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Sample records for hillsborough county florida

  1. Hillsborough County Public Schools and the University of South Florida: Better Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Danielle; Jacobs, Jennifer; West Burns, Rebecca; Davis, Jeni; Van Ingen, Sarah; Tricarico, Katie; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Professional Development Schools National Conference recognized the partnership between the University of South Florida and Hillsborough County Public Schools for its outstanding collaborative accomplishments, and so named it one of the four recipients of the National Association for Professional Development Schools Exemplary Professional…

  2. Evapotranspiration (ET) data at Dead River forested wetland site, Hillsborough County, Florida, December 2009 - February 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The data set consists of evapotranspiration measurements made at the USGS Dead River forested wetland climate station beginning November 21, 2009 and ending February 29, 2016. Annual ET rates corrected to a near-surface energy-budget varied from 1448 mm (2012) to 1614 mm (2010). The eddy-covariance method was used, with high-frequency sensors installed above the forest canopy to measure sensible and latent heat fluxes. Ancillary meteorological data are also included in the data set: net radiation, soil temperature and moisture, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, rainfall, and ground-water levels. Data were collected at 30-minute resolution, with evapotranspiration corrected to the near-surface energy-budget at a daily timescale. The study was conducted at an undeveloped mixed hardwood swamp within Dead River Wilderness Park, located at the end of Dead River Rd., west of U.S. Highway 301, 27 km northeast of Tampa in Hillsborough County, Florida (latitude 28 07’ 43” N  longitude 82 15’ 44” W, Section 13, Township 27S, Range 20E). Study instruments were installed in November 2009. The 46-m instrument tower was located about 90 m northeast of the final pullout before the parking area, which is 2.6 km from the park entrance gate on Dead River Rd.  The station is within the Hillsborough River floodplain, and is inundated at high river stages (Lewelling, 2004).  The site is classified as a freshwater palustrine forested broad-leaf deciduous wetland that is seasonally flooded (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2010).  Dominant tree species are cabbage palm (Sabal palmetto), red maple (Acer rubrum), sweet-gum (Liquidambar styraciflua), live oak (Quercus virginiana), elm (Ulmus americana), with occasional slash pine, magnolia, and hickory.  Canopy height is 20-24 m.  The site is located near the middle of the floodplain at least 1 km away from different land cover types in all directions.  The floodplain extends farther to the

  3. Water-quality data for landfills, Hillsborough County, Florida, January 1974-October 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario; Hallbourg, Robin R.

    1978-01-01

    Periodic water-quality data were collected at four landfills in Hillsborough County from January 1974 through October 1977. Water samples were analyzed for nitrogen and phosphorous species, cations, trace metals, chloride, specific conductance, chemical oxygen demand, biological oxygen demand, and coliforms. Select ground-water samples were analyzed for herbicide and pesticide. Results of chemical and bacteriological analysis form four landfills are presented as basic data. Geologic logs and well descriptions are presented for wells drilled at the landfills after January 1974.

  4. Risk factors for drowning and near-drowning among children in Hillsborough County, Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Liller, K D; Kent, E B; Arcari, C; McDermott, R J

    1993-01-01

    The authors obtained data from 700 households in Hillsborough County, FL, in a telephone random survey to determine risk factors for incidents of drowning and near-drowning among children in the county. The survey was conducted from August through December 1991. A combination of forced-choice and open-ended questions was used to assess adults' drowning-related knowledge, attitudes, and prevention behaviors, as well as the incidence of and the circumstances surrounding drowning and near-drowning among children who lived in those households. The results showed that although most respondents had some knowledge of the epidemiology of drowning and near-drowning among children, deficits were noted in their knowledge of the importance of adult supervision and the recommended age at which to begin children's swimming instruction. Results showed a need for isolation fencing, that which separates a swimming pool from a house and yard. Most respondents reported that they did not know how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on an infant or child. More than 40 percent reported not knowing how to perform CPR on an adult. Respondents reported no drowning or near-drowning incidents among children of their household within the last 3 years. However, the respondents did describe water-related immersions that involved children who experienced difficulty in the water, but recovered by themselves or with the aid of a nearby person. In some instances the child's breathing pattern was altered. There were three episodes during which difficulty in breathing occurred. The respondents reported a total of nine childhood water-immersion episodes within their families, none of which had been reported to treatment facilities. Recommendations are provided for programs for prevention of childhood drowning. PMID:8497573

  5. Hydrologic monitoring program in Eldridge-Wilde and East Lake Road well-field areas, Pinellas and Hillsborough counties, Florida, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the observation-well network in Eldridge-Wilde and East Lake Road well-field areas, Pinellas and Hillsborough Counties, Florida. Data obtained in 1978 from the network in and adjacent to the two well fields, as well as rainfall and pumpage records, are presented. The Southwest Florida Water Management District has established regulatory water-level limits in four observation wells and water-quality limits in three observation wells. Water levels dropped below regulatory limits in the spring of 1978 in three wells. Chloride concentrations in 1978 remained above regulatory limits for the entire year in one well and exceeded the limit during the late spring in the other two deep wells, both west of Eldridge-Wilde well field. (USGS)

  6. Public health assessment for MRI Corporation, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS Number FLD088787585

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-28

    MRI site in Tampa, Florida, was proposed to the National Priorities List (NPL) on June 14, 1996 and listed on the NPL December 23, 1996. It was a chemical detinning plant, between 1979 and 1986, located in a sparsely populated industrial area of east Tampa. This public health assessment evaluates the potential for health effects from exposure to on-site soils, sediment, and groundwater. Off-site contamination was not addressed due to lack of data. Since public access is restricted by a fence and undeveloped land surrounding the site, contact with on-site soils is an incomplete exposure pathway. The area around the site is mostly undeveloped or industrial; therefore, public access to contaminated sediments are minimal. Groundwater at the site is contaminated with cyanide and lead, but currently on one is drinking the groundwater at the site.

  7. Simulated Effects of Ground-Water Augmentation on the Hydrology of Round and Halfmoon Lakes in Northwestern Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Metz, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    Pumpage from the Upper Floridan aquifer in northwest Hillsborough County near Tampa, Florida, has induced downward leakage from the overlying surficial aquifer and lowered the water table in many areas. Leakage is highest where the confining layer separating the aquifers is breached, which is common beneath many of the lakes in the study area. Leakage of water to the Upper Floridan aquifer has lowered the water level in many lakes and drained many wetlands. Ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer has been added (augmented) to some lakes in an effort to maintain lake levels, but the resulting lake-water chemistry and lake leakage patterns are substantially different from those of natural lakes. Changes in lake-water chemistry can cause changes in lake flora, fauna, and lake sediment composition, and large volumes of lake leakage are suspected to enhance the formation of sinkholes near the shoreline of augmented lakes. The leakage rate of lake water through the surficial aquifer to the Upper Floridan aquifer was estimated in this study using ground-water-flow models developed for an augmented lake (Round Lake) and non-augmented lake (Halfmoon Lake). Flow models developed with MODFLOW were calibrated through nonlinear regression with UCODE to measured water levels and monthly net ground-water-flow rates from the lakes estimated from lake-water budgets. Monthly estimates of ground-water recharge were computed using an unsaturated flow model (LEACHM) that simulated daily changes in storage of water in the soil profile, thus estimating recharge as drainage to the water table. Aquifer properties in the Round Lake model were estimated through transient-state simulations using two sets of monthly recharge rates computed during July 1996 to February 1999, which spanned both average conditions (July 1996 through October 1997), and an El Ni?o event (November 1997 through September 1998) when the recharge rate doubled. Aquifer properties in the Halfmoon Lake model were

  8. Hydrogeology and results of tracer tests at the old Tampa well field in Hillsborough County, with implications for wellhead-protection strategies in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Wellhead-protection strategies were evaluated for the Upper Floridan aquifer of west-central Florida using the old Tampa well field in northeastern Hillsborough County, Florida, as a test site. The upper 400 feet of the Upper Floridan aquifer responded to pumping as an equivalent, porous medium for a range of discharge rates from 450 to 1,000 gallons per minute. Transmissivity and storage coefficient values determined for the Upper Floridan aquifer were 23,000 feet squared per day and 0.0001, respectively. Rock cores from the Upper Floridan aquifer have effective porosity values from 21 to 46 percent. Tracer tests were conducted using a fluorescent dye. A bimodal distribution of tracer arrival times indicates ground-water flow through a dual porosity system. Analysis of tracer test results an effective porosity of 25 percent and a longitudinal dispersivity of 1.3 feet for the aquifer matrix. A numerical aquifer-simulation equivalent porous media model of the Upper Floridan aquifer was calibrated using results of aquifer tests. A particle-tracking program was used to simulate the matrix flow groundwater travel time measured with the fluorescent dye tracer test. An evaluation of wellhead-protection strategies was conducted using the particle-tracking program to simulate areas of contribution from the aquifer matrix. The results of this study demonstrate the heterogeneity of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Because of this heterogeneity, the use of uniform porosity models to delineate time-related areas of wellhead protection in the karst Upper Floridan aquifer is inappropriate; however, ground-water movement in the aquifer matrix can be simulated with uniform porosity models.

  9. Comparison of the hydrogeology and water quality of a ground-water augmented lake with two non-augmented lakes in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.; Sacks, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrologic effects associated with augmenting a lake with ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer were examined in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, from June 1996 through May 1999. The hydrogeology, ground-water flow patterns, water budgets, and water-quality characteristics were compared between a lake that has been augmented for more than 30 years (Round Lake) and two nearby non-augmented lakes (Dosson Lake and Halfmoon Lake). Compared to the other study lakes, Round Lake is in a more leakage-dominated hydrogeologic setting. The intermediate confining unit is thin or highly breached, which increases the potential for vertical ground-water flow. Round Lake has the least amount of soft, organic lake-bottom sediments and the lake bottom has been dredged deeper and more extensively than the other study lakes, which could allow more leakage from the lake bottom. The area around Round Lake has experienced more sinkhole activity than the other study lakes. During this study, three sinkholes developed around the perimeter of the lake, which may have further disrupted the intermediate confining unit. Ground-water flow patterns around Round Lake were considerably different than the non-augmented lakes. For most of the study, ground-water augmentation artificially raised the level of Round Lake to about 2 to 3 feet higher than the adjacent water table. As a result, lake water recharged the surficial aquifer around the entire lake perimeter, except during very wet periods when ground-water inflow occurred around part of the lake perimeter. The non-augmented lakes typically had areas of ground-water inflow and areas of lake leakage around their perimeter, and during wet periods, ground-water inflow occurred around the entire lake perimeter. Therefore, the area potentially contributing ground water to the non-augmented lakes is much larger than for augmented Round Lake. Vertical head loss within the surficial aquifer was greater at Round Lake than the other

  10. Hydrologic monitoring program in Eldridge-Wilde and East Lake Road well-field areas, Pinellas and Hillsborough counties, Florida, 1977 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, Boyd F.; Gerhart, James M.

    1980-01-01

    The observation-well network in the vicinity of the two well fields is described in detail. Data obtained from the network from October 1976 through September 1977, as well as rainfall and pumpage records, are presented and discussed. Below-normal rainfall caused the water table and potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in Eldridge-Wilde well field to recover 2 feet less in September 1977 than in the previous September. Water levels in East Lake Road will field were approximately the same in Spetember of both years. The Southwest Florida Water Management District has established regulatory water-level and water-quality limits in several observation wells. Water levels did not drop below regulatory limits during the year. Water from two deep wells west of Eldridge-Wilde well field exceeded the regulatory limits for chloride concentrations. The position of the 250 milligram per liter chloride line is shown in cross section in the vicinity of Eldridge-Wilde well field in September 1977. Network modifications are proposed that would result in a more comprehensive knowledge of the hydrologic system. (USGS)

  11. Hydrology of Lake Carroll, Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, S.E.; Hayes, R.D.; Stoker, Y.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lakeshore property around Lake Carroll has undergone extensive residential development since 1960. This development increased the lake shoreline, altered surface water flow to and from the lake, and may have affected lake-stage characteristics. Some areas of the lake were dredged to provide fill material for lakefront property. Water-balance analyses for 1952-60, a predevelopment period, and 1961-80, a period of residential development, indicate that both net surface water flow to the lake and downward leakage from the lake to the Floridan aquifer were greater after 1960. These changes were due more to changes in the regional climate and related changes in ground-water levels than to changes associated with residential development. Results of water quality analyses in 1980-81 are within State limits for surface waters used for recreation and wildlife propagation. (USGS)

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Helena Chemical Company, (Tampa Plant), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL, May 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected remedial action for the Helena Chemical Company Superfund Site, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. This action addresses soil, sediment, and ground water contamination at the site and calls for the implementation of response measures which will protect human health and the environment. The selected remedy includes biological treatment (i.e., bioremediation) of pesticides and other site related contaminants located in surface soil sand sediments to levels appropriate for future industrial use of the Site. In addition, the selected remedy includes ground water recovery and treatment to remove pesticides and other site related contaminants.

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Stauffer Chemical Company, Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL, December 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected remedial action for the Stauffer Management Company Superfund Site, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. This action addresses soil, sediment, and ground water contamination at the Site and calls for the implementation of response measures which will protect human health and the environment. The selected remedy includes ex situ anaerobic treatment (i.e., bioremediation) of pesticide contaminated surface soils and sediments to levels appropriate for future industrial use of the Site. In addition, the selected remedy includes ground water recovery and treatment with activated carbon to remove pesticides. Since bioremediation is an innovative treatment technology for pesticide removal, ex situ thermal treatment of contaminated soils/sediments is being proposed as a contingency remedy in the event that bioremediation cannot be implemented.

  14. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing changes caused by dredge and fill in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1991-01-01

    Hillsborough Bay, Florida, underwent extensive physical changes between 1880 and 1972 because of the construction of islands, channels, and shoreline fills. These changes resulted in a progressive reduction in the quantity of tidal water that enters and leaves the bay. Dredging and filling also changed the magnitude and direction of tidal flow in most of the bay. A two-dimensional, finite-difference hydrodynamic model was used to simulate flood, ebb, and residual water transport for physical conditions in Hillsborough Bay and the northeastern part of Middle Tampa Bay during 1880, 1972, and 1985. The calibrated and verified model was used to evaluate cumulative water-transport changes resulting from construction in the study area between 1880 and 1972. The model also was used to evaluate water-transport changes as a result of a major Federal dredging project completed in 1985. The model indicates that transport changes resulting from the Federal dredging project are much less areally extensive than the corresponding transport changes resulting from construction between 1880 and 1972. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in flood and ebb water transport were computed to occur over only about 8 square miles of the 65-square-mile study area between 1972 and 1985. Model results indicate that construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over about 23 square miles. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in residual water transport were computed to occur over only 17 square miles between 1972 and 1985. Between 1880 and 1972, changes of similar magnitude were computed to occur over an area of 45 square miles. Model results also reveal historical tide-induced circulation patterns. The patterns consist of a series of about 8 interconnected circulatory features in 1880 and as many as 15 in 1985. Dredging- and construction-caused changes in number, size, position, shape, and intensity of the circulatory features increase tide

  15. Water-supply potential of the lower Hillsborough River, Florida, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, C.L.; Reichenbaugh, R.C.; Ogle, J.K.

    1978-01-01

    The Tampa Reservoir Dam, constructed in 1945 on the lower Hillsborough River 10 miles above the mouth, provides 12.5 miles of natural channel storage for city water supply. Flow of the lower Hillsborough River and storage in Tampa Reservoir become deficient during annual dry periods. Excluding dead storage, Tampa Reservoir capacity is 2,000 million gallons at a maximum stage of 22.5 feet above mean sea level. For 20-year, annual-minimum-flow conditions, Hillsborough River flow is exceeded when the draft rate reaches 38 million gallons per day. In any year, at full capacity, Tampa Reservoir and Hillsborough River have a 5-percent chance of failing to supply at least 66 million gallons of water per day; and a 2-percent chance of failing to supply at least 59 million gallons per day. Runoff and effluent from agricultural, industrial, and urban areas enter the stream system above Tampa Reservoir. A wide range of chemical constituents, including nutrients, metals, herbicides, and pesticides analyzed in samples taken at the reservoir, are all below the maximum acceptable limits set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for raw waters used for public supply. Water color exceeds the recommended level based on aesthetic considerations. The color is successfully removed through the treatment process at the Tampa water treatment plant. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Hydrology of the Citrus Park Quadrangle, Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corral, M.A.; Thompson, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid increases in population and development in the Citrus Park quadrangle northwest of Tampa have increased the demand for water from the surficial and Upper Floridan aquifers, while at the same time decreasing the amount of wetlands and agricultural or forested lands that formerly provided recharge to these aquifers. Because the study area is underlain by soluble deposits, sinkholes and small closed depressions are common surface features. Some of the lakes in the area are remnants of ancient sinkholes. Four streams drain the area. Two of the streams have been channelized to reduce the risk of local flooding. Pumping from three municipal well fields within the study area and from three nearby well fields has lowered the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer. The pumping also lowers the water table levels by inducing recharge from the surficial aquifer to the Upper Floridan aquifer. Heavy pumpage may prompt sinkhole activity, or in areas near the coast , induce saltwater intrusion. Water quality of streams and groundwater is generally good except in the vicinity of landfills and where saltwater encroachment into the principal water bearing unit has occurred along the coast. (USGS)

  17. Relation between ground water and surface water in the Hillsborough River basin, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolansky, R.M.; Thompson, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    The relation between groundwater and surface water in the Hillsborough River basin was defined through the use of: seismic-reflection profiling along selected reaches of the Hillsborough River, and evaluation of streamflow, rainfall, groundwater levels, water quality, and geologic data. Major municipal well fields in the basin are Morris Bridge and Cypress Creek where an averages of 15.3 and 30.0 million gal/day (mgd), respectively, were pumped in 1980. Mean annual rainfall for the study area is 53.7 inches. Average rainfall for 1980, determined from eight rainfall stations, was 49.7 inches. Evapotranspiration, corrected for the 5% of the basin that is standing water, was 35.7 in/year. The principal geohydrologic units in the basin are the surficial aquifer, the intermediate aquifer and confining beds, the Upper Floridan aquifer, the middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. Total pumpage of groundwater in 1980 was 98.18 mgd. The surficial aquifer and the intermediate aquifer are not used for major groundwater supply in the basin. Continuous marine seismic-reflection data collected along selected reaches of the Hillsborough River were interpreted to define the riverbed profile, the thickness of surficial deposits, and the top of persistent limestone. Major areas of groundwater discharge near the Hillsborough River and its tributaries are the wetlands adjacent to the river between the Zephyrhills gaging stations and Fletcher Avenue and the wetlands adjacent to Cypress Creek. An estimated 20 mgd seeps upward from the Upper Floridan aquifer within those wetland areas. The runoff/sq mi is greater at the Zephyrhills station than at Morris Bridge. However, results of groundwater flow models and potentiometric-surface maps indicate that groundwater is flowing upward along the Hillsborough River between the Zephyrhills gage and the Morris Bridge gage. This upward leakage is lost to evapotranspiration. An aquifer test conducted in 1978 at the Morris Bridge well

  18. Preliminary simulated tidal flow and circulation patterns in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of channel dredging and island construction on tidal flow and circulation in Hillsborough Bay, Fla., due to the Tampa Harbor Deepening Project is being investigated using a two-dimensional, finite-difference numerical model. Preliminary model results are presented as a series of maps showing tidal flood, tidal ebb, and circulation patterns in the bay for predredging and postdredging conditions. Complex circulation patterns occur near the bay mouth in an area where there is (1) a change in thalweg alinement of the bay, (2) an intersection of three major ship channels, and (3) submergent and emergent dredged material located adjacent to each of the channels. (USGS)

  19. Evaluation of future base-flow water-quality conditions in the Hillsborough River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario; Goetz, C.L.; Miller, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady-state, water-quality model was developed for a 30.0 mile reach of the Hillsborough River to evaluate water-quality conditions to be expected from future development. The model was calibrated and verified using data collected under critical base-flow conditions in April and December 1978. Dissolved organic nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and total and fecal coliforms were modeled for most of the study reach. Model results were used to evaluate the impacts of two typical housing developments on water-quality conditions in Tampa Reservoir. One development is located in the Cypress Creek basin and the other near the upper end of the study reach. Model results show development in the Hillsborough River basin may cause increased total and fecal coliform conditions. Simulated total coliforms at the Tampa water treatment plant for 1-, 3-, and 5-square-mile developments located in the Cypress Creek basin were 3,000, 5,400, and 8,300 colonies per 100 milliliters. Similar developments, however, located near the upper end of the study reach were 2,000, 3,600, and 5,100 colonies per 100 milliliters. Simulated fecal coliforms were 360, 700, and 100 and 180, 350, and 510 colonies per 100 milliliters, respectively. Other constituents modeled showed only minor increases in concentrations. (USGS)

  20. Water resources and effects of development in Pasco County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fretwell, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-nine percent of the 79.72 million gal/d of water used in Pasco County, Florida is groundwater from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In addition, 53.5 million gal/d is exported for use in Pinellas County. Chemical quality of the water generally falls within recommended limits for drinking water except near the coast. A groundwater flow model was used to predict drawdowns in water levels under five different development plans for west Pasco County. One of these plans was incorporated in an estimated groundwater development plan for 2035 for Pasco, Pinellas, and part of Hillsborough County. Reduction in evapotranspiration accounts for nearly all the water required for each development plan. Two plans showed less effect in drawdown and potential of saltwater intrusion than the other three. For the overall groundwater development plan for Pasco, Pinellas, and parts of Hillsborough Counties, the average potentiometric surface in 2035 would be from 8 ft higher to 20 ft lower than the average 1976-77 potentiometric surface. Reductions in head would increase the potential for infiltration of contaminants in areas where surficial materials are thin, sinkhole development in sinkhole prone areas, and upconing and lateral intrusion of saltwater. The potential for dewatering the surficial aquifer is great in the Cross Bar Ranch and Cypress Creek well-field areas. Evapotranspiration of groundwater would be reduced by 19% between 1976-77 and 2035. Exchange of water between the rivers and the aquifers will be reduced by 13%. Springflow will be reduced by 6%, and three springs will cease to flow. Model boundary inflow and outflow also will be reduced. (USGS)

  1. Hydrology, Water Quality, and Surface- and Ground-Water Interactions in the Upper Hillsborough River Watershed, West-Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trommer, J.T.; Sacks, L.A.; Kuniansky, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    A study of the Hillsborough River watershed was conducted between October 1999 through September 2003 to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and interaction between the surface and ground water in the highly karstic uppermost part of the watershed. Information such as locations of ground-water recharge and discharge, depth of the flow system interacting with the stream, and water quality in the watershed can aid in prudent water-management decisions. The upper Hillsborough River watershed covers a 220-square-mile area upstream from Hillsborough River State Park where the watershed is relatively undeveloped. The watershed contains a second order magnitude spring, many karst features, poorly drained swamps, marshes, upland flatwoods, and ridge areas. The upper Hillsborough River watershed is subdivided into two major subbasins, namely, the upper Hillsborough River subbasin, and the Blackwater Creek subbasin. The Blackwater Creek subbasin includes the Itchepackesassa Creek subbasin, which in turn includes the East Canal subbasin. The upper Hillsborough River watershed is underlain by thick sequences of carbonate rock that are covered by thin surficial deposits of unconsolidated sand and sandy clay. The clay layer is breached in many places because of the karst nature of the underlying limestone, and the highly variable degree of confinement between the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers throughout the watershed. Potentiometric-surface maps indicate good hydraulic connection between the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Hillsborough River, and a poorer connection with Blackwater and Itchepackesassa Creeks. Similar water level elevations and fluctuations in the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers at paired wells also indicate good hydraulic connection. Calcium was the dominant ion in ground water from all wells sampled in the watershed. Nitrate concentrations were near or below the detection limit in all except two wells that may have been affected by

  2. Hydrology of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2007-01-01

    Local water managers usually rely on information produced at the State and regional scale to make water-resource management decisions. Current assessments of hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County, Florida, commonly end at the boundaries of two water management districts (South Florida Water Management District and the Southwest Florida Water Management District), which makes it difficult for managers to determine conditions throughout the county. The last comprehensive water-resources assessment of Polk County was published almost 40 years ago. To address the need for current countywide information, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3?-year study in 2002 to update information about hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County and identify changes that have occurred. Ground-water use in Polk County has decreased substantially since 1965. In 1965, total ground-water withdrawals in the county were about 350 million gallons per day. In 2002, withdrawals totaled about 285 million gallons per day, of which nearly 95 percent was from the Floridan aquifer system. Water-conservation practices mainly related to the phosphate-mining industry as well as the decrease in the number of mines in operation in Polk County have reduced total water use by about 65 million gallons per day since 1965. Polk County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer system, which is unconfined and composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer system is underlain by the intermediate confining unit, which grades into the intermediate aquifer system and consists of up to two water-bearing zones composed of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a thick sequence of permeable limestone and dolostone, consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and

  3. Streamflow simulation studies of the Hillsborough, Alafia, and Anclote Rivers, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    A modified version of the Georgia Tech Watershed Model was applied for the purpose of flow simulation in three large river basins of west-central Florida. Calibrations were evaluated by comparing the following synthesized and observed data: annual hydrographs for the 1959, 1960, 1973 and 1974 water years, flood hydrographs (maximum daily discharge and flood volume), and long-term annual flood-peak discharges (1950-72). Annual hydrographs, excluding the 1973 water year, were compared using average absolute error in annual runoff and daily flows and correlation coefficients of monthly and daily flows. Correlations coefficients for simulated and observed maximum daily discharges and flood volumes used for calibrating range from 0.91 to 0.98 and average standard errors of estimate range from 18 to 45 percent. Correlation coefficients for simulated and observed annual flood-peak discharges range from 0.60 to 0.74 and average standard errors of estimate range from 33 to 44 percent. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. A Geochemical Mass-Balance Method for Base-Flow Separation, Upper Hillsborough River Watershed, West-Central Florida, 2003-2005 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kish, G.R.; Stringer, C.E.; Stewart, M.T.; Rains, M.C.; Torres, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    Geochemical mass-balance (GMB) and conductivity mass-balance (CMB) methods for hydrograph separation were used to determine the contribution of base flow to total stormflow at two sites in the upper Hillsborough River watershed in west-central Florida from 2003-2005 and at one site in 2009. The chemical and isotopic composition of streamflow and precipitation was measured during selected local and frontal low- and high-intensity storm events and compared to the geochemical and isotopic composition of groundwater. Input for the GMB method included cation, anion, and stable isotope concentrations of surface water and groundwater, whereas input for the CMB method included continuous or point-sample measurement of specific conductance. The surface water is a calcium-bicarbonate type water, which closely resembles groundwater geochemically, indicating that much of the surface water in the upper Hillsborough River basin is derived from local groundwater discharge. This discharge into the Hillsborough River at State Road 39 and at Hillsborough River State Park becomes diluted by precipitation and runoff during the wet season, but retains the calcium-bicarbonate characteristics of Upper Floridan aquifer water. Field conditions limited the application of the GMB method to low-intensity storms but the CMB method was applied to both low-intensity and high-intensity storms. The average contribution of base flow to total discharge for all storms ranged from 31 to 100 percent, whereas the contribution of base flow to total discharge during peak discharge periods ranged from less than 10 percent to 100 percent. Although calcium, magnesium, and silica were consistent markers of Upper Floridan aquifer chemistry, their use in calculating base flow by the GMB method was limited because the frequency of point data collected in this study was not sufficient to capture the complete hydrograph from pre-event base-flow to post-event base-flow concentrations. In this study, pre-event water

  5. A Profile of Suwannee County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.

    Agriculture and the railroad were significant forces in the development of Suwannee County, Florida, formally created in 1858 but explored and settled beginning some 300 years earlier. Lumber and cotton caused an early 20th century boom in the county which soon saw the negative effects of both industries. The introduction of tobacco in the late…

  6. A Profile of Hardee County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.; Anderson, Deborah S.

    In 1977 leaders of Hardee County, Florida, listed relationships and attitudes of residents, rural atmosphere, environmental conditions, and economic potential among the county's strong points, and public service and facility improvements, developing economic potential, recreational and entertainment development, and planning and zoning as its most…

  7. Spodoptera species as pests in Florida strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hillsborough County, Florida, produces about 15% of the nation’s strawberries on over 11,000 acres. The economic impact to the area is over $700 million. Production averages over 20 million flats of strawberries from November through March. Fields are planted in the fall with young plants (transp...

  8. Experimental study of artificial recharge alternatives in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinclair, William C.

    1977-01-01

    Extensive water withdrawal from the Floridan aquifer in the urban Tampa Bay area has induced leakage from the overlying surficial aquifer adversely effecting the water table and lake levels. Artificial recharge could reduce the impact of these effects. Four experiments were conducted to investigate possible recharge alternatives; sinkhole recharge, water-spreading, connector wells, and subsurface-tile drainage to a deep well. Experiments indicate that all four methods can be effective. However, the sink-hole recharge experiment moved the greatest volume of water into the Floridan aquifer. The drain-tile experiment indicated greatest potential for draining the surficial aquifer. Combinations of the four methods could be used where potential exists for downward movement of water and sufficient unsaturated aquifer for water storage. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. A Qualitative Study of Three Outdoor Environmental Education Programs in Pasco and Hillsborough Counties in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngberg, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    Research and literature support the notion that environmental literacy requires a depth of knowledge and skills that go beyond simply being aware of or knowledgeable about the environment and environmental issues. Environmental literacy requires the learning of a skill set that builds a sense of empowerment and the attitudes that enable a person…

  10. Environmental Assessment for Construction at US Central Command Headquarters Complex MacDill AFB, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    Avenue Tampa Hillsborough County Florida David H. Diesing, Hardlines Photographer WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. NORTH SIDE AND WEST FRONT. January... Lbl !..!!se<.!...r~veSJ<d’--------- ----- Au.::c:"’""’Loo ~ .. ~.4.. ..... , !’=:it .. l=’il" Oivi,.ion nf ~i,.tori~AI RAsources . The Caoitol...Avenue Tampa Hillsborough County Florida David H. Diesing , Hardlines Photographer January 1994 FL -384-AX-1 FL-384-AX-2 FL-384-AX-3 FL-384-AX

  11. 78 FR 43881 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Jap. Tech, Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by...

  12. Floods in southwest-central Florida from hurricane Frances, September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Frances brought heavy rainfall and widespread flooding to southwest-central Florida September 4-14, 2004. The center of Hurricane Frances made landfall on the east coast of Florida on September 5 as a category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, then moved west-northwestward through central Florida before exiting Pasco County into the Gulf of Mexico on September 6 (fig. 1; National Weather Service, 2004). The hurricane moved across the Florida Peninsula generating 5 to 11 inches of rain over already saturated ground (table 1). Record flooding occurred in parts of Hardee, Hillsborough, Pasco, and Polk Counties (fig. 1). The hurricane and resulting floods caused an estimated $4-5 billion in damage to public and private property (Harrington, 2004), and 23 deaths were attributed to Hurricane Frances (National Weather Service, 2004). Several watersheds drain counties in southwest-central Florida that were affected by Hurricane Frances. De Soto, Hardee, and Polk Counties generally are drained by the Peace River system, which flows southwestward to Charlotte Harbor and the Gulf of Mexico. Hillsborough and Pasco Counties generally are drained by the Alafia, Hillsborough, Anclote, and Pithlachascotee River systems. Water in the Hillsborough and Alafia River watersheds flows west to Tampa Bay and water in the Anclote and Pithlachascotee River watersheds flows west to the Gulf of Mexico. (fig. 1, http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/fs/2005/3028/#fig1).

  13. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer, southwest Florida Water Management District, September 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Schiner, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    A September 1981 potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual high water-level period. Water levels in most wells measured in September 1981 are equal to or higher than in May 1981. Levels averaged about 26 feet higher in the southern part of the area and 5 feet in the north. In the agricultural sections of southern Hillsborough, Hardee, southwestern Polk, northwestern De Soto, and Manatee Counties, water levels increased 10 to 46 feet. From September 1980 to September 1981, water levels ranged from a decrease of 11 feet in Citrus County to an increase of 9 feet in southern Hillsborough County. (USGS)

  14. Florida City & County Government. A Condensed Reference Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massialas, Byron; Jenkins, Ann

    Designed to serve as a reference tool on city and county government in Florida, this handbook consists of lessons that can be used by schools, community groups, newly elected officials, and libraries. These curriculum materials on Florida city and county governments specifically address the general purpose of local governments. Subject areas…

  15. Survey of chiropractic in Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R B; Butler, R

    1982-06-01

    This survey of the members of the Dade County Chiropractic Society of Miami, Florida was initiated with the encouragement and under the supervision of the Dade County Health Systems Agency (HSA). The purpose of the survey was to obtain information relative to the inclusion of chiropractic into future health planning to be conducted by the HSA. The survey was divided into a "Physicians Survey" obtaining information on location, office hours, gross income, total patient visits and type of practice of the doctor, and a "Patient Survey" obtaining information on age, sex, ethnic origin, residence, and payment source of the patients. Clinical information on initial complaints, diagnoses, treatment, referrals, and amount of care was also obtained. It was found that chiropractors work an average of 31.7 hours per week with a gross annual income of $74,750.00 (1979). The male-female distribution of patients was equal and the average patient age was 43.4 years. Anglocaucasian category comprised 80.2% of the patient sample. Nearly 50% of all chiropractic patients pay for services rendered out of their own pocket. Of the primary diagnosis, 81.3% related to the spine. The study concludes that the practice of chiropractic in Dade County is very similar to the practice of chiropractic in general.

  16. A Plan of Library Services for Broward County Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, F. William; Williams, James G.

    In January 1973 the Broward County (Florida) Commissioners authorized a study to find out what library facilities and services existed and were needed in the county, and to develop structure and guidelines for setting up a county library system. Data were collected from existing census and other reports, from a questionnaire to community libraries…

  17. EVALUATION OF COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA LANDFILL MINING DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the landfill mining process as demonstrated under the U.S. EPA, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory's Municipal Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program by the Collier County (Florida) Solid Waste Management Department. Landfill mining is the ...

  18. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  19. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-07-12

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  20. Hydrologic conditions in Broward County, Florida, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaven, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    During the 1976 water year, rainfall was 3.6 percent below average in Broward County, Fla. Water levels in the Pompano Beach and Dixie well fields were lower during the peak of the 1976 dry season than the peak of the record low dry season in 1971. Flow in the major canals was variable during the 1976 water year compared to 1962-75 averages. Flows in Cypress Creek, Middle River, and Snake Creek at S-29 were higher than the average. Flows in Plantation Canal and South New River were equal to the 1962-75 averages, while Hillsboro, North New River, and Snake Creek at N.W. 67th Avenue were below the long-term averages. The concentrations of principal mineral constituents in surface water in Broward County were within limits established by Florida State Water Standards, with the exception of iron at one station. Total coliforms were equal to or within permissible limits for class III water and waters for public supply in Broward canals at all sites during the 1976 water year. Fecal coliform did not exceed the permissible limit for public water supply at any of the sites during the 1976 water year. (Kosco-USGS)

  1. Rethinking "Turner v. Keefe": The Parallel Mobilization of African-American and White Teachers in Tampa, Florida, 1936-1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    In 1941, members of the local unit of the Florida State Teachers Association (FSTA) met in Tampa to plan a lawsuit against Hillsborough County's school board for paying African-American teachers less than white teachers. Hilda Turner, who taught history and economics at Tampa's historically black high school, agreed to serve as plaintiff; she was…

  2. Geohydrology of Indian River County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiner, G.R.; Laughlin, C.P.; Toth, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system and the Floridan aquifer system are the sources of groundwater used in Indian River County, Florida. About 65% of the groundwater is used for irrigation and is from the Floridan aquifer system. Saline water ranging from slightly saline to brine underlies the fresh groundwater throughout the county and is the chief water quality problem. Transmissivities of the surficial aquifer system in eastern Indian River County range from 1,500 to 11,000 sq ft/d. Yields of wells are as much as 1,200 gal/min. Reported transmissivities for the Floridan aquifer system range from 65,000 to 200,000 sq ft/d. Most wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system flow; flow rates range from 30 to 2,000 gal/min. Chloride concentrations of water in the surficial aquifer system generally are below 100 mg/L, but concentrations often exceed 250 mg/L in water from the Floridan aquifer system. Between 1976 and 1983, average chloride concentrations in water from six wells that tap the surficial aquifer system in the Vero Beach well field increased about 36 mg/L, but were unchanged in four other wells. The increase in chloride concentration probably is related to a well-field pumpage increase from 5.44 million gal/d in 1976 to 8.00 million gal/d in 1983. In most of the County, chloride concentrations of wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system have not changed significantly in the 15-year period, 1968-83. Water levels in the surficial aquifer system declined 15 to 19 ft between 1971 and 1984 in the Vero Beach well field where the larger groundwater withdrawals occur, but have not declined significantly outside heavily pumped areas. Water levels in the Floridan aquifer system have declined 16 to 24 ft in eastern Indian River County in the 50-year period, 1934-84, but declines outside the heavily pumped areas generally have been less than 10 ft during this period. (USGS)

  3. Profile of Florida's Children: The 1995 Statewide and County Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, S.; And Others

    This Kids Count report presents information on the status of Florida's children. A statistical profile is presented for the state and for each county, based on demographic data and 19 indicators of child well being: (1) per capita income; (2) county population; (3) number of white and nonwhite children under 18 years; (4) number of births in 1993…

  4. Hydrology of Lake Butler, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, James L.; Schiffer, Donna M.

    1984-01-01

    Lake Butler is one of the lakes that collectively make up the Butler chain of lakes in the headwaters of the Kissimmee River, Florida. The bottom configuration of the lake is typical of relict karst features formed during lower stages in sea level. The top of the Floridan aquifer is 50 to 100 feet below the land surface. The drainage area of Lake Butler is approximately 14.5 sq mi and is comprised of sub-basins of other lakes in the vicinity. Surface outflow from Lake Butler is generally southward to Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Kissimmee River. The extremes in lake stage for the period 1933-81 are 94.67 ft on June 23, 1981 and 101.78 ft on September 13, 1960. The median lake stage for this period was 99.28 ft above sea level. The quality of water in Lake Butler is excellent, based on studies of physical, chemical, and biological conditions by the Orange County Pollution Control Department. The lake water is slightly acidic and soft (48 mg/L hardness as calcium carbonate). Pesticides in water were below detection levels at two sites sampled in the lake, but were detected in the bottom sediments. (USGS)

  5. Hydrology of Lake Panasoffkee, Sumter County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    Lake Panasoffkee, in midwest Sumter County of central Florida, receives water from three creeks and discharges water through Outlet River at an average daily rate of 207 cubic feet per second. The eastern shore of the lake is marsh and wooded swamp with inflow to the lake coming from the northeast and southeast. About 15 percent of the basin contributes surface water to the lake and about 50 percent of the 420-square-mile topographic drainage basin contributes ground water to the lake. The water from the remainder of the basin either evaporates from low areas or directly recharges the Floridan aquifer for discharge outside the basin. The maximum stage on record is 44.28 feet above mean sea level and the minimum stage on record is 37.65 feet above. The lake level is partly affected by the Wysong Dam and has stabilized in recent years at about 40.95 feet above mean sea level. The quality of the water is generally good. The lake supports a favorably balanced fish population even though minor fish kills were reported in 1973 and 1974. These kills were probably the result of algal blooms. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Impact Studies at Merced College and the Community College of Baltimore County. NCPR Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Evan; Cullinan, Dan; Cerna, Oscar; Safran, Stephanie; Richman, Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Communities Demonstration is a national research project that is testing the effectiveness of learning communities in six community colleges across the United States: Merced College in California; The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) in Baltimore, Maryland; Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida; Houston…

  7. Hydrology of Hunters Lake, Hernando County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The size and shape of Hunters Lake, Florida has been significantly altered by development of the surrounding Spring Hill residential community. The lake is the largest in Hernando County, enlarged by lakeshore excavation and connection to nearby ponds to an area of 360 acres at an average stage of 17.2 ft above sea level. Hunters Lake is naturally a closed lake, but development of Spring Hill has resulted in a surface water outflow from the lake in its southwest corner. Inflow to the lake could occur on the east side during extreme high-water periods. The karst terrain of the Hunters Lake area is internally drained through permeable soils, depressions, and sinkholes, and natural surface drainage is absent. The underlying Floridan aquifer system is unconfined except locally near coastal springs. Flow in the groundwater system is to the west regionally and to the southwest in the immediate area of Hunters Lake. Water level gradients in the groundwater system increase from 1.4 ft/mi east of the lake to about 8 ft/mi southwest of the lake. Hunters Lake is hydraulically connected to the groundwater system, receiving groundwater on the northeast side and losing water to the groundwater system on the southwest side. This close relationship with the groundwater system is demonstrated by graphical and numerical comparison of Hunters Lake stage with water levels in nearby groundwater sites. During 1965-84, the stage of Hunters Lake fluctuated between 12.48 and 20.7 ft above sea level. Because area lakes are all directly affected by groundwater levels, they also show a close relationship with water levels in Hunters Lake. Analysis of water quality data for Hunters Lake indicates that the water of the lake is a soft calcium bicarbonate type with ionic concentrations higher than in water from nearby shallow wells and lower than in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples collected in 1981-1983 indicate slightly higher levels of ionic concentration than in 1965

  8. 75 FR 53694 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site located in Davie, Broward County, Florida for publication..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0729 or Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocessors...

  9. Learning Communities for Students in Developmental English: Impact Studies at Merced College and the Community College of Baltimore County. NCPR Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Evan; Cullinan, Dan; Cerna, Oscar; Safran, Stephanie; Richman, Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Communities Demonstration is a national research project that is testing the effectiveness of learning communities in six community colleges across the United States: Merced College in California; The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) in Baltimore, Maryland; Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida; Houston…

  10. Vocational-Technical Education: A Plan for Monroe County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Hugh L., Sr., Ed.; Pilcher, Palmer, C., Ed.

    Suggested vocational-technical education programs for the Monroe County Florida school system are presented along with recommendations to implement the principle of coordinated career education in the public schools. Expansion of vocational-technical programs is emphasized to expose all students from kindergarten through Grade 12 to career…

  11. Effects of the Gulf Oil Spill in Escambia County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Kelcey Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the British Petroleum Gulf Oil Spill on resource change, psychological stress, and resilience for business owners, residents, and workers in Escambia County, Florida. This study was based on Hobfoll's (1988, 1989) Conservation of Resources theory. All business owners, residents, and workers…

  12. A brief geologic history of Volusia County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Volusia County is in a unique and beautiful setting. This Florida landscape is characterized by low coastal plains bordered by upland areas of sandy ridges and many lakes. Beautiful streams and springs abound within the vicinity. Underneath the land surface is a deep layer of limestone rocks that stores fresh, clean water used to serve drinking and other needs. However, the landscape and the subsurface rocks have not always been as they appear today. These features are the result of environmental forces and processes that began millions of years ago and are still ongoing. This fact sheet provides a brief geologic history of the Earth, Florida, and Volusia County, with an emphasis on explaining why the Volusia County landscape and geologic structure exists as it does today.

