity of the dermamyotome, the nature of the activity secreted by the notochord remains undetermined. We have employed an expression cloning strategy to search for axon repellents secreted by the notochord, and have identified SEMA3A as a candidate repellent. Moreover, using a spectrum of different axon populations to assay the notochord activity, together with neuropilin/Fc receptor reagents to block semaphorin activity in collagen gel assays, we show that SEMA3A probably contributes to notochord-mediated repulsion. Sympathetic axons that normally avoid the midline in vivo are also repelled, in part, by a semaphorin-based notochord activity. Although our results implicate semaphorin signalling in mediating repulsion by the notochord, repulsion of early dorsal root ganglion axons is only partially blocked when using neuropilin/Fc reagents. Moreover, retinal axons, which are insensitive to SEMA3A, are also repelled by the notochord. We conclude that multiple factors act in concert to guide axons in this system, and that further notochord repellents remain to be identified.

  12. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces.

    PubMed

    Munday, J N; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction. PMID:19129843

  13. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    PubMed Central

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  14. Attractive and repulsive Casimir vacuum energy with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Muñoz-Castañeda, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The infrared behaviour of quantum field theories confined in bounded domains is strongly dependent on the shape and structure of space boundaries. The most significant physical effect arises in the behaviour of the vacuum energy. The Casimir energy can be attractive or repulsive depending on the nature of the boundary. We calculate the vacuum energy for a massless scalar field confined between two homogeneous parallel plates with the most general type of boundary conditions depending on four parameters. The analysis provides a powerful method to identify which boundary conditions generate attractive or repulsive Casimir forces between the plates. In the interface between both regimes we find a very interesting family of boundary conditions which do not induce any type of Casimir force. We also show that the attractive regime holds far beyond identical boundary conditions for the two plates required by the Kenneth-Klich theorem and that the strongest attractive Casimir force appears for periodic boundary conditions whereas the strongest repulsive Casimir force corresponds to anti-periodic boundary conditions. Most of the analysed boundary conditions are new and some of them can be physically implemented with metamaterials.

  15. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-12-01

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, m, and gravitational, mg, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no confirmation for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear - current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits - 65 repulsion of the antimatter by Earth. Here we demonstrate an indirect bound 0.96 gravitational mass of relativistic electrons and positrons coming from the absence of the vacuum Cherenkov radiation at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and stability of photons at the Tevatron collider in presence of the annual variations of the solar gravitational potential. Our result clearly rules out the speculated antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS), we also predict the bounds 1 - 4 ×10-7

  16. Gravitational Wave Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio

    2005-02-01

    There is only one experimental proof that gravitational waves exist. With such a limitation, it may seem premature to suggest the possibility that gravitational waves can became a preferred space propulsion technique. The present understanding of the problem indicates that this is not the case. The emission of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources has been confirmed by observation, the respective detection at large distance from the source is difficult and actually we have no confirmation of a successful detection. Therefore the required preliminary discovery has been already made. This opinion is enforced by many different proposals for building the required powerful gravitational wave generators that have recently appeared in the literature and discussed at conferences. It is no longer reasonable to wait for additional confirmation of the existence of gravitational waves to start a program for building generators and testing their possible application to space travel. A vast literature shows that gravitational waves can be employed for space propulsion. Gravitational wave rockets have been proposed, non-linearity of Einstein equations allows the conversion of gravitational waves to a static gravitational field and ``artificial gravity assist'' may become a new way of travelling in space-time. Different approaches to gravitational wave propulsion are reviewed and compared. Gravitational wave propulsion is also compared to traditional rocket propulsion and an undeniable advantage can be demonstrated in terms of efficiency and performance. Testing the predictions will require gravitational wave generators with high power and wavelength short enough for producing high energy densities. Detectors designed for the specific application must be developed, taking into account that non-linearity effects are expected. The study and development of Gravitational wave propulsion is a very challenging endeavor, involving the most complex theories, sophisticated

  17. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  18. The Origin of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng Ming

    2012-10-01

    In the natural world, people have discovered four kinds of forces: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Although the gravitation has been discovered more than three hundred years, its mechanism of origin is unclear until today. While investigating the origin of gravitation, I do some experiments discover the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I do some experiments discover the light interference fringes are produced by the gravitation: my discovery demonstrate light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. Furthermore, applications of this discovery to other moving particles show a similar effect. In a word: the micro particle moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force. Then I do quantity experiment get a general formula: Reveal the essence of gravitational mass and the essence of electric charge; reveal the origin of gravitation and the essence of matter wave. Along this way, I unify the gravitation and electromagnetic force. Namely I find a natural law that from atomic world to star world play in moving track. See website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter

  19. Electrostatic Repulsion during Ferritin Assembly and Its Screening by Ions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Takebe, Satsuki; Kurobe, Atsushi; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Ikeguchi, Masamichi

    2016-01-26

    Escherichia coli non-heme-binding ferritin A (EcFtnA) is a spherical cagelike protein that is composed of 24 identical subunits. EcFtnA dissociates into 2-mers under acidic conditions and can reassemble into the native structure when the pH is increased. To understand how electrostatic interactions influence the assembly reaction, the dependence of the process on ionic strength and pH was investigated. The assembly reaction was initiated by stopped-flow mixing of the acid-dissociated EcFtnA solution and high-pH buffer solutions and monitored by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering. The rate of assembly increased with increasing ionic strength and decreased with increasing pH from 6 to 8. These dependences were thought to originate from repulsion between assembly units (2-mer in the case of EcFtnA) with the same net charge sign; therefore, to test this assumption, mutants with different net charges (net-charge mutants) were prepared. In buffers with a low ionic strength, the rate of assembly increased with a decreasing net charge. Thus, repulsion between the assembly unit net charges was demonstrated to be an important factor determining the rate of assembly. However, the difference in the assembly rate among net-charge mutants was not significant in buffers with an ionic strength of >0.1. Notably, under such high-ionic strength conditions, the assembly rate increased with an increasing ionic strength, suggesting that local electrostatic interactions are also responsible for the ionic strength dependence of the rate of assembly and are repulsive on average. PMID:26716350

  20. Gravitation in material media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-03-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium is herein derived on the basis of classical, Newtonian gravitational theory and by a general relativistic use of Archimedes' principle. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate students and those undergraduate students having prior experience with vector analysis and potential theory.

  1. Efficient Multiple Object Tracking Using Mutually Repulsive Active Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi; Coen, Philip; Sun, Mingzhai; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of social and group behavior in interacting organisms require high-throughput analysis of the motion of a large number of individual subjects. Computer vision techniques offer solutions to specific tracking problems, and allow automated and efficient tracking with minimal human intervention. In this work, we adopt the open active contour model to track the trajectories of moving objects at high density. We add repulsive interactions between open contours to the original model, treat the trajectories as an extrusion in the temporal dimension, and show applications to two tracking problems. The walking behavior of Drosophila is studied at different population density and gender composition. We demonstrate that individual male flies have distinct walking signatures, and that the social interaction between flies in a mixed gender arena is gender specific. We also apply our model to studies of trajectories of gliding Myxococcus xanthus bacteria at high density. We examine the individual gliding behavioral statistics in terms of the gliding speed distribution. Using these two examples at very distinctive spatial scales, we illustrate the use of our algorithm on tracking both short rigid bodies (Drosophila) and long flexible objects (Myxococcus xanthus). Our repulsive active membrane model reaches error rates better than per fly per second for Drosophila tracking and comparable results for Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:23799046

  2. Density and structural anomalies in soft-repulsive dimeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Munaó, Gianmarco; Saija, Franz

    2016-04-14

    We report Monte Carlo results for the fluid structure of a system of dimeric particles interacting via a core-softened potential. More specifically, dimers interact through a repulsive pair potential of an inverse-power form, modified in such a way that the repulsion strength is softened for a given range of distances. The aim of such a study is to investigate how both the elongation of the dimers and the softness of the potential affect some features of the model. Our results show that the dimeric fluid exhibits both density and structural anomalies, even if the interaction is not characterized by two length scales. Upon increasing the aspect ratio of the dimers, such anomalies are progressively hindered, with the structural anomaly surviving even after the disappearance of the density anomaly. These results shed light on the peculiar behaviour of molecular systems of non-spherical shape, showing how geometrical and interaction parameters play a fundamental role in determining the presence of anomalies.

  3. Interaction Versus Entropic Repulsion for Low Temperature Ising Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, Dmitry; Shlosman, Senya; Toninelli, Fabio Lucio

    2015-03-01

    Contours associated to many interesting low-temperature statistical mechanics models (2D Ising model, (2+1)D SOS interface model, etc) can be described as self-interacting and self-avoiding walks on . When the model is defined in a finite box, the presence of the boundary induces an interaction, that can turn out to be attractive, between the contour and the boundary of the box. On the other hand, the contour cannot cross the boundary, so it feels entropic repulsion from it. In various situations of interest (in Caputo et al. Ann. Probab., arXiv:1205.6884, J. Eur. Math. Soc., arXiv:1302.6941, arXiv:1406.1206, Ioffe and Shlosman, in preparation), a crucial technical problem is to prove that entropic repulsion prevails over the pinning interaction: in particular, the contour-boundary interaction should not modify significantly the contour partition function and the related surface tension should be unchanged. Here we prove that this is indeed the case, at least at sufficiently low temperature, in a quite general framework that applies in particular to the models of interest mentioned above.

  4. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    DOE PAGES

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-07-27

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton’s theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen domore » not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). As a result, this serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials.« less

  6. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    PubMed Central

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton’s theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials. PMID:27461548

  7. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-07-01

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton’s theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials.

  8. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses.

    PubMed

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-07-27

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton's theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials.

  9. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses.

    PubMed

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton's theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials. PMID:27461548

  10. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  11. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  12. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  13. Searching for Novel Gravitational Effects (George B. Pegram Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Stubbs

    2010-04-13

    Astrophysical observations provide robust evidence that our current picture of fundamental physics is incomplete. The discovery in 1998 that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating (apparently due to gravitational repulsion between regions of empty space!) presents us with a profound challenge, at the interface between gravity and quantum mechanics. This "Dark Energy" problem is arguably the most pressing open question in modern fundamental physics. The first talk will describe why the Dark Energy problem constitutes a crisis, with wide-reaching ramifications. One consequence is that we should probe our understanding of gravity at all accessible scales, and the second talk will present experiments and observations that are exploring this issue.

  14. Phantom energy mediates a long-range repulsive force.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Luca

    2004-10-29

    Scalar field models with nonstandard kinetic terms have been proposed in the context of k inflation, of Born-Infeld Lagrangians, of phantom energy and, more in general, of low-energy string theory. In general, scalar fields are expected to couple to matter inducing a new interaction. In this Letter I derive the cosmological perturbation equations and the Yukawa correction to gravity for such general models. I find three interesting results: first, when the field behaves as phantom energy (equation of state less than -1), then the coupling strength is negative, inducing a long-range repulsive force; second, the dark-energy field might cluster on astrophysical scales; third, applying the formalism to a Brans-Dicke theory with a general kinetic term it is shown that its Newtonian effects depend on a single parameter that generalizes the Brans-Dicke constant.

  15. Superconductivity from a Long-Range Repulsive Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onari, S.; Arita, R.; Kuroki, K.; Aoki, H.

    2006-09-01

    The lattice model with short-range interactions (exemplified by the Hubbard model) is known to exhibit quite different features from those in the electron gas with the long-range Coulomb interaction. In order to explore how they cross over to each other, we have studied an extended Hubbard model which includes repulsions up to the 12th neighbors with the simplified fluctuation exchange (FLEX) approximation for the square lattice. We have found that (i) in the most dilute density region, spin and charge fluctuations become comparable, and s- and p-waves superconductivity become dominant, in agreement with the result for the electron gas by Takada, while (ii) the dominant spin fluctuation and its reflection on dx2-y2 and dxy pairing, both the effect of lattice structure, persists well away (n ≳ 0.2) from the half filling. 2006 American Institute of Physics

  16. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  17. Reduced colloidal repulsion imparted by adsorbed polymer of particle dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu Ho; Lin, Po-Chang; Lee, Chun Yi; Hua, Chi Chung; Lee, Tai-Chou

    2010-09-01

    This work investigated the detailed interparticle interactions in a concentrated polymer-coated colloidal system in which the bare colloidal particles and the adsorbed polymers are of comparable size and, hence, the polymer adsorption cannot be foreseen to induce repulsive or attractive interactions. Specifically, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains (R(g) approximately 10nm) adsorbed onto fine silica colloidal particles (SAXS-determined radius approximately 7.4nm; width of log-normal size distribution approximately 0.28) were considered as a model system, for which the impact of a small amount of polymer adsorption (0.18mg/m(2)) in controlling the interactions of the PEO-coated silica particles was systematically explored by analyzing the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data against three interaction potentials-the equivalent hard-sphere (EHS) potential, the Hayter-Penfold-Yukawa (HPY) potential, and the square-well (SW) potential. Moreover, the SAXS analysis was enforced by dynamic light scattering (DLS) for predetermining the adsorption behavior, as well as for evaluating the possibility of polymer bridging. Under a dilute condition, the DLS analysis showed no sign of forming colloidal multiplets. In concentrated dispersions, both the HPY and SW potentials clearly revealed a systematic decrease of colloidal repulsions with increased PEO coverage, ascribed to a partially "screened" electrostatic interaction and/or the formation of PEO-bridged silica doublets. The present findings have interesting implications for controlling the colloidal interactions and microstructures of fine polymer-coated particles in dense or condensed phases.

  18. Repulsive DNA-DNA Interactions Accelerate Viral DNA Packaging in Phage Phi29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation.

  19. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  20. Inverting Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, P. R.; Spiteri, R. J.

    2002-02-01

    Gravitational lensing provides a powerful tool to study a number of fundamental questions in astrophysics. Fortuitously, one can begin to explore some non-trivial issues associated with this phenomenon without a lot of very sophisticated mathematics, making an elementary treatment of this topic tractable even to senior undergraduates. In this paper, we give a relatively self-contained outline of the basic concepts and mathematics behind gravitational lensing as a recent and exciting topic for courses in mathematical modeling or scientific computing. To this end, we have designed and made available some interactive software to aid in the simulation and inversion of gravitational lenses in a classroom setting.

  1. Gravitational-wave joy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    seyithocuk; jjeherrera; eltodesukane; GrahamRounce; rloldershaw; Beaker, Dr; Sandhu, G. S.; Ophiuchi

    2016-03-01

    In reply to the news article on the LIGO collaboration's groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves, first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, from two black holes colliding (pp5, 6-7 and http://ow.ly/Ylsyt).

  2. Gravitational clustering: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labini, Francesco Sylos

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the differences and analogies of gravitational clustering in finite and infinite systems. The process of collective, or violent, relaxation leading to the formation of quasi-stationary states is one of the distinguished features in the dynamics of self-gravitating systems. This occurs, in different conditions, both in a finite than in an infinite system, the latter embedded in a static or in an expanding background. We then discuss, by considering some simple and paradigmatic examples, the problems related to the definition of a mean-field approach to gravitational clustering, focusing on role of discrete fluctuations. The effect of these fluctuations is a basic issue to be clarified to establish the range of scales and times in which a collision-less approximation may describe the evolution of a self-gravitating system and for the theoretical modeling of the non-linear phase.

  3. Solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive interactions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navascués, G.; Velasco, E.; Mederos, L.

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a problem already studied 15 years ago by us in collaboration with Stell and Hemmer: the isostructural solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive particle interactions exhibited by classical systems interacting via the Stell-Hemmer potentials. The full phase diagram in the crystal region is obtained by applying a perturbation theory for classical solids used during our collaboration with Stell. Also, the performance of such a theory is now tested by comparing the perturbative phase diagram with that obtained from computer simulations. The latter was calculated using a recently refined method to obtain the free-energy of crystals by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The perturbation theory captures the correct topology and correctly identifies the stable, fcc and bcc, phases. In addition, the theory predicts the occurrence of special points: a point where the two stable structures coexist at the same density, and two critical points terminating the corresponding isostructural phase transitions for fcc and bcc phases. The location of some of these features in the phase diagram is predicted almost quantitatively. However, phase boundaries involving the non-compact bcc phase are much less accurate, a problem that can be traced to the poor representation used for the bcc phase of the reference, hard-sphere, system.

  4. Kinematic Repulsions Between Inertial Systems in AN Expanding Inflationary Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, D.

    2013-09-01

    The cosmological background radiation is observed to be isotropic only within a coordinate system that is at rest relative to its local Hubble drift. This indicates that the Hubble motion describes the recessional motion of an inertial system that is at rest relative to its local Hubble drift. It is shown that when the Hubble parameter is kinematically defined directly in terms of the positions and velocities of mass particles in the universe, it then also defines inertial systems themselves in terms of the distribution and motion of mass particles. It is independent of the velocity of photons because photons always have a speed c relative to the inertial system in which they are located. Therefore the definition of their velocity depends on the definition of the Hubble parameter itself and cannot be used to define H. The derivative of the kinematically defined Hubble parameter with respect to time is shown to always be positive and highly repulsive at the time of the origin of the universe. A model is used which describes a universe that is balanced at the time of its origin so that H approaches zero as the universe expands to infinity.

  5. Solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive interactions revisited.

    PubMed

    Navascués, G; Velasco, E; Mederos, L

    2016-10-19

    We revisit a problem already studied 15 years ago by us in collaboration with Stell and Hemmer: the isostructural solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive particle interactions exhibited by classical systems interacting via the Stell-Hemmer potentials. The full phase diagram in the crystal region is obtained by applying a perturbation theory for classical solids used during our collaboration with Stell. Also, the performance of such a theory is now tested by comparing the perturbative phase diagram with that obtained from computer simulations. The latter was calculated using a recently refined method to obtain the free-energy of crystals by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The perturbation theory captures the correct topology and correctly identifies the stable, fcc and bcc, phases. In addition, the theory predicts the occurrence of special points: a point where the two stable structures coexist at the same density, and two critical points terminating the corresponding isostructural phase transitions for fcc and bcc phases. The location of some of these features in the phase diagram is predicted almost quantitatively. However, phase boundaries involving the non-compact bcc phase are much less accurate, a problem that can be traced to the poor representation used for the bcc phase of the reference, hard-sphere, system. PMID:27546295

  6. Exponential repulsion improves structural predictability of molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2016-10-30

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool for theoretical prediction of the preferred conformation and orientation of small molecules within protein active sites. The obtained poses can be used for estimation of binding energies, which indicate the inhibition effect of designed inhibitors, and therefore might be used for in silico drug design. However, the evaluation of ligand binding affinity critically depends on successful prediction of the native binding mode. Contemporary docking methods are often based on scoring functions derived from molecular mechanical potentials. In such potentials, nonbonded interactions are typically represented by electrostatic interactions between atom-centered partial charges and standard 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. Here, we present implementation and testing of a scoring function based on more physically justified exponential repulsion instead of the standard Lennard-Jones potential. We found that this scoring function significantly improved prediction of the native binding modes in proteins bearing narrow active sites such as serine proteases and kinases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27620738

  7. Repulsive and Attractive Forces on Dust Particles in a Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Osamu; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    The ordered structure of dust particles and forces acting on negatively charged dust particles in a cluster placed in a plasma produced between two electrodes in a microgravity condition is analyzed. Study of the dynamics of a collection of dust particles placed initially at the center of the plasma reveals the expansion of the cluster together with the formation of a certain ordered structure in the presence of collisions with plasma particles. The dynamic expansion of the cluster is a result of the Coulomb repulsion between negatively charged dust particles, while the ordered structure at a later time is a manifestation of the attractive force between a pair of dust particles. An electrostatic force between dust particles in a complex plasma is studied in a context of thermodynamic free energy stored in the dust cluster in the plasma where the overall charge neutrality is conserved. The excessive energy in the system is calculated. An attractive force between a pair of dust particles results from a release of the thermodynamic free energy in charged dust particles.

  8. FLRT Structure: Balancing Repulsion and Cell Adhesion in Cortical and Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; del Toro, Daniel; Nagel, Daniel; Cop, Florian; Härtl, Ricarda; Ruff, Tobias; Seyit-Bremer, Gönül; Harlos, Karl; Border, Ellen Clare; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are broadly expressed proteins with the unique property of acting as homophilic cell adhesion molecules and as heterophilic repulsive ligands of Unc5/Netrin receptors. How these functions direct cell behavior and the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. Here we use X-ray crystallography to reveal the distinct structural bases for FLRT-mediated cell adhesion and repulsion in neurons. We apply this knowledge to elucidate FLRT functions during cortical development. We show that FLRTs regulate both the radial migration of pyramidal neurons, as well as their tangential spread. Mechanistically, radial migration is controlled by repulsive FLRT2-Unc5D interactions, while spatial organization in the tangential axis involves adhesive FLRT-FLRT interactions. Further, we show that the fundamental mechanisms of FLRT adhesion and repulsion are conserved between neurons and vascular endothelial cells. Our results reveal FLRTs as powerful guidance factors with structurally encoded repulsive and adhesive surfaces. PMID:25374360

  9. Superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Sei-Ichiro; Inaba, Kensuke

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component (color) fermionic atoms in optical lattices using Feynman diagrammatic approaches and the dynamical mean field theory. When the anisotropy of the three repulsive interactions is strong, atoms of two of the three colors form Cooper pairs and atoms of the third color remain a Fermi liquid. This superfluid emerges close to half filling at which the Mott insulating state characteristic of the three-component repulsive fermions appears. An effective attractive interaction is induced by density fluctuations of the third-color atoms. The superfluid state is stable against the phase separation that occurs in the strongly repulsive region. We determine the phase diagrams in terms of temperature, filling, and the anisotropy of the repulsive interactions. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (No. 23540467) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  10. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  11. On the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the gravitational redshift-a relative wavelength increase of ≈2×10-6 was predicted for solar radiation by Einstein in 1908-is still an important subject in modern physics. In a dispute whether or not atom interferometry experiments can be employed for gravitational redshift measurements, two research teams have recently disagreed on the physical cause of the shift. Regardless of any discussion on the interferometer aspect-we find that both groups of authors miss the important point that the ratio of gravitational to the electrostatic forces is generally very small. For instance, the ratio of the gravitational force acting on an electron in a hydrogen atom situated in the Sun’s photosphere to the electrostatic force between the proton and the electron in such an atom is approximately 3×10-21. A comparison of this ratio with the predicted and observed solar redshift indicates a discrepancy of many orders of magnitude. With Einstein’s early assumption that the frequencies of spectral lines depend only on the generating ions themselves as starting point, we show that a solution can be formulated based on a two-step process in analogy with Fermi’s treatment of the Doppler effect. It provides a sequence of physical processes in line with the conservation of energy and momentum resulting in the observed shift and does not employ a geometric description. The gravitational field affects the release of the photon and not the atomic transition. The control parameter is the speed of light. The atomic emission is then contrasted with the gravitational redshift of matter-antimatter annihilation events.

  12. Glass transition of repulsive charged rods (fd-viruses).

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyongok

    2014-05-14

    It has recently been shown that suspensions of long and thin charged fibrous viruses (fd) form a glass at low ionic strengths. The corresponding thick electric double layers give rise to long-ranged repulsive electrostatic interactions, which lead to caging and structural arrest at concentrations far above the isotropic-nematic coexistence region. Structural arrest and freezing of the orientational texture are found to occur at the same concentration. In addition, various types of orientational textures are equilibrated below the glass transition concentration, ranging from a chiral-nematic texture with a large pitch (of about 100 μm), an X-pattern, and a tightly packed domain texture, consisting of helical domains with a relatively small pitch (of about 10 μm) and twisted boundaries. The dynamics of both particles as well as the texture are discussed, below and above the glass transition. Dynamic light scattering correlation functions exhibit two dynamical modes, where the slow mode is attributed to the elasticity of helical domains. On approach of the glass-transition concentration, the slow mode increases in amplitude, while as the amplitudes of the fast and slow mode become equal at the glass transition. Finally, interesting features of the "transient" behaviors of charged fd-rod glass are shown as the initial caging due to structural arrest, the propagation of flow originating from stress release, and the transition to the final metastable glass state. In addition to the intensity correlation function, power spectra are presented as a function of the waiting time, at the zero-frequency limit that may access to the thermal anomalities in a charged system.

  13. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2016-04-28

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water's density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results. PMID:27131551

  14. Repulsive interactions in quantum Hall systems as a pairing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; Nussinov, Z.; Dukelsky, J.; Seidel, A.

    2013-10-01

    A subtle relation between quantum Hall physics and the phenomenon of pairing is unveiled. By use of second quantization, we establish a connection between (i) a broad class of rotationally symmetric two-body interactions within the lowest Landau level and (ii) integrable hyperbolic Richardson-Gaudin-type Hamiltonians that arise in (px+ipy) superconductivity. Specifically, we show that general Haldane pseudopotentials (and their sums) can be expressed as a sum of repulsive noncommuting (px+ipy)-type pairing Hamiltonians. The determination of the spectrum and individual null spaces of each of these noncommuting Richardson-Gaudin-type Hamiltonians is nontrivial yet is Bethe ansatz solvable. For the Laughlin sequence, it is observed that this problem is frustration free and zero-energy ground states lie in the common null space of all of these noncommuting Hamiltonians. This property allows for the use of a new truncated basis of pairing configurations in which to express Laughlin states at general filling factors. We prove separability of arbitrary Haldane pseudopotentials, providing explicit expressions for their second quantized forms, and further show by explicit construction how to exploit the topological equivalence between different geometries (disk, cylinder, and sphere) sharing the same topological genus number, in the second quantized formalism, through similarity transformations. As an application of the second quantized approach, we establish a “squeezing principle” that applies to the zero modes of a general class of Hamiltonians, which includes but is not limited to Haldane pseudopotentials. We also show how one may establish (bounds on) “incompressible filling factors” for those Hamiltonians. By invoking properties of symmetric polynomials, we provide explicit second quantized quasihole generators; the generators that we find directly relate to bosonic chiral edge modes and further make aspects of dimensional reduction in the quantum Hall systems

  15. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2016-04-01

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water's density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results.

  16. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2016-04-28

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water's density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results.

  17. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  18. Supersymmetry and gravitational duality

    SciTech Connect

    Argurio, Riccardo; Dehouck, Francois; Houart, Laurent

    2009-06-15

    We study how the supersymmetry algebra copes with gravitational duality. As a playground, we consider a charged Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino(NUT) solution of D=4, N=2 supergravity. We find explicitly its Killing spinors, and the projection they obey provides evidence that the dual magnetic momenta necessarily have to appear in the supersymmetry algebra. The existence of such a modification is further supported using an approach based on the Nester form. In the process, we find new expressions for the dual magnetic momenta, including the NUT charge. The same expressions are then rederived using gravitational duality.

  19. Galaxies as gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Barnothy, J; Barnothy, M F

    1968-10-18

    Of all the galaxies in the visible part of the universe, 500 million are seen through intervening galaxies. In some instances the foreground galaxy will act as a gravitational lens and produce distorted and (in brightness) greatly amplified images of the galaxy behind it; such images may simulate starlike superluminous objects such as quasars (quasi-stellar objects). The number of gravitational lenses is several times greater than the number of quasars yet observed. In other instances the superposition of the image upon a visible foreground galaxy may simulate morphological configurations resembling N-type, dumbbell, spiral, or barred-spiral galaxies. PMID:17836654

  20. Gravitation: Foundations and Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-01-01

    1. Special relativity; 2. Scalar and electromagnetic fields in special relativity; 3. Gravity and spacetime geometry: the inescapable connection; 4. Metric tensor, geodesics and covariant derivative; 5. Curvature of spacetime; 6. Einstein's field equations and gravitational dynamics; 7. Spherically symmetric geometry; 8. Black holes; 9. Gravitational waves; 10. Relativistic cosmology; 11. Differential forms and exterior calculus; 12. Hamiltonian structure of general relativity; 13. Evolution of cosmological perturbations; 14. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime; 15. Gravity in higher and lower dimensions; 16. Gravity as an emergent phenomenon; Notes; Index.

  1. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  2. Gravitational signatures of antiparticles:a cosmic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Dallal, Shawqi

    The gravitational signature of antimatter has received growing interest during the past few decades. Much of the theoretical work in ordinary tensor gravity rules out any difference in the gravitational interaction of matter and antimatter. In field theories the exchange of even-spin bosons, such as the spin-2 graviton or its spin-0 partner, generates attractive forces, while the exchange of odd bosons, such as the photon or the postulated spin-1 graviton generates repulsive forces. The CPT theorem is at the origin of the argument that the exchange of even-spin bosons produces a universally attractive force field. So far, it has been impossible to construct a CPT-violating theory in flat spacetime. However, in curved spacetime, no generalization of the CPT theorem has been unequivocally demonstrated and its validity is open to question. Recently, experiments at the LEAR (Low Energy Accumulating Ring) at CERN have shown a surprising result for a fraction (3%) of antiprotons annihilated by protons of He3 nuclei. The annihilation process was retarded by as much as 10 to the power 8 times the value derived from theoretical calculations of Enrico Fermi and Edward Teller. These results are in good agreement with a formula introduced earlier by certain authors describing the time annihilation of anti-atoms by atoms. The motivation for investigating this problem is that a repulsive field between matter and antimatter may have drastic consequences on certain cosmic issues, such as the early phase of the Big Bang, Hawking radiation, and virtual particle production and annihilation. In the first part of this work we discuss the various theoretical arguments supporting or refuting the gravitational attraction between matter and antimatter, with emphasis on the CPT theorem. In the second part, we address the consequences of certain cosmic issues that arise from this problem. Finally, we propose an experimental test to clarify the nature of matter-antimatter interactions.

  3. Dissipative particle dynamics with attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Moubin Liu; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations, a combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions allows the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and multiphase systems to be simulated. We demonstrate that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations with similar pairwise particle-particle interactions can also be used to simulate the dynamics of multiphase fluids. In these simulations, the positive, short-range, repulsive part of the interaction potentials were represented by polynomial spline functions such as those used as smoothing functions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and the negative long-range part of the interaction has the same form but a different range and amplitude. If a single spline function corresponding to a purely repulsive interaction is used, the DPD fluid is a gas, and we show that the Poiseuille flow of this gas can be described accurately by the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers. In a two-component system in which the purely repulsive interactions between different components are substantially larger than the purely repulsive intracomponent interactions, separation into two gas phases occurs, in agreement with results obtained using DPD simulations with standard repulsive particle-particle interactions. Finally, we show that a combination of short-range repulsive interactions and long-range attractive interactions can be used to simulate the behavior of liquid drops surrounded by a gas. Similar models can be used to simulate a wide range of processes such as multiphase fluid flow through fractures and porous media with complex geometries and wetting behaviors.

  4. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  5. Gravitational lenses and particle properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of observations of gravitational lens systems for the determination of cosmological constants and for tests of the nature and distribution of dark matter is illustrated. The advantages and disadvantages of gravitational lenses as cosmological probes are evaluated.

  6. Research on gravitational physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Dahl, A. O.

    1974-01-01

    The topic of gravitational plant physiology was studied through aspects of plant development (in ARABIDOPSIS) and of behavior (in HELIANTHUS) as these were affected by altered g experience. The effect of increased g levels on stem polarity (in COLEUS) was also examined.

  7. Probing gravitational dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-01

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χs. It is a Bbb Z2 odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξsχs2Script R, where ξs is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξsχs2Script R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξhH†HScript R, induces effective couplings between χs2 and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  8. Probing gravitational dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-27

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χ{sub s}. It is a ℤ{sub 2} odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, where ξ{sub s} is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξ{sub h}H{sup †}HR, induces effective couplings between χ{sub s}{sup 2} and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  9. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  10. Quantum levitation of a thin magnetodielectric plate on a metallic plate using the repulsive Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Levitation of a thin magnetodielectric plate on a metallic plate by using the repulsive Casimir force is theoretically considered. If the permittivity of the metallic plate near zero frequency is expressed by a plasma model and the static permeability of the magnetodielectric plate is higher than its static permittivity, the Casimir force between the magnetodielectric plate and the metallic plate changes from attractive to repulsive as the separation between them increases. Furthermore, as the thickness of the magnetodielectric plate is decreased, the attractive component of the Casimir force decreases more than the repulsive one. This effect generates a larger repulsive Casimir force as compared with that between the plates having infinite thickness. Combined with the effect of decreasing the weight of the plate, this might enable a thin plate to levitate in vacuum. The height of quantum levitation is evaluated for a combination of yttrium iron garnet and gold.

  11. Controlling an electrostatic repulsion by oppositely charged surfactants towards positively charged fluorescent gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Corpuz, Ryan D; Ishida, Yohei; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    A novel positively charged fluorescent gold nanocluster was successfully synthesized using the shortest cationic thiol, thiocholine. Effective control of electrostatic repulsion by the introduction of an anionic surfactant afforded a nanocluster that showed blue fluorescence emission.

  12. Level repulsion of GHz phononic surface waves in quartz substrate with finite-depth holes.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sih-Ling; Lin, Yu-Ching; Tsai, Yao-Chuan; Ono, Takahito; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental results on the level repulsion of gigahertz surface acoustic waves in an air/ST-cut quartz phononic structure with finite-depth holes. The colorful dispersion with the parameter of the in-plane (sagittal plane) ratio of polarization was adopted to determine the Rayleigh wave bandgap induced by the level repulsion. The results of numerical analyses showed that the frequency and width of the bandgap induced by the level repulsion strongly depend on the geometry of the air holes in the phononic structure. In the experiment, a pair of slanted interdigital transducers with frequency in the gigahertz range was designed and fabricated to generate and receive broadband Rayleigh waves, whereas the reactive ion etching process with electron-beam lithography was used to fabricate submicrometer phononic structures. The measured results of the bandgap induced by the level repulsion agreed favorably with the numerical prediction. PMID:27300272

  13. Phase diagram of harmonically confined one-dimensional fermions with attractive and repulsive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, V. L. Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2005-12-15

    We construct the complete U-{mu} phase diagram for harmonically confined ultracold fermionic atoms with repulsive and attractive interactions({mu} is the chemical potential and U the interaction strength). Our approach is based on density-functional theory, and employs analytical expressions for the kinetic and correlation energy functionals, permitting us to obtain closed expressions for all phase boundaries and characteristic lines of the phase diagram, both for repulsive and attractive interactions.

  14. Gravitational lensing by gravastars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    As a possible method to detect gravastars (gravitational-vacuum-star), which was originally proposed by Mazur and Mottola, we study their gravitational lensing effects. Specifically, we adopt a spherical thin-shell model of a gravastar developed by Visser and Wiltshire, which connects interior de Sitter geometry and exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and assume that its surface is optically transparent. We calculate the image of a companion which rotates around the gravastar; we find that some characteristic images appear, depending on whether the gravastar possess unstable circular orbits of photons (Model 1) or not (Model 2). For Model 2, we calculate the total luminosity change, which is called microlensing effects; the maximal luminosity could be considerably larger than the black hole with the same mass.

  15. Gravitational coset models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Paul P.; Fleming, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The algebra A {/D - 3 + + +} dimensionally reduces to the E D-1 symmetry algebra of (12 - D)-dimensional supergravity. An infinite set of five-dimensional gravitational objects embedded in D-dimensions is constructed by identifying the null geodesic motion on cosets embedded in the generalised Kac-Moody algebra A {/D - 3 + + +}. By analogy with super-gravity these are bound states of dual gravitons. The metric interpolates continuously between exotic gravitational solutions generated by the action of an affine sub-group. We investigate mixed-symmetry fields in the brane sigma model, identify actions for the full interpolating bound state and investigate the dualisation of the bound state to a solution of the Einstein-Hilbert action via the Hodge dual on multiforms. We conclude that the Hodge dual is insufficient to reconstruct solutions to the Einstein-Hilbert action from mixed-symmetry tensors.

  16. Applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Neal

    I derive the basic principles of gravitational lensing, and proceed to describe several astrophysical applications. First, invariants in gravitational lensing magnification are derived using techniques of multidimensional residue calculus, and illustrated with example calculations. Then I discuss how these invariant quantities may be useful for measuring the properties of lenses. Next, I discuss the use of astrometric microlensing for studying extrasolar planets. Finally, the use of lensing for the study of substructure in dark matter halos is presented, along with ramifications for the small-scale power spectrum of matter fluctuations. The strongest bounds to date are placed on the mass of the dark matter particle, as well as bounds on the neutrino mass and slope of the primordial power spectrum.

  17. Self-gravitating skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Canfora, Fabrizio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    A self-gravitating Skyrmion is an analytic and globally regular solution of the Einstein-Skyrme system with nonvanishing topological charge. The spacetime is the direct product R × S3 and the Skyrmion is the self-gravitating generalization of the static hedgehog solution of Manton and Ruback. This solution can be promoted to a dynamical one in which the spacetime is a cosmology of the Bianchi type-IX and, through an analytic continuation, it can also be turned into a transversable asymptotically AdS Lorentzian wormhole. The stress-energy of this wormhole satisfies physically realistic energy conditions and the only “exotic matter” required by it is a negative cosmological constant.

  18. Linked Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Amy; Swearngin, Joseph; Wickes, Alexander; Willem Dalhuisen, Jan; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The electromagnetic knot is a topologically nontrivial solution to the vacuum Maxwell equations with the property that any two field lines belonging to either the electric, magnetic, or Poynting vector fields are closed and linked exactly once [1]. The relationship between the vacuum Maxwell and linearized Einstein equations, as expressed in the form of the spin-N massless field equations, suggests that gravitational radiation possesses analogous topologically nontrivial field configurations. Using twistor methods we find the analogous spin-2 solutions of Petrov types N, D, and III. Aided by the concept of tendex and vortex lines as recently developed for the physical interpretation of solutions in general relativity [2], we investigate the physical properties of these knotted gravitational fields by characterizing the topology of their associated tendex and vortex lines.[4pt] [1] Ranada, A. F. and Trueba, J. L., Mod. Nonlinear Opt. III, 119, 197 (2002).[2] Nichols, D. A., et al., Phys. Rev. D, 84 (2011).

  19. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  20. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  1. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  2. Spacetime and gravitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopczyński, W.; Trautman, A.

    This book is a revised translation of the Polish original "Czasoprzestrzeń i grawitacja", Warszawa (Poland), Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, 1984. Ideas about space and time are at the root of one's understanding of nature, both at the intuitive level of everyday experience and in the framework of sophisticated physical theories. These ideas have led to the development of geometry and its applications to physics. The contemporary physical theory of space and time, including its extention to the phenomena of gravitation, is Einstein's theory of relativity. The book is a short introduction to this theory. A great deal of emphasis is given to the geometrical aspects of relativity theory and its comparison with the Newtonian view of the world. There are short chapters on the origins of Einstein's theory, gravitational waves, cosmology, spinors and the Einstein-Cartan theory.

  3. Quasars and gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Turner, E L

    1984-03-23

    Despite the expenditure of large amounts of telescope time and other resources, most of the fundamental questions concerning quasi-stellar objects (quasars) remain unanswered. A complex phenomenology of radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray properties has accumulated but has not yielded even a satisfactory classification system. The large red shifts (distances) of quasars make them very valuable tools for studying cosmology and the properties of intervening matter in the Universe through observations of absorption lines and gravitational lenses.

  4. Undulator Gravitational Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.

    2005-01-31

    This note estimates distortions imposed by gravity on LCLS undulator strong-backs. Because of the strongback's asymmetric cross section, gravitational forces cause both torsion as well as simple bending. The superposition of these two effects yields a 4.4 {micro}m maximum deflection and a 0.16 milli radian rotation of the undulator axis. The choice of titanium is compared to aluminum.

  5. Kaluza-Klein magnetized cylindrical wormhole and its gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Sedigheh; Riazi, Nematollah

    2016-10-01

    A new exact vacuum solution in five dimensions, which describes a magnetized cylindrical wormhole in 3+1 dimensions is presented. The magnetic field lines are stretched along the wormhole throat and are concentrated near to it. We study the motion of neutral and charged test particles under the influence of the magnetized wormhole. The effective potential for a neutral test particle around and across the magnetized wormhole has a repulsive character. The gravitational lensing for the magnetized wormhole for various lens parameters are calculated and compared. The total magnetic flux on either side of the wormhole is obtained. We present analytic expressions which show regions in which the null energy condition is violated.

  6. Two-dimensional colloidal mixtures in magnetic and gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, H.; Horn, T.; Neuhaus, T.; ten Hagen, B.

    2013-11-01

    This mini-review is concerned with two-dimensional colloidal mixtures exposed to various kinds of external fields. By a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane, dipole moments are induced in paramagnetic particles which give rise to repulsive interactions leading to complex crystalline alloys in the composition-asymmetry diagram. A quench in the magnetic field induces complex crystal nucleation scenarios. If exposed to a gravitational field, these mixtures exhibit a brazil-nut effect and show a boundary layering which is explained in terms of a depletion bubble picture. The latter persists for time-dependent gravity ("colloidal shaking"). Finally, we summarize crystallization effects when the second species is frozen in a disordered matrix which provides obstacles for the crystallizing component.

  7. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  8. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

  9. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-07-14

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

  10. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  11. Recent Developments in Gravitation - Proceedings of the Relativity Meeting - 89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer, E.; Garriga, J.; Céspedes, J.

    1990-10-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * I. INVITED LECTURES * Low Energy Effects of Quantum Gravity * Rigid Motion lnvariance of Newtonian and Einatein's Theories of General Relativity * General Relativity and the Early Universe * Computer Algebra and Exact Solutions of the Einstein Equations * Gravitational Waves * II. REVIEW TALKS * Classical Relativistic Particles with Spin * Testing Flux Conservative Methods in Numerical Relativity * Symmetries in General Relativity and the Problem of Symmetry Inheritance * Clifford Algebra Approach to Gravitation: Applications to Symmetries and to Twisting, Type-N Fields * Unusual Frames of the Space-Time * Massive Photon Modes in Q.E.D. and Abnormal e+ e- Pair Production * Repulsive Gravity: A Current State of Understanding * Physics versus Metaphysics in Collision between Plane Gravitational Waves * Primordial Black Holes and FRW Cosmology * What Does Morphological Segregation of Galaxies Tell Us about Galaxy Formation? * III. SHORT COMMUNICATIONS * A Demianski Cavity with Small Rotation Parameter in a Dust Universe with Cosmological Constant * Relation between Quasirigidity and Weak Rigidity in Weak Fields * Almost-Product Structures in Relativity * On the Solutions of Quantum Field Equations in Curved Space-Time * Perturbative Methods for Type D Space-Time * The Energy-Momentum Tensor of Two Perfect Fluids * Two Fluids Solutions of Einstein Equations * Gravitational Wave Detection: The Problem of Estimating a Signal's Arrival Time * Quantum Particles Produced during Cosmic String Formation * Electric Neutrality and the Jordan-Thiry Scalar Field * Why Do Spinors Appear in Relativity? * Variational Principles and Quantum Gravity * A Nelson Like Approach to Quantum Mechanics on a Maximally Symmetric Manifold * A Note on the Scalar Product in Relativistic Quantum Mechanics * On the Tolman Bondi Solution of Einstein's Equations. Numerical Applications * The Dirac Equation in Two Rectilinear

  12. Gravitational collapse of Vaidya spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, Vitalii

    2016-03-01

    The gravitational collapse of generalized Vaidya spacetime is considered. It is known that the endstate of gravitational collapse, as to whether a black hole or a naked singularity is formed, depends on the mass function M(v,r). Here we give conditions for the mass function which corresponds to the equation of the state P = αρ where α ∈ (0, 1 3] and according to these conditions we obtain either a black hole or a naked singularity at the endstate of gravitational collapse. Also we give conditions for the mass function when the singularity is gravitationally strong.

  13. The Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David G.

    2005-10-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Waves and Methods for their Detection: 1. Gravitational waves in general relativity D. G. Blair; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair; Part II. Gravitational Wave Detectors: 4. Resonant-bar detectors D. G. Blair; 5. Gravity wave dewars W. O. Hamilton; 6. Internal friction in high Q materials J. Ferreirinko; 7. Motion amplifiers and passive transducers J. P. Richard; 8. Parametric transducers P. J. Veitch; 9. Detection of continuous waves K. Tsubono; 10. Data analysis and algorithms for gravitational wave-antennas G. V. Paalottino; Part III. Laser Interferometer Antennas: 11. A Michelson interferometer using delay lines W. Winkler; 12. Fabry-Perot cavity gravity-wave detectors R. W. P. Drever; 13. The stabilisation of lasers for interferometric gravitational wave detectors J. Hough; 14. Vibration isolation for the test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors N. A. Robertson; 15. Advanced techniques A. Brillet; 16. Data processing, analysis and storage for interferometric antennas B. F. Schutz; 17. Gravitational wave detection at low and very low frequencies R. W. Hellings.

  14. Gravitational Physics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational physics research at ISPAE is connected with NASA's Relativity Mission (Gravity Probe B (GP-B)) which will perform a test of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. GP-B will measure the geodetic and motional effect predicted by General Relativity Theory with extremely stable and sensitive gyroscopes in an earth orbiting satellite. Both effects cause a very small precession of the gyroscope spin axis. The goal of the GP-B experiment is the measurement of the gyroscope precession with very high precision. GP-B is being developed by a team at Stanford University and is scheduled for launch in the year 2001. The related UAH research is a collaboration with Stanford University and MSFC. This research is focussed primarily on the error analysis and data reduction methods of the experiment but includes other topics concerned with experiment systems and their performance affecting the science measurements. The hydrogen maser is the most accurate and stable clock available. It will be used in future gravitational physics missions to measure relativistic effects such as the second order Doppler effect. The HMC experiment, currently under development at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), will test the performance and capability of the hydrogen maser clock for gravitational physics measurements. UAH in collaboration with the SAO science team will study methods to evaluate the behavior and performance of the HMC. The GP-B data analysis developed by the Stanford group involves complicated mathematical operations. This situation led to the idea to investigate alternate and possibly simpler mathematical procedures to extract the GP-B measurements form the data stream. Comparison of different methods would increase the confidence in the selected scheme.

  15. Gravitinos from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Grifols, J.A.; Masso, E.; Toldra, R.

    1998-01-01

    We reanalyze the limits on the gravitino mass m{sub 3/2} in superlight gravitino scenarios derived from arguments on energy loss during gravitational collapse. We conclude that the mass range 10{sup {minus}6} eV{le}m{sub 3/2}{le}2.3{times}10{sup {minus}5} eV is excluded by SN 1987A data. In terms of the scale of supersymmetry breaking {Lambda}, the range 70 GeV {le}{Lambda}{le}300 GeV is not allowed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Regular gravitational lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragon, Norbert

    1992-02-01

    The Einstein action with vanishing cosmological constant is for appropriate field content the unique local action which is regular at the fixed point of affine coordinate transformations. Imposing this regularity requirement one excludes also Wess-Zumino counterterms which trade gravitational anomalies for Lorentz anomalies. One has to expect dilatational and SL (D) anomalies. If these anomalies are absent and if the regularity of the quantum vertex functional can be controlled then Einstein gravity is renormalizable. On leave of absence from Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hannover, W-3000 Hannover 1, FRG.

  17. Soft repulsive mixtures under gravity: brazil-nut effect, depletion bubbles, boundary layering, nonequilibrium shaking.

    PubMed

    Kruppa, Tobias; Neuhaus, Tim; Messina, René; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-04-01

    A binary mixture of particles interacting via long-ranged repulsive forces is studied in gravity by computer simulation and theory. The more repulsive A-particles create a depletion zone of less repulsive B-particles around them reminiscent to a bubble. Applying Archimedes' principle effectively to this bubble, an A-particle can be lifted in a fluid background of B-particles. This "depletion bubble" mechanism explains and predicts a brazil-nut effect where the heavier A-particles float on top of the lighter B-particles. It also implies an effective attraction of an A-particle towards a hard container bottom wall which leads to boundary layering of A-particles. Additionally, we have studied a periodic inversion of gravity causing perpetuous mutual penetration of the mixture in a slit geometry. In this nonequilibrium case of time-dependent gravity, the boundary layering persists. Our results are based on computer simulations and density functional theory of a two-dimensional binary mixture of colloidal repulsive dipoles. The predicted effects also occur for other long-ranged repulsive interactions and in three spatial dimensions. They are therefore verifiable in settling experiments on dipolar or charged colloidal mixtures as well as in charged granulates and dusty plasmas.

  18. Soft repulsive mixtures under gravity: Brazil-nut effect, depletion bubbles, boundary layering, nonequilibrium shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruppa, Tobias; Neuhaus, Tim; Messina, René; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-04-01

    A binary mixture of particles interacting via long-ranged repulsive forces is studied in gravity by computer simulation and theory. The more repulsive A-particles create a depletion zone of less repulsive B-particles around them reminiscent to a bubble. Applying Archimedes' principle effectively to this bubble, an A-particle can be lifted in a fluid background of B-particles. This "depletion bubble" mechanism explains and predicts a brazil-nut effect where the heavier A-particles float on top of the lighter B-particles. It also implies an effective attraction of an A-particle towards a hard container bottom wall which leads to boundary layering of A-particles. Additionally, we have studied a periodic inversion of gravity causing perpetuous mutual penetration of the mixture in a slit geometry. In this nonequilibrium case of time-dependent gravity, the boundary layering persists. Our results are based on computer simulations and density functional theory of a two-dimensional binary mixture of colloidal repulsive dipoles. The predicted effects also occur for other long-ranged repulsive interactions and in three spatial dimensions. They are therefore verifiable in settling experiments on dipolar or charged colloidal mixtures as well as in charged granulates and dusty plasmas.

  19. A requirement for filopodia extension toward Slit during Robo-mediated axon repulsion

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Russell E.; Edward van Veen, J.; Vidaki, Marina; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Meyer, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Axons navigate long distances through complex 3D environments to interconnect the nervous system during development. Although the precise spatiotemporal effects of most axon guidance cues remain poorly characterized, a prevailing model posits that attractive guidance cues stimulate actin polymerization in neuronal growth cones whereas repulsive cues induce actin disassembly. Contrary to this model, we find that the repulsive guidance cue Slit stimulates the formation and elongation of actin-based filopodia from mouse dorsal root ganglion growth cones. Surprisingly, filopodia form and elongate toward sources of Slit, a response that we find is required for subsequent axonal repulsion away from Slit. Mechanistically, Slit evokes changes in filopodium dynamics by increasing direct binding of its receptor, Robo, to members of the actin-regulatory Ena/VASP family. Perturbing filopodium dynamics pharmacologically or genetically disrupts Slit-mediated repulsion and produces severe axon guidance defects in vivo. Thus, Slit locally stimulates directional filopodial extension, a process that is required for subsequent axonal repulsion downstream of the Robo receptor. PMID:27091449

  20. Soft repulsive mixtures under gravity: brazil-nut effect, depletion bubbles, boundary layering, nonequilibrium shaking.

    PubMed

    Kruppa, Tobias; Neuhaus, Tim; Messina, René; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-04-01

    A binary mixture of particles interacting via long-ranged repulsive forces is studied in gravity by computer simulation and theory. The more repulsive A-particles create a depletion zone of less repulsive B-particles around them reminiscent to a bubble. Applying Archimedes' principle effectively to this bubble, an A-particle can be lifted in a fluid background of B-particles. This "depletion bubble" mechanism explains and predicts a brazil-nut effect where the heavier A-particles float on top of the lighter B-particles. It also implies an effective attraction of an A-particle towards a hard container bottom wall which leads to boundary layering of A-particles. Additionally, we have studied a periodic inversion of gravity causing perpetuous mutual penetration of the mixture in a slit geometry. In this nonequilibrium case of time-dependent gravity, the boundary layering persists. Our results are based on computer simulations and density functional theory of a two-dimensional binary mixture of colloidal repulsive dipoles. The predicted effects also occur for other long-ranged repulsive interactions and in three spatial dimensions. They are therefore verifiable in settling experiments on dipolar or charged colloidal mixtures as well as in charged granulates and dusty plasmas. PMID:22482539

  1. Gravitating lepton bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution exhibits the external gravitational and electromagnetic field corresponding to that of the Dirac electron. For the large spin/mass ratio, a ≫ m, the BH loses horizons and acquires a naked singular ring creating two-sheeted topology. This space is regularized by the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking, leading to an extended particle that has a regular spinning core compatible with the external KN solution. We show that this core has much in common with the known MIT and SLAC bag models, but has the important advantage of being in accordance with the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the KN solution. A peculiar two-sheeted structure of Kerr's gravity provides a framework for the implementation of the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking in configuration space in accordance with the concept of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Similar to other bag models, the KN bag is flexible and pliant to deformations. For parameters of a spinning electron, the bag takes the shape of a thin rotating disk of the Compton radius, with a ring-string structure and a quark-like singular pole formed at the sharp edge of this disk, indicating that the considered lepton bag forms a single bag-string-quark system.

  2. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  3. Gravitational Neurobiology of Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmann, H.; Anken, R. H.

    In vertebrates (including man), altered gravitational environments such as weightlessness can induce malfunctions of the inner ears, based on irregular movements of the semicircular cristae or on dislocations of the inner ear otoliths from the corresponding sensory epithelia. This will lead to illusionary tilts, since the vestibular inputs are not confirmed by the other sensory organs, which results in an intersensory conflict. Vertebrates in orbit therefore face severe orientation problems. In humans, the intersensory conflict may additionally lead to a malaise, commonly referred to as space motion sickness (SMS), a kinetosis. During the first days at weightlessness, the orientation problems (and SMS) disappear, since the brain develops a new compensatory interpretation of the available sensory data. The present review reports on the neurobiological responses - particularly of fish - observed at altered gravitational states, concerning behaviour and neuroplastic reactivities. Recent investigations employing microgravity (spaceflight, parabolic aircraft flights, clinostat) and hyper-gravity (laboratory centrifuges as ground based research tools) yielded clues and insights into the understanding of the respective basic phenomena

  4. Gravitating lepton bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-08-15

    The Kerr–Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution exhibits the external gravitational and electromagnetic field corresponding to that of the Dirac electron. For the large spin/mass ratio, a ≫ m, the BH loses horizons and acquires a naked singular ring creating two-sheeted topology. This space is regularized by the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking, leading to an extended particle that has a regular spinning core compatible with the external KN solution. We show that this core has much in common with the known MIT and SLAC bag models, but has the important advantage of being in accordance with the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the KN solution. A peculiar two-sheeted structure of Kerr’s gravity provides a framework for the implementation of the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking in configuration space in accordance with the concept of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Similar to other bag models, the KN bag is flexible and pliant to deformations. For parameters of a spinning electron, the bag takes the shape of a thin rotating disk of the Compton radius, with a ring–string structure and a quark-like singular pole formed at the sharp edge of this disk, indicating that the considered lepton bag forms a single bag–string–quark system.

  5. Itinerant Ferromagnetism of a Repulsive Atomic Fermi Gas: A Quantum Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pilati, S.; Troyer, M.; Bertaina, G.; Giorgini, S.

    2010-07-16

    We investigate the phase diagram of a two-component repulsive Fermi gas at T=0 by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Both purely repulsive and resonant attractive model potentials are considered in order to analyze the limits of the universal regime where the details of interatomic forces can be neglected. The equation of state of both balanced and unbalanced systems is calculated as a function of the interaction strength and the critical density for the onset of ferromagnetism is determined. The energy of the strongly polarized gas is calculated and parametrized in terms of the physical properties of repulsive polarons, which are relevant for the stability of the fully ferromagnetic state. Finally, we analyze the phase diagram in the interaction-polarization plane under the assumption that only phases with homogeneous magnetization can be produced.

  6. Quantum vacuum photon modes and repulsive Lifshitz-van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellieu, Louis; Deparis, Olivier; Muller, Jérôme; Kolaric, Branko; Sarrazin, Michaël

    2015-12-01

    The bridge between quantum vacuum photon modes and properties of patterned surfaces is currently being established on solid theoretical grounds. Based on these foundations, the manipulation of quantum vacuum photon modes in a nanostructured cavity is theoretically shown to be able to change the Lifshitz-van der Waals forces from attractive to repulsive regime. Since this concept relies on surface nanopatterning instead of chemical composition changes, it drastically relaxes the usual conditions for achieving repulsive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces. As a case study, the potential interaction energy between a nanopatterned polyethylene slab and a flat polyethylene slab with water as the intervening medium is calculated. Extremely small corrugation heights (<10 nm) are shown to be able to change the Lifshitz-van der Waals force from attractive to repulsive, the interaction strength being controlled by the corrugation height. This new approach could lead to various applications in surface science.

  7. Emergence of amplitude death scenario in a network of oscillators under repulsive delay interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-07-01

    We report the existence of amplitude death in a network of identical oscillators under repulsive mean coupling. Amplitude death appears in a globally coupled network of identical oscillators with instantaneous repulsive mean coupling only when the number of oscillators is more than two. We further investigate that, amplitude death may emerge even in two coupled oscillators as well as network of oscillators if we introduce delay time in the repulsive mean coupling. We have analytically derived the region of amplitude death island and find out how strength of delay controls the death regime in two coupled or a large network of coupled oscillators. We have verified our results on network of delayed Mackey-Glass systems where parameters are set in hyperchaotic regime. We have also tested our coupling approach in two paradigmatic limit cycle oscillators: Stuart-Landau and Van der Pol oscillators.

  8. Slow relaxation mode in concentrated oil-in-water microemulsions consisting of repulsive droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Y.; Ushiki, H.; Courbin, L.; Panizza, P.

    2007-02-01

    The present contribution reports on the observation of two diffusive relaxation modes in a concentrated microemulsion made of repulsive droplets. These two modes can be interpreted in the frame of Weissman’s and Pusey’s theoretical pioneering works. The fast mode is associated to the collective diffusion of droplets whereas the slow one corresponds to the relaxation of droplet concentration fluctuations associated with composition and/or size. We show that (i) repulsive interactions considerably slow down the latter and (ii) a generalized Stokes Einstein relationship between its coefficient of diffusion and the Newtonian viscosity of the solutions, similar to the Walden’s rule for electrolytes, holds for concentrated microemulsion systems made of repulsive droplets.

  9. A new conveyor system based on a passive magnetic levitation unit having repulsive-type magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohji, T.; Ichiyama, S.; Amei, K.; Sakui, M.; Yamada, S.

    2004-05-01

    A magnetic repulsive-type conveyor system is proposed as a new application of repulsive-type magnetic bearings, which use repulsive forces between the stator and rotor permanent magnets. The proposed conveyer is composed by aligning many passive magnetic levitation units. Each unit also contains electromagnets to oscillate a levitator shaft in the radial direction. The way of generating vibration and rotation in the conveyance direction was examined by the various excitation methods.

  10. Maximum repulsed magnetization of a bulk superconductor with low pulsed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimoto, M.; Kamijo, H.; Fujimoto, H.

    2005-10-01

    Pulsed field magnetization of a bulk high- Tc superconductor (HTS) is important technique especially for practical applications of a bulk superconducting magnet. Full magnetization is not obtained for low pulsed field and trapped field is decreased by reversed current in the HTS. The trapped field distribution by repulsed magnetization was previously reported in experiments with temperature control. In this study, repulsed magnetization technique with the low pulsed field is numerically analyzed under assumption of variable shielding current by the temperature control. The shielding current densities are discussed to obtain maximum trapped field by two times of low pulsed field magnetizations.

  11. Three-component fermionic atoms with repulsive interaction in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Shin-ya; Inaba, Kensuke; Suga, Sei-ichiro

    2010-02-15

    We investigate three-component (colors) repulsive fermionic atoms in optical lattices using the dynamical mean-field theory. Depending on the anisotropy of the repulsive interactions, either a color density-wave state or a color-selective staggered state appears at half filling. In the former state, pairs of atoms with two of the three colors and atoms with the third color occupy different sites alternately. In the latter state, atoms with two of the three colors occupy different sites alternately and atoms with the third color are itinerant throughout the system. When the interactions are isotropic, both states are degenerate. We discuss the results using an effective model.

  12. Repulsive Casimir forces between solid materials with high-refractive-index intervening liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zwol, P. J. van; Palasantzas, G.

    2010-06-15

    In order to explore repulsive Casimir or van der Waals forces between solid materials with liquid as the intervening medium, we analyze dielectric data for a wide range of materials as, for example, (p)olytetrafluoroethylene, polystyrene, silica, and more than 20 liquids. Although significant variation in the dielectric data from different sources exists, we provide a scheme based on measured static dielectric constants, refractive indices, and applying Kramers-Kronig consistency to dielectric data to create accurate dielectric functions at imaginary frequencies. The latter is necessary for more accurate force calculations via the Lifshitz theory, thereby allowing reliable predictions of repulsive Casimir forces.

  13. Repulsive interactions between dislocations and overgrown v-shaped defects in epitaxial GaN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, P. H.; Schnedler, M.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial distribution and the projected line directions of dislocations intersecting a cross-sectional (101¯0) cleavage plane of a GaN(0001) epitaxial layer is mapped using scanning tunneling microscopy. The data is correlated with the spatial positions of v-shaped defects. The dislocations are found to be bent away from the inclined semipolar facets of v-shaped defects, due to a strain-induced repulsive interaction. The dislocation distribution is characterized by agglomerations and intersecting bundles of dislocations with parallel projected line directions, stabilized by many body effects in the repulsive strain interactions.

  14. Numerical simulation of gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Yakov

    Gravitational lens is a massive body or system of bodies with gravitational field that bends directions of light rays propagating nearby. This may cause an observer to see multiple images of a light source, e.g. a star, if there is a gravitational lens between the star and the observer. Light rays that form each individual image may have different distances to travel, which creates time delays between them. In complex gravitational fields generated by the system of stars, analytical calculation of trajectories and light intensities is virtually impossible. Gravitational lens of two massive bodies, one behind another, are able to create four images of a light source. Furthermore, the interaction between the four light beams can form a complicated interference pattern. This article provides a brief theory of light behavior in a gravitational field and describes the algorithm for constructing the trajectories of light rays in a gravitational field, calculating wave fronts and interference pattern of light. If you set gravitational field by any number of transparent and non- transparent objects (stars) and set emitters of radio wave beams, it is possible to calculate the interference pattern in any region of space. The proposed method of calculation can be applied even in the case of the lack of continuity between the position of the emitting stars and position of the resulting image. In this paper we propose methods of optimization, as well as solutions for some problems arising in modeling of gravitational lenses. The simulation of light rays in the sun's gravitational field is taken as an example. Also caustic is constructed for objects with uniform mass distribution.

  15. Galaxies as gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, D

    1967-12-01

    The probability that a galaxy gathers light from another remote galaxy, and deflects and focuses it toward an observer on Earth, is calculated according to various cosmologic models. I pose the question of whether an object called a quasar is a single, intrinsically luminous entity or the result of accidental alignment, along the line of sight, of two normal galaxies, the more distant of which has its light amplified by the gravitational-lens effect of the nearer galaxy. If galaxies are distributed at random in the universe, the former alternative is true. But, if we assume that most galaxies exist in pairs, we can find about 30 galaxies occurring exactly one behind the other in such a way as to enable amplification of the order of 50. This model explains also the variations in intensity in quasars, but fails to explain others of their observed properties. PMID:17734305

  16. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  17. Frontiers in gravitational physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Koushik

    In this thesis we present three research projects in classical General Relativity and Cosmology. In the first part of the thesis we investigate the definition of gravitational charge corresponding to the asymptotic boost symmetry of a spacetime and derive its role in the first law of black hole thermodynamics. In the cosmology part, we investigate the role of a scalar field in the early and late time evolution of the Universe. We find out observational constraints on the pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson quintessence model using the latest supernova and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data. In an attempt to explain a particular anomaly in the latest CMB data, we propose a modification to the standard single field inflation based on the initial kinetic energy domination with anisotropic initial conditions. Predictions of this mechanism can be tested in future data analysis.

  18. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity, respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous - whose rates are related by a non-constant function beta sub a - is demonstrated. The cosmological character of beta sub a is also discussed.

  19. Gravitational adaptation of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Burton, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of gravitational adaptation is studied in a group of five Leghorn cocks which had become physiologically adapted to 2 G after 162 days of centrifugation. After this period of adaptation, they are periodically exposed to a 2 G field, accompanied by five previously unexposed hatch-mates, and the degree of retained acceleration adaptation is estimated from the decrease in lymphocyte frequency after 24 hr at 2 G. Results show that the previously adapted birds exhibit an 84% greater lymphopenia than the unexposed birds, and that the lymphocyte frequency does not decrease to a level below that found at the end of 162 days at 2 G. In addition, the capacity for adaptation to chronic acceleration is found to be highly heritable. An acceleration tolerant strain of birds shows lesser mortality during chronic acceleration, particularly in intermediate fields, although the result of acceleration selection is largely quantitative (a greater number of survivors) rather than qualitative (behavioral or physiological changes).

  20. Earth Gravitational Model 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D.; Factor, J. K.; Holmes, S. A.; Ingalls, S.; Presicci, M. R.; Beale, J.; Fecher, T.

    2015-12-01

    The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency [NGA], in conjunction with its U.S. and international partners, has begun preliminary work on its next Earth Gravitational Model, to replace EGM2008. The new 'Earth Gravitational Model 2020' [EGM2020] has an expected public release date of 2020, and will likely retain the same harmonic basis and resolution as EGM2008. As such, EGM2020 will be essentially an ellipsoidal harmonic model up to degree (n) and order (m) 2159, but will be released as a spherical harmonic model to degree 2190 and order 2159. EGM2020 will benefit from new data sources and procedures. Updated satellite gravity information from the GOCE and GRACE mission, will better support the lower harmonics, globally. Multiple new acquisitions (terrestrial, airborne and shipborne) of gravimetric data over specific geographical areas, will provide improved global coverage and resolution over the land, as well as for coastal and some ocean areas. Ongoing accumulation of satellite altimetry data as well as improvements in the treatment of this data, will better define the marine gravity field, most notably in polar and near-coastal regions. NGA and partners are evaluating different approaches for optimally combining the new GOCE/GRACE satellite gravity models with the terrestrial data. These include the latest methods employing a full covariance adjustment. NGA is also working to assess systematically the quality of its entire gravimetry database, towards correcting biases and other egregious errors where possible, and generating improved error models that will inform the final combination with the latest satellite gravity models. Outdated data gridding procedures have been replaced with improved approaches. For EGM2020, NGA intends to extract maximum value from the proprietary data that overlaps geographically with unrestricted data, whilst also making sure to respect and honor its proprietary agreements with its data-sharing partners.

  1. Weight, gravitation, inertia, and tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Olivier; Lagoute, Christophe; Pérez, José-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the factors that influence the weight of an object near the Earth's surface. They are: (1) the Earth's gravitational force, (2) the centrifugal force due to the Earth's diurnal rotation, and (3) tidal forces due to the gravitational field of the Moon and Sun, and other solar system bodies to a lesser extent. Each of these three contributions is discussed and expressions are derived. The relationship between weight and gravitation is thus established in a direct and pedagogical manner readily understandable by undergraduate students. The analysis applies to the Newtonian limit of gravitation. The derivation is based on an experimental (or operational) definition of weight, and it is shown that it coincides with the Earth’s gravitational force modified by diurnal rotation around a polar axis and non-uniformity of external gravitational bodies (tidal term). Two examples illustrate and quantify these modifications, respectively the Eötvös effect and the oceanic tides; tidal forces due to differential gravitation on a spacecraft and an asteroid are also proposed as examples. Considerations about inertia are also given and some comments are made about a widespread, yet confusing, explanation of tides based on a centrifugal force. Finally, the expression of the potential energy of the tide-generating force is established rigorously in the appendix.

  2. Attitudes and attraction: a new test of the attraction, repulsion and similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Ho, S Y

    2000-06-01

    Dissimilarity and similarity between attitudes of the participants and a stranger were manipulated across two sets of issues to test the attraction, repulsion and similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry hypotheses. Participants (N = 192) judged social (liking, enjoyment of company) and intellectual (intelligence, general knowledge) attractiveness of the stranger. The similarity in the first set of attitudes x similarity in the second set of attitudes effect emerged in social attraction, but not in intellectual attraction. Stated simply, dissimilarity had a greater weight than similarity in social attraction, but equal weight in intellectual attraction. These results support the similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry hypothesis that predicts dissimilarity-repulsion to be stronger than similarity-attraction. However, they reject (1) the attraction hypothesis that dissimilarity and similarity produce equal and opposite effects on social attraction; and (2) the repulsion hypothesis that only dissimilar attitudes affect social attraction by leading to repulsion. An equal weighting of dissimilarity and similarity in intellectual attraction further suggested that the similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry on social attraction is reflective of a stronger avoidance response in the Darwinian sense. PMID:10907095

  3. Similarity and Difference in Multicultural Counseling: Considering the Attraction and Repulsion Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speight, Suzette L.; Vera, Elizabeth M.

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes issues relevant to empirical investigations of client and counselor preferences. Explores the effects of similarity and difference on relationship development and focuses on the attraction and repulsion hypotheses' applicability to multicultural counseling research and theory. It is hoped that differences between counseling and social…

  4. Attitudes and attraction: a new test of the attraction, repulsion and similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Ho, S Y

    2000-06-01

    Dissimilarity and similarity between attitudes of the participants and a stranger were manipulated across two sets of issues to test the attraction, repulsion and similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry hypotheses. Participants (N = 192) judged social (liking, enjoyment of company) and intellectual (intelligence, general knowledge) attractiveness of the stranger. The similarity in the first set of attitudes x similarity in the second set of attitudes effect emerged in social attraction, but not in intellectual attraction. Stated simply, dissimilarity had a greater weight than similarity in social attraction, but equal weight in intellectual attraction. These results support the similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry hypothesis that predicts dissimilarity-repulsion to be stronger than similarity-attraction. However, they reject (1) the attraction hypothesis that dissimilarity and similarity produce equal and opposite effects on social attraction; and (2) the repulsion hypothesis that only dissimilar attitudes affect social attraction by leading to repulsion. An equal weighting of dissimilarity and similarity in intellectual attraction further suggested that the similarity-dissimilarity asymmetry on social attraction is reflective of a stronger avoidance response in the Darwinian sense.

  5. Regardless-of-Speed Superconducting LSM Controlled-Repulsive MAGLEV Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Egashira, Tatsuya; Hirai, Ryuichi

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes a new repulsive Maglev vehicle which a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) can levitate and propel simultaneously, independently of the vehicle speeds. The combined levitation and propulsion control is carried out by controlling mechanical-load angle and armature-current. Dynamic simulations show successful operations with good ride-quality by using a compact control method proposed here.

  6. Collapse in boson-fermion mixtures with all-repulsive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Prytula, Vladyslav I.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Vekslerchik, Vadym E.

    2007-10-15

    We describe the collapse of the bosonic component in a boson-fermion mixture due to the pressure exerted on it by a large fermionic component, leading to collapse in a system with all-repulsive interactions. We describe the phenomena of early collapse and superslow collapse of the mixture.

  7. Electronic Structure in Pi Systems: Part I. Huckel Theory with Electron Repulsion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marye Anne; Matsen, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    Pi-CI theory is a simple, semi-empirical procedure which (like Huckel theory) treats pi and pseudo-pi orbitals; in addition, electron repulsion is explicitly included and molecular configurations are mixed. Results obtained from application of pi-CI to ethylene are superior to either the Huckel molecular orbital or valence bond theories. (JN)

  8. Polymer Brushes that Mimic Repulsive Properties of the Boundary Lubricant Glycoprotein Lubricin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jahn; Jay, Gregory; Ni, Qian; Bello, David; Bothun, Geoffrey; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    This is a report on the design of tailored functional groups which mimic the repulsive forces at work in the natural-joint boundary lubricant known as lubricin. Lubricin, an amphiphilic polyelectrolyte biomolecule, decreases friction and cellular adhesion by exhibiting surface force fields based on steric hindrance, Debye electrostatic double layer repulsion and hydration repulsive forces. We have identified a physically and chemically stable candidate polymers for anti-fouling coatings that will mimic lubricin's repulsive properties. Synthetic polymer brushes mimicking lubricin have been produced using these polymers grafted onto a glass surfaces. The average adhesive forces for the polymer brushes measured through atomic force microscopy are as low (56.796 +/- 0.796 mN/m), similar to those exhibited by lubricin coated surfaces and on the same order of magnitude as superhydrophobic surfaces. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  9. Discontinuous nature of the repulsive-to-attractive colloidal glass transition.