  13. Florida's Children at a Glance: The 1999 Statewide and County Update. Florida KIDS COUNT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Susan L.; Shockley, Cindi C.; Miranda, Barbara

    This Kids Count report examines state and countywide trends in the well-being of Florida's children. Demographic information is presented along with a statistical portrait for the state and for each county based on the following indicators: (1) birth, including births to unwed mothers, teen births, early prenatal care, low birth weight, and infant…

  14. Water-resources data for Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, William E.; Musgrove, Rufus H.; Menke, Clarence G.; Cagle, Joseph W.

    1964-01-01

    A study of the water resources of Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union counties, Florida (fig. 1), was made by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey during the period 1957-61. The results of this study will be published by the Florida Geological Survey in the following reports by William E. Clark, Rufus H. Musgrove, Clarence G. Menke, and Joseph W. Cagle, Jr.: "Interim Report on the Water Resources of Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union Counties, Florida," "Water Resources of Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union Counties, Florida," and "Hydrology of Brooklyn Lake, near Keystone Heights, Florida."

  15. Flood-prone areas of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Richard B.; Causey, Lawson V.; Tucker, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Floods in the consolidated city of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida, are caused directly by rainfall which, when combined with storm driven tides, causes rivers or other bodies of water to flood the low lying parts of the county. This map report supplies information on areas subject to floods of 100-year frequency; the information will permit evaluation of alternative uses of such areas. The extent of the 100-year flood is shown on the large-scale map accompanying the report. Also included is an index map showing sections of Duval County where more detailed information on the 100-year flood can be obtained. The major flood of record in the county occurred in 1964 when Hurricane Dora crossed the area. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Water resources and effects of development in Hernando County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fretwell, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    In spite of the hill and valley terrain in the Brooksville Ridge area of Hernando County, Florida, little surface drainage occurs within the county. Recharge to the Floridan aquifer system occurs as infiltration of precipitation within the county or as ground-water flow from Sumter County to the east and Pasco County to the south. Discharge is principally to the Gulf of Mexico, but some ground water flows north into Citrus County before it reaches the Gulf. The Floridan aquifer system is generally unconfined. Water quality is generally good except near the coast where high chloride occurs. Water from the Floridan aquifer system accounted for 87 percent of the water used for irrigation, industry, and rural and public supply in 1982. Sixty-seven percent of this water was used by industry. Rock mining, the major industry, used 99 percent of the industrial water. The anticipated increase in population in the county between 1982 and 2000 will increase demand for water primarily from public water-supply systems. This higher demand will cause about a 1 percent reduction in flow from Weeki Wachee Springs, but little change in lake levels or saltwater intrusion will occur if the projected additional supplies are developed far enough inland from the coast. (USGS)

  17. Mapping Success: Performance-Based Scholarships, Student Services, and Developmental Math at Hillsborough Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommo, Colleen; Boynton, Melissa; Collado, Herbert; Diamond, John; Gardenhire, Alissa; Ratledge, Alyssa; Rudd, Timothy; Weiss, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Hillsborough Community College (HCC), a large multicampus institution in Tampa, Florida, worked with MDRC to create the Mathematics Access Performance Scholarship (MAPS) program to help academically underprepared community college students succeed in developmental math. MAPS provides an incentive for low-income students referred to…

  18. 78 FR 13339 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement with 2238 NW. 86th Street Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by...

  19. 77 FR 16548 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... entered into four (4) settlements for past response costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida...

  20. Hydrogeology of a landfill, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario

    1983-01-01

    The Pinellas County landfill site is on a flat, coastal area characterized by a high water table is subject to tidal flooding. Altitudes within the study area range from 8 to 12 feet above sea level. Three geohydrologic units underlie the landfill site: a surficial aquifer about 19 feet thick composed of sand and shells; a confining bed about 35 feet thick composed of marl and clay; and the Floridan aquifer composed of limestone. The rate of lateral movement of ground water away from the site is about 1.2 feet per year; however, the rate of movement along the boundary of the landfill cells is about 20 feet per year. Vertical movement through the confining layer is about 0.005 foot per year. Landfill operations have not altered surface-water quality. Leachate migration downward into the Floridan aquifer is not indicated, but data do indicate leachate is migrating from the oldest section of the landfill site through the surficial aquifer. Peaks in concentration of selected chemical parameters and flow-rate analysis of water from trenches indicate the possibility of slug-flow leachate. (USGS)

  1. Cultural and Economic Mediation Among Spanish Speaking Migrant Farm Workers in Dade County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferster, Lucian Edward

    Based on the study "Migrant Children in Florida", this paper discusses the Spanish speaking farm workers who migrate to Dade County yearly to harvest the tomato and fresh vegetable crops. During the fall of 1969 and the spring of 1970, questionnaires were given to a random sample of 9,065 adult migrant workers in Florida counties with…

  2. Hydrogeology and quality of ground water in Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamski, James C.; German, Edward R.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water is the main source of water supply in central Florida and is critical for aquatic habitats and human consumption. To provide a better understanding for the conservation, development, and management of the water resources of Orange County, Florida, a study of the hydrogeologic framework, water budget, and ground-water quality characteristics was conducted from 1998 through 2002. The study also included extensive analyses of the surface-water resources, published as a separate report. An increase in population from about 264,000 in 1960 to 896,000 in 2000 and subsequent urban growth throughout this region has been accompanied by a substantial increase in water use. Total ground-water use in Orange County increased from about 82 million gallons per day in 1965 to about 287 million gallons per day in 2000. The hydrogeology of Orange County consists of three major hydrogeologic units: the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate confining unit, and the Floridan aquifer system. Data were compiled from 634 sites to construct hydrogeologic maps and sections of Orange County. Water-level elevations measured in 23 wells tapping the surficial aquifer system ranged from about 10.6 feet in eastern Orange County to 123.8 feet above NGVD 29 in northwestern Orange County from March 2000 through September 2001. Water levels also were measured in 14 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer. Water levels fluctuate over time from seasonal and annual variations in rainfall; however, water levels in a number of wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer have declined over time. Withdrawal of ground water from the aquifers by pumping probably is causing the declines because the average annual precipitation rate has not changed substantially in central Florida since the 1930s, although yearly rates can vary. A generalized water budget was computed for Orange County from 1991 to 2000. Average rates for the 10-year period for the following budget components were computed based

  3. Northeast Florida Regional Sediment Management: Implementation Strategies and Recommendations for Nassau County and Duval County, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    maintenance sediment to serve as shore protection and mitigation for navigation projects’ disruption to the natural sediment transport patterns and...33 Figure 13. Jacksonville Harbor maintenance overview, 2011 permit...Naval Station NSB Naval Submarine Base ODMDS Ocean Dredge Material Disposal Site O&M Operation and Maintenance R Florida Department of

  4. Hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water supply in Highlands County, Florida. As the demand for water in the county increases, additional information about local groundwater resources is needed to manage and develop the water supply effectively. To address the need for additional data, a study was conducted to evaluate the hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County. Total groundwater use in Highlands County has increased steadily since 1965. Total groundwater withdrawals increased from about 37 million gallons per day in 1965 to about 107 million gallons per day in 2005. Much of this increase in water use is related to agricultural activities, especially citrus cultivation, which increased more than 300 percent from 1965 to 2005. Highlands County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer, which is underlain by the intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system, which consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, as many as three middle confining units, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer consists primarily of fine-to-medium grained quartz sand with varying amounts of clay and silt. The aquifer system is unconfined and underlies the entire county. The thickness of the surficial aquifer is highly variable, ranging from less than 50 to more than 300 feet. Groundwater in the surficial aquifer is recharged primarily by precipitation, but also by septic tanks, irrigation from wells, seepage from lakes and streams, and the lateral groundwater inflow from adjacent areas. The intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit acts as a confining layer (except where breached by sinkholes) that restricts the vertical movement of water between the surficial aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The sediments have varying degrees of permeability and consist of permeable limestone, dolostone, or

  5. Bathymetry of Lake Manatee, Manatee County, Florida, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellino, Jason C.; Pfeiffer, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Manatee, located in central Manatee County, Florida, is the principal drinking-water source for Manatee and Sarasota Counties. The drainage basin of Lake Manatee encompasses about 120 square miles, and the reservoir covers a surface area of about 1,450 acres at an elevation of 38.8 feet above NAVD 88 or 39.7 feet above NGVD 29. The full pool water-surface elevation is 39.1 feet above NAVD 88 (40.0 feet above NGVD 29), and the estimated minimum usable elevation is 25.1 feet above NAVD 88 (26.0 feet above NGVD 29). The minimum usable elevation is based on the elevation of water intake structures. Manatee County has used the stage/volume relation that was developed from the original survey in the 1960s to estimate the volume of water available for consumption. Concerns about potential changes in storage capacity of the Lake Manatee reservoir, coupled with a recent drought, led to this bathymetry mapping effort.

  6. Hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, J.E.; Stewart, M.T.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the surficial aquifer system in Dade County, begun in 1983, is part of a regional study of the aquifer system in southeastern Florida. Test drilling for lithologic samples, flow measurements during drilling, aquifer testing, and analyses of earlier data permitted delineation of the hydraulic conductivity distribution (on hydrogeologic sections), the aquifers in the system, the generalized transmissivity distribution, and interpretation of the ground-water flow system. The surficial aquifer system, in which an unconfined ground-water flow system exists, is composed of the sediments from land surface downward to the top of a regionally extensive zone of sediments of low permeability called the intermediate confining unit. The aquifer system units, which vary in composition from clay-size sediments to cavernous limestone, are hydro stratigraphically divided into the Biscayne aquifer at the top; an intervening semiconfining unit that consists principally of clayey sand; a predominantly gray limestone aquifer in the Tamiami Formation in western and west-central Dade County; and sand or clayey sand near the base of the surficial aquifer system. The base of the surficial aquifer system ranges from a depth of about 175 to 210 feet below land surface in westernmost Dade County to greater than 270 feet in northeastern Dade County. Test drilling and aquifer-test data indicate a complex hydraulic conductivity distribution. Hydraulic conductivities of the very highly permeable zone of the Biscayne aquifer commonly exceed 10,000 feet per day; in the gray limestone aquifer, they range from 210 to 780 feet per day. Transmissivities of the surficial aquifer system vary locally but have a recognizable areal trend. Estimated values generally are about 300,000 feet squared per day or greater in nearly all of central and eastern Dade County. Transmissivity is lower to the west, decreasing to less than 75,000 feet squared per day in western Dade County. High

  7. Water resources of Okaloosa County and adjacent areas, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trapp, Henry; Pascale, C.A.; Foster, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Okaloosa County, in the northwest Florida panhandle, uses the Floridan aquifer for water supply, although it also has abundant surface water and ground water in the surficial sand-and-gravel aquifer. Water levels have declined locally more than 90 feet in the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer. The Floridan aquifer is overlain by the Pensacola clay confining bed, and the Bucatunna Clay subdivides it into two limestone units. Water in the upper limestone is generally of good quality. The lower limestone probably contains saline water. Average daily stream discharge is about 2,500 million gallons. Stream discharge does not diminish excessively during droughts, owing to high base runoff. Water levels in the Floridan aquifer will decline as long as pumping increases in the present areas of withdrawal. The decline could be alleviated by redistribution of pumping, artificial recharge, and the use of the sand-and-gravel aquifer or streams. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Integrated solid waste management of Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm Beach County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.

  9. SOIL RADON POTENTIAL MAPPLING OF TWELVE COUNTIES IN NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the approach, methods, and detailed data used to prepare soil radon potential maps of 12 counties in North-Central Florida. he maps were developed under the Florida Radon Research Program to provide a scientific basis for implementing radon-protective buildin...

  10. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area... section shall be enforced by the Commander, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, and/or such persons...

  11. Geohydrology and Potential for Upward Movement of Saline Water in the Cocoa Well Field, East Orange County, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Geohydrology and Potential for Upward Movement of Saline Water in the Cocoa Well Field, East Orange County, Florida By G.G. Phelps and Donna M...Management District City of Cocoa , Florida Tallahassee, Florida 1996 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Potential for Upward Movement of Saline Water in the Cocoa Well Field, East Orange County, Florida 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  12. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District, September 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Woodham, W.M.; Schiner, George R.

    1980-01-01

    A September 1980 potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual high water-level period. Potentiometric levels rose 1 to 31 feet between May 1980 and September 1980 in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk, northwestern DeSoto, and Manatee Counties. Water levels in these areas are widely affected by reduced pumping for irrigation and have the greatest range in fluctuations. Generally, potentiometric levels were lower than previous September levels except in Citrus, eastern Levy, and western Marion Counties where levels were 0 to 8 feet higher. (USGS)

  13. Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Multibeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Although large, well-known concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard, most mapping of Florida's coral resources addresses the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. To date, technological limitations precluded mapping corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by minimal or nonexistent coordinated management, monitoring, and mapping activities. In November 2000, the Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data south of Port Everglades. Additionally, the Broward County shore protection project conducted a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey in 2001. Wavelet analyses performed on overlapping transects of the two data sets compare the accuracy of reef bathymetry and complexity captured in the two data collection projects.

  14. Geologic data from test drilling in Palm Beach County, Florida since 1970

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, James J.

    1976-01-01

    Test hole data, in Palm Beach County, Florida, include lithologic logs from 66 test wells and geophysical logs from 54 test wells. The purpose of the study is to provide the geohydrologic information needed for water management and land use decisions, with emphasis on the urbanized eastern part of the county and the readily developable area in the central part. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Implementation Study of the Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Sandra; Karlstrom, Mikael; Haywood, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida, was an ambitious and innovative effort to improve the school readiness of low-income children in Palm Beach County by identifying needs early and providing early intervention services to support physical, cognitive, and emotional health and development. Services were delivered to…

  16. Florida's Children at a Glance: The 1998 Statewide and County Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, S.; Shockley, C.; Goltry, K.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide and county level trends in the well-being of Florida's children. Demographic information is presented along with a statistical portrait for the state and for each county based on indicators related to: (1) birth, including births to unwed mothers, births to teenage mothers, births receiving early prenatal…

  17. Landfill Gas Characterization and Leachate Removal at the Alachua County Southwest Landfill, Alachua County, Florida Through Utilization of a Mechanical Gas Collection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    AD-A280 036 LANDFILL GAS CHARACTERIZATION AND LEACHATE REMOVAL AT THE ALACHUA COUNTY SOUTHWEST LANDFILL, ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA THROUGH UTILIZATION...UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 1994 94 6 8 131S - &~ i I I LANDFILL GAS CHARACTERIZATION AND LEACHATE REMOVAL AT THE ALACHUA COUNTY SOUTHWEST LANDFILL, ALACHUA...of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Engineering. LANDFILL GAS CHARACTERIZATION AND LEACHATE REMOVAL AT THE ALACHUA COUNTY SOUTHWEST

  18. Assessment of saltwater intrusion in southern coastal Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Of the counties in southeastern Florida, Broward County has experienced some of the most severe effects of saltwater intrusion into the surficial Biscayne aquifer because, before 1950, most public water-supply well fields in the county were constructed near the principal early population centers located less than 5 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The construction of major regional drainage canals in the early 20th century caused a lowering of the water table and a gradual inland movement of the saltwater front toward the well fields. The U.S. Geological Survey began field investigations of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of southeastern Broward County in 1939. As part of the present study, the positions of the saltwater front in 1945, 1969, and 1993 were estimated using chloride concentrations of water samples collected between 1939 and 1994 from various monitoring and exploratory wells. The data indicate that, between 1945 and 1993, the saltwater front has moved as much as 0.5 mile inland in parts of the study area. The position and movement of the saltwater front were simulated numerically to help determine which of the various hydrologic factors and water-management features characterizing the coastal subsurface environment and its alteration by man are of significance in increasing or decreasing the degree of saltwater intrusion. Two representational methods were applied by the selection and use of appropriate model codes. The SHARP code simulates the position of the saltwater front as a sharp interface, which implies that no transition zone (a zone in which a gradational change between freshwater and saltwater occurs) separates freshwater and saltwater. The Subsurface Waste Injection Program (SWIP) code simulates a two-fluid, variable-density system using a convective-diffusion approach that includes a representation of the transition zone that occurs between the freshwater and saltwater bodies. The models were applied to: (1) approximately

  19. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Broward County, Florida, 1939-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Fish, J.E.; Causaras, C.R.; Poore, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers, of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. This report indexes through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Broward County. (USGS)

  20. Altitude of water table, surficial aquifer, Palm Beach County, Florida, April 24-26, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    Water levels in Palm Beach County, Florida, were measured in April 1984 to determine the altitude of the water table in the surficial aquifer. A total of 104 wells and 50 surface-water measurement sites were used to contour the altitude of the water table at 2 and 4-foot intervals. The water-level measurements made in April represent low-water levels near the end of south Florida 's dry season. Contours of the water table at this time ranged from 22 feet above sea level in the north-central part of the county to 2 feet near the coast. (USGS)

  1. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Dade County, Florida, 1923-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Causaras, C.R.; Fish, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties. This report indexes, through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Dade County. (USGS)

  2. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Palm Beach County, Florida, 1928-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Causaras, C.R.; Fish, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A regional assessment of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward , and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the first phase of the project was to determine the geologic, hydrologic, and water quality data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies. This report summarizes, through tables and maps, the types of data available for Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  3. Direct-current resistivity data from 94 sites in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Cathleen J.

    1988-01-01

    Direct-current resistivity data were collected from 94 vertical electric sounding profiles in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Direct-current resistivity data, which may be used to determine the location and thicknesses of shallow, semipermeable marls or locate zones of high chloride concentration, are presented in this report. The resistivity data consist of field data, smoothed data, layer resistivity from smoothed data, and Cartesian graphs of resistivity in relation to depth for 94 sites located in northeastern Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  4. Hydrogeology and Analysis of Aquifer Characteristics in West-Central Pinellas County, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    the Study Area Pinellas County is a peninsula in west-central Florida bounded by Tampa Bay to the east and the Gulf of Mexico to the west (fig. 1). The...packstones. The foraminiferal limestones in the unit commonly contain benthic foraminifera , bryozoan, echinoid, and mollusk fossils. The Ocala Limestone...county is part of the Gulf Coastal Lowlands physiographic region described by White (1970) which consists of low angle scarps and terraces formed

  5. Hydrology of the Floridan Aquifer in Northwest Volusia County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    Northwest Volusia County, in east-central Florida, is a 262-square-mile area including the southern part of the Crescent City Ridge and the northern tip of the DeLand Ridge. The hydrogeologic units in the area include the Floridan aquifer, which is made up of parts of the Lake City Limestone, the Avon Park Limestone, and the Ocala Limestone, all of Eocene age; the confining bed, which is composed of clays of Miocene or Pliocene age; and the surficial aquifer, which is made up of Pleistocene and Holocene sands. Ornamental fern growing is a $12 million per year industry in northwest Volusia County. Fern culture requires a large amount of good-quality water for irrigation, and more significantly, a large water withdrawal rate for freeze protection during winter months. The source of most water used is the Floridan aquifer. The large irrigation withdrawals, especially in winter months when spray irrigation is used for freeze protection of ferns, introduce problems such as the potential for saltwater intrusion, the temporary loss of water in domestic wells caused by large potentiometric drawdown, and increased sinkhole activity. The water budget of the surficial layer consists of 55 inches per year rainfall, 39 inches per year evapotranspiration, 13 inches per year runoff, and a net downward leakage of 3 inches per year. Average ground-water irrigational withdrawal is 8.1 million gallons per day, while the peak withdrawal rate is 300 million gallons per day during freeze-protection pumpage. The average irrigation well depth exceeds 300 feet. Transmissivities of the Floridan aquifer range from 4,500 to 160,000 feet squared per day. Highest transmissivities are in the DeLeon Springs area and the lowest are in the east Pierson area. Storage coefficients range from 0.0003 to 0.0013. The water budget of the Floridan aquifer under present conditions of withdrawal consists of 108 cubic feet per second recharge, 2 cubic feet per second horizontal ground-water inflow, 34 cubic

  6. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, September 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolansky, R.M.; Mills, L.R.; Woodham, W.M.; Laughlin, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    A September 1978 potentiometric-surface map depicts the annual high water-level period of the Floridan aquifer in the Southwest Florida Management District. Potentiometric levels increased 10 to 25 feet between May 1978 and September 1978, in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk and Manatee Counties. These areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest fluctuations in water-levels between the low and high water-level periods. Water-level rises in coastal, northern and southern areas of the Water Management District ranged from 0 to 10 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District, September 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Woodham, W.M.; Laughlin, Charles P.

    1979-01-01

    A September 1979 potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual high water-level period. Potentiometric levels increased 1 to 20 feet between May 1979 and September 1979, in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk, northwestern DeSoto, and Manatee Counties. Water levels in these areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest range in fluctuations. Water-level increases ranged from 0 to 7 feet in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District. Generally, potentiometric levels were higher than previous September levels due to heavy rains in August and September. (USGS)

  8. Potentiometric surface of Floridan aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, September 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, P.D.; Mills, L.R.; Laughlin, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    A potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual high water-level period. Potentiometric levels increased 15 to 30 feet between May 1977 and September 1977 in the citrus and farming sections of southeastern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, and southwestern Polk Counties. These areas are widely affected by pumpage for irrigation and have the greatest range in water-level fluctuations between the low and high water-level periods. Water-level rises in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District ranged from 0 to 15 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. 76 FR 78702 - Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application for Levy County Nuclear Power Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application for Levy County Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2) Notice of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Reconstitution Pursuant to 10 CFR...

  10. Depth to water table, recharge areas, drainage basins, and relief of Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, L.V.

    1975-01-01

    This 3-sheet map report depicts hydrologic systems of surface water and groundwater in Duval County, Florida. The maps are from 1:20,000 and 1:62,500 quadrangles, U.S. Geological Survey. Symbols and colors describe water levels, groundwater recharge, drainage areas, and topography. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. High School Accountability: Early Evidence from Florida's Broward County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iatarola, Patrice; Gao, Niu

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, Florida adopted the Differentiated Accountability (DA) plan, making it among the first to specifically incorporate into its existing school grading scheme college readiness targets. In this paper we use a rich panel of data on high school students in Broward County (Ft. Lauderdale) Public Schools to present early evidence of the impact of…

  12. Black Immigrant Mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Their Children's Readiness for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Lauren; Spielberger, Julie; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos

    2012-01-01

    This report compares the circumstances and characteristics of Black immigrant mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, to those of Latina immigrant and Black native-born mothers, focusing on those living in distressed areas. The study also compares the early developmental outcomes of their children. When controlling for parental and child…

  13. Hydrologic conditions in the Lakeland Ridge area of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Alton F.

    1973-01-01

    The Lakeland ridge area of this investigation covers about 300 square miles in northwest Polk County in central Florida. The growth of industry, phosphate mining, and citrus production as well as population growth during the last two decades has resulted in an increase in ground-water pumpage from about 11 billion gallons in 1950 to 27 billion gallons in 1970.

  14. Solar-heated municipal swimming pools, a case study: Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, M.

    1981-09-01

    The installation of a solar energy system to heat the water in the swimming pool in one of Dade County, Florida's major parks is described. The mechanics of solar heated swimming pools are explained. The solar heating system consists of 216 unglazed polypropylene tube collectors, a differential thermostat, and the distribution system. The systems performance and economics as well as future plants are discussed.

  15. Planning for a New State Institution of Higher Learning in Dade County Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

    In 1965 the Florida State Legislature authorized the establishment of a new state university in Dade County. This report outlines various projections and preliminary plans for the institution. The 3 planning phases for the institution include first, the selection of a site for the first campus and construction of facilities; second, the…

  16. The Impact of Standards-Based Reform in Duval County, Florida: 1999-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supovitz, Jonathan A.; Taylor, Brooke Snyder

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge that school districts face is to improve the learning of all students, not just in individual schools, but across the entire system of schools. Duval County, Florida has embarked on a remarkable journey to implement standards-based reform in schools throughout the district with the intent to systematically improve teaching and…

  17. Polk County (Florida) Vocational-Occupational Curriculum Model for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk County Board of Public Instruction, Bartow, FL.

    Presented is the Polk County, Florida preliminary model vocational-occupational curriculum guide for educable mentally retarded (EMR) students in grades 1-2. Aim of the curriculum is the successful placement of students in the community. Provided for grades 1-6 are the following components: a rating scale and behavioral objectives for primary and…

  18. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County, Venice, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-11-01

    PNNL and Calcs Plus helped the South Sarasota County Florida Habitat for Humanity retrofit a 1978 single-story home by stripping old drywall, air sealing concrete block walls, and installing rigid insulation, furring strips, and new drywall. The attic was sealed and insulated with spray foam to house a new heat pump.

  19. Florida City & County Government. A Teacher Handbook for the High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Robert; And Others

    Designed to remedy student's lack of opportunity to learn about the decision making process at the city or county government levels, this teacher handbook focuses on local government in Florida. The subject areas around which units and corresponding lessons are developed include: (1) the foundations of local government, history, legal roles, home…

  20. Exceptional Child Education; DeSoto County Board of Public Instruction, Arcadia, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSoto County Board of Public Instruction, Arcadia, FL.

    Educational specifications of the program for secondary educable mentally handicapped students in DeSoto County (Florida) are described. Specifications for the overall philosophy, purposes, objectives, activities, space and equipment requirements, and special considerations are provided in the following areas: academics, food preparation, clothing…

  1. Florida's Children at a Glance: The 2000 Statewide and County Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Susan L.; Shockley, Cindi C.

    This Kids Count report examines state and countywide trends in the well-being of Florida's children. Demographic information is presented along with a statistical portrait for the state and for each county based on the following indicators: (1) births, including births to unwed mothers, teen births, early prenatal care, low birth weight, and…

  2. Implementing Uniform Suspension Procedures in the Broward County, Florida School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiter, Joel; And Others

    The Broward County, Florida, School District student suspension policies, rules, and procedures were found to be deficient by standards based on the Wood v. Strickland and Goss v. Lopez decisions of the Supreme Court and the guidelines set down by the Office of Civil Rights. Subsequent to the identification of the deficiencies, an accounting…

  3. 78 FR 60182 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Broward County, Florida, to a Nonappropriated Fund Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM83 Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Broward County, Florida, to a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Area AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Final rule... System (FWS) wage area. This change is necessary because there are three NAF FWS employees working...

  4. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District, September 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, G.L.; Schiner, George R.

    1983-01-01

    Maps of the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida are prepared semiannually by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Maps for May and September show the potentiometric surface that is close to the annual low or high water level condition that usually occurs in May or September, respectively. The surface is mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and is represented on maps by contours that connect points of equal altitude. This report shows the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer for September 1983. Data for the map were collected during September 12-23. The map represents water level conditions near the end of the summer rainy season when groundwater withdrawals for agricultural use are low. Water levels in most wells measured in September 1983 were higher than those measured in May 1983. September water levels averaged about 0.6 ft higher than May levels in areas north of Hillsborough County and about 7 ft higher in southern areas. Water level increases in the north ranged from zero to about 2 ft along coastal regions and from zero to about 5 ft in inland areas. Water level declines in the north ranged from zero to about 7 ft and occurred in scattered parts of all northern counties. In the south, water level increases ranged from zero to about 3 ft along coastal and extreme southern regions and from about 5 to 34 ft in other southern areas. The greatest water level increases occurred in southern Hillsborough County where irrigation pumpage contributes to large seasonal fluctuations. There were a few areas in Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties where September water levels showed declines ranging from about 1 to 3 ft when compared with May levels. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. Ground-water recharge in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grubbs, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water is a major component of Florida's water resources, accounting for 90 percent of all public-supply and self-supplied domestic water withdrawals, and 58 percent of self-supplied commercial-industrial and agricultural withdrawals of freshwater (Marella, 1992). Ground-water is also an important source of water for streams, lakes, and wetlands in Florida. Because of their importance, a good understanding of these resources is essential for their sound development, use, and protection. One area in which our understanding is lacking is in characterizing the rate at which ground water in aquifers is recharged, and how recharge rates vary geographically. Ground-water recharge (recharge) is the replenishment of ground water by downward infiltration of water from rainfall, streams, and other sources (American Society of Civil Engineers, 1987, p. 222). The recharge rates in many areas of Florida are unknown, of insufficient accuracy, or mapped at scales that are too coarse to be useful. Improved maps of recharge rates will result in improved capabilities for managing Florida's ground-water resources. In 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, began a study to delineate high-rate recharge areas in several regions of Florida (Vecchioli and others, 1990). This study resulted in recharge maps that delineated areas of high (greater than 10 inches per year) and low (0 to 10 inches per year) recharge in three counties--Okaloosa, Pasco, and Volusia Counties--at a scale of 1:100,000. This report describes the results of a similar recharge mapping study for Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties (fig. 1), in which areas of high- and low-rates of recharge to the sand-and-gravel aquifer and Upper Floridan aquifer are delineated. The study was conducted in 1992 and 1993 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

  6. Fluctuations of ground-water levels in Lee County, Florida, in 1975 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    During the 1975 water year, rainfall was about average at Page Field, Florida, and from 20-25 percent below average at Lehigh Acres and Sanibel Island. Water levels were monitored in 57 observation wells in Lee County, Florida. Of the 23 wells that tap the water-table aquifer, one record high and 5 record low water levels were established. Record low water levels were established in 5 of 20 wells that tap the sandstone aquifer and in 1 of 10 wells that tap the upper Hawthorn aquifer. A record high water level was established in 1 of 3 wells that tap the lower Hawthorn aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Water-use data by category, county, and water management district in Florida, 1950-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The population for Florida in 1990 was estimated at 12.94 million, an increase of nearly 10.17 million (370 percent) from the population of 2.77 million in 1950. Consequently, water use (fresh and saline) in Florida increased nearly 510 percent (15,175 million gallons per day) between 1950 and 1990. The resident population of the State is projected to surpass 20 million by the year 2020. Through the cooperation of the Florida Department of Environ- mental Protection and the U.S. Geologial Survey, water-use data for the period between 1950 and 1990 has been consolidated into one publication. This report aggregates and summarizes the quantities of water withdrawn annually for all water-use categories (public supply, self-supplied domestic, self-supplied commercial-industrial, agriculture, and thermoelectric power generation), by counties, and water management districts in Florida from 1950 through 1990. Total water withdrawn in Florida increased from 2,923 million gallons per day in 1950 to 17,898 million gallons per day in 1990. Surface- water withdrawals during 1950 totaled 2,333 million gallons per day but were not differentiated between fresh and saline, therefore, comparisons between fresh and saline water were made beginning with 1955 data. Freshwater withdrawals increased 245 percent between 1955 and 1990. Saline water withdrawals increased more than 1,500 percent between 1955 and 1990. In 1955, more than 47 percent of the fresh- water used was withdrawn from ground-water sources and 53 percent was withdrawn from surface-water sources. In 1990, nearly 62 percent of the fresh- water withdrawn was from ground-water sources, while 38 percent was withdrawn from surface-water sources. The steady increase in ground-water withdrawals since the 1950's primarily is a result of the ability to drill and pump water more economically from large, deep wells and the reliability of both the quality and quantity of water from these wells. Water withdrawn for public supply in

  8. Florida coastal ecological characterization: a socioeconomic study of the southwestern region. Volume II. Data appendix, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    French, C.O.; Parsons, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Data are compiled from existing sources on the social and economic characteristics of the southwestern coastal region of Florida, which is made up of Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Monroe, Pasco, Pinellas, and Sarasota Counties. Described are the components and interrelationships among complex processes that include population and demographics characteristics, mineral production, multiple-use conflicts, recreation and tourism, agricultural production, sport and commercial fishing, transportation, industrial and residential development, and environmental issues and regulations. Energetics models of socioeconomic systems are also presented. This volume contains appendices presenting data on land use, public utilities, transportation, recreation and tourism. 21 figures, 141 tables.

  9. Accessibility to minors of cigarettes from vending machines--Broward County, Florida, 1996.

    PubMed

    1996-11-29

    The sale of tobacco products to persons ages < 18 years has been prohibited by law in Florida since October 1992, and since May 1994, a statewide law in Florida has required retailers or owners of businesses that sell cigarettes or other tobacco products to post a conspicuous sign stating that tobacco sales to minors are illegal and that proof of age is required to purchase tobacco products. To assess the impact of these laws in Broward County (1990 population: 1,255,531) during February-March 1996, the Florida Atlantic University Department of Exercise Science/Wellness Education conducted studies of vendor compliance with laws enacted to prevent minors from gaining access to cigarettes through vending machines and to ensure that tobacco vendors comply with the sign statute. This report summarizes the findings of the assessment of access to cigarettes from vending machines, which indicated that approximately one third of such attempts by minors were successful.

  10. Environmental Assessment, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida Department of Transportation. Section 6, Township 2 South, Range 26 West Eglin Air Force Base, Santa Rosa County, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-03

    39 FIGURES 1-1 Project Corridor 3-1 State of Florida 3-2 Map of Western Panhandle 3-3 Map of Santa Rosa County 3-4 Site...standard 6.0 feet wide flared design. The pavement tie-in would feature standard friction course feathering involving decreasing thickness of asphalt...OKALOOSA WAKULLA ESCAMBIA CALHOUN HOLMES GADSDEN FRANKLIN JEFFERSON WASHINGTON FIGURE 3-2 MAP OF WESTERN FLORIDA PANHANDLE EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE

  11. Production of biomass fuel for resource recovery: Trash recycling in Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, P.J.; Brooks, K.G.

    1997-12-01

    Dade County, Florida has been in the forefront of resources recovery from municipal solid waste since the early 1980`s. The County completed its 3,000 tons per day (six days per week) refuse derived fuel waste-to-energy facility in 1982. The Resources Recovery facility is operated under a long-term agreement with Montenay-Dade, Ltd. The trash processing capability of this facility was upgraded in 1997 to process 860 tons per day (six days per week) of trash into a biomass fuel which is used off-site to produce electrical energy. Under current Florida law, facilities like trash-to-fuel that produce alternative clean-burning fuels for the production of energy may receive credit for up to one-half of the state`s 30 percent waste reduction goal.

  12. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-194-1779, Dade County Fire Department, Miami, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.A.

    1987-02-01

    An investigation was made of potential exposures to hazardous wastes (solvents) used for starting practice fires at the Dade County Fire Department aircraft fire training facility at Opa-Locka Airport, Dade County, Florida. Used solvents donated by waste handlers or local industries had been used to start practice fires. Laboratory analysis of the soil and ground water samples taken from the burn pits revealed the presence of several common industrial solvents. The only suspected carcinogen identified was dichlorobenzene. Other potential carcinogens identified included methylene chlroide and perchloroethylene. The author recommends that the practice of using unknown solvents to help start practice fires be eliminated.

  13. Records of selected wells and lithologic logs of test holes, Hendry County and adjacent areas, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, John E.; Causaras, Carmen R.; O'Donnell, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    To provide water-resource information for Hendry County, Florida , geologic test holes were drilled in the surficial aquifer, and an extensive inventory was compiled of wells in the surficial aquifer and deep artesian aquifers. This report provides: (1) records for 788 selected wells and test holes including location , construction, water use, water level, chloride concentration, specific conductance, temperature, yield, hydrogen sulfide, and iron-staining problems; and (2) lithologic logs for 26 test holes ranging in depth from 90 to 650 feet. A few inventoried wells and two test holes are in adjacent parts of Collier or Glades Counties. (USGS)

  14. Hydrology of the sand-and-gravel aquifer, southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, L.R.; Barr, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The sand-and-gravel aquifer in southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida, extends from land surface to depth of 50 to 150 feet. Intervening layers of clay generally separate the aquifer into an unconfined surficial zone, composed principally of fine to medium sand, and a lower confined zone, consisting of variable amounts of medium to coarse sand and gravel. Well yields of 50 to 500 gallons per minute are possible in most of the area, and yields of 500 to 1,000 gallons per minute can be developed in parts of southwestern Okaloosa County. (USGS)

  15. Summary of hydrologic data collected during 1974 in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hull, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    This report is ninth in a series documenting the annual hydrologic conditions in Dade County, Florida. The hydrologic conditions in Dade County for the 1974 water year (October 1, 1973 to September 30, 1974) except for rainfall are summarized in tables, graphs, and maps. The locations of ground-water data-collection stations are shown in figure 1, rainfall and surface-water stations in figure 2, and water quality sampling stations in figure 43. As shown, the network of stations is extensive. The long-term records (1940 to 1974) furnish background information vital in the analysis of effects of water-management practices.

  16. Encephalitis associated with cat scratch disease--Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, 1994.

    PubMed

    1994-12-16

    On August 14, 1994, the Broward County Public Health Unit of the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services was notified of three children from Pompano Beach who were hospitalized with encephalitis attributed to cat scratch disease (CSD). All three children (aged 5, 6, and 11 years) were previously healthy and had no histories of seizure disorders or diagnoses of CSD. This report summarizes the investigation of these cases.

  17. Bridging cultural chasms between providers and HIV-positive Haitians in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Potocky-Tripodi, Miriam; Dodge, Karen; Greene, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This article discusses special challenges faced by HIV-positive Haitian immigrants, one of the groups targeted by the Care System Assessment Demonstration Project in Palm Beach County, Florida. The article examines the following issues: structural health care access barriers; language and literacy; health beliefs and practices and their intersection with Western medicine; health care-seeking attitudes, emotions, and behaviors; bridging cultural chasms; and lessons learned.

  18. Solar-heated municipal swimming pools, a case study: Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.

    1981-09-01

    The experience of installing a solar energy system to heat the water in the swimming pool in one of Dade County, Florida's major parks is described and the mechanics of solar heated swimming pools are explained. The solar heating system consists of 216 unglazed polypropylene tube collectors, a differential thermostat, and the distribution system. The performance and economics of the system are discussed as well as future plants. (LEW)

  19. Stormwater-runoff data for a multifamily residential area, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardee, Jack; Mattraw, H.C.; Miller, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    Rainfall, stormwater discharge, and water-quality data for a multifamily residential area in Dade County, Florida, are summarized. Loads for 19 water-quality constituents were computed for runoff from 16 storms from May 1977 through June 1978. The 14.7 acre basin contains apartment buildings with adjacent parking lots. The total surface area consists of 70.7 percent impervious material. (Kosco-USGS)

  20. The Florida Department of Health and the Florida Association of County Health Department Business Administrators: a model of successful collaboration to sustain operational excellence.

    PubMed

    Napier, Michael J; Street, Phillip; Wright, Robin; Kouba, James Michael; Ciereck, Christina; Dillon, Matthew J; Dollar, Rosemary C; Parizek, William A; Stapp, Charles Philip; Dickinson, Ross

    2004-01-01

    The Florida Association of County Health Department Business Administrators, Inc., is an organization of public health business professionals working collaboratively with the state's department of health administrative offices in promoting best practices throughout local county health departments. This article discusses a number of joint initiatives, past and present, that are benefiting public health services in Florida. In addition, mentoring and training, contract management, cost allocation, and financial reporting, among others, are "hot button" topics of interest to all states in promoting improved administration of their public health programs.

  1. Annotated selected references on natural resources investigations, Collier County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A data base for future natural resources investigations in Collier County, Fla., was initiated by compiling a selected annotated bibliography. This report provides references and annotations for selected reports released between 1950 and 1978. The references are presented by subject material as follows: biologic, ecologic, geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic. (USGS)

  2. The Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida: QIS Development Process Evaluation--Year 2 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2006-01-01

    This report covers the second year of a 3-year process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the availability and quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously. This growth has occurred partly in…

  3. Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Mulitbeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.; McIntyre, M. L.; O'Kiefe, K. M.; Wheaton, J. L.; Naar, D. F.; Donahue, B. T.; Kohler, M. F.

    2002-12-01

    Most mapping of Florida's coral resources has been in the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. However, it is well known that large concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard. To date, technological limitations have precluded the mapping of corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by the fact that there are little or no coordinated management, monitoring and mapping activities in place. To assist the Broward county shore protection project geographic information systems database, a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey was performed in 2001. The surveyFlanked the 43 km shoreline to a depth of ~50m and distances out to 2km in the north and 3.5km in the southern portion at a spatial resolution of 1.524m (5ft). Additionally, in November 2000 as part of a container vessel grounding lawsuit, funding was allocated to find an alternative anchorage for Port Everglades. The Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data in a 2km x 2km square south of Port Everglades, offshore at a depth from 7m to 36m deep and at a spatial resolution of 1m. The area of overlap coincided with the second and third reef tracts, which have the highest biodiversity of the three reef tracts. These datasets were compared at overlapping geographic extents.

  4. Local transmission of Plasmodium vivax malaria--Palm Beach County, Florida, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-09-26

    The majority of malaria cases diagnosed in the United States are imported, usually by persons who travel to countries where malaria is endemic. However, small outbreaks of locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria continue to occur. Despite certification of malaria eradication in the United States in 1970, 11 outbreaks involving 20 cases of probable locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria have been reported to CDC since 1992, including two reported in July 1996 from Palm Beach County, Florida (Palm Beach County Health Department, unpublished data, 1998). This report describes the investigation of seven cases of locally acquired Plasmodium vivax malaria that occurred in Palm Beach County during July-August 2003. In addition to considering malaria in the differential diagnosis for febrile patients with a history of travel to malarious areas, health-care providers also should consider malaria as a possible cause of fever among patients who have not traveled but are experiencing alternating fevers, rigors, and sweats with no obvious cause.