    PubMed

    van de Laar, T; Higler, R; Schroën, K; Sprakel, J

    2016-01-01

    In purely repulsive colloidal systems a glass transition can be reached by increasing the particle volume fraction beyond a certain threshold. The resulting glassy state is governed by configurational cages which confine particles and restrict their motion. A colloidal glass may also be formed by inducing attractive interactions between the particles. When attraction is turned on in a repulsive colloidal glass a re-entrant solidification ensues. Initially, the repulsive glass melts as free volume in the system increases. As the attraction strength is increased further, this weakened configurational glass gives way to an attractive glass in which motion is hindered by the formation of physical bonds between neighboring particles. In this paper, we study the transition from repulsive-to-attractive glasses using three-dimensional imaging at the single-particle level. We show how the onset of cage weakening and bond formation is signalled by subtle changes in local structure. We then demonstrate the discontinuous nature of the solid-solid transition, which is marked by a critical onset at a threshold bonding energy. Finally, we highlight how the interplay between bonding and caging leads to complex and heterogeneous dynamics at the microscale.

  10. The s-wave repulsion and deeply bound pionic atoms: fact and fancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2003-06-01

    Fits to a large data set of pionic atoms show that the 'missing' s-wave repulsion is accounted for when a density dependence suggested recently by Weise is included in the isovector term of the s-wave pion optical potential. The importance of using large data sets is demonstrated and the role of deeply bound pionic atom states is discussed.

  11. An overview of gravitational physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, Jaime; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this review is on the response of humans and animals to the effects of the near weightless condition occurring aboard orbiting spacecraft. Gravity is an omnipresent force that has been a constant part of our lives and of the evolution of all living species. Emphasis is placed on the general mechanisms of adaptation to altered gravitational fields and vectors, i.e., both hypo- and hypergravity. A broad literature review of gravitational biology was conducted and the general state of our knowledge in this area is discussed. The review is specifically targeted at newcomers to the exciting and relatively new area of space and gravitational biology.

  12. Gravitation. [Book on general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misner, C. W.; Thorne, K. S.; Wheeler, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    This textbook on gravitation physics (Einstein's general relativity or geometrodynamics) is designed for a rigorous full-year course at the graduate level. The material is presented in two parallel tracks in an attempt to divide key physical ideas from more complex enrichment material to be selected at the discretion of the reader or teacher. The full book is intended to provide competence relative to the laws of physics in flat space-time, Einstein's geometric framework for physics, applications with pulsars and neutron stars, cosmology, the Schwarzschild geometry and gravitational collapse, gravitational waves, experimental tests of Einstein's theory, and mathematical concepts of differential geometry.

  13. Gravitational radiation quadrupole formula is valid for gravitationally interacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented for the validity of the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation energy loss in the far field of nearly Newtonian (e.g., binary stellar) systems. This argument differs from earlier ones in that it determines beforehand the formal accuracy of approximation required to describe gravitationally self-interacting systems, uses the corresponding approximate equation of motion explicitly, and evaluates the appropriate asymptotic quantities by matching along the correct space-time light cones.

  14. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  15. Dissipation of modified entropic gravitational energy through gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenological nature of a new gravitational type interaction between two different bodies derived from Verlinde's entropic approach to gravitation in combination with Sorkin's definition of Universe's quantum information content, is investigated. Assuming that the energy stored in this entropic gravitational field is dissipated under the form of gravitational waves and that the Heisenberg principle holds for this system, one calculates a possible value for an absolute minimum time scale in nature tau=15/16 Λ^{1/2}hbar G/c4˜9.27×10^{-105} seconds, which is much smaller than the Planck time t P =( ħG/ c 5)1/2˜5.38×10-44 seconds. This appears together with an absolute possible maximum value for Newtonian gravitational forces generated by matter Fg=32/30c7/Λ hbar G2˜ 3.84× 10^{165} Newtons, which is much higher than the gravitational field between two Planck masses separated by the Planck length F gP = c 4/ G˜1.21×1044 Newtons.

  16. A combined frontal and maxillary sinus approach for repulsion of the third maxillary molar in a horse.

    PubMed

    Boutros, C P; Koenig, J B

    2001-04-01

    The 3rd maxillary molar is a difficult tooth to remove by extraction or repulsion. A combined frontal and maxillary approach provides good exposure for repulsion of this tooth, debridement of the sinuses, and placement of an alveolar seal. The improved exposure should minimize operative difficulties and postoperative complications. PMID:11326631

  17. Faraday rotation due to quadratic gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yihan; Liu, Liping; Tian, Wen-Xiu

    2011-01-01

    The linearized field equations of quadratic gravitation in stationary space-time are written in quasi-Maxwell form. The rotation of the polarization plane for an electromagnetic wave propagating in the gravito-electromagnetic field caused by a rotating gravitational lens is discussed. The influences of the Yukawa potential in quadratic gravitation on the gravitational Faraday rotation are investigated.

  18. Gravitation toward Walls among Human Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.; Wheeler, Patricia A.

    1976-01-01

    In two studies, college students (N=34) in a classroom corridor who walked near the wall ("gravitators") were contrasted with those who walked near the center ("non-gravitators"). Gravitators were lower than non-gravitators on Autonomy and Defendence and appeared to be less responsive to other persons. (Author)

  19. Quantum Opportunities in Gravitational Wave Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mavalvala, Negris

    2012-03-14

    Direct observation of gravitational waves should open a new window into the Universe. Gravitational wave detectors are the most sensitive position meters ever constructed. The quantum limit in gravitational wave detectors opens up a whole new field of study. Quantum opportunities in gravitational wave detectors include applications of quantum optics techniques and new tools for quantum measurement on truly macroscopic (human) scales.

  20. Gravitational energy sources in Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    1973-01-01

    Gravitational sources of the intrinsic luminosity of Jupiter are examined in the context of current hydrogen-helium models. When no gravitational separation of matter occurs, the amount of heat which can be released over the remaining lifetime of the planet is necessarily limited by the size of its existing reservoir of thermal energy. This conclusion rests only on the assumption that its interior is relatively cold and degenerate. If gravitational unmixing occurs, the size of the thermal reservoir does not necessarily limit the heat output. If core formation occurs, for example, then the size of the core formed will be a limiting factor. The energy released with the formation of a helium core is computed for Jupiter. A core growth rate, averaged over several billion years, of 20 trillionths of Jupiter's mass per year is required if gravitational separation is to play a significant role in the thermal evolution.

  1. Gravitational quantum states of Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A. Yu.; Froelich, P.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.

    2011-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of the motion of the antihydrogen atom (H) in the gravitational field of Earth above a material surface. We predict that the H atom, falling in the gravitational field of Earth above a material surface, would settle into long-lived quantum states. We point out a method of measuring the difference in the energy of H in such states. The method allows for spectroscopy of gravitational levels based on atom-interferometric principles. We analyze the general feasibility of performing experiments of this kind. We point out that such experiments provide a method of measuring the gravitational force (Mg) acting on H and that they might be of interest in the context of testing the weak equivalence principle for antimatter.

  2. Relativistic Gravitational Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, Ronald W. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The results are summarized of a workshop on future gravitational physics space missions. The purpose of the workshop was to define generic technological requirements for such missions. NASA will use the results to direct its program of advanced technology development.

  3. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  4. Gravitational Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, J.

    2008-04-29

    In this paper, we briefly review some aspects of the gravitational many-body problem, which is one of the oldest problems in the modern mathematical science. Then we review our GRAPE project to design computers specialized to this problem.

  5. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  6. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - The Correct Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a clear, definitive Scientific explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and with distinct Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 certain, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are obviously Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli- Foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  7. The Antibubble as a Casimir force Phenomenon and its Relation to ZPF Theories of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, John

    2009-04-01

    The hypothesis that the `anti-bubble' (1) in water owes its existence to Casimir forces is proposed, based on a model of Quantum ZPF (Zero Point Fluctuation) interaction with matter. The Casimir effect can be explained by imbalanced radiation pressure from the ZPF and is linked to Gravity. This concept is extended to the phenomena of anti-bubble and ``boules'' : drops of water levitated above the surface of water. In the case of the anti-bubble the water surfaces are kept apart stably by a force of approximately 10^3 dynes /cm^2 with separations of the order of a micron (2). The hypothesized ZPF energy density is much stronger than seen in Casimir forces between metal plates and is hypothesized to be due trapped ZPF energy and linked to the unusual properties of water. Unlike Casmir repulsion derived from existing models (3) this hypothetical repulsive trapped ZPF force can arise between similar substances of suitable properties. A model of ZPF interaction with water that creates a short range repulsion between parallel water surfaces will be presented based on the principle of `Nondissipative Pondermotive Forces' of ZPF. If true, this hypothesis may allow tabletop studies of ZPF forces and perhaps Gravitation. (1) Strong, C.L., (1974) Sci. American, 230,116-120. (2) Dorbolo, S. et. al. (2003) New. Jou. Of Phys. 5, (1) 161. (3) Dzyaloshinskii, I. et al. (1961), Sov. Phys. Uspekhi, 4, (2) 153.

  8. Quantum Celestial Mechanics: Large-scale Gravitational Quantization States in Galaxies and the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Howard G.; Potter, Franklin

    2006-03-01

    We report a new theory of celestial mechanics for gravitationally bound systems based upon a gravitational wave equation derived from the general relativistic Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The single ad hoc assumption is that the large-scale physical properties depend only on the ratio of the bound system's total angular momentum to its total mass. The theory predicts quantization states for the Solar System and for galaxies. The galactic quantization determines the energy and angular momentum eigenstates without requiring dark matter, and predicts expressions for the galactic disk rotation velocity, the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, the MOND acceleration parameter, the large-angle gravitational lensing, and the shape, stability and number of arms in spiral galaxies. Applied to the universe, the theory has a repulsive effective gravitational potential that predicts a new Hubble relation and explains the observed apparent acceleration of distant supernovae with the matter/energy density of the universe at the critical density with only about 5% matter content. We suggest a laboratory experiment with a torsion bar near a rotating mass. This theory is not quantum gravity.

  9. Multibaseline gravitational wave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Talukder, Dipongkar; Bose, Sukanta; Mitra, Sanjit

    2011-03-15

    We present a statistic for the detection of stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds (SGWBs) using radiometry with a network of multiple baselines. We also quantitatively compare the sensitivities of existing baselines and their network to SGWBs. We assess how the measurement accuracy of signal parameters, e.g., the sky position of a localized source, can improve when using a network of baselines, as compared to any of the single participating baselines. The search statistic itself is derived from the likelihood ratio of the cross correlation of the data across all possible baselines in a detector network and is optimal in Gaussian noise. Specifically, it is the likelihood ratio maximized over the strength of the SGWB and is called the maximized-likelihood ratio (MLR). One of the main advantages of using the MLR over past search strategies for inferring the presence or absence of a signal is that the former does not require the deconvolution of the cross correlation statistic. Therefore, it does not suffer from errors inherent to the deconvolution procedure and is especially useful for detecting weak sources. In the limit of a single baseline, it reduces to the detection statistic studied by Ballmer [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, S179 (2006).] and Mitra et al.[Phys. Rev. D 77, 042002 (2008).]. Unlike past studies, here the MLR statistic enables us to compare quantitatively the performances of a variety of baselines searching for a SGWB signal in (simulated) data. Although we use simulated noise and SGWB signals for making these comparisons, our method can be straightforwardly applied on real data.

  10. Gravitational lensing in Tangherlini spacetime in the weak gravitational field and the strong gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Naoki; Kitamura, Takao; Nakajima, Koki; Asada, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    The gravitational lensing effects in the weak gravitational field by exotic lenses have been investigated intensively to find nonluminous exotic objects. Gravitational lensing based on 1/rn fall-off metric, as a one-parameter model that can treat by hand both the Schwarzschild lens (n =1) and the Ellis wormhole (n =2) in the weak field, has been recently studied. Only for n=1 case, however, it has been explicitly shown that effects of relativistic lens images by the strong field on the light curve can be neglected. We discuss whether relativistic images by the strong field can be neglected for n>1 in the Tangherlini spacetime which is one of the simplest models for our purpose. We calculate the divergent part of the deflection angle for arbitrary n and the regular part for n=1, 2 and 4 in the strong field limit, the deflection angle for arbitrary n under the weak gravitational approximation. We also compare the radius of the Einstein ring with the radii of the relativistic Einstein rings for arbitrary n. We conclude that the images in the strong gravitational field have little effect on the total light curve and that the time-symmetric demagnification parts in the light curve will appear even after taking account of the images in the strong gravitational field for n>1.

  11. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Biesiada, Marek; Zhu, Zong-Hong E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl

    2013-10-01

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations.

  12. How To Measure Gravitational Aberration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizek, M.; Solcova, A.

    2007-08-01

    In 1905, Henri Poincaré predicted the existence of gravitational waves and assumed that their speed c[g] would be that of the speed of light c. If the gravitational aberration would also have the same magnitude as the aberration of light, we would observe several paradoxical phenomena. For instance, the orbit of two bodies of equal mass would be unstable, since two attractive forces arise that are not in line and hence form a couple. This tends to increase the angular momentum, period, and total energy of the system. This can be modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations with delay. A big advantage of computer simulation is that we can easily perform many test for various possible values of the speed of gravity [1]. In [2], Carlip showed that gravitational aberration in general relativity is almost cancelled out by velocity-dependent interactions. This means that rays of sunlight are not parallel to the attractive gravitational force of the Sun, i.e., we do not see the Sun in the direction of its attractive force, but slightly shifted about an angle less than 20``. We show how the actual value of the gravitational aberration can be obtained by measurement of a single angle at a suitable time instant T corresponding to the perihelion of an elliptic orbit. We also derive an a priori error estimate that expresses how acurately T has to be determined to attain the gravitational aberration to a prescribed tolerance. [1] M. Křížek: Numerical experience with the finite speed of gravitational interaction, Math. Comput. Simulation 50 (1999), 237-245. [2] S. Carlip: Aberration and the speed of gravity, Phys. Lett. A 267 (2000), 81-87.

  13. Dichotomy between Attractive and Repulsive Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquids in Spin Ladders.

    PubMed

    Jeong, M; Schmidiger, D; Mayaffre, H; Klanjšek, M; Berthier, C; Knafo, W; Ballon, G; Vignolle, B; Krämer, S; Zheludev, A; Horvatić, M

    2016-09-01

    We present a direct NMR method to determine whether the interactions in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladder are attractive or repulsive. For the strong-leg spin ladder compound (C_{7}H_{10}N)_{2}CuBr_{4} we find that the isothermal magnetic field dependence of the NMR relaxation rate T_{1}^{-1}(H) displays a concave curve between the two critical fields bounding the TLL regime. This is in sharp contrast to the convex curve previously reported for a strong-rung ladder, (C_{5}H_{12}N)_{2}CuBr_{4}. We show that the concavity and the convexity of T_{1}^{-1}(H), which is a fingerprint of spin fluctuations, directly reflect the attractive and repulsive fermionic interactions in the TLL, respectively. The interaction sign is alternatively determined from an indirect method combining bulk magnetization and specific heat data. PMID:27636483

  14. Development of a simple 2.45 GHz microwave plasma with a repulsive double hexapole configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Arciaga, Marko; Ulano, April; Lee, Henry Jr.; Lledo, Rumar; Ramos, Henry; Tumlos, Roy

    2008-09-15

    A simple and inexpensive 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source with a repulsive double hexapole configuration is described and characterized. In this work, the operation of the source is shown to be flexible in terms of electron density, electron temperature, and plasma uniformity even at low-pressures (approximately millitorr). It allows for easy control of the electron temperature (2-3.8 eV) and density ({approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) by removing either of the two hexapoles or by varying the separation distance between the two hexapoles. Characterization was done via information gathered from the usual Langmuir probe measurements for electron temperature and density. The source makes a resonant surface with its repulsive double hexapole magnetic configuration providing an additional longitudinal confinement near the walls midway between the two hexapoles. Magnetic field maps are presented for varying double hexapole distances. Power delivery for various settings is also presented.

  15. Inverse problem of flame surface properties of wood using a repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kyung-Beom; Park, Won-Hee

    2015-04-01

    The convective heat transfer coefficient and surface emissivity before and after flame occurrence on a wood specimen surface and the flame heat flux were estimated using the repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm and cone heater test results. The cone heater specified in the ISO 5660 standards was used, and six cone heater heat fluxes were tested. Preservative-treated Douglas fir 21 mm in thickness was used as the wood specimen in the tests. This study confirmed that the surface temperature of the specimen, which was calculated using the convective heat transfer coefficient, surface emissivity and flame heat flux on the wood specimen by a repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm, was consistent with the measured temperature. Considering the measurement errors in the surface temperature of the specimen, the applicability of the optimization method considered in this study was evaluated.

  16. Analysis on Patterns of Globally Coupled Phase Oscillators with Attractive and Repulsive Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Ruan, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Zhong-Bin; Fu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The Hong-Strogatz (HS) model of globally coupled phase oscillators with attractive and repulsive interactions reflects the fact that each individual (oscillator) has its own attitude (attractive or repulsive) to the same environment (mean field). Previous studies on HS model focused mainly on the stable states on Ott-Antonsen (OA) manifold. In this paper, the eigenvalues of the Jacobi matrix of each fixed point in HS model are explicitly derived, with the aim to understand the local dynamics around each fixed point. Phase transitions are described according to relative population and coupling strength. Besides, the dynamics off OA manifold is studied. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No. 2015CB057301, the Applied Research Project of Public Welfare Technology of Zhejiang Province under Grant No. 201SC31109 and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M560483

  17. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions.

  18. Classical and quantum analysis of repulsive singularities in four-dimensional extended supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaida, I.; Hollmann, H. R.; Stewart, J. M.

    1999-07-01

    Non-minimal repulsive singularities (`repulsons') in extended supergravity theories are investigated. The short-distance antigravity properties of the repulsons are tested at the classical and the quantum level by a scalar test-particle. Using a partial wave expansion it is shown that the particle is totally reflected at the origin. A high-frequency incoming particle undergoes a phase shift of icons/Journals/Common/pi" ALT="pi" ALIGN="TOP"/>/2. However, the phase shift for a low-frequency particle depends upon the physical data of the repulson. The curvature singularity at a finite distance rh turns out to be transparent for the scalar test-particle and the coordinate singularity at the origin serves as the repulsive barrier to bounce back the particles.

  19. Measurement of long-range repulsive forces between charged particles at an oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Aveyard, R; Binks, B P; Clint, J H; Fletcher, P D I; Horozov, T S; Neumann, B; Paunov, V N; Annesley, J; Botchway, S W; Nees, D; Parker, A W; Ward, A D; Burgess, A N

    2002-06-17

    Using a laser tweezers method, we have determined the long-range repulsive force as a function of separation between two charged, spherical polystyrene particles (2.7 microm diameter) present at a nonpolar oil-water interface. At large separations (6 to 12 microm between particle centers) the force is found to decay with distance to the power -4 and is insensitive to the ionic strength of the aqueous phase. The results are consistent with a model in which the repulsion arises primarily from the presence of a very small residual electric charge at the particle-oil interface. This charge corresponds to a fractional dissociation of the total ionizable (sulfate) groups present at the particle-oil surface of approximately 3 x 10(-4).

  20. Measurement of Long-Range Repulsive Forces between Charged Particles at an Oil-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveyard, R.; Binks, B. P.; Clint, J. H.; Fletcher, P. D.; Horozov, T. S.; Neumann, B.; Paunov, V. N.; Annesley, J.; Botchway, S. W.; Nees, D.; Parker, A. W.; Ward, A. D.; Burgess, A. N.

    2002-06-01

    Using a laser tweezers method, we have determined the long-range repulsive force as a function of separation between two charged, spherical polystyrene particles ( 2.7μm diameter) present at a nonpolar oil-water interface. At large separations (6 to 12 μm between particle centers) the force is found to decay with distance to the power -4 and is insensitive to the ionic strength of the aqueous phase. The results are consistent with a model in which the repulsion arises primarily from the presence of a very small residual electric charge at the particle-oil interface. This charge corresponds to a fractional dissociation of the total ionizable (sulfate) groups present at the particle-oil surface of approximately 3×10-4.

  1. Attraction and repulsion between two static intruders immersed in a granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-de-La-Cruz, Ricardo Arturo; Caballero-Robledo, Gabriel Arturo

    2014-11-01

    The interaction between a group of intruders immersed in a granular medium has gained attention because of the presence of flow mediated repulsive and attractive forces in projectile impact experiments. The origin of the repulsive interaction has been well explained by means of the jamming of the grains moving between them, but the attractive behavior is not well understood yet. One possible explanation is that these forces originate by a Bernoulli like effect, i.e. because of a pressure difference in the regions between and outside the intruders due to a difference in flow velocity. On the other side, a Casimir like effect has also been proposed, claiming that the pressure difference originates in the fluctuations of the granular medium confined by the intruders. In this work, we present a series of Discrete Element Particle simulations aiming to confirm which phenomenon is the responsible of the interactions by fixing two intruders at different separations within a granular flow.

  2. Dichotomy between Attractive and Repulsive Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquids in Spin Ladders.

    PubMed

    Jeong, M; Schmidiger, D; Mayaffre, H; Klanjšek, M; Berthier, C; Knafo, W; Ballon, G; Vignolle, B; Krämer, S; Zheludev, A; Horvatić, M

    2016-09-01

    We present a direct NMR method to determine whether the interactions in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladder are attractive or repulsive. For the strong-leg spin ladder compound (C_{7}H_{10}N)_{2}CuBr_{4} we find that the isothermal magnetic field dependence of the NMR relaxation rate T_{1}^{-1}(H) displays a concave curve between the two critical fields bounding the TLL regime. This is in sharp contrast to the convex curve previously reported for a strong-rung ladder, (C_{5}H_{12}N)_{2}CuBr_{4}. We show that the concavity and the convexity of T_{1}^{-1}(H), which is a fingerprint of spin fluctuations, directly reflect the attractive and repulsive fermionic interactions in the TLL, respectively. The interaction sign is alternatively determined from an indirect method combining bulk magnetization and specific heat data.

  3. Dichotomy between Attractive and Repulsive Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquids in Spin Ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M.; Schmidiger, D.; Mayaffre, H.; Klanjšek, M.; Berthier, C.; Knafo, W.; Ballon, G.; Vignolle, B.; Krämer, S.; Zheludev, A.; Horvatić, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a direct NMR method to determine whether the interactions in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) state of a spin-1 /2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladder are attractive or repulsive. For the strong-leg spin ladder compound (C7H10N )2CuBr4 we find that the isothermal magnetic field dependence of the NMR relaxation rate T1-1(H ) displays a concave curve between the two critical fields bounding the TLL regime. This is in sharp contrast to the convex curve previously reported for a strong-rung ladder, (C5H12N )2CuBr4 . We show that the concavity and the convexity of T1-1(H ), which is a fingerprint of spin fluctuations, directly reflect the attractive and repulsive fermionic interactions in the TLL, respectively. The interaction sign is alternatively determined from an indirect method combining bulk magnetization and specific heat data.

  4. Universal Repulsive Contribution to the Solvent-Induced Interaction Between Sizable, Curved Hydrophobes.

    PubMed

    Jabes, B Shadrack; Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2016-08-18

    In addition to the direct attraction, sizable hydrophobes in water experience an attractive force mediated by interfacial water. Using simple geometric arguments, we identify the conditions at which the water-induced interaction between curved hydrocarbon surfaces becomes repulsive. The repulsive contribution arises from the thermodynamic penalty due to the emergence of the liquid/vapor boundary created as water gets expelled between curved hydrophobes. By augmenting the mean field approach with atomistic simulations of pristine and alkyl-coated graphitic nanoparticles in three distinct geometries, spherical, cylindrical and planar, immersed in water, we show the macroscopic thermodynamics remarkably works down to the molecular scale. The new insights improve the prediction and control of wetting and dispersion properties for a broad class of nonpolar nanoparticles.

  5. Photoassociative ionization of cold Na atoms: repulsive levels effects on the ion production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, R. R.; Muhammad, R.; Shiozaki, R. F.; de Oliveira, A. L.; Magalhães, D. V.; Ramirez-Serrano, J.; Bagnato, V. S.; Magalhães, K. M. F.

    2009-02-01

    We have revisited photoassociative ionization (PAI) in a cold sample of Na atoms. A two-color experiment was performed in a magneto-optical trap through the addition of a probe laser. The observation of a marked change in the PAI rate for a definite frequency range can be attributed to the influence of repulsive levels and a possible avoided crossing between long-range molecular levels.

  6. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fernando Barbosa V; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  7. Study of hard core repulsive interactions in an hadronic gas from a comparison with lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, P.; Vovchenko, V.; Stoecker, H.

    2016-08-01

    We study the influence of hard-core repulsive interactions within the Hadron- Resonace Gas model in comparison to first principle calculation performed on a lattice. We check the effect of a bag-like parametrization for particle eigenvolume on flavor correlators, looking for an extension of the agreement with lattice simulations up to higher temperatures, as was yet pointed out in an analysis of hadron yields measured by the ALICE experiment. Hints for a flavor depending eigenvolume are present.

  8. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Fernando Barbosa V. da; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  9. Pioneer midbrain longitudinal axons navigate using a balance of Netrin attraction and Slit repulsion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Longitudinal axons grow parallel to the embryonic midline to connect distant regions of the central nervous system. Previous studies suggested that repulsive midline signals guide pioneer longitudinal axons by blocking their entry into the floor plate; however, the role of midline attractants, and whether attractant signals may cooperate with repulsive signals, remains unclear. In this study we investigated the navigation of a set of pioneer longitudinal axons, the medial longitudinal fasciculus, in mouse embryos mutant for the Netrin/Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) attractants, and for Slit repellents, as well as the responses of explanted longitudinal axons in vitro. Results In mutants for Netrin1 chemoattractant or DCC receptor signaling, longitudinal axons shifted away from the ventral midline, suggesting that Netrin1/DCC signals act attractively to pull axons ventrally. Analysis of mutants in the three Slit genes, including Slit1/2/3 triple mutants, suggest that concurrent repulsive Slit/Robo signals push pioneer axons away from the ventral midline. Combinations of mutations between the Netrin and Slit guidance systems provided genetic evidence that the attractive and repulsive signals balance against each other. This balance is demonstrated in vitro using explant culture, finding that the cues can act directly on longitudinal axons. The explants also reveal an unexpected synergy of Netrin1 and Slit2 that promotes outgrowth. Conclusions These results support a mechanism in which longitudinal trajectories are positioned by a push-pull balance between opposing Netrin and Slit signals. Our evidence suggests that longitudinal axons respond directly and simultaneously to both attractants and repellents, and that the combined signals constrain axons to grow longitudinally. PMID:25056828

  10. The vesicular SNARE Synaptobrevin is required for Semaphorin 3A axonal repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Kathleen; Petkovic, Maja; Burgo, Andrea; Deck, Marie; Garel, Sonia; Marcos, Séverine; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Nothias, Fatiha; Serini, Guido; Bagnard, Dominique; Binz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Attractive and repulsive molecules such as Semaphorins (Sema) trigger rapid responses that control the navigation of axonal growth cones. The role of vesicular traffic in axonal guidance is still largely unknown. The exocytic vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) Synaptobrevin 2 (Syb2) is known for mediating neurotransmitter release in mature neurons, but its potential role in axonal guidance remains elusive. Here we show that Syb2 is required for Sema3A-dependent repulsion but not Sema3C-dependent attraction in cultured neurons and in the mouse brain. Syb2 associated with Neuropilin 1 and Plexin A1, two essential components of the Sema3A receptor, via its juxtatransmembrane domain. Sema3A receptor and Syb2 colocalize in endosomal membranes. Moreover, upon Sema3A treatment, Syb2-deficient neurons failed to collapse and transport Plexin A1 to cell bodies. Reconstitution of Sema3A receptor in nonneuronal cells revealed that Sema3A further inhibited the exocytosis of Syb2. Therefore, Sema3A-mediated signaling and axonal repulsion require Syb2-dependent vesicular traffic. PMID:22213797

  11. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall. PMID:24032936

  12. Structural properties of fluids with short-range attractive and repulsive tails: Inverse temperature expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Soon-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic perturbation theories based on a power series in the inverse temperature have been proposed for studying the structure of square-well and square-shoulder fluids in various ranges, and the results have compared with those from computer simulations. The perturbation theory based on the hard-sphere reference system seems to reproduce the simulation data at high temperature. However, it fails in the region of low density and low temperature. On the other hand, the perturbation theory based on the high-temperature reference system, which incorporates both repulsive and short-range attractive/repulsive tails is in excellent agreement with simulation results and is more accurate than the perturbation theory based on the hard-sphere reference system. In particular, the perturbation theory based on the high-temperature reference system is the most successful for a square-shoulder fluid with a purely repulsive potential and is more accurate than the rational function approximation of Yuste et al. [Mol. Phys. 109 987 (2011)] for the whole density range. In this case, the convergence of the power series in the inverse temperature is seen to be quiet satisfactory even for low density and low temperature.

  13. Aggregation of heteropolyanions in aqueous solutions exhibiting short-range attractions and long-range repulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Mrinal K.; Qiao, Baofu; Seifert, Soenke; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Monica Olvera de la Cruz; Antonio, Mark R.

    2015-12-15

    Charged colloids and proteins in aqueous solutions interact via short-range attractions and long-range repulsions (SALR) and exhibit complex structural phases. These include homogeneously dispersed monomers, percolated monomers, clusters, and percolated clusters. We report the structural architectures of simple charged systems in the form of spherical, Keggin-type heteropolyanions (HPAs) by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Structure factors obtained from the SAXS measurements show that the HPAs interact via SALR. Concentration and temperature dependences of the structure factors for HPAs with –3e (e is the charge of an electron) charge are consistent with a mixture of nonassociated monomers and associated randomly percolated monomers, whereas those for HPAs with –4e and –5e charges exhibit only nonassociated monomers in aqueous solutions. Our experiments show that the increase in magnitude of the charge of the HPAs increases their repulsive interactions and inhibits their aggregation in aqueous solutions. MD simulations were done to reveal the atomistic scale origins of SALR between HPAs. As a result, the short-range attractions result from water or proton-mediated hydrogen bonds between neighboring HPAs, whereas the long-range repulsions are due to the distributions of ions surrounding the HPAs.

  14. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R

    2015-10-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at constant water chemical potential in combination with basic theoretical arguments, we study hydration-induced interactions between two overall charge-neutral yet polar planar surfaces with different wetting properties. Whether the water film between the two surfaces becomes unstable below a threshold separation and cavitation gives rise to long-range attraction, depends on the sum of the two individual surface contact angles. Consequently, cavitation-induced attraction also occurs for a mildly hydrophilic surface interacting with a very hydrophobic surface. If both surfaces are very hydrophilic, hydration repulsion dominates at small separations and direct attractive force contribution can-if strong enough-give rise to wet adhesion in this case. In between the regimes of cavitation-induced attraction and hydration repulsion we find a narrow range of contact angle combinations where the surfaces adhere at contact in the absence of cavitation. This dry adhesion regime is driven by direct surface-surface interactions. We derive simple laws for the cavitation transition as well as for the transition between hydration repulsion and dry adhesion, which favorably compare with simulation results in a generic adhesion state diagram as a function of the two surface contact angles.

  15. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at constant water chemical potential in combination with basic theoretical arguments, we study hydration-induced interactions between two overall charge-neutral yet polar planar surfaces with different wetting properties. Whether the water film between the two surfaces becomes unstable below a threshold separation and cavitation gives rise to long-range attraction, depends on the sum of the two individual surface contact angles. Consequently, cavitation-induced attraction also occurs for a mildly hydrophilic surface interacting with a very hydrophobic surface. If both surfaces are very hydrophilic, hydration repulsion dominates at small separations and direct attractive force contribution can—if strong enough—give rise to wet adhesion in this case. In between the regimes of cavitation-induced attraction and hydration repulsion we find a narrow range of contact angle combinations where the surfaces adhere at contact in the absence of cavitation. This dry adhesion regime is driven by direct surface–surface interactions. We derive simple laws for the cavitation transition as well as for the transition between hydration repulsion and dry adhesion, which favorably compare with simulation results in a generic adhesion state diagram as a function of the two surface contact angles. PMID:26392526

  16. Diamagnetic repulsion, the method of magnetic images & suitability of the solenoid and dipole models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ming; Zhang, Huaizhou; Datta, Timir

    2012-02-01

    The repulsion of a permanent magnet from a diamagnetic region was investigated. A magnet of moment m can be described by two models (i) solenoid - a circulating current of appropriate value; second (ii) a magnetic dipole comprising of a pair of north and south poles of separated by a distance.The magnetic field (B) of a permanent magnet was measured. The magnet was modeled as a solenoid with a circulating surface current. The Biot-Savart law field (B) was of computed in Matlab. The experimental data of was in excellent agreement with the Matlab results. However, for computing the repulsion force (F) between the magnet and its diamagnetic image by the direct integration of the current-current interaction require detailed knowledge of the two current densities. However such knowledge is not essential if image is modeled as a dipole. When the magnet is a distance z above the diamagnetic interface then the image current I2 gives rise to a image dipole m2 and the F ˜ m2div B, where the div of the holding field is computed at the distance 2z below the magnet. In this model F is directly proportional to both m' and the derivative of the field and a negative slope indicates repulsion, all three were confirmed.

  17. Construction of exchange repulsion in terms of the wave functions at QM/MM boundary region

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideaki Umino, Satoru; Morita, Akihiro

    2015-08-28

    We developed a simple method to calculate exchange repulsion between a quantum mechanical (QM) solute and a molecular mechanical (MM) molecule in the QM/MM approach. In our method, the size parameter in the Buckingham type potential for the QM solute is directly determined in terms of the one-electron wave functions of the solute. The point of the method lies in the introduction of the exchange core function (ECF) defined as a Slater function which mimics the behavior of the exterior electron density at the QM/MM boundary region. In the present paper, the ECF was constructed in terms of the Becke-Roussel (BR) exchange hole function. It was demonstrated that the ECF yielded by the BR procedure can faithfully reproduce the radial behavior of the electron density of a QM solute. The size parameter of the solute as well as the exchange repulsion are, then, obtained using the overlap model without any fitting procedure. To examine the efficiency of the method, it was applied to calculation of the exchange repulsions for minimal QM/MM systems, hydrogen-bonded water dimer, and H{sub 3}O{sup +}–H{sub 2}O. We found that our approach is able to reproduce the potential energy curves for these systems showing reasonable agreements with those given by accurate full quantum chemical calculations.

  18. Stabilization of thin liquid films by repulsive van der Waals force.

    PubMed

    Li, Er Qiang; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-05-13

    Using high-speed video recording of bubble rise experiments, we study the stability of thin liquid films trapped between a rising bubble and a surfactant-free liquid-liquid meniscus interface. Using different combinations of nonpolar oils and water that are all immiscible, we investigate the extent to which film stability can be predicted by attractive and repulsive van der Waals (vdW) interactions that are indicated by the relative magnitude of the refractive indices of the liquid combinations, for example, water (refractive index, n = 1.33), perfluorohexane (n = 1.23), and tetradecane (n = 1.43). We show that, when the film-forming phase was oil (perfluorohexane or tetradecane), the stability of the film could always be predicted from the sign of the vdW interaction, with a repulsive vdW force resulting in a stable film and an attractive vdW force resulting in film rupture. However, if aqueous electrolyte is the film-forming bulk phase between the rising air bubble and the upper oil phase, the film always ruptured, even when a repulsive vdW interaction was predicted. We interpret these results as supporting the hypothesis that a short-ranged hydrophobic attraction determines the stability of the thin water film formed between an air phase and a nonpolar oil phase. PMID:24761748

  19. Vilse, a conserved Rac/Cdc42 GAP mediating Robo repulsion in tracheal cells and axons

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Annika; Gallio, Marco; Englund, Camilla; Steneberg, Pär; Hemphälä, Johanna; Aspenström, Pontus; Keleman, Krystyna; Falileeva, Ludmilla; Dickson, Barry J.; Samakovlis, Christos

    2004-01-01

    Slit proteins steer the migration of many cell types through their binding to Robo receptors, but how Robo controls cell motility is not clear. We describe the functional analysis of vilse, a Drosophila gene required for Robo repulsion in epithelial cells and axons. Vilse defines a conserved family of RhoGAPs (Rho GTPase-activating proteins), with representatives in flies and vertebrates. The phenotypes of vilse mutants resemble the tracheal and axonal phenotypes of Slit and Robo mutants at the CNS midline. Dosage-sensitive genetic interactions between vilse, slit, and robo mutants suggest that vilse is a component of robo signaling. Moreover, overexpression of Vilse in the trachea of robo mutants ameliorates the phenotypes of robo, indicating that Vilse acts downstream of Robo to mediate midline repulsion. Vilse and its human homolog bind directly to the intracellular domains of the corresponding Robo receptors and promote the hydrolysis of RacGTP and, less efficiently, of Cdc42GTP. These results together with genetic interaction experiments with robo, vilse, and rac mutants suggest a mechanism whereby Robo repulsion is mediated by the localized inactivation of Rac through Vilse. PMID:15342493

  20. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall.