  5. Surficial aquifer system in eastern Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, D.H.; Watkins, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system in eastern Lee County consists of an upper water bearing unit, which is generally unconfined, and a lower water bearing unit, which is confined and is the major source tapped by most wells. The top of the lower unit, which is of primary interest in this report, ranges in depth from 40 to 60 ft below land surface in the east-central part of the county to more than 120 ft in the southern part. In the extreme southern part of the county, a middle water bearing unit also contains water under artesian pressure. Recharge to the lower unit occurs primarily by leakage from the overlying saturated section through the confining beds. Water levels in the lower unit fluctuate similarly to those in the upper (unconfined) unit. Groundwater in the lower unit moves from areas of highest water level in the south part of Lehigh acres, northward toward the Caloosahatchee River, and toward the coast. The lower unit contains freshwater throughout much of its extent and is the source of public water supply at Lehigh Acres and Green Meadows where an average of about 3 mil gal/day was withdrawn in 1980. In several areas, the concentrations of chlorides and dissolved solids exceed drinking water standards. Yields of wells that tap the lower unit range from 10 to 1,100 gal/min. Transmissivities ranging from about 17,700 to 7,750 sq ft/day were determined for different areas of the unit. Storage coefficients range from 0.0001 to 0.0003. (Author 's abstract)

  6. Topographic map of Golden Gate Estates, Collier County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurado, Antonio

    1981-01-01

    Construction of canals related to land development in the Golden Gate Estates area of Collier County, Fla., has altered the natural drainage pattern of the watershed. The area of approximately 300 square miles was topographically mapped with a contour interval of 0.5 foot to assist in determining the effects of canal construction on the surface-water and ground-water resources in the watershed. The topographic map was prepared at a scale of 1:48,000 using aerial photography and ground-control points. (USGS)

  7. Hydrogeology of the Lake Miona area, northeast Sumter County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Lake Miona area, in northeast Sumter County, is characterized by karstic depressions that contain lakes, ponds, and marshes that drain vertically to the upper Floridan aquifer. Lake Miona, Black Lake, and Cherry Lake are the prominent water features of the area. When the lake levels are lowest, the lakes are not connected, but at higher levels, they become connected and water flows eastward from Lake Miona through Black Lake to Cherry Lake. The chemical and biological conditions in the lakes are such that, although they support a large population of submerged aquatic plants, no problem with algae blooms was observed. (USGS)

  8. Municipal water supplies in Lee County, Florida, 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    In 1974 the total pumpage for Lee County, Fla., municipal supplies reached 5,700 Mgal (million gallons annually), an increase of 54 percent over 1970 levels. Pumpage from individual sources included: Caloosahatchee River, 1,312 Mgal; water-table aquifer, 2,171 Mgal; the water-bearing zone in the Tamiami Formation, 340 Mgal; the water-bearing zone in the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation, 1,399 Mgal; the saline water zones in the lower part of the Hawthorn Formation and the Suwannee Limestone, 483 Mgal. Among the various sources, the water-table aquifer showed the greatest increase in municipal pumpage over 1970 levels (60 percent) while the saline zones in the lower part of the Hawthorn Formation and Suwannee Limestone showed the least (40 percent). Intensive pumpage from the water bearing zone in the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation has caused a progressive decline in water levels in wells tapping that zone. The quality of fresh ground water in areas unaffected by intrusion of saline water, generally meets all the recommended limits of the Environmental Protection Agency. The chemical treatment processes utilized by water plants in the county are generally effective in producing finished water that meets EPA preliminary drinking water standards. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Tsala Apopka Lake, Citrus County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1977-01-01

    The swamps, marshes, and open waters of Tsala Apopka Lake, Florida, were mapped and the hydrologic connection between the lake and the Floridan limestone aquifer was studied from October 1975 to September 1976. Tsala Apopka Lake is a series of shallow , interconnected lakes, ponds, and marshes whose water surface slopes northward at 0.5 foot per mile. According to aerial photographs of December 1972, only 6 percent of the 103 square miles of study area is covered by open water. Open water is abundant along the western side of the lake, dense and sparse marshes occupy most of the lake area, and swamps occupy a thick zone around the Withlacoochee River which borders the lake to the east. Only a small fraction of the total surface flow occurs through the lake. The average lake outflow through S-351 canal is 23.6 cfs; while the average river flow at Holder is 714 cfs. Tsala Apopka Lake is hydraulically connected to the Floridan aquifer. At low flow, the major source of water in the river is ground water from the Floridan aquifer. The specific conductance of water in the Floridan aquifer averages 250-350 umho/cm (micromhos per centimeter) at 25C in this area. The specific conductance of water in the Withlacoochee River near Holder averages 268 umho/cm at 25C, while water in Tsala Apopka Lake at Hernando averages 139 umho/cm at 25C. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Hurricane modification and adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Klima, Kelly; Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry; Morgan, M Granger; Grossmann, Iris

    2012-01-17

    We investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  11. Hurricane Modification and Adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.; Morgan, G.; Grossmann, I.

    2012-12-01

    Annual losses from tropical cyclones (TCs) in the United States are estimated to average about $10-billion/year. Damages can be caused by wind, storm surge, and floods. Some U.S. coastal areas experience high TC wind speeds and contain geophysical features vulnerable to storm surges and flooding. Since the Miami-Dade County coastline contains a range of topography, bathymetry and infrastructure with different susceptibilities to TCs, optimal policy choices regarding methods to reduce TC damages depend strongly on locale. Various adaptation techniques, including "hardening", are available to reduce damages from TCs. Strategies to reduce the intensity of a TC, while still hypothetical, offer a very different approach to reducing damages. Here we investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  12. Fish consumption patterns and mercury exposure levels among women of childbearing age in Duval County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Traynor, Sharleen; Kearney, Greg; Olson, David; Hilliard, Aaron; Palcic, Jason; Pawlowicz, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of fish containing methylmercury can pose serious health concerns including neurotoxic effects in adults and toxicity to the fetuses of mothers exposed during pregnancy. In the study described in this article, the authors examined fish consumption patterns and measured hair mercury levels of women of childbearing age in a coastal county in Florida. Women from the community participated in a risk factor assessment survey (N = 703). Hair samples (n = 698) were collected and analyzed for mercury. The authors identified 74.8% below detection limit; 25.2% had detectable limits of mercury, while 7% exceeded 1 pg/g. Hair mercury levels increased with fish consumption and age. Race, income, and education levels were also associated with increased hair mercury levels. Women of Asian/Pacific Islander origin had the highest levels. Although reported fish consumption exceeded the recommendations for women of childbearing age, the study population had lower mercury levels than other comparative studies in Florida and at national levels.

  13. Geology of the surficial aquifer system, Dade County, Florida; lithologic logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The geologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Dade County, Florida, was investigated as part of a longterm study by the USGS in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, to describe the geology, hydrologic characteristics, and groundwater quality of the surficial aquifer system. Thirty-three test wells were drilled completely through the surficial aquifer system and into the underlying, relatively impermeable units of the Tamiami and Hawthorn Formations. Detailed lithologic logs were made from microscopic examination of rock cuttings and cores obtained from these wells. The logs were used to prepare geologic sections that show the lithologic variations, thickness of the lithologic units, and different geologic formations that comprise the aquifers system. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Attenuation of stormwater contaminants from highway runoff within unsaturated limestone, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.; Klein, Howard; Lefkoff, Lawrence J.

    1984-01-01

    Infiltration of stormwater in heavily urbanized parts of Dade County, Florida, is a prime source of recharge to the unconfined Biscayne aquifer, the sole source of drinking water for southeast Florida. Ponded stormwater at the test site contained greater concentrations of lead, zinc, manganese, nitrogen (except nitrate), and phosphorus than the water which percolated through the unsaturated limestone. Attenuation of some stormwater contaminants in the surface soils and limestone is indicated at the test site adjacent to a busy throughfare. Lead concentrations of 610 micrograms per kilogram and zinc concentrations of 91 micrograms per kilogram were found in the thin surface soils, nearly 20 times more than the concentrations of these metals at greater depth. In contrast, soil and rock sample at a control site remote from heavy traffic contained low concentrations of metals and showed little variation in concentration with depth. (USGS)

  15. Hydrology and water quality of East Lake Tohopekaliga, Osceola County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1987-01-01

    East Lake Tohopekaliga, one of the major lakes in central Florida, is located in the upper Kissimmee River basin in north-east Osceola County. It is one of numerous lakes in the upper basin used for flood control, in addition to recreation and some irrigation of surrounding pasture. This report is the fourth in a series of lake reconnaissance studies in the Kissimmee River basin prepared in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the report is to provide government agencies and the public with a brief summary of the lake 's hydrology and water quality. Site information is given and includes map number, site name, location, and type of data available (specific conductivity, pH, alkalinity, turbidity, color, dissolved oxygen, hardness, dissolved chlorides, dissolved sodium, dissolved calcium, dissolved magnesium, dissolved potassium, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrates, carbon and phosphorus). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintained a lake stage gaging station on East Lake Tohopekaliga from 1942 to 1968. The South Florida Water Management District has recorded lake stage since 1963. Periodic water quality samples have been collected from the lake by the South Florida Water Management District and USGS. Water quality and discharge data have been collected for one major tributary to the lake, Boggy Creek. Although few groundwater data are available for the study area, results of previous studies of the groundwater resources of Osceola County are included in this report. To supplement the water quality data for East Lake Tohopekaliga, water samples were collected at selected sites in November 1982 (dry season) and in August 1983 (rainy season). Samples were taken at inflow points, and in the lake, and vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen and temperature were measured in the lake. A water budget from an EPA report on the lake is also included. (Lantz-PTT)

  16. Surface-water and ground-water features, Clay County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentley, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Clay County is a rapidly growing area in northeastern Florida. Surface water largely is undeveloped except for recreational use. Black Creek is the largest fresh-water stream in the country and has an average discharge of about 515 cubic feet per second. However, excessive color, iron concentration, hardness, and pH often make the water objectionable for many asses. Water from the lakes and streams in the Etonia Creek basin in southwestern Clay County generally is of good chemical quality. Ground water occurs in the county in a water-table aquifer, secondary artesian aquifers, and the Floridan aquifer. Large withdrawals of water from the Floridan aquifer since the 1940's, especially in nearby metropolitan Jacksonville, have caused a decline of the potentiometric surface of up to 30 feet in the northeast corner of Clay County to less than 5 feet in the western part. The rate of decline in recent years at Orange Park has been about 0.7 of a foot per year. Ground water in the county generally is of good chemical quality and is suitable for most uses. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Field investigations of winter transmission of eastern equine encephalitis virus in Florida.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Andrea M; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Hassan, Hassan K; McClure, Christopher J W; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Studies investigating winter transmission of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were conducted in Hillsborough County, Florida. The virus was detected in Culiseta melanura and Anopheles quadrimaculatus in February 2012 and 2013, respectively. During the winter months, herons were the most important avian hosts for all mosquito species encountered. In collections carried out in the summer of 2011, blood meals taken from herons were still common, but less frequently encountered than in winter, with an increased frequency of mammalian- and reptile-derived meals observed in the summer. Four wading bird species (Black-crowned Night Heron [Nycticorax nycticorax], Yellow-crowned Night Heron [Nyctanassa violacea], Anhinga [Anhinga anhinga], and Great Blue Heron [Ardea herodias]) were most frequently fed upon by Cs. melanura and Culex erraticus, suggesting that these species may participate in maintaining EEEV during the winter in Florida.

  18. Field Investigations of Winter Transmission of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Andrea M.; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; Hassan, Hassan K.; McClure, Christopher J. W.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating winter transmission of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were conducted in Hillsborough County, Florida. The virus was detected in Culiseta melanura and Anopheles quadrimaculatus in February 2012 and 2013, respectively. During the winter months, herons were the most important avian hosts for all mosquito species encountered. In collections carried out in the summer of 2011, blood meals taken from herons were still common, but less frequently encountered than in winter, with an increased frequency of mammalian- and reptile-derived meals observed in the summer. Four wading bird species (Black-crowned Night Heron [Nycticorax nycticorax], Yellow-crowned Night Heron [Nyctanassa violacea], Anhinga [Anhinga anhinga], and Great Blue Heron [Ardea herodias]) were most frequently fed upon by Cs. melanura and Culex erraticus, suggesting that these species may participate in maintaining EEEV during the winter in Florida. PMID:25070997

  19. Presence of Alcohol and Drugs in Hispanic Versus Non-Hispanic Youth Suicide Victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Daniel; Kosoy, Jennifer Ellyn; Ayllon, Karla Diaz; Acuna, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the association between the presence of drugs and alcohol at time of suicide in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth suicide victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Medical Examiner's records of 435 persons aged 24 years or younger classified as suicides in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Hispanic youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida were 1.62 times more likely than non-Hispanic youth to have used drugs and alcohol at time of suicide (OR 1.62; 95 % CI 1.07-2.04; p = 0.049). Firearm use was significantly associated with drug and alcohol use at time of death. Use of drugs and alcohol at the time of death are important risk factors for suicide in Hispanic youth.

  20. Evaluation of the Collier County, Florida landfill mining demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    von Stein, E.; Savage, G.

    1993-09-01

    The report describes the landfill mining process as demonstrated under the U.S. EPA, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory's Municipal Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program by the Collier County (Florida) Solid Waste Management Department. Landfill mining is the recovery of useful resources (e.g., cover soil) from previously landfilled solid wastes. During the two week demonstration 265 MT (292 tons) of excavated material was mechanically processed. The characteristics of the recovered soil fraction were similar to a low-grade MSW compost. State regulators have approved the use of the soil fraction as landfill cover. Based on the demonstration period, the unit cost was $127/MT ($115/ton) of material mined.

  1. Hydrologic data for Okaloosa, Walton, and southeastern Santa Rosa counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Hayes, L.R.; Lewis, C.E.; Barr, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic and water-quality data collected within Okaloosa, Walton, and southeastern Santa Rosa Counties in northwest Florida. The data are presented in graphs and tables. Groundwater data include descriptions of wells and test holes, analyses of water quality, water level measurements, hydrographs of water levels and chloride concentrations in wells open to the upper part of the Floridan aquifer, and municipal and federal facilities pumpage. Surface-water data include streamflow measurements, streamflow hydrographs and analyses of water quality at selected stations. Maps of the area show locations of wells and surface-water stations. (USGS)

  2. Water-quality data from a landfill, Pinellas County, Florida, May 1975-October 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario

    1979-01-01

    Beginning in May 1975, surface- and ground-water samples were collected periodically to obtain certain background water-quality conditions at a landfill site in Pinellas County, Florida. Landfill operation began in November 1975, and water analysis continued to October 1977. Specific conductance and pH were determined in the field. Samples were collected for laboratory determination of selected nitrogen and phosphorus species, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, trace metals, chloride, pH, specific conductance, chemical and biochemical oxygen demands, specific pesticides, and herbicides and coliforms. The collected data are presented. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Interim report on the ground-water resources of Manatee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peek, Harry M.; Anders, Robert B.

    1955-01-01

    Manatee County comprises an area of about 800 square miles adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico in the southwestern part of the Florida peninsula. The county is underlain at depths ranging from about 200 to 350 feet by a series of limestone formations of Tertiary age having a total thickness of several thousand feet. The upper part of the limestone section consists of the Ocala group of Eocene age, the Suwannee limestone of Oligocene age, and the Tampa formation of early Miocene age. These limestone formations are overlain by the Hawthorn formation of middle Miocene age which consists of interbedded clay, limestone, and sand. The Hawthorn is overlain by undifferentiated deposits of sand, limestone, and shell of Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene age that range in thickness from a few feet to about 75 feet.

  4. Geology of the surficial aquifer system, Broward County, Florida; lithologic logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The geologic framework of the surficial aquifer system, of which the Biscayne aquifer is the major component in Broward County, Florida, is presented in eight geologic cross sections. The cross sections are based on detailed lithologic logs of 27 test wells that were drilled, in the summer of 1981, through the sediments overlying the relatively impermeable units of the Hawthorn Formation, of Miocene age. The cross sections show the aquifer system as a wedge-shaped sequence of Cenozoic sediments. The aquifer thickness gradually decreases from more than 400 feet along the coast to about 160 feet in the west and southwest parts of Broward County. The sediments that comprise the aquifer system range in age from Pliocene to Pleistocene and are assigned to the following stratigraphic units from bottom to top: Tamiami Formation, Caloosahatchee Marl, Fort Thompson Formation, Key Largo Limestone, Anastasia Formation, Miami Oolite, and Pamlico Sand. (USGS)

  5. Care system assessment demonstration project, Palm Beach County, Florida: methodology, findings, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Karen; Potocky-Tripodi, Miriam

    2007-08-01

    Palm Beach County, Florida was one of three sites selected nationally for the Care System Assessment Demonstration Project. The special focus of the Palm Beach project was Black women (both U.S.-born and foreign-born). The CSAD consists of two complementary components: (1) Rapid Assessment, Response, and Evaluation (RARE), which examines the research topic from the perspectives of the affected population (i.e., HIV-positive Black women who are not in care); and (2) Care System Assessment, which examines the research topic from the perspectives of people within the HIV/AIDS care system (e.g., health care providers, planners, HIV-positive Black women in care). This article presents the methods, findings, and recommendations from the Palm Beach County site.

  6. An overview of urban stormwater-management practices in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Agencies with jurisdiction over stormwater-management systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida, include the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). These agencies are primarily concerned with minor drainage systems that handle runoff from storms with return periods of 10 years or less (DERM), major drainage systems that handle runoff from storms with return periods of 25 years or more (SFWMD), and runoff from major roadways (FDOT). All drainage regulations require retention of at least a specified water-quality volume (defined volume of surface runoff), typically the first inch of runoff. The DERM and FDOT intensity duration frequency (IDF) curves used as a basis for design are similar but different, with differences particularly apparent for short-duration storms. The SFWMD 25-year 3-day storm incorporates an IDF curve that is substantially different from both the IDF curves of DERM and FDOT. A DERM methodology for designing closed exfiltration systems is applicable to storms of 1-hour duration, but is not applicable to all storms with a given T-year return period. A trench design that is applicable to all storms with a given T-year return period is presented as an alternative approach.

  7. Chemical characteristics of water in the surficial aquifer system, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonntag, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    concentrations of sodium, chloride, color, fluoride, iron, and dissolved solids in some areas of Dade County, however, exceed maximum contaminant levels established by the Florida Primary and Secondary Drinking Water Regulations standards. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Recharge to the surficial aquifer system in Lee and Hendry counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krulikas, R.K.; Giese, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Protection of ground-water recharge areas against contamination is of great interest in Florida, a State whose population depends heavily on ground water and that is experiencing rapid growth. The Florida Legislature is considering implementation of a tax incentive program to owners of high-rate recharge lands that remain undeveloped. High-rate recharge was arbitrarily set at 10 or more inches per year. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, conducted a study to investigate the efficacy of several methods for estimating recharge to the surficial aquifer system in southwestern Florida and to map recharge at a scale of 1:100,000. Four maps were constructed at a scale of 1:100,000 for Lee and Hendry Counties, depicting the configuration of the water table of the surficial aquifer system, direction of ground-water flow, general soil characteristics, and recharge rates. Point recharge rates calculated for 25 sites in Lee County from comparisons of chloride concentrations in precipitation and in water from the surficial aquifer system ranged from 0.6 to 9.0 inches per year. Local recharge rates estimated by increases in flow along theoretical flow tubes in the surficial aquifer system were 8.0 inches per year in a part of Lee County and 8.2 inches per year in a part of Hendry County. Information on oxygen isotopes in precipitation and water from the surficial aquifer system was used to verify that the source of chlorides in the aquifer system was from precipitation rather than upward leakage of saline water. Soil maps and general topographic and hydrologic considerations were used with calculated point and local recharge rates to regionalize rates throughout Lee and Hendry Counties. The areas of greatest recharge were found in soils of flatwoods and sloughs, which were assigned estimated recharge rates of 0 to 10 inches per year. Soils of swamps and sloughs were assigned values of 0 to 3.0 inches per year; soils of

  9. Public supply water use, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1978-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W.L.; Alvarez, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Public supply water-use data are listed for 32 utilities in Palm Beach County, Florida, for 1978 through 1982. The data are tabulated as monthly and yearly untreated water withdrawals from each public supply utility. Utilities using ground water as a source are listed separately from those using surface-water sources. In 1978, the total public supply water withdrawal in the county was 37,580.64 million gallons, of which 74.0 percent (27,823.22 million gallons) was ground water. By 1982, the total withdrawal had increased to 43,264.16 million gallons, of which 77.5 percent (33,544.52 million gallons) was ground water. Nearly 57 percent of the ground-water withdrawal was in southeast Palm Beach County (Zone 1) during 1982. The greatest surface-water withdrawal during this time was from Clear Lake and Lake Mangonia (Zone 2) and amounted to 79.3 percent of the county 's total surface-water withdrawal. (USGS)

  10. Estimated water use in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, A.D.; Trommer, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Water-use data for 1980 are summarized in this report for 16 counties in the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Data include total use of ground water and surface water for each of five water-use categories. The 1980 withdrawals for each category were as follows: 290 million gallons per day for public supply, 63 million gallons per day for rural, 325 million gallons per day for industry, 416 million gallons per day for irrigation, and 6,605 million gallons per day for thermoelectric power generation. Withdrawals totaled 7,699 million gallons per day and included 983 million gallons per day of ground water and 6,716 million gallons per day of surface water. Excluding thermoelectric power generation, all water withdrawn was freshwater except 38 million gallons per day of saline ground water withdrawn for industrial use in Hillsborough County. (USGS)

  11. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Woodham, W.M.; Schiner, George R.

    1980-01-01

    A May 1980 potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual low water-level period. Potentiometric levels decreased 5 to 36 feet between September 1979 and May 1980, in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, southwestern Polk, northwestern DeSoto , Hardee, and Manatee Counties. Water levels in these areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest range in fluctuations. Water-level decreases ranged from 0 to 8 feet in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District. Generally, potentiometric levels were lower than previous May levels except in the northernmost and southernmost counties where water levels were 1 to 5 feet higher. (USGS)

  12. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the John F. Kennedy Bridge. The regulated area includes the following in their entirety: Hillsborough Cut “D” Channel, Seddon Channel, and the Hillsborough River south of the John F. Kennedy...

  13. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the John F. Kennedy Bridge. The regulated area includes the following in their entirety: Hillsborough Cut “D” Channel, Seddon Channel, and the Hillsborough River south of the John F. Kennedy...

  14. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the John F. Kennedy Bridge. The regulated area includes the following in their entirety: Hillsborough Cut “D” Channel, Seddon Channel, and the Hillsborough River south of the John F. Kennedy...

  15. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the John F. Kennedy Bridge. The regulated area includes the following in their entirety: Hillsborough Cut “D” Channel, Seddon Channel, and the Hillsborough River south of the John F. Kennedy...

  16. 76 FR 11522 - In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application, Levy County Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application, Levy County Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2); Notice of Appointment of Adjudicatory Employee Commissioners: Gregory...

  17. 77 FR 51832 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Levy County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2) August 21, 2012. Before Administrative Judges: Alex S. Karlin... Energy Florida, Inc.; Application for the Levy County Nuclear Power Plant Units 1 and 2; Notice of Order... and increases in nutrient concentrations caused by the removal of water; and 5. Impacts on...

  18. Hurricane Elena and Pinellas County, Florida: Some Lessons Learned from the Largest Evacuation of Nursing Home Patients in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Wiley P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied prior planning for and problems associated with evacuation of 1,860 nursing home patients in Pinellas County, Florida, due to Hurricane Elena in 1985 through questionnaires administered to nursing home administrators and public documents. Found most serious problems to be transporting patients to shelters in timely fashion, delayed passage…

  19. NEW HOUSE EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION FOR THE CONTROL OF RADON IN MARION AND ALACHUA COUNTIES, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a new house evaluation of potential building design and construction for the control of radon in Marion and Alachua Counties, Florida. During the project, which began in March 1992, the construction of 14 new houses, built in accordance with the Draft ...

  20. 78 FR 18314 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 169--Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC; Subzone 169A (Textile Fabric Adhesive Bandage Coating and Production); Sarasota... facility is used for the production of plastic and textile fabric adhesive bandages. ASO is also...

  1. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, Lake Worth, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-03-01

    PNNL and Florida Solar Energy Center worked with Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County to upgrade an empty 1996 home with a 14.5 SEER AC, heat pump water heater, CFLs, more attic insulation, and air sealing to cut utility bills $872 annually.

  2. Spatial and functional characterization, identification and assessment of isolated wetlands in Alachua County, Florida, USA - GIS and remote sensing techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing mapping techniques were developed to identify the locations of isolated wetlands in Alachua County, FL, a 2510 sq km area in north-central Florida with diverse geology and numerous isolated wetlands. The resul...

  3. Chemical characteristics of water in the surficial aquifer system, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howie, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data was collected in 1981 and 1982 during the drilling of test holes at 27 sites throughout Broward County, Florida. Determinations were made for the following physical properties and chemical constituents: pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, major ions, selected nutrients and dissolved iron, aluminum, and manganese. Determinations for the trace elements-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, zinc, selenium, and mercury-were made at 14 wells. Water in the surficial aquifer system between the coastal ridge and the conservation areas is potable and usually is a calcium bicarbonate type for the first 140 ft or more below land surface. Between depths of 140 and 230 ft, groundwater generally grades into a mixed-ion water type. In some areas, diluted seawater occurs beneath the mixed water zone. Dissolved iron concentrations between the coastal ridge and the conservation areas are variable but generally exceed 1,000 micrograms/L. Beneath the conservation areas and the western edge of Broward County, groundwater in the first 100 ft below land surface generally is either a calcium bicarbonate type or a mixed-ion type. At depths between 100 and 200 ft, diluted residual seawater occurs, except along the far western edge of the county. Residual seawater is least diluted in the north. Dissolved iron concentrations generally are between 300 and 1 ,000 micrograms/L but increase to the east of the conservation areas. Other findings of the investigation include: (1) groundwater in some areas west of the coastal ridge probably would be suitable for most domestic, agricultural, and industrial uses if it were treated for carbonate hardness; (2) groundwater in much of Broward County is chemically altered by natural softening and magnesium enrichment (natural softening increases to the west and is very pronounced beneath the far western edge of the county); and (3) there is evidence of mineralized water from the conservation areas mixing with groundwater east of the

  4. Commercial Fishing Port Development in North Florida. [Escambia, Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Nassau, and Duval Counties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, K. (Principal Investigator); Cato, J. C.; Degner, P. D.; Landrum, P. D.; Prochaska, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Seven major counties were examined: Escambia, Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Nassau, and Duval. Population and economic activity were reviewed, along with commercial fishing and port facilities. Recommendations for five northwest Florida counties were based on interpretation of aerial photographs, satellite imagery, an aerial survey site visit, and published data. Major needs in Pensacola included docking, ice supply, and net and engine repair services. Costs for additional docks, an ice plant, and gear storage were estimated at $3,658,600. Port users in Panama City identified additional docking and gear storage as primary needs, along with gear repair and a marine railway. Estimated costs for dock and gear storage were $2,860,000. Added docking, gear storage, and ice supply, as well as gear electronics and diesel repair were needed in Port St. Joe. Costs were calculated at $1,231,500. Franklin County has three ports (Apalachicola - $1,107,000 for docks and gear storage, Eastpoint - $420,000 for additional docks, and Carrabella - $2,824,100 for docks, gear storage, and ice plant).

  5. Quality-of-water data, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1970-1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.; Lietz, Arthur C.

    1976-01-01

    One of the most pressing problems of Palm Beach County, Florida, is the present and potential contamination of the surface and ground-water resources. The canals which dissect the urban and agricultural areas are convenient receptacles for storm-water runoff, sewage effluent, and agricultural wastes. Contaminants in the canals may enter the shallow aquifer as the canal water infiltrates. The quality of water in the shallow aquifer is further influenced by constituents in infiltrating rainwater, septic tank effluent, and many other sources of contamination. The County Health Department has stated that many of the canals and lakes, including Lake Worth, an estuary, have reached levels of contamination rendering them unfit for recreation (Land and others, 1972). The purpose of this report is to: (1) Compile the basic water-quality data collected during 1970-75 as a part of the monitoring program. (2) Make these data available in a usable form to assist in urban and regional planning of the county 's water resources. The water-quality programs include 36 surface-water stations on canals and lakes and 136 ground-water stations which have been regularly sampled. Both urban and agricultural areas are included in the sampling programs. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Epidemiology study of the use of asbestos-cement pipe for the distribution of drinking water in Escambia County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Millette, J.R.; Craun, G.F.; Stober, J.A.; Kraemer, D.F.; Tousignant, H.G.

    1983-11-01

    Cancer mortality for the population census tracts of Escambia County, Florida was compared with cancer mortality data collected from census tracts elsewhere within the same county. In the first group asbestos-cement (AC) pipe was used for public potable water distribution. In the second group other types of piping material are used. The differences in standard mortality ratios for seven cancer sites among three potential asbestos exposure groups based on the AC pipe usage was tested using an analysis of covariance. Twelve variables representing nonexposure-related influences on disease rates were combined in four independent factors and used as covariates in these analyses. To the level of sensitivity imposed by the limitations of the study no evidence was found for an association between the use of AC pipe for carrying drinking water and deaths due to gastrointestinal and related cancers in Escambia County, Florida. 15 references, 2 figures, 7 tables.

  7. Florida

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Florida in Color and Stereo     View Larger ... 9, 2000 during Terra orbit 1650. The image at the top is a color view acquired by the vertical (nadir) camera. It has been reoriented so ... provides a three-dimensional effect when viewed using red/blue glasses with the red filter placed over the left eye. This stereoscopic ...

  8. Changes in saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer, Hialeah-Miami Springs area, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Howard; Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1989-01-01

    A lobe of salty groundwater that had intruded the Hialeah-Miami Springs area municipal well field, adjacent to the Miami and Tamiami Canals in Dade County, Florida, was stabilized after flow-regulation structures were installed in the canals in 1946. However, in 1971, the saltwater began to readvance toward the center of the well field because of water level declines caused by large increases in withdrawals during a near-record dry season. To better protect the well field, a temporary flow-regulation structure, constructed in 1971, in the Tamiami Canal was moved in 1976 to a permanent site, about 3,000 ft farther seaward; this converted that tidal reach of canal to a controlled reach under a sustained freshwater head. This water management procedure resulted in dilution of the intruding saltwater lobe and a marked concentration of its size even though large municipal withdrawals continued. (USGS)

  9. Ground-water quality in the Davie Landfill, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-water adjacent to a disposal pond for septic tank sludge, oil, and grease at the Davie landfill, Broward County, Florida was tested for a variety of ground-water contaminants. Three wells adjacent to the disposal pond yielded water rich in nutrients, organic carbon and many other chemical constituents. Total coliform bacteria ranged from less than 100 to 660 colonies per 100 milliliters in samples collected from the shallowest well (depth 20 feet). At well depths of 35 and 45 feet bacterial counts were less than 20 colonies per 100 milliliters or zero. Concentrations of several constituents in water samples collected from the wells downgradient from the landfill, disposal pond, and an incinerator wash pond were greater than in samples collected from wells immediately upgradient of the landfill. A comparison of sodium-chloride ion ratios indicated that downgradient ground-water contamination was related to the incinerator wash water pond rather than the septic tank sludge pond. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Depositional history of Sunniland Limestone (Lower Cretaceous), Raccoon Point field, Collier County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    The Sunniland Limestone (Lower Cretaceous), consisting of carbonate rock and anhydrite, bears the only oil and gas production in southern Florida. Raccoon Point field, Collier County, Florida, is one of 13 fields discovered along the Sunniland producing trend, producing from paleotopographic highs associated with shelfal patch reefs and high-energy bioclastic deposits. Deposition of the Sunniland Limestone, as determined from detailed stratigraphic and microfacies analysis (using core, thin sections, and well logs), occurred in three transgressive-regressive packages or sequences: the lower, middle, and upper Sunniland. Each sequence is further divided into successive shallowing-upward intervals or parasequences. The dolomite reservoirs at Raccoon Point field occur at the top of the middle Sunniland and within the upper Sunniland. They are interpreted as high-energy deposits formed from bioclastic debris and as a network between rudist mounds. Reservoir development in the middle Sunniland is most likely due to the diagenesis associated with restrictive hypersaline conditions and subaerial exposure when sea level dropped at the end of middle Sunniland deposition. Creation of upper Sunniland reservoir was probably influenced by diagenetic fluids derived from the restricted conditions associated with intertidal-flat and supratidal-sabkha environments, in which the overlying sediments were deposited. Anhydrite and dolomitized carbonate rock from these environments dominate the upper Sunniland and form the overall top seal.

  11. Habitat associations of eastern equine encephalitis transmission in Walton County Florida.

    PubMed

    Kelen, Patrick T Vander; Downs, Joni A; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Ottendorfer, Christy L; Hill, Kevin; Sickerman, Stephen; Hernandez, José; Jinright, Joseph; Hunt, Brenda; Lusk, John; Hoover, Victor; Armstrong, Keith; Unnasch, Robert S; Stark, Lillian M; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2012-05-01

    Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEEV; family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus) a highly pathogenic mosquito-borne virus is endemic to eastern North America. The ecology of EEEV in Florida differs from that in other parts of the United States; EEEV in the northeastern United States is historically associated with freshwater wetlands. No formal test of habitat associations of EEEV in Florida has been reported. Geographical Information Sciences (GIS) was used in conjunction with sentinel chicken EEEV seroconversion rate data as a means to examine landscape features associated with EEEV transmission in Walton County, FL. Sentinel sites were categorized as enzootic, periodically enzootic, and negative based on the number of chicken seroconversions to EEEV from 2005 to 2009. EEEV transmission was then categorized by land cover usage using Arc GIS 9.3. The land classification data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test for each land use class to determine which habitats may be associated with virus transmission as measured by sentinel chicken seroconversion rates. The habitat class found to be most significantly associated with EEEV transmission was tree plantations. The ecological factor most commonly associated with reduced levels of EEEV transmission was vegetated nonforest wetlands. Culiseta melanura (Coquillett), the species generally considered to be the major enzootic EEEV vector, was relatively evenly distributed across all habitat classes, while Aedes vexans (Meigen) and Anopheles crucians Weidemann were most commonly associated with tree plantation habitats.

  12. Hydrologic considerations in dewatering and refilling Lake Carlton : Orange and Lake Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Warren; Hughes, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Lake Carlton straddles the line between Lake and Orange Counties in central Florida. The 382-acre lake is highly eutrophic and subject to virtually perpetual algal blooms. The Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission has proposed to restore the lake to a less eutrophic state by dewatering the lake long enough to allow the muck on its bottom to dry and compact. Lake Carlton would be permanently sealed off from Lake Carlton. On the assumption that the seasonal rainfall would be normal, and that the dewatering phase would begin on March 1, the predicted time required to dewater the lake at a pumping rate of 50,000 gpm (gallons per minute) is 21 days. The average rate of pumping required to maintain the lake in a dewatered condition is computed to be 2,400 gpm. If pumping is ended May 31, the predicted altitude to which the lake would recover by October 31 as a result of net natural input is 56.2 feet above sea level. Raising the lake level to 63 feet above sea level by October 31 would require that the net natural input be supplemented at an average rate of about 4,860 gpm between May 31 and October 31. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Hydrogeology of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Sarasota and adjacent counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    From 1991 to 1995, the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system and the major permeable zones and confining units of the intermediate aquifer system in southwest Florida was studied. The study area is a 1,400-square-mile area that includes Sarasota County and parts of Manatee, De Soto, Charlotte, and Lee Counties. Lithologic, geophysical, hydraulic property, and water-level data were used to correlate the hydrogeology and map the extent of the aquifer systems. Water chemistry was evaluated in southwest Sarasota County to determine salinity of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems. The surficial aquifer is an unconfined aquifer system that overlies the intermediate aquifer system and ranges from a few feet to over 60 feet in thickness in the study area. Hydraulic properties of the surficial aquifer system determined from aquifer and laboratory tests, and model simulations vary considerably across the study area. The intermediate aquifer system, a confined aquifer system that lies between the surficial and the Upper Floridan aquifers, is composed of alternating confining units and permeable zones. The intermediate aquifer system has three major permeable zones that exhibit a wide range of hydraulic properties. Horizontal flow in the intermediate aquifer system is northeast to southwest. Most of the study area is in a discharge area of the intermediate aquifer system. Water ranges naturally from fresh in the surficial aquifer system and upper permeable zones of the intermediate aquifer system to moderately saline in the lower permeable zone. Water-quality data collected in coastal southwest Sarasota County indicate that ground-water withdrawals from major pumping centers have resulted in lateral seawater intrusion and upconing into the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems.

  14. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Osceola County, Florida, October 2013-April 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed inventory of irrigated crop acreage is not available at the level of resolution needed to increase the accuracy of current water-use estimates or to project future water demands in many Florida counties. This report provides a detailed digital map and summary of irrigated areas within Osceola County for the agricultural growing period October 2013–April 2014. The irrigated areas were first delineated using land-use data and satellite imagery and then field verified between February and April 2014. Selected attribute data were collected for the irrigated areas, including crop type, primary water source, and type of irrigation system. Results indicate that an estimated 27,450 acres were irrigated during the study period. This includes 4,370 acres of vegetables, 10,970 acres of orchard crops, 1,620 acres of field crops, and 10,490 acres of ornamentals and grasses. Specifically, irrigated acreage included citrus (10,860 acres), sod (5,640 acres), pasture (4,580 acres), and potatoes (3,320 acres). Overall, groundwater was used to irrigate 18,350 acres (67 percent of the total acreage), and surface water was used to irrigate the remaining 9,100 acres (33 percent). Microirrigation systems accounted for 45 percent of the total acreage irrigated, flood systems 30 percent, and sprinkler systems the remaining 25 percent. An accurate, detailed, spatially referenced, and field-verified inventory of irrigated crop acreage can be used to assist resource managers making current and future county-level water-use estimates in Osceola County.

  15. Cause, setting and ownership analysis of dog bites in Bay County, Florida from 2009 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Matthias, J; Templin, M; Jordan, M M; Stanek, D

    2015-02-01

    Emergency room and hospital discharge data have been used to describe the risk factors and public health impact of dog bites. These data sets are based on financial charges for severe bites and underestimates dog bite burdens within communities. This study expands both the source of information and risk factor data collected to provide demographic analysis of dog bite injury risk factors reported in Bay County, Florida in 2009-2010. Extended data for dog bites reported by various sources from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010 were collected by Florida Department of Health in Bay County. Data collected included bite victim's age and gender, primary reported cause of bite, setting, dog's restraint status and relationship between the victim and the dog. A total of 799 bites were reported. Most bites (55%) were reported first by healthcare practitioners, particularly bites involving children<6 years. Bites involving unfamiliar dogs and dogs off the owner's property were more likely to be reported by other sources. Boys aged 6-14 years accounted for 2.24 times more bites than same-aged females (P<0.001) and had the highest incidence with 424 bites per 100,000 persons per year. Persons 6 years or older were 3.6 times more likely to be bitten by an unfamiliar dog. Inappropriate behaviour management was the most common cause of bites (26%), followed by protective behaviour (24%). Bites of unknown cause were 2.5 times more likely in children<6 years. Separating dog fights was the most common cause of bites for persons 15 years or older (24%); females were significantly more likely to be bit than males (P=0.01). Bites by unrestrained dogs off the owner's property (32% of all bites) most commonly involved males. Estimates based solely on healthcare discharge data significantly underestimate dog bite burden within a community. Characterizing these risks by age group or gender provides an opportunity to implement targeted interventions to prevent dog bites.

  16. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, May 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.; Blanchard, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the USGS during May 23-27, 2005. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the SWFWMD boundary by the USGS office in Altamonte Springs, Florida (Kinnaman, 2006). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal low water-level condition. Water levels in about 19 percent of the wells measured in May 2005 were lower than the May 2004 water levels (Blanchard and others, 2004). Data from 409 wells indicate that the May 2005 water levels ranged from about 5 feet below to about 18 feet above the May 2004 water levels (fig. 1). The largest water-level declines occurred in southwestern Hernando County, northeastern Hillsborough County, and parts of Hillsborough, Sumter, and Sarasota Counties. The largest water-level rises occurred in southeastern Hillsborough County, eastern Manatee County, and western Hardee County (fig. 1). Water levels in about 95 percent of the wells measured in May 2005 were lower than the September 2004 water levels (Blanchard and Seidenfeld, 2005). Data from 405 wells indicate that the May 2005 water levels ranged from about 22 feet below to 14 feet above the September 2004 water levels. The largest water-level decline was in east-central Manatee County and the largest water-level rise was in central Sarasota County.

  17. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, Fall 1993 (Brown Wood Preserving Site Profile, Suwanee County, Florida)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Superfund at Work bulletin series profiles hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide. This issue profiles the Brown Wood Preserving Site near Live Oak, Florida, where creosote and other toxic chemicals used for pressure-treating lumber and other wood products polluted 55 acres of Suwanee County, Florida. Much of the indigenous wildlife disappeared from the area due to progressive soil and surface water contamination. Cleanup activities costing nearly $2.8 million were funded by the facility owners under a cooperative settlement agreement, called a consent decree.

  18. Helicopter electromagnetic survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Prinos, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over the Model Land Area in southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer. The survey, which is located south and east of Florida City, Florida, covers an area of 115 square kilometers with a flight-line spacing of 400 meters. A five-frequency, horizontal, coplanar bird with frequencies ranging from 400 to 100,000 Hertz was used. The data were interpreted using differential resistivity analysis and inversion to produce cross sections and resistivity depth-slice maps. The depth of investigation is as deep as 100 meters in freshwater-saturated portions of the Biscayne aquifer and the depth diminishes to about 50 meters in areas that are intruded by saltwater. The results compare favorably with ground-based, time-domain electromagnetic soundings and induction logs from observation wells in the area. The base of a high-resistivity, freshwater-saturated zone mapped in the northern 2 kilometers of the survey area corresponds quite well with the base of the surficial aquifer that has been determined by drilling. In general, saltwater in the survey area extends 9 to 12 kilometers inland from the coast; however, there is a long nose of saltwater centered along the Card Sound Road Canal that extends 15 kilometers inland. The cause of this preferential intrusion is likely due to uncontrolled surface flow along the canal and subsequent leakage of saltwater into the aquifer. Saltwater also extends farther inland in the area between U.S. Highway 1 and Card Sound Road than it does to the west of this area. Until 1944, a railroad grade occupied the current location of U.S. Highway 1. Borrow ditches associated with the railroad grade connected to Barnes Sound and allowed saltwater to flow during droughts and storm surges to within a few kilometers of Florida City. Relicts of this saltwater that settled to the bottom of the Biscayne aquifer can be seen in the helicopter

  19. Documentation of a digital spatial data base for hydrologic investigations, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Geographic information systems have become an important tool in planning for the protection and development of natural resources, including ground water and surface water. A digital spatial data base consisting of 18 data layers that can be accessed by a geographic information system was developed for Broward County, Florida. Five computer programs, including one that can be used to create documentation files for each data layer and four that can be used to create data layers from data files not already in geographic information system format, were also developed. Four types of data layers have been developed. Data layers for manmade features include major roads, municipal boundaries, the public land-survey section grid, land use, and underground storage tank facilities. The data layer for topographic features consists of surveyed point land-surface elevations. Data layers for hydrologic features include surface-water and rainfall data-collection stations, surface-water bodies, water-control district boundaries, and water-management basins. Data layers for hydrogeologic features include soil associations, transmissivity polygons, hydrogeologic unit depths, and a finite-difference model grid for south-central Broward County. Each data layer is documented as to the extent of the features, number of features, scale, data sources, and a description of the attribute tables where applicable.

  20. Analysis of data acquired by synthetic aperture radar over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results of digital processing of airborne X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana are presented. The goal was to investigate the utility of SAR data for land cover mapping and area estimation under the AgRISTARS Domestic Crops and Land Cover Project. In the case of the Acadia Paris study area, LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data were also used to form a combined SAR and MSS data set. The results of accuracy evaluation for the SAR, MSS, and SAR/MSS data using supervised classification show that the combined SAR/MSS data set results in an improved classification accuracy of the five land cover classes as compared with SAR-only and MSS-only data sets. In the case of the Dade County study area, the results indicate that both HH and VV polarization data are highly responsive to the row orientation of the row crop but not to the specific vegetation which forms the row structure. On the other hand, the HV polarization data are relatively insensitive to the orientation of row crop. Therefore, the HV polarization data may be used to discriminate the specific vegetation that forms the row structure.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-001-1995, Broward County Library, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Gupta, S.; Sinks, T.

    1989-11-01

    In response to a request from the Director of Libraries in Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, an evaluation was undertaken of possible poor air quality in the Main Library Building (SIC-8231). The building was eight stories high, and about 300 county employees worked in the building. Soon after the building was opened in April of 1984, workers began to complain of eye and upper airway irritation, difficulty in breathing and headaches. Particularly on the fifth floor, where government documents were housed, the employees suffered allergy-like symptoms. Some documents had visible growths of mold on their covers. The building had repeated problems with the heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, and numerous rainwater leaks occurred. All air samples collected for viable aerosols contained very low counts of mold, and no thermophilic or mesophilic actinomycetes were found. Formaldehyde was found in air samples at levels from less than 0.01 to 0.07 parts per million. Measurements were taken of temperature, relative humidity, and carbon-dioxide. The carbon-dioxide measurements in some places in the library approached the point which indicated that inadequate quantities of fresh air were being distributed to an occupied space. The study concluded that the employees' symptoms were not the result of exposure to molds released through the ventilation system.

  2. Current & future vulnerability of sarasota county Florida to hurricane storm surge & sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazier, T.; Wood, N.; Yarnal, B.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal communities in portions of the United States are vulnerable to storm-surge inundation from hurricanes and this vulnerability will likely increase, given predicted rises in sea level from climate change and growing coastal development. In this paper, we provide an overview of research to determine current and future societal vulnerability to hurricane storm-surge inundation and to help public officials and planners integrate these scenarios into their long-range land use plans. Our case study is Sarasota County, Florida, where planners face the challenge of balancing increasing population growth and development with the desire to lower vulnerability to storm surge. Initial results indicate that a large proportion of Sarasota County's residential and employee populations are in areas prone to storm-surge inundation from a Category 5 hurricane. This hazard zone increases when accounting for potential sea-level-rise scenarios, thereby putting additional populations at risk. Subsequent project phases involve the development of future land use and vulnerability scenarios in collaboration with local officials. Copyright ASCE 2008.

  3. Hydrologic sections through Lee County and adjacent areas of Hendry and Collier counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, Durward H.; Missimer, T.M.; O'Donnell, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    The freshwater underlying Lee, western Hendry, and northern Collier Counties occurs within the marine terrace sands, the Fort Thompson, Caloosahatchee, Tamiami, and Hawthorn Formations. These are, respectively, the water-table aquifer, an aquifer in the Tamiami Formation, and an aquifer in the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation. These aquifers are separated by clay, marl, and marly limestone. Wells tapping the water-table aquifer are commonly less than 50 feet deep, with yields ranging from 5 to 500 gallons per minute. The water quality in the aquifer is usually good, except for iron, which generally exceeds 1 milligram per liter, and color, which ranges from 30 to 600 Platinum-Cobalt units. Wells tapping the Tamiami aquifer range in depth from about 60 to 300 feet; most are less than 100 feet deep. Yields range from 20 to 500 gallons per minute. The water quality in the Tamiami aquifer is good, except where affected by leakage from deep artesian wells. Wells tapping the upper Hawthorn aquifer range in depth from about 100 to 300 feet. Yields range from 10 to 500 gallons per minute. The water quality from the upper Hawthorn aquifer is good, except in areas where upward leakage from the deep artesian aquifer has occurred. (USGS)

  4. Hydrogeology and analysis of aquifer characteristics in west-central Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broska, J.C.; Barnette, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County, Florida, conducted an investigation to describe the hydrogeology and analyze the aquifer characteristics in west-central Pinellas County. A production test well and four monitor wells were constructed in Pinellas County at Walsingham Park during 1996-97. Water-quality sampling, static and dynamic borehole geophysical surveys, and hydraulic tests were conducted at the wells to delineate the hydrogeology at Walsingham Park. A 9-day aquifer test was conducted to determine the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer system and observe the changes in water quality due to pumping. A numerical model was constructed to simulate the aquifer test and calculate values for hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient for permeable zones and confining units at Walsingham Park. Final calibrated values for hydraulic conductivity for the different permeable zones and confining units at the test site were 18 feet per day for Upper Zone A, 750 feet per day for Lower Zone A, 1 foot per day for Zone B, 1x10-4 feet per day for the intermediate confining unit, and 10 feet per day for the semiconfining unit separating Upper Zone A and Lower Zone A. Final calibrated values for storage coefficient were 3.1x10-4 for Upper Zone A, 8.6x10-5 for Lower Zone A, 2.6x10-5 for Zone B, 3.1x10-4 for the intermediate confining unit, and 4.3x10-5 for the semiconfining unit separating Upper Zone A and Lower Zone A. Estimates of transmissivity for Upper Zone A and Lower Zone A were about 2,500 and 37,500 feet squared per day, respectively.

  5. Hydrogeology of the surficial and intermediate aquifers of central Sarasota County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, A.D.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The geohydrologic units underlying a 300 sq mi area in central Sarasota County, Florida, consist of the surficial aquifer, intermediate aquifers (Tamiami-upper Hawthorn and lower Hawthorn-upper Tampa aquifers) and confining units, the Floridan aquifer system, and the sub-Floridan confining unit. The saturated thickness of the surficial aquifer ranges from about 40 to 75 ft and the water table is generally within 5 ft of land surface. The Tamiami-upper Hawthorn is the uppermost intermediate aquifer. The top of the aquifer ranges from about 50 ft to about 75 below sea level and has an average thickness of about 100 ft. The lower Hawthorne-upper Tampa aquifer is the lowermost intermediate aquifer. The top of the aquifer ranges from about 190 to about 220 ft below sea level and its thickness ranges from about 200 to 250 ft. The quality of water in the surficial and the two intermediate aquifers is acceptable for potable use except near the coast. Water from the Floridan aquifer system is used primarily for agricultural purposes because it is too mineralized for most other uses; therefore, the surficial and intermediate aquifers are developed for water supply. The artesian pressure of the various aquifers generally increases with depth. A more detailed geohydrologic description is presented for the Ringling-MacArthur Reserve, a 51 sq mi area in the central part of the county that may be used by Sarasota County as a future water supply. Average annual rainfall is 56 inches and evapotranspiration is about 42 in at the Reserve. The area has a high water table, many sloughs and swamps, and undeveloped land, making it an attractive site as a potential source of water. (Author 's abstract)

  6. Ground-water quality in selected areas serviced by septic tanks, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A.; Mattraw, H.C.; Klein, Howard

    1975-01-01

    During 1971-74, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the chemical, physical, bacteriological, and virological characteristics of the ground water in five selected areas serviced by septic tanks in Dade County, Florida. Periodic water samples were collected from multiple-depth groups of monitor wells ranging in depth from 10 to 60 ft at each of the five areas. Analyses of ground water from base-line water-quality wells in inland areas remote from urban development indicated that the ground water is naturally high in organic nitrogen, ammonia, organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand. Some enrichment of ground water with sodium provided a possible key to differentiating septic-tank effluent from other urban ground-water contaminant sources. High ammonia nitrogen, phosphorus, and the repetitive detection of fecal coliform bacteria were characteristic of two 10-foot monitor wells that consistently indicated the presence of septic-tank effluent in ground water. Dispersion, dilution, and various chemical processes have presumably prevented accumulation of septic-tank effluent at depths greater than 20 ft, as indicated by the 65 types of water analyses used in the investigation. Fecal coliform bacteria were present on one or two occasions in many monitor wells but the highest concentration, 1,600 colonies/100 ml, was related to storm-water infiltration rather than septic-tank discharge. Areal variations in the composition and the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and limestone aquifer had the most noticeable influence on the overall ground-water quality. The ground water in the more permeable limestone in south Dade County near Homestead contained low concentrations of septic-tank related constituents, but higher concentrations of dissolved sulfate and nitrate. The ground water in north Dade County, where the aquifer is less permeable, contained the highest dissolved iron, manganese, COD, and organic carbon.

  7. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of drainage wells in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, J.O.; Fayard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Drainage wells are used to inject surface waters directly into an aquifer, or shallow ground waters directly into a deeper aquifer, primarily by gravity. Such wells in Florida may be grouped into two broad types: (1) surface-water injection wells, and (2) interaquifer connector wells. Drainage wells of the first type are further categorized as either Floridan aquifer drainage wells or Biscayne aquifer drainage wells. Floridan aquifer drainage wells are commonly used to supplement drainage for urban areas in karst terranes of central and north Florida. Data are available for 25 wells in the Ocala, Live Oak, and Orlando areas that allow comparison of the quality of water samples from these Floridan aquifer drainage wells with allowable contaminant levels. Comparison indicates that maximum contaminant levels for turbidity, color, and iron, manganese, and lead concentrations are equaled or exceeded in some drainage-well samples, and relatively high counts for coliform bacteria are present in most wells. Biscayne aquifer drainage wells are used locally to dispose of stormwater runoff and other surplus water in southeast Florida, where large numbers of these wells have been permitted in Dade and Broward Counties. The majority of these wells are used to dispose of water from swimming pools or to dispose of heated water from air-conditioning units. The use of Biscayne aquifer drainage wells may have minimal effect on aquifer potability so long as injection of runoff and industrial wates is restricted to zones where chloride concentrations exceed 1,500 milligrams per liter. Interaquifer connector wells are used in the phosphate mining areas of Polk and Hillsborough Counties, to drain mines and recharge the Floridan aquifer. Water-quality data available from 13 connector wells indicate that samples from most of these wells exceed standards values for iron concentration and turbidity. One well yielded a highly mineralized water, and samples from 6 of the other 12 wells exceed

  8. Summary of ground-water and surface-water data for city of Pensacola and Escambia County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffin, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrologic, geologic, and water-quality data collected in Escambia County, Florida, October 1962 through September 1980 are presented. The data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative investigation with the city of Pensacola and Escambia County to provide information on the quality and quantity of water available from the sand-and-gravel aquifer and selected surface-water sites in Escambia County. Ground-water data include records of 440 wells, chemical and physical analyses of water quality for 325 wells, 6 long-term hydrographs, and 19 lithologic logs. Surface-water data include streamflow measurements and analyses of water collected at 9 sites. Maps of the county show the locations of the data-collection sites. (USGS)

  9. Analyzing effective municipal solid waste recycling programs: the case of county-level MSW recycling performance in Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Park, Seejeen; Berry, Frances S

    2013-09-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) recycling performance, both nationally and in Florida, USA, has shown little improvement during the past decade. This research examines variations in the MSW recycling program performance in Florida counties in an attempt to identify effective recycling programs. After reviewing trends in the MSW management literature, we conducted an empirical analysis using cross-sectional multiple regression analysis. The findings suggest that the convenience-based hypothesis was supported by showing that curbside recycling had a positive effect on MSW recycling performance. Financial (cost-saving) incentive-based hypotheses were partially supported meaning that individual level incentives can influence recycling performance. Citizen environmental concern was found to positively affect the amount of county recycling, while education and political affiliation yielded no significant results. In conclusion, this article discusses the implications of the findings for both academic research and practice of MSW recycling programs.

  10. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District, May 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Woodham, W.M.; Schiner, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A May 1981 potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual low water-level period. Potentiometric levels decreased 10 to 45 feet between September 1980 and May 1981 in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk, northwestern DeSoto, and Manatee Counties. Water levels in these areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest range in fluctuations. Water-level decreases ranged from 0 to 1 feet in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District. Water levels in all of the approximate 700 wells measured in May 1981 are lower than May 1980 because of the virtual absence of rainfall in April and May. (USGS)

  11. Florida Men Sentenced for Poisoning Wildlife and Hunting Dogs in Bullock County

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Daryl Fischer of Seminole, Florida and Russell Taylor of Loxahatchee, Florida were sentenced on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, to terms of probation for improper use of the pesticide Aldicarb, which is marketed as Temik, announced the United Sta

  12. Reconnaissance of Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Selected Bottom Sediments of the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Tributaries, and Contiguous Bays, Lee County, Florida, July 20-30, 1998

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    areas of Lee County discharge through stormwater conveyances into the Caloosahatchee River estuary (Tony Pellicer , Natural Resource Manager, Lee County... Pellicer , Tony, Natural Resource Manager, Lee County, Florida, 1999, verbal communication. Seal, Thomas, Florida Department of Environmental...23 24 25 26 2829 30 31 32 33 34 35 38 39 40 40A 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 7 9 13 27 37 51 52 21 8 Franklin Lock Olga Fort

  13. Gun Violence, Mental Illness, And Laws That Prohibit Gun Possession: Evidence From Two Florida Counties

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Jeffrey W.; Easter, Michele M.; Robertson, Allison G.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Moseley, Daniel; Dion, Charles; Petrila, John

    2016-01-01

    Gun violence kills about ninety people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. Some policy makers suggest that reforming mental health care systems and improving point-of-purchase background checks to keep guns from mentally disturbed people will address the problem. Epidemiological research shows that serious mental illness contributes little to the risk of interpersonal violence but is a strong factor in suicide, which accounts for most firearm fatalities. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of gun restrictions focused on mental illness remains poorly understood. This article examines gun-related suicide and violent crime in people with serious mental illnesses, and whether legal restrictions on firearm sales to people with a history of mental health adjudication are effective in preventing gun violence. Among the study population in two large Florida counties, we found that 62 percent of violent gun crime arrests and 28 percent of gun suicides involved individuals not legally permitted to have a gun at the time. Suggested policy reforms include enacting risk-based gun removal laws and prohibiting guns from people involuntarily detained in short-term psychiatric hospitalizations. PMID:27269024

  14. Water-quality reconnaissance of the north Dade County solid-waste facility, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A water-quality sampling reconnaissance of the north Dade County solid-waste disposal facility (landfill) near Carol City, Florida, was conducted during 1977-78. The purpose of the reconnaissance was to determine selected quality characteristics of the surface- and ground-water of the landfill and contiguous area; and to assess, generally, if leachate produced by the decomposition of landfill wastes was adversely impacting the downgradient water quality. Sampling results indicated that several water-quality characteristics were present in landfill ground water at significantly higher levels than in ground water upgradient or downgradient from the landfill. Moreover, many of these water-quality characteristics were found at slightly higher levels at down gradient site 5 than at upgradient site 1 which suggested that some downgradient movement of landfill leachate had occurred. For example, chloride and alkalinity in ground water had average concentrations of 20 and 290 mg/L at background wells (site 1), 144 and 610 mg/L at landfill wells (sites 2 and 4), and 29 and 338 mg/L at downgradient wells (site 5). A comparison of the 1977-78 sampling results with the National Primary and Secondary Drinking Water Regulations indicated that levels of iron and color in ground water of the study area frequently exceeded national maximum contaminant levels, dissolved solids, turbidity, lead, and manganese occasionally exceeded regulations. Concentrations of iron and levels of color and turbidity in some surface water samples also exceeded National maximum contaminant levels. (USGS)

  15. Water quality at and adjacent to the south Dade County solid-waste disposal facility, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A water-quality reconnaissance was conducted at the south Dade County solid-waste landfill near Goulds, Florida, from December 1977 through August 1978. The landfill is located directly on the unconfined Biscayne aquifer, which, in the study area, is affected by saltwater intrusion. Water samples collected from six monitor well sites at two depths and four surface-water sites were analyzed to determine the chemical, physical, and biological conditions of the ground water and surface water of the study area. Results indicated that water quality beneath the landfill was highly variable with location and depth. Leachate was generally more evident in the shallow wells and during the dry-season sampling, but was greatly diluted and dispersed in the deep wells and during the wet season. High concentrations of contaminants were generated primarily in areas of the landfill with the most recent waste deposits. Chloride (limited to the shallow wells and the dry season), alkalinity, ammonia, iron, manganese, lead, phosphorus, and organic nitrogen indicate leachate contamination of the aquifer. Water-quality characteristics in the surface waters were generally only slightly above background levels. (USGS)

  16. Gun Violence, Mental Illness, And Laws That Prohibit Gun Possession: Evidence From Two Florida Counties.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Easter, Michele M; Robertson, Allison G; Swartz, Marvin S; Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Moseley, Daniel; Dion, Charles; Petrila, John

    2016-06-01

    Gun violence kills about ninety people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. Some policy makers suggest that reforming mental health care systems and improving point-of-purchase background checks to keep guns from mentally disturbed people will address the problem. Epidemiological research shows that serious mental illness contributes little to the risk of interpersonal violence but is a strong factor in suicide, which accounts for most firearm fatalities. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of gun restrictions focused on mental illness remains poorly understood. This article examines gun-related suicide and violent crime in people with serious mental illnesses, and whether legal restrictions on firearm sales to people with a history of mental health adjudication are effective in preventing gun violence. Among the study population in two large Florida counties, we found that 62 percent of violent gun crime arrests and 28 percent of gun suicides involved individuals not legally permitted to have a gun at the time. Suggested policy reforms include enacting risk-based gun removal laws and prohibiting guns from people involuntarily detained in short-term psychiatric hospitalizations.

  17. Effects of land use on ground-water quality in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    Groundwater quality characteristics of the Biscayne aquifer from September 1978 through June 1979 were determined for seven land use areas within the East Everglades in Dade County, Florida. Four agricultural areas, two low-density residential areas, and Chekika Hammock State Park were investigated. The effects of land use on the groundwater were minimal in all areas; only iron , which occurs naturally in high concentrations in the Everglades, exceeded potable groundwater standards. Potassium and nitrate concentrations in certain samples increased over background concentrations in the agricultural areas. Groundwater at Chekika Hammock State Park and at a citrus grove is contaminated by brackish water flowing from an artesian well. The soil at the agricultural areas had higher concentrations of chromium, copper, and manganese than at the two residential areas or at Chekika Hammock State Park. One residential area (Coopertown) had the highest concentrations of lead and zinc and detectable polychlorinated biphenyls. Chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticide residues in soil at three agricultural areas were higher than background concentrations. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Hydrology of Lake June in winter, Highlands County, South-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belles, Roger G.; Martin, Edward H.

    1985-01-01

    Lake June in Winter is in central Highlands County near the town of Lake Placid in south-central Florida. Recreation and citrus-grove irrigation are the major uses of lake water. Land use around the lake is residential citrus, and undeveloped. Most of the land use in the 44-square mile lake-drainage area is undeveloped. The surface area of the lake is approximately 5.7 square miles with water-surface altitude average of 74 feet. The extremes in lake altitude for the period 1945-82 were 77.58 feet in October 1948, and 71.62 feet in May 1981. Flow into Lake June in Winter is from Lake Placid to the south through Catfish Creek. Flow out of the Lake is northward through Stearns Creek to Lake Francis, and eventually by Josephine Creek to Lake Istokpoga. The quality of water in Lake June in Winter is good. Specific conductance was found to be generally low, ranging between 90 umho/cm to 170 umho/cm, indicating a lack of dissolved solids present in the lake. The lake is clear, with transparency values between 3 and 14 feet. Total nitrogen was found to be 0.60 mg/L indicating a minimal effect from nitrogen fertilizer washoff or septic-tank discharge. (USGS)

  19. Effects of land use on surface-water quality in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    Water-quality characteristics were determined at five developed areas in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida, during the 1978 wet season (June through October). These areas are designated as: Coopertown; Chekika Hammock State Park; residential area; rock-plowed tomato field; and Cracker Jack Slough agricultural area. Data from the developed areas were compared with data from four baseline sites in undeveloped areas to determine the effects of land use on the surface-water quality. The rock-plowed tomato field was the only area where surface-water quality was affected. Water quality at this field is affected by agricultural activities and chemical applications as indicated by increased concentrations of orthophosphate, organic nitrogen, organic carbon, copper, manganese, mercury, and potassium. The remaining four areas of land use had water-quality characteristics typical of baseline sites in nearby Northeast Shark River Slough or Taylor Slough. Chemical analyses of soil indicated chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticide residues at Coopertown and the two agricultural areas, Cracker Jack Slough and the rock-plowed tomato field. Trace elements in concentrations greater than base level occurred at both agricultural areas (manganese), Chekika Hammock State Park (manganese), and at Coopertown (lead and zinc). (USGS)

  20. Investigation of Coastal Hydrogeology Utilizing Geophysical and Geochemical Tools along the Broward County Coast, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Christopher D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Greenwood, W. Jason; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    Geophysical (CHIRP, boomer, and continuous direct-current resistivity) and geochemical tracer studies (continuous and time-series 222Radon) were conducted along the Broward County coast from Port Everglades to Hillsboro Inlet, Florida. Simultaneous seismic, direct-current resistivity, and radon surveys in the coastal waters provided information to characterize the geologic framework and identify potential groundwater-discharge sites. Time-series radon at the Nova Southeastern University National Coral Reef Institute (NSU/NCRI) seawall indicated a very strong tidally modulated discharge of ground water with 222Rn activities ranging from 4 to 10 disintegrations per minute per liter depending on tidal stage. CHIRP seismic data provided very detailed bottom profiles (i.e., bathymetry); however, acoustic penetration was poor and resulted in no observed subsurface geologic structure. Boomer data, on the other hand, showed features that are indicative of karst, antecedent topography (buried reefs), and sand-filled troughs. Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) data showed slight variability in the subsurface along the coast. Subtle changes in subsurface resistivity between nearshore (higher values) and offshore (lower values) profiles may indicate either a freshening of subsurface water nearshore or a change in sediment porosity or lithology. Further lithologic and hydrologic controls from sediment or rock cores or well data are needed to constrain the variability in CRP data.

  1. Stormwater quality processes for three land-use areas in Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H.C.; Miller, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic collection and chemical analysis of stormwater runoff samples from three small urban areas in Broward County, Florida, were obtained between 1974 and 1977. Thirty or more runoff-constituent loads were computed for each of the homogeneous land-use areas. The areas sampled were single family residential, highway, and a commercial shopping center. Rainfall , runoff, and nutrient and metal analyses were stored in a data-management system. The data-management system permitted computation of loads, publication of basic-data reports and the interface of environmental and load information with a comprehensive statistical analysis system. Seven regression models relating water quality loads to characteristics of peak discharge, antecedent conditions, season, storm duration and rainfall intensity were constructed for each of the three sites. Total water-quality loads were computed for the collection period by summing loads for individual storms. Loads for unsampled storms were estimated by using regression models and records of storm precipitation. Loadings, pounds per day per acre of hydraulically effective impervious area, were computed for the three land-use types. Total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total residue loadings were highest in the residential area. Chemical oxygen demand and total lead loadings were highest in the commercial area. Loadings of atmospheric fallout on each watershed were estimated by bulk precipitation samples collected at the highway and commercial site. (USGS)

  2. Deep artesian aquifers of Sanibel and Captiva Islands, Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, D.H.; O'Donnell, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    The principal sources of water on Sanibel and Captiva Islands, Lee County, Florida, are two deep artesian aquifers within the upper and lower parts of the Hawthorn Formation. Both aquifers are under artesian pressure and wells flow at the land surface. Water from the upper aquifer is of better quality than that from the lower aquifer and can be used in some areas without desalination. Dissolved solids concentrations in the upper aquifer average 1,540 milligrams per liter. Water levels in wells in the upper aquifer range from 8 to 15 feet above sea level; most wells flow as much as 15 gallons per minute at land surface. The lower aquifer is the source of the public supply for the islands. Dissolved solids concentrations in the lower aquifer range from 1,700 to 4,130 milligrams per liter and average 2,571 milligrams per liter. From July to November 1977, water levels in the aquifer ranged from 7 to 32 feet above sea level throughout Sanibel-Captiva Islands. In 1977 the average pumpage from public supply wells was 1.4 million gallons per day. Pumpage from the artesian aquifers during 1977 was about 690 million gallons. The water is desalinated before distribution. (USGS)

  3. Utilizing health ambassadors to improve type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease outcomes in Gadsden County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Suther, Sandra; Battle, Arrie M; Battle-Jones, Felecia; Seaborn, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Minority racial and ethnic groups are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. These groups also experience more severe complications from diabetes and have higher mortality rates as a result of the disease, such as cardiovascular disease, amputation and kidney failure. Underserved rural ethnically disparate populations benefit from health education outreach efforts that are conveyed and translated by specially-trained community health ambassadors. Project H.I.G.H. (Helping Individuals Get Healthy) was developed to target the priority areas of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Utilizing trained community health ambassadors, CDC's The Road to Health Toolkit as well as New Beginnings: A Discussion Guide for Living Well with Diabetes was used as a model for a community-based educational program. The overall goal of Project H.I.G.H was to implement and evaluate: (1) a coordinated, behavior-focused, family-centered, community-based educational program and; (2) a client service coordination effort resulting in improved health outcomes (BMI, Glucose Levels, BP) for individuals with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Gadsden County, Florida. Overall, Project H.I.G.H. was very successful in its first year at motivating participants to delay or prevent diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease or at the very least to start taking better care of their health.

  4. High-resolution seismic reflection profiling for mapping shallow aquifers in Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Missimer, T.M.; Gardner, Richard Alfred

    1976-01-01

    High-resolution continuous seismic reflection profiling equipment was utilized to define the configuration of sedimentary layers underlying part of Lee County, Florida. About 45 miles (72 kilometers) of profile were made on the Caloosahatchee River Estuary and San Carlos Bay. Two different acoustic energy sources, a high resolution boomer and a 45-electrode high resolution sparker, both having a power input of 300 joules, were used to obtain both adequate penetration and good resolution. The seismic profiles show that much of the strata of middle Miocene to Holocene age apparently are extensively folded but not faulted. Initial interpretations indicate that: (1) the top of the Hawthorn Formation (which contains the upper Hawthorn aquifer) has much relief due chiefly to apparent folding; (2) the limestone, sandstone, and unconsolidated sand and phosphorite, which together compose the sandstone aquifer, appear to be discontinuous; (3) the green clay unit of the Tamiami Formation contains large scale angular beds dipping eastward; and (4) numerous deeply cut alluvium-filled paleochannels underlie the Caloosahatchee River. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Hydrogeologic assessment of shallow clastic and carbonate rock aquifers in Hendry and Collier counties, southwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin; Krulikas, R.K.; Brendle, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Direct-current electrical resistivity data were collected from 109 vertical electrical sounding sites in Hendry and Collier Counties, southwestern Florida. Selected direct-current electrical resistivity surveys, together with available borehole geologic and geophysical data, were used to determine the approximate areal extent of the shallow clastic aquifers composed of thick sands and carbonate lithologies. Results indicated that a complex pattern of shallow sands, clays, and carbonate lithologies occur throughout the area. Buried channel sands were found as deep as 50 meters below land surface in some places. The channels contain unconsolidated fine- to medium-grained quartz sand interbedded with sandy limestone, shell fragments, and gray-green sandy clay. Both surface and borehole geophysical techniques with lithologic data were necessary to approximately locate and define layers that might behave as confining layers and to locate and define the extent of any buried sand aquifers. The borehole geophysical data were used to analyze the zones of higher resistivity. Direct-current electrical resistivity data indicated the approximate location of certain layer boundaries. The conjunctive use of natural gamma and short- and long-normal resistivity logs was helpful in determining lithologic effects. Geohydrologic sections were prepared to identify potential locations of buried channels and carbonates containing freshwater. Buried channel sands and carbonate rock sections were identified in the subsurface that potentially may contain freshwater supplies.

  6. Preliminary Assessment of Landslides Along the Florida River Downstream from Lemon Reservoir, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, William L.; Kibler, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly two-dozen shallow landslides were active during spring 2005 on a hillside located along the east side of the Florida River about one kilometer downstream from Lemon Reservoir in La Plata County, southwestern Colorado. Landslides on the hillside directly threaten human safety, residential structures, a county roadway, utilities, and the Florida River, and indirectly threaten downstream areas and Lemon Dam. Most of the area where the landslides occurred was burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge wildfire. We performed geologic mapping, subsurface exploration and sampling, radiocarbon dating, and shallow ground-water and ground-displacement monitoring to assess landslide activity. Active landslides during spring 2005 were as large as 35,000 m3 and confined to colluvium. Debris flows were mobilized from most of the landslides, were as large as 1,500 m3, and traveled as far as 250 m. Landslide activity was triggered by elevated ground-water pressures within the colluvium caused by infiltration of snowmelt. Landslide activity ceased as ground-water pressures dropped during the summer. Shallow landslides on the hillside appear to be much more likely following the Missionary Ridge fire because of the loss of tree root strength and evapotranspiration. We used monitoring data and observations to develop preliminary, approximate rainfall/snowmelt thresholds above which shallow landslide activity can be expected. Landslides triggered during spring 2005 occurred within a 1.97 x 107 m3 older landslide that extends, on average, about 40 m into bedrock. The south end of this older landslide appears to have experienced deep secondary landsliding. Radiocarbon dating of sediments at the head of the older landslide suggests that the landslide was active about 1,424-1,696 years ago. A relatively widespread wildfire may have preceded the older landslide, and the landslide may have occurred during a wetter time. The wetter climate and effects of the wildfire would likely have

  7. Public health assessment for Florida Petroleum Reprocessors, Davie, Broward County, Florida, Region 4: CERCLIS number FLD984184127. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-13

    The Florida Petroleum Reprocessors (FPR) Site in Davie, Florida was listed on National Priorities List on March 27, 1998. Between 1978--1992, it was a waste oil transfer station. The groundwater, soil and sediments are contaminated with volatile organic chemicals, metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Currently, this site poses an indeterminate public health hazard because of contaminated groundwater. In the past, the site posed a public health hazard because private wells in the northern part of the site were contaminated. As a result, these residents are at an increased risk of cancer and non-cancer illnesses from household use of 1,1-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride contaminated groundwater. It is unknown if there are private wells south of FPR property; however, the contamination is moving south, people could be exposed in the future.

  8. Hydrology and water quality of lakes and streams in Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.; Adamski, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Orange County, Florida, is continuing to experience a large growth in population. In 1920, the population of Orange County was less than 20,000; in 2000, the population was about 896,000. The amount of urban area around Orlando has increased considerably, especially in the northwest part of the County. The eastern one-third of the County, however, had relatively little increase in urbanization from 1977-97. The increase of population, tourism, and industry in Orange County and nearby areas changed land use; land that was once agricultural has become urban, industrial, and major recreation areas. These changes could impact surface-water resources that are important for wildlife habitat, for esthetic reasons, and potentially for public supply. Streamflow characteristics and water quality could be affected in various ways. As a result of changing land use, changes in the hydrology and water quality of Orange County's lakes and streams could occur. Median runoff in 10 selected Orange County streams ranges from about 20 inches per year (in/yr) in the Wekiva River to about 1.1 in/yr in Cypress Creek. The runoff for the Wekiva River is significantly higher than other river basins because of the relatively constant spring discharge that sustains streamflow, even during drought conditions. The low runoff for the Cypress Creek basin results from a lack of sustained inflow from ground water and a relatively large area of lakes within the drainage basin. Streamflow characteristics for 13 stations were computed on an annual basis and examined for temporal trends. Results of the trend testing indicate changes in annual mean streamflow, 1-day high streamflow, or 7-day low streamflow at 8 of the 13 stations. However, changes in 7-day low streamflow are more common than changes in annual mean or 1-day high streamflow. There is probably no single reason for the changes in 7-day low streamflows, and for most streams, it is difficult to determine definite reasons for the flow

  9. Measles outbreak in an unvaccinated family and a possibly associated international traveler - Orange County, Florida, December 2012-January 2013.

    PubMed

    Slade, Tania A; Klekamp, Benjamin; Rico, Edhelene; Mejia-Echeverry, Alvaro

    2014-09-12

    The Florida Department of Health in Orange County (DOH-Orange) was notified by a child care facility on January 11, 2013, that a parent had reported that an attendee and three siblings were ill with measles. All four siblings were unvaccinated for measles and had no travel history outside of Orange County during the periods when they likely had been exposed. A fifth, possibly associated case was later reported in a Brazilian citizen who had become ill while vacationing in Florida. The outbreak investigation that was conducted at multiple community settings in Orange County, including at an Orlando-area theme park, identified no additional cases. The genotype sequence was identical for cases 2-5, and visits to the same theme park suggested an unknown, common exposure and link between the cases. Sources of measles exposure can be difficult to identify for every measles case. Measles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of febrile rash illness, especially in unvaccinated persons. Reporting a confirmed or suspected case immediately to public health authorities is critical to limit the spread of measles.

  10. Correlation analysis of a ground-water level monitoring network, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey cooperative ground-water monitoring program in Miami-Dade County, Florida, expanded from 4 to 98 continuously recording water-level monitoring wells during the 1939-2001 period. Network design was based on area specific assessments; however, no countywide statistical assessments of network coverage had been performed for the purpose of assessing network redundancy. To aid in the assessment of network redundancy, correlation analyses were performed using S-PLUS 2000 statistical analysis software for daily maximum water-level data from 98 monitoring wells for the November 1, 1973, to October 31, 2000 period. Because of the complexities of the hydrologic, water-supply, and water-management systems in Miami-Dade County and the changes that have occurred to these systems through time, spatial and temporal variations in the degree of correlation had to be considered. To assess temporal variation in correlation, water-level data from each well were subdivided by year and by wet and dry seasons. For each well, year, and season, correlation analyses were performed on the data from those wells that had available data. For selected wells, the resulting correlation coefficients from each year and season were plotted with respect to time. To assess spatial variation in correlation, the coefficients determined from the correlation analysis were averaged. These average wet- and dry-season correlation coefficients were plotted spatially using geographic information system software. Wells with water-level data that correlated with a coefficient of 0.95 or greater were almost always located in relatively close proximity to each other. Five areas were identified where the water-level data from wells within the area remained correlated with that of other wells in the area during the wet and dry seasons. These areas are located in or near the C-1 and C-102 basins (2 wells), in or near the C-6 and C-7 basins (2 wells), near the Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority

  11. A reconnaissance of hydrogeologic conditions in Lehigh Acres and adjacent areas of Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, Durward Hoye; Missimer, T.M.

    1975-01-01

    Lehigh Acres, a residential community with a population of about 13,500 and comprising an area of about 94 square miles (243 square kilometres) in the eastern part of Lee County, has been under development since 1954. Prior to development the area was poorly drained. By 1974, more than 150 miles (241 kilometres) of drainageways had been constructed to drain the area. The water-bearing formations underlying Lehigh Acres include the water-table, sandstone, lower Hawthorn, and Suwannee aquifers. The water-table aquifer is usually not more than 30 feet (9 metres) thick; it contains water of relatively good quality, except for iron and color. Water levels in this aquifer probably have been affected by construction of drainage canals. The sandstone aquifer, used extensively throughout the area as a source of water supply usually contains water of good quality although the water is hard and in places may contain concentrations of dissolved solids and iron which exceed the recommended limits of the U.S. Public Health Service and the State of Florida for drinking water. The lower Hawthorn and Suwannee aquifers, usually encountered at depths between 440 and 850 feet (135 and 262 metres), contains water with relatively high concentrations of sodium, sulfate, chloride, and dissolved solids. Three streams, the Orange River, Hickey Creek, and Bedman Creek and the canals connected to them, provide drainage of the area. Except for the Orange River, where the water is of good chemical quality, little is known of the water quality. Similarly, little information is available on stream discharge except for the Orange River where the average annual discharge was 41.1 cubic feet per second (11.6 cubic metres per second) between 1935-46. Most lakes and ponds in Lehigh Acres are hydraulically connected to the water-table aquifer such that factors which affect one also affect the other. Theoretical drawdown curves indicate that the drainage canals may affect ground-water levels to a

  12. Geophysical investigation of sentinel lakes in Lake, Seminole, Orange, and Volusia Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Christopher; Flocks, James; Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study was initiated in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) to investigate groundwater and surface-water interaction in designated sentinel lakes in central Florida. Sentinel lakes are a SJRWMD established set of priority water bodies (lakes) for which minimum flows and levels (MFLs) are determined. Understanding both the structure and lithology beneath these lakes can ultimately lead to a better understanding of the MFLs and why water levels fluctuate in certain lakes more so than in other lakes. These sentinel lakes have become important water bodies to use as water-fluctuation indicators in the SJRWMD Minimum Flows and Levels program and will be used to define long-term hydrologic and ecologic performance measures. Geologic control on lake hydrology remains poorly understood in this study area. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated 16 of the 21 water bodies on the SJRWMD priority list. Geologic information was obtained by the tandem use of high-resolution seismic profiling (HRSP) and direct-current (DC) resistivity profiling to isolate both the geologic framework (structure) and composition (lithology). Previous HRSP surveys from various lakes in the study area have been successful in identifying karst features, such as subsidence sinkholes. However, by using this method only, it is difficult to image highly irregular or chaotic surfaces, such as collapse sinkholes. Resistivity profiling was used to complement HRSP by detecting porosity change within fractured or collapsed structures and increase the ability to fully characterize the subsurface. Lake Saunders (Lake County) is an example of a lake composed of a series of north-south-trending sinkholes that have joined to form one lake body. HRSP shows surface depressions and deformation in the substrate. Resistivity data likewise show areas in the southern part of the lake where resistivity shifts abruptly from approximately 400 ohm meters (ohm-m) along the

  13. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    -level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during the period May 15-19, 2006. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the Southwest Florida Water Management District boundary by the U.S. Geological Survey office in Altamonte Springs, Florida (Kinnaman, 2006). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal low water-level condition. Water-Level Changes Water levels in about 95 percent of the wells measured in May 2006 were lower than the May 2005 water levels (Ortiz and Blanchard, 2006). May 2006 water levels in 403 wells ranged from about 26 feet below to about 6 feet above May 2005 water levels (fig. 1). Significant water level declines occurred in eastern Manatee County, southwestern Polk County, southeastern Hillsborough County, and in all of Hardee County. The largest water level declines occurred in southwestern Hardee County. The largest water level rises occurred in south-central Pasco County, northeastern Levy County, northwestern Marion County, and along the gulf coast from Pasco County to Citrus County (fig. 1). Water levels in about 96 percent of the wells measured in May 2006 were lower than the September 2005 water levels (Ortiz, 2006). May 2006 water levels in 397 wells ranged from about 31 feet below to 3 feet above the September 2005 water levels. The largest water level decline was in west-central Hardee County and the largest rise in water levels was in south-central Pasco County.

  14. Waterborne typhoid fever in Dade County, Florida. Clinical and therapeutic evaluation of 105 bacteremic patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T A; Ruiz, C J; Counts, G W; Sachs, J M; Nitzkin, J L

    1975-10-01

    An extensive outbreak of waterborne typhoid fever occurred in 1973 at a migrant labor camp in Dade County, Florida. Blood cultures from 105 of the 188 patients with proved or presumptive cases of typhoid fever grew Salmonella typhi. The clinical and laboratory findings in these patients were reviewed. Fever, usually with temperatures above 38.8 degrees C and of the sustained type, was a primary manifestation of disease, although a majority of the patients also complained of headache and gastroenteric symptoms. Hepatic or splenic enlargement was present in 52 per cent and 42 per cent, respectively, whereas rose spots were detected in only 13 per cent. The total leukocyte count was normal in 74 per cent, but serum levels of liver and muscle enzymes were frequently elevated. Gastrointestinal, pulmonary and neurologic complications were infrequent; circulatory failure was not observed. Defervescence in response to antibiotic therapy was variable; however, the median response among 68 patients who received chloramphenicol was two days less than that in 34 patients treated with ampicillin. There was one possible treatment failure with ampicillin. The relapse rate of 10 per cent in chloramphenicol-treated patients was not significantly greater than the 3 per cent rate among those treated with ampicillin. Serologic studies for typhoid fever were of limited diagnostic value since the titer of agglutinins was 1:160 or higher in 49 per cent of the serums obtained before treatment, and a fourfold rise in titer occurred in only 24 per cent of 57 patients studied. The serologic response to chloramphenicol treatment did not differ from that to ampicillin.

  15. Vegetative changes in a wetland in the vicinity of a well field, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofstetter, R.H.; Sonenshein, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Plant communities present in 1978 and 1986 were analyzed at 250 random points on stereoscopic pairs of aerial photographs for four study sites in the vicinity of the Northwest Well Field in Dade County, Florida. Sites NW and NE lie northwest of the well field beyond the cone of depression. Site SW lies in the outer part of the cone, and site SE lies within the cone of depression. Relative frequency values for several plant types including herbs, shrubs-small trees, and trees were analyzed by the Heterogeneity G-test to determine heterogeneity among sites in 1978 and 1986. In 1978, all four sites were dominated by plant communities having herbs, shrubs, or a mixture thereof. The communities at sites NW and NE were similar, and those at SE and SW were somewhat similar. In 1986, sites NW, NE, and SE were dominated by a mixture of shrubs and trees. Only at site SW was the relative frequency of occurrence of herbaceous plants still high. At each site, there was a decrease in herbaceous vegetation and an increase in woody vegetation during this period, with the increase in trees being greatest at site SE. Time between the start of the well-field operation in May 1983 and the January 1986 photographs was insufficient to allow determination of any direct effects of the well field on the vegetation. Ground-level observations in 1987 and 1988 indicate a trend toward continued increase in dominance of woody plants and a decrease in herbaceous wetland vegetation. Development of a forest of the exotic pest tree melaleuca is occurring at all four sites, but especially at site SE. Vegetative changes between 1978 and 1986 are attributed to an invasion of the exotic species melaleuca, a shortened hydroperiod, and natural succession within the plant communities.

  16. Hydrogeologic data from a test well in east-central Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.P.; Johnson, R.A.; Broxton, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A 2,112-foot test well was drilled in east-central Duval County, Florida, to obtain geologic, hydrologic, and water chemistry data. Drill cuttings and water samples were collected, and water-level measurements and lithologic and geophysical logs were made. Deposits to a depth of 575 feet consist of sand, clayey sand, phosphatic sandy clay, coquina, sandy limestone, and dolostone. Below 575 feet, the deposits consist of fragmented and granular limestone, dolomitic limestone, and massive to finely crystalline dolostone, which comprise the Floridan aquifer system in the area. Water levels were measured near or at the bottom of the drill hole through the drill stem and in the annular space between the drilled hole and drill stem at the well head as drilling progressed from 770 to 2,112 feet in depth. Water levels measured through the drill stem ranged from 1.17 feet above land surface at a depth of 2,107 feet to 15.0 feet above land surface at a depth of 1,574 feet. Water levels measured in the annular space ranged from 7.5 feet above land surface at a depth of 770 feet to 14.9 feet at various depths from 1,574 to 1,721 feet. Chloride concentrations of water sampled through the drill stem from a depth of 711 to 1 ,616 feet ranged from 22 to 150 milligrams per liter at 1,648 feet. Chloride concentrations then ranged from 345 to about 800 milligrams per liter to a depth of 2,071 feet and then increased to a maximum of 5,450 milligrams per liter at 2,107 feet. (USGS)

  17. STEM Education: Introduction of Quantitative Math and Science Content into Elementary Education, STEM Enrichment Effort in Title One Elementary and Middle Schools in Bay County, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    of these situations but a prominent factor they share is the absence of quantitative content in elementary school classrooms —the educational window...Enrichment Effort in Title One Elementary and Middle Schools In Bay County, Florida Ginger Littleton Florida State University Joseph Wander Tyndall...aimed primarily at students in the higher grades, and science scores by the county’s public school students in elementary grades have had a long

  18. Hydrostratigraphic Framework and Selection and Correlation of Geophysical Log Markers in the Surficial Aquifer System, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is the major source of freshwater for public water supply in Palm Beach County, Florida, yet many previous studies of the hydrogeology of this aquifer system have focused only on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal area (Land and others, 1973; Swayze and others, 1980; Swayze and Miller, 1984; Shine and others, 1989). Population growth in the county has resulted in the westward expansion of urbanized areas into agricultural areas and has created new demands on the water resources of the county. Additionally, interest in surface-water resources of central and western areas of the county has increased. In these areas, plans for additional surface-water storage reservoirs are being made under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan originally proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District (1999), and stormwater treatment areas have been constructed by the South Florida Water Management District. Surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Everglades are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology (Harvey and others, 2002). Most of the previous hydrogeologic and ground-water flow simulation studies of the surficial aquifer system have not utilized a hydrostratigraphic framework, in which stratigraphic or sequence stratigraphic units, such as those proposed in Cunningham and others (2001), are delineated in this stratigraphically complex aquifer system. A thick zone of secondary permeability mapped by Swayze and Miller (1984) was not subdivided and was identified as only being within the Anastasia Formation of Pleistocene age. Miller (1987) published 11 geologic sections of the surficial aquifer system, but did not delineate any named stratigraphic units in these sections. This limited interpretation has resulted, in part, from the complex facies changes within rocks and sediments of the surficial aquifer

  19. Water-quality data for the ground-water network in eastern Broward County, Florida, 1983-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, B.G.; Cannon, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    During 1983-84, groundwater from 63 wells located at 31 sites throughout eastern Broward County, Florida, was sampled and analyzed to determine baseline water quality conditions. The physical and chemical parameters analyzed included field measurements (pH and temperature), physical characteristics (color, turbidity, and specific conductance), major inorganic ions, nutrients, (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon), selected metals, and total phenolic compounds. Groundwater samples were collected at the end of the dry season (April) and during the wet season (July and September). These data are tabulated, by well, in this report. (USGS)

  20. Use of MODIS Terra Imagery to Estimate Surface Water Quality Standards, Using Lake Thonotosassa, Florida, as a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Max J.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Rickman, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Thonotosassa is a highly eutrophied lake located in an area with rapidly growing population in the Tampa Bay watershed, Florida. The Florida Administrative Code has designated its use for "recreation, propagation and maintenance of a healthy, well-balanced population of fish and wildlife." Although this lake has been the subject of efforts to improve water quality since 1970, overall water quality has remained below the acceptable state standards, and has a high concentration of nutrients. This condition is of great concern to public health since it has favored episodic blooms of Cyanobacteria. Some Cyanobacterial species release toxins that can reach humans through drinking water, fish consumption, and direct contact with contaminated water. The lake has been historically popular for fishing and water sports, and its overflow water drains into the Hillsborough River, the main supply of municipal water for the City of Tampa, this explains why it has being constantly monitored in situ for water quality by the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County (EPC). Advances in remote sensing technology, however, open the possibility of facilitating similar types of monitoring in this and similar lakes, further contributing to the implementation of surveillance systems that would benefit not just public health, but also tourism and ecosystems. Although traditional application of this technology to water quality has been focused on much larger coastal water bodies like bays and estuaries, this study evaluates the feasibility of its application on a 46.6 km2 freshwater lake. Using surface reflectance products from Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra, this study evaluates associations between remotely sensed data and in situ data from the EPC. The parameters analyzed are the surface water quality standards used by the State of Florida and general indicators of trophic status.