  1. Aggregation of heteropolyanions in aqueous solutions exhibiting short-range attractions and long-range repulsions

    DOE PAGES

    Bera, Mrinal K.; Qiao, Baofu; Seifert, Soenke; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Monica Olvera de la Cruz; Antonio, Mark R.

    2015-12-15

    Charged colloids and proteins in aqueous solutions interact via short-range attractions and long-range repulsions (SALR) and exhibit complex structural phases. These include homogeneously dispersed monomers, percolated monomers, clusters, and percolated clusters. We report the structural architectures of simple charged systems in the form of spherical, Keggin-type heteropolyanions (HPAs) by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Structure factors obtained from the SAXS measurements show that the HPAs interact via SALR. Concentration and temperature dependences of the structure factors for HPAs with –3e (e is the charge of an electron) charge are consistent with a mixture of nonassociated monomersmore » and associated randomly percolated monomers, whereas those for HPAs with –4e and –5e charges exhibit only nonassociated monomers in aqueous solutions. Our experiments show that the increase in magnitude of the charge of the HPAs increases their repulsive interactions and inhibits their aggregation in aqueous solutions. MD simulations were done to reveal the atomistic scale origins of SALR between HPAs. As a result, the short-range attractions result from water or proton-mediated hydrogen bonds between neighboring HPAs, whereas the long-range repulsions are due to the distributions of ions surrounding the HPAs.« less

  2. The role of repulsive guidance molecules in the embryonic and adult vertebrate central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Bernhard K; Yamashita, Toshihide; Schaffar, Gregor; Mueller, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    During the development of the nervous system, outgrowing axons often have to travel long distances to reach their target neurons. In this process, outgrowing neurites tipped with motile growth cones rely on guidance cues present in their local environment. These cues are detected by specific receptors expressed on growth cones and neurites and influence the trajectory of the growing fibres. Neurite growth, guidance, target innervation and synapse formation and maturation are the processes that occur predominantly but not exclusively during embryonic or early post-natal development in vertebrates. As a result, a functional neural network is established, which is usually remarkably stable. However, the stability of the neural network in higher vertebrates comes at an expensive price, i.e. the loss of any significant ability to regenerate injured or damaged neuronal connections in their central nervous system (CNS). Most importantly, neurite growth inhibitors prevent any regenerative growth of injured nerve fibres. Some of these inhibitors are associated with CNS myelin, others are found at the lesion site and in the scar tissue. Traumatic injuries in brain and spinal cord of mammals induce upregulation of embryonic inhibitory or repulsive guidance cues and their receptors on the neurites. An example for embryonic repulsive directional cues re-expressed at lesion sites in both the rat and human CNS is provided with repulsive guidance molecules, a new family of directional guidance cues. PMID:16939972

  3. Myosin 1b functions as an effector of EphB signaling to control cell repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Prospéri, Marie-Thérèse; Lépine, Priscilla; Dingli, Florent; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Martin, René; Loew, Damarys; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptors and their membrane-tethered ligands, the ephrins, have important functions in embryo morphogenesis and in adult tissue homeostasis. Eph/ephrin signaling is essential for cell segregation and cell repulsion. This process is accompanied by morphological changes and actin remodeling that drives cell segregation and tissue patterning. The actin cortex must be mechanically coupled to the plasma membrane to orchestrate the cell morphology changes. Here, we demonstrate that myosin 1b that can mechanically link the membrane to the actin cytoskeleton interacts with EphB2 receptors via its tail and is tyrosine phosphorylated on its tail in an EphB2-dependent manner. Myosin 1b regulates the redistribution of myosin II in actomyosin fibers and the formation of filopodia at the interface of ephrinB1 and EphB2 cells, which are two processes mediated by EphB2 signaling that contribute to cell repulsion. Together, our results provide the first evidence that a myosin 1 functions as an effector of EphB2/ephrinB signaling, controls cell morphology, and thereby cell repulsion. PMID:26195670

  4. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  5. The Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Stefano; Fidecaro, Francesco

    The detection of gravitational waves is challenging researchers since half a century. The relative precision required, 10^{-21}, is difficult to imagine, this is 10^{-5} the diameter of a proton over several kilometres, using masses of tens of kilograms, or picometres over millions of kilometres. A theoretical description of gravitational radiation and its effects on matter, all consequence of the general theory of relativity, is given. Then the astrophysical phenomena that are candidates of gravitational wave emission are discussed, considering also amplitudes and rates. The binary neutron star system PSR1913+16, which provided the first evidence for energy loss by gravitational radiation in 1975, is briefly discussed. Then comes a description of the experimental developments, starting with ground-based interferometers, their working principles and their most important sources of noise. The earth-wide network that is being built describes how these instruments will be used in the observation era. Several other detection techniques, such as space interferometry, pulsar timing arrays and resonant detectors, covering different bands of the gravitational wave frequency spectrum complete these lectures.

  6. Gravitational Effects on Signal Transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms by which individual cells perceive gravity and how these cells transduce and respond to gravitational stimuli is critical for the development of long-term manned space flight experiments. We now propose to use a well-characterized model erythroid cell system and to investigate gravitational perturbations of its erythropoietin (Epo) signaling pathway and gene regulation. Cells will be grown at 1-G and in simulated microgravity in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor (RWV). Cell growth and differentiation, the Epo-receptor, the protein kinase C pathway to the c-myc gene, and the protein phosphatase pathway to the c-myb gene will be studied and evaluated as reporters of gravitational stimuli. The results of these experiments will have impact on the problems of 1) gravitational sensing by individual cells, and 2) the anemia of space flight. This ground-based study also will serve as a Space Station Development Study in gravitational effects on intracellular signal transduction.

  7. Spin gravitational resonance and graviton detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quach, James Q.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a gravitational analogue of spin magnetic resonance, called spin gravitational resonance, whereby a gravitational wave interacts with a magnetic field to produce a spin transition. In particular, an external magnetic field separates the energy spin states of a spin-1 /2 particle, and the presence of the gravitational wave produces a perturbation in the components of the magnetic field orthogonal to the gravitational-wave propagation. In this framework we test Dyson's conjecture that individual gravitons cannot be detected. Although we find no fundamental laws preventing single gravitons being detected with spin gravitational resonance, we show that it cannot be used in practice, in support of Dyson's conjecture.

  8. THE OPTIMAL GRAVITATIONAL LENS TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Surdej, J.; Hanot, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Delacroix, C.; Habraken, S.; Coleman, P.; Dominik, M.; Le Coroller, H.; Mawet, D.; Quintana, H.; Sluse, D.

    2010-05-15

    Given an observed gravitational lens mirage produced by a foreground deflector (cf. galaxy, quasar, cluster, ...), it is possible via numerical lens inversion to retrieve the real source image, taking full advantage of the magnifying power of the cosmic lens. This has been achieved in the past for several remarkable gravitational lens systems. Instead, we propose here to invert an observed multiply imaged source directly at the telescope using an ad hoc optical instrument which is described in the present paper. Compared to the previous method, this should allow one to detect fainter source features as well as to use such an optimal gravitational lens telescope to explore even fainter objects located behind and near the lens. Laboratory and numerical experiments illustrate this new approach.

  9. Cardiovascular Adjustments to Gravitational Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Stone, H. Lowell

    1991-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the cardiovascular system must be taken into account whenever a hemodynamic assessment is made. All intravascular pressure have a gravity-dependent hydrostatic component. The interaction between the gravitational field, the position of the body, and the functional characteristics of the blood vessels determines the distribution of intravascular volume. In turn this distribution largely determines cardiac pump function. Multiple control mechanisms are activated to preserve optimal tissue perfusion when the magnitude of the gravitational field or its direction relative to the body changes. Humans are particularly sensitive to such changes because of the combination of their normally erect posture and the large body mass and blood volume below the level of the heart. Current aerospace technology also exposes human subjects to extreme variations in the gravitational forces that range from zero during space travel to as much an nine-times normal during operation of high-performance military aircraft. This chapter therefore emphasizes human physiology.

  10. Gravitational baryogenesis after anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence, it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  11. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  12. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. PMID:25919812

  13. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented.

  14. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  15. Cosmologies with variable gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect

    Narkikar, J.V.

    1983-03-01

    In 1937 Dirac presented an argument, based on the socalled large dimensionless numbers, which led him to the conclusion that the Newtonian gravitational constant G changes with epoch. Towards the end of the last century Ernst Mach had given plausible arguments to link the property of inertia of matter to the large scale structure of the universe. Mach's principle also leads to cosmological models with a variable gravitational constant. Three cosmologies which predict a variable G are discussed in this paper both from theoretical and observational points of view.

  16. Testing the gravitational instability hypothesis?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babul, Arif; Weinberg, David H.; Dekel, Avishai; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    We challenge a widely accepted assumption of observational cosmology: that successful reconstruction of observed galaxy density fields from measured galaxy velocity fields (or vice versa), using the methods of gravitational instability theory, implies that the observed large-scale structures and large-scale flows were produced by the action of gravity. This assumption is false, in that there exist nongravitational theories that pass the reconstruction tests and gravitational theories with certain forms of biased galaxy formation that fail them. Gravitational instability theory predicts specific correlations between large-scale velocity and mass density fields, but the same correlations arise in any model where (a) structures in the galaxy distribution grow from homogeneous initial conditions in a way that satisfies the continuity equation, and (b) the present-day velocity field is irrotational and proportional to the time-averaged velocity field. We demonstrate these assertions using analytical arguments and N-body simulations. If large-scale structure is formed by gravitational instability, then the ratio of the galaxy density contrast to the divergence of the velocity field yields an estimate of the density parameter Omega (or, more generally, an estimate of beta identically equal to Omega(exp 0.6)/b, where b is an assumed constant of proportionality between galaxy and mass density fluctuations. In nongravitational scenarios, the values of Omega or beta estimated in this way may fail to represent the true cosmological values. However, even if nongravitational forces initiate and shape the growth of structure, gravitationally induced accelerations can dominate the velocity field at late times, long after the action of any nongravitational impulses. The estimated beta approaches the true value in such cases, and in our numerical simulations the estimated beta values are reasonably accurate for both gravitational and nongravitational models. Reconstruction tests

  17. Particles, Fields, and Gravitation. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Rembieli ski, J.

    1998-11-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Conference on Particles, Fields, and Gravitation held in Lodz, Poland in April, 1998. The topics discussed included quantum deformations and noncommutative geometry, quantum mechanics, quantum and topological field theory, modern gravitation theory and geometrical methods in physics. Solvable and quasisolvable models were also disussed. The talks and the resulting papers provided a comprehensive coverage of the main aspects of contemporary theoretical and mathematical physics. The Conference was attended by more than 100 scientists from all over the world. There were 54 papers presented at the conference,out of which 1 paper has been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  18. The gravitational field of Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, B.F.; Rubincam, D.P. )

    1989-08-01

    The external gravitational field produced by a rigid body of uniform density but irregular shape is formulated in terms of spherical harmonics. The formalism is applied to the Martian satellite Phobos. Based on a 3-dimensional shape model of Phobos by Duxbury, the gravitational coefficients up to degree and order 4 for a homogeneous Phobos are computed. In particular, the authors find J{sub 2} = 0.105. The in-plane liberation amplitude of a homogeneous Phobos is predicted to be 0.97{degree}, within the rather large uncertainty of the observed value of 0.78 {plus minus} 0.4{degree}.

  19. Dynamics of dissipative gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.

    2004-10-15

    The Misner and Sharp approach to the study of gravitational collapse is extended to the dissipative case in, both, the streaming out and the diffusion approximations. The role of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is then coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decreasing of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamics state, is reobtained, at any time scale. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decreasing factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. Prospective applications of this result to some astrophysical scenarios are discussed.

  20. Merging Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This talk will focus on simulations of binary black hole mergers and the gravitational wave signals they produce. Applications to gravitational wave detection with LISA, and electronagnetic counterparts, will be highlighted.

  1. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum. Keywords: Gravitational wave astrophysics; gravitational radiation; gravitational wave detectors; black holes.

  2. The Gravitational Landscape of the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Willem H.

    2008-01-01

    The Sun's gravitational influence is of course much greater than that of any of the planets. Just how much greater can be dramatically illustrated by plotting their combined gravitational potential on the same graph.

  3. Precursory singularities in spherical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Kayll

    1992-05-01

    General conditions are developed for the formation of naked precursory ('shell-focusing') singularities in spherical gravitational collapse. These singularities owe their nakedness to the fact that the gravitational potential fails to be single valued prior to the onset of a true gravitational singularity. It is argued that they do not violate the spirit of cosmic censorship. Rather, they may well be an essentially generic feature of relativistic gravitational collapse.

  4. How to test gravitation theories by means of gravitational-wave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    Gravitational-wave experiments are a potentially powerful tool for testing gravitation theories. Most theories in the literature predict rather different polarization properties for gravitational waves than are predicted by general relativity; and many theories predict anomalies in the propagation speeds of gravitational waves.

  5. Gravitational Lenses in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2008-01-01

    It is not common to introduce current astronomy in school lessons. This article presents a set of experiments about gravitational lenses. It is normal to simulate them by means of computers, but it is very simple to simulate similar effects using a drinking glass full of liquid or using only the glass base. These are, of course, cheap and easy…

  6. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S. Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  7. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  8. Gravitational Lensing: Einstein's unfinished symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, Tommaso; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational lensing - the deflection of light rays by gravitating matter - has become a major tool in the armoury of the modern cosmologist. Proposed nearly a hundred years ago as a key feature of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we trace the historical development since its verification at a solar eclipse in 1919. Einstein was apparently cautious about its practical utility and the subject lay dormant observationally for nearly 60 years. Nonetheless there has been rapid progress over the past twenty years. The technique allows astronomers to chart the distribution of dark matter on large and small scales thereby testing predictions of the standard cosmological model which assumes dark matter comprises a massive weakly-interacting particle. By measuring the distances and tracing the growth of dark matter structure over cosmic time, gravitational lensing also holds great promise in determining whether the dark energy, postulated to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion, is a vacuum energy density or a failure of general relativity on large scales. We illustrate the wide range of applications which harness the power of gravitational lensing, from searches for the earliest galaxies magnified by massive clusters to those for extrasolar planets which temporarily brighten a background star. We summarise the future prospects with dedicated ground and space-based facilities designed to exploit this remarkable physical phenomenon.

  9. Counteracting Gravitation In Dielectric Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E.; Jackson, Henry W.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Force of gravity in variety of dielectric liquids counteracted by imposing suitably contoured electric fields. Technique makes possible to perform, on Earth, variety of experiments previously performed only in outer space and at great cost. Also used similarly in outer space to generate sort of artificial gravitation.

  10. Thought experiments on gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Katz, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Large contributions to the near closure of the Universe and to the acceleration of its expansion are due to the gravitation of components of the stress-energy tensor other than its mass density. To familiarize astronomers with the gravitation of these components we conduct thought experiments on gravity, analogous to the real experiments that our forebears conducted on electricity. By analogy to the forces due to electric currents we investigate the gravitational forces due to the flows of momentum, angular momentum and energy along a cylinder. Under tension the gravity of the cylinder decreases but the `closure' of the 3-space around it increases. When the cylinder carries a torque the flow of angular momentum along it leads to a novel helical interpretation of Levi-Civita's external metric and a novel relativistic effect. Energy currents give gravomagnetic effects in which parallel currents repel and antiparallel currents attract, though such effects must be added to those of static gravity. The gravity of beams of light give striking illustrations of these effects and a re-derivation of light bending via the gravity of the light itself. Faraday's experiments lead us to discuss lines of force of both gravomagnetic and gravity fields. A serious conundrum arises if Landau and Lifshitz's definition of gravitational force is adopted.

  11. Normalization of Gravitational Acceleration Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Randy A.; Brown, Aaron J.; Adamo, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the uniform density spherical shell approximations of Newton, the con- sequence of spaceflight in the real universe is that gravitational fields are sensitive to the nonsphericity of their generating central bodies. The gravitational potential of a nonspherical central body is typically resolved using spherical harmonic approximations. However, attempting to directly calculate the spherical harmonic approximations results in at least two singularities which must be removed in order to generalize the method and solve for any possible orbit, including polar orbits. Three unique algorithms have been developed to eliminate these singularities by Samuel Pines [1], Bill Lear [2], and Robert Gottlieb [3]. This paper documents the methodical normalization of two1 of the three known formulations for singularity-free gravitational acceleration (namely, the Lear [2] and Gottlieb [3] algorithms) and formulates a general method for defining normalization parameters used to generate normalized Legendre Polynomials and ALFs for any algorithm. A treatment of the conventional formulation of the gravitational potential and acceleration is also provided, in addition to a brief overview of the philosophical differences between the three known singularity-free algorithms.

  12. Caution: Strong Gravitational Field Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reif, Marc

    2014-01-01

    I came up with a new way to introduce the concept of a constant gravitational field near the surface of the Earth. I made "g-field detectors" (see Fig. 1 ) and suspended them by strings from the ceiling in a regular spacing. The detectors are cardstock arrows with a hole punched out of them and the letter "g" in the center.

  13. Challenges in nonlinear gravitational clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2006-04-01

    This article addresses some issues related to the statistical description of gravitating systems in an expanding backgrounds. In particular, I describe (a) how the nonlinear mode-mode coupling transfers power from one scale to another in the Fourier space if the initial power spectrum is sharply peaked at a given scale and (b) what are the asymptotic characteristics of gravitational clustering that are independent of the initial conditions. The analysis uses a new approach based on an integro-differential equation for the evolution of the gravitational potential in the Fourier space. I show how this equation allows one to understand several aspects of nonlinear gravitational clustering and provides insight in to the transfer of power from one scale to another through nonlinear mode coupling. Numerical simulations as well as analytic work shows that power transfer leads to a universal power spectrum at late times, somewhat reminiscent of the existence of Kolmogorov spectrum in fluid turbulence. To cite this article: T. Padmanabhan, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  14. Anatomy of gravitationally deformed slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Shintaro; Hariyama, Takehiro

    2010-05-01

    Deep-seated gravitational slope deformation is the deformation of rocks as well as slope surfaces, but the internal structures have not been well observed and described before. This is mainly due to the difficulty in obtaining undisturbed samples from underground. We analyzed the internal deformational structures of gravitationally deformed slopes by using high quality drilled cores obtained by hybrid drilling technique, which has been recently developed and can recover very fragile materials that could not be taken by the conventional drilling techniques. Investigated slopes were gravitationally deformed out-facing slopes of pelitic schist and shale. The slope surfaces showed deformational features of small steps, depressions, knobs, and linear depressions, but had no major main scarp and landslide body with well-defined outline. This is indicative of slow, deep-seated gravitational deformation. Most of these small deformational features are hidden by vegetations, but they are detected by using airborne laser scanner. Drilled cores showed that the internal deformation is dominated by the slip and tearing off along foliations. Slippage along foliations is conspicuous in pelitic schist: Pelitic schist is sheared, particularly along black layers, which are rich in graphite and pyrite. Graphite is known to be a solid lubricant in material sciences, which seems to be why shearing occurs along the black layers. Rock mass between two slip layers is sheared, rotated, fractured, and pulverized; undulation of bedding or schistosity could be the nucleation points of fracturing. Tearing off along foliations is also the major deformation mode, which forms jagged morphology of rock fragments within shear zones. Rock fragments with jagged surface are commonly observed in "gouge", which is very different from tectonic gouge. This probably reflects the low confining pressures during their formation. Microscopic to mesoscopic openings along fractures are commonly observed with

  15. A SIMPLE GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODEL FOR COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-10

    We present a simple gravitational lens model to illustrate the ease of using the embedded lensing theory when studying cosmic voids. It confirms the previously used repulsive lensing models for deep voids. We start by estimating magnitude fluctuations and weak-lensing shears of background sources lensed by large voids. We find that sources behind large (∼90 Mpc) and deep voids (density contrast about −0.9) can be magnified or demagnified with magnitude fluctuations of up to ∼0.05 mag and that the weak-lensing shear can be up to the ∼10{sup −2} level in the outer regions of large voids. Smaller or shallower voids produce proportionally smaller effects. We investigate the “wiggling” of the primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies caused by intervening cosmic voids. The void-wiggling of primary CMB temperature gradients is of the opposite sign to that caused by galaxy clusters. Only extremely large and deep voids can produce wiggling amplitudes similar to galaxy clusters, ∼15 μK by a large void of radius ∼4° and central density contrast −0.9 at redshift 0.5 assuming a CMB background gradient of ∼10 μK arcmin{sup −1}. The dipole signal is spread over the entire void area, and not concentrated at the lens center as it is for clusters. Finally, we use our model to simulate CMB sky maps lensed by large cosmic voids. Our embedded theory can easily be applied to more complicated void models and used to study gravitational lensing of the CMB, to probe dark matter profiles, to reduce the lensing-induced systematics in supernova Hubble diagrams, and to study the integrated Sachs–Wolfe effect.

  16. Universal low-energy physics in 1D strongly repulsive multi-component Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuzhu; He, Peng; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown (Yang and You 2011 Chin. Phys. Lett. 28 020503) that at zero temperature the ground state of the one-dimensional (1D) w-component Fermi gas coincides with that of the spinless Bose gas in the limit ω \\to ∞ . This behavior was experimentally evidenced through quasi-1D tightly trapping ultracold 173Yb atoms in a recent paper (Pagano et al 2014 Nat. Phys. 10 198). However, understanding of low-temperature behavior of Fermi gases with a repulsive interaction requires spin-charge separated conformal field theories of an effective Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and an antiferromagnetic SU(w) Heisenberg spin chain. Here we analytically derive universal thermodynamics of 1D strongly repulsive fermionic gases with SU(w) symmetry via the Yang-Yang thermodynamic Bethe ansatz method. The analytical free energy and magnetic properties of the systems at low temperature in a weak magnetic field are obtained through the Wiener-Hopf method. In particular, the free energy essentially manifests the spin-charge separated conformal field theories for high-symmetry systems with arbitrary repulsive interaction strength. We also find that the sound velocity of the Fermi gases in the large w limit coincides with that for the spinless Bose gas, whereas the spin velocity vanishes quickly as w becomes large. This indicates strong suppression of the Fermi exclusion statistics by the commutativity feature among the w-component fermions with different spin states in the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid phase. Moreover, the equations of state and critical behavior of physical quantities at finite temperature are analytically derived in terms of the polylogarithm functions in the quantum critical region.

  17. Vapor-liquid equilibria for copolymer+solvent systems: Effect of intramolecular repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.B.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    Role of intramolecular interactions in blend miscibility is well documented for polymer+copolymer mixtures. Some copolymer+polymer mixtures are miscible although their corresponding homopolymers are not miscible; for example, over a range of acrylonitrile content, styrene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate) but neither polystyrene nor polyacrylonitrile is miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate). Similarly, over a composition range, butadiene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(vinyl chloride) while none of the binary combinations of the homopolymers [polybutadiene, polyacrylonitrile, and poly(vinyl chloride)] are miscible. This behavior has been attributed to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike copolymer segments. We have observed similar behavior in vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of copolymer+solvent systems. We find that acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymers have higher affinity for acetonitrile solvent than do polyacrylonitrile or polybutadiene. We attribute this non-intuitive behavior to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike segments of the copolymer. This repulsive interaction is weakened when acetonitrile molecules are in the vicinity of unlike copolymer segments, favoring copolymer+solvent miscibility. We find similar behavior when acetonitrile is replaced by methyl ethyl ketone. To best knowledge, this effect has not been reported previously for VLE. We have obtained VLE data for mixtures containing a solvent and a copolymer as a function of copolymer composition. It appears that, at a given solvent partial pressure, there may be copolymer composition that yields maximum absorption of the solvent. This highly non-ideal VLE phase behavior may be useful for optimum design of a membrane for a separation process.

  18. Spatial Extent of Charge Repulsion Regulates Assembly Pathways for Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Richmond, Tyson; Muschol, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Formation of large protein fibrils with a characteristic cross β-sheet architecture is the key indicator for a wide variety of systemic and neurodegenerative amyloid diseases. Recent experiments have strongly implicated oligomeric intermediates, transiently formed during fibril assembly, as critical contributors to cellular toxicity in amyloid diseases. At the same time, amyloid fibril assembly can proceed along different assembly pathways that might or might not involve such oligomeric intermediates. Elucidating the mechanisms that determine whether fibril formation proceeds along non-oligomeric or oligomeric pathways, therefore, is important not just for understanding amyloid fibril assembly at the molecular level but also for developing new targets for intervening with fibril formation. We have investigated fibril formation by hen egg white lysozyme, an enzyme for which human variants underlie non-neuropathic amyloidosis. Using a combination of static and dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and circular dichroism, we find that amyloidogenic lysozyme monomers switch between three different assembly pathways: from monomeric to oligomeric fibril assembly and, eventually, disordered precipitation as the ionic strength of the solution increases. Fibril assembly only occurred under conditions of net repulsion among the amyloidogenic monomers while net attraction caused precipitation. The transition from monomeric to oligomeric fibril assembly, in turn, occurred as salt-mediated charge screening reduced repulsion among individual charged residues on the same monomer. We suggest a model of amyloid fibril formation in which repulsive charge interactions are a prerequisite for ordered fibril assembly. Furthermore, the spatial extent of non-specific charge screening selects between monomeric and oligomeric assembly pathways by affecting which subset of denatured states can form suitable intermolecular bonds and by altering the energetic and entropic

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of a sinusoidally driven pendulum in a repulsive magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahmakoun, Azad; French, Valentina A.; Patterson, Jeffrey

    1997-05-01

    The dynamics of a sinusoidally driven pendulum in a repulsive magnetic field is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The experimental data are acquired using a shaft encoder interfaced to a PC which measures the angular displacement of the pendulum as a function of time. Both the theoretical simulations and the experimental measurements exhibit regions of periodic and chaotic behavior, depending on the system parameters. Amplitude jumps, hysteresis, and bistable states are also observed. The simplicity of the apparatus makes this experiment suitable for an advanced undergraduate laboratory.

  20. Ferromagnetism of the repulsive atomic Fermi gas: three-body recombination and domain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Wang, Lei; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The simplest model for itinerant ferromagnetism, the Stoner model, has so far eluded experimental observation in repulsive ultracold fermions due to rapid three-body recombination at large scattering lengths. Here we show that a ferromagnetic phase can be stabilised by imposing a moderate optical lattice. The reduced kinetic energy drop upon formation of a polarized phase in an optical lattice extends the ferromagnetic phase to smaller scattering lengths where three-body recombination is small enough to permit experimental detection of the phase. We also show, using time dependent density functional theory, that in such a setup ferromagnetic domains emerge rapidly from a paramagnetic initial state.

  1. New algorithm for the rapid evaluation of electron repulsion integrals: elementary basis algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masato

    2004-04-01

    We propose a new algorithm for the rapid evaluation of electron repulsion integrals over Gaussian type orbitals, termed elementary basis algorithm (EBA). In the EBA, the information of the atomic basis functions is divided into two parts: an elementary and an atomic basis part. In the conventional algorithm, all information is assigned to atoms, which requires that all computations must be performed in the atomic loops. In the EBA, computations can be partly carried out in the elementary loops. We apply the EBA to the accompanying coordinate expansion method of Ishida.

  2. Repulsion of dispersion curves of quasidipole modes of anisotropic waveguides studied by finite element method.

    PubMed

    Zharnikov, T V; Syresin, D E

    2015-06-01

    In this letter repulsion of phase-velocity dispersion curves of quasidipole eigenmodes of waveguides with non-circular cross section in non-axisymmetric anisotropic medium is studied by the semi-analytical finite element technique. Borehole waveguide is used as an example. The modeling helps in clarifying the nature of this phenomenon, which is accompanied by the rotation of the orientation of two quasidipole modes with frequency and by the exchange of their behavior at near-crossover point. The dispersion curves cross only in the presence of exact symmetry. Such a scenario is the alternative to the stress-induced anisotropy crossing of dispersion curves. PMID:26093446

  3. Soft Repulsion and the Behavior of Equations of State at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkova, Olga L.; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2010-02-01

    The so-called characteristic curves of Brown—the Amagat (Joule inversion), Boyle, and Charles (Joule-Thomson inversion) curves—of hydrogen are calculated with several equations of state. This work demonstrates that not all equations can generate physically reasonable Amagat curves. After inclusion of corrections for soft repulsion (based on the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory) and quantum effects into the simplified perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) equation of state, this equation is able to not only generate an Amagat curve, but also predict pVT data, residual Gibbs energies, and heat capacities of several gases at and above 100 MPa reasonably well.

  4. Searching for transition paths in multidimensional space with a fixed repulsive bias potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, O. S.; Salo, P.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Ying, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    An efficient method for searching for transition paths in a multidimensional configuration space is proposed. It is based on using a fixed, locally repulsive bias potential, which forces the system to move from a given initial state to a different final state. This simple method is very effective in determining nearby configurations and possible transition paths for many-particle systems. Once the approximate transition paths are known, the corresponding activation energies can be computed using, e.g., the nudged elastic band method. The usefulness of the present method is demonstrated for both classical and quantum-mechanical systems.

  5. An efficient algorithm for electron repulsion integrals over contracted Gaussian-type functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten-no, Seiichiro

    1993-08-01

    An efficient new algorithm for two-electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) over contracted Cartesian Gaussian-type functions has been proposed, making use of the contracted recurrence relation (CRR) derived here. The CRR, which is obtained by extending the auxiliary function-based methodologies, enables us to remove all the transformations to increment angular momentum of ERIs from the contraction loops. The new scheme turns out to be very suitable for contracted ERIs. Explicit flop (floating point operation) counts indicate about 60% reduction of computational work in the innermost contraction loop for (pp|pp) and (sp) 4 ERI classes, compared to the recent scheme of Gill, Head-Gordon and Pople.

  6. Suppression of the quantum-mechanical collapse by repulsive interactions in a quantum gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-01-15

    The quantum-mechanical collapse (alias fall onto the center of particles attracted by potential -r{sup -2}) is a well-known issue in quantum theory. It is closely related to the quantum anomaly, i.e., breaking of the scaling invariance of the respective Hamiltonian by quantization. We demonstrate that the mean-field repulsive nonlinearity prevents the collapse and thus puts forward a solution to the quantum-anomaly problem that differs from that previously developed in the framework of the linear quantum-field theory. This solution may be realized in the 3D or 2D gas of dipolar bosons attracted by a central charge and in the 2D gas of magnetic dipoles attracted by a current filament. In the 3D setting, the dipole-dipole interactions are also taken into regard, in the mean-field approximation, resulting in a redefinition of the scattering length which accounts for the contact repulsion between the bosons. In lieu of the collapse, the cubic nonlinearity creates a 3D ground state (GS), which does not exist in the respective linear Schroedinger equation. The addition of the harmonic trap gives rise to a tristability, in the case when the Schroedinger equation still does not lead to the collapse. In the 2D setting, the cubic nonlinearity is not strong enough to prevent the collapse; however, the quintic term does it, creating the GS, as well as its counterparts carrying the angular momentum (vorticity). Counterintuitively, such self-trapped 2D modes exist even in the case of a weakly repulsive potential r{sup -2}. The 2D vortical modes avoid the phase singularity at the pivot (r=0) by having the amplitude diverging at r{yields}0 instead of the usual situation with the amplitude of the vortical mode vanishing at r{yields}0 (the norm of the mode converges despite of the singularity of the amplitude at r{yields}0). In the presence of the harmonic trap, the 2D quintic model with a weakly repulsive central potential r{sup -2} gives rise to three confined modes, the middle

  7. Structural ordering and glass forming of soft spherical particles with harmonic repulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bin; Sun, Zhiwei; Ouyang, Wenze Xu, Shenghua

    2014-04-07

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamic process of phase transformation in the system with harmonic repulsion particles. Just below the melting point, the system undergoes liquid state, face-centered cubic crystallization, body-centered cubic crystallization, and reentrant melting phase transition upon compression, which is in good agreement with the phase diagram constructed previously via thermodynamic integration. However, when the temperature is decreased sufficiently, the system is trapped into an amorphous and frustrated glass state in the region of intermediate density, where the solid phase and crystal structure should be thermodynamically most stable.

  8. Constructing black hole entropy from gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Ellis, George F. R.; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I. M.

    2015-03-01

    Based on a recent proposal for the gravitational entropy of free gravitational fields, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of black hole formation through gravitational collapse in the framework of the semitetrad 1 +1 +2 covariant formalism. In the simplest case of an Oppenheimer-Snyder-Datt collapse, we prove that the change in gravitational entropy outside a collapsing body is related to the variation of the surface area of the body itself, even before the formation of horizons. As a result, we are able to relate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole end state to the variation of the vacuum gravitational entropy outside the collapsing body.

  9. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-08-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  10. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in approx. 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters, through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  11. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in approximately 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  12. Gravitational collapse in f(R) theories

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J.A.R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Núñez, B. Montes E-mail: alvaro.delacruzdombriz@uct.ac.za

    2012-04-01

    We study the gravitational collapse in modified gravitational theories. In particular, we analyze a general f(R) model with uniformly collapsing cloud of self-gravitating dust particles. This analysis shares analogies with the formation of large-scale structures in the early Universe and with the formation of stars in a molecular cloud experiencing gravitational collapse. In the same way, this investigation can be used as a first approximation to the modification that stellar objects can suffer in these modified theories of gravity. We study concrete examples, and find that the analysis of gravitational collapse is an important tool to constrain models that present late-time cosmological acceleration.

  13. Gravitational Cooling of Self-gravitating Bose Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, F. Siddhartha; Ureña-López, L. Arturo

    2006-07-01

    Equilibrium configurations for a self-gravitating scalar field with self-interaction are constructed. The corresponding Schrödinger-Poisson (SP) system is solved using finite differences, assuming spherical symmetry. It is shown that equilibrium configurations of the SP system are late-time attractor solutions for initially quite arbitrary density profiles, which relax and virialize through the emission of scalar field bursts-a process dubbed gravitational cooling. Among other potential applications, these results indicate that scalar field dark matter models (in their different flavors) tolerate the introduction of a self-interaction term in the SP equations. This study can be useful in exploring models in which dark matter in galaxies is not pointlike.

  14. Determining gravitational radiation from Newtonian self-gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Evans, Charles R.

    1990-03-01

    Quadrupole gravitational radiation formulas are tested and compared in a calculation of rotating stellar core collapse. While the standard quadrupole formula (SQF) allows an economical calculation of the waveform in postlinear gravity, it has several shortcomings that become apparent in a finite difference (FD) calculation. These shortcomings are related to the large-moment arm of the quadrupole moment and the two (numerical) time derivatives that separate it from the waveform. These shortcomings lead to high-frequency noise in the SQF waveform. Several alternatives to the SQF are developed. Each is mathematically equivalent to the SQF and applicable to self-gravitating sources. For FD calculations, the new quadrupole formulas are all superior to the SQF and capable of producing waveforms free of the high-frequency noise characteristics of its use.

  15. Spherical gravitational curvature boundary-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Values of scalar, vector and second-order tensor parameters of the Earth's gravitational field have been collected by various sensors in geodesy and geophysics. Such observables have been widely exploited in different parametrization methods for the gravitational field modelling. Moreover, theoretical aspects of these quantities have extensively been studied and well understood. On the other hand, new sensors for observing gravitational curvatures, i.e., components of the third-order gravitational tensor, are currently under development. As the gravitational curvatures represent new types of observables, their exploitation for modelling of the Earth's gravitational field is a subject of this study. Firstly, the gravitational curvature tensor is decomposed into six parts which are expanded in terms of third-order tensor spherical harmonics. Secondly, gravitational curvature boundary-value problems defined for four combinations of the gravitational curvatures are formulated and solved in spectral and spatial domains. Thirdly, properties of the corresponding sub-integral kernels are investigated. The presented mathematical formulations reveal some important properties of the gravitational curvatures and extend the so-called Meissl scheme, i.e., an important theoretical framework that relates various parameters of the Earth's gravitational field.