  1. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of drainage wells in Florida; an interim report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, Joel O.; Fayard, Larry D.

    1982-01-01

    Drainage wells are used to inject surface waters directly into an aquifer, or shallow ground waters directly into a deeper aquifer, primarily by gravity. Such wells in Florida may be grouped into two broad types: (1) Surface-water injection wells, and (2) interaquifer connector wells. Surface-water injection wells are commonly used to supplement drainage for urban areas in karst terranes of central and north Florida. Data are available for 25 wells in the Ocala, Live Oak, and Orlando areas that allow comparison of the quality of water samples from these Floridan aquifer drainage wells with allowable contaminant levels. Comparison indicates that maximum contaminant levels for turbidity, color, and iron, manganese, and lead concentrations are equaled or exceeded in some drainage-well samples, and relatively high counts for coliform bacteria are present in most wells. Interaquifer connector wells are used in the phosphate mining areas of Polk and Hillsborough Counties, to drain mining operations and recharge the Floridan aquifer. Water-quality data available from 13 connector wells indicate that samples from most of these wells exceed standards values for iron concentration and turbidity. One well yielded a highly mineralized water, and samples from 6 of the other 12 wells exceed standards values for gross alpha concentrations. (USGS)

  2. A preliminary investigation of risks for adverse outcomes of relationship seeking on social network sites (SNS): a descriptive study of women over 50 seeking relationships on MySpace in Hillsborough County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Vandeweerd, Carla; Corvin, Jaime; Coulter, Martha; Perkins, Elizabeth; Telford, Robin; Yalcin, Ali; Myers, Jaime; Yegidis, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to younger populations, little attention has been paid to the increase in seniors using Internet-based venues to find relationships and the potential risk for adverse outcomes this poses. This study examined data collected via an online survey from 45 ethnically diverse women aged 50+ "seeking relationships" on MySpace. The majority of women reported a relationship with someone they met online (85%). They also reported experiencing adverse events including financial exploitation (40%), threats (55%), and physical harm (38%) by someone they met online at levels greater than traditional relationship seeking in the general population. Directions for future research are explored.

  3. Water withdrawals, use, discharge, and trends in Florida, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1995, the total amount of water withdrawn in Florida was nearly 18,200 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), of which 60 percent was saline and 40 percent was freshwater. Ground water accounted for 60 percent of freshwater withdrawals and surface water accounted for the remaining 40 percent. Ninety-three percent of the 14.15 million people in Florida relied on ground water for their drinking water needs in 1995. Almost all (99.9 percent) saline water withdrawals were from surface water. Public supply accounted for 43 percent of ground water withdrawn in 1995, followed by agricultural self-supplied (35 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (including mining) (10 percent), domestic self-supplied (7 percent), recreational irrigation (4.5 percent), and power generation (0.5 percent). Agricultural self-supplied accounted for 60 percent of fresh surface water withdrawn in 1995, followed by power generation (21 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (9 percent), public supply (7 percent), and recreational irrigation (3 percent). Almost all of saline water withdrawn was used for power generation. The largest amount of freshwater was withdrawn in Palm Beach County and the largest amount of saline water was withdrawn in Hillsborough County. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh ground water occurred in Dade, Broward, Polk, Orange, and Palm Beach Counties. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh surface water occurred in Palm Beach, Hendry, and St. Lucie Counties. The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest amount of freshwater withdrawn (nearly 50 percent). About 57 percent of the total ground water withdrawn was from the Floridan aquifer system; 20 percent was from the Biscayne aquifer. Most of the surface water used in Florida was from managed and maintained canal systems or large water bodies. Major sources of fresh surface water include the Caloosahatchee River, Deer Point Lake, Hillsborough River

  4. Water withdrawals, use, discharge, and trends in Florida, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, the estimated amount of water withdrawn in Florida was 20,148 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), of which 59 percent was saline and 41 percent was fresh. Ground water accounted for 62 percent of freshwater withdrawals and surface water accounted for the remaining 38 percent. Ninety-two percent of the 15.98 million people in Florida relied on ground water for their drinking water needs in 2000. Almost all of the saline water withdrawals (99.9 percent) were from surface water. Public supply accounted for 43 percent of ground water withdrawn in 2000, followed by agricultural self-supplied (39 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (including mining) (8.5 percent), recreational irrigation (4.5 percent), domestic self-supplied (4 percent), and power generation (1 percent). Agricultural self-supplied accounted for 62 percent of fresh surface water withdrawn in 2000, followed by power generation (20 percent), public supply (8 percent), recreational irrigation (6 percent), and commercial-industrial self-supplied (4 percent). Almost all of saline water withdrawn was used for power generation. The largest amount of freshwater was withdrawn in Palm Beach County and the largest amount of saline water was withdrawn in Hillsborough County. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh ground water occurred in Miami-Dade, Polk, Orange, Palm Beach, Broward, and Collier Counties. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh surface water occurred in Palm Beach, Hendry, and Escambia Counties. The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest amount of freshwater withdrawn (49 percent). About 62 percent of the total ground water withdrawn was from the Floridan aquifer system; 17 percent was from the Biscayne aquifer. Most of the surface water used in Florida was from managed and maintained canal systems or large water bodies. Major sources of fresh surface water include the Caloosahatchee River, Deer Point Lake, Hillsborough

  5. First Case of Bioterrorism-Related Inhalational Anthrax in the United States, Palm Beach County, Florida, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Steven T.; Rosenstein, Nancy E.; Malecki, Jean M.; Shepard, Colin W.; Raghunathan, Pratima L.; Pillai, Segaran P.; Popovic, Tanja; Quinn, Conrad P.; Meyer, Richard F.; Zaki, Sharif R.; Kumar, Savita; Bruce, Sherrie M.; Sejvar, James J.; Dull, Peter M.; Tierney, Bruce C.; Jones, Joshua D.; Perkins, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    On October 4, 2001, we confirmed the first bioterrorism-related anthrax case identified in the United States in a resident of Palm Beach County, Florida. Epidemiologic investigation indicated that exposure occurred at the workplace through intentionally contaminated mail. One additional case of inhalational anthrax was identified from the index patient’s workplace. Among 1,076 nasal cultures performed to assess exposure, Bacillus anthracis was isolated from a co-worker later confirmed as being infected, as well as from an asymptomatic mail-handler in the same workplace. Environmental cultures for B. anthracis showed contamination at the workplace and six county postal facilities. Environmental and nasal swab cultures were useful epidemiologic tools that helped direct the investigation towards the infection source and transmission vehicle. We identified 1,114 persons at risk and offered antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:12396910

  6. First case of bioterrorism-related inhalational anthrax in the United States, Palm Beach County, Florida, 2001.

    PubMed

    Traeger, Marc S; Wiersma, Steven T; Rosenstein, Nancy E; Malecki, Jean M; Shepard, Colin W; Raghunathan, Pratima L; Pillai, Segaran P; Popovic, Tanja; Quinn, Conrad P; Meyer, Richard F; Zaki, Sharif R; Kumar, Savita; Bruce, Sherrie M; Sejvar, James J; Dull, Peter M; Tierney, Bruce C; Jones, Joshua D; Perkins, Bradley A

    2002-10-01

    On October 4, 2001, we confirmed the first bioterrorism-related anthrax case identified in the United States in a resident of Palm Beach County, Florida. Epidemiologic investigation indicated that exposure occurred at the workplace through intentionally contaminated mail. One additional case of inhalational anthrax was identified from the index patient's workplace. Among 1,076 nasal cultures performed to assess exposure, Bacillus anthracis was isolated from a co-worker later confirmed as being infected, as well as from an asymptomatic mail-handler in the same workplace. Environmental cultures for B. anthracis showed contamination at the workplace and six county postal facilities. Environmental and nasal swab cultures were useful epidemiologic tools that helped direct the investigation towards the infection source and transmission vehicle. We identified 1,114 persons at risk and offered antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  7. Evaluation of methodology for delineation of protection zones around public-supply wells in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchioli, John; Hunn, J.D.; Aucott, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Public-supply wells in the west-central Florida area of Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Hillsborough, and Pinellas Counties derive their supply solely from the Floridan aquifer system. In much of this area, the Floridan is at or near land surface and vulnerable to contamination. Recognizing this potential threat to the aquifer, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) recently promulgated regulations providing for the delineation of protection zones around public-supply wells that tap vulnerable aquifers, such as the Floridan in west-central Florida. This report evaluates the methodology for delineation of protection zones for public supply wells in west-central Florida in accordance with the methods detailed in the FDER regulations. Protection zones were delineated for public supply wells or well fields that are permitted an average daily withdrawal of 100,000 gal or more from the Floridan aquifer system where it is unconfined or leaky confined. Leaky confined, as used in FDER regulations describe conditions such that the time for a particle of water to travel vertically from the water table to the top of the Floridan is 5 years or less. Protection zones were delineated by using a radial volumetric-displacement model that simulated 5 years of permitted-rate withdrawal. Where zones overlapped, such as for well fields, composite protection zones in shapes that varied according to the configuration of well arrays were delineated on maps. (USGS)

  8. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  9. Florida-focused climate change lesson demonstrations from the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of Florida-focused climate change activities will be featured as part of the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops. In a combined effort from Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and University of South Florida's Coalition for Science Literacy (CSL), and supported by NASA's NICE initiative, the ASK Florida professional development workshops are a series of workshops designed to enhance and support climate change information and related pedagogical skills for middle school science teachers from Title-I schools in Florida. These workshops took place during a two-year period from 2011 to 2013 and consisted of two cohorts in Hillsborough and Volusia counties in Florida. Featured activities include lab-style exercises demonstrating topics such as storm surge and coastal geometry, sea level rise from thermal expansion, and the greenhouse effect. These types of labs are modified so that they allow more independent, inquiry thinking as they require teachers to design their own experiment in order to test a hypothesis. Lecture based activities are used to cover a broad range of topics including hurricanes, climate modeling, and sink holes. The more innovative activities are group activities that utilize roll-playing, technology and resources, and group discussion. For example, 'Climate Gallery Walk' is an activity that features group discussions on each of the climate literacy principles established by the United States Global Change Research Program. By observing discussions between individuals and groups, this activity helps the facilitators gather information on their previous knowledge and identify possible misconceptions that will be addressed within the workshops. Furthermore, 'Fact or Misconception' presents the challenge of identifying whether a given statement is fact or misconception based on the material covered throughout the workshops. It serves as a way to

  10. Profile of the Older Population Living in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Juan C.; Wilcox, Meredith L.; Jean, Naomie; Acuña, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Florida has the greatest proportion (19%) of older population (65 years or older) in the United States. The age distribution of its residents, in conjunction with a major shift in the leading cause of death within all age groups from acute illnesses to chronic disease, creates unprecedented health care challenges for the state. The objective of this study is to profile the older population living in Miami-Dade County (MDC) using 3 population-based, household-based surveys conducted over the past 5 years. This study examined cross-sectional data (demographics, health outcomes, risk factors, health assess, and utilization) collected from probability-sampled, household-based surveys conducted in 3 areas of MDC: north Miami-Dade, Little Haiti, and South Miami. The questionnaire was administered face-to-face by trained interviewers in English, Spanish, French, or Creole. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member aged 65 years or older (n = 935). One consenting adult answered the questionnaire on behalf of household members. The mean age of the respondent (60% females) was 60 years. Overall, respondents were predominantly African-Americans, Hispanics, and blacks of Haitian origin. One-third of all households fell below the US poverty thresholds. One-quarter of all households had at least 1 member who was uninsured within the year before the survey. Twenty percent of households had at least 1 member with an acute myocardial infarction or stroke during the year before the survey. Bone density tests and blood stool tests were strikingly underutilized. The health outcomes most prevalent within household members were cardiovascular diseases followed by cancer, anxiety/depression, obesity, asthma, and bone fractures. Twenty percent of households reported having at least 1 current smoker. Overall, emergency rooms were the most commonly used places of care after doctor's offices. Findings of 3 household-based surveys show a predominantly

  11. Reconnaissance of water quality at four swine farms in Jackson County, Florida, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The quality of ground water on four typical swine farms in Jackson County, Florida, was studied by analyzing water samples from wastewater lagoons, monitoring wells, and supply wells. Water samples were collected quarterly for 1 year and analyzed for the following dissolved species: nitrate, nitrite, ammonium nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulfate, chloride, calcium, magnesium, fluoride, total ammonium plus organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, alkalinity, carbonate, and bicarbonate. Additionally, the following field constituents were determined in the water samples: temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, and fecal streptococcus and fecal coliform bacteria. Chemical changes in swine waste as it leaches and migrates through the saturated zone were examined by comparing median values and ranges of water- quality data from farm wastewater in lagoons, shallow pond, shallow monitoring wells, and deeper farm supply wells. The effects of hydrogeologic settings and swine farmland uses on shallow ground-water quality were examined by comparing the shallow ground-water-quality data set with the results of the chemical analyses of water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and to land uses adjacent to the monitoring wells. Substantial differences occur between the quality of diluted swine waste in the wastewater lagoons, and that of the water quality found in the shallow pond, and the ground water frm all but two of the monitoring wells of the four swine farms. The liquid from the wastewater lagoons and ground water from two wells adjacent to and down the regional gradient from a lagoon on one site, have relatively high values for the following properties and constituents: specific conductance, dissolved ammonia nitrogen, dissolved potassium, and dissolved chloride. Ground water from all other monitoring wells and farm supply wells and the surface water pond, have relatively much lower values for the same properties and constituents. To determine the relation

  12. Potential For Denitrification near Reclaimed Water Application Sites in Orange County, Florida, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Smith, Richard L.; Repert, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for denitrification was tested in water samples from four Upper Floridan aquifer wells near a reclaimed water application site, in west Orange County Florida, and two adjacent springs. Results of the study indicate that denitrifying bacteria are present in the groundwater and spring water samples, and that these bacteria can readily denitrify the waters when suitable geochemical conditions exist. The acetylene block technique was used to assess nitrous oxide in the samples that was produced by denitrification. The laboratory incubation experiment consisted of four different treatments to each of the six samples: (1) ambient water (no added nitrate or glucose), (2) ambient water amended with 1.4 milligrams per liter (mg/L) nitrate as nitrogen (N), (3) ambient water amended with 5.0 mg/L nitrate as N, and (4) ambient water amended with 5.0 mg/L nitrate as N and 10 mg/L glucose as C6H12O6. A companion set of incubations using treatment 2 tracked changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration with time. The rate of denitrification in treatment 2 ranged from 0.059 to 0.124 milligram per liter per day nitrogen [(mg/L)/d N] and in treatment 3 ranged from 0.071 to 0.226 (mg/L)/d N. At all of the sampling sites, treatment 4 yielded denitrification rates at least an order of magnitude greater than those measured for the other treatments; rates ranged from 2.3 to 4.4 (mg/L)/d N. The electron donor supply, dissolved organic carbon, in the groundwater and springwater is sufficient to remove at least 1.1-1.4 mg/L nitrate as N in 20 to 30 days, as indicated by nitrous oxide production rates under ambient conditions (treatment 1). The even higher nitrate removal observed with addition of supplemental carbon in treatment 4 suggests that carbon is a limiting nutrient in this reaction. Denitrifying activity might explain the low ambient nitrate concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer in this area.

  13. Rapid assessment of the needs and health status of older adults after Hurricane Charley--Charlotte, DeSoto, and Hardee Counties, Florida, August 27-31, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-09-17

    On August 13, 2004, Hurricane Charley, a Category 4 storm with sustained winds of 145 mph, made landfall at a Gulf of Mexico barrier island in Florida, resulting in an estimated 31 deaths statewide and extensive property damage in Charlotte, DeSoto, and Hardee counties. The Florida Department of Health (FLDOH) requested that CDC conduct a rapid needs assessment of older adults (i.e., aged >/=60 years) because this vulnerable age group constitutes a substantial proportion of the population in the most severely affected counties (Charlotte County [43% older adult residents of 141,627 total population], DeSoto County [24% of 32,209], and Hardee County [18% of 36,938]). This report summarizes the findings and recommendations from three rapid needs assessments in these Florida counties. Older adult residents experienced disruptions in both quality-of-life status and medical care for preexisting conditions (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and physical disabilities). On the basis of these findings, recommendations were provided to FLDOH for immediate use in deploying resources for response to Hurricane Charley and in planning responses to future disasters.

  14. A Comparison of the Perceptions of School Work Culture by Administrators and Faculty in the Public Charter and Non-Charter Elementary Schools of a Central Florida County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quin, Wayne Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated perceptions of school work culture of instructional staff members (administrators and faculty) in public charter and public non-charter elementary schools in a large urban metropolitan county of Central Florida by assessing differences in perceptions of administrators and faculty related to school work culture, perceptions…

  15. Position of the saltwater-freshwater interface in the upper part of the Floridan Aquifer, southwest Florida, 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causseaux, K.W.; Fretwell, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The position of the saltwater-freshwater transition zone in the Floridan aquifer along coastal southwest Florida is depicted by the 250 milligram per liter line of equal chloride concentration in the upper producing zone of the aquifer. The line was interpolated from chloride concentration data for wells open to the upper producing zone of the aquifer and plotted on a map having a scale of 1:250,000. The line generally lies inland within 5 miles of the coast in areas extending from latitude 29 degrees in Citrus County southward to southern Hillsborough County. In Manatee and Sarasota Counties, the line generally lies with 2 miles of the coast, except in southern Sarasota County where it extends eastward along the Charlotte-DeSoto County line. Knowledge about the position and movement of the 250 milligram per liter line is significant in the effective management of the ground-water resources of coastal areas. The present position of the line will be used as a basis for detecting future movement of the saltwater-freshwater interface. (USGS)

  16. Radium-226 accumulation in Florida freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, M.; Smoak, J.M.; Leeper, D.A.; Streubert, M.; Baker, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Selected lakes in Hillsborough County, Florida have been hydrologically augmented with groundwater to offset stage declines caused by excessive pumping of the Floridan Aquifer. Augmentation water can be relatively rich in 226Ra (>5 decays per minute [dpm] L-1). We measured 226Ra activities in shells and soft tissues of adult bivalve molluscs (Elliptio cf. buckleyi) from groundwater-augmented and nonaugmented lakes to assess bioaccumulation of 226Ra by mussels. Mussels from augmented lakes displayed higher 226Ra in both shells and tissues than did mussels from nonaugmented lakes. Within a sample, 226Ra activity in Elliptio tissues was higher than the value measured in shells. Highest activities were found in a composite mussel sample (n = 6) from an augmented lake; soft tissue activity was 619 ?? 33 dpm g-1 dry weight and shell activity was 147 ?? 7 dpm g-1 g dry weight. Large mussels displayed greater activities in soft tissues and shells than did small mussels. We transplanted animals from a nonaugmented lake into a groundwater-augmented water body. 226Ra activity in dry tissue rose from 32 ?? 1 to 196 ?? 2 dpm g-1 within 2 months. When 226Ra-rich mussels (232 ?? 2 dpm g-1) from the augmented lake were transferred to the nonaugmented lake, they showed no significant 226Ra loss over the 69-d experiment. Large Elliptio mussels concentrated 226Ra in their soft tissues to levels about 1,000 to 25,000 times concentrations in lake water. Pumping of groundwater in Florida for residential, agricultural, and industrial use contributes dissolved 226Ra to some surface water bodies, where it can be bioaccumulated by bivalve molluscs. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  17. Hydrogeology of a zone of secondary permeability in the surficial aquifer of eastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, L.J.; Miller, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The surficial aquifer is the primary source of freshwater for the heavily developed coastal area in eastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Well fields are generally located in a discontinuous zone of higher secondary permeability, the northernmost extension of the Biscayne aquifer in the surficial aquifer, that extends from the Juno Beach area south to Broward County and varies in width from about 4 to 15 miles. The zone was formed by varying dissolution of aquifer limestone materials during Pleistocene age changes in sea level, and ranges in depth from about sea level to 220 feet below sea level. Because of proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and saltwater estuaries, the aquifer is susceptible to saltwater intrusion. Ground water to the west of the zone of higher secondary permeability is of poor quality. The ground water is calcium bicarbonate dominant. Dissolved solids, calcium carbonate hardness, and chloride are greatest along the saltwater intruded coastline and in the western part of the study area where diluted residual seawater exists. Total organic carbon increases inland due to infiltration of rainwater through thicker layers of organic soils. Ground-water levels in the surficial aquifer in eastern Palm Beach County are strongly influenced by controlled levels in canals. In March 1981, after 12 months of below average rainfall, ground-water levels ranged from about 2 feet above sea level along the coast to nearly 21 feet above sea level 15 miles inland in the northwest section of the study area. (USGS)

  18. The historical record of metal enrichment in two Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.R.; Smith, R.G. ); Calder, F.D.; Schropp, S.J. ); Windom H.L. )

    1993-12-01

    Historical profiles of metal accumulation have been generated for the lower St. Johns River and Hillsborough Bay, Florida, in cores representing approximately 50 yr of sediment and metal accumulation. These profiles demonstrate that Cd, Pb, and Zn are enriched in these Florida estuarine sediments. Pb enrichment has decreased since the mid 1970s because of reduced use of leaded gasoline. In the St. Johns River, most metals exhibit a trend of increasing enrichment with time. Cd enrichment significantly decreased between 1970 and 1975 as a result of reduced discharges into the river and control of aquatic vegetation. In Hillsborough Bay, enrichment factors for most metals are relatively high and show little change downcore. Cr, Cu, and Ni border on enrichment and Pb, Cd, and Zn are enriched. The results of this study are consistent with other studies of surficial-sediment metal concentration in other Florida estuaries. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-09-18

    The irrigated acreage estimated for Jackson County in 2014 (31,608) is about 47 percent higher than the 2012 estimated acreage published by the USDA (21,508 acres). The estimates of irrigated acreage field verified during 2014 for Calhoun and Gadsden Counties are also higher than those published by the USDA for 2012 (86 percent and 71 percent, respectively). In Calhoun County the USDA reported 1,647 irrigated acres while the current study estimated 3,060 acres, and in Gadsden County the USDA reported 2,650 acres while the current study estimated 4,547 acres. For Houston County the USDA-reported value of 9,138 acres in 2012 was 13 percent below the 10,333 acres field verified in the current study. Differences between the USDA 2012 values and 2014 field verified estimates in these two datasets may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 2-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) irrigated acreage calculated for the current study may be estimated high because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the USDA for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  20. Saline-water intrusion related to well construction in Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, Durward Hoye; Missimer, T.M.; O'Donnell, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    Ground water is the principle source of water supply in Lee County, Florida where an estimated 30,000 wells have been drilled since 1990. These wells ranges in depth from about 10 to 1,240 feet and tap the water table aquifer or one or more of the artesian water-bearing units or zones in the Tamiami Formation, the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation, the lower part of the Hawthorn Formation and the Tampa Limestone and the Suwannee Limestone. Before 1968, nearly all wells were constructed with galvanized or black iron pipe. Many of these wells are sources of saline-water intrusion into freshwater-bearing zones. The water-bearing zones in the lower part of the Hawthorn Formation, Tampa Limestone, and Suwannee Limestone are artesian-they have higher water levels and usually contain water with a higher concentration of dissolved solids than do the aquifers occurring at shallower depths. The water from these deeper aquifers generally range in dissolved solids concentration from about 1,500 to 2,400 mg/L, and in chloride from about 500 to 1,00 mg/L. A maximum chloride concentration of 15,200 mg/L has been determined. Few of the 3,00 wells estimated to have been drilled to these zones contain sufficient casing to prevent upward flow into overlaying water-bearing zones. Because of water-level differentials, upward movement and lateral intrusion of saline water occurs principally into the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation where the chloride concentrations in water unaffected by saline-water intrusion ranges from about 80 to 150 mg/L. Where intrusion from deep artesian zones has occurred, the chloride concentration in water from the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation ranges from about 300 to more than 2,100 mg/L Surface discharges of the saline water from wells tapping the lower part of the Hawthorn Formation and the Suwannee Limestone also had affected the water-table aquifer which normally contains water with 10 to 50 mg/L of chloride. In one area, the chloride

  1. Methods to quantify seepage beneath Levee 30, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional, cross-sectional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model and a simple application of Darcy?s law were used to quantify ground-water flow (from a wetlands) beneath Levee 30 in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Geologic and geophysical data, vertical seepage data from the wetlands, canal discharge data, ground-water-level data, and surface-water-stage data collected during 1995 and 1996 were used as boundary conditions and calibration data for the ground-water flow model and as input for the analytical model. Vertical seepage data indicated that water from the wetlands infiltrated the subsurface, near Levee 30, at rates ranging from 0.033 to 0.266 foot per day when the gates at the control structures along Levee 30 canal were closed. During the same period, stage differences between the wetlands (Water Conservation Area 3B) and Levee 30 canal ranged from 0.11 to 1.27 feet. A layer of low-permeability limestone, located 7 to 10 feet below land surface, restricts vertical flow between the surface water in the wetlands and the ground water. Based on measured water-level data, ground-water flow appears to be generally horizontal, except in the direct vicinity of the canal. The increase in discharge rate along a 2-mile reach of the Levee 30 canal ranged from 9 to 30 cubic feet per second per mile and can be attributed primarily to ground-water inflow. Flow rates in Levee 30 canal were greatest when the gates at the control structures were open. The ground-water flow model data were compared with the measured ground-water heads and vertical seepage from the wetlands. Estimating the horizontal ground-water flow rate beneath Levee 30 was difficult owing to the uncertainty in the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the main flow zone of the Biscayne aquifer. Measurements of ground-water flows into Levee 30 canal, a substantial component of the water budget, were also uncertain, which lessened the ability to validate the model results. Because of vertical

  2. Discharge, water temperature, and water quality of Warm Mineral Springs, Sarasota County, Florida: A retrospective analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.

    2016-09-27

    Warm Mineral Springs, located in southern Sarasota County, Florida, is a warm, highly mineralized, inland spring. Since 1946, a bathing spa has been in operation at the spring, attracting vacationers and health enthusiasts. During the winter months, the warm water attracts manatees to the adjoining spring run and provides vital habitat for these mammals. Well-preserved late Pleistocene to early Holocene-age human and animal bones, artifacts, and plant remains have been found in and around the spring, and indicate the surrounding sinkhole formed more than 12,000 years ago. The spring is a multiuse resource of hydrologic importance, ecological and archeological significance, and economic value to the community.The pool of Warm Mineral Springs has a circular shape that reflects its origin as a sinkhole. The pool measures about 240 feet in diameter at the surface and has a maximum depth of about 205 feet. The sinkhole developed in the sand, clay, and dolostone of the Arcadia Formation of the Miocene-age to Oligocene-age Hawthorn Group. Underlying the Hawthorn Group are Oligocene-age to Eocene-age limestones and dolostones, including the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. Mineralized groundwater, under artesian pressure in the underlying aquifers, fills the remnant sink, and the overflow discharges into Warm Mineral Springs Creek, to Salt Creek, and subsequently into the Myakka River. Aquifers described in the vicinity of Warm Mineral Springs include the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system within the Hawthorn Group, and the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. The Hawthorn Group acts as an upper confining unit of the Upper Floridan aquifer.Groundwater flow paths are inferred from the configuration of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer for September 2010. Groundwater flow models indicate the downward flow of water into the Upper Floridan aquifer

  3. Stormwater-runoff data for a highway area, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardee, Jack; Miller, Robert A.; Mattraw, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    Rainfall, stormwater runoff, and water-quality data are summarized for a highway area near Pompano Beach, Florida. Loads for 21 water-quality constituents were computed for the runoff from 45 storm events between April 1975 and July 1977. The size of the basin is 58.3 acres and 36 percent impervious. Stormwater runoff from urban watersheds represent an unqualified but possibly major source of contaminants to the numerous canals in south Florida. The quantification of the contaminate load from different land-use areas will assist governmental agencies involved with pollution control in evaluating alternative drainage system designs. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Dye trace and bacteriological testing of sinkholes: Sulphur Springs, Tampa, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, R. E.

    1993-12-01

    This paper summarizes over four years of studies and testing of a sinkhole/spring system in north Tampa. Sulphur Springs Pool delivers an average of 95 million l/d to the Hillsborough River, which is tributary to Tampa Bay. In 1986, owing to increasingly erratic bacterial levels at the natural bathing area adjacent to Sulphur Springs, the Hillsborough County Health Department closed the pool for swimming. The City of Tampa, Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission, and the United States Geological Survey have gathered data in an attempt to better understand the system and possible sources of contamination. The Sulphur Springs Action League is a civic group in the area, which has an objective of reopening the pool for recreational purposes. Environmental Engineering Consultants, Inc. provided pro bono technical assistance and expertise in assisting the Action League with its goal. The Action League obtained a grant from SWFWMD to outfit underwater divers for sinkhole exploration as well as water quality and dye trace analysis. The main suspects for bacterial contamination of the pool were two significant sinkholes located 1950 and 2300 m north of the spring. A series of dye tests and water-quality tests were performed. It was estimated that the underground velocity of water was between 90 100 m/h. Using a dye trace, bacteria testing, and travel time estimating, a new source of contamination was found in a Department of Transportation (DOT) stormwater retention basin in which a sinkhole had opened up and was receiving stormwater. The two significant sinkholes received stormwater from commercial and residential areas, and this stormwater brings a large amount of bacteria into the sinkhole, which funnels into the underground system and induces a bacteria spike at Sulphur Springs pool that exceeds the bathing water standards. The City of Tampa has constructed an experimental initial flush capture basin

  5. Depth-dependent groundwater quality sampling at City of Tallahassee test well 32, Leon County, Florida, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, William S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    A test well was drilled by the City of Tallahassee to assess the suitability of the site for the installation of a new well for public water supply. The test well is in Leon County in north-central Florida. The U.S. Geological Survey delineated high-permeability zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer, using borehole-geophysical data collected from the open interval of the test well. A composite water sample was collected from the open interval during high-flow conditions, and three discrete water samples were collected from specified depth intervals within the test well during low-flow conditions. Water-quality, source tracer, and age-dating results indicate that the open interval of the test well produces water of consistently high quality throughout its length. The cavernous nature of the open interval makes it likely that the highly permeable zones are interconnected in the aquifer by secondary porosity features.

  6. Public health assessment for Solitron Microwave, Port Salerno, Martin County, Florida, Region 4, CERCLIS number FLD045459526. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-31

    Solitron Microwave, on Cove Road in Port Salerno, Martin County, Florida, covers approximately 20 acres. On-site surface water, sediment, soil and groundwater are contaminated with metals and organic chemicals. Off-site groundwater is contaminated with metals and organic chemicals. In this public health assessment, the authors evaluate the potential for illnesses to be caused by exposure to contaminated surface soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Off-site groundwater and on-site soil are completed exposure pathways. On-site groundwater is a potential exposure pathway. Surface water and sediment are not completed exposure pathways. Currently the site is a potential public health hazard because people could be exposed in the future to contaminated on-site groundwater.

  7. On the mineral characteristics and geochemistry of the Florida phosphate of Four Corners and Hardee County mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdady, Ashraf R.; Howari, Fares M.; Al-Wakeel, Mohamed I.

    2016-08-01

    The Florida phosphate deposits in Four Corners and Hardee County mines are composed mainly of phosphate minerals and quartz in addition to subordinate proportions of feldspars, dolomite, calcite, gypsum, kaolinite, attapulgite and montmorillonite. These phosphorites contain three structurally different types of mudclasts: massive mudclasts, mudclasts with concentric structure and mudclasts consisting of agglomerates of apatite microparticles. The latter are represented by particles resembling phosphatized fossil bacteria associated with microbial filaments, and hollow apatite particles having surfacial coatings and connected to microbial filaments. The Florida phosphate particles are reworked and vary in mineral composition, color and shape. They are composed of a mixture of well-crystalline species including carbonate fluorapatite (francolite), carbonate apatite and fluorapatite. The color variation of the phosphate particles is related to difference in mineral composition, extent of diagenetic effects and reworking. The light-colored mudclasts are characterized by the presence of carbonate apatite and aluminum hydroxide phosphate minerals, whereas the dark mudclasts are rich in iron aluminum hydroxide phosphate minerals. The Florida phosphorites are suggested to be formed partially by authigenetic precipitation, replacement of the sea floor carbonate and diatomite, and microbial processes. With respect to elemental geochemistry, the analyzed particles contain small percentages of sulfur and iron which are related to the occurrence of pyrite. Traces of silica and alumina are recorded which may be attributed to the diagenetic. Some of the tested particles are relatively rich in phosphorous, fluorine, calcium, and magnesium, while poor in silicon, potassium and sulfur. Whereas, the bioclasts (especially teeth) are relatively rich in calcium, phosphorous and fluorine while poor in silicon, aluminum, magnesium and potassium. Hence, the microchemical analyses revealed

  8. Determining the Extent and Characterizing Coral Reef Habitats of the Northern Latitudes of the Florida Reef Tract (Martin County)

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Brian K.; Gilliam, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has recently been implicated in poleward shifts of many tropical species including corals; thus attention focused on higher-latitude coral communities is warranted to investigate possible range expansions and ecosystem shifts due to global warming. As the northern extension of the Florida Reef Tract (FRT), the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world, southeast Florida (25–27° N latitude) is a prime region to study such effects. Most of the shallow-water FRT benthic habitats have been mapped, however minimal data and limited knowledge exist about the coral reef communities of its northernmost reaches off Martin County. First benthic habitat mapping was conducted using newly acquired high resolution LIDAR bathymetry and aerial photography where possible to map the spatial extent of coral reef habitats. Quantitative data were collected to characterize benthic cover and stony coral demographics and a comprehensive accuracy assessment was performed. The data were then analyzed in a habitat biogeography context to determine if a new coral reef ecosystem region designation was warranted. Of the 374 km2 seafloor mapped, 95.2% was Sand, 4.1% was Coral Reef and Colonized Pavement, and 0.7% was Other Delineations. Map accuracy assessment yielded an overall accuracy of 94.9% once adjusted for known map marginal proportions. Cluster analysis of cross-shelf habitat type and widths indicated that the benthic habitats were different than those further south and warranted designation of a new coral reef ecosystem region. Unlike the FRT further south, coral communities were dominated by cold-water tolerant species and LIDAR morphology indicated no evidence of historic reef growth during warmer climates. Present-day hydrographic conditions may be inhibiting poleward expansion of coral communities along Florida. This study provides new information on the benthic community composition of the northern FRT, serving as a baseline for future community shift and

  9. Determining the extent and characterizing coral reef habitats of the northern latitudes of the Florida Reef Tract (Martin County).

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian K; Gilliam, David S

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has recently been implicated in poleward shifts of many tropical species including corals; thus attention focused on higher-latitude coral communities is warranted to investigate possible range expansions and ecosystem shifts due to global warming. As the northern extension of the Florida Reef Tract (FRT), the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world, southeast Florida (25-27° N latitude) is a prime region to study such effects. Most of the shallow-water FRT benthic habitats have been mapped, however minimal data and limited knowledge exist about the coral reef communities of its northernmost reaches off Martin County. First benthic habitat mapping was conducted using newly acquired high resolution LIDAR bathymetry and aerial photography where possible to map the spatial extent of coral reef habitats. Quantitative data were collected to characterize benthic cover and stony coral demographics and a comprehensive accuracy assessment was performed. The data were then analyzed in a habitat biogeography context to determine if a new coral reef ecosystem region designation was warranted. Of the 374 km(2) seafloor mapped, 95.2% was Sand, 4.1% was Coral Reef and Colonized Pavement, and 0.7% was Other Delineations. Map accuracy assessment yielded an overall accuracy of 94.9% once adjusted for known map marginal proportions. Cluster analysis of cross-shelf habitat type and widths indicated that the benthic habitats were different than those further south and warranted designation of a new coral reef ecosystem region. Unlike the FRT further south, coral communities were dominated by cold-water tolerant species and LIDAR morphology indicated no evidence of historic reef growth during warmer climates. Present-day hydrographic conditions may be inhibiting poleward expansion of coral communities along Florida. This study provides new information on the benthic community composition of the northern FRT, serving as a baseline for future community shift and

  10. HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the Household Hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to: 1) Quantity the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County Florida’s (the County) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal s...

  11. 78 FR 29658 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Broward County, Florida, to a Nonappropriated Fund Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... facilities activity in each county; Transportation facilities and commuting patterns; and Similarities of the counties in: Overall population; Private employment in major industry categories; and Kinds and sizes of..., and the overall population, employment sizes, and kinds and sizes of private industrial...

  12. HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Beliefs among Haitian Adolescents in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelin, Louis Herns; McCoy, H. Virginia; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined HIV/AIDS knowledge and beliefs in Haitian adolescents in an HIV epicenter, Miami-Dade Florida. This study examined survey data from 300 Haitian adolescents, aged 13 through 18, from both low- and middle-income neighborhoods. A sub-sample of 80 adolescents was selected for in-depth interviews and continuous observations with…

  13. Analyzing Data and Asking Questions at Shell School, Sea County Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanover, Charles

    2015-01-01

    This case discusses early work to implement the Common Core State Standards at a fictitious school in Florida. The case is designed to support students' efforts to use school accountability data for inquiry and to conceptualize change in schools where previous leaders' efforts were not successful. Shell Elementary is an exurban school that serves…

  14. Energy Efficient Florida Educational Facilities. Improvements to a Portable Classroom in a Volusia County School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Danny S.

    The Florida Department of Education is monitoring the energy use of two adjacent portable classrooms to compare their energy efficiency in a hot and humid climate and determine if they can be made more energy efficient either by retrofit or when the portables were constructed. This report provides the background of this research and describes the…

  15. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

  16. Hydraulic conductivity and water quality of the shallow aquifer, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Subsurface geophysical logs were correlated with logs of drill cuttings to determine the permeability of selected zones of the shallow aquifer, Palm Beach County, Fla. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is estimated to range from 1 to 130 feet per day, based on lithology and physical properties. The yield of wells penetrating this aquifer ranges from 100 to more than 1,000 gallons per minute. Water samples were collected from different depths throughout the county and analyzed for chemical constituents. Stiff diagrams illustrate the changes in types of water by depth and area. Water of suitable quality is in the eastern parts of the county. In this area the aquifer is the thickest and most permeable. The concentration of chemical constituents in the water increase in a westerly direction. The water in the western parts of the county is unsuitable for most purposes. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Water quality in the Old Plantation Water Control District, Broward County, Florida; progress report, July 1976-June 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Gary M.; Hanson, Chris E.; Pitt, William A.J.

    1978-01-01

    Water quality in the Old Plantation Water Control District in Broward County, Florida has been affected by effluent from sewage-treatment plants, agriculture, and storm-water runoff. Effect of effluent from sewage-treatment plants on water quality was evident at 3 sites where concentrations of nutrients and bacteria in the Broward County canals exceeded State standards of 2,400 colonies per 100 milliliters for total coliform bacteria. At 2 of the 3 sites the fecal coliform/fecal streptococcus ratios indicated possible human contamination. The effect of agriculture on water quality was evident where relatively high levels of chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides had concentrated in the bottom sediments, of the canals. For example, DDD reached levels of 330 micrograms per kilogram at one site. The effects of storm-water runoff on water quality were detected during the wet season when concentrations of several trace elements increased. For example, zinc averaged 30 micrograms per milliliter in the wet season compared with 20 micrograms per milliliter during the dry season. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Stormwater-runoff data for a commercial area, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robert A.; Mattraw, H.C.; Hardee, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Rainfall, stormwater discharge, and water-quality data for rainfall and runoff are summarized for a commercial area in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Loads for 20 water-quality constituents were computed for runoff from 31 storms between May 1975 and June 1977. The basin of 20.4 acres contains a shopping center with adjacent parking, and is 97.9 percent impervious. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer System, and Origin of High Salinity Groundwater, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, Florida, have focused mostly on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal areas. These studies have not placed the hydrogeology in a framework in which stratigraphic units in this complex aquifer system are defined and correlated between wells. Interest in the surficial aquifer system has increased because of population growth, westward expansion of urbanized areas, and increased utilization of surface-water resources in the central and western areas of the county. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to delineate the hydrogeologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, based on a lithostratigraphic framework, and to evaluate hydraulic properties and characteristics of units and permeable zones within this framework. A lithostratigraphic framework was delineated by correlating markers between all wells with data available based primarily on borehole natural gamma-ray geophysical log signatures and secondarily, lithologic characteristics. These correlation markers approximately correspond to important lithostratigraphic unit boundaries. Using the markers as guides to their boundaries, the surficial aquifer system was divided into three main permeable zones or subaquifers, which are designated, from shallowest to deepest, zones 1, 2, and 3. Zone 1 is above the Tamiami Formation in the Anastasia and Fort Thompson Formations. Zone 2 primarily is in the upper part or Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation, and zone 3 is in the Ochopee Limestone Member of the Tamiami Formation or its correlative equivalent. Differences in the lithologic character exist between these three zones, and these differences commonly include differences in the nature of the pore space. Zone 1 attains its greatest thickness (50 feet or more

  20. Hydrology of the Wolf Branch sinkhole basin, Lake County, east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A 4-year study of the hydrology of the Wolf Branch sinkhole basin in Lake County, Florida, was conducted from 1991-95 by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide information about the hydrologic characteristics of the drainage basin in the vicinity of Wolf Sink. Wolf Branch drains a 4.94 square mile area and directly recharges the Upper Floridan aquifer through Wolf Sink. Because of the direct connection of the sinkhole with the aquifer, a contaminant spill in the basin could pose a threat to the aquifer. The Wolf Branch drainage basin varies in hydrologic characteristics from its headwaters to its terminus at Wolf Sink. Ground- water seepage provides baseflow to the stream north of Wolf Branch Road, but the stream south of State Road 46 is intermittent and the stream can remain dry for months. A single culvert under a railroad crossing conducts flow from wetlands just south of State Road 46 to a well-defined channel which leads to Wolf Sink. The basin morphology is characterized by karst terrain, with many closed depressions which can provide intermittent surface-water storage. Wetlands in the lower third of the basin (south of State Road 46) also provide surface water storage. The presence of numerous water-control structures (impoundments, canals, and culverts), and the surface-water storage capacity throughout the basin affects the flow characteristics of Wolf Branch. Streamflow records for two stations (one above and one below major wetlands in the basin) indicate the flow about State Road 46 is characterized by rapid runoff and continuous baseflow, whereas below State Road 46, peak discharges are much lower but of longer duration than at the upstream station. Rainfall, discharge, ground-water level, and surface-water level data were collected at selected sites in the basin. Hydrologic conditions during the study ranged from long dry periods when there was no inflow to Wolf Sink, to very wet periods, as when nearly 7 inches of rain fell in a 2-day period in

  1. Lithology and base of the surficial aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1987-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is a major source of freshwater in Palm Beach County. In 1982, public supply withdrawals from the aquifer system totaled 33,543 million gallons, 77.5% of total public supply withdrawals. To evaluate the aquifer system and its geologic framework, a cooperative study with Palm Beach County was begun in 1982 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County is composed primarily of sand, sandstone, shell, silt, calcareous clay (marl), and limestone deposited during the Pleistocene and Pliocene epochs. In the western two-thirds of Palm Beach County, sediments in the aquifer system are poorly consolidated sand, shell, and sandy limestone. Owing to interspersed calcareous clays and silt and very poorly sorted materials, permeabilities in this zone of the aquifer system are relatively low. Two other zones of the aquifer system are found in the eastern one-third of the county where the sediments are appreciably more permeable than in the west due to better sorting and less silt and clay content. The location of more detailed lithologic logs for wells in these sections, along with data from nearby wells, allowed enhanced interpretation and depiction of the lithology which had previously been generalized. The most permeable zone of the aquifer system in this area is characterized by highly developed secondary porosity where infiltrating rainwater and solution by groundwater have removed calcitic-cementing materials from the sediments to produce interconnected cavities. Increased permeability in the aquifer system is generally coincident with the eastern boundary of the overlying organic soils and Lake Flirt Marl. Lithologic logs of wells in Palm Beach County indicate that sediments forming the aquifer system were deposited directly on the erosional surface of the Hawthorn Formation in some areas. In other locations in the county, lithologic logs indicate that the base of the aquifer system was formed by fluvial

  2. A hydrologic description of Keystone Lake near Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The terrain around Keystone Lake, a 388-acre lake in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, near the Cosme well field, is dotted with sinks that promote leakage from the surficial aquifer to the underlying Floridan aquifer. The lake, an integral part of the Brooker Creek channel, receives overland runoff from cypress swamps, pastures, citrus groves, and lakefront residential areas. The lake, a composite of many coalescing sinkholes, is generally 14 to 16 ft deep and has been dredged in places to 23 ft deep. Since 1960, rainfall in the area shows a cumulative negative departure of 86 in. from the long-term average. The mean annual lake stage in 1973 was the lowest on record. Concurrently, municipal pumpage in the Cosme well field from the Floridan aquifer peaked in 1961 and again in 1973, and in 1972 the potentiometric surface was the lowest since 1960. Comparisons of the hydrographs of lake stage and the potentiometric surface in the Floridan aquifer with rainfall graphs shows that both correspond closely to seasonal rainfall, resulting in the trend of decreasing seasonal maximum levels in the lake and the aquifer. Keystone Lake water quality is adequate for recreation and propagation of wildlife. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Abundance, distribution and use of power plant effluents by manatees (Trichechus manatus) in Brevard county, Florida. Final report, Jan 1978-Feb 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shane, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Brevard County, on Florida's east coast, contains one of the largest concentrations of manatees remaining in Florida. This population was studied from January 1978 through February 1980 using aerial surveys, and boat and land observations. As many as 250 manatees were counted in the county in the spring of 1979. During the warm months most manatees were observed in the Banana River, but during the winter most manatees (up to 100) were found in the warm effluent zones of two power plants on the Indian River. Declining air and water temperatures were significantly correlated with increases in the number of manatees in the power plant effluents. Manatees rely heavily upon these power plants as winter refuges, and plant shut-downs could prove disastrous for these animals.

  4. Saltwater intrusion in the Floridan aquifer, coastal Citrus and Hernando Counties, Florida, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, L.R.; Ryder, Paul D.

    1977-01-01

    The coastal parts of Citrus and Hernando Counties, Fla., are undergoing extensive urban development along U.S. Highway 19. The Floridan aquifer, a thick sequence of limestone and dolomite , is the principal source of water supply for the coastal parts of these two counties. The construction of canals that penetrate the Floridan aquifer, deficient rainfall during 1964-75, and pumping of ground water, have caused saltwater to intrude the aquifer. A map shows the inland extend of that intrusion as of 1975. The report is based on field data collected in 1964, 1973, and 1975. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Quality of Ground Water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, 1996-1998, with Emphasis on Contaminants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    lens-like; the entire sequence of units (table 1) is not present in any one place. The aquifer extends beneath Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic Ocean...U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2004-1438 Quality of Ground Water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade...Quality of Ground Water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, 1996-1998, With Emphasis on Contaminants

  6. Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15

    PubMed Central

    Lednicky, John A.; Iovine, Nicole M.; Brew, Joe; Loeb, Julia C.; Sugimoto, Jonathan D.; Rand, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A(H3N2) strains isolated during 2014–15 in Alachua County, Florida, USA, belonged to hemagglutinin gene clade 3C.2a. High rates of influenza-like illness and confirmed influenza cases in children were associated with a decrease in estimated vaccine effectiveness. Illnesses were milder than in 2013–14; severe cases were concentrated in elderly patients with underlying diseases. PMID:26692074

  7. ASK Florida; a climate change education professional development program for middle school teachers in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    A series of professional development workshops covering the fundamentals of climate change have been developed and facilitated for two groups of middle school science teachers in three Florida counties. The NASA-supported joint venture between Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and the University of South Florida's (USF's) Coalition for Science Literacy, ASK Florida, focuses on expanding and deepening teachers' content knowledge of a wide range of climate change topics, connecting local and regional changes to the global picture, and supporting classroom implementation and effective teaching practices. Education experts from USF, climate scientists from COAPS, and Hillsborough county teachers and science coaches coordinated and developed the workshop content, which is based on Florida's Next Generation Sunshine State Standards in science, science curriculum guides for 6th grade, and teacher interest. Several scientists have facilitated activities during the workshop, including professors in meteorology and climatology, research scientists in the field, a NOAA program manager, the state climatologists for Florida, and others. Having these climate scientists present during the workshop provides teachers an opportunity to interact directly with the scientists and gain insight into the climatology field. Additionally, we host an open-forum discussion panel during which teachers can ask the experts about any topics of interest. Activities are designed to enhance the scientific skill level of the teachers. Introductory activities reinforce teachers' abilities to distinguish facts from opinions and to evaluate sources. Other activities provide hands-on experience using actual scientific data from NASA and other agencies. For example, teachers analyze precipitation data to create distributions of Florida rainfall, examine sea level trends at various locations, identify Atlantic hurricane frequencies during the phases of ENSO

  8. HOUSING FOR FLORIDA'S MIGRANTS, A SURVEY OF MIGRATORY FARM LABOR HOUSING IN DADE COUNTY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MIRENGOFF, WILLIAM; SHOSTACK, ALBERT

    AT THE PEAK OF THE 1955-56 WINTER SEASON, 1,300 FAMILIES AND 5,600 SINGLE MIGRANT WORKERS WERE LIVING IN DADE COUNTY'S URBAN AREAS AND 71 LABOR CAMPS. MOST LIVED IN OVERCROWDED QUARTERS, BUT THE UNITS WERE SOUNDLY CONSTRUCTED. WATER AND SEWAGE WERE ADEQUATE, BUT THERE WERE MANY STRUCTURAL DEFICIENCIES, INCLUDING LACK OF SCREENS AND LACK OF…

  9. Lithologic logs and geophysical logs from test drilling in Palm Beach County, Florida, since 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, Leo J.; McGovern, Michael C.; Fischer, John N.

    1980-01-01

    Test-hole data that may be used to determine the hydrogeology of the zone of high permeability in Palm Beach County, Fla., are presented. Lithologic logs from 46 test wells and geophysical logs from 40 test wells are contained in this report. (USGS)

  10. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 82-056-1186, Monroe County Incinerator, Key Largo, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.; Hickey, J.L.S.

    1982-09-01

    On November 24, 1981, NIOSH received a request concerned with possible biohazards from the handling of hospital waste (human body parts, blood-contaminated bedding and wearing apparel, syringes, and operating room waste) at the incinerator. Interviews with several incinerator operators and general laborers did not reveal any incident of human body parts being seen or spilled from bags. Blood had been observed leaking from bags onto truckbeds and the incinerator floor. The State Epidemiologist was contacted and found to be aware of the concern for worker exposure to infectious waste as it was being handled by personnel outside hospitals and health care units. The 1982 Florida Legislature adopted a bill providing regulation of infectious waste disposal. The act requires that each hospital and ambulatory surgical center properly identify, segregate, and separate infectious from solid waste, and that any transporter of infectious waste be notified of the existence and location of such waste. No immediate biohazard at the incinerator was identified during the survey; however, worker exposure to infectious wastes due to breakage of the bags because of mishandling is possible. There was no indication of unburned infectious wastes in the grate ash. The bill enacted by the 1982 Florida Legislature should be strictly observed by persons delivering wastes, and incinerator managers should reject any waste not properly bagged and marked.

  11. Health assessment for Broward County Landfill (Aka Davie Landfill), Davie, Broward County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD980602288. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Broward Count Landfill (aka Davie Landfill, South Broward Landfill, and Broward County Solid Waste Disposal Facility), which began operations in 1964, is located 10 miles southwest of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The site consists of a 48-acre solid waste landfill, a 68-acre sanitary landfill and a 4-acre sludge lagoon. The solid waste landfill was used to dispose of the municipal solid waste being incinerated at the on-site incinerator. Ammonia, chlorides, sulfate, nitrates, and iron were found in the surface water (borrow pits) on-site. Sludge from the lagoon was found to contain cyanide. Soils on-site have been contaminated with a variety of compounds related to previous landfill activities. The groundwater on-site and downgradient of the site shows elevated levels of sulfate, chloride, lead, and ammonia. Benzene, vinyl chloride, and some unidentified compounds have been detected in monitoring wells and private wells to the south of the landfill. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via on-site ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact exposures to contaminants present in soil, groundwater, surface water, sediments, and air and off-site ingestion, inhalation, and direct contact exposures to contaminants present in groundwater.

  12. Simulated changes in ground-water levels resulting from proposed phosphate mining, west-central Florida; preliminary results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, William Edward

    1977-01-01

    A digital model of two-dimensional ground-water flow was used to simulate projected changes in the Floridan aquifer potentiometric surface in 1985 and 2000, resulting from proposed ground-water developments by the phosphate mining industry in west-central Florida. The .model was calibrated under steady-state conditions to simulate the September 1975 potentiometric surface. Under one development plan, existing phosphate mines in Polk County would continue to withdraw ground water at 1975 rates, until phased out as the ore is depleted; no new mines would be introduced. Preliminary results indicate that under this plan, maximum simulated recovery of the potentiometric surface is 11.9 feet by 1985 and 36.5 feet by 2000. Under an alternative plan, all proposed mines in Polk, Hardee, DeSoto, Hillsborough and Manatee Counties would begin operations: in addition to the continuation and phasing out of existing mines. Preliminary results indicate that the potentiometric surface would generally recover in Polk County and decline elsewhere in the modeled area. Maximum simulated recovery is 4.5 feet by 1985 and 29.6 feet by 2000; maximum simulated drawdown is 15.1 feet by 1985 and feet by 2000. All results are preliminary and subject to revision as the investigation continues.

  13. Final Environmental Assessment: For Okaloosa County Wastewater Treatment Facility Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    oxygen levels and result in a detrimental condition known as eutrophication . Other potential impacts to surface waters include construction impacts...waste holding area (Law Engineering, 2001). The facility stored oil in 55-gallon waste oil drums. The waste oil drums were placed on concrete...County Water and Sewer in December 1999, which revealed no visual indication of oil spills on the ground surface at the previous CRD land area (Law

  14. Lithostratigraphy, geophysics, biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of the surficial aquifer system of eastern Collier County and northern Monroe County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, S.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Edwards, L.E.; Simmons, K.R.; Scott, T.M.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Reese, R.S.; Blair, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, ten cores were drilled in eastern Collier County and northern Monroe County, within the limits of the Big Cypress National Preserve. These cores represent a continuation of the study of seven cores in western Collier County begun in 1996 and reported in Weedman and others (1997) and Edwards and others (1998). This joint U.S. Geological Survey and Florida Geological Survey project is designed to acquire subsurface geologic and hydrologic data in southwest Florida to extend current ground-water models, thereby expanding the utility of these models for land and water management. In this report we describe the lithostratigraphy, geophysical logging, sedimentological analysis, dinocyst biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of these ten cores. The three geophysical logs (natural gamma-ray, induction conductivity, and neutron porosity) assumed to be related to formation lithology and water quality show that a number of clay-rich zones are present in all of the boreholes, and that pore-water conductivity increases with depth. The clay-rich zones are confirmed by visual examination of core material and sedimentological analysis. The relative transmissivity calculated at 10-foot-thick intervals shows that in six of the boreholes, high values are associated with the shallow aquifer in the 0-40 ft interval. Two of the boreholes (the most northerly and the most easterly) showed relatively higher values of transmissivity in permeable zones at or somewhat below 100 ft in depth. Core geology and logs indicate that the deeper aquifers are not more permeable than similar deeper zones in the other boreholes, but rather that the shallow aquifer appears to be less permeable in these two coreholes. The Arcadia (?) Formation was only penetrated in the deepest core where it is late Miocene in age. The Peace River Formation was penetrated in all but the two westernmost cores. It yields a late Miocene age, based on both dinocysts and strontium-isotope stratigraphy

  15. Analysis of water-surface profiles in Leon County and the city of Tallahassee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, M.A.; Orr, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Water surface profiles for the 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-yr recurrence interval floods for most of the streams that drain developing areas of Leon County and the city of Tallahassee are presented. The principal streams studied are in the Lake Munson, Lake Lafayette, and Lake Jackson basins Peak discharges were computed from regression equations based on information gained from 15 streamflow stations in the area. Standard step-backwater procedures were used to determine the water-surface elevations for the streams. The flood elevations were generally higher than those in the Flood Insurance Studies for Tallahassee (1976) and Leon County (1982). The primary reason for the higher profiles is that peak discharges used in this report are larger than those used previously, largely due to changes in land use. The flood profiles for Bradford Brook, North Branch Gum Creek, and West Branch Gum Creek generally match those in the Leon County Flood Insurance Studies. Channel improvements in some areas would lower the flood elevation in that area, but would probably increase flooding downstream. (Lantz-PTT)

  16. Occurrence of natural radium-226 radioactivity in ground water of Sarasota County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; Sutcliffe, Horace

    1985-01-01

    Water that contains radium-226 radioactivity in excess of the 5.0-picocurie-per-liter limit set in the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations was found in the majority of wells sampled throughout Sarasota County. Highest levels were found areally near the coast or near rivers and vertically in the Tamiami-upper Hawthorn aquifer where semiconsolidated phosphate pebbles occur. Analysis of data suggests that part of the radium-226 in ground water of Sarasota County is dissolved by alpha particle recoil. In slightly mineralized water, radium-226 concentrations are decreased by ion exchange or sorption. In more mineralized water, other ions compete with radium-226 for ion exchange or sorption sites. Dissolution of minerals containing radium-226 by mineralized water probably contributes a significant fraction of the dissolved radium-226. Two types of mineralized water were present in Sarasota County. One type is a marine-like water, presumably associated with saltwater encroachment in coastal areas; the other is a calcium magnesium strontium surfate bicarbonate type. In general, water that contains high radium-226 radioactivities also contains too much water hardness or dissolved solids to be used for public supply without treatment that would also reduce radium-226 radioactivities. (USGS)

  17. Hydrodynamic Characteristics and Salinity Patterns in Estero Bay, Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Gabaldon, Jessica N.

    2008-01-01

    Estero Bay is an estuary (about 12 miles long and 3 miles wide) on the southwestern Florida coast, with several inlets connecting the bay to the Gulf of Mexico and numerous freshwater tributaries. Continuous stage and salinity data were recorded at eight gaging stations in Estero Bay estuary from October 2001 to September 2005. Continuous water velocity data were recorded at six of these stations for the purpose of measuring discharge. In addition, turbidity data were recorded at four stations, suspended sediment concentration were measured at three stations, and wind measurements were taken at one station. Salinity surveys, within and around Estero Bay, were conducted 15 times from July 2002 to January 2004. The average daily discharge ranged from 35,000 to -34,000 ft3/s (cubic feet per second) at Big Carlos Pass, 10,800 to -11,200 ft3/s at Matanzas Pass, 2,200 to -2,900 ft3/s at Big Hickory Pass, 680 to -700 ft3/s at Mullock Creek, 330 to -370 ft3/s at Estero River, and 190 to -180 ft3/s at Imperial River. Flood tide is expressed as negative discharge and ebb flow as positive discharge. Reduced salinity at Matanzas Pass was negatively correlated (R2 = 0.48) to freshwater discharge from the Caloosahatchee River at Franklin Locks (S-79). Matanzas Pass is hydrologically linked to Hell Peckney Bay; therefore, water-quality problems associated with the Caloosahatchee River also affect Hell Peckney Bay. Rocky Bay was significantly less saline than Coconut Point and Matanzas Pass was significantly less saline than Ostego Bay, based on data from the salinity surveys. The quality-checked and edited continuous data and the salinity maps have been compiled and are stored on the U.S. Geological Survey South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) website (http://sofia.usgs.gov).

  18. Hydrogeology and chemical quality of water and bottom sediment at three stormwater detention ponds, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario; Hutchinson, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of three detention ponds in Pinellas County, Florida indicated little potential for chemical contamination of surficial-aquifer ground water; however, concentrations of contami- nants in some sediments are sufficient to indicate possible hazardous levels of bioconcentration in benthic organisms. The general direction of ground- water movement at three pond sites indicates that the ponds are ground-water discharge points. Shallow ground water tends to move laterally toward these ponds, which have surface outflow, instead of from the ponds into the aquifer. Surface-water and pond-sediment samples from a 1-year-old pond were collected and analyzed for inorganic constituents and organic compounds. The concentrations were either near or below analytical detection limits. Surface-water and pond-sediment samples from the other two ponds, 20- and 30-years old, respectively, also were analyzed for inorganic constituents and organic compounds. The water quality of these older ponds was not significantly different from that of the 1-year-old pond. However, bottom sediments in the 20- and 30-year-old ponds contained 16 and 23 organic compounds, respectively. None of the organic compounds were in sufficient concentrations to cause concern about their chronic effects on aquatic life. Concentrations of dichlordiphenyl-trichlorethane, dieldrin, and heptachlor were above the hazardous level with respect to bioconcentration in the food chain.

  19. Assessment of water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess ground-water and surface-water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District in northern Palm Beach County from 1989 to 1994. Contamination of the surficial aquifer system and availability of a potable water supply have become of increasing concern. The study consisted of sampling 11 ground-water wells and 14 surface- water sites for determination of major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics, trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and synthetic organic compounds. Sodium and chloride concentrations exceeded Florida drinking-water standards in ground water at two wells, dissolved- solids concentrations at five ground-water wells and one surface-water site, and color values at all 11 ground-water wells and all 14 surface-water sites. Other constituents also exhibited concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards. Cadmium and zinc concentrations exceeded the standards in ground water at one well, and lead concentrations exceeded the standard in ground water at five wells. Nitrogen and phosphorus specie concentrations did not exceed respective drinking-water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples. Several synthetic organic compounds were detected at or above 50 micrograms per liter in water samples collected from six ground-water wells and three surface-water sites.

  20. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Deep Creek and Brandy Branch crossings, Nassau County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of surveys conducted July 14-18, 1992, at the Deep Creek and the Brandy Branch crossings of a pipeline installed during May 1991 in Nassau County, Florida. Both floodplains supported bottomland hardwood forests. The pipeline at the Deep Creek crossing was installed by means of horizontal directional drilling after the ROW had been clear-cut, while the pipeline at the Brandy Branch crossing was installed by means of conventional open trenching. Neither site was seeded or fertilized. At the time of sampling, a dense vegetative community, made up primarily of native perennial herbaceous species, occupied the ROW within the Deep Creek floodplain. The Brandy Branch ROW was vegetated by a less dense stand of primarily native perennial herbaceous plants. Plant diversity was also lower at the Brandy Branch crossing than at the Deep Creek crossing. The results suggest that some of the differences in plant communities are related to the more hydric conditions at the Brandy Branch floodplain.

  1. Productivity of an unconfined aquifer as related to carbonate facies: the Coral Reef Aquifer of Collier County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Missimer, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    A 3-year investigation of the shallow, unconfined Coral Reef Aquifer of northern Collier County, Florida, has revealed the relationship of carbonate lithofacies to the transmissivity and specific yield of the aquifer. The geology of the aquifer was studied using cores, test wells, and both surface and borehole geophysics. Numerous aquifer performance tests were conducted to measure the hydraulic coefficients of the aquifer. The Coral Reef Aquifer consists of a surficial quartz sand mantel from 4 to 20 feet thick underlain by 24 to 70 feet of limestone. Four predominant lithofacies were found in the limestone: moldic arenaceous, molluscan packstone; corraline, moldic boundstone,; molluscan wackestone; and unconsolidated, agrillaceous wackestone. The base of the aquifer is formed by a low permeability, green dolosilt. Transmissivity values measured over a 12-square mile area ranged from 59,000 to 1,550,000 gpd/ft. The highest transmissivity values were associated with the occurrence of molluscan packstones. Estimated porosities in the molluscan packstone ranged up to 65% compared to 40% or less in the other lithofacies. The transmissivity of the aquifer was dependent primarily on the occurrence of the molluscan packstones and not greatly dependent on the overall aquifer thickness.

  2. Public health assessment for Plymouth Avenue Landfill, Deland, Volusia County, Florida, Region 4. Cerclis No. FLD984167569. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Plymouth Avenue Landfill is about 1.75 miles west of the City of DeLand in rural western Volusia County, Florida. From 1971 to 1988 it was a Class I landfill and received all types of nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste. From June 1978 to October 1980, the landfill reportedly received 4,500 gallons per week of process waste slurry from the Brunswick Corporation. The authors selected the following contaminants of concern: barium, chromium, 1,2-dichloroethene, iron, nitrate, sulfate, and vinyl chloride. Ingestion of ground water is a past completed human exposure pathway. Concentrations of the contaminants of concern found so far are unlikely to have caused illness in the nearby residents. Analysis of water samples has been inadequate, however, to assess the public health threat from ingestion of sulfate, giardia, or vinyl chloride. Based on the information currently available, the authors classify the public health hazard at this landfill as indeterminate. Groundwater sampling is needed to determine the extent of vinyl chloride contamination.

  3. Cryptosporidiosis outbreak in a Nassau County, Florida, return travel group from Ireland, May 24, 2006-June 4, 2006.

    PubMed

    Lazensky, Rebecca; Hammond, Roberta M; Van Zile, Kathleen; Geib, Kim

    2008-09-01

    The Nassau County Health Department (NCHD) in Florida investigated an outbreak of gastrointestinal (GI) illness in a returning choral group who toured Ireland from May 24 to June 4, 2006. The travel group, consisting predominantly of retirees, had performed at several churches and at a dinner theater in Ireland. The NCHD administered a telephone questionnaire to 40 of the 41 group members to examine possible water exposures; common meals; and food, travel, and clinical histories. The results of the questionnaire showed that 29 people met the case definition for the outbreak. Five stool samples from travel group members tested positive for Cryptosporidium parvum, a species that is animal in origin and often spread through an environmental contamination with animal feces. All five positive samples were subtyped 11aA16G1R1b, a strain that scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Parasitic Diseases detected twice in 2006 in other human specimens from Northern Ireland.

  4. 77 FR 58562 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    .... Additional information regarding the SRP process can be found online at www.fema.gov/pdf/media/factsheets/2010/srp_fs.pdf . The watersheds and/or communities affected are listed in the tables below. The....php/florida/hillsborough Unincorporated Areas of Hillsborough Hillsborough County Department...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    In this 18-home community, all homes are LEED Platinum and meet ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 requirements, HERS 23–53. Half way through the project, Habitat for Humanity heard about the DOE Challenge Home program and signed on, committing to build the next home, a three-bedroom, two-bath, 1,143 ft2 duplex, to Challenge Home criteria. The home is the first DOE Challenge Home in Manatee County, and was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the affordable builder category.

  6. Effects of septic tank effluent on ground-water quality, Dade County, Florida: an interim report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A.

    1974-01-01

    Except at one site, no fecal coliforms were found below the 10-foot depth. Total coliforms exceeded a count of one colony per ml at the 60- foot depth at two sites. At one site a fecal streptococci count of 53 colonies per ml was found at the 60-foot depth and at another a count of seven colonies was found at the 40-foot depth. The three types of bacteria occur in higher concentration in the northern areas of the county than in the south. Bacteria concentrations were also higher where the septic tanks were more concentrated. 

  7. Surface-water features in Osceola County and adjacent areas, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, G.H.; Frazee, James M.

    1979-01-01

    The western two-thirds of Osceola County, Fla., drains southward by way of the Kissimmee River and its tributaries; the eastern one-third drains eastward to the St. Johns River or to marshy areas that make up part of the headwaters of the St. Johns River. About 15 percent of the county is covered by several hundred lakes whose surface areas range in size from a few to several thousand acres. Much of the natural drainage has been altered by canalization or regulated by control structures. Under natural conditions streamflow is seasonal, usually high in September or October and low in May or June, in phase with the rainy season. Control structures are used to maintain lake levels within a relatively small range in stage, producing greater seasonal variations in river flow than before regulation. Dissolved-solids concentration of much of the surface water is less than 240 mg/l, in some, much less. The water typically is of calcium bicarbonate type. Color is fairly high, in water draining from swamps, where the pickup of humic acids is significant. (Kosco-USGS)

  8. Use of Surveillance Systems in Detection of a Ciguatera Fish Poisoning Outbreak - Orange County, Florida, 2014.

    PubMed

    Klekamp, Benjamin G; Bodager, Dean; Matthews, Sarah D

    2015-10-16

    What is already known on this topic? Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), caused by the ingestion of predatory reef-dwelling fish harboring ciguatoxins is one of the most commonly reported fish-associated marine intoxications. Ciguatoxin retains toxicity regardless of freezing or cooking. Prompt treatment can reduce debilitating neurologic symptoms that are associated with CFP.What is added by this report? Syndromic surveillance systems in Florida identified six adults with CFP following consumption of black grouper. Five patients sought medical attention; health care providers did not make a diagnosis of CFP or report the cases to public health authorities, and none of the patients received treatment. Close collaboration among several investigating agencies allowed traceback efforts to link black grouper consumed by all patients to a common international distributor.What are the implications for public health practice? Syndromic surveillance systems capable of detecting CFP are essential public health tools to identify outbreaks and enhance investigations. Medical and public health practitioners should be educated to inquire about recent fish consumption when evaluating patients with clinically compatible signs and symptoms to allow for prompt treatment, and report suspected CFP cases to public health authorities to facilitate source-food traceback efforts. Public education on avoidance of consumption of relatively large predatory reef fish species known to be from ciguatoxic-endemic areas might reduce the risk for CFP.

  9. Hydrology of the Lake Deaton and Lake Okahumpka area, Northeast Sumter County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simonds, Edward P.; German, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer in the Lake Deaton and Lake Okahumpka area is 50 to 130 feet below land surface. During the 16-year period 1963-78 lake evaporation exceeded rainfall by 0.4 inches. Drainage from Lake Deaton and its surrounding area goes into Chitty Chatty Creek and on the Hogeye Sink when the altitude of the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is low. During a higher altitude of the Floridan potentiometric surface, Hogeye Sink may discharge water; this water, along with the normal runoff, goes into Lake Okahumpka. Average lake fluctuation is 1.5 to 2.0 feet per year. Lake Deaton supports a large population of blue-green algae and Lake Okahumpka is choked with aquatic plants. The water quality of the two lakes differ, with Lake Deaton having a sodium chloride water and Lake Okahumpka having a calcium bicarbonate water. Analysis of water and bottom material samples showed that only cadmium and mercury exceeded the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation 's criteria for Class III waters; however, the amounts detected were at or slightly above the limits of the analytical method. (USGS)

  10. Racial/ethnic disparities in annual mammogram compliance among households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; Ward-Peterson, Melissa; Alzayed, Abdullah; Alghamdi, Mushref; Aldaham, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in the U.S. Although routine screening via mammogram has been shown to increase survival through early detection and treatment of breast cancer, only 3 out of 5 women age ≥40 are compliant with annual mammogram within the U.S. and the state of Florida. A breadth of literature exists on racial/ethnic disparities in compliance with mammogram; however, few such studies include data on individual Black subgroups, such as Haitians. This study assessed the association between race/ethnicity and annual mammogram compliance among randomly selected households residing in the largely Haitian community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County (MDC), Florida. Methods This study used cross-sectional, health data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within households residing in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012 (n = 951). Mammogram compliance was defined as completion of mammogram by all female household members within the 12 months prior to the survey. The association between mammogram compliance and race/ethnicity was assessed using binary logistic regression models. Potential confounders were identified as factors that were conservatively associated with both compliance and race/ethnicity (P ≤ 0.20). Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 female member age ≥40 (n = 697). Results Overall compliance with annual mammogram was 62%. Race/ethnicity was significantly associated with mammogram compliance (P = 0.030). Compliance was highest among non-Hispanic Black (NHB) households (75%), followed by Hispanic (62%), Haitian (59%), and non-Hispanic White (NHW) households (51%). After controlling for educational level, marital status, employment status, the presence of young children within the household, health insurance status, and regular doctor visits, a borderline significant

  11. Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus - Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida, June-August 2016.

    PubMed

    Likos, Anna; Griffin, Isabel; Bingham, Andrea M; Stanek, Danielle; Fischer, Marc; White, Stephen; Hamilton, Janet; Eisenstein, Leah; Atrubin, David; Mulay, Prakash; Scott, Blake; Jenkins, Patrick; Fernandez, Danielle; Rico, Edhelene; Gillis, Leah; Jean, Reynald; Cone, Marshall; Blackmore, Carina; McAllister, Janet; Vasquez, Chalmers; Rivera, Lillian; Philip, Celeste

    2016-09-30

    During the first 6 months of 2016, large outbreaks of Zika virus disease caused by local mosquito-borne transmission occurred in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories, but local mosquito-borne transmission was not identified in the continental United States (1,2). As of July 22, 2016, the Florida Department of Health had identified 321 Zika virus disease cases among Florida residents and visitors, all occurring in either travelers from other countries or territories with ongoing Zika virus transmission or sexual contacts of recent travelers.* During standard case investigation of persons with compatible illness and laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection (i.e., a specimen positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR], or positive Zika immunoglobulin M [IgM] with supporting dengue serology [negative for dengue IgM antibodies and positive for dengue IgG antibodies], or confirmation of Zika virus neutralizing antibodies by plaque reduction neutralization testing [PRNT]) (3), four persons were identified in Broward and Miami-Dade counties whose infections were attributed to likely local mosquito-borne transmission. Two of these persons worked within 120 meters (131 yards) of each other but had no other epidemiologic connections, suggesting the possibility of a local community-based outbreak. Further epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of the worksites and surrounding neighborhood identified a total of 29 persons with laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection and likely exposure during late June to early August, most within an approximate 6-block area. In response to limited impact on the population of Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors from initial ground-based mosquito control efforts, aerial ultralow volume spraying with the organophosphate insecticide naled was applied over a 10 square-mile area beginning in early August and alternated with aerial larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies

  12. Application of ground-penetrating radar methods in determining hydrogeologic conditions in a karst area, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is useful as a surface geophysical method for exploring geology and subsurface features in karst settings. Interpretation of GPR data was used to infer lithology and hydrogeologic conditions in west-central Florida. This study demonstrates how GPR methods can be used to investigate the hydrogeology of an area. GPR transmits radio- frequency electromagnetic waves into the ground and receives reflected energy waves from subsurface interfaces. Subsurface profiles showing sediment thickness, depth to water table and clay beds, karst development, buried objects, and lake-bottom structure were produced from GPR traverses obtained during December 1987 and March 1990 in Pinellas, Hillsborough, and Hardee Counties in west-central Florida. Performance of the GPR method is site specific, and data collected are principally affected by the sediment and pore fluids, conductances and dielectric constants. Effective exploration depths of the GPR surveys through predominately unsaturated and saturated sand and clay sediments at five study sites ranged from a few feet to greater than 50 feet below land surface. Exploration depths were limited when high conductivity clay was encountered, whereas greater exploration depths were possible in material composed of sand. Application of GPR is useful in profiling subsurface conditions, but proper interpretation depends upon the user's knowledge of the equipment and the local hydrogeological setting, as well as the ability to interpret the graphic profile.

  13. Saltwater intrusion in the shallow aquifer in Martin and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.B.; Land, L.F.; Rodis, H.G.

    1977-01-01

    Urban growth has been rapid in recent years in Palm Beach and Martin Counties, Fla. The withdrawal of large quantities of fresh ground water in the vicinity of the coast has reduced or locally reversed the natural seaward hydraulic gradient and, in places, allowed saltwater to advance landward in the aquifer, displacing freshwater. Maps show the position of the saltwater front in eight urban areas adjacent to the coast. The saltwater front, as shown on the profiles, is based on a chloride concentration of 250 mg/liter which is recommended as a limit for water that is considered potable. The chloride concentration of native freshwater almost always is less than 50 mg/liter in the coastal aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Distribution and migration of pesticide residues in mosquito control impoundments St. Lucie County, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, R. W.; Wang, T. C.; White, J. R.; David, J. R.; Hoffman, M. E.

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to: (1) document the distribution and migration of organochlorine pesticide residues within marsh substrates of 18 St. Lucie County mosquito control impoundments located along the Indian River Lagoon estuary, and (2) evaluate the impact of water management techniques on residue mobility. Our results indicate that detectible concentrations of organochlorine compounds, applied between the late 1940s and early 1950s, are present in 16 of the 18 St. Lucie County mosquito control impoundments. These compounds are primarily restricted to the surficial, organic-rich wetland sediment, which, based upon geotechnical analysis, was exposed to the atmosphere at a time when the impoundments were subjected to pesticide treatment. Contaminated sediments are present below the surficial, organic-rich layer, suggesting that some vertical migration of pesticides has occurred. It is unlikely that leaching associated with the downward percolation of impounded water was responsible for this migration as pesticide residues were never detected within the in situ pore waters. An alternative explanation is that biological processes (e.g., rooting, burrowing) facilitated the downward flux of organochlorine compounds into sediment horizons not subjected to direct treatment. Eighty-eight surface water samples obtained from two impoundments subjected to contrasting water management techniques were analyzed for pesticide content. None of the surficial water samples collected in association with these impoundments contained detectible concentrations of organochlorine compounds. These samples were unfiltered and contained as much as 25 mg/1 of particulate organic matter. This suggests that the currently preferred management technique (RIM), which is designed to maintain water quality, limit mosquito production, and provide for ecological continuity, does not hydraulically mobilize pesticide residues into the Indian River Lagoon estuary.

  15. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics of Kings Bay, Citrus County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammett, K.M.; Goodwin, C.R.; Sanders, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Kings Bay is an estuary on the gulf coast of peninsular Florida with a surface area of less than one square mile. It is a unique estuarine system with no significant inflowing rivers or streams. As much as 99 percent of the freshwater entering the bay originates from multiple spring vents at the bottom of the estuary. The circulation and flushing characteristics of Kings Bay were evaluated by applying SIMSYS2D, a two-dimensional numerical model. Field data were used to calibrate and verify the model. Lagrangian particle simulations were used to determine the circulation characteristics for three hydrologic conditions: low inflow, typical inflow, and low inflow with reduced friction from aquatic vegetation. Spring discharge transported the particles from Kings Bay through Crystal River and out of the model domain. Tidal effects added an oscillatory component to the particle paths. The mean particle residence time was 59 hours for low inflow with reduced friction; therefore, particle residence time is affected more by spring discharge than by bottom friction. Circulation patterns were virtually identical for the three simulated hydroloigc conditions. Simulated particles introduced in the southern part of Kings Bay traveled along the eastern side of Buzzard Island before entering Crystal River and existing the model domain. The flushing characteristics of Kings Bay for the three hydrodynamic conditions were determined by simulating the injection of conservative dye constituents. The average concentration of dye initially injected in Kings Bay decreased asymptotically because of spring discharge, and the tide caused some oscillation in the average dye concentration. Ninety-five percent of the injected dye exited Kings Bay and Crystal River with 94 hours for low inflow, 71 hours for typical inflow, and 94 hours for low inflow with reduced bottom friction. Simulation results indicate that all of the open waters of Kings Bay are flushed by the spring discharge. Reduced

  16. Hydrogeology and simulated effects of ground-water withdrawals for citrus irrigation, Hardee and De Soto counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogeology of Hardee and De Soto Counties in west-central Florida was evaluated, and a ground-water flow model was developed to simulate the effects of expected increases in ground-water withdrawals for citrus irrigation on the potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system and the Upper Floridan aquifer. In 1988, total citrus acreage in Hardee and De Soto Counties was 89,041 acres. By the year 2020, citrus acreage is projected to increase to 130,000 acres. Ground water is the major source of water supply in the study area, and 94 percent of the ground-water withdrawn in the area is used for irrigation purposes. The principal sources of ground water in the study area are the surficial aquifer, the intermediate aquifer system, and upper water-yielding units of the Floridan aquifer system, commonly referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer is a permeable hydrogeo1ogic unit contiguous with land surface that is comprised predominately of surficial quartz sand deposits that generally are less than 100 feet thick. The intermediate aquifer system is a somewhat less permeable hydrogeologic unit that lies between and retards the exchange of water between the overlying surficial aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. Thickness of the intermediate aquifer system ranges from about 200 to 500 feet and transmissivity ranges from 400 to 7,000 feet squared per day. The highly productive Upper Floridan aquifer consists of 1,200 to 1,400 feet of solution-riddled and fractured limestone and dolomite. Transmissivity values for this aquifer range from 71,000 to 850,000 feet squared per day. Wells open to the Upper Floridan aquifer. the major source of water in the area, can yield as much as 2,500 gallons of water per minute. The potential effects of projected increases in water withdrawals for citrus irrigation on groundwater heads were evaluated by the use of a quasi-three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model. The

  17. Vector control programs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador: successes and barriers to integrated vector management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and mosquito control programs (MCPs) diverge in settings and countries, and lead control specialists need to be aware of the most effective control strategies. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) strategies, once implemented in MCPs, aim to reduce cost and optimize protection of the populations against VBDs. This study presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis to compare IVM strategies used by MCPs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador. This research evaluates MCPs strategies to improve vector control activities. Methods Methods included descriptive findings of the MCP operations. Information was obtained from vector control specialists, directors, and residents through field trips, surveys, and questionnaires. Evaluations of the strategies and assets of the control programs where obtained through SWOT analysis and within an IVM approach. Results Organizationally, the Floridian MCP is a tax-based District able to make decisions independently from county government officials, with the oversight of an elected board of commissioners. The Guayas program is directed by the country government and assessed by non-governmental organizations like the World health Organization. Operationally, the Floridian MCP conducts entomological surveillance and the Ecuadorian MCP focuses on epidemiological monitoring of human disease cases. Strengths of both MCPs were their community participation and educational programs. Weaknesses for both MCPs included limitations in budgets and technical capabilities. Opportunities, for both MCPs, are additional funding and partnerships with private, non-governmental, and governmental organizations. Threats experienced by both MCPs included political constraints and changes in the social and ecological environment that affect mosquito densities and control efforts. IVM pillars for policy making were used to compare the information among the programs. Differences

  18. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Wexler, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer

  19. Hydrogeologic framework and salinity distribution of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns about water-level decline and seawater intrusion in the surficial Biscayne aquifer, currently the principal source of water supply to Broward County, prompted a study to refine the hydrogeologic framework of the underlying Floridan aquifer system to evaluate its potential as an alternative source of supply. This report presents cross sections that illustrate the stratigraphy and hydrogeology in eastern Broward County; maps of the upper surfaces and thicknesses of several geologic formations or units within the Floridan aquifer system; and maps of two of the potentially productive water-bearing zones within the system, the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Avon Park permeable zone. An analysis of data on rock depositional textures, associated pore networks, and flow zones in the Floridan aquifer system shows that groundwater moves through the system in two ways. These data support a conceptual, dual-porosity model of the system wherein groundwater moves either as concentrated flow in discrete, thin bedding-plane vugs or zones of vuggy megaporosity, or as diffuse flow through rocks with primarily interparticle and moldic-particle porosity. Because considerable exchange of groundwater may occur between the zones of vuggy and matrix-dominated porosity, understanding the distribution of that porosity and flow zone types is important to evaluating the suitability of the several units within the Floridan aquifer system for managing the water through practices such as aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). The salinity of the water in the Floridan aquifer system is highest in the central part of the study area, and lower toward the north and south. Although salinity generally increases with depth, in the western part of the study area a zone of relatively high saline water is perched above water of lower salinity in the underlying Avon Park permeable zone. Overall, the areas of highest salinity in the aquifer system coincide with those with the lowest estimated

  20. Three-dimensional steady-state simulation of flow in the sand-and-gravel aquifer, southern Escambia County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trapp, Henry; Geiger, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    The sand-and-gravel aquifer is the only freshwater aquifer in southern Escambia County, Florida and is the source of public water supply for the area, including the City of Pensacola. The aquifer was simulated by a two-layer, digital model to provide hydrologic information for water resource planning. The lower layer represents the main-producing zone; the upper layer represents all of the aquifer above the main-producing zone including an unconfined zone and discontinuous perched, confined , and confining zones. The model was designed for steady-state simulation and predicts the response of the aquifer (changes in water levels) to groundwater pumping where steady-state conditions have been reached. Input to the model includes matrices representing constant-head nodes, starting head, transmissivity of layer 1, leakance between layers 1 and 2, lateral hydraulic conductivity of layer 2, and altitude of the base layer 2. The sources of water to the model are from recharge by infiltrated precipitation (estimated from base runoff), inflow across boundaries, and induced recharge from river leakance in periods of prolonged groundwater pumping. Model output includes final head and drawdown for each layer and total values for discharge and recharge in the model area. The model was calibrated for 1972 pumping and tested by simulating pumpages during 1939-40, 1958, and 1977. Sensitivity analyses showed water levels in both layers were most sensitive to changes in the recharge matrix and least sensitive to river leakage. Suggestions for further development of the model include subdivision and expansion of the grid, assignment of storage coefficients for transient simulations, more intensive study of the stream-aquifer relations, and consideration of the effects of infiltration basins on recharge. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Determining discharge-coefficient ratings for selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillis, G.M.; Swain, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Discharges through 10 selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, are presently computed using the theoretical discharge-coefficient ratings developed from scale modeling, theoretical discharge coefficients, and some field calibrations whose accuracies for specific sites are unknown. To achieve more accurate discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures, field discharge measurements were taken with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler at the coastal control structures under a variety of flow conditions. These measurements were used to determine computed discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures under different flow regimes: submerged orifice flow, submerged weir flow, free orifice flow, and free weir flow. Theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged orifice and weir flows were determined at seven coastal control structures, and discharge ratings for free orifice and weir flows were determined at three coastal control structures. The difference between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings varied from structure to structure. The theoretical and computed dischargecoefficient ratings for submerged orifice flow were within 10 percent at four of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at two of the seven structures. The theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged weir flow were within 10 percent at three of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at four of the seven coastal control structures. The difference between theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for free orifice and free weir flows ranged from 5 to 32 percent. Some differences between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings could be better defined with more data collected over a greater distribution of measuring conditions.