  16. Does Pressure Accentuate General Relativistic Gravitational Collapse and Formation of Trapped Surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely believed that though pressure resists gravitational collapse in Newtonian gravity, it aids the same in general relativity (GR) so that GR collapse should eventually be similar to the monotonous free fall case. But we show that, even in the context of radiationless adiabatic collapse of a perfect fluid, pressure tends to resist GR collapse in a manner which is more pronounced than the corresponding Newtonian case and formation of trapped surfaces is inhibited. In fact there are many works which show such collapse to rebound or become oscillatory implying a tug of war between attractive gravity and repulsive pressure gradient. Furthermore, for an imperfect fluid, the resistive effect of pressure could be significant due to likely dramatic increase of tangential pressure beyond the "photon sphere." Indeed, with inclusion of tangential pressure, in principle, there can be static objects with surface gravitational redshift z → ∞. Therefore, pressure can certainly oppose gravitational contraction in GR in a significant manner in contradiction to the idea of Roger Penrose that GR continued collapse must be unstoppable.

  17. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-01-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions. PMID:27334145

  18. Effect of the repulsive force in the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-10-01

    Magnetic levitation using the pinning force of the YBaCuO high- Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) materials has an advantage to achieve stable levitation without control. To increase levitation force, the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing system is introduced. A circular shaped three phase Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet is installed on the rotor, and HTSC bulk superconductor is set on the stator. The additional permanent magnet is installed under the HTSC. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is used for levitation, and pinning force between the HTSC and permanent magnet is used for guidance force of the bearing. In this system, relationship between permanent magnet and the HTSC is important. When repulsive force of the permanent magnet is large, pinning force of superconductor is used to keep the rotor position. As a result, stability for the lateral direction is decreased with hybrid system. For levitation force, effect of the hybrid system is not observed with column HTSC. Compared with the ring HTSC results, the following thing is considered. Because there is no space that flux of one permanent magnet acts on the other one with the column HTSC configuration, interaction between two permanent magnets becomes small.

  19. Aggregation Pattern Transitions by Slightly Varying the Attractive/Repulsive Function

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhao; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Zhou, Tao; Valeyev, Najl V.

    2011-01-01

    Among collective behaviors of biological swarms and flocks, the attractive/repulsive (A/R) functional links between particles play an important role. By slightly changing the cutoff distance of the A/R function, a drastic transition between two distinct aggregation patterns is observed. More precisely, a large cutoff distance yields a liquid-like aggregation pattern where the particle density decreases monotonously from the inside to the outwards within each aggregated cluster. Conversely, a small cutoff distance produces a crystal-like aggregation pattern where the distance between each pair of neighboring particles remains constant. Significantly, there is an obvious spinodal in the variance curve of the inter-particle distances along the increasing cutoff distances, implying a legible transition pattern between the liquid-like and crystal-like aggregations. This work bridges the aggregation phenomena of physical particles and swarming of organisms in nature upon revealing some common mechanism behind them by slightly varying their inter-individual attractive/repulsive functions, and may find its potential engineering applications, for example, in the formation design of multi-robot systems and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). PMID:21799776

  20. Inquiry into thermodynamic behavior of hard sphere plus repulsive barrier of finite height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi; Solana, J. R.

    2009-11-01

    A bridge function approximation is proposed to close the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) integral equation for fluids with purely repulsive potentials. The performance of the bridge function approximation is then tested by applying the approximation to two kinds of repulsive potentials, namely, the square shoulder potential and the triangle shoulder potential. An extensive comparison between simulation and the OZ approach is performed over a wide density range for the fluid phase and several temperatures. It is found that the agreement between the two routes is excellent for not too low temperatures and satisfactory for extremely low temperatures. Then, this globally trustworthy OZ approach is used to investigate the possible existence or not of a liquid anomaly, i.e., a liquid-liquid phase transition at low temperatures and negative values of the thermal expansion coefficient in certain region of the phase diagram. While the existence of the liquid anomaly in the square shoulder potential has been previously predicted by a traditional first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT), the present investigation indicates that the liquid-liquid phase transition disappears in the OZ approach, so that its prediction by the first-order TPT is only an artifact originating from the low temperature inadequacy of the first-order TPT. However, the OZ approach indeed predicts negative thermal expansion coefficients. The present bridge function approximation, free of adjustable parameters, is suitable to be used within the context of a recently proposed nonhard sphere perturbation scheme.

  1. Resilience of d-wave superconductivity to nearest-neighbor repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, A. G. R.; Senechal, D.; Bouliane, V.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2014-03-01

    Many theoretical approaches find d-wave superconductivity in the one-band Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductors. At strong-coupling (U >= W , where U is the on-site repulsion and W = 8 t the bandwidth) pairing is controlled by the exchange energy J = 4t2 / U . One may then surmise, ignoring retardation effects, that near-neighbor Coulomb repulsion V will destroy superconductivity when it becomes larger than J, a condition that is easily satisfied in cuprates for example. Using Cellular Dynamical Mean-Field theory with an exact diagonalization solver for the extended Hubbard model, we show that pairing at strong coupling is preserved, even when V >> J , as long as V < U / 2 . While at weak coupling V always reduces the spin fluctuations and hence d-wave pairing, at strong coupling, in the underdoped regime, the increase of J = 4t2 /(U - V) caused by V increases binding at low frequency while the pair-breaking effect of V is pushed to high frequency. These two effects compensate in the underdoped regime, in the presence of a pseudogap. While the pseudogap competes with superconductivity, the proximity to the Mott transition that leads to the pseudogap, and retardation effects, protect d-wave superconductivity from V. PRB 87, 075123 (2013) Supported by NSERC (Canada), CFI (Canada), CIFAR, and the Tier I Canada Research chair Program (A.-M.S.T.). Computational facilities were provided by Compute Canada and Calcul Quebec.

  2. FLRT2 and FLRT3 act as repulsive guidance cues for Unc5-positive neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Satoru; Hampel, Falko; Hata, Katsuhiko; del Toro, Daniel; Schwark, Manuela; Kvachnina, Elena; Bastmeyer, Martin; Yamashita, Toshihide; Tarabykin, Victor; Klein, Rüdiger; Egea, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Netrin-1 induces repulsive axon guidance by binding to the mammalian Unc5 receptor family (Unc5A–Unc5D). Mouse genetic analysis of selected members of the Unc5 family, however, revealed essential functions independent of Netrin-1, suggesting the presence of other ligands. Unc5B was recently shown to bind fibronectin and leucine-rich transmembrane protein-3 (FLRT3), although the relevance of this interaction for nervous system development remained unclear. Here, we show that the related Unc5D receptor binds specifically to another FLRT protein, FLRT2. During development, FLRT2/3 ectodomains (ECDs) are shed from neurons and act as repulsive guidance molecules for axons and somata of Unc5-positive neurons. In the developing mammalian neocortex, Unc5D is expressed by neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ), which display delayed migration to the FLRT2-expressing cortical plate (CP). Deletion of either FLRT2 or Unc5D causes a subset of SVZ-derived neurons to prematurely migrate towards the CP, whereas overexpression of Unc5D has opposite effects. Hence, the shed FLRT2 and FLRT3 ECDs represent a novel family of chemorepellents for Unc5-positive neurons and FLRT2/Unc5D signalling modulates cortical neuron migration. PMID:21673655

  3. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  4. Soft electrostatic repulsion in particle monolayers at liquid interfaces: surface pressure and effect of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kralchevsky, Peter A; Danov, Krassimir D; Petkov, Plamen V

    2016-07-28

    Non-densely packed interfacial monolayers from charged micrometre-sized colloid particles find applications for producing micropatterned surfaces. The soft electrostatic repulsion between the particles in a monolayer on an air/water (or oil/water) interface is mediated by the non-polar fluid, where Debye screening is absent and the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters. Surface pressure versus area isotherms were measured at the air/water interface. The experiments show that asymptotically the surface pressure is inversely proportional to the third power of the interparticle distance. A theoretical model is developed that predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole surface pressure versus area dependence. An increase in the surface pressure upon aggregation of charged particles in the interfacial monolayers is experimentally established. This effect is explained by the developed theoretical model, which predicts that the surface pressure should linearly increase with the square root of the particle mean aggregation number. The effect of added electrolyte on the aggregation is also investigated. The data lead to the conclusion that 'limited aggregation' exists in the monolayers of charged particles. In brief, the stronger electrostatic repulsion between the bigger aggregates leads to a higher barrier to their coalescence that, in turn, prevents any further aggregation, i.e. negative feedback is present.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298437

  5. A gravitating electroweak bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational and electromagnetic (EM) field of electron is described by the Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole solution with a topological defect. Regularization of this defect by the Higgs field leads to the smooth source which shares much in common with the known MIT- and SLAC- bag models, but has the advantage, of matching gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the electron. This model is flexible, and the rotating KN bag takes the shape of a thin disk with a circular string positioned on the sharp border of the disk. We consider the lowest excitations of the KN solution and the corresponding deformations of the bag surface, setting a preliminary correspondence with electroweak sector of the SM.

  6. Gravitational wave science from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-01

    The rich millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space- based detector. The technology for such a detector will be demonstrated by the LISA Pathfinder satellite that is due to launch this year and ESA has selected gravitational wave detection from space as the science theme to be addressed by the L3 large mission to be launched around 2034. In this article we will discuss the sources that such an instrument will observe, and how the numbers of events and precision of parameter determination are affected by modifications to the, as yet not finalised, mission design. We will also describe some of the exciting scientific applications of these observations, to astrophysics, fundamental physics and cosmology.

  7. Gravitational instabilities in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric stability of self-gravitating, geometrically thick accretion disks has been studied for protostellar systems having a wide range of disk-to-central object mass ratios. Global eigenmodes with four distinctly different characters were identified using numerical, nonlinear hydrodynamic techniques. The mode that appears most likely to arise in normal star formation settings, however, resembles the 'eccentric instability' that was identified earlier in thin, nearly Keplerian disks: It presents an open, one-armed spiral pattern that sweeps continuously in a trailing direction through more than 2-pi radians, smoothly connecting the inner and outer edges of the disk, and requires cooperative motion of the point mass for effective amplification. This particular instability promotes the development of a single, self-gravitating clump of material in orbit about the point mass, so its routine appearance in our simulations supports the conjecture that the eccentric instability provides a primary route to the formation of short-period binaries in protostellar systems.

  8. Post-Newtonian gravitational bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M.; Will, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Formulae and numerical results are presented for the gravitational radiation emitted during a low-deflection encounter between two massive bodies. Results are valid through post-Newtonian order within general relativity. The gravitational waveform, the total luminosity and total emitted energy, the angular distribution of emitted energy, and the frequency spectrum are discussed in detail. A method boosting the accuracy of these quantities to post Newtonian order is also presented. A numerical comparison of results with those of Peters, and of Kovacs and Thorne shows that the post Newtonian method is reliable to better than 0.1 percent at v = 0.1 c, to a few percent at v = 0.35 c, and to 10 to 20 percent at v = 0.5 c.

  9. Nonadiabatic charged spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2007-09-15

    We present a complete set of the equations and matching conditions required for the description of physically meaningful charged, dissipative, spherically symmetric gravitational collapse with shear. Dissipation is described with both free-streaming and diffusion approximations. The effects of viscosity are also taken into account. The roles of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decrease of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamic state, is reobtained, with the viscosity terms included. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decrease factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. The effect of the electric charge on the relation between the Weyl tensor and the inhomogeneity of the energy density is discussed.

  10. Gravitating dyons in Vaidya geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Buddhi Vallabh; Nandan, Hemwati; Dehnen, Heinz; Purohit, K. D.

    2014-03-01

    Gravitating monopoles and dyons in Einstein-Yang-Mills (EYM) or Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs (EYMH) systems have been extensively studied for various curved space-times, including those of black holes. We construct dyonic solutions of the EYMH theory in Vaidya space-time using a set of generalized Julia-Zee ansatz for the fields. It is found that the dyonic charge is static in nature and it does not contribute to the energy of the null dust.

  11. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  12. Mansouri-Chang gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavelle, R.

    1978-01-01

    The gauge theory of gravitation introduced by Mansouri and Chang (1976) is investigated; a symbolic manipulation computer system generates the Mansouri-Chang field equations in various coordinate systems. It is found that all vacuum Einstein spaces are vacuum Mansouri-Chang spaces in four dimensions, though for higher dimensions an Einstein vacuum space is not generally a Mansouri-Chang solution. The possibility that no solutions of the Mansouri-Chang equations are not Einstein vacuum spaces is discussed.

  13. Equivalence Principle and Gravitational Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Hohensee, Michael A.; Chu, Steven; Mueller, Holger; Peters, Achim

    2011-04-15

    We investigate leading order deviations from general relativity that violate the Einstein equivalence principle in the gravitational standard model extension. We show that redshift experiments based on matter waves and clock comparisons are equivalent to one another. Consideration of torsion balance tests, along with matter-wave, microwave, optical, and Moessbauer clock tests, yields comprehensive limits on spin-independent Einstein equivalence principle-violating standard model extension terms at the 10{sup -6} level.

  14. Gravitational Instability in Planetesimal Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Bryce T.; Lithwick, Yoram; Pan, Margaret; Rein, Hanno; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-11-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) has been proposed as a method of forming giant gas planets enhanced by disk thermodynamics in a protoplanetary disk (Boss, 1997, Science 276; Durisen et al., 2007, Protostars and Planets V) and as a method of forming planetesimals through the focusing of boulders by the interaction between solids and gases in a turbulent circumstellar disk (Johansen et al., 2007, Nature 448; Youdin & Goodman, 2005, Astrophys. J. 620). GI is mediated through a gaseous circumstellar disk in each each of these scenarios. We explore the possibility of GI occurring in a planetesimal disk devoid of gas. In this regime, mutual collisions between planetesimals are required to dissipate their orbital shear and velocity dispersion enough for collapse to occur as described by the Toomre stability criterion (Toomre, 1964, Astrophys. J. 139; Toomre, 1981, Structure and Evolution of Normal Galaxies). How frequent must collisions be between planetesimals in a gravitationally stable planetesimal disk for GI to occur? Are there collisional rates where GI is postponed indefinitely in an equilibrium state between gravitational stirring and collisional cooling? We present 3D shearing sheet simulations using the REBOUND N-body code with the symplectic epicyclic integrator (Rein & Liu, 2011, A&A 537; Rein & Tremaine, 2011, MNRAS 415) in which the candidate collision rates are within a few orders of magnitude of the disk dynamical lifetime. Our simulations suggest that collisions rate directly controls disk cooling. The shape of the disk cooling curve is independent of the collision rate when scaled to the collision time.

  15. Measuring Gravitation Using Polarization Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    A proposed method of measuring gravitational acceleration would involve the application of polarization spectroscopy to an ultracold, vertically moving cloud of atoms (an atomic fountain). A related proposed method involving measurements of absorption of light pulses like those used in conventional atomic interferometry would yield an estimate of the number of atoms participating in the interferometric interaction. The basis of the first-mentioned proposed method is that the rotation of polarization of light is affected by the acceleration of atoms along the path of propagation of the light. The rotation of polarization is associated with a phase shift: When an atom moving in a laboratory reference interacts with an electromagnetic wave, the energy levels of the atom are Doppler-shifted, relative to where they would be if the atom were stationary. The Doppler shift gives rise to changes in the detuning of the light from the corresponding atomic transitions. This detuning, in turn, causes the electromagnetic wave to undergo a phase shift that can be measured by conventional means. One would infer the gravitational acceleration and/or the gradient of the gravitational acceleration from the phase measurements.

  16. Thermal duality and gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Thermal duality is a relationship between the behaviour of heterotic string models of the E(8)×E(8) or SO(32) types at inversely related temperatures, a variant of T duality in the Euclidean regime. This duality would have consequences for the nature of the Hagedorn transition in these string models. We propose that the vacuum admits a family of deformations in situations where there are closed surfaces of constant area but high radial acceleration (a string regularized version of a Penrose trapped surface), such as would be formed in situations of extreme gravitational collapse. This would allow a radical resolution of the firewall paradox by allowing quantum effects to significantly modify the spacetime geometry around a collapsed object. A string bremsstrahlung process would convert the kinetic energy of infalling matter in extreme gravitational collapse to form a region of the deformed vacuum, which would be equivalent to forming a high temperature string phase. A heuristic criterion for the conversion process is presented, relating Newtonian gravity to the string tension, suggesting an upper limit to the strength of the gravitational interaction. This conversion process might have observable consequences for charged particles falling into a rotating collapsed object by producing high energy particles via a variant of the Penrose process.

  17. In vitro investigations of repulsion during laser lithotripsy using a pendulum set-up.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Ronald; Haseke, Nicolas; Pongratz, Thomas; Hecht, Volkmar; Tilki, Derya; Stief, Christian G; Bader, Markus Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy is a commonly used technique to treat ureteral calculi.The type of energy source used is one of the main influences of retrograd calculi propulsion. Using a momentum pendulum under-water set-up the induced momentum and the initial velocity were investigated. Pulsed laser light from three different clinically available laser systems, including a Ho:YAG laser, a frequency-doubled double-pulse (second harmonic generation, SHG) Nd:YAG laser and a flash-lamp pumped dye (FLPD) laser, were transmitted via flexible fibres of different core diameter to the front of the pendulum sinker. Single pulses at variable pulse energy, according to the clinical laser parameter settings, were applied to the target sinker, thus causing a repulsion-induced deflection which was documented by video recording. The maximum deflection was determined. Solving the differential equation of a pendulum gives the initial velocity, the laser-induced momentum and the efficiency of momentum transfer. The induced deflection as well as the starting velocity of the two short-duration pulsed laser systems (SHG Nd:YAG, FLPD) were similar (s (max) = 2-3.6 cm and v (0) = 150-200 mm/s, respectively), whereas both values were lower using the Ho:YAG laser with a long pulse duration (s (max) = 0.9--1.6 cm and v (0) = 60-105 mm/s, respectively). The momentum I induced by the Ho:YAG laser was only 50% and its transfer efficacy η (Repuls) was reduced to less than 5% of the values of the two short-pulsed laser systems. This investigation clearly showed the variable parts and amounts of repulsion using different pulsed lasers in an objective and reproducible manner. The momentum transfer efficiency could be determined without any physical friction problems. Further investigations are needed to compare stone fragmentation techniques with respect to laser repulsion and its clinical impact.

  18. a Field-Theoretical Investigation of 2-D Coulomb Systems with Short-Range Yukawa Repulsion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargocki, Krzysztof Piotr

    The two-dimensional Coulomb gas, consisting of positive and negative charges, is an important system which, on one hand, is equivalent to the vortex sector of the planar X-Y model, and, on the other, to the sine-Gordon field theory. In most treatments the charged particles are assumed to have a repulsive hard core which prevents arbitrarily close approaches. In the present work a new regularization scheme based on a soft short-range Yukawa repulsion between the Coulomb gas particles is presented. This formulation is transcribed into a local sine-Gordon-like field theory involving two Bose fields, one the original massless sine -Gordon field corresponding to the long-range Coulomb interaction and an auxiliary massive field corresponding to the short -range Yukawa repulsion. The resulting Lagrangian is not Hermitian. Using the techniques of functional integration, an effective field theory involving the Coulomb field alone is obtained by integrating out the massive field. The resulting Lagrangian is now Hermitian. Then a generalization of Peierls' inequality is used to make a variational calculation of the ground state energy of the Coulomb system. Unlike in the pure sine-Gordon case the theory has a well-defined ground state energy for (beta)q('2) > 2 (or (beta)c('2) > 8(pi)). A new method is used to derive the Kosterlitz -Thouless renormalization group equations, starting with the original sine-Gordon-like theory. The equations are identical to those found previously by other authors. A wave function renormalization is found to be necessary in addition to the normal ordering discussed by Coleman. A fermionized version of the theory is obtained, using the dictionary provided by Kogut and Susskind, which involves two Fermi fields and an electromagnetic potential. Position -space correlation functions are calculated at the critical point. The effective potential is computed in the one -loop approximation. A nonlinear field theory with derivative couplings is found to

  19. In vitro investigations of repulsion during laser lithotripsy using a pendulum set-up.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Ronald; Haseke, Nicolas; Pongratz, Thomas; Hecht, Volkmar; Tilki, Derya; Stief, Christian G; Bader, Markus Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy is a commonly used technique to treat ureteral calculi.The type of energy source used is one of the main influences of retrograd calculi propulsion. Using a momentum pendulum under-water set-up the induced momentum and the initial velocity were investigated. Pulsed laser light from three different clinically available laser systems, including a Ho:YAG laser, a frequency-doubled double-pulse (second harmonic generation, SHG) Nd:YAG laser and a flash-lamp pumped dye (FLPD) laser, were transmitted via flexible fibres of different core diameter to the front of the pendulum sinker. Single pulses at variable pulse energy, according to the clinical laser parameter settings, were applied to the target sinker, thus causing a repulsion-induced deflection which was documented by video recording. The maximum deflection was determined. Solving the differential equation of a pendulum gives the initial velocity, the laser-induced momentum and the efficiency of momentum transfer. The induced deflection as well as the starting velocity of the two short-duration pulsed laser systems (SHG Nd:YAG, FLPD) were similar (s (max) = 2-3.6 cm and v (0) = 150-200 mm/s, respectively), whereas both values were lower using the Ho:YAG laser with a long pulse duration (s (max) = 0.9--1.6 cm and v (0) = 60-105 mm/s, respectively). The momentum I induced by the Ho:YAG laser was only 50% and its transfer efficacy η (Repuls) was reduced to less than 5% of the values of the two short-pulsed laser systems. This investigation clearly showed the variable parts and amounts of repulsion using different pulsed lasers in an objective and reproducible manner. The momentum transfer efficiency could be determined without any physical friction problems. Further investigations are needed to compare stone fragmentation techniques with respect to laser repulsion and its clinical impact. PMID:22011742

  20. Effects of Coulomb Repulsion on the Phase Diagram of the Asakura-Oosawa Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaga, Jason; Pemberton, Elizabeth; Gunton, James; Rickman, Jeffrey

    We investigate the effect of adding a screened Coulomb charge to a model colloidal system interacting via the Asakura-Oosawa depletion potential. This model has previously been used to study the early stages of amelogenin self-assembly, a crucial process in the formation of dental enamel, by Li et al (BiophysicalJournal 101, 2502 (2011). By employing Monte Carlo simulations, we explore the role of interaction strengths and ranges on phase behavior. We find that charge strength and range have a strong influence on the stable, in the case of long range depletion potential, or metastable, in the case of short range depletion, fluid-fluid phase separation. Coulomb repulsion narrows and flattens the coexistence curve with increasing charge. This talk will also discuss solid-solid transitions present for certain interaction ranges. This work is supported by the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation.

  1. Phase and frequency entrainment in locally coupled phase oscillators with repulsive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giver, Michael; Jabeen, Zahera; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2011-03-01

    Recent experiments in one and two-dimensional microfluidic arrays of droplets containing Belousov - Zhabotinsky reactants show a rich variety of spatial patterns [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 1241-1246 (2010)]. These experiments provide the first steps towards creating easily reproducible model active emulsion systems. Motivated by this experimental system, we study repulsively coupled Kuramoto oscillators with nearest neighbor interactions on a linear chain as well as a ring in one dimension. We show using linear stability analysis as well as numerical study, that the stable phase patterns depend on the geometry of the lattice and that a transition to the ordered state does not exist in the thermodynamic limit. We will also present results comparing our Kuramoto model with finite element simulations of the Brusselator model in geometries similar to those of the experiment.

  2. Bethe ansatz density-functional theory of ultracold repulsive fermions in one-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Xianlong, Gao; Polini, Marco; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, Vivaldo L. Jr.; Capelle, Klaus; Rigol, Marcos

    2006-04-15

    We present an extensive numerical study of the ground-state properties of confined repulsively interacting fermions in one-dimensional optical lattices. Detailed predictions for the atom-density profiles are obtained from parallel Kohn-Sham density-functional calculations and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The density-functional calculations employ a Bethe ansatz based local-density approximation for the correlation energy that accounts for Luttinger-liquid and Mott-insulator physics. Semianalytical and fully numerical formulations of this approximation are compared with each other and with a cruder Thomas-Fermi-type local-density approximation for the total energy. Precise quantum Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the reliability of the various local-density approximations, and in conjunction with these provide a detailed microscopic picture of the consequences of the interplay between particle-particle interactions and confinement in one-dimensional systems of strongly correlated fermions.

  3. High island densities and long range repulsive interactions: Fe on epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Binz, S M; Hupalo, M; Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, C Z; Lu, Wen-Cai; Thiel, P A; Ho, K M; Conrad, E H; Tringides, M C

    2012-07-13

    The understanding of metal nucleation on graphene is essential for promising future applications, especially of magnetic metals which can be used in spintronics or computer storage media. A common method to study the grown morphology is to measure the nucleated island density n as a function of growth parameters. Surprisingly, the growth of Fe on graphene is found to be unusual because it does not follow classical nucleation: n is unexpectedtly high, it increases continuously with the deposited amount θ and shows no temperature dependence. These unusual results indicate the presence of long range repulsive interactions. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations support this conclusion. In addition to answering an outstanding question in epitaxial growth, i.e., to find systems where long range interactions are present, the high density of magnetic islands, tunable with θ, is of interest for nanomagnetism applications.

  4. Phase diagram of softly repulsive systems: the Gaussian and inverse-power-law potentials.

    PubMed

    Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Giaquinta, Paolo V

    2005-10-01

    We redraw, using state-of-the-art methods for free-energy calculations, the phase diagrams of two reference models for the liquid state: the Gaussian and inverse-power-law repulsive potentials. Notwithstanding the different behaviors of the two potentials for vanishing interparticle distances, their thermodynamic properties are similar in a range of densities and temperatures, being ruled by the competition between the body-centered-cubic (bcc) and face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structures and the fluid phase. We confirm the existence of a reentrant bcc phase in the phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model, just above the triple point. We also trace the bcc-fcc coexistence line of the inverse-power-law model as a function of the power exponent n and relate the common features in the phase diagrams of such systems to the softness degree of the interaction. PMID:16238377

  5. Time delay induced different synchronization patterns in repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenggui; Yi, Ming; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Time delayed coupling plays a crucial role in determining the system's dynamics. We here report that the time delay induces transition from the asynchronous state to the complete synchronization (CS) state in the repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, by changing the coupling strength or time delay, various types of synchronous patterns, including CS, antiphase CS, antiphase synchronization (ANS), and phase synchronization, can be generated. In the transition regions between different synchronous patterns, bistable synchronous oscillators can be observed. Furthermore, we show that the time-delay-induced phase flip bifurcation is of key importance for the emergence of CS. All these findings may light on our understanding of neuronal synchronization and information processing in the brain.

  6. Time delay induced different synchronization patterns in repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenggui; Yi, Ming; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Time delayed coupling plays a crucial role in determining the system's dynamics. We here report that the time delay induces transition from the asynchronous state to the complete synchronization (CS) state in the repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, by changing the coupling strength or time delay, various types of synchronous patterns, including CS, antiphase CS, antiphase synchronization (ANS), and phase synchronization, can be generated. In the transition regions between different synchronous patterns, bistable synchronous oscillators can be observed. Furthermore, we show that the time-delay-induced phase flip bifurcation is of key importance for the emergence of CS. All these findings may light on our understanding of neuronal synchronization and information processing in the brain.

  7. Time Development of Explosion of Stochastic Process with Repulsive Drift of Polynomial Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toru; Ezawa, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Keiji

    2008-06-18

    For a diffusion process X(t) representing the momentum of a particle subject to an external force f(x) and a random force dB(t)/dt in one-dimensional space, almost all sample paths explode to infinity in finite times if f(x) grows repulsively to infinity faster than linear as |x|{yields}{infinity}, so that the survival probability P(t) of the particle by time t decreases to zero as time passes. It is shown that P(t) decays at least exponentially in time and the rate of the exponential decay is strictly positive and equal to the lowest eigenvalue of a Hamiltonian of an imaginary-time Schroedinger equation.

  8. Equation satisfied by the energy-density functional for electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that the electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy-density functional V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}] satisfies the equationV{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]-V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}]={integral}d{sup 3}r({delta}V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]/{delta}{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r))[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r)-{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r)], where {rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r) and {rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r) are N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential of the N-electron system at coupling strength {gamma}.

  9. Skyrmion-skyrmion and skyrmion-edge repulsions in skyrmion-based racetrack memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhao, G. P.; Fangohr, Hans; Liu, J. Ping; Xia, W. X.; Xia, J.; Morvan, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are promising for building next-generation magnetic memories and spintronic devices due to their stability, small size and the extremely low currents needed to move them. In particular, skyrmion-based racetrack memory is attractive for information technology, where skyrmions are used to store information as data bits instead of traditional domain walls. Here we numerically demonstrate the impacts of skyrmion-skyrmion and skyrmion-edge repulsions on the feasibility of skyrmion-based racetrack memory. The reliable and practicable spacing between consecutive skyrmionic bits on the racetrack as well as the ability to adjust it are investigated. Clogging of skyrmionic bits is found at the end of the racetrack, leading to the reduction of skyrmion size. Further, we demonstrate an effective and simple method to avoid the clogging of skyrmionic bits, which ensures the elimination of skyrmionic bits beyond the reading element. Our results give guidance for the design and development of future skyrmion-based racetrack memory.

  10. Acceleration of Electron Repulsion Integral Evaluation on Graphics Processing Units via Use of Recurrence Relations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yipu; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-02-12

    Electron repulsion integral (ERI) calculation on graphical processing units (GPUs) can significantly accelerate quantum chemical calculations. Herein, the ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) calculation is implemented on GPUs using recurrence relations, which is one of the fastest ERI evaluation algorithms currently available. A direct-SCF scheme to assemble the Fock matrix efficiently is presented, wherein ERIs are evaluated on-the-fly to avoid CPU-GPU data transfer, a well-known architectural bottleneck in GPU specific computation. Realized speedups on GPUs reach 10-100 times relative to traditional CPU nodes, with accuracies of better than 1 × 10(-7) for systems with more than 4000 basis functions. PMID:26588740

  11. Uniting extrinsic vectorization and shell structure for efficient SIMD evaluation of electron repulsion integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdas, Tirath; Egan, Gregory K.; Abramson, David; Baldridge, Kim K.

    2008-06-01

    Future computer architectures are likely to feature greater reliance on single instruction multiple data (SIMD) processing for high throughput processing of data-intensive workloads. For algorithms that rely heavily on electron repulsion integrals (ERIs), exploitation of SIMD processing requires extrinsic vectorization, i.e. the sorting of ERIs into sets with equivalent class that may be computed with an identical instruction stream. Such sorting is incongruous with the commonly exploited shell structure whereby ERI are generated over shells such that initialization/bootstrap values may be reused, yielding significant savings in ERI evaluation time. In this work, we discuss how extrinsic vectorization may be unified with shell structure through the exploitation of memory access locality.

  12. Phase diagram of Rydberg atoms with repulsive van der Waals interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Osychenko, O. N.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.; Lutsyshyn, Y.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2011-12-15

    We report a quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the phase diagram of bosons interacting with a repulsive inverse sixth power pair potential, a model for assemblies of Rydberg atoms in the local van der Waals blockade regime. The model can be parametrized in terms of just two parameters, the reduced density and temperature. Solidification happens to the fcc phase. At zero temperature, the transition density is found with the diffusion Monte Carlo method at density {rho}=3.9 (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup 2}/mC{sub 6}){sup 3/4}, where C{sub 6} is the strength of the interaction. The solidification curve at nonzero temperature is studied with the path-integral Monte Carlo approach and is compared with transitions in corresponding harmonic and classical crystals. Relaxation mechanisms are considered in relation to present experiments.

  13. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, William D; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  14. Communication: Intraparticle segregation of structurally homogeneous polyelectrolyte microgels caused by long-range Coulomb repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Artem M.; Rudov, Andrey A.; Potemkin, Igor I.

    2015-05-01

    Structurally homogeneous polyelectrolyte microgels in dilute aqueous solutions are shown to exhibit inhomogeneous density profile including intraparticle "phase" coexistence of hollow core and dense "skin." This effect is a consequence of long-range Coulomb repulsion of charged groups which appear because of entropy-driven escape of monovalent counterions into the outer solvent. Excess of the charged groups at the periphery of the microgel particle reduces electrostatic energy and overall free energy of the system despite a penalty in the elastic free energy of strongly stretched subchains in the hole. This finding can serve as additional tool controlling encapsulation, transport, and release of high- and low-molecular-weight species in processes where the microgels are used as delivery systems.

  15. Repulsively bound exciton-biexciton states in high-spin fermions in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Argueelles, A.; Santos, L.

    2011-03-15

    We show that the interplay between spin-changing collisions and quadratic Zeeman coupling provides a mechanism for the formation of repulsively bound composites in high-spin fermions, which we illustrate by considering spin flips in an initially polarized hard-core one-dimensional Mott insulator of spin-3/2 fermions. We show that after the flips the dynamics is characterized by the creation of two types of exciton-biexciton composites. We analyze the conditions for the existence of these bound states and discuss their intriguing properties. In particular we show that the effective mass and stability of the composites depends nontrivially on spin-changing collisions, on the quadratic Zeeman effect, and on the initial exciton localization. Finally, we show that the composites may remain stable against inelastic collisions, opening the possibility of interesting quantum composite phases.

  16. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  17. The Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion in harmonium atoms.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Highly accurate Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion energies of the three-electron harmonium atoms in the (2)P- and (4)P+ states are obtained for 19 values of the confinement strength ω ranging from 10(-3) to 10(3). The computed data are consistent with their ω → 0 and ω → ∞ asymptotics that are given by closed-form algebraic expressions. Robust approximants that accurately reproduce the actual values of the energy components while strictly conforming to these limits are constructed, opening an avenue to stringent tests capable of predicting the performance of electronic structure methods for systems with varying extents of the dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation. The values of the correlation components, paired with the computed 1-matrices are expected to be particularly useful in the context of benchmarking of approximate density matrix functionals.

  18. The Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion in harmonium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Highly accurate Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion energies of the three-electron harmonium atoms in the {sup 2}P{sub −} and {sup 4}P{sub +} states are obtained for 19 values of the confinement strength ω ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup 3}. The computed data are consistent with their ω → 0 and ω → ∞ asymptotics that are given by closed-form algebraic expressions. Robust approximants that accurately reproduce the actual values of the energy components while strictly conforming to these limits are constructed, opening an avenue to stringent tests capable of predicting the performance of electronic structure methods for systems with varying extents of the dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation. The values of the correlation components, paired with the computed 1-matrices are expected to be particularly useful in the context of benchmarking of approximate density matrix functionals.

  19. Repulsive Interaction of Sulfide Layers on Compressor Impeller Blades Remanufactured Through Plasma Spray Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y. L.; Huang, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the repulsive interaction of sulfide layers on compressor impeller blades remanufactured through plasma spray welding (PSW). Sulfide layers on the blades made of FV(520)B steel were prepared through multifarious corrosion experiments, and PSW was utilized to remanufacture blade specimens. The specimens were evaluated through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, 3D surface topography, x-ray diffraction, ImageJ software analysis, Vicker's micro-hardness test and tensile tests. Results showed a large number of sulfide inclusions in the fusion zone generated by sulfide layers embodied into the molten pool during PSW. These sulfide inclusions seriously degraded the mechanical performance of the blades remanufactured through PSW.

  20. Influence of repulsion zone in the directional alignment of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambui, Dorilson

    2014-04-01

    Collective behavior in animal groups such as schools of fish, swarms of insects or flocks of birds, although a phenomenon widely studied in biological systems, is subject of great interdisciplinary interest. An important tool to describe the dynamics of collective motion and ordered live organisms is the concept of self-propelled particles. Proposed by Vicsek and collaborators, it was considered in this model only as an (single) interaction rule, set as alignment, where particles align to motion the nearest neighbors. In this paper, we have considered a variant of this model by adding a second rule called repulsion zone, where particles repel each other at short distances, in order to investigate the influence of this zone on directional order of the particles.