  2. Bedrock geologic map of the Nashua South quadrangle, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, and Middlesex County, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Jahns, Richard H.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2013-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the 7.5-minute Nashua South quadrangle consists primarily of deformed Silurian metasedimentary rocks of the Berwick Formation. The metasedimentary rocks are intruded by a Late Silurian to Early Devonian diorite-gabbro suite, Devonian rocks of the Ayer Granodiorite, Devonian granitic rocks of the New Hampshire Plutonic Suite including pegmatite and the Chelmsford Granite, and Jurassic diabase dikes. The bedrock geology was mapped to study the tectonic history of the area and to provide a framework for ongoing hydrogeologic characterization of the fractured bedrock of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. This report presents mapping by G.J. Walsh and R.H. Jahns and zircon U-Pb geochronology by J.N. Aleinikoff. The complete report consists of a map, text pamphlet, and GIS database. The map and text pamphlet are only available as downloadable files (see frame at right). The GIS database is available for download in ESRITM shapefile and Google EarthTM formats, and includes contacts of bedrock geologic units, faults, outcrops, structural geologic information, photographs, and a three-dimensional model.

  3. Summary of hydrologic data collected during 1975 in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hull, John E.; Beaven, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    During the 1975 calendar year rainfall in Dade County, Fla., was 14.89 inches below the long-term average (57.17 in.). Ground-water levels ranged from 0.1 foot above to 1.1 feet below average. The highest and lowest ground-water levels for the year were both 1 foot below their long-term averages. In the Hialeah-Miami Springs area, ground-water levels in wells near the centers of the heaviest pumping ranged from 9.8 to 11.2 feet below mean sea level and in the Southwest well field area, ground-water levels near the centers of pumping ranged from 3.5 feet above to 3.4 feet below mean sea level. The combined average daily discharge from eight major streams and canals that flow into Biscayne Bay was 1,014 cubic feet per second (cfs), 124 cfs above the combined average daily flow for the 1974 water year. The combined average daily flow through the Tamiami Canal outlets was 568 cfs, 202 cfs below that of the 1974 water year. The position of the salt front in 1975 in the coastal part of the Biscayne aquifer was about the same as in 1974 except at Miami International Airport and Homestead Air Force Base where the salt front had encroached farther inland. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Summary of hydrologic data collected during 1977 in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hull, John E.

    1979-01-01

    During 1977 rainfall was 1.52 inches above the long-term average in Dade County, Fla. Ground-water levels ranged from 0.3 foot above to 0.1 foot below average. The highest and lowest ground-water levels for the year were 1 foot below and 1 foot above their long-term average. In the Hialeah-Miami Springs area , water levels in wells near the centers of the heaviest pumping ranged from 7.2 to 11.9 feet below mean sea level, 1929; and in the Southwest well-field area, ground-water levels near the centers of pumping ranged from 1.0 foot above to 1.5 feet below mean sea level. In 1977 the combined average daily discharge from nine major streams and canals that flow eastward into tidal waters was 1,712 cubic feet per second (cfs), 46 cfs above the combined average daily flow for 1976. The combined average daily flow through the Tamiami Canal outlets was 582 cfs, 201 cfs above that of 1976. The 1977 position of the salt front in the coastal part of the Biscayne aquifer was about the same as in 1976, except south of Homestead Air Force Base where the salt front had encroached farther inland. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Results of time-domain electromagnetic soundings in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Prinos, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were made in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties to aid in mapping the landward extent of saltwater in the Biscayne aquifer. A total of 79 soundings were collected in settings ranging from urban to undeveloped land, with some of the former posing problems of land access and interference from anthropogenic features. TEM soundings combined with monitoring-well data were used to determine if the saltwater front had moved since the last time it was mapped, to provide additional spatial coverage where existing monitoring wells were insufficient, and to help interpret a previously collected helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) survey flown in the southernmost portion of the study area. TEM soundings were interpreted as layered resistivity-depth models. Using information from well logs and water-quality data, the resistivity of the freshwater saturated Biscayne aquifer is expected to be above 30 ohm-meters, and the saltwater-saturated aquifer will have resistivities of less than 10 ohm-meters allowing determination of water quality from the TEM interpretations. TEM models from 29 soundings were compared to electromagnetic induction logs collected in nearby monitoring wells. In general, the agreement of these results was very good, giving confidence in the use of the TEM data for mapping saltwater encroachment.

  6. Hydrology of sand-and-gravel aquifer in central and southern Escambia County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trapp, Henry

    1975-01-01

    The sand-and-gravel aquifer is the only fresh-water aquifer in the Pensacola area. Problems related to development of the aquifer include maximum safe yield, local contamination, local salt-water intrusion, corrosiveness of the water, areas of high iron concentration, and increasing nitrate concentration. The city of Pensacola is seeking hydrologic information, including water-quality data, to plan for future expansion of the water-supply system. This report summarizes the third year's findings of a 6-year study of the sand-and-gravel aquifer. Although the thickness of the aquifer locally exceeds 1,000 feet (300 metres) most of the clean sand layers are no more than 450 feet (140 metres) below land surface. The highest head is at the north edge of the area; the head is drawn down below sea level in areas of heavy pumping. Ground water moves southward from the northern half of the county to be intercepted near Cantonment. Virtually all ground water discharged south of Cantonment derives from local precipitation. The report contains maps showing concentrations of carbon dioxide, nitrate, and iron in water from the aquifer, potentiometric maps, geohydrologic sections, and lithologic and radioactive logs of test holes.

  7. Ground-water resources of coastal Citrus, Hernando, and southwestern Levy counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fretwell, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ground water in the coastal parts of Citrus, Hernando, and Levy Counties is obtained almost entirely from the Floridan aquifer. The aquifer is unconfined near the coast and semiconfined in the ridge area. Transmissivity ranges from 20,000 feet squared per day in the ridge area to greater than 2,000,000 feet squared per day near major springs. Changes in the potentiometric surface of the aquifer are small between the wet and dry seasons. Water quality within the study area is generally very good except immediately adjacent to the coast where saltwater from the Gulf of Mexico poses a threat to freshwater supply. This threat can be compensated for by placing well fields a sufficient distance away from the zone of transition from saltwater to freshwater so as not to reduce or reverse the hydraulic gradient in that zone. Computer models are presently available to help predict the extent of influence of ground-water withdrawals in an area. These may be used as management tools in planning ground-water development of the area. (USGS)

  8. The surficial aquifer in east-central St Johns County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Eugene C.

    1981-01-01

    The surficial aquifer, a composite of confined and unconfined water-bearing zones overlying the Miocene Hawthorn Formation, is an important source of water in St. Johns County, Fla. The water from wells open to the surficial aquifer generally meets quality standards recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for public water supplies, except for concentrations of iron that for most wells are substantially greater than the recommended limit of 0.3 milligrams per liter. Data from 12 test wells drilled to the top of the Hawthorn formation, about 100 feet below land surface, indicate that the productive zones and confining beds in the surficial aquifer are discontinuous. Test well yields from individual zones range from less than 1 to 42 gallons per minute from depths between 20 and 100 feet below land surface. The most productive zones were generally found in the Tillman Ridge area, about 10 square miles in the west-central part of the area of investigation. Analysis of an aquifer test on a well in the Tillman Ridge area indicates a transmissivity of about 6,500 to 7,000 feet squared per day. The best local source of good quality water for development of a relatively large water supply is in the vicinity of Tillman Ridge. (USGS)

  9. Summary of hydrologic data for the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, James J.; Waller, Bradley G.

    1980-01-01

    The East Everglades area in south-central Dade County, Fla., occupies approximately 240 square miles. The area is flat and low lying with elevations ranging from sea level in the southeast part to 10 feet at Chekika Hammock with an average elevation of about 6 feet. Rainfall in the area averages 57.9 inches a year with about 80% of the total falling during the May to October wet season. There is some residential development and farming in the east-central part of the area where land elevations are slightly higher. Pressure by agricultural, commerical, and housing interests to develop the area is increasing. Historically, most of the area was flooded for extended periods of time. The construction of canals, levees, and controls has lowered the average water levels of the area. This has reduced the extent and decreased the time of flooding. Long-term hydrographs show graphically the effects that the water control works have had on the hydrologic system. The change in discharge into the north end of the East Everglades through the Tamiami Canal outlets, Levees 30 to 67A, due to construction is very pronounced. Maps showing the altitude of the water table for wet and dry periods indicate that Levee 67 Extended Canal greatly influences the water levels and shape of the water-table contours in the northwestern part of the East Everglades. (USGS)

  10. Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, R.S.; Memberg, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The virtually untapped Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a supplemental source of water for public use in the highly populated coastal area of Palm Beach County. A recent study was conducted to delineate the distribution of salinity in relation to the local hydrogeology and assess the potential processes that might control (or have affected) the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system in the study area consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer and ranges in age from Paleocene to Oligocene. Included at its top is part of a lowermost Hawthorn Group unit referred to as the basal Hawthorn unit. The thickness of this basal unit is variable, ranging from about 30 to 355 feet; areas where this unit is thick were paleotopographic lows during deposition of the unit. The uppermost permeable zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer occur in close association with an unconformity at the base of the Hawthorn Group; however, the highest of these zones can be up in the basal unit. A dolomite unit of Eocene age generally marks the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer, but the top of this dolomite unit has a considerable altitude range: from about 1,200 to 2,300 feet below sea level. Additionally, where the dolomite unit is thick, its top is high and the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system, as normally defined, probably is not present. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with salinity similar to that of seawater (saline-water zone) are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transition zone (typically 100 to 200 feet thick) in which salinity rapidly increases with depth. The transition zone was defined by using a salinity of 10,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) of dissolved-solids concentration (about 5,240 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its top and 35,000 mg/L of dissolved

  11. Chemical effects of highway runoff on the surficial aquifer, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howie, Barbara; Waller, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    In many areas of Broward County, swales are commonly designed to accept stormwater runoff from highways. Two sites adjacent to heavily traveled highways were studied to determine if stormwater percolating through unsaturated sand underlying the swales may affect the quality of water in the Biscayne aquifer. Concentrations of selected chemicals common in highway runoff were measured in swale stormwater, in the unsaturated-zone percolate, and in the surficial aquifer during 12 storms, May through November 1983. Analyses of the unsaturated lithologic material at the two sites and one control site were also made to indicate the extent of vertical attenuation of selected chemical constituents. Results of trace metal nutrient analyses indicated that there is no obvious water-quality effect on the surficial aquifer caused by highway runoff. In general, the data collected for dissolved trace metals indicated slight concentrations in stormwater samples with subsurface water samples usually indicating decreases in concentration below about 0.5 to 1 ft of unsaturated material. For most trace metals, the apparent decreases with depth were statistically significant based on nonparametric analysis of variance. Concentrations of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, however, were somewhat homogeneous and were not inferred to be significantly different with depth. Water hardness as calcium carbonate at both sites indicated a significant difference with depth because of calcium carbonate solution, but the effect of percolate hardness on the shallow groundwater was negligible because of regional mixing. The analyses of lithologic material at the two test sites indicated significant near-surface accumulation of some trace elements. For example, in the first foot below land surface, concentrations of iron, lead, and zinc were detected in the 1 to 7 mg/kg range, with concentrations decreasing sharply at lower depths. This near-surface accumulation was not indicated in the lithologic

  12. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade... HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.734 Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is...

  13. Building a Low-Cost, Low-Labor Library Web Site at Hillsborough Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullian, Jeremy; Ellison, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    When an institutional program review determined the Hillsborough Community College Libraries Web site was out-of-date, lacked resources, and was in desperate need of a makeover, the authors embarked upon a redesign project. The article describes the challenges and considerations that contributed to the authors' decision-making and design…

  14. Hydrology of the coastal springs ground-water basin and adjacent parts of Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Lari A.; Yobbi, Dann K.

    2001-01-01

    The coastal springs in Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus Counties, Florida consist of three first-order magnitude springs and numerous smaller springs, which are points of substantial ground-water discharge from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Spring flow is proportional to the water-level altitude in the aquifer and is affected primarily by the magnitude and timing of rainfall. Ground-water levels in 206 Upper Floridan aquifer wells, and surface-water stage, flow, and specific conductance of water from springs at 10 gaging stations were measured to define the hydrologic variability (temporally and spatially) in the Coastal Springs Ground-Water Basin and adjacent parts of Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus Counties. Rainfall at 46 stations and ground-water withdrawals for three counties, were used to calculate water budgets, to evaluate long-term changes in hydrologic conditions, and to evaluate relations among the hydrologic components. Predictive equations to estimate daily spring flow were developed for eight gaging stations using regression techniques. Regression techniques included ordinary least squares and multiple linear regression techniques. The predictive equations indicate that ground-water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer are directly related to spring flow. At tidally affected gaging stations, spring flow is inversely related to spring-pool altitude. The springs have similar seasonal flow patterns throughout the area. Water-budget analysis provided insight into the relative importance of the hydrologic components expected to influence spring flow. Four water budgets were constructed for small ground-water basins that form the Coastal Springs Ground-Water Basin. Rainfall averaged 55 inches per year and was the only source of inflow to the Basin. The pathways for outflow were evapotranspiration (34 inches per year), runoff by spring flow (8 inches per year), ground-water outflow from upward leakage (11 inches per year), and ground-water withdrawal (2 inches per year

  15. Hydrogeology and results of injection tests at waste-injection test sites in Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Potential benefits or hazards to freshwater resources could result from subsurface injection of treated wastewater. Recognizing this, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County and the city of St. Petersburg, undertook an evaluation of the hydrogeology and injection of wastewater at proposed test sites on the Pinellas peninsula. The injection sites are underlain by sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Lower Eocene carbonate rocks were penetrated to a maximum depth of 3,504 feet and were found to have relatively low water yields. The most permeable part of the investigated section was in rocks of middle Eocene age within the Floridan aquifer. At the injection sites, the Floridan aquifer was subdivided into four permeable zones and three semiconfining beds. The test injection zone is within the Avon Park Limestone, the most productive of the identified permeable zones, with a transmissivity of about 1,000,000 feet squared per day. Two semiconfining beds are above the injection zone in the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and have vertical hydraulic conductivities estimated to range from about 0.1 to 1 foot per day where these beds do not contain clay. Limited fresh ground-water supplies exist in the Floridan aquifer within the Pinellas peninsula. At all test sites, chloride concentration in the injection zone ranged from 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Injection tests ranging in duration from 3 to 91.1 days were run at three different sites. Pressure buildup occurred in permeable zones above and below the injection zone during these tests. Calculated pressure buildup in observation wells close to and at some distance from the test wells was typically less than 1 pound per square inch. Injection and formation water will probably move slowly through the semiconfining bed overlying the injection zone, and long-term injection tests will be needed to determine the effectiveness of these beds to retard flow. The

  16. Lithostratigraphy, petrography, biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of the surficial aquifer system of western Collier County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.; Weedman, S.D.; Simmons, R.; Scott, T.M.; Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Ishman, S.E.; Carlin, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, seven cores were recovered in western Collier County, southwestern Florida, to acquire subsurface geologic and hydrologic data to support ground-water modeling efforts. This report presents the lithostratigraphy, X-ray diffraction analyses, petrography, biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of these cores. The oldest unit encountered in the study cores is an unnamed formation that is late Miocene. At least four depositional sequences are present within this formation. Calculated age of the formation, based on strontium-isotope stratigraphy, ranges from 9.5 to 5.7 Ma (million years ago). An unconformity within this formation that represents a hiatus of at least 2 million years is indicated in the Old Pump Road core. In two cores, Collier-Seminole and Old Pump Road, the uppermost sediments of the unnamed formation are not dated by strontium isotopes, and, based on the fossils present, these sediments could be as young as Pliocene. In another core (Fakahatchee Strand-Ranger Station), the upper part of the unnamed formation is dated by mollusks as Pliocene. The Tamiami Formation overlies the unnamed formation throughout the study area and is represented by the Ochopee Limestone Member. The unit is Pliocene and probably includes the interval of time near the early/late Pliocene boundary. Strontium-isotope analysis indicates an early Pliocene age (calculated ages range from 5.1 to 3.5 Ma), but the margin of error includes the latest Miocene and the late Pliocene. The dinocyst assemblages in the Ochopee typically are not age-diagnostic, but, near the base of the unit in the Collier-Seminole, Jones Grade, and Fakahatchee Strand State Forest cores, they indicate an age of late Miocene or Pliocene. The molluscan assemblages indicate a Pliocene age for the Ochopee, and a distinctive assemblage of Carditimera arata and Chione cortinaria in several of the cores specifically indicates an age near the early/late Pliocene boundary. Undifferentiated sands

  17. Effects of dried wastewater-treatment sludge application on ground-water quality in South Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howie, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Four test fields in the south Dade agricultural area were studied to determine the effects of sludge application on ground-water quality. Two fields had been cultivated for 10 years or more, and two had not been farmed for at least 10 years. The fields were representative of the area's two soil types (Rockdale and Perrine marl) and two major crop types (row crops and groves). Before the application of sludge, wells upgradient of, within, and downgradient of each field were sampled for possible sludge contaminants at the end of wet and dry seasons. Municipal wastewater treatment sludge from the Dade County Water and Sewe Authority Department was then applied to the fields at varying application rates. The wells at each field were sampled over a 2-year period under different hydrologic conditions for possible sludge-related constituents (specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, nitrogen, phosphorus, total organic carbon, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, chloride, chromium, lead, mercury, nickel, and sodium). Comparisons were made between water quality in the vicinity of the test fields and Florida Department of Environmental Regulation primary and secondary drinking-water regulations, an between water quality upgradient of, beneath, and downgradient of the fields. Comparisons between presludge and postsludge water quality did not indicate any improvement because of retention of agrichemicals by the sludge nor did they indicate any deterioration because of leaching from the sludge. Comparisons of water quality upgradient of the fields to water quality beneath and downgradient of the fields also did not indicate any changes related to sludge. Florida Department of Environmental Regulation primary and secondary drinking-water regulations wer exceeded at the Rockdale maximum-application field by mercury (9.5 ug/L (micrograms per liter)), and the Perrine marl maximum-application field by manganese (60 ug/L) and lead (85 ug/L), and at the

  18. Evaluation of Water Quality for Two St. Johns River Tributaries Receiving Septic Tank Effluent, Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.

    2004-01-01

    Tributary streamflow to the St. Johns River in Duval County is thought to be affected by septic tank leachate from residential areas adjacent to these tributaries. Water managers and the city of Jacksonville have committed to infrastructure improvements as part of a management plan to address the impairment of tributary water quality. In order to provide data to evaluate the effects of future remedial activities in selected tributaries, major ion and nutrient concentrations, fecal coliform concentrations, detection of wastewater compounds, and tracking of bacterial sources were used to document septic tank influences on the water quality of selected tributaries. The tributaries Fishing Creek and South Big Fishweir Creek were selected because they drain subdivisions identified as high priority locations for septic tank phase-out projects: the Pernecia and Murray Hill B subdivisions, respectively. Population, housing (number of residences), and septic tank densities for the Murray Hill B subdivision are greater than those for the Pernecia subdivision. Water-quality samples collected in the study basins indicate influences from ground water and septic tanks. Estimated concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.33 to 2.86 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and ranged from less than laboratory reporting limit (0.02 mg/L) to 0.64 mg/L for total phosphorus. Major ion concentrations met the State of Florida Class III surface-water standards; total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ecoregion XII nutrient criteria for rivers and streams 49 and 96 percent of the time, respectively. Organic wastewater compounds detected at study sites were categorized as detergents, antioxidants and flame retardants, manufactured polycarbonate resins, industrial solvents, and mosquito repellent. The most commonly detected compound was para-nonylphenol, a breakdown product of detergent. Results of wastewater sampling give evidence that

  19. Evaluation of the use of reach transmissivity to quantify leakage beneath Levee 31N, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemeth, Mark S.; Wilcox, Walter M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ground- and surface-water model (MODBRANCH) was developed to estimate ground-water flow beneath Levee 31N in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and to simulate hydrologic conditions in the surrounding area. The study included compilation of data from monitoring stations, measurement of vertical seepage rates in wetlands, and analysis of the hydrogeologic properties of the ground-water aquifer within the study area. In addition, the MODBRANCH code was modified to calculate the exchange between surface-water channels and ground water using a relation based on the concept of reach transmissivity. The modified reach-transmissivity version of the MODBRANCH code was successfully tested on three simple problems with known analytical solutions. It was also tested and determined to function adequately on one field problem that had previously been solved using the unmodified version of the software. The modified version of MODBRANCH was judged to have performed satisfactorily, and it required about 60 percent as many iterations to reach a solution. Additionally, its input parameters are more physically-based and less dependent on model-grid spacing. A model of the Levee 31N area was developed and used with the original and modified versions of MODBRANCH, which produced similar output. The mean annual modeled ground-water heads differed by only 0.02 foot, and the mean annual canal discharge differed by less than 1.0 cubic foot per second. Seepage meters were used to quantify vertical seepage rates in the Everglades wetlands area west of Levee 31N. A comparison between results from the seepage meters and from the computer model indicated substantial differences that seemed to be a result of local variations in the hydraulic properties in the topmost part of the Biscayne aquifer. The transmissivity of the Biscayne aquifer was estimated to be 1,400,000 square feet per day in the study area. The computer model was employed to simulate seepage of ground water beneath Levee 31N

  20. Hydrogeology in the area of a freshwater lens in the Floridan aquifer system, northeast Seminole County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Rohrer, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Northeast Seminole County, Florida, contains an isolated recharge area of the Floridan aquifer system that forms a freshwater lens completely surrounded by saline water. The freshwater lens covers an area of about 22 sq mi surrounding the town of Geneva, and generally is enclosed by the 25 ft land surface altitude contour. Thickness of the lens is about 350 ft in the center of the recharge area. The geohydrologic units in descending order consist of the post-Miocene sand and shell of the surficial aquifer; Miocene clay, sand, clay, and shell that form a leaky confining bed; and permeable Eocene limestones of the Floridan aquifer system. The freshwater lens is the result of local rainfall flushing ancient seawater from the Floridan aquifer system. Sufficient quantities of water for domestic and small public supply systems are available from the Floridan aquifer system in the Geneva area. The limiting factor for water supply in the area is the chemical quality of the water. Chloride concentrations range from < 20 mg/L in the center of the recharge area to about 5,100 mg/L near the St. Johns River southeast of Geneva. Constituents analyzed included sulfate (range 1 to 800 mg/L), hardness (range 89 to 2,076 mg/L), and iron (range 34 to 6,600 mg/L). Because the freshwater lens results entirely from local recharge, the long-term sustained freshwater yield of the aquifer in the Geneva area depends on the local recharge rate. In 1982, recharge was about 13 inches (13.8 million gal/day). Average recharge for 1941 through 1970 was estimated to be about 11 inches (11.3 million gal/day). Freshwater that recharges the aquifer in the Geneva area is either pumped out or flows north and northeast to discharge near or in the St. Johns River. Average annual outflow from the lens is about 10 in/yr. No measurable change in the size or location of the freshwater lens has occurred since studies in the early 1950's. (Lantz-PTT)

  1. Evapotranspiration from a cypress and pine forest subjected to natural fires, Volusia County, Florida, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Daily values of evapotranspiration from a watershed in Volusia County, Florida, were estimated for a 2-year period (January 1998 through December 1999) by using an energy-budget variant of the eddy correlation method and a Priestley-Taylor model. The watershed consisted primarily of pine flatwood uplands interspersed within cypress wetlands. A drought-induced fire in spring 1998 burned about 40 percent of the watershed, most of which was subsequently logged. The model reproduced the 449 measured values of evapotranspiration reasonably well (r2=0.90) over a wide range of seasonal and surface-cover conditions. Annual evapotranspiration from the watershed was estimated to be 916 millimeters (36 inches) for 1998 and 1,070 millimeters (42 inches) for 1999. Evapotranspiration declined from near potential rates in the wet conditions of January 1998 to less than 50 percent of potential evapotranspiration after the fire and at the peak of the drought in June 1998. After the drought ended in early July 1998 and water levels returned to near land-surface, evapotranspiration increased sharply; however, the evapotranspiration rate was only about 60 percent of the potential rate in the burned areas, compared to about 90 percent of the potential rate in the unburned areas. This discrepancy can be explained as a result of fire damage to vegetation. Beginning in spring 1999, evapotranspiration from burned areas increased sharply relative to unburned areas, sometimes exceeding unburned evapotranspiration by almost 100 percent. Possible explanations for the dramatic increase in evapotranspiration from burned areas could include phenological changes associated with maturation or seasonality of plants that emerged after the fire or successional changes in composition of plant community within burned areas. Variations in daily evapotranspiration are primarily the result of variations in surface cover, net radiation, photosynthetically active radiation, air temperature, and water

  2. Bioinjection Performance Review for the Building 100 Area and 4.5 Acre Site at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site

    SciTech Connect

    Survochak, Scott; Daniel, Joe

    2016-05-01

    This document provides a summary of a review of the performance of bioinjection activities at the Building 100 Area and the 4.5 Acre Site at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site since 2010, determines how best to optimize future injection events, and identifies the approach for the bioinjection event in 2016 at (1) the 4.5 Acre Site and (2) the Essentra property at the Building 100 Area. Because this document describes the next bioinjection event at the 4.5 Acre Site, it also serves as an addendum to the Interim Remedial Action Plan for Emulsified Edible Oil Injection at the 4.5 Acre Site (DOE 2013). In addition, this document revises the injection layout and injection intervals for the Essentra property that were originally described in the Interim Corrective Measure Work Plan for Source and Plume Treatment at the Building 100 Area (DOE 2014), and is a de facto update of that document. Bioinjection consists of injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (DHM; formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface to enhance biodegradation of trichloroethene (TCE), dichloroethene (DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). VC is the only contaminant that exceeds its maximum contaminant level (10 micrograms per liter onsite and 1 microgram per liter onsite) on the 4.5 Acre Site and the Essentra property. Bioinjection was conducted at the 4.5 Acre Site in 2010 and 2013. Approximately 49,900 gallons of EVO and DHM were injected at 95 injection points in February 2010, and approximately 22,900 gallons of EVO and DHM were injected at 46 injection points in July 2013. The injection locations are shown on Figure 1. The goal of bioinjection at the 4.5 Acre Site is to decrease contaminant concentrations to maximum contaminant levels along the west and southwest property boundaries (to meet risk–based corrective action requirements) and to minimize the extent of the contaminant plume in the interior of the site. Bioinjection was

  3. Evapotranspiration (ET) at Blue Cypress marsh site, daily data, Indian River County, Florida, June 1, 1995 – October 20, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of daily evapotranspiration (ET) measurements/estimates for the time period June 1, 1995 to October 2014. These data are derived from (1) measurements of actual ET conducted at the USGS Blue Cypress marsh station (USGS station number 274143080424100) and (2) estimates of actual ET inferred from statistical regressions between the measurements of actual ET and potential ET. The station is located at a nearly flat wetlands site (27 degrees 41 minutes 43 seconds North / 080 degrees 42 minutes 41 seconds West) within the Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, Indian River County, Florida. The dominant plant cover at the study site is sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense), with secondary amounts of other wetland plant species. Sawgrass height generally varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters. The canopy can be temporarily removed through fire, followed by rapid re-growth. The soils at the site are peats. The water-table generally is above land surface but can be greater than a meter below land surface during droughts. Actual ET measurements derived using the eddy-covariance method are available for January 1, 2000 to September 1, 2005; and December 11, 2009 to October 20, 2014. The contribution of the present Data Release is dissemination of a dataset of actual ET estimates for a period prior to the first period of actual ET measurements (June 1, 1995 to December 31, 1999) and for the time interval between the two periods of actual ET measurement (September 2, 2005 to December 10, 2009). Estimates of actual ET during periods of missing actual ET measurements were obtained using regression-determined, monthly vegetation coefficient multipliers applied to potential ET data. The source of potential ET data was an existing Statewide database developed through an assimilation of satellite- and field-based meterological data. A seamless time series of measured and estimated actual ET for the period June 1, 1999 to December 10, 2014 is

  4. Potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system, west-central Florida, May, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mularoni, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The intermediate aquifer system underlies a 5000-sq-mi area including De Soto, Sarasota, Hardee, Manatee, and parts of Charlotte, Hillsborough, Highlands, and Polk Counties, Florida. It is overlain by the surf@cial aquifer system and underlain by the Floridan aquifer system. The potentiometric surface of the intermediate aquifer system was mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and represented on a map by contours that connect points of equal altitude. This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the spring dry season when ground- water withdrawals for agricultural use were high. The cumulative rainfall for the study area was 4.84 inches above normal for the period from June 1992 to May 1993. Hydrographs for selected wells indicated that the annual and seasonal fluctuations of the water levels were generally large (greater than 15 feet) in the central interior region where water demand for irrigation is high during the fall and spring. Seasonal fluctuations were smaller in the northern recharge area where water use is predominantly for public supply. Water levels measured in May 1993 for the composite intermediate aquifer potentiometric surface were lower than those measured in May or September 1992. A cone of depression exists in the potentiometric surface for the composite aquifer system at Warm Mineral Springs, which is a natural discharge point from this system.

  5. Hydrogeologic framework and geochemistry of the intermediate aquifer system in parts of Charlotte, De Soto, and Sarasota counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, A.E.; Sacks, L.A.; Yobbi, D.K.; Knochenmus, L.A.; Katz, B.G.

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework underlying the 600-square-mile study area in Charlotte, De Soto, and Sarasota Counties, Florida, consists of the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system, and the Upper Floridan aquifer. The hydrogeologic framework and the geochemical processes controlling ground-water composition were evaluated for the study area. Particular emphasis was given to the analysis of hydrogeologic and geochemical data for the intermediate aquifer system. Flow regimes are not well understood in the intermediate aquifer system; therefore, hydrogeologic and geochemical information were used to evaluate connections between permeable zones within the intermediate aquifer system and between overlying and underlying aquifer systems. Knowledge of these connections will ultimately help to protect ground-water quality in the intermediate aquifer system. The hydrogeology was interpreted from lithologic and geophysical logs, water levels, hydraulic properties, and water quality from six separate well sites. Water-quality samples were collected from wells located along six ground-water flow paths and finished at different depth intervals. The selection of flow paths was based on current potentiometric-surface maps. Ground-water samples were analyzed for major ions; field parameters (temperature, pH, specific conductance, and alkalinity); stable isotopes (deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon-13); and radioactive isotopes (tritium and carbon-14). The surficial aquifer system is the uppermost aquifer, is unconfined, relatively thin, and consists of unconsolidated sand, shell, and limestone. The intermediate aquifer system underlies the surficial aquifer system and is composed of clastic sediments interbedded with carbonate rocks. The intermediate aquifer system is divided into three permeable zones, the Tamiami/Peace River zone (PZ1), the Upper Arcadia zone (PZ2), and the Lower Arcadia zone (PZ3). The Tamiami/Peace River zone (PZ1) is the uppermost zone and is

  6. Hydrogeology and simulation of the effects of reclaimed-water application in west Orange and southeast Lake counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater reclamation and reuse has become increasingly popular as water agencies search for alternative water-supply and wastewater-disposal options. Several governmental agencies in central Florida currently use the land-based application of reclaimed water (wastewater that has been treated beyond secondary treatment) as a management alternative to surface-water disposal of wastewater. Water Conserv II, a water reuse project developed jointly by Orange County and the City of Orlando, began operation in December 1986. In 1995, the Water Conserv II facility distributed approximately 28 Mgal/d of reclaimed water for discharge to rapid-infiltration basins (RIBs) and for use as agricultural irrigation. The Reedy Creek Improvement District (RCID) began operation of RIBs in September 1990, and in 1995 these RIBs received approximately 6.7 Mgal/d of reclaimed water. Analyses of existing data and data collected during the course of this study were combined with ground-water flow modeling and particle-tracking analyses to develop a process-oriented evaluation of the regional effects of reclaimed water applied by Water Conserv II and the RCID RIBs on the hydrology of west Orange and southeast Lake Counties. The ground-water flow system beneath the study area is a multi-aquifer system that consists of a thick sequence of highly permeable carbonate rocks overlain by unconsolidated sediments. The hydrogeologic units are the unconfined surficial aquifer system, the intermediate confining unit, and the confined Floridan aquifer system, which consists of two major permeable zones, the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers, separated by the less permeable middle semiconfining unit. Flow in the surficial aquifer system is dominated regionally by diffuse downward leakage to the Floridan aquifer system and is affected locally by lateral flow systems produced by streams, lakes, and spatial variations in recharge. Ground water generally flows laterally through the Upper Floridan aquifer

  7. Methodology for estimating nutrient loads discharged from the east coast canals to Biscayne Bay, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, Arthur C.

    1999-01-01

    Biscayne Bay is an oligotrophic, subtropical estuary located along the southeastern coast of Florida that provides habitat for a variety of plant and animal life. Concern has arisen with regard to the ecological health of Biscayne Bay because of the presence of nutrient-laden discharges from the east coast canals that drain into the bay. This concern, as well as planned diversion of discharges for ecosystem restoration from the urban and agricultural corridors of Miami-Dade County to Everglades National Park, served as the impetus for a study conducted during the 1996 and 1997 water years to estimate nutrient loads discharged from the east coast canals into Biscayne Bay. Analytical results indicated that the highest concentration of any individual nutrient sampled for in the study was 4.38 mg/L (milligrams per liter) for nitrate at one site, and the lowest concentrations determined were below the detection limits for orthophosphate at six sites and nitrite at four sites. Median concentrations for all the sites were 0.75 mg/L for total organic nitrogen, 0.10 mg/L for ammonia, 0.02 mg/L for nitrite, 0.18 mg/L for nitrate, 0.20 mg/L for nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, 0.02 mg/L for total phosphorus, and 0.005 mg/L for orthophosphate. The maximum total phosphorus concentration of 0.31 mg/L was the only nutrient concentration to exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1986) water-quality criteria. High concentrations of total phosphorus usually reflect contamination as a result of human activities. Five sites exceeded the fresh-water quality standard of 0.5 mg/L for ammonia concentration as determined by the Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management. Median total organic nitrogen concentrations were higher in urban and forested/wetland areas than in agricultural areas; median concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, and nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen were higher in agricultural areas than in urban and forested/wetland areas; and ammonia, total

  8. Annotated bibliography of the geology and hydrology of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    References and abstracts from 149 hydrologic and geologic investigations concerning the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida have been compiled to prepare an annotated bibliography. The references are listed alphabetically by the author 's name. (USGS)

  9. Estimated effects of projected ground-water withdrawals on movement of the saltwater front in the Floridan aquifer, 1976-2000, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, William Edward

    1982-01-01

    Maps of observed 1976 and simulated 2000 potentiometric surfaces were used to estimate rates of saltwater encroachment and theoretical predevelopment equilibrium positions of the saltwater-freshwater interface in west-central Florida. The observed saltwater front, defined by the 19,000 milligrams-per-liter line of equal chloride concentration in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer, corresponds closely to a theoretical predevelopment equilibrium position of a saltwater-freshwater interface. The interface position was computed by the Ghyben-Herzberg method, using heads from a map of the predevelopment potentiometric surface. In maps of both the observed May 1976 and simulated May 2000 potentiometric surface, the saltwater front was within a large seasonal cone of depression in parts of Hillsborough, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties. Average landward flow rate of the front was computed to be 0.30 foot per day in May 1976 and 0.36 foot per day in May 2000. Seaward potentiometric-surface gradient under simulated October 2000 conditions averaged 8.8 x 10-5 foot per foot less than under observed September 1976 conditions. Regional observation wells are desirable for monitoring potentiometric-level changes in western Hardee County and eastern Manatee County and for monitoring water-quality changes along the saltwater front, on its landward side, from mid-Sarasota County northward to Hillsborough County. Net landward movement of the saltwater front in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer is probably occurring under existing conditions. Pumping during 1976-2000 would probably increase slightly the rate of movement. However, rates are so slow that on a regional basis saltwater encroachment under existing and projected conditions is not presently a threat to the existing freshwater resources. The maximum projected regional landward movement, under 'worst case' conditions, of the saltwater front between 1976 and 2000 is estimated to be about one-half mile. Significant local

  10. Migrant Programs in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    As the last of 3 directories, this lists services available to migrants in Florida. Migrant programs, Community Action Agencies, and labor camps in the state are identified by county. Information for each county includes total population, estimated migrant population, migrant labor demand, estimated migrant wages, crops, work periods, migrant…

  11. Born to Trouble: One Hundred Years of Huckleberry Finn. The Center for the Book Viewpoint Series No. 13. Lecture Presented at the Broward County Library (Fort Lauderdale, Florida, September 11, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Justin

    Presented at the Broward County Library (Florida) on September 11, 1984, to coincide with Banned Books Week and to mark the centennial of the "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," the address in this booklet reviews the reasons why this classic book has always been in trouble with the censors. Drawing upon the Pulitzer Prize winning…

  12. 1. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING FRONT EAST FACADE, FROM SOUTHEAST. Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING FRONT EAST FACADE, FROM SOUTHEAST. Photo supplied by the Florida Division of Archives, History and Records Management, Tallahasse, Florida. - Sulphur Springs Hotel, 8122 North Nebraska Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  13. Rotala rotundifolia (Lythraceae) new to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burks, K.C.; Hall, D.W.; Vandiver, V.V.; Jacono, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    Naturalized populations of the Asian amphibious species Rotala rotundifolia are documented for three peninsular Florida counties. Distinguishing characters and a comment on invasive potential are also provided.

  14. Monthly variability and possible sources of nitrate in ground water beneath mixed agricultural land use, Suwannee and Lafayette Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Brian G.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    In an area of mixed agricultural land use in Suwannee and Lafayette Counties of northern Florida, water samples were collected monthly from 14 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer during July 1998 through June 1999 to assess hydrologic and land-use factors affecting the variability in nitrate concentrations in ground water. Unusually high amounts of rainfall in September and October 1998 (43.5 centimeters total for both months) resulted in an increase in water levels in all wells in October 1998. This was followed by unusually low amounts of rainfall during November 1998 through May 1999, when rainfall was 40.7 centimeters below 30-year mean monthly values. The presence of karst features (sinkholes, springs, solution conduits) and the highly permeable sands that overlie the Upper Floridan aquifer provide for rapid movement of water containing elevated nitrate concentrations to the aquifer. Nitrate was the dominant form of nitrogen in ground water collected at all sites and nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.02 to 22 milligrams per liter (mg/L), as nitrogen. Water samples from most wells showed substantial monthly or seasonal fluctuations in nitrate concentrations. Generally, water samples from wells with nitrate concentrations higher than 10 mg/L showed the greatest amount of monthly fluctuation. For example, water samples from six of eight wells had monthly nitrate concentrations that varied by at least 5 mg/L during the study period. Water from most wells with lower nitrate concentrations (less than 6 mg/L) also showed large monthly fluctuations. For instance, nitrate concentrations in water from four sites showed monthly variations of more than 50 percent. Large fluctuations in nitrate concentrations likely result from seasonal agricultural practices (fertilizer application and animal waste spreading) at a particular site. For example, an increase in nitrate concentrations observed in water samples from seven sites in February or March 1999 most

  15. Analysis of tests of subsurface injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater in the lower Floridan aquifer, Okeechobee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Aponte, Vicente; Kotun, Kevin; Whitley, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A series of freshwater subsurface injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted at an injection-well site near Lake Okeechobee in Okeechobee County, Florida, to assess the recoverability of injected canal water from the Lower Floridan aquifer. At the study site, the Lower Floridan aquifer is characterized as having four local, relatively independent, high-permeability flow zones (389 to 398 meters, 419 to 424 meters, 456 to 462 meters, and 472 to 476 meters below sea level). Four subsurface injection, storage, and recovery cycles were performed at the Lake Okeechobee injection-well site in which volumes of water injected ranged from about 387,275 to 1,343,675 cubic meters for all the cycles, and volumes of water recovered ranged from about 106,200 to 484,400 cubic meters for cycles 1, 2, and 3. The recovery efficiency for successive cycles 2 and 3 increased from 22 to 36 percent and is expected to continue increasing with additional cycles. A comparison of chloride concentration breakthrough curves at the deep monitor well (located about 171 meters from the injection well) for cycles 1, 4, and test no. 4 (from a previous study) revealed unexpected finings. One significant result was that the concentration asymptote, expected to be reached at concentration levels equivalent or close to the injected water concentration, was instead reached at higher concentration levels. The injection to recovery rate ratio might affect the chloride concentration breakthrough curve at the deep monitor well, which could explain this unexpected behavior. Because there are four high-permeability zones, if the rate of injection is smaller than the rate of recovery (natural artesian flow), the head differential might not be transmitted through the entire open wellbore, and injected water would probably flow only through the upper high- permeability zones. Therefore, observed chloride concentration values at the deep monitor well would be higher than the concentration of the

  16. Simulation of the water-table altitude in the Biscayne Aquifer, southern Dade County, Florida, water years 1945-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital model of the flow system in the highly permeable surficial aquifer of southern Dade County, Florida, was constructed for the purposes of better understanding processes that influence the flow system and of supporting the construction of a subregional model of the transport of brackish water from a flowing artesian well. Problems that needed resolution in this endeavor included the development of methods to represent the influence of flowing surface water in seasonally inundated wetlands and the influence of a network of controlled canals developed in stages during the simulation time period (water years 1945-89). An additional problem was the general lack of natural aquifer boundaries near the boundaries of the study area. The model construction was based on a conceptual description of the Biscayne aquifer developed from the results of previous U.S. Geological Survey investigations. Modifications were made to an existing three- dimensional finite-difference simulator of ground- water flow to enable an upper layer of the grid to represent seasonally occurring overland sheetflow in a series of transient simulations of water levels from 1945 to 1989. A rewetting procedure was developed for the simulator that permitted resaturation of cells in this layer when the wet season recurred. An "equivalent hydraulic conductivity" coefficient was assigned to the overland flow layer that was analogous, subject to various approximations, to the use of the Manning equation. The surficial semiconfining peat and marl layers, levees, canals, and control structures were also represented as part of the model grid with the appropriate choices of hydraulic coefficient values. For most of the Biscayne aquifer grid cells, the value assigned to hydraulic conductivity for model calibration was 30,000 feet per day and the value assigned to porosity was 20 percent. Boundary conditions were specified near data sites having long-term records of surface-water stages or water

  17. Hydraulic characteristics and nutrient transport and transformation beneath a rapid infiltration basin, Reedy Creek Improvement District, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Bradner, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Reedy Creek Improvement District disposes of about 7.5 million gallons per day (1992) of reclaimed water through 85 1-acre rapid infiltration basins within a 1,000-acre area of sandy soils in Orange County, Florida. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted field experiments in 1992 at an individual basin to examine and better understand the hydraulic characteristics and nutrient transport and transformation of reclaimed water beneath a rapid infiltration basin. At the time, concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in reclaimed water were about 3 and 0.25 milligrams per liter, respectively. A two-dimensional, radial, unsaturated/saturated numerical flow model was applied to describe the flow system beneath a rapid infiltration basin under current and hypothetical basin loading scenarios and to estimate the hydraulic properties of the soil and sediment beneath a basin. The thicknesses of the unsaturated and saturated parts of the surficial aquifer system at the basin investigated were about 37 and 52 feet, respectively. The model successfully replicated the field-monitored infiltration rate (about 5.5 feet per day during the daily flooding periods of about 17 hours) and ground-water mounding response during basin operation. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity of the saturated part of the surficial aquifer system were estimated to be 150 and 45 feet per day, respectively. The field-saturated vertical hydraulic conductivity of the shallow soil, estimated to be about 5.1 feet per day, was considered to have been less than the full- saturation value because of the effects of air entrapment. Specific yield of the surficial aquifer was estimated to be 0.41. The upper 20 feet of the basin subsurface profile probably served as a system control on infiltration because of the relatively low field-saturated, vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments within this layer. The flow model indicates that, in the vicinity of the basin, flow in the deeper

  18. Simulation of the interaction of karstic lakes Magnolia and Brooklyn with the upper Floridan Aquifer, southwestern Clay County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The stage of Lake Brooklyn, in southwestern Clay County, Florida, has varied over a range of 27 feet since measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey began in July 1957. The large stage changes have been attributed to the relation between highly transient surface-water inflow to the lake and subsurface conduits of karstic origin that permit a high rate of leakage from the lake to the Upper Floridan aquifer. After the most recent and severe stage decline (1990-1994), the U.S. Geological Survey began a study that entailed the use of numerical ground-water flow models to simulate the interaction of the lake with the Upper Floridan aquifer and the large fluctuations of stage that were a part of that process. A package (set of computer programs) designed to represent lake/aquifer interaction in the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-96) and the Three-Dimensional Method-of-Characteristics Solute-Transport Model (MOC3D) simulators was prepared as part of this study, and a demonstration of its capability was a primary objective of the study. (Although the official names are Brooklyn Lake and Magnolia Lake (Florida Geographic Names), in this report the local names, Lake Brooklyn and Lake Magnolia, are used.) In the simulator of lake/aquifer interaction used in this investigation, the stage of each lake in a simulation is updated in successive time steps by a budget process that takes into account ground-water seepage, precipitation upon and evaporation from the lake surface, stream inflows and outflows, overland runoff inflows, and augmentation or depletion by artificial means. The simulator was given the capability to simulate both the division of a lake into separate pools as lake stage falls and the coalescence of several pools into a single lake as the stage rises. This representational capability was required to simulate Lake Brooklyn, which can divide into as many as 10 separate pools at sufficiently low stage. In the

  19. Ground-water quality of the surficial aquifer system and the upper Floridan Aquifer, Ocala National Forest and Lake County, Florida, 1990-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamski, J.C.; Knowles, Leel

    2001-01-01

    Data from 217 ground-water samples were statistically analyzed to assess the water quality of the surficial aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer in the Ocala National Forest and Lake County, Florida. Samples were collected from 49 wells tapping the surficial aquifer system, 141 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, and from 27 springs that discharge water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. A total of 136 samples was collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1995 through 1999. These data were supplemented with 81 samples collected by the St. Johns River Water Management District and Lake County Water Resources Management from 1990 through 1998. In general, the surficial aquifer system has low concentrations of total dissolved solids (median was 41 milligrams per liter) and major ions. Water quality of the surficial aquifer system, however, is not homogeneous throughout the study area. Concentrations of total dissolved solids, many major ions, and nutrients are greater in samples from Lake County outside the Ocala National Forest than in samples from within the Forest. These results indicate that the surficial aquifer system in Lake County outside the Ocala National Forest probably is being affected by agricultural and (or) urban land-use practices. High concentrations of dissolved oxygen (less than 0.1 to 8.2 milligrams per liter) in the surficial aquifer system underlying the Ocala National Forest indicate that the aquifer is readily recharged by precipitation and is susceptible to surface contamination. Concentrations of total dissolved solids were significantly greater in the Upper Floridan aquifer (median was 182 milligrams per liter) than in the surficial aquifer system. In general, water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer was homogeneous, primarily being a calcium or calciummagnesium- bicarbonate water type. Near the St. Johns River, the water type of the Upper Floridan aquifer is sodium-chloride, corresponding to an increase in total dissolved

  20. Comparison of revegetation of a gas pipeline right-of-way in two forested wetland crossings involving conventional methods of pipeline installation and horizontal drilling, Nassau County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D.; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    One year after pipeline installation, vegetation in the right-of-way (ROW) was inventoried at two stream floodplain crossings in Nassau County, Florida. Both sites were forested wetlands composed of Acer rubrum, Fraxinus caroliniana, Liquidamber styraciflua, Nyssa ogecho, Quercus laurifolia, and Taxodium distichum, together with other wetland trees. Pipeline installation across the Brandy Branch floodplain was by conventional ditching and backfill methods. Installation across the Deep Creek floodplain was by horizontal drilling after clearcutting the ROW. The latter method left tree stumps, understory vegetation, and soil layers intact, except for disruptions caused by logging. According to the inventory, vegetation at the drilled site was more diverse (nearly twice as many species occurring in the ROW as at the trenched site) and more robust (no unvegetated exposed soil compared to 15% at the trenched site). Differences between the ROW vegetation at the two sites can be attributed to both site differences and installation technologies used.

  1. Using High-Impact HIV Prevention to Achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategic Goals in Miami-Dade County, Florida: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Carey, James W.; LaLota, Marlene; Villamizar, Kira; McElroy, Tamara; Wilson, M. Maximillion; Garcia, Jersey; Sandrock, Robert; Taveras, Janelle; Candio, Darline; Flores, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the release of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the “Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention Planning” (ECHPP) project, which provided support to health departments in 12 Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the highest AIDS prevalence to strengthen local HIV programs. We describe a case study of how one MSA, Miami-Dade County, developed and implemented a locally tailored plan. Examples include actions to reinforce local partnerships and identify neighborhoods with highest unmet needs; an improved condom distribution system to assist local HIV care providers; collaboration with local stakeholders to establish a new walk-in center for transgender client needs; and overcoming incompatibilities in health department and Ryan White program computer record systems to facilitate faster and more efficient patient services. These examples show how jurisdictions both within Florida and elsewhere can create low-cost and sustainable activities tailored to improve local HIV prevention needs. PMID:26785398

  2. A Snapshot of Teacher Perceptions on Full Inclusion in an International Urban Community: Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watnick, Beryl; Sacks, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    Miami Dade County Public Schools serves an international community with the highest poverty rate of any large U.S. city as well as the highest percentage of immigrants calling it "home" of any large city throughout the world. This article examines: (a) how Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS), the fifth largest school district in…

  3. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: SUMMARY REPORT ON THE FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE SAPP BATTERY SITE JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study presents the results of field investigations at the Sapp Battery site in Florida, an abandoned battery recycling operation. The site is estimated to contain 14,300 cubic yards of soils with lead levels in excess of 1,000 ppm. The soils in the immediate v...

  4. Quality of the water in Borrow Ponds near a major highway interchange, Dade County, Florida, October-November 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaven, T.R.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1978-01-01

    Water, bottom sediment, and aquatic plants were sampled from ponds near a major south Florida highway interchange to document concentrations of selected constituents in an aquatic environment near heavy vehicular traffic. Generally, concentrations of constituents were within the range expected in an uncontaminated environment in south Florida. However, concentrations did exceed south Florida background levels or Environmental Protection Agency criteria in a few cases. Two trace elements--chromium (20 micrograms per liter) in ponded surface water and lead (500 micrograms per gram) in bottom sediment--exceeded background levels. Concentrations of dieldrin (22 micrograms per kilogram) and polychlorinated biphenyls (53 micrograms per kilogram) also exceed background levels in bottom sediment. The concentration of phenol (23 micrograms per liter) in ground water exceeded Environmental Protection Agency quality criteria by 22 micrograms per liter, but was within the background range for south Florida. Ten metals were detected in the cattail or algal samples, but only iron, manganese, and zinc were in higher concentrations than those in the bottom sediment. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. 76 FR 77561 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc.; (Levy County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... FR 74,532 (Dec. 8, 2008) (ADAMS Accession No. ML083430114). On February 6, 2009, the Nuclear.... ML090371107). \\2\\ Progress Energy Florida, Inc.; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, 74 FR... Meetings, 67 FR 36,920, 36,923 (May 28, 2002). C. Submitting a Request To Make an Oral Limited...

  6. 40 CFR 52.536 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... program agencies (the Duval County Bio-Environmental Services Division and the Hillsborough County... tanks, vapor collection systems, volatile organic compound (VOC) content of coating materials and... State of Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. (ii) Additional material None. (54)...

  7. 40 CFR 52.536 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... program agencies (the Duval County Bio-Environmental Services Division and the Hillsborough County... tanks, vapor collection systems, volatile organic compound (VOC) content of coating materials and... State of Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. (ii) Additional material None. (54)...

  8. 40 CFR 52.536 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... program agencies (the Duval County Bio-Environmental Services Division and the Hillsborough County... tanks, vapor collection systems, volatile organic compound (VOC) content of coating materials and... State of Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. (ii) Additional material None. (54)...

  9. Occurrence and potential transport of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds from wastewater-treatment plant influent and effluent to groundwater and canal systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    An increased demand for fresh groundwater resources in South Florida has prompted Miami-Dade County to expand its water reclamation program and actively pursue reuse plans for aquifer recharge, irrigation, and wetland rehydration. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD) and the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), initiated a study in 2008 to assess the presence of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds in the influent and effluent at three regional wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) operated by the WASD and at one WWTP operated by the City of Homestead, Florida (HSWWTP).

  10. Evapotranspiration (ET) data at Immokalee row crop site, Collier County, Florida, September 22, 2008 - January 8, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of evapotranspiration measurements made at the USGS Immokalee row crop climate station beginning September 22, 2008 and ending January 8, 2009. Daily evapotranspiration rates corrected to a near-surface energy-budget varied from 0.1 millimeter (9/28/2008) to 3.3 millimeters (9/24/2008). The eddy-covariance method was used, with high-frequency sensors installed above an experimental field planted in green peppers to measure sensible and latent heat fluxes. Ancillary meteorological data are also included in the data set: net radiation, soil temperature and moisture, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and ground-water level. Data were collected at 30-minute resolution, with evapotranspiration corrected to the near-surface energy-budget at that timescale. The study was conducted at an experimental field on the University of Florida Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC) in Immokalee, Florida (Latitude 26 27 40 North Longitude 81 26 24 West, in degrees minutes seconds, North American Datum 83, Section 20, Township 46S, Range 29E). The full data release associated with this site consists of: 1.  Immokalee row crop evapotranspiration, 30-minute data, from September 22, 2008 through January 8, 2009 (comma delimited text format) 2. Immokalee row crop evapotranspiration, daily data, from September 23, 2008 through January 7, 2009 (comma delimited text format) including an ancillary file: Vegetation and equipment photographs (zipped jpeg files).

  11. Geohydrology and potential for upward movement of saline water in the Cocoa well field, East Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Schiffer, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system, an approximately 2,000-foot thick sequence of Eocene-age limestone and dolomite, is the main source of water supply in central Florida. Hydraulic conductivity is different in strata of different lithology and is the basis for separating the aquifer system into the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semi- confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The coastal city of Cocoa withdraws about 26 million gallons of water per day from the Upper Floridan aquifer from a well field in east Orange County, about 25 miles inland. About 60 million gallons per day are withdrawn from the Upper Floridan aquifer and 56 million gallons per day from the Lower Floridan aquifer in the Orlando area, about 15 miles west of the Cocoa well field. Wells drilled in the Cocoa well field from 1955-61 yielded water with chloride concentrations ranging from 25-55 milligrams per liter. Soon after the wells were put in service, chloride concentrations increased; therefore, new wells were drilled further inland. Chloride concen- trations in water from many of the new wells also have increased. Possible sources of saline water are lateral movement of relict seawater in the Upper Floridan aquifer from the east, regional upconing of saline water from the Lower Floridan aquifer or underlying older rocks, or localized upward movement of saline water through fractures. Several test wells were drilled to provide information about chloride concentration changes with depth and to monitor changes with time, including a multi-zone well drilled in 1965 (well C) and two wells drilled in the 1990's (wells R and S). Chloride concentrations have increased in the zone pumped by the supply wells (the upper 500 feet of the aquifer) and in the 1,351-1,357-foot deep zone of well C, but not in the two intervening zones. This indicates that the source of saline water is located laterally, rather than vertically, from the pumped zone in the area of well C. The potential for upward movement

  12. Assessment of hydrogeologic conditions with emphasis on water quality and wastewater injection, southwest Sarasota and West Charlotte counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    The 250-square-mile area of southwest Sarasota and west Charlotte Counties is underlain by a complex hydrogeologic system having diverse ground-water quality. The surficial and intermediate aquifer systems and the Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system contain six separate aquifers, or permeable zones, and have a total thickness of about 2,000 feet. Water in the clastic surficial aquifer system is potable and is tapped by hundreds of shallow, low-yielding supply wells. Water in the mixed clastic and carbonate intermediate aquifer system is potable in the upper part, but in the lower part, because of increasing salinity, it is used primarily for reverse-osmosis desalinization feed water and irrigation. Within the Upper Floridan aquifer, limestone and dolomite of the Suwannee permeable zone are tapped by irrigation and reverse-osmosis supply wells. The underlying, less permeable limestone of the Suwannee-Ocala semiconfining unit generally encompasses the transition zone between freshwater and very saline water. Interbedded limestone and dolomite of the Ocala-Avon Park moderately permeable zone and Avon Park highly permeable zone compose the deep, very saline injection zone. Potential ground-water contamination problems include flooding by storm tides, upward movement of saline water toward pumping centers by natural and induced leakage or through improperly constructed and abandoned wells, and lateral and vertical movement of treated sewage and reverse-osmosis wastewater injected into deep zones. Effects of flooding are evident in coastal areas where vertical layering of fresh and saline waters is observed. Approximately 100 uncontrolled flowing artesian wells that have interaquifer flow rates as high as 350 gallons per minute have been located and scheduled for plugging by the Southwest Florida Water Management District--in an attempt to improve ground-water quality of the shallow aquifers. Because each aquifer or permeable zone has unique head and

  13. Inhalant Use in Florida Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siqueira, Lorena; Crandall, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in Florida youth. Methods: The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties. Results: The sample consisted of 60,345…

  14. Water withdrawals, use, and trends in Florida, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the total amount of water withdrawn in Florida was estimated to be 14,988 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Saline water accounted for 8,589 Mgal/d (57 percent) and freshwater accounted for 6,399 Mgal/d (43 percent). Groundwater accounted for 4,166 Mgal/d (65 percent) of freshwater withdrawals, and surface water accounted for the remaining 2,233 Mgal/d (35 percent). Surface water accounted for nearly all (99.9 percent) saline-water withdrawals. An additional 659 Mgal/d of reclaimed wastewater was used in Florida during 2010. Freshwater withdrawals were greatest in Palm Beach County (707 Mgal/d), and saline-water withdrawals were greatest in Hillsborough County (1,715 Mgal/d). Fresh groundwater provided drinking water (public supplied and self-supplied) for 17.33 million people (92 percent of Florida’s population), and fresh surface water provided drinking water for 1.47 million people (8 percent). The statewide public-supply gross per capita use for 2010 was 134 gallons per day, whereas the statewide public-supply domestic per capita use was 85 gallons per day. The majority of groundwater withdrawals (almost 62 percent) in 2010 were obtained from the Floridan aquifer system, which is present throughout most of the State. The majority of fresh surface-water withdrawals (56 percent) came from the southern Florida hydrologic unit subregion and is associated with Lake Okeechobee and the canals in the Everglades Agricultural Area of Glades, Hendry, and Palm Beach Counties, as well as the Caloosahatchee River and its tributaries in the agricultural areas of Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee Counties. Overall, agricultural irrigation accounted for 40 percent of the total freshwater withdrawals (ground and surface), followed by public supply with 35 percent. Public supply accounted for 48 percent of groundwater withdrawals, followed by agricultural self-supplied (34 percent), commercial-industrial-mining self-supplied (7 percent), recreational

  15. Geology and structure of the Pine River, Florida River, Carbon Junction, and Basin Creek gas seeps, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, James E.; Condon, Steven M.; Huffman, A. Curtis; Taylor, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: This study was commissioned by a consortium consisting of the Bureau of Land Management, Durango Office; the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission; La Plata County; and all of the major gas-producing companies operating in La Plata County, Colorado. The gas-seep study project consisted of four parts; 1) detailed surface mapping of Fruitland Formation coal outcrops in the above listed seep areas, 2) detailed measurement of joint and fracture patterns in the seep areas, 3) detailed coal-bed correlation of Fruitland coals in the subsurface adjacent to the seep areas, and 4) studies of deep-seated seismic patterns in those seep areas where seismic data was available. This report is divided into three chapters labeled 1, 2, and 3. Chapter 1 contains the results of the subsurface coal-bed correla-tion study, chapter 2 contains the results of the surface geologic mapping and joint measurement study, and chapter 3, contains the results of the deep-seismic study. A preliminary draft of this report was submitted to the La Plata County Group in September 1996. All of the members of the La Plata Group were given an opportunity to critically review the draft report and their comments were the basis for revising the first draft to create this final version of a geologic report on the major La Plata County gas seeps located north of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation.

  16. Preliminary stratigraphic and hydrogeologic cross sections and seismic profile of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    To help water-resource managers evaluate the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) as an alternative water supply, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a study, in cooperation with the Broward County Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department, to refine the hydrogeologic framework of the FAS in the eastern part of Broward County. This report presents three preliminary cross sections illustrating stratigraphy and hydrogeology in eastern Broward County as well as an interpreted seismic profile along one of the cross sections. Marker horizons were identified using borehole geophysical data and were initially used to perform well-to-well correlation. Core sample data were integrated with the borehole geophysical data to support stratigraphic and hydrogeologic interpretations of marker horizons. Stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units were correlated across the county using borehole geophysical data from multiple wells. Seismic-reflection data were collected along the Hillsboro Canal. Borehole geophysical data were used to identify and correlate hydrogeologic units in the seismic-reflection profile. Faults and collapse structures that intersect hydrogeologic units were also identified in the seismic profile. The information provided in the cross sections and the seismic profile is preliminary and subject to revision.

  17. 75 FR 59695 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Extension of Subzone; Aso LLC (Adhesive Bandage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... (Adhesive Bandage Manufacturing); Sarasota County, FL An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade... strips per year) was approved by the Board in 2000 for the manufacture of adhesive bandages under FTZ... has at times instead used various duty suspension provisions on adhesive tape. Aso is now...

  18. Description and evaluation of the effects of urban and agricultural development on the surficial aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County was studied during 1982-85 to determine the effects of increased urban and agricultural development on groundwater levels, flow directions, and quality. The surficial aquifer system and its geologic matrix are divisible into three zones on the bases of relative permeabilities and lithologic characteristics. The two greatest water users in the county, public supply utilities and agricultural irrigators, increased total water withdrawals by 123 and 50%, respectively, during 1970-80. By 1980, 76% of public supply withdrawals were from zones I and II of the surficial aquifer system, whereas groundwater pumpage for irrigation decreased to 9% of the total irrigation water used. Increases in groundwater withdrawals for public supply were greatest in the southeast and central coastal parts of the county and served as an indicator for potential changes of flow directions and water quality in the surficial aquifer system. Residual seawater, emplaced in the aquifer system during the Pleistocene Epoch, is still prevalent in the central and western parts of Palm Beach County where low permeabilities in the geologic matrix have retarded its dilution. Chemical analyses of canal-water and groundwater samples collected in April 1984 were used to evaluate the effects of groundwater/surface water exchange on the quality of water during canal conveyance across the area containing residual seawater. (USGS)

  19. The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study and Evaluability Assessment. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

  20. Application of a Density-Dependent Numerical Model (MODHMS) to Assess Salinity Intrusion in the Biscayne Aquifer, North Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, H.; Panday, S.

    2005-05-01

    Miami-Dade County is located at the Southeastern part of the State of Florida adjoining the Atlantic coast. The sole drinking water source is the Biscayne Aquifer, which is an unconfined freshwater aquifer, composed of marine limestone with intermediate sand lenses. The aquifer is highly conductive with hydraulic conductivity values ranging from 1,000 ft/day to over 100,000 ft/day in some areas. Saltwater intrusion from the coast is an immediate threat to the freshwater resources of the County. Therefore, a multilayer density-dependent transient groundwater model was developed to evaluate the saltwater intrusion characteristics of the system. The model was developed using MODHMS, a finite difference, fully coupled groundwater and surface water flow and transport model. The buoyancy term is included in the equation for unconfined flow and the flow and transport equations are coupled using an iterative scheme. The transport equation was solved using an adaptive implicit total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and anisotropy of dispersivity was included for longitudinal, transverse, vertical transverse, and vertical longitudinal directions. The model eastern boundaries extended approximately 3.5 miles into the Atlantic Ocean while the western boundary extended approximately 27 miles inland from the coast. The northern and southern boundaries extend 6 miles into Broward County and up to the C-100 canal in Miami-Dade County respectively. Close to 2 million active nodes were simulated, with horizontal discretization of 500 feet. A total of nine different statistical analyses were conducted with observed and simulated hydraulic heads. The analysis indicates that the model simulated hydraulic heads matched closely with the observed heads across the model domain. In general, the model reasonably simulated the inland extent of saltwater intrusion within the aquifer, and matched relatively well with limited observed chloride data from monitoring wells along the coast

  1. Potentiometric surface of Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, May 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolansky, R.M.; Mills, L.R.; Woodham, W.M.; Laughlin, C.P.

    1979-01-01

    A May 1979 potentiometric-surface map depicts the annual low water-level period. Potentiometric levels declined 4 to 21 feet between September 1978 and May 1979, in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk, northwestern DeSoto, and Manatee Counties. Water levels in these areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest range in fluctuations. Water-level declines ranged from 0 to 6 feet in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District. Generally potentiometric levels were higher than previous May levels due to heavy rains in April and May. In parts of Hillsborough, Pasco, and Pinellas Counties, May 1979 potentiometric levels were 18 feet higher than those of September 1978. (USGS)

  2. SEAWAT model used to evaluate the potential effects of alterations to the hydrologic system on the distribution of salinity in the Biscayne aquifer in Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Sifuentes, Dorothy F.; White, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional, variable-density solute-transport model (SEAWAT) was developed to examine causes of saltwater intrusion and predict the effects of future alterations to the hydrologic system on salinity distribution in eastern Broward County, Florida. The model was calibrated to conditions from 1970 to 2012, the period for which data are most complete and reliable, and was used to simulate historical conditions from 1950 to 2012. The model was used to (1) evaluate the sensitivity of the salinity distribution in groundwater to sea-level rise and groundwater pumping , and (2) simulate the potential effects of increases in pumping, variable rates of sea-level rise, movement of a salinity control structure, and use of drainage recharge wells on the future distribution of salinity in the aquifer. This USGS data release contains all of the input and output files for the simulations described in the associated model documentation report (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sir20165022). This data release also includes (1) preprocessing python scripts and associated input data files for creating the sensitivity and scenarios runs, (2) flopy source code, and (3) SEAWAT (v4) source code. This groundwater model was created to examine causes of saltwater intrusion and predict the effects of future alterations to the hydrologic system on salinity distribution in eastern Broward County, Florida. The development of the model input and output files included in this data release are documented in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5022 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sir20165022). The models, along with pre- and post-processing tools, will run successfully only if the original directory structure is correctly restored. The model archive is broken into several pieces to reduce the likelihood of download timeouts. Instructions for reconstructing the original directory structure and running the models included in this data release and described in the model

  3. Bedrock geologic and joint trend map of the Pinardville quadrangle, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, William C.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the Pinardville quadrangle includes the Massabesic Gneiss Complex, exposed in the core of a regional northeast-trending anticlinorium, and highly deformed metasedimentary rocks of the Rangeley Formation, exposed along the northwest limb of the anticlinorium. Both formations were subjected to high-grade metamorphism and partial melting: the Rangeley during the middle Paleozoic Acadian orogeny, and the Massabesic Gneiss Complex during both the Acadian and the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. Granitoids produced during these orogenies range in age from Devonian (Spaulding Tonalite) to Permian (granite at Damon Pond), each with associated pegmatite. In the latest Paleozoic the Massabesic Gneiss Complex was uplifted with respect to the Rangeley Formation along the ductile Powder Hill fault, which also had a left-lateral component. Uplift continued into the early Mesozoic, producing the 2-kilometer-wide Campbell Hill fault zone, which is marked by northwest-dipping normal faults and dilational map-scale quartz bodies. Rare, undeformed Jurassic diabase dikes cut all older lithologies and structures. A second map is a compilation of joint orientations measured at all outcrops in the quadrangle. There is a great diversity of strike trends, with northeast perhaps being the most predominant.

  4. Potential for pollution of the Upper Floridan aquifer from five sinkholes and an internally drained basin in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trommer, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Sinkholes are natural and common geologic features in west-central Florida, which is underlain by water soluble limestone deposits. Dissolution of these deposits is the fundamental cause of sinkhole development. Sinkholes and other karst features are more pronounced in the northern part of the study area, but sinkhole activity has occurred throughout the area. Fifty-eight sinkholes with known or suspected connection to the Upper Floridan aquifer are located in the study area. An internally drained basin near the city of Brandon and five sinkholes in Hillsborough, Pasco, and Hernando Counties were selected for detailed investigation. At all sites, chemical or biological constituents were detected that indicate pollutants had entered the aquifer. A generalized classification, based on the potential to pollute, was applied to the selected sites. Four of the sites have high potential and two have moderate potential to pollute the Upper Floridan aquifer. All of the sites investigated are capable of recharging large volumes of water to the Upper Floridan aquifer in short periods of time. Continued monitoring of the quality of water entering the sinkholes and of wells downgradient to the sinks is needed to assess the future impacts on the aquifer. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  6. Historic Landscape Plan University of Florida Campus, Plaza of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Landscape Plan - University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of Florida Campus Quad Bounded by West University Avenue, US 441/Southwest 13th Street, Stadium Road, and North-South Drive, Gainesville, Alachua County, FL

  7. Cool & Dry: Dual-Path Approach for a Florida School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattar, Mukesh; Shirey, Don, III; Raustad, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the Brevard County School District in Florida teamed with companies EPRI and Florida Power and Light to implement a dual-path, low temperature air-distribution system used in conjunction with thermal energy storage. (EV)

  8. University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of Florida Campus Quad Bounded by West University Avenue, US 441/Southwest 13th Street, Stadium Road, and North-South Drive, Gainesville, Alachua County, FL

  9. Long-Term Trends in Abundance and Distribution of Manatees (Trichechus Manatus) in the Northern Banana River, Brevard County, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provancha, J. A.; Provancha, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Four aerial survey projects were conducted between 1977 and 1986 to determine the abundance, density and distribution of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus), in the northern Banana River, Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Manatee density and distribution within selected portions of the 78.5 sq km study area were determined. Peak numbers of manatees occurred in spring of each year. The maximum counts increased from 56 in 1978 to 297 in 1986. Manatee abundance was lowest in the winter of each year. Mean density per flight increased from 0.52 manatees/sq km in 1977-78 to 2.73/sq km in 1984-86. This increase may reflect increases in the east coast population or shifts in the population distribution. Distributional changes were observed in the study area through time, with a lower percentage of manatees occurring in industrial areas and a correspondingly higher percentage of manatees in nonindustrial areas by 1985.

  10. Public health assessment for Munisport landfill, North Miami, Dade County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD084535442. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-28

    The Munisport Landfill site is an inactive landfill in, and owned by, the City of North Miami, Florida. The site is an urban area adjacent to the Oleta River Recreational Area, a state mangrove preserve, and Biscayne Bay. Soil, sediments, surface water, and ground water are contaminated. The authors selected ammonia, benzene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, carbon disulfide, chloromethane, coliform bacteria, dieldrin, lead, methylene chloride, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), styrene, vanadium, and zinc as contaminants of concern. Accidentally ingesting contaminated soil and surface water, and breathing contaminated smoke are completed human exposure pathways. Children who swam in the landfill lakes risked bacterial and viral infections. Based on the available data, the authors categorize the Munisport Landfill site as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  11. Water-supply potential of the Floridan Aquifer in Osceola, eastern Orange, and southwestern Brevard counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planert, Michael; Aucott, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The city of Melbourne and adjacent areas in south Brevard County obtain their water supply from Lake Washington. As of 1982, the lake could provide a maximum of 15 million gallons per day but the projected need for the year 2000 is nearly three times that amount. As one alternative for a future water supply, this study investigated with a digital model, the potential yields of well fields completed in the Floridan aquifer. Seven pumping schemes were simulated with the digital model. Each simulation was made under steady-state conditions so that storage properties of the ground-water system were not included. The most advantageous area for ground-water development was in central Osceola County. Poor quality of water precluded locating a well field within Brevard County. If the ground-water alternative is chosen for the future supply, an observation well network is advisable to monitor head changes; chloride concentration trends east of the pumping centers; and chloride concentration trends in zones below the pumped zone. (USGS)

  12. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

    2001-02-28

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  13. Ground-water hydrology of the Dade City area, Pasco County, Florida : with emphasis on the hydrologic effects of pumping from the Floridan aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tibbals, C.H.; Anderson, Warren; Laughlin, Charles P.

    1980-01-01

    The Dade City area, northeast Pasco County, Florida, is an area of about 260 square miles. Of the approximately 32 million gallons per day pumped from the Floridan aquifer in the area in 1975, about 16 million gallons per day were pumped from an area of about 0.25 square miles by a citrus processing plant. There are essentially two producing zones in the Floridan aquifer in the Dade City area. The upper zone is from about 10 feet above to about 150 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 , and the lower zone from about 300 to about 500 feet below NGVD of 1929. There is evidence of hydraulic interconnection of the upper and lower zones of the Floridan aquifer. This appears to be highly significant in terms of the geohydrology of the Floridan aquifer in the area, particularly with regard to its ground-water flow pattern, water quality, and aquifer hydraulic characteristics. In the immediate vicinity of the citrus processing plant, aquifer transmissivity may range from 200,000 to as much as 400,000 feet squared per day. It is probable the Floridan is only semiconfined in the immediate vicinity of the citrus processing plant. High aquifer transmissivity in the area is the reason why there are only a few feet of drawdown of the Floridan 's potentiometric level even near the center of the well field. (USGS)

  14. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

    2001-02-01

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  15. Borehole geophysical and flowmeter data for eight boreholes in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, Lake Seminole, Jackson County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Hamrick, Michael D.; Holloway, O. Gary

    2011-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs and flowmeter data were collected in April 2011 from eight boreholes to identify the depth and orientation of cavernous zones within the Miocene Tampa Limestone in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam in Jackson County, Florida. These data are used to assess leakage near the dam. Each of the eight boreholes was terminated in limestone at depths ranging from 84 to 104 feet. Large cavernous zones were encountered in most of the borings, with several exceeding 20-inches in diameter. The cavernous zones generally were between 1 and 5 feet in height, but a cavern in one of the borings reached a height of about 6 feet. The resistivity of limestone layers penetrated by the boreholes generally was less than 1,000 ohm-meters. Formation resistivity near the cavernous zones did not show an appreciable contrast from surrounding bedrock, probably because the bedrock is saturated, owing to its primary permeability. Measured flow rates in the eight boreholes determined using an electromagnetic flowmeter were all less than ±0.1 liter per second. These low flow rates suggest that vertical hydraulic gradients in the boreholes are negligible and that hydraulic head in the various cavernous zones shows only minor, if any, variation.

  16. Mosquito fauna of wilderness islands within the National Key Deer Refuge and the Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge, Monroe County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Leal, Andrea L; Hribar, Lawrence J

    2010-06-01

    Dry ice-baited light traps, counts of mosquitoes biting and landing on technicians, and larval surveillance were used to determine mosquito species abundance on Annette Key, Little Knockem-down Key, Little Pine Key, Raccoon Key, and the Water Keys, all of which are located offshore, within the National Key Deer Refuge and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge in Monroe County, FL. Due to the close proximity of these wilderness islands to the inhabited islands of the Florida Keys, it is important to understand the abundance and composition of the mosquitoes and the effects they may have on populations on inhabited islands. Thirty different species were collected during 2004-2008. Aedes taeniorhynchus, the black salt-marsh mosquito, was the most abundant mosquito species collected at all locations. Other mosquitoes collected in large numbers at all locations were Anopheles atropos, Culex bahamensis, Cx. nigripalpus, and Deinocerites cancer. Because these wilderness islands are difficult to traverse due to vegetative growth, the placement of mosquito traps close to the perimeter of the islands may influence assessment of the abundance and diversity of mosquito species collected on each island.

  17. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  18. Separate and Unequal at Hillsborough High: A Principal's Challenges in Integrating "Academic" and Career and Technical Education Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malin, Joel R.; Hackmann, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Edward White, Hillsborough High School principal, has decided to allocate faculty in-service time to address an unproductive chasm between academic and career and technical education programming within the school, which has created tensions among the faculty. On returning to his office after the professional development session, which was…

  19. A hydrogeologic approach to identify land uses that overlie ground-water flow paths, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogeologic approach that integrates the use of hydrogeologic and spatial tools aids in the identification of land uses that overlie ground- water flow paths and permits a better understanding of ground-water flow systems. A mathematical model was used to simulate the ground-water flow system in Broward County, particle-tracking software was used to determine flow paths leading to the monitor wells in Broward County, and a Geographic Information System was used to identify which land uses overlie the flow paths. A procedure using a geographic information system to evaluate the output from a ground-water flow model has been documented. The ground-water flow model was used to represent steady-state conditions during selected wet- and dry-season months, and an advective flow particle- tracking program was used to simulate the direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer system. Digital spatial data layers were created from the particle pathlines that lead to the vicinity of the open interval of selected wells in the Broward County ground-water quality monitoring network. Buffer zone data layers were created, surrounding the particle pathlines to represent the area of contribution to the water sampled from the monitor wells. Spatial data layers, combined with a land-use data layer, were used to identify the land uses that overlie the ground-water flow paths leading to the monitor wells. The simulation analysis was performed on five Broward County wells with different hydraulic parameters to determine the source of ground-water stress, determine selected particle pathlines, and identify land use in buffer zones in the vicinity of the wells. The flow paths that lead to the grid cells containing wells G-2355, G-2373, and G-2373A did not vary between the wet- and dry-season conditions. Changes in the area of contribution for wells G-2345X and G-2369 were attributed to variations in rainfall patterns, well-field pumpage, and surface-water management practices

  20. Hydrogeology, water quality, and simulated effects of ground-water withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system, Seminole County and vicinity, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Halford, Keith J.

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogeology and ground-water quality of Seminole County in east-central Florida was evaluated. A ground-water flow model was developed to simulate the effects of both present day (September 1996 through August 1997) and projected 2020 ground-water withdrawals on the water levels in the surficial aquifer system and the potentiometric surface of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers in Seminole County and vicinity. The Floridan aquifer system is the major source of ground water in the study area. In 1965, ground-water withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system in Seminole County were about 11 million gallons per day. In 1995, withdrawals totaled about 69 million gallons per day. Of the total ground water used in 1995, 74 percent was for public supply, 12 percent for domestic self-supplied, 10 percent for agriculture self-supplied, and 4 percent for recreational irrigation. The principal water-bearing units in Seminole County are the surficial aquifer system and the Floridan aquifer system. The two aquifer systems are separated by the intermediate confining unit, which contains beds of lower permeability sediments that confine the water in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system has two major water-bearing zones (the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Lower Floridan aquifer), which are separated by a less-permeable semiconfining unit. Upper Floridan aquifer water levels and spring flows have been affected by ground-water development. Long-term hydrographs of four wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer show a general downward trend from the early 1950's until 1990. The declines in water levels are caused predominantly by increased pumpage and below average annual rainfall. From 1991 to 1998, water levels rose slightly, a trend that can be explained by an increase in average annual rainfall. Long-term declines in the potentiometric surface varied throughout the area, ranging from about 3 to 12 feet. Decreases in spring discharge also have been

  1. Influence of potential sea level rise on societal vulnerability to hurricane storm-surge hazards, Sarasota County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazier, Tim G.; Wood, Nathan; Yarnal, Brent; Bauer, Denise H.

    2010-01-01

    Although the potential for hurricanes under current climatic conditions continue to threaten coastal communities, there is concern that climate change, specifically potential increases in sea level, could influence the impacts of future hurricanes. To examine the potential effect of sea level rise on community vulnerability to future hurricanes, we assess variations in socioeconomic exposure in Sarasota County, FL, to contemporary hurricane storm-surge hazards and to storm-surge hazards enhanced by sea level rise scenarios. Analysis indicates that significant portions of the population, economic activity, and critical facilities are in contemporary and future hurricane storm-surge hazard zones. The addition of sea level rise to contemporary storm-surge hazard zones effectively causes population and asset (infrastructure, natural resources, etc) exposure to be equal to or greater than what is in the hazard zone of the next higher contemporary Saffir–Simpson hurricane category. There is variability among communities for this increased exposure, with greater increases in socioeconomic exposure due to the addition of sea level rise to storm-surge hazard zones as one progresses south along the shoreline. Analysis of the 2050 comprehensive land use plan suggests efforts to manage future growth in residential, economic and infrastructure development in Sarasota County may increase societal exposure to hurricane storm-surge hazards.

  2. Influence of potential sea level rise on societal vulnerability to hurricane storm-surge hazards, Sarasota County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazier, T.G.; Wood, N.; Yarnal, B.; Bauer, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Although the potential for hurricanes under current climatic conditions continue to threaten coastal communities, there is concern that climate change, specifically potential increases in sea level, could influence the impacts of future hurricanes. To examine the potential effect of sea level rise on community vulnerability to future hurricanes, we assess variations in socioeconomic exposure in Sarasota County, FL, to contemporary hurricane storm-surge hazards and to storm-surge hazards enhanced by sea level rise scenarios. Analysis indicates that significant portions of the population, economic activity, and critical facilities are in contemporary and future hurricane storm-surge hazard zones. The addition of sea level rise to contemporary storm-surge hazard zones effectively causes population and asset (infrastructure, natural resources, etc) exposure to be equal to or greater than what is in the hazard zone of the next higher contemporary Saffir-Simpson hurricane category. There is variability among communities for this increased exposure, with greater increases in socioeconomic exposure due to the addition of sea level rise to storm-surge hazard zones as one progresses south along the shoreline. Analysis of the 2050 comprehensive land use plan suggests efforts to manage future growth in residential, economic and infrastructure development in Sarasota County may increase societal exposure to hurricane storm-surge hazards. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-07-28

    The irrigated acreage that was field verified in 2015 for the 13 counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District (113,134 acres) is about 6 percent higher than the estimated acreage published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (107,217 acres) for 2012; however, this 2012 value represents acreage for the entire portion of all 13 counties, not just the Suwannee River Water Management District portion. Differences between the 2015 field-verified acreage totals and those published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 2012 may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 3-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) calculated field-verified irrigated acreage may be an overestimate because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  4. Chemical quality of landfill leachate in treatment ponds and migration of leachate in the surficial aquifer, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario; Barr, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Pinellas County leachate treatment and disposal site encompasses about 8 acres within the 220 acres of the county 's Bridgeway Acres landfill. The site has a high water table and is subject to inundation due to tidal flooding and major storms. Fresh leachate is pumped from V-shaped trenches an average of about 3.8 hours per day. The pumping rate ranges from 150 to 500 gallons per minute. The leachate is aerated for about 2 days in a lined basin, then transferred by gravity to a stabilization pond where it is permitted to infiltrate into the surficial aquifer. Two chemical constituents, ammonia nitrogen and potassium, were used as indicators of migration of the leachate in the aquifer. No apparent nitrification occurred within the treatment system. Leachate has migrated from about 75 to 80 feet along the upper 5 feet of the aquifer during the period of study. Vertical migration was about 4 feet beneath the bottom of the pond into the aquifer. (USGS)

  5. The effects of implementing a feral cat spay/neuter program in a Florida county animal control service.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kathy L; Slater, Margaret R; Haller, Linda

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, a county animal control service implemented a feral cat sterilization program with the goal of reducing the number of healthy cats euthanized, complaints, and the county's costs. The service collected data from a 6-year period both before and after the program's implementation. The service totaled the numbers of both cat and dog impoundments, surgeries, adoptions, euthanasias, and complaints for each year; standardized both sets of numbers on a per- 10,000-person basis to compare trends between dogs and cats; and calculated estimated costs for neutering versus impounding and euthanizing the feral cats. Changing from a policy of euthanasia of feral cats to support for trap-neuter-return did not result in an increase in the number of complaints or cat impoundments. The percentage of impounded cats euthanized decreased between the periods before and after the program began, and the percentage adopted increased. The ratio of complaints to impounds decreased between the 2 periods, and the ratio of surgeries to impounds increased. Impoundments of cats were relatively steady in spite of the continually increasing human population. Euthanasias decreased for both cats and dogs since 1997. Since 1996, complaints decreased for both. Surgeries for both cats and dogs increased over the 12 years. Adoptions for cats and dogs increased greatly in fiscal year 1998/1999.

  6. The relation between hydrogeology and water quality of the Lower Floridan Aquifer in Duval County, Florida, and implications for monitoring movement of saline water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Spechler, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the Upper zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer and its relation to water quality were evaluated