  1. Gravitaton Wave and Gravitational-Photon Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, Kholmurad

    2013-06-01

    Gravitation waves and gravitational-photon interaction with high energy photons emission is found experimentally. Super-compressibility phenomenon was studied. Spectral investigations of supersonic jets and incandescent nichrome thread and wolfram spiral were studied. The shifting of the emission spectrum was detected depending on vector of gravity. The increasing frequency of light emitted against gravity vector is measured. Uneven along the spectrum character of intensity increasing is found. Generation of short-wavelength component of the spectrum is observed in case of more power of heating. The measurements show that presented interactions have resonance nature. Our experiments demonstrate the existence resonance nature. Our experiments demonstrate the gravitation wave and generation and existence of gravitational-photon interactions. From left to right: Fig. 1-2. Visualization of the gravitation wave. Fig. 3-5. Gravitational-photon interaction in HF field.

  2. The final stage of gravitational collapse for high density fluid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, R. G.; De Campos, M.

    2013-03-25

    The High density high density fluids can be represented by a stiff matter state equation P={rho} and also by the Hagedorn state equation. The first is constructed using a lagrangian that allows bare nucleons to interact attractively via scalar meson exchange, and repulsively by a more massive vector meson exchange; the second consider that for large mass the spectrum of hadrons grows exponentially, namely {rho}(m) {approx}exp(m/T{sub H}), where T{sub H} is the Hagedorn temperature, resulting the state equation P = P{sub 0}+{rho}{sub 0}ln({rho}/{rho}{sub 0}). We study the gravitational collapse for a high density fluid, considering a Hagedorn state equation in a presence of a vacuum component.

  3. Optimal strategies for driving a mobile agent in a "guidance by repulsion" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, R.; Ibañez, A.; Zuazua, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present a guidance by repulsion model based on a driver-evader interaction where the driver, assumed to be faster than the evader, follows the evader but cannot be arbitrarily close to it, and the evader tries to move away from the driver beyond a short distance. The key ingredient allowing the driver to guide the evader is that the driver is able to display a circumvention maneuver around the evader, in such a way that the trajectory of the evader is modified in the direction of the repulsion that the driver exerts on the evader. The evader can thus be driven towards any given target or along a sufficiently smooth path by controlling a single discrete parameter acting on driver's behavior. The control parameter serves both to activate/deactivate the circumvention mode and to select the clockwise/counterclockwise direction of the circumvention maneuver. Assuming that the circumvention mode is more expensive than the pursuit mode, and that the activation of the circumvention mode has a high cost, we formulate an optimal control problem for the optimal strategy to drive the evader to a given target. By means of numerical shooting methods, we find the optimal open-loop control which reduces the number of activations of the circumvention mode to one and which minimizes the time spent in the active mode. Our numerical simulations show that the system is highly sensitive to small variations of the control function, and that the cost function has a nonlinear regime which contributes to the complexity of the behavior of the system, so that a general open-loop control would not be of practical interest. We then propose a feedback control law that corrects from deviations while preventing from an excessive use of the circumvention mode, finding numerically that the feedback law significantly reduces the cost obtained with the open-loop control.

  4. Dynamical generation of a repulsive vector contribution to the quark pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Tulio E.; Macias, Juan Camilo; Pinto, Marcus Benghi; Ferrari, Gabriel N.

    2015-03-01

    Lattice QCD results for the coefficient c2 appearing in the Taylor expansion of the pressure show that this quantity increases with the temperature towards the Stefan-Boltzmann limit. On the other hand, model approximations predict that when a vector repulsion, parametrized by GV, is present this coefficient reaches a maximum just after Tc and then deviates from the lattice predictions. Recently, this discrepancy has been used as a guide to constrain the (presently unknown) value of GV within the framework of effective models at large Nc (LN). In the present investigation we show that, due to finite Nc effects, c2 may also develop a maximum even when GV=0 since a vector repulsive term can be dynamically generated by exchange-type radiative corrections. Here we apply the optimized perturbation theory (OPT) method to the two-flavor Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model (at GV=0 ) and compare the results with those furnished by lattice simulations and by the LN approximation at GV=0 and also at GV≠0 . The OPT numerical results for c2 are impressively accurate for T ≲1.2 Tc but, as expected, they predict that this quantity develops a maximum at high T . After identifying the mathematical origin of this extremum we argue that such a discrepant behavior may naturally arise within this type of effective quark theories (at GV=0 ) whenever the first 1 /Nc corrections are taken into account. We then interpret this hypothesis as an indication that beyond the large-Nc limit the correct high-temperature (perturbative) behavior of c2 will be faithfully described by effective models only if they also mimic the asymptotic freedom phenomenon.

  5. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  6. Repulsive parallel MCMC algorithm for discovering diverse motifs from large sequence sets

    PubMed Central

    Ikebata, Hisaki; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding recurring patterns of short strings in a set of nucleotide sequences. This classical problem is receiving renewed attention as most early motif discovery methods lack the ability to handle large data of recent genome-wide ChIP studies. New ChIP-tailored methods focus on reducing computation time and pay little regard to the accuracy of motif detection. Unlike such methods, our method focuses on increasing the detection accuracy while maintaining the computation efficiency at an acceptable level. The major advantage of our method is that it can mine diverse multiple motifs undetectable by current methods. Results: The repulsive parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo (RPMCMC) algorithm that we propose is a parallel version of the widely used Gibbs motif sampler. RPMCMC is run on parallel interacting motif samplers. A repulsive force is generated when different motifs produced by different samplers near each other. Thus, different samplers explore different motifs. In this way, we can detect much more diverse motifs than conventional methods can. Through application to 228 transcription factor ChIP-seq datasets of the ENCODE project, we show that the RPMCMC algorithm can find many reliable cofactor interacting motifs that existing methods are unable to discover. Availability and implementation: A C++ implementation of RPMCMC and discovered cofactor motifs for the 228 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets are available from http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/yoshidalab/motif. Contact: ikebata.hisaki@ism.ac.jp, yoshidar@ism.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available from Bioinformatics online. PMID:25583120

  7. Repulsive interatomic potentials for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Interatomic potentials that are relevant for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets have been calculated in the energy region below 10 keV. Potentials are calculated for the diatomic species: NeCu, ArCu, KrCu, Cu2, ArNi, Ni2 and NiCu. The calculations primarily employ density functional theory (with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional). Potential curves derived from Hartree-Fock theory calculations are also discussed. Scalar relativistic effects have been included via the second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) method. On the basis of a variational argument, it can be shown that the predicted potential curves represent an upper limit to the true potential curves. The potentials provide a basis for assessing corrections required to the ZBL and Molière screened Coulombic potentials, which are typically found to be too repulsive below 1-2 keV. These corrections significantly improve the accuracy of the sputter yield predicted by molecular dynamics for Ni(1 0 0), whereas the sputter yield predicted for Cu(1 0 0) is negligibly affected. The validity of the pair potential approximation in the repulsive region of the potential is tested by direct calculation of the potentials arising from the interaction of either an Ar or Cu atom with a Cu3 cluster. The pairwise approximation represents the Ar-Cu3 potential energy function with an error <3 eV at all Ar-Cu3 separations. For Cu-Cu3, the pairwise approximation underestimates the potential by ca. 10 eV when the interstitial atom is located near the centre of the cluster.

  8. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    A new era in time-domain astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multimessenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  9. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters - through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  10. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years) as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves) these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses) spins) luminosity distances) and orbital parameters - through dense) obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers) highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  11. Gravitating instantons in 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferstl, Andrew; Tekin, Bayram; Weir, Victor

    2000-09-01

    We study the Einstein-Chern-Simons gravity coupled to Yang-Mills-Higgs theory in three-dimensional Euclidean space with a cosmological constant. The classical equations reduce to Bogomol'nyi type first order equations in curved space. There are BPS type gauge theory instanton (monopole) solutions of finite action in a gravitational instanton which itself has a finite action. We also discuss gauge theory instantons in the vacuum (zero action) AdS space. In addition we point out to some exact solutions which are singular.

  12. Gravitational Lensing Extends SETI Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, Richard

    Microwave SETI (The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) focuses on two primary strategies, the "Targeted Search" and the "All-Sky Survey." Although the goal of both strategies is the unequivocal discovery of a signal transmitted by intelligent species outside our solar system, they pursue the strategies in very different manners and have vastly different requirements. This chapter introduces Gravitational Lensing SETI (GL-SETI), a third strategy. Its goal is the unequivocal discovery of an extraterrestrial signal, with equipment and data processing requirements that are substantially different from the commonly-used strategies. This strategy is particularly suitable for use with smaller radio telescopes and has budgetary requirements suitable for individual researchers.

  13. Gravitational drainage of foam films.

    PubMed

    Sett, S; Sinha-Ray, S; Yarin, A L

    2013-04-23

    Gravitational drainage from thick plane vertical soap films and hemispherical bubbles is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments involve microinterferometry kindred to the one used in the experiments in the Scheludko cell. The following surfactants were used in the experiments: cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), anionic Pantene shampoo which primarily contains sodium lauryl sulfate, nonionic tetraethylene glycol monooctyl ether (C8E4), and nonionic Pluronic (P-123) surfactants at different concentrations. The theoretical results explain the drainage mechanism and are used to develop a new method of measurement of the surface elasticity and to test it on the above-mentioned surfactants. PMID:23557027

  14. Gravitational effects on inflaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-05-22

    We point out that the inflaton inevitably couples to all non-conformally coupled matters gravitationally through an oscillation in the Hubble parameter or the cosmic scale factor. It leads to particle production during the inflaton oscillation regime, which is most efficient just after inflation. Moreover, the analysis is extended to the model with non-minimal inflaton couplings to gravity, in which the Hubble parameter oscillates more violently. We apply our results to the graviton production by the inflaton: gravitons are also produced just after inflation, but the non-minimal coupling does not induce inflaton decay into the graviton pair.

  15. Gravitational polarizability of black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2009-08-15

    The gravitational polarizability properties of black holes are compared and contrasted with their electromagnetic polarizability properties. The 'shape' or 'height' multipolar Love numbers h{sub l} of a black hole are defined and computed. They are then compared to their electromagnetic analogs h{sub l}{sup EM}. The Love numbers h{sub l} give the height of the lth multipolar 'tidal bulge' raised on the horizon of a black hole by faraway masses. We also discuss the shape of the tidal bulge raised by a test-mass m, in the limit where m gets very close to the horizon.

  16. A VLA gravitational lens survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. N.; Turner, E. L.; Burke, B. F.; Lawrence, C. R.; Bennett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    A VLA survey designed to detect gravitational lensing on sub-arc second and arc second scales is described, and preliminary results of radio data are presented. In particular, it is found that the density of matter in the form of a uniform comoving number density of 10 to the 11th - 10 to the 12th solar mass compact objects, luminous or dark, must be substantially less than the critical density. Data obtained for the radio source 1042+178 are briefly examined.

  17. Critical behavior of gravitating sphalerons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, R. Steven; Hirschmann, Eric W.

    2003-07-01

    We examine the gravitational collapse of sphaleron type configurations in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. Working in spherical symmetry, we investigate the critical behavior in this model. We provide evidence that for various initial configurations, there can be three different critical transitions between possible end states with different critical solutions sitting on the threshold between these outcomes. In addition, we show that within the dispersive and black hole regimes there are new possible end states: namely, a stable, regular sphaleron and a stable, hairy black hole.

  18. Towards an alternative gravitational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J. A.; Beltrán, L. A.

    2015-03-01

    In 1680, Cassini proposed oval curves as alternative trajectories for the visible planets around the sun. The Cassini ovals were of course overshadowed by the Kepler's first law (1609), namely the planets move around the sun describing conic orbits. Here, we describe the possibility that the Cassini's idea works at larger or smaller scales. Indeed, we consider the Spiric curves (which are a generalization of the Cassini oval) and present the first steps towards a Spiric gravitational theory. We show that from our formalism an ellipse associated with a planet can be obtained as a particular case.

  19. Primordial gravitational waves and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Dodelson, Scott; Meyer, Stephan

    2010-05-21

    The observation of primordial gravitational waves could provide a new and unique window on the earliest moments in the history of the universe and on possible new physics at energies many orders of magnitude beyond those accessible at particle accelerators. Such waves might be detectable soon, in current or planned satellite experiments that will probe for characteristic imprints in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, or later with direct space-based interferometers. A positive detection could provide definitive evidence for inflation in the early universe and would constrain new physics from the grand unification scale to the Planck scale.

  20. Review on possible gravitational anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Xavier E.

    2005-01-01

    This is an updated introductory review of 2 possible gravitational anomalies that has attracted part of the Scientific community: the Allais effect that occur during solar eclipses, and the Pioneer 10 spacecraft anomaly, experimented also by Pioneer 11 and Ulysses spacecrafts. It seems that, to date, no satisfactory conventional explanation exist to these phenomena, and this suggests that possible new physics will be needed to account for them. The main purpose of this review is to announce 3 other new measurements that will be carried on during the 2005 solar eclipses in Panama and Colombia (Apr. 8) and in Portugal (Oct.15).

  1. Regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential by inverting satellite gravitational gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Hamáčková, Eliška; Novák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential in the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients data is discussed in this contribution. The disturbing gravitational potential is obtained by inverting surface integral formulas which transform the disturbing gravitational potential onto disturbing gravitational gradients in the spherical local north-oriented frame. Two numerical approaches that solve the inverse problem are considered. In the first approach, the integral formulas are rigorously decomposed into two parts, that is, the effects of the gradient data within near and distant zones. While the effect of the near zone data is sought as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant zone data is synthesized from the global gravitational model GGM05S using spectral weights given by truncation error coefficients up to the degree 150. In the second approach, a reference gravitational field up to the degree 180 is applied to reduce and smooth measured gravitational gradients. In both cases we recovered the disturbing gravitational potential from each of the four well-measured gravitational gradients of the GOCE satellite separately as well as from their combination. Obtained results are compared with the EGM2008, DIR-r2, TIM-r2 and SPW-r2 global gravitational models. The best fit was achieved for EGM2008 and the second approach combining all four well-measured gravitational gradients with rms of 1.231 m2 s-2.

  2. Dyadosphere formed in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue Shesheng

    2008-10-10

    We first recall the concept of Dyadosphere (electron-positron-photon plasma around a formed black holes) and its motivation, and recall on (i) the Dirac process: annihilation of electron-positron pairs to photons; (ii) the Breit-Wheeler process: production of electron-positron pairs by photons with the energy larger than electron-positron mass threshold; the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian and rate for the process of electron-positron production in a constant electric field. We present a general formula for the pair-production rate in the semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanical tunneling. We also present in the Quantum Electro-Dynamics framework, the calculations of the Schwinger rate and effective Lagrangian for constant electromagnetic fields. We give a review on the electron-positron plasma oscillation in constant electric fields, and its interaction with photons leading to energy and number equipartition of photons, electrons and positrons. The possibility of creating an overcritical field in astrophysical condition is pointed out. We present the discussions and calculations on (i) energy extraction from gravitational collapse; (ii) the formation of Dyadosphere in gravitational collapsing process, and (iii) its hydrodynamical expansion in Reissner Nordstroem geometry. We calculate the spectrum and flux of photon radiation at the point of transparency, and make predictions for short Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  3. Gravitational waves from axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebecker, Arthur; Jaeckel, Joerg; Rompineve, Fabrizio; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2016-11-01

    Large field inflation is arguably the simplest and most natural variant of slow-roll inflation. Axion monodromy may be the most promising framework for realising this scenario. As one of its defining features, the long-range polynomial potential possesses short-range, instantonic modulations. These can give rise to a series of local minima in the post-inflationary region of the potential. We show that for certain parameter choices the inflaton populates more than one of these vacua inside a single Hubble patch. This corresponds to a dynamical phase decomposition, analogously to what happens in the course of thermal first-order phase transitions. In the subsequent process of bubble wall collisions, the lowest-lying axionic minimum eventually takes over all space. Our main result is that this violent process sources gravitational waves, very much like in the case of a first-order phase transition. We compute the energy density and peak frequency of the signal, which can lie anywhere in the mHz-GHz range, possibly within reach of next-generation interferometers. We also note that this ``dynamical phase decomposition" phenomenon and its gravitational wave signal are more general and may apply to other inflationary or reheating scenarios with axions and modulated potentials.

  4. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  5. Confusion in Cosmology and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, C.; Katebi, R.; Schmidt, N. O.

    2016-10-01

    In a series of papers, Santilli and collaborators released various strong statements against the general theory of relativity (GTR) and the standard ΛCDM model of cosmology. In this paper we show that such claims are due to misunderstandings of basic concepts of gravitation and cosmology. In particular, we show that Santilli and collaborators demonstrated neither that the GTR is wrong, nor that the Universe is not expanding. We also show that the so-called iso-gravitation theory (IGT) of Santilli is in macroscopic contrast with geodesic motion and, in turn, with the Equivalence Principle (EP) and must therefore be ultimately rejected. Finally, we show that, although the so called iso-redshift could represent an interesting alternative (similar to the tired light theory historically proposed by Zwicky) to the Universe expansion from a qualitative point of view, it must be rejected from a quantitative point of view because the effect of iso-redshift is 10-6 smaller than the effect requested to achieve the cosmological redshift.

  6. Black holes as gravitational atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Cenalo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it was argued [A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1207.3123, A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1304.6483], via a delicate thought experiment, that it is not consistent to simultaneously require that (a) Hawking radiation is pure, (b) effective field theory is valid outside a stretched horizon and (c) infalling observers encounter nothing unusual as they cross the horizon. These are the three fundamental assumptions underlying Black Hole Complementarity and the authors proposed that the most conservative resolution of the paradox is that (c) is false and the infalling observer burns up at the horizon (the horizon acts as a "firewall"). However, the firewall violates the equivalence principle and breaks the CPT invariance of quantum gravity. This led Hawking to propose recently that gravitational collapse may not end up producing event horizons, although he did not give a mechanism for how this may happen. Here we will support Hawking's conclusion in a quantum gravitational model of dust collapse. We will show that continued collapse to a singularity can only be achieved by combining two independent and entire solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We interpret the paradox as simply forbidding such a combination. This leads naturally to a picture in which matter condenses on the apparent horizon during quantum collapse.

  7. Towards noiseless gravitational lensing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Raul E.; Chen, Ruizhu; Hilbert, Stefan; Abel, Tom

    2014-11-01

    The microphysical properties of the dark matter (DM) particle can, in principle, be constrained by the properties and abundance of substructures in galaxy clusters, as measured through strong gravitational lensing. Unfortunately, there is a lack of accurate theoretical predictions for the lensing signal of these substructures, mainly because of the discreteness noise inherent to N-body simulations. Here, we present a method, dubbed as Recursive-TCM, that is able to provide lensing predictions with an arbitrarily low discreteness noise. This solution is based on a novel way of interpreting the results of N-body simulations, where particles simply trace the evolution and distortion of Lagrangian phase-space volume elements. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this method compared to the widely used density estimators based on cloud-in-cells and adaptive-kernel smoothing. Applying the new method to a cluster-sized DM halo simulated in warm and cold DM scenarios, we show how the expected differences in their substructure population translate into differences in convergence and magnification maps. We anticipate that our method will provide the high-precision theoretical predictions required to interpret and fully exploit strong gravitational lensing observations.

  8. Confusion in Cosmology and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, C.; Katebi, R.; Schmidt, N. O.

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers, Santilli and collaborators released various strong statements against the general theory of relativity (GTR) and the standard ΛCDM model of cosmology. In this paper we show that such claims are due to misunderstandings of basic concepts of gravitation and cosmology. In particular, we show that Santilli and collaborators demonstrated neither that the GTR is wrong, nor that the Universe is not expanding. We also show that the so-called iso-gravitation theory (IGT) of Santilli is in macroscopic contrast with geodesic motion and, in turn, with the Equivalence Principle (EP) and must therefore be ultimately rejected. Finally, we show that, although the so called iso-redshift could represent an interesting alternative (similar to the tired light theory historically proposed by Zwicky) to the Universe expansion from a qualitative point of view, it must be rejected from a quantitative point of view because the effect of iso-redshift is 10-6 smaller than the effect requested to achieve the cosmological redshift.

  9. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  10. A report on the gravitational redshift test for non-metric theories of gravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The frequencies of two atomic hydrogen masers and of three superconducting cavity stabilized oscillators were compared as the ensemble of oscillators was moved in the Sun's gravitational field by the rotation and orbital motion of the Earth. Metric gravitation theories predict that the gravitational redshifts of the two types of oscillators are identical, and that there should be no relative frequency shift between the oscillators; nonmetric theories, in contrast, predict a frequency shift between masers and SCSOs that is proportional to the change in solar gravitational potential experienced by the oscillators. The results are consistent with metric theories of gravitation at a level of 2%.

  11. Separating the effects of repulsive and attractive forces on the phase diagram, interfacial, and critical properties of simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Herrera, M.; Moreno-Razo, J. A.; Guzmán, O.; López-Lemus, J.; Ibarra-Tandi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular simulations in the canonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles were performed to study the effect of varying the shape of the intermolecular potential on the phase diagram, critical, and interfacial properties of model fluids. The molecular interactions were modeled by the Approximate Non-Conformal (ANC) theory potentials. Unlike the Lennard-Jones or Morse potentials, the ANC interactions incorporate parameters (called softnesses) that modulate the steepness of the potential in their repulsive and attractive parts independently. This feature allowed us to separate unambiguously the role of each region of the potential on setting the thermophysical properties. In particular, we found positive linear correlation between all critical coordinates and the attractive and repulsive softness, except for the critical density and the attractive softness which are negatively correlated. Moreover, we found that the physical properties related to phase coexistence (such as span of the liquid phase between the critical and triple points, variations in the P-T vaporization curve, interface width, and surface tension) are more sensitive to changes in the attractive softness than to the repulsive one. Understanding the different roles of attractive and repulsive forces on phase coexistence may contribute to developing more accurate models of liquids and their mixtures.

  12. Slit-Dependent Endocytic Trafficking of the Robo Receptor Is Required for Son of Sevenless Recruitment and Midline Axon Repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Chance, Rebecca K.; Bashaw, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how axon guidance receptors are activated by their extracellular ligands to regulate growth cone motility is critical to learning how proper wiring is established during development. Roundabout (Robo) is one such guidance receptor that mediates repulsion from its ligand Slit in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we show that endocytic trafficking of the Robo receptor in response to Slit-binding is necessary for its repulsive signaling output. Dose-dependent genetic interactions and in vitro Robo activation assays support a role for Clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and entry into both the early and late endosomes as positive regulators of Slit-Robo signaling. We identify two conserved motifs in Robo’s cytoplasmic domain that are required for its Clathrin-dependent endocytosis and activation in vitro; gain of function and genetic rescue experiments provide strong evidence that these trafficking events are required for Robo repulsive guidance activity in vivo. Our data support a model in which Robo’s ligand-dependent internalization from the cell surface to the late endosome is essential for receptor activation and proper repulsive guidance at the midline by allowing recruitment of the downstream effector Son of Sevenless in a spatially constrained endocytic trafficking compartment. PMID:26335920

  13. Gravitational bending of light rays in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsupko, O. Yu.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the gravitational lensing effect in presence of plasma. We observe that in a homogeneous plasma the gravitational deflection angle differs from that in vacuum, and it depends on the frequency of the photon. We discuss observational consequences of this dependence for the point-mass lensing and estimate possibility of the observation of this effect by the planned project Radioastron.

  14. A symplectic framework for multiplane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumiya, S.; Janeczko, S.

    2003-05-01

    We construct a new framework for the study of multiplane gravitational lensing from the view point of symplectic geometry. Symplectic relations are used to compose the systems and weaker Lagrangian equivalence is applied for classifying the caustics of multiplane gravitational lensing.

  15. Onthe static and spherically symmetric gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Ioan; Maftei, Gheorghe; Mociutchi, Cleopatra

    Starting from a generalization of Einstein 's theory of gravitation, proposed by one of the authors (Cleopatra Mociutchi), the authors study a particular spherical symmetric case. Among other one obtain the compatibility conditions for the existence of the static and spherically symmetruic gravitational filed in the case of extended Einstein equation.

  16. The wavefunction of a gravitating shell

    SciTech Connect

    Dokuchaev, V. I. Chernov, S. V.

    2010-10-15

    We have calculated a discrete spectrum and found an exact analytical solution in the form of Meixner polynomials for the wavefunction of a thin gravitating shell in the Reissner-Nordstroem geometry. We show that there is no extreme state in the quantum spectrum of the gravitating shell, as in the case of an extreme black hole.

  17. Gravitational consequences of modern field theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Some gravitational consequences of certain extensions of Einstein's general theory of relativity are discussed. These theories are not alternative theories of gravity in the usual sense. It is assumed that general relativity is the appropriate description of all gravitational phenomena which were observed to date.

  18. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 9, Universal Gravitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the ninth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials relating to universal gravitation are presented in this study guide. The subject is concerned with the quantitative meaning of the law of universal gravitation and its applications in astronomy. The content is arranged in scrambled form, and the use of matrix…

  19. Gravitational potential: real-life results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium surface of a large body of water is a gravitational equipotential. However, that does not imply that in a local region of increased gravitational field g the height h of the water surface will be lower to keep the potential gh constant, in contrast to a recent claim to that effect.

  20. How Spherical Is a Cube (Gravitationally)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanny, Jeff; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    An important concept that is presented in the discussion of Newton's law of universal gravitation is that the gravitational effect external to a spherically symmetric mass distribution is the same as if all of the mass of the distribution were concentrated at the center. By integrating over ring elements of a spherical shell, we show that the…

  1. Long-range repulsive charged colloids in and out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, M. N.

    2013-04-01

    The research described in this thesis focusses on the behaviour of charged colloidal particles with long-range repulsive interactions. The experimental model system we used consisted of sterically stabilised charged poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloids suspended in cyclohexyl bromide (CHB). In this low-polar solvent very low ionic concentrations can be achieved, resulting in a large Debye screening length (on the order of the particle diameter), i.e. long-range interactions. The pair interaction in these systems is often modelled by the hard-core repulsive Yukawa (or screened Coulomb) potential, which we used for our computer simulations. In Monte Carlo simulations we investigated the effect of size polydispersity on the crystal-fluid transition. We observed a shift to higher volume fraction of the crystal-fluid transition upon increasing the polydispersity. At high polydispersities parts of the higher charged systems that were initially crystalline became amorphous. The amorphous parts had a higher polydispersity than the crystalline parts, indicating the presence of a terminal polydispersity beyond which the homogeneous crystal phase was no longer stable. We investigated the slow dynamics close to the glass transition as a function of the range of the potential, also in simulations. We determined the long-time structural relaxation time and long-time self-diffusion coefficient, which could be well fitted by a power law predicted by mode-coupling theory (MCT) and by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation. In experiments we used confocal microscopy to study the system quantitatively in 3D on a single-particle level. We performed micro-electrophoresis measurements to determine the surface potential and charge of the PMMA particles at a volume fraction around 0.02. The surface potential was roughly independent of the diameter of the particle and was found to be lower for unlocked particles (steric stabiliser adsorbed to surface) than for locked particles

  2. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Interplay of Attractive and Repulsive Interactions in Nanoparticle-Polymer System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2016-02-16

    The phase behavior of nanoparticle (silica)-polymer (polyethylene glycol) system without and with an electrolyte (NaCl) has been studied. It is observed that nanoparticle-polymer system behaves very differently in the presence of electrolyte. In the absence of electrolyte, the nanoparticle-polymer system remains in one-phase even at very high polymer concentrations. On the other hand, a re-entrant phase behavior is found in the presence of electrolyte, where one-phase (individual) system undergoes two-phase (nanoparticle aggregation) and then back to one-phase with increasing polymer concentration. The regime of two-phase system has been tuned by varying the electrolyte concentration. The polymer concentration range over which the two-phase system exists is significantly enhanced with the increase in the electrolyte concentration. These systems have been characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments of contrast-marching the polymer to the solvent. The data are modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system is explained by interplay of attractive (polymer-induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles) and repulsive (nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion and polymer-polymer repulsion) interactions present in the system. In the absence of electrolyte, the strong electrostatic repulsion between nanoparticles dominates over the polymer-induced depletion attraction and the nanoparticle system remains in one-phase. With addition of electrolyte, depletion attraction overcomes electrostatic repulsion at some polymer concentration, resulting into nanoparticle aggregation and two-phase system. Further addition of polymer increases the polymer-polymer repulsion which eventually reduces the strength of depletion and hence re-entrant phase behavior. The effects of varying electrolyte concentration on the phase

  3. Separation of peptides and intact proteins by electrostatic repulsion reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-12-29

    A new brand of BEH-C18 hybrid particles chemically bonded to a leash carrying an amine group permits the implementation of electrostatic repulsive interactions chromatography. Using columns packed with this material, the influence of the concentration of positive charges bonded to the BEH-C18 surface on the overloaded band profiles of a few positively charged peptides and proteins was investigated in the gradient elution mode. Three columns packed with endcapped BEH-C18 particles bonded with three different surface-charge densities (LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH) were used and compared with those provided by a column packed with non-doped, endcapped BEH-C18 particles. The surface concentrations of fixed charges in the LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH columns were estimated at 0.029, 0.050, and 0.064μmol/m(2), for example, about two orders of magnitude smaller than the surface density of bonded C18 chains (2.1μmol/m(2)). Three different mobile phase additives (0.1% v/v of trifluoro-acetic, phosphoric, and formic acid) were used to optimize the purification levels of proteins under different loading conditions. The weak ion-pairing ions (formate and phosphate) generate smaller retention but broader, more fronting band profiles than those eluted with a stronger ion-pairing ion (trifluoroactate). This effect is worse in the presence of fixed charges at the surface of the BEH-C18 particles. This was explained by an enhanced anti-Langmuirian adsorption behavior of the charged proteins in the presence of fixed surface charges. As the protein concentration increases in the bulk, so does the internal ionic strength, the electrostatic repulsive interactions weaken, and retention increases. Band fronting is mostly eliminated by replacing weak ion-pairing acids with TFA with which the adsorption isotherm remains weakly langmuirian. Faster but still complete gradient separation of insulin and myoglobin were achieved with the HIGH column than with the reference neutral column, despite a measurable

  4. Optics in a nonlinear gravitational plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational waves can act like gravitational lenses, affecting the observed positions, brightnesses, and redshifts of distant objects. Exact expressions for such effects are derived here in general relativity, allowing for arbitrarily-moving sources and observers in the presence of plane-symmetric gravitational waves. At least for freely falling sources and observers, it is shown that the commonly-used predictions of linear perturbation theory can be generically overshadowed by nonlinear effects; even for very weak gravitational waves, higher-order perturbative corrections involve secularly-growing terms which cannot necessarily be neglected when considering observations of sufficiently distant sources. Even on more moderate scales where linear effects remain at least marginally dominant, nonlinear corrections are qualitatively different from their linear counterparts. There is a sense in which they can, for example, mimic the existence of a third type of gravitational wave polarization.

  5. C1IV:. Gravitational Wave Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2002-09-01

    Resonant bar detectors are routinely searching for astronomical sources of gravitational waves and to setting upper limits on event rates. Interferometric detectors are beginning to operate at sensitivity levels good enough to set meaningful upper limits and begin astrophysical searches. With the long baseline interferometers scheduled to take data at unprecedented sensitivity levels the next few years will be a very exciting period for gravitational waves. In session C1iv there were talks focusing on gravitational wave searches (Krolak and Sintes), setting upper limits on astrophysical signals (Brady and Whelan), theoretical developments in modelling binary black holes (Iyer), testing general relativity with gravitational wave data (Will) and tools for gravitational wave data analysis (Schutz). There was also a one-hour round-table discussion on setting upper limits chaired by Andersson.

  6. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  7. Comparing numerical and analytic approximate gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Nousha; Lovelace, Geoffrey; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A direct observation of gravitational waves will test Einstein's theory of general relativity under the most extreme conditions. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, began searching for gravitational waves in September 2015 with three times the sensitivity of initial LIGO. To help Advanced LIGO detect as many gravitational waves as possible, a major research effort is underway to accurately predict the expected waves. In this poster, I will explore how the gravitational waveform produced by a long binary-black-hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown is affected by how fast the larger black hole spins. In particular, I will present results from simulations of merging black holes, completed using the Spectral Einstein Code (black-holes.org/SpEC.html), including some new, long simulations designed to mimic black hole-neutron star mergers. I will present comparisons of the numerical waveforms with analytic approximations.

  8. Types of biological reactions to the gravitation loads.

    PubMed

    Pestov, I D

    1997-07-01

    The nature of adaptation to gravitational loads is reviewed. Topics include an organism's antigravitation function, exposure to gravitational loads, types of physiological reactions, and results of adaptation.

  9. Exploring gravitational theories beyond Horndeski

    SciTech Connect

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Langlois, David; Piazza, Federico E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-partis7.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2015-02-01

    We have recently proposed a new class of gravitational scalar-tensor theories free from Ostrogradski instabilities, in ref. [1]. As they generalize Horndeski theories, or ''generalized'' galileons, we call them G{sup 3}. These theories possess a simple formulation when the time hypersurfaces are chosen to coincide with the uniform scalar field hypersurfaces. We confirm that they contain only three propagating degrees of freedom by presenting the details of the Hamiltonian formulation. We examine the coupling between these theories and matter. Moreover, we investigate how they transform under a disformal redefinition of the metric. Remarkably, these theories are preserved by disformal transformations that depend on the scalar field gradient, which also allow to map subfamilies of G{sup 3} into Horndeski theories.

  10. Exploring gravitational theories beyond Horndeski

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Langlois, David; Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-02-01

    We have recently proposed a new class of gravitational scalar-tensor theories free from Ostrogradski instabilities, in ref. [1]. As they generalize Horndeski theories, or "generalized" galileons, we call them G3. These theories possess a simple formulation when the time hypersurfaces are chosen to coincide with the uniform scalar field hypersurfaces. We confirm that they contain only three propagating degrees of freedom by presenting the details of the Hamiltonian formulation. We examine the coupling between these theories and matter. Moreover, we investigate how they transform under a disformal redefinition of the metric. Remarkably, these theories are preserved by disformal transformations that depend on the scalar field gradient, which also allow to map subfamilies of G3 into Horndeski theories.

  11. CHAOTIC ZONES AROUND GRAVITATING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2015-01-20

    The extent of the continuous zone of chaotic orbits of a small-mass tertiary around a system of two gravitationally bound primaries of comparable masses (a binary star, a binary black hole, a binary asteroid, etc.) is estimated analytically, as a function of the tertiary's orbital eccentricity. The separatrix map theory is used to demonstrate that the central continuous chaos zone emerges (above a threshold in the primaries' mass ratio) due to overlapping of the orbital resonances corresponding to the integer ratios p:1 between the tertiary and the central binary periods. In this zone, the unlimited chaotic orbital diffusion of the tertiary takes place, up to its ejection from the system. The primaries' mass ratio, above which such a chaotic zone is universally present at all initial eccentricities of the tertiary, is estimated. The diversity of the observed orbital configurations of biplanetary and circumbinary exosystems is shown to be in accord with the existence of the primaries' mass parameter threshold.

  12. Strong Gravitational Lensing with SNAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2001-12-01

    As currently configured, SNAP should cover an area of sky to sufficient depth to observe tens of thousands of strong (ie multiple-imaging) gravitational lenses. This could provide an unprecedented database for performing cosmography, studies of large scale structure and galactic structure.and should complement the weak lensing program which will concentrate on larger scales. The challenge will be to recognize multiple imaging efficiently in an unbiased way and to organize effective follow up so as to obtain spectroscopic redshifts and monitor variable sources, when appropriate. Experience with the CLASS radio survey and the CASTLES program will be invaluable as we transition from the detailed study of a few tens of strong lenses through the ACS ultra-deep, deep and wide surveys (which should yield hundreds of examples of multiple imaging) to the larger samples envisaged from SNAP. New approaches to data analysis will be needed and coordinated planning with other proposed large survey instruments, like SKA, will be essential.

  13. Gauss-Bonnet gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter we study some variant forms of gravitational baryogenesis by using higher order terms containing the partial derivative of the Gauss-Bonnet scalar coupled to the baryonic current. This scenario extends the well known theory that uses a similar coupling between the Ricci scalar and the baryonic current. One appealing feature of the scenario we study is that the predicted baryon asymmetry during a radiation domination era is non-zero. We calculate the baryon to entropy ratio for the Gauss-Bonnet term and by using the observational constraints we investigate which are the allowed forms of the R + F (G) gravity controlling the evolution. Also we briefly discuss some alternative higher order terms that can generate a non-zero baryon asymmetry, even in the conformal invariance limit.

  14. Gravitational effects in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.; Chopra, M.

    1983-01-01

    The theories of diffusion-controlled dendritic crystallization will be reviewed briefly, along with recently published critical experiments on the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth in pure substances. The influence of the gravitational body force on dendrite growth kinetics will be shown to be highly dependent on the growth orientation with respect to the gravity vector and on the level of the thermal supercooling. In fact, an abrupt transition occurs at a critical supercooling, above which diffusional transport dominates the growth process and below which convective transport dominates. Our most recent work on binary mixtures shows that dilute solute additions influence the crystallization process indirectly, by altering the interfacial stability, rather than by directly affecting the transport mode. Directions for future studies in this field will also be discussed.

  15. Gravitational effects on electrochemical batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, R. E.; Juvinall, G. L.; Uchiyama, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    The existing work on gravitational effects on electrochemical batteries is summarized, certain conclusions are drawn, and recommendations are made for future activities in this field. The effects of sustained high-G environments on cycle silver-zinc and nickel-cadmium cells have been evaluated over four complete cycles in the region of 10 to 75 G. Although no effects on high current discharge performances or on ampere-hour capacity were noted, severe zinc migration and sloughing of active material from the zinc electrode were observed. This latter effect constitutes real damage, and over a long period of time would result in loss of capacity. It is recommended that a zero-G battery experiment be implemented. Both an orbiting satellite and a sounding rocket approach are being considered.

  16. Centrifuges in gravitational physiology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Davies, Phil; Fuller, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Data from space flight and ground based experiments have clearly demonstrated the importance of Earth gravity for normal physiological function in man and animals. Gravitational Physiology is concerned with the role and influence of gravity on physiological systems. Research in this field examines how we perceive and respond to gravity and the mechanisms underlying these responses. Inherent in our search for answers to these questions is the ability to alter gravity, which is not physically possible without leaving Earth. However, useful experimental paradigms have been to modify the perceived force of gravity by changing either the orientation of subjects to the gravity vector (i.e., postural changes) or by applying inertial forces to augment the magnitude of the gravity vector. The later technique has commonly been used by applying centripetal force via centrifugation.

  17. Repulsive van der Waals forces enable Pickering emulsions with non-touching colloids.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Nina A; van der Hoeven, Jessi E S; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; van der Linden, Marjolein N; Filion, Laura; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2016-09-21

    Emulsions stabilized by solid particles, called Pickering emulsions, offer promising applications in drug delivery, cosmetics, food science and the manufacturing of porous materials. This potential stems from their high stability against coalescence and 'surfactant-free' nature. Generally, Pickering emulsions require that the solid particles are wetted by both phases and as a result, the adsorption free energy is often large with respect to the thermal energy (kBT). Here we provide the first experimental proof for an alternative scenario: non-touching (effectively non-wetting), charged, particles that are completely immersed in the oil phase through a balance of charge induced attractions and repulsions caused by van der Waals forces. These particles nonetheless stabilize the emulsion. The main advantage of this novel adsorption mechanism is that these particles can easily be detached from the interface simply by adding salt. This not only makes the finding fundamentally of interest, but also enables a triggered de-emulsification and particle recovery, which is useful in fields like enhanced oil recovery, heterogeneous catalysis, and emulsion polymerization. PMID:27406917

  18. Dragon (repulsive guidance molecule b) inhibits IL-6 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Niederkofler, Vera; Salie, Rishard; Chen, Shanzhuo; Samad, Tarek A; Hong, Charles C; Arber, Silvia; Vyas, Jatin M; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, Herbert Y

    2011-02-01

    Repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family members RGMa, RGMb/Dragon, and RGMc/hemojuvelin were found recently to act as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptors that enhance BMP signaling activity. Although our previous studies have shown that hemojuvelin regulates hepcidin expression and iron metabolism through the BMP pathway, the role of the BMP signaling mediated by Dragon remains largely unknown. We have shown previously that Dragon is expressed in neural cells, germ cells, and renal epithelial cells. In this study, we demonstrate that Dragon is highly expressed in macrophages. Studies with RAW264.7 and J774 macrophage cell lines reveal that Dragon negatively regulates IL-6 expression in a BMP ligand-dependent manner via the p38 MAPK and Erk1/2 pathways but not the Smad1/5/8 pathway. We also generated Dragon knockout mice and found that IL-6 is upregulated in macrophages and dendritic cells derived from whole lung tissue of these mice compared with that in respective cells derived from wild-type littermates. These results indicate that Dragon is an important negative regulator of IL-6 expression in immune cells and that Dragon-deficient mice may be a useful model for studying immune and inflammatory disorders.

  19. Dragon (repulsive guidance molecule b, RGMb) is a novel gene that promotes colorectal cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Chen, Guo-Bin; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Wang, Huan-Huan; Li, Ye-Sen; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Li, Shao; Xia, Yin; Ren, Jian-Lin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2015-08-21

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC initiation, growth and metastasis are poorly understood. Dragon (RGMb), a member of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family, has been recently identified as a co-receptor for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, but the role of Dragon in CRC development is undefined. Here, we show that Dragon expression was increased in colon cancer tissues compared to control tissues in CAC mouse model and in human patients. Dragon promoted proliferation of CT26.WT and CMT93 colon cancer cells and accelerated tumor growth in the xenograft mouse model. Dragon's action on colon cancer development was mediated via the BMP4-Smad1/5/8 and Erk1/2 pathways. Therefore, our results have revealed that Dragon is a novel gene that promotes CRC growth through the BMP pathway. Dragon may be exploited as a potential therapeutic target for CRC treatment.

  20. The equilibrium properties and microstructure of mixtures of colloidal particles with long-range, soft repulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W.J.; Zukoski, C.F.

    1999-02-15

    Osmotic pressure and elastic moduli of bimodal suspensions of particles experiencing long-range, soft repulsions were measured. At fixed osmotic pressure, the total suspension volume fraction, {phi}, varies linearly as the mixing ratio {phi}{sub l}/{phi} is increased from 0 to 1. Here {phi}{sub l} is the volume fraction of large particles based on total suspension volume. This result suggests the suspensions studied here are phase separated into domains containing primarily small and primarily large particles and is not expected for hard sphere suspensions where, at fixed osmotic pressure, {phi} passes through a maximum as {phi}{sub l}/{phi} is increased. Elastic moduli are well described by a model based on a composite microstructure where the domains of pure large and small particles must have the same osmotic pressure which fixes the local particle volume fraction and hence the elastic modulus in each phase. The existence of phase separation is supported by electron micrographs taken on samples prepared by rapidly drying suspensions with volume fractions near 0.6.

  1. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, William D; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability. PMID:27497576

  2. Observation of Attractive and Repulsive Polarons in a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Wacker, Lars; Skalmstang, Kristoffer T; Parish, Meera M; Levinsen, Jesper; Christensen, Rasmus S; Bruun, Georg M; Arlt, Jan J

    2016-07-29

    The problem of an impurity particle moving through a bosonic medium plays a fundamental role in physics. However, the canonical scenario of a mobile impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) has not yet been realized. Here, we use radio frequency spectroscopy of ultracold bosonic ^{39}K atoms to experimentally demonstrate the existence of a well-defined quasiparticle state of an impurity interacting with a BEC. We measure the energy of the impurity both for attractive and repulsive interactions, and find excellent agreement with theories that incorporate three-body correlations, both in the weak-coupling limits and across unitarity. The spectral response consists of a well-defined quasiparticle peak at weak coupling, while for increasing interaction strength, the spectrum is strongly broadened and becomes dominated by the many-body continuum of excited states. Crucially, no significant effects of three-body decay are observed. Our results open up exciting prospects for studying mobile impurities in a bosonic environment and strongly interacting Bose systems in general. PMID:27517777

  3. Confining and repulsive potentials from effective non-Abelian gauge fields in graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of shear and strain in graphene bilayers, under conditions where the distortion of the lattice gives rise to a smooth one-dimensional modulation in the stacking sequence of the bilayer. We show that strain and shear produce characteristic Moiré patterns which can have the same visual appearance on a large scale, but representing graphene bilayers with quite different electronic properties. The different features in the low-energy electronic bands can be ascribed to the effect of a fictitious non-Abelian gauge field mimicking the smooth modulation of the stacking order. Strained and sheared bilayers show a complementary behavior, which can be understood from the fact that the non-Abelian gauge field acts as a repulsive interaction in the former, expelling the electron density away from the stacking domain walls, while behaving as a confining interaction leading to localization of the electronic states in the sheared bilayers. In this latter case, the presence of the effective gauge field explains the development of almost flat low-energy bands, resembling the form of the zeroth Landau level characteristic of a Dirac fermion field. The estimate of the gauge field strength in those systems gives a magnitude of the order of several tens of tesla, implying a robust phenomenology that should be susceptible of being observed in suitably distorted bilayer samples.

  4. Repulsive Guidance Molecule is a structural bridge between Neogenin and Bone Morphogenetic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Eleanor G.; Bishop, Benjamin; Elegheert, Jonathan; Bell, Christian H.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Siebold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) control crucial processes spanning cell motility, adhesion, immune cell regulation and systemic iron metabolism. RGMs signal via two fundamental signaling cascades: the Neogenin (NEO1) and the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathways. Here, we report crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of all human RGM family members in complex with the BMP ligand BMP2, revealing a novel protein fold and a conserved BMP-binding mode. Our structural and functional data suggest a pH-linked mechanism for RGM-activated BMP signaling and offer a rationale for RGM mutations causing juvenile hemochromatosis. We also determined the ternary BMP2–RGM–NEO1 complex crystal structure, which combined with solution scattering and live-cell super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, indicates BMP-induced clustering of the RGM–NEO1 complex. Our results show how RGM acts as the central hub linking BMP and NEO1 and physically connecting these fundamental signaling pathways. PMID:25938661

  5. Chimeralike states in a network of oscillators under attractive and repulsive global coupling.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arindam; Hens, Chittaranjan; Bose, Mridul; Roy, Prodyot K; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report chimeralike states in an ensemble of oscillators using a type of global coupling consisting of two components: attractive and repulsive mean-field feedback. We identify the existence of two types of chimeralike states in a bistable Liénard system; in one type, both the coherent and the incoherent populations are in chaotic states (which we refer to as chaos-chaos chimeralike states) and, in another type, the incoherent population is in periodic state while the coherent population has irregular small oscillation. We find a metastable state in a parameter regime of the Liénard system where the coherent and noncoherent states migrate in time from one to another subpopulation. The relative size of the incoherent subpopulation, in the chimeralike states, remains almost stable with increasing size of the network. The generality of the coupling configuration in the origin of the chimeralike states is tested, using a second example of bistable system, the van der Pol-Duffing oscillator where the chimeralike states emerge as weakly chaotic in the coherent subpopulation and chaotic in the incoherent subpopulation. Furthermore, we apply the coupling, in a simplified form, to form a network of the chaotic Rössler system where both the noncoherent and the coherent subpopulations show chaotic dynamics. PMID:26764787

  6. Chimeralike states in a network of oscillators under attractive and repulsive global coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Arindam; Hens, Chittaranjan; Bose, Mridul; Roy, Prodyot K.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-12-01

    We report chimeralike states in an ensemble of oscillators using a type of global coupling consisting of two components: attractive and repulsive mean-field feedback. We identify the existence of two types of chimeralike states in a bistable Liénard system; in one type, both the coherent and the incoherent populations are in chaotic states (which we refer to as chaos-chaos chimeralike states) and, in another type, the incoherent population is in periodic state while the coherent population has irregular small oscillation. We find a metastable state in a parameter regime of the Liénard system where the coherent and noncoherent states migrate in time from one to another subpopulation. The relative size of the incoherent subpopulation, in the chimeralike states, remains almost stable with increasing size of the network. The generality of the coupling configuration in the origin of the chimeralike states is tested, using a second example of bistable system, the van der Pol-Duffing oscillator where the chimeralike states emerge as weakly chaotic in the coherent subpopulation and chaotic in the incoherent subpopulation. Furthermore, we apply the coupling, in a simplified form, to form a network of the chaotic Rössler system where both the noncoherent and the coherent subpopulations show chaotic dynamics.

  7. An attraction-repulsion point process model for respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joshua; Haran, Murali; Simeonov, Ivan; Fricks, John; Chiaromonte, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    How is the progression of a virus influenced by properties intrinsic to individual cells? We address this question by studying the susceptibility of cells infected with two strains of the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-A and RSV-B) in an in vitro experiment. Spatial patterns of infected cells give us insight into how local conditions influence susceptibility to the virus. We observe a complicated attraction and repulsion behavior, a tendency for infected cells to lump together or remain apart. We develop a new spatial point process model to describe this behavior. Inference on spatial point processes is difficult because the likelihood functions of these models contain intractable normalizing constants; we adapt an MCMC algorithm called double Metropolis-Hastings to overcome this computational challenge. Our methods are computationally efficient even for large point patterns consisting of over 10,000 points. We illustrate the application of our model and inferential approach to simulated data examples and fit our model to various RSV experiments. Because our model parameters are easy to interpret, we are able to draw meaningful scientific conclusions from the fitted models. PMID:25660222

  8. Three-dimensional electrospun alginate nanofiber mats via tailored charge repulsions.

    PubMed

    Bonino, Christopher A; Efimenko, Kirill; Jeong, Sung In; Krebs, Melissa D; Alsberg, Eben; Khan, Saad A

    2012-06-25

    The formation of 3D electrospun mat structures from alginate-polyethylene oxide (PEO) solution blends is reported. These unique architectures expand the capabilities of traditional electrospun mats for applications such as regenerative medicine, where a scaffold can help to promote tissue growth in three dimensions. The mat structures extend off the surface of the flat collector plate without the need of any modifications in the electrospinning apparatus, are self-supported when the electric field is removed, and are composed of bundles of nanofibers. A mechanism for the unique formations is proposed, based on the fiber-fiber repulsions from surface charges on the negatively charged alginate. Furthermore, the role of the electric field in the distribution of alginate within the nanofibers is discussed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to analyze the surface composition of the electrospun nanofiber mats and the data is related to cast films made in the absence of the electric field. Further techniques to tailor the 3D architecture and nanofiber morphology by changing the surface tension and relative humidity are also discussed.

  9. Observation of Attractive and Repulsive Polarons in a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Wacker, Lars; Skalmstang, Kristoffer T; Parish, Meera M; Levinsen, Jesper; Christensen, Rasmus S; Bruun, Georg M; Arlt, Jan J

    2016-07-29

    The problem of an impurity particle moving through a bosonic medium plays a fundamental role in physics. However, the canonical scenario of a mobile impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) has not yet been realized. Here, we use radio frequency spectroscopy of ultracold bosonic ^{39}K atoms to experimentally demonstrate the existence of a well-defined quasiparticle state of an impurity interacting with a BEC. We measure the energy of the impurity both for attractive and repulsive interactions, and find excellent agreement with theories that incorporate three-body correlations, both in the weak-coupling limits and across unitarity. The spectral response consists of a well-defined quasiparticle peak at weak coupling, while for increasing interaction strength, the spectrum is strongly broadened and becomes dominated by the many-body continuum of excited states. Crucially, no significant effects of three-body decay are observed. Our results open up exciting prospects for studying mobile impurities in a bosonic environment and strongly interacting Bose systems in general.

  10. Observation of Attractive and Repulsive Polarons in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Nils B.; Wacker, Lars; Skalmstang, Kristoffer T.; Parish, Meera M.; Levinsen, Jesper; Christensen, Rasmus S.; Bruun, Georg M.; Arlt, Jan J.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of an impurity particle moving through a bosonic medium plays a fundamental role in physics. However, the canonical scenario of a mobile impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) has not yet been realized. Here, we use radio frequency spectroscopy of ultracold bosonic 39K atoms to experimentally demonstrate the existence of a well-defined quasiparticle state of an impurity interacting with a BEC. We measure the energy of the impurity both for attractive and repulsive interactions, and find excellent agreement with theories that incorporate three-body correlations, both in the weak-coupling limits and across unitarity. The spectral response consists of a well-defined quasiparticle peak at weak coupling, while for increasing interaction strength, the spectrum is strongly broadened and becomes dominated by the many-body continuum of excited states. Crucially, no significant effects of three-body decay are observed. Our results open up exciting prospects for studying mobile impurities in a bosonic environment and strongly interacting Bose systems in general.

  11. Self-Organized Collective Crystal-Like Formations of the Attractive/repulsive Swarming System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wen-Qiang; Gao, Dan; Wang, Ying-Guan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive attractive/repulsive (A/R) swarming model is proposed to explore the role of self-organized formation in swarming systems. By defining the adjustable A/R range γi, which is affected by the localized steady state of agents, the standard collective crystal-like swarming formations are straightforwardly unfolded in different scale. Meanwhile, with numerical simulations and analyses, the results show that the adaptive A/R swarming model provides an effective solution to the current existing dilemma of the collective liquid-like formation with unexpected neighbor distances and the split crystal-like formation. The actual neighbor distance of the adaptive A/R model could converge to the expected neighbor distance as planned, based on the different settings of the expected neighbor distance and the A/R range. Moreover, such adjustable A/R swarming formations may find their potential applications such as the formation of self-organized multi-robots and unmanned aerial vehicles, the automatic networking of sensors, etc.

  12. Repulsive guidance molecule-a and demyelination: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takekazu; Tokita, Shigeru; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-09-01

    Drug development for neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury is challenging. One promising strategy is to target a molecule with multiple biological actions affecting divergent pathophysiological disease phases simultaneously since these diseases arise from multiple pathological phases. In recent years, we pursued this strategy with a focus on multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury and found that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa) inhibits regeneration of injured CNS axons following spinal cord injury. We also found that RGMa enhances CD4(+) T cell activation facilitating CNS demyelination in an animal model of MS, mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which supports the idea that RGMa has distinct pathological actions. The multiple functions of RGMa in the CNS and the immune system would provide a therapeutic opportunity to concurrently block the autoimmune reactions and axon injury in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. In this article, we introduce the therapeutic potential of targeting RGMa as a novel intervention for MS and spinal cord injury. PMID:22183806

  13. Influence of pH condition on colloidal suspension of exfoliated graphene oxide by electrostatic repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Long-Yue; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-02-15

    A facile chemical process is described to produce graphene oxide utilizing a zwitterions amino acid intermediate from graphite oxide sheets. 11-aminoundecanoic acid molecules were protonated to intercalate molecules into the graphite oxide sheets to achieve ion exchange, and the carboxyl groups were then ionized in a NaOH solution to exfoliate the graphite oxide sheets. In this way, the produced graphene oxide nanosheets were stably dispersed in water. The delaminated graphene nanosheets were confirmed by XRD, AFM, and TEM. XRD patterns indicated the d{sub 002}-spacing of the graphite greatly increased from 0.380 nm and 0.870 nm. AFM and TEM images showed that the ordered graphite crystal structure of graphene nanosheets was effectively exfoliated by this method. The prepared graphene nanosheets films showed 87.1% transmittance and a sheet resistance of 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} {Omega}/square. - Graphical abstract: A stable graphene oxide suspension could be quickly prepared by exfoliating a graphite oxide suspension by a host-guest electrostatic repulsion in aqueous solution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene nanosheets were prepared by a zwitterions amino acid intermediate from graphite oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 11-aminoundecanoic acid was protonated to intercalate molecules into the graphene oxide to achieve ion exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The d{sub 002}-spacing of the graphite oxide greatly increased from 0.330 nm to 0.415 nm after 11-aminoundecanoic acid treatment.

  14. Negative-mass mitigation of Coulomb repulsion for terahertz undulator radiation of electron bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Balal, N.; Magory, E.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Bratman, V. L.; Savilov, A. V.

    2015-10-19

    It is proposed to utilize the effect of negative mass for stabilization of the effective axial size of very dense and short electron bunches produced by photo-injector guns by using combined undulator and strong uniform magnetic fields. It has been shown that in the “abnormal” regime, an increase in the electron energy leads to a decrease in the axial velocity of the electron; due to the negative-mass effect, the Coulomb repulsion of electrons leads to their attraction and formation of a fairly stable and compact bunch “nucleus.” An undulator with a strong uniform magnetic field providing the negative-mass effect is designed for an experimental source of terahertz radiation. The use of the negative-mass regime in this experiment should result in a long-pulse coherent spontaneous undulator emission from a short dense moderately relativistic (5.5 MeV) photo-injector electron bunch with a high (up to 20%) efficiency and a narrow frequency spectrum.

  15. Exchange repulsive potential adaptable for electronic structure changes during chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yokogawa, D.

    2015-04-28

    Hybrid methods combining quantum mechanical (QM) and classical calculations are becoming important tools in chemistry. The popular approach to calculate the interaction between QM and classical calculations employs interatomic potentials. In most cases, the interatomic potential is constructed of an electrostatic (ES) potential and a non-ES potential. Because QM treatment is employed in the calculation of the ES potential, the electronic change can be considered in this ES potential. However, QM treatment of the non-ES potential is difficult because of high computational cost. To overcome this difficulty of evaluating the non-ES potential, we proposed an exchange repulsive potential as the main part of the non-ES potential on the basis of a QM approach. This potential is independent of empirical parameters and adaptable for electronic structure. We combined this potential with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field explicitly including spatial electron density distribution and successfully applied it to the chemical reactions in aqueous phase.

  16. Beyond Born-Mayer: Improved Models for Short-Range Repulsion in ab Initio Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Van Vleet, Mary J; Misquitta, Alston J; Stone, Anthony J; Schmidt, J R

    2016-08-01

    Short-range repulsion within intermolecular force fields is conventionally described by either Lennard-Jones (A/r(12)) or Born-Mayer (A exp(-Br)) forms. Despite their widespread use, these simple functional forms are often unable to describe the interaction energy accurately over a broad range of intermolecular distances, thus creating challenges in the development of ab initio force fields and potentially leading to decreased accuracy and transferability. Herein, we derive a novel short-range functional form based on a simple Slater-like model of overlapping atomic densities and an iterated stockholder atom (ISA) partitioning of the molecular electron density. We demonstrate that this Slater-ISA methodology yields a more accurate, transferable, and robust description of the short-range interactions at minimal additional computational cost compared to standard Lennard-Jones or Born-Mayer approaches. Finally, we show how this methodology can be adapted to yield the standard Born-Mayer functional form while still retaining many of the advantages of the Slater-ISA approach. PMID:27337546

  17. Systematically altering the hydrophobic nanobubble bridging capillary force from attractive to repulsive.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V

    2009-05-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to examine how ethanol/water concentration affects the nanobubble bridging capillary force between a hydrophobic silica colloidal probe and a hydrophobic silica wafer. Nanobubbles were produced on the solid surfaces by a previously utilised method which uses solvent-exchange and surface scanning. In pure water a strong, long range attractive force ( approximately 230 nm) with a single jump in step was measured, typical of an interaction between two nanobubbles attached to the hydrophobic surfaces. An increase in the ethanol concentration had little effect on the range of the force but dramatically reduced its magnitude. At an ethanol concentration of 40% by mass, the force became repulsive after the initial attractive jump in. Above an ethanol concentration of 40% by mass, the capillary force disappeared. The change in the force with ethanol concentration was explained using a capillary force model with constant volume and contact angle. The bridge geometry, contact angle, volume and rupture distance were determined for different ethanol concentrations.

  18. Theoretical and experimental evidence of level repulsion states and evanescent modes in sonic crystal stubbed waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Vasseur, J. O.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Hladky-Hennion, A. C.

    2012-02-01

    The complex band structures calculated using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE) reveal the presence of evanescent modes in periodic systems, never predicted by the classical \\omega(\\vec {k}) methods, providing novel interpretations of several phenomena as well as a complete picture of the system. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally observe that in the ranges of frequencies where a deaf band is traditionally predicted, an evanescent mode with excitable symmetry appears, changing drastically the interpretation of the transmission properties. On the other hand, the simplicity of the sonic crystals in which only the longitudinal polarization can be excited is used to interpret, without loss of generality, the level repulsion between symmetric and antisymmetric bands in sonic crystals as the presence of an evanescent mode connecting both repelled bands. These evanescent modes, obtained using EPWE, explain both the attenuation produced in this range of frequencies and the transfer of symmetry from one band to the other in good agreement with both experimental results and multiple scattering predictions. Thus, the evanescent properties of the periodic system have been revealed to be necessary for the design of new acoustic and electromagnetic applications based on periodicity.

  19. The composition of EphB2 clusters determines the strength in the cellular repulsion response

    PubMed Central

    Schaupp, Andreas; Sabet, Ola; Dudanova, Irina; Ponserre, Marion; Bastiaens, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Trans interactions of erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular (Eph) receptors with their membrane-bound ephrin ligands generate higher-order clusters that can form extended signaling arrays. The functional relevance of the cluster size for repulsive signaling is not understood. We used chemical dimerizers and fluorescence anisotropy to generate and visualize specific EphB2 cluster species in living cells. We find that cell collapse responses are induced by small-sized EphB2 clusters, suggesting that extended EphB2 arrays are dispensable and that EphB2 activation follows an ON–OFF switch with EphB2 dimers being inactive and trimers and tetramers being fully functional. Moreover, the strength of the collapse response is determined by the abundance of multimers over dimers within a cluster population: the more dimers are present, the weaker the response. Finally, we show that the C-terminal modules of EphB2 have negative regulatory effects on ephrin-induced clustering. These results shed new light on the mechanism and regulation of EphB2 activation and provide a model on how Eph signaling translates into graded cellular responses. PMID:24469634

  20. Repulsively driven frequency-increased-generators for durable energy harvesting from ultra-low frequency vibration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiaochu; Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2014-04-01

    An electromagnetic kinetic energy harvester has been developed, which can convert ultra-low-frequency motion and vibration energy into electrical power. This harvester employs a two-stage vibratory structure to collect low-frequency kinetic energy and effectively transfer it into electric power by using a pair of high-frequency resonant generators. Non-contact magnetic repulsive force is herein utilized for the 1st-stage sliding vibrator to drive the 2nd-stage resonators into frequency-up-conversion resonance. The non-contact actuation is helpful for durable and long-life working of the device. The prototyped device is fabricated and the design is well confirmed by experimental test. The harvester can be well operated at the frequency as low as 0.25 Hz. Under driving acceleration of 1 g at 0.5 Hz, the miniaturized harvester can generate a peak power of 4.42 mW and an average power of 158 μW. PMID:24784650

  1. Repulsive van der Waals forces enable Pickering emulsions with non-touching colloids.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Nina A; van der Hoeven, Jessi E S; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; van der Linden, Marjolein N; Filion, Laura; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2016-09-21

    Emulsions stabilized by solid particles, called Pickering emulsions, offer promising applications in drug delivery, cosmetics, food science and the manufacturing of porous materials. This potential stems from their high stability against coalescence and 'surfactant-free' nature. Generally, Pickering emulsions require that the solid particles are wetted by both phases and as a result, the adsorption free energy is often large with respect to the thermal energy (kBT). Here we provide the first experimental proof for an alternative scenario: non-touching (effectively non-wetting), charged, particles that are completely immersed in the oil phase through a balance of charge induced attractions and repulsions caused by van der Waals forces. These particles nonetheless stabilize the emulsion. The main advantage of this novel adsorption mechanism is that these particles can easily be detached from the interface simply by adding salt. This not only makes the finding fundamentally of interest, but also enables a triggered de-emulsification and particle recovery, which is useful in fields like enhanced oil recovery, heterogeneous catalysis, and emulsion polymerization.

  2. Unconventional superconductivity in a two-dimensional repulsive gas of fermions with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Vafek, Oskar

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the superconducting instability of a two-dimensional repulsive Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling αR. Using renormalization group approach, we find the superconducting transition temperature as a function of the dimensionless ratio Θ=1}/{2}mαR2/EF where EF = 0 when the smaller Fermi surface shrinks to a (Dirac) point. The general trend is that superconductivity is enhanced as Θ increases, but in an intermediate regime Θ ∼ 0.1, a dome-like behavior appears. At a very small value of Θ, the angular momentum channel jz in which superconductivity occurs is quite high. With increasing Θ, jz decreases with a step of 2 down to jz = 6, after which we find the sequence jz = 6, 4, 6, 2, the last value of which continues to Θ → ∞. In an extended range of Θ, the superconducting gap predominantly resides on the large Fermi surface, while Josephson coupling induces a much smaller gap on the small Fermi surface. Below the superconducting transition temperature, we apply mean field theory to derive the self-consistent equations and find the condensation energies. The state with the lowest condensation energy is an unconventional superconducting state which breaks time-reversal symmetry, and in which singlet and triplet pairings are mixed. In general, these states are topologically nontrivial, and the Chern number of the state with total angular momentum jz is C = 2jz.

  3. A Repulsive Electrostatic Mechanism for Protein Export through the Type III Secretion Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Weis, David D.; De Guzman, Roberto N.; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Many Gram-negative bacteria initiate infections by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus, which is comprised of a basal body, a needle, and a tip. The needle channel is formed by the assembly of a single needle protein. To explore the export mechanisms of MxiH needle protein through the needle of Shigella flexneri, an essential step during needle assembly, we have performed steered molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent. The trajectories reveal a screwlike rotation motion during the export of nativelike helix-turn-helix conformations. Interestingly, the channel interior with excessive electronegative potential creates an energy barrier for MxiH to enter the channel, whereas the same may facilitate the ejection of the effectors into host cells. Structurally known basal regions and ATPase underneath the basal region also have electronegative interiors. Effector proteins also have considerable electronegative potential patches on their surfaces. From these observations, we propose a repulsive electrostatic mechanism for protein translocation through the type III secretion apparatus. Based on this mechanism, the ATPase activity and/or proton motive force could be used to energize the protein translocation through these nanomachines. A similar mechanism may be applicable to macromolecular channels in other secretion systems or viruses through which proteins or nucleic acids are transported. PMID:20141759

  4. Spinal cord injury-induced lesional expression of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM).

    PubMed

    Schwab, Jan M; Conrad, Sabine; Monnier, Philippe P; Julien, Sylvie; Mueller, Bernhard K; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2005-03-01

    The repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) is involved in the formation of the central nervous system (CNS) during development by modulating guidance of growing axons. However, a role of RGM in CNS injury remains to be established. We studied the expression of RGM in the spinal cord of rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). After SCI, RGM+ cells accumulated in lesions and peri-lesional areas. During the first days after SCI, RGM expression was confined to neurons, ballooned neurite fibers/retraction bulbs, smooth muscle/endothelial cells, and to leucocytes infiltrating the lesion. Lesional RGM expression was frequently confined to hypertrophic beta-APP+ and RhoA+ neurites/retraction bulbs. With maturation of the lesion, we observed RGM expression by components of the developing scar tissue (cicatrix), such as fibroblastoid cells, reactive astrocytes and in addition a pronounced extracellular RGM deposition resembling neo-laminae. Frequent RGM+, RhoA+ coexpression by lesional retraction bulbs represent first preliminary evidence of RGM to exert growth inhibitory effects by the second messenger system RhoA. To date, RGM is one of the most potent axonal growth inhibitors identified and present in axonal growth impediments (i) oligodendrocytes; (ii) the plexus choroideus and (iii) components of the developing scar.

  5. Inhibition of repulsive guidance molecule, RGMa, increases afferent synapse formation with auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Tong, Mingjie; Luo, Li; Edge, Albert S B

    2014-04-01

    The peripheral fibers that extend from auditory neurons to hair cells are sensitive to damage, and replacement of the fibers and their afferent synapse with hair cells would be of therapeutic interest. Here, we show that RGMa, a repulsive guidance molecule previously shown to play a role in the development of the chick visual system, is expressed in the developing, newborn, and mature mouse inner ear. The effect of RGMa on synaptogenesis between afferent neurons and hair cells, from which afferent connections had been removed, was assessed. Contact of neural processes with hair cells and elaboration of postsynaptic densities at sites of the ribbon synapse were increased by treatment with a blocking antibody to RGMa, and pruning of auditory fibers to achieve the mature branching pattern of afferent neurons was accelerated. Inhibition by RGMa could thus explain why auditory neurons have a low capacity to regenerate peripheral processes: postnatal spiral ganglion neurons retain the capacity to send out processes that respond to signals for synapse formation, but expression of RGMa postnatally appears to be detrimental to regeneration of afferent hair cell innervation and antagonizes synaptogenesis. Increased synaptogenesis after inhibition of RGMa suggests that manipulation of guidance or inhibitory factors may provide a route to increase formation of new synapses at deafferented hair cells.

  6. Acceleration of High Angular Momentum Electron Repulsion Integrals and Integral Derivatives on Graphics Processing Units.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yipu; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-04-14

    We present an efficient implementation of ab initio self-consistent field (SCF) energy and gradient calculations that run on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) enabled graphical processing units (GPUs) using recurrence relations. We first discuss the machine-generated code that calculates the electron-repulsion integrals (ERIs) for different ERI types. Next we describe the porting of the SCF gradient calculation to GPUs, which results in an acceleration of the computation of the first-order derivative of the ERIs. However, only s, p, and d ERIs and s and p derivatives could be executed simultaneously on GPUs using the current version of CUDA and generation of NVidia GPUs using a previously described algorithm [Miao and Merz J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 965-976.]. Hence, we developed an algorithm to compute f type ERIs and d type ERI derivatives on GPUs. Our benchmarks shows the performance GPU enable ERI and ERI derivative computation yielded speedups of 10-18 times relative to traditional CPU execution. An accuracy analysis using double-precision calculations demonstrates that the overall accuracy is satisfactory for most applications. PMID:26574356

  7. Dynamic Precision for Electron Repulsion Integral Evaluation on Graphical Processing Units (GPUs).

    PubMed

    Luehr, Nathan; Ufimtsev, Ivan S; Martínez, Todd J

    2011-04-12

    It has recently been demonstrated that novel streaming architectures found in consumer video gaming hardware such as graphical processing units (GPUs) are well-suited to a broad range of computations including electronic structure theory (quantum chemistry). Although recent GPUs have developed robust support for double precision arithmetic, they continue to provide 2-8× more hardware units for single precision. In order to maximize performance on GPU architectures, we present a technique of dynamically selecting double or single precision evaluation for electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) in Hartree-Fock and density functional self-consistent field (SCF) calculations. We show that precision error can be effectively controlled by evaluating only the largest integrals in double precision. By dynamically scaling the precision cutoff over the course of the SCF procedure, we arrive at a scheme that minimizes the number of double precision integral evaluations for any desired accuracy. This dynamic precision scheme is shown to be effective for an array of molecules ranging in size from 20 to nearly 2000 atoms. PMID:26606344

  8. Protein B5 is required on extracellular enveloped vaccinia virus for repulsion of superinfecting virions.

    PubMed

    Doceul, Virginie; Hollinshead, Michael; Breiman, Adrien; Laval, Kathlyn; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) spreads across cell monolayers fourfold faster than predicted from its replication kinetics. Early after infection, infected cells repulse some superinfecting extracellular enveloped virus (EEV) particles by the formation of actin tails from the cell surface, thereby causing accelerated spread to uninfected cells. This strategy requires the expression of two viral proteins, A33 and A36, on the surface of infected cells and upon contact with EEV this complex induces actin polymerization. Here we have studied this phenomenon further and investigated whether A33 and A36 expression in cell lines causes an increase in VACV plaque size, whether these proteins are able to block superinfection by EEV, and which protein(s) on the EEV surface are required to initiate the formation of actin tails from infected cells. Data presented show that VACV plaque size was not increased by expression of A33 and A36, and these proteins did not block entry of the majority of EEV binding to these cells. In contrast, expression of proteins A56 and K2 inhibited entry of both EEV and intracellular mature virus. Lastly, VACV protein B5 was required on EEV to induce the formation of actin tails at the surface of cells expressing A33 and A36, and B5 short consensus repeat 4 is critical for this induction.

  9. Thermodynamics, contact, and density profiles of the repulsive Gaudin-Yang model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PâÅ£u, Ovidiu I.; Klümper, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We address the problem of computing the thermodynamic properties of the repulsive one-dimensional two-component Fermi gas with contact interaction, also known as the Gaudin-Yang model. Using a specific lattice embedding and the quantum transfer matrix we derive an exact system of only two nonlinear integral equations for the thermodynamics of the homogeneous model which is valid for all temperatures and values of the chemical potential, magnetic field, and coupling strength. This system allows for an easy and extremely accurate calculation of thermodynamic properties circumventing the difficulties associated with the truncation of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz system of equations. We present extensive results for the densities, polarization, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, interaction energy, Tan contact, and local correlation function of opposite spins. Our results show that at low and intermediate temperatures the experimentally accessible contact is a nonmonotonic function of the coupling strength. As a function of the temperature the contact presents a pronounced local minimum in the Tonks-Girardeau regime which signals an abrupt change of the momentum distribution in a small interval of temperature. The density profiles of the system in the presence of a harmonic trapping potential are computed using the exact solution of the homogeneous model coupled with the local density approximation. We find that at finite temperature the density profile presents a double shell structure (partially polarized center and fully polarized wings) only when the polarization in the center of the trap is above a critical value which is monotonically increasing with temperature.

  10. A review of dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.

    1998-07-01

    Vehicle dynamics and the need to satisfy ride quality requirements have long been recognized as crucial to the commercial success of passenger-carrying transportation systems. Design concepts for maglev systems are no exception. Early maglev investigators and designers were well aware of the importance of ride quality and took care to ensure that their designs would meet acceptable ride quality standards. In contrast, the dynamic stability of electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems, which has obvious implications for system safety and cost as well as for ride quality, has not received nearly as much attention. Because of the well-known under-damped nature of EDS suspension systems and the observation of instabilities in laboratory-scale model systems, it is prudent to develop a better understanding of vehicle stability characteristics. The work reported in this was undertaken with the intention of summarizing information that has been accumulated worldwide and that is relevant to dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems, assimilating that information, and gaining an understanding of the factors that influence that stability. Included in the paper is a discussion and comparison of results acquired from some representative tests of large-scale vehicles on linear test tracks, together with analytical and laboratory-scale investigations of stability and dynamics of EDS systems. This paper will also summarize the R and D activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) since 1991 to study the nature of the forces that are operative in an EDS system and the dynamic stability of such systems.

  11. [Effects of carrier liquid and flow rate on the separation in gravitational field-flow fractionation].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Zhu, Chenqi; Gao-Yang, Yaya; Qiu, Bailing; Wu, Di; Liang, Qihui; He, Jiayuan; Han, Nanyin

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation is the simplest field-flow fractionation technique in terms of principle and operation. The earth' s gravity is its external field. Different sized particles are injected into a thin channel and carried by carrier fluid. The different velocities of the carrier liquid in different places results in a size-based separation. A gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) instrument was designed and constructed. Two kinds of polystyrene (PS) particles with different sizes (20 µm and 6 µm) were chosen as model particles. In this work, the separation of the sample was achieved by changing the concentration of NaN3, the percentage of mixed surfactant in the carrier liquid and the flow rate of carrier liquid. Six levels were set for each factor. The effects of these three factors on the retention ratio (R) and plate height (H) of the PS particles were investigated. It was found that R increased and H decreased with increasing particle size. On the other hand, the R and H increased with increasing flow rate. The R and H also increased with increasing NaN3 concentration. The reason was that the electrostatic repulsive force between the particles and the glass channel wall increased. The force allowed the samples approach closer to the channel wall. The results showed that the resolution and retention time can be improved by adjusting the experimental conditions. These results can provide important values to the further applications of GrFFF technique. PMID:27382718

  12. Gravitational waves and light cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depies, Matthew

    Gravitational wave signatures from cosmic strings are analyzed numerically. Cosmic string networks form during phase transistions in the early universe and these networks of long cosmic strings break into loops that radiate energy in the form of gravitational waves until they decay. The gravitational waves come in the form of harmonic modes from individual string loops, a "confusion noise" from galactic loops, and a stochastic background of gravitational waves from a network of loops. In this study string loops of larger size a and lower string tensions G m, (where m the mass per unit length of the string) are investigated than in previous studies. Several detectors are currently searching for gravitational waves and a space based satellite, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), is in the final stages of pre-flight. The results for large loop sizes (a = 0.1) put an upper limit of about G m < 10 -9 and indicate that gravitational waves from string loops down to G m [approximate] 10 -20 could be detectabe by LISA. The string tension is related to the energy scale of the phase transition and the Planck mass via Gm = [Special characters omitted.] , so the limits on G m set the energy scale of any phase transition L s < 10^-4.5 m pl . Our results indicate that loops may form a significant gravitational wave signal, even for string tensions too low to have larger cosmological effects.

  13. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation and General Relativity Compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 18 proofs and indications with a reasonable, non-fallacious explanation stating Gravity and Gravitation are electromagnetic and alternating, functioning in nuclei and alternating electromagnetic coupling between nuclei and other nuclei in other masses. This is according to Maxwell, Quantum, and Newtonian Laws. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation passes the Cavendish test. With the 18 proofs and indications of NQG it is clear that Gravity and Gravitation are electromagnetic and thoroughly explained by the Nuclear Quantum Gravitation theory. In comparison, General Relativity pictures mass somehow effects ``Time-Space'' about the mass, producing gravity about that mass. This is not described as an electromagnetic effect, but as a geometric function; the changing of geometry about mass. GR lists as a proof the bending of light in the area near the Sun. However, recently it was observed that the temperature of the Sun's corona is in the millions of degrees, and thus the bending of light and other electromagnetic radiation is caused by the refraction effects of the corona and heliosphere; NOT GR. The other ``proofs'' of GR are not definitive, and no one has yet explained the ``somehow'' of GR. General Relativity fails the Cavendish experiment and cannot account for the attractions between masses. It should be realized that Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a coherent, factual, scientific and direct physical explanation of Gravity and Gravitation thus Unifying the Physical Forces.

  14. Influence of the cosmological constant on the motion of Magellanic Clouds in the gravitational field of Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan E-mail: jan.schee@fpf.slu.cz

    2011-09-01

    Using the pseudo-Newtonian (PN) potential reflecting properties of the Schwarz-schild-de Sitter spacetime, we estimate the influence of the repulsive cosmological constant Λ ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup −56}cm{sup −2} implied by recent cosmological tests onto the motion of both Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC) in the gravitational field of the Milky Way. Considering detailed modelling of the gravitational field of the Galaxy disc, bulge and cold dark matter halo, the trajectories of SMC and LMC constructed for the PN potential with the cosmological constant are confronted to those given for Λ = 0. In the realistic model of the extended cold dark matter halo its edge and related total mass are taken at typical values reflecting recent diversity in the total Galaxy mass estimates. In all cases, strong influence of the cosmological constant, on 10% level or higher, has been found for motion of both SMC and LMC. Inside the halo, the Newtonian part of the PN potential is exact enough, while outside the halo the PN potential can give relevant relativistic corrections. The role of the cosmological constant is most conspicuous when binding mass is estimated for the satellite galaxies. We have found a strong influence of cosmic repulsion on the total binding mass for both galaxies. For SMC there is the binding mass M{sub SMC}{sup Λ=0} = 7.07 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ⨀} and M{sub SMC}{sup Λ>0} = 8.61 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ⨀}, while even much higher increase is found for LMC, where M{sub LMC}{sup Λ=0} = 1.50 × 10{sup 12}M{sub ⨀} and M{sub LMC}{sup Λ} {sup >0} = 2.21 × 10{sup 12}M{sub ⨀}, putting serious doubts on the possibility that the LMC is bounded by the Milky Way. However, the estimates of binding masses are strongly influenced by initial velocity of SMC and LMC; we took the values inferred for the IAU MW rotation velocity ∼ 220 km/s. Our results indicate very important role of the cosmic repulsion in the motion of interacting galaxies, clearly

  15. Newtorites in bar detectors of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronga, F.; ROG Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The detection of particles with only gravitational interactions (Newtorites) in gravitational bar detectors was studied in 1984 by Bernard, De Rujula and Lautrup. The negative results of dark matter searches suggest to look to exotic possibilities like Newtorites. The limits obtained with the Nautilus bar detector will be presented and the possible improvements will be discussed. Since the gravitational coupling is very weak, the possible limits are very far from what is needed for dark matter, but for large masses are the best limits obtained on the Earth. An update of limits for MACRO particles will be given.

  16. Microwave background anisotropy induced by gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    1988-01-01

    A cosmological background of gravitational waves induces redshift perturbations in light transversing it. Calculations of this Sachs-Wolfe effect on the microwave background are presented in an Omega = 1 Friedmann universe as a function of angular scale and gravitational wave spectrum. Blurriness of the last-scattering surface can cause nonnegligible dilution of the anisotropy for wavelengths less than about 100 Mpc. The limit implied for the energy density of the gravitational waves is given. A difficulty in associating a linear scale with an angular anisotropy, due to the clumpiness of the universe, is also pointed out.

  17. Hypermass generalization of Einstein's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, J. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The curvilinear invariant quaternion formalism is examined for curved space time. Einstein's gravitation equation is shown to have a simple and natural form in this notation. The hypermass generalization of particle mass, which was generated in our studies of the Dirac equation, is incorporated in gravitation by generalizing Einstein's equation. Covariance requires that the gravitational constant be generalized to an invariant quaternion when the mass is. The modification appears minor and of no importance cosmologically, unless one begins considering time and mass dependence of G.

  18. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns.

  19. Modification of the characteristic gravitational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujičić, V. A.

    2006-08-01

    In the educational and scientific literature the numerical values of gravitational constants are seen as only approximately correct. The numerical values are different in work by various researchers, as also are the formulae and definitions of constants employed. In this paper, on the basis of Newton’s laws and Kepler’s laws we prove that it is necessary to modify the characteristic gravitational constants and their definitions. The formula for the geocentric gravitational constant of the satellites Kosmos N and the Moon are calculated.

  20. Phase Transitions and Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Nicholas A.

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented for numerical calculations of gravitational collapses and explosions. Two effects are studied. The first involves aspects of the numerical models used in almost all current gravitational collapse calculations. The second involves phase transitions in the equation of state of dense matter. A (1+1) dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamics code was constructed to investigate both effects. A modification of standard artificial viscosity methods was developed. This extended both the tensor artificial viscosity formulation and the artificial heat conduction formulation to the general relativistic regime. This method shows better results for collapse calculations than the standard scalar artificial viscosity. Numerical collapse calculations were also examined with respect to the number of zones used in the model. These calculations suggest that the number of zones used in current supernova calculations may be insufficient, and that the more sophisticated artificial viscosity methods used may be useful in future core collapse investigations. The second effect studied by this thesis is the impact of phase transitions in dense matter on the results of core collapse in Type 2 supernovae. Two different phase transitions were investigated. The QCD phase transition embodies the prediction of quantum chromodynamics that at high density the constituents of baryonic matter will be free quarks and gluons. The effects on the shock wave formed by core collapse and bounce is studied for various phase transitions. We find that some of the phase transitions modeled significantly increase the shock strength. The second phase transition we study is one from a normal hadronic gas to Q matter. Q matter is a phase of dense baryonic matter that is motivated by soliton models for the nucleus. It has been used to model zero temperature dense matter in static stellar objects, here we extend it to finite temperature, determine the phase transitions with hadronic matter

  1. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  2. Riemannian geometry of thermodynamics and systems with repulsive power-law interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruppeiner, George

    2005-07-01

    A Riemannian geometric theory of thermodynamics based on the postulate that the curvature scalar R is proportional to the inverse free energy density is used to investigate three-dimensional fluid systems of identical classical point particles interacting with each other via a power-law potential energy gamma r(-alpha) . Such systems are useful in modeling melting transitions. The limit alpha-->infinity corresponds to the hard sphere gas. A thermodynamic limit exists only for short-range (alpha>3) and repulsive (gamma>0) interactions. The geometric theory solutions for given alpha>3 , gamma>0 , and any constant temperature T have the following properties: (1) the thermodynamics follows from a single function b (rho T(-3/alpha) ) , where rho is the density; (2) all solutions are equivalent up to a single scaling constant for rho T(-3/alpha) , related to gamma via the virial theorem; (3) at low density, solutions correspond to the ideal gas; (4) at high density there are solutions with pressure and energy depending on density as expected from solid state physics, though not with a Dulong-Petit heat capacity limit; (5) for 33.7913 a phase transition is required to go between these regimes; (7) for any alpha>3 we may include a first-order phase transition, which is expected from computer simulations; and (8) if alpha-->infinity, the density approaches a finite value as the pressure increases to infinity, with the pressure diverging logarithmically in the density difference.

  3. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Nobre, Fernando D

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s_{q}, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q=2. The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T, so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T/θ≃0). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ(x)=αx^{2}/2 (α>0). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ(x)=α|x|^{z}/z (z>1). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z>1: (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s_{2}. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η=1-(θ_{2}/θ_{1}), where θ_{1} and θ_{2} are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ_{1}>θ_{2}. The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z. (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ(x), increasing the possibility of experimental verifications. PMID:27627259

  4. Riemannian geometry of thermodynamics and systems with repulsive power-law interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruppeiner, George

    2005-07-01

    A Riemannian geometric theory of thermodynamics based on the postulate that the curvature scalar R is proportional to the inverse free energy density is used to investigate three-dimensional fluid systems of identical classical point particles interacting with each other via a power-law potential energy gamma r(-alpha) . Such systems are useful in modeling melting transitions. The limit alpha-->infinity corresponds to the hard sphere gas. A thermodynamic limit exists only for short-range (alpha>3) and repulsive (gamma>0) interactions. The geometric theory solutions for given alpha>3 , gamma>0 , and any constant temperature T have the following properties: (1) the thermodynamics follows from a single function b (rho T(-3/alpha) ) , where rho is the density; (2) all solutions are equivalent up to a single scaling constant for rho T(-3/alpha) , related to gamma via the virial theorem; (3) at low density, solutions correspond to the ideal gas; (4) at high density there are solutions with pressure and energy depending on density as expected from solid state physics, though not with a Dulong-Petit heat capacity limit; (5) for 33.7913 a phase transition is required to go between these regimes; (7) for any alpha>3 we may include a first-order phase transition, which is expected from computer simulations; and (8) if alpha-->infinity, the density approaches a finite value as the pressure increases to infinity, with the pressure diverging logarithmically in the density difference. PMID:16090049

  5. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  6. Universal features of the free-energy functional at the freezing transition for repulsive potentials.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anurag; Ford, David M

    2011-05-01

    The free-energy difference between coexisting solid and liquid phases is studied in the context of classical density functional theory (DFT). A bridge function is used to represent the higher-order (n>2) terms in the perturbative expansion of the excess Helmholtz free energy, and the values of this bridge function within the solid lattice are determined by inversion using literature Monte Carlo simulation results. Four potential models, specifically hard-sphere and inverse twelfth-, sixth-, and fourth-power repulsive, are studied. The face-centered cubic (fcc) solid is considered for the hard-sphere and inverse twelfth- and sixth-power potentials, while the body-centered cubic (bcc) solid is considered for the inverse sixth- and fourth-power potentials. For a given solid structure there is a remarkable similarity among the bridge functions for different potentials that is analogous to the universality in the sum of elementary diagrams, or bridge functions, of liquid-state theory as originally observed by Rosenfeld and Ashcroft [Phys. Rev. A 20, 1208 (1979)]. In further analogy with liquid-state theory, the bridge functions in the present problem are plotted as functionals of the second-order convolution term in the perturbative expansion. In each case, the plot indicates a unique functionality in the dense regions of the solid near the lattice sites but a scattered and nonunique behavior in the void regions. Interestingly, knowledge of the functional relationship in the unique region near the lattice sites seems to be sufficient to quantitatively model the solid-fluid phase transition. These qualitative observations are true for both fcc and bcc solid phases, although there are some quantitative differences between them. The findings suggest that pursuit of a closure-based DFT of solid-fluid transitions may be profitable. PMID:21728493

  7. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Nobre, Fernando D

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s_{q}, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q=2. The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T, so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T/θ≃0). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ(x)=αx^{2}/2 (α>0). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ(x)=α|x|^{z}/z (z>1). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z>1: (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s_{2}. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η=1-(θ_{2}/θ_{1}), where θ_{1} and θ_{2} are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ_{1}>θ_{2}. The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z. (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ(x), increasing the possibility of experimental verifications.

  8. GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jihwan; Hong, Sungho; DeWoskin, Daniel; De Schutter, Erik; Forger, Daniel B.; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) forms not only the master circadian clock but also a seasonal clock. This neural network of ∼10,000 circadian oscillators encodes season-dependent day-length changes through a largely unknown mechanism. We show that region-intrinsic changes in the SCN fine-tune the degree of network synchrony and reorganize the phase relationship among circadian oscillators to represent day length. We measure oscillations of the clock gene Bmal1, at single-cell and regional levels in cultured SCN explanted from animals raised under short or long days. Coupling estimation using the Kuramoto framework reveals that the network has couplings that can be both phase-attractive (synchronizing) and -repulsive (desynchronizing). The phase gap between the dorsal and ventral regions increases and the overall period of the SCN shortens with longer day length. We find that one of the underlying physiological mechanisms is the modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, which can adjust the strength and polarity of the ionotropic GABAA-mediated synaptic input. We show that increasing day-length changes the pattern of chloride transporter expression, yielding more excitatory GABA synaptic input, and that blocking GABAA signaling or the chloride transporter disrupts the unique phase and period organization induced by the day length. We test the consequences of this tunable GABA coupling in the context of excitation–inhibition balance through detailed realistic modeling. These results indicate that the network encoding of seasonal time is controlled by modulation of intracellular chloride, which determines the phase relationship among and period difference between the dorsal and ventral SCN. PMID:26130804

  9. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S.; Nobre, Fernando D.

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ , conjugated to a generalized entropy sq, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q =2 . The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T , so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T /θ ≃0 ). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ (x ) =α x2/2 (α >0 ). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ (x ) =α|x | z/z (z >1 ). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z >1 : (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s2. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η =1 -(θ2/θ1) , where θ1 and θ2 are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ1>θ2 . The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z . (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ (x ) , increasing the possibility of experimental verifications.

  10. GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time.

    PubMed

    Myung, Jihwan; Hong, Sungho; DeWoskin, Daniel; De Schutter, Erik; Forger, Daniel B; Takumi, Toru

    2015-07-21

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) forms not only the master circadian clock but also a seasonal clock. This neural network of ∼10,000 circadian oscillators encodes season-dependent day-length changes through a largely unknown mechanism. We show that region-intrinsic changes in the SCN fine-tune the degree of network synchrony and reorganize the phase relationship among circadian oscillators to represent day length. We measure oscillations of the clock gene Bmal1, at single-cell and regional levels in cultured SCN explanted from animals raised under short or long days. Coupling estimation using the Kuramoto framework reveals that the network has couplings that can be both phase-attractive (synchronizing) and -repulsive (desynchronizing). The phase gap between the dorsal and ventral regions increases and the overall period of the SCN shortens with longer day length. We find that one of the underlying physiological mechanisms is the modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, which can adjust the strength and polarity of the ionotropic GABAA-mediated synaptic input. We show that increasing day-length changes the pattern of chloride transporter expression, yielding more excitatory GABA synaptic input, and that blocking GABAA signaling or the chloride transporter disrupts the unique phase and period organization induced by the day length. We test the consequences of this tunable GABA coupling in the context of excitation-inhibition balance through detailed realistic modeling. These results indicate that the network encoding of seasonal time is controlled by modulation of intracellular chloride, which determines the phase relationship among and period difference between the dorsal and ventral SCN.

  11. Repulsive magnetic levitation-based ocean wave energy harvester with variable resonance: Modeling, simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Masoud; Wang, Ya

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a magnetic levitation characteristic used in a vibration based energy harvester, called repulsive magnetic scavenger (RMS). The RMS is capable of harvesting ocean wave energy with a unique repelling permanent magnet array, which provides a stronger and more uniform magnetic field, compared to its attracting magnetic counterparts. The levitating magnets are stacked together around a threaded rod so that the same pole is facing each other. Two fixed magnets placed with one at each end of the RMS provides a collocated harvesting and braking mechanism in the face of high amplitude vibrations. Magnets in the levitated magnet stack are separated by pole pieces which are made of metals to intensify the magnetic field strength. The effect of the thickness and the use of different materials with different permeability for pole pieces is also studied to obtain an optimal energy harvesting efficiency. Moreover, the procedure to find the restoring force applied to the levitating magnet stack is demonstrated. Then, the Duffing vibration equation of the harvester is solved and the frequency response function is calculated for various force amplitudes and electrical damping so as to investigate the effect of these parameters on the response of the system. Furthermore, the effect of the maximum displacement of the moving magnet stack on the natural frequency of the device is studied. And finally, Faraday's law is employed to estimate the output voltage and power of the system under the specified input excitation force. Experiments show that the output emf voltage of the manufactured prototype reaches up to 42 V for an excitation force with the frequency of 9 Hz and the maximum amplitude of 3.4 g.

  12. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  13. Modulation of a chirp gravitational wave from a compact binary due to gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2005-05-15

    A possible wave effect in the gravitational lensing phenomenon is discussed. We consider the interference of two coherent gravitational waves of slightly different frequencies from a compact binary, due to the gravitational lensing by a galaxy halo. This system shows the modulation of the wave amplitude. The lensing probability of such the phenomenon is of order 10{sup -5} for a high-z source, but it may be advantageous to the observation due to the magnification of the amplitude.

  14. An SCC-DFTB Repulsive Potential for Various ZnO Polymorphs and the ZnO–Water System

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an efficient scheme for the generation of accurate repulsive potentials for self-consistent charge density-functional-based tight-binding calculations, which involves energy-volume scans of bulk polymorphs with different coordination numbers. The scheme was used to generate an optimized parameter set for various ZnO polymorphs. The new potential was subsequently tested for ZnO bulk, surface, and nanowire systems as well as for water adsorption on the low-index wurtzite (101̅0) and (112̅0) surfaces. By comparison to results obtained at the density functional level of theory, we show that the newly generated repulsive potential is highly transferable and capable of capturing most of the relevant chemistry of ZnO and the ZnO/water interface. PMID:23991228

  15. Gray solitons and phonons in repulsive Bose-Einstein condensates confined in one-dimensional nonharmonic traps

    SciTech Connect

    Radouani, A.

    2003-10-01

    We numerically solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) that describes the evolution of an elongated dilute repulsive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a one-dimensional (1D) nonharmonic potential. We find that the gray solitons, which are propagative solutions of the 1D GPE, traveling at an initial constant velocity, smaller than the speed of sound, oscillate through the trapped condensate, but that this oscillatory motion is accompanied by a spontaneous emission of small sound waves. By examining the gray soliton trajectory and its velocity in the trapped repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate, we show that the oscillatory motion is uniform and nondissipative except at the returning points of the gray soliton, where it exhibits a slight radiative acceleration (antidamping). Our numerical results are in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions, but show the need to take radiation emission into account.

  16. Levitation of a metallic sphere near gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces by the repulsive Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2014-06-01

    By counteracting gravity, the repulsive Casimir force enables stable levitation of a perfectly conducting particle near a liquid-air interface if the particle exists inside the liquid. In the present study, we examine the levitation of a gold particle near a bromobenzene-air interface and calculate the levitation height using the scattering-matrix formulation. In addition, we consider the Casimir force acting on a gold sphere near the interface between bromobenzene and water. At asymptotically large separations, the Casimir force is attractive because of the large static dielectric permittivity of water. However, the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive as the separation decreases. We also found that the gold particle can be levitated in bromobenzene above water.

  17. Effect of Water Hydrogen Bonding on the Solvent-Mediated "Oscillatory" Repulsion of C60 Fullerenes in Water.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Yuri S; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-05-01

    The solvent-mediated interaction of C60 fullerenes in liquid water is examined by using the combination of the probabilistic hydrogen bond model with the density functional theory. This combination allows one to take into account the effect of hydrogen bonding between water molecules on their interaction with fullerenes and to construct an approximation for the distribution of water molecules in the system, which provides an efficient foundation for studying hydrophobic phenomena. Our numerical evaluations predict the solvent-induced interaction of two C60 fullerenes in water at 293 K to have an oscillatory-repulsive character (previously observed in molecular dynamics simulations) only when the vicinal water-water hydrogen bonds are slightly weaker than bulk ones. Besides indicating the direction of the energetic alteration of water-water hydrogen bonds near C60 fullerenes, our model also suggests that the hydrogen bonding ability of water plays a defining role in the solvent-mediated C60-C60 repulsion.

  18. Report from the Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team

    2016-03-01

    As a response to the selection of the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for ESA's L3 mission, ESA formed the Gravitational-Wave Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise ESA on the scientific and technological approach for a gravitational wave observatory. NASA is participating with three US scientists and one NASA observer; JAXA was also invited and participates with one observer. The GOAT looked at a range of mission technologies and designs, discussed their technical readiness with respect to the ESA schedule, recommended technology development activities for selected technologies, and worked with the wider gravitational-wave community to analyze the impact on the science of the various mission designs. The final report is expected to be submitted to ESA early March and I plan to summarize its content.

  19. The Rotational and Gravitational Effect of Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The static displacement field generated by an earthquake has the effect of rearranging the Earth's mass distribution and will consequently cause the Earth's rotation and gravitational field to change. Although the coseismic effect of earthquakes on the Earth's rotation and gravitational field have been modeled in the past, no unambiguous observations of this effect have yet been made. However, the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite, which is scheduled to be launched in 2001, will measure time variations of the Earth's gravitational field to high degree and order with unprecedented accuracy. In this presentation, the modeled coseismic effect of earthquakes upon the Earth's gravitational field to degree and order 100 will be computed and compared to the expected accuracy of the GRACE measurements. In addition, the modeled second degree changes, corresponding to changes in the Earth's rotation, will be compared to length-of-day and polar motion excitation observations.

  20. The Gravitational Universe - ESA's L3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Ando, Masaki; Binetruy, Pierre; Bouyer, Philippe; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Cruise, Mike; Favata, Fabio; Gehler, Martin; Genzel, Reinhard; Jennrich, Oliver; Kasevich, Mark; Klipstein, Bill; Perryman, Michael; Safa, Frederic; Schutz, Bernard; Stebbins, Robin; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Following the advice of ESA's Senior Survey Committee (SSC) the Science Programme Committee (SPC) decided in November 2013 to select the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for their L3 mission. The Director of Science and Robotic Exploration (D/SRE) has established a Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise on the scientific and technological approaches for a gravitational wave observatory with a planned launch date in 2034. Our team is comprised of scientists from Europe and the US as well as scientists and engineers from ESA and observers from NASA and JAXA. We meet about every ten weeks, evaluate the technical readiness of all necessary technologies, study the science impact of different mission designs, and will advise ESA on the required future technology development. We will report on our progress and plans forward to a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. For JAXA.

  1. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  2. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU (N ) dark sectors with nf flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios.

  3. Gravitational Wave Detection with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-23

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. The terrestrial experiment can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment probes the same frequency spectrum as LISA with better strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The effect of the gravitational waves on the propagating laser field produces the main effect in this configuration and enables a large enhancement in the gravitational wave signal while significantly suppressing many backgrounds. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations and acceleration noise, and reduces spacecraft control requirements.

  4. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU(N) dark sectors with n_{f} flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios. PMID:26565451

  5. Gauge anomalies, gravitational anomalies, and superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    The structure of gauge and gravitational anomalies will be reviewed. The impact of these anomalies on the construction, consistency, and application of the new superstring theories will be discussed. 25 refs.

  6. The rate of gravitational galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslaw, William C.

    1992-06-01

    The rate of gravitational galaxy clustering is considered within the framework of the simple but fundamental case when the initial distribution of galaxy positions is close to Poisson and most of the matter is closely associated with the galaxies. Simple gravitational clustering in an expanding universe is found to evolve along an adiabat of the equation of state which includes gravitational interactions. The faster the universe expands relative to its gravitational clustering time scale, the better this adiabatic approximation becomes. This generalizes the well-known result that a homogeneous unclustered perfect gas in an expanding universe evolves along an adiabat of the perfect gas equation of state. The evolving clustering is characterized. There is a critical value of 0.8604 at which clustering dominates the equation of state and the specific heat at constant volume becomes negative. Subsequent growth of clustering slows appreciably. Numerical N-body experiments are consistent with these properties.

  7. Gravitational Wave Physics with Binary Love Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves from the late inspiral of neutron star binaries encode rich information about their internal structure at supranuclear densities through their tidal deformabilities. However, extracting the individual tidal deformabilities of the components of a binary is challenging with future ground-based gravitational wave interferometers due to degeneracies between them. We overcome this difficulty by finding new, approximate universal relations between the individual tidal deformabilities that depend on the mass ratio of the two stars and are insensitive to their internal structure. Such relations have applications not only to gravitational wave astrophysics, but also to nuclear physics as they improve the measurement accuracy of tidal parameters. Moreover, the relations improve our ability to test extreme gravity and perform cosmology with gravitational waves emitted from neutron star binaries.

  8. Lovelock gravitational field equations in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Deruelle, N. Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Institut Henri Poincare, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris ); Farina-Busto, L. )

    1990-06-15

    We present a systematic study of cosmological solutions in the Lovelock theory of gravitation, including maximally symmetric space-times, Robertson-Walker universes, and product manifolds of symmetric subspaces.

  9. Building a Galactic Scale Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2016-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars with phenomenal rotational stability that can be used as celestial clocks in a variety of fundamental physics experiences. One of these experiments involves using a pulsar timing array of precisely timed millisecond pulsars to detect perturbations due to gravitational waves. The low frequency gravitational waves detectable through pulsar timing will most likely result from an ensemble of supermassive black hole binaries. I will introduce the efforts of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), a collaboration that monitors over 50 millisecond pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory, with a focus on our observation and data analysis methods. I will also describe how NANOGrav has joined international partners through the International Pulsar Timing Array to form a low-frequency gravitational wave detector of unprecedented sensitivity.

  10. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  11. Gravitation in pathogeny of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, V N

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this research is the study of changes of a systemic hemodynamics under passive orthostatic test for a healthy persons and an ill with Essential Hypertension (EH) and analysis of a possible role of the gravitational factor in a Pathogeny of this disease. For an ill with EH reduction of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output were reliably lower in an orthostatic position. Increasing of a Total peripheral vascular resistance was twice less for ill. Considerable differences in reaction of cardiovascular system to gravitational influence for an ill with Essential Hypertension are stipulated by changes in central regulation of circulation and in the structure of a vascular wall. It allows to assume influence of gravitation at early stages of a Pathogeny of the given disease. The detection of hyper reactivity of a cardiovascular system to influence of gravitation can indicate the first stage of the disease.

  12. Homogeneous cosmological models in Yang's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1979-01-01

    We present a dynamic, spatially homogeneous solution of Yang's pure space gravitational field equations which is non-Einsteinian. The predictions of this cosmological model seem to be at variance with observations.

  13. Gravitational Lens B0218+357

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie illustrates the components of a gravitational lens system (a kind of natural telescope formed when a rare cosmic alignment allows the gravity of a massive object to bend and amplify ligh...

  14. Gravitational Waves and Time-Domain Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-04-01

    The gravitational-wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high-frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time-domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low-frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational-wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  15. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling induced enhancement of superconductivity in a two-dimensional repulsive gas of fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafek, Oskar; Wang, Luyang

    2011-11-01

    We study a model of a two-dimensional repulsive Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling αR and investigate the superconducting instability using the renormalization-group approach. We find that, in general, superconductivity is enhanced as the dimensionless ratio (1)/(2)mαR2/EF increases, resulting in unconventional superconducting states which break time-reversal symmetry.

  17. Wnt5a Evokes Cortical Axon Outgrowth and Repulsive Guidance by Tau Mediated Reorganization of Dynamic Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Fothergill, Thomas; Hutchins, B Ian; Dent, Erik W; Kali, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a guides cortical axons in vivo by repulsion and in vitro evokes cortical axon outgrowth and repulsion by calcium signaling pathways. Here we examined the role of microtubule (MT) reorganization and dynamics in mediating effects of Wnt5a. Inhibiting MT dynamics with nocodazole and taxol abolished Wnt5a evoked axon outgrowth and repulsion of cultured hamster cortical neurons. EGFP-EB3 labeled dynamic MTs visualized in live cell imaging revealed that growth cone MTs align with the nascent axon. Wnt5a increased axon outgrowth by reorganization of dynamic MTs from a splayed to a bundled array oriented in the direction of axon extension, and Wnt5a gradients induced asymmetric redistribution of dynamic MTs toward the far side of the growth cone. Wnt5a gradients also evoked calcium transients that were highest on the far side of the growth cone. Calcium signaling and the reorganization of dynamic MTs could be linked by tau, a MT associated protein that stabilizes MTs. Tau is phosphorylated at the Ser 262 MT binding site by CaMKII, and is required for Wnt5a induced axon outgrowth and repulsive turning. Phosphorylation of tau at Ser262 is known to detach tau from MTs to increase their dynamics. Using transfection with tau constructs mutated at Ser262, we found that this site is required for the growth and guidance effects of Wnt5a by mediating reorganization of dynamic MTs in cortical growth cones. Moreover, CaMKII inhibition also prevents MT reorganization required for Wnt5a induced axon outgrowth, thus linking Wnt/calcium signaling to tau mediated MT reorganization during growth cone behaviors. © 2013 The Authors. Developmental Neurobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.Develop Neurobiol 74: 797–817, 2014 PMID:23818454

  18. The Nuclear Electromagnetic Graviton, Basis of Gravity-Gravitation and Nuclear Quantum Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2003-04-01

    The basic attraction of two nuclei at an average .8546Angstroms apart, and the dynamic Electromagnetic factor included in the Newtonian formula equals Gq = 1.010334x10-48 Newtons. This is the basic Graviton function. This ALTERNATING ELECTROMAGNETIC DYNAMIC FORCE couples between the nuclei in masses according to the type of mass, the number of nuclei, and through the mass that produces a gravitating body. Nuclei linearly and dynamically couple in gravitating mass to produce maximum Gravity at the surface. Nucleon polar Electromagnetic build-up is what causes Gravity on a Gravitating Body. The Electromagnetic Graviton also propagates through space and produces Gravitation between Gravitating masses. Electromagnetic Graviton energy has to have a wavelength approximately the size of one nuclei, 2.98x10-15 meters and a frequency of 1.007 x10-23 Hertz. There are many proofs that Gravity and Gravitation are Electromagnetic. Clearly, there is ONE FORCE that acts at a distance in many ways. It is very apparent that this ONE FORCE is ELECTROMAGNETISM. This is the cause of the nuclear strong force, the nuclear weak force, Gravity and Gravitation. Gravity and Gravitation are Electromagnetic - NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. See: http://www.physicaloverviews.org

  19. Gravitational wave astrophysics with compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime that convey information about changing gravitational fields. Large-scale detection projects are currently in operation, and more advanced detectors are being designed and built. Though we have yet to make a direct detection of a gravitational wave signal, upgrades to current detectors are expected to bring the first detections within the next year or two. Gravitational waves will bring us information about astrophysical phenomena that is complementary to the information gained from photon-based observations (e.g., telescopes and radio receivers). One of the primary sources of gravitational waves are binary systems: two massive objects that orbit around each other due to their mutual gravitational attraction. These systems can have very predictable gravitational wave signatures due to their repetitive motions, making them ideal gravitational wave sources. In this dissertation, I present two research projects pertaining to gravitational wave astrophysics and compact binary systems. In the first, I explore interactions between compact binary systems near the center of our galaxy with the supermassive black hole that resides there. I am interested in the final state of the binary as a result of the interaction, ranging from small perturbations to the orbit up to total disruption. In the case of disruption, I characterize the new orbits formed between the binary components and the central black hole, known as extreme mass ratio inspirals. For binaries that survive the encounter, I examine the changes they experience, and find on average, they will merge together as a result of gravitational wave emission faster than before the encounter. In the second project, I propose a new method of measuring the radius of the swirling disc of gas and dust that encircles some stars in compact binary systems, known as the accretion disc. This method relies on the use of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational wave

  20. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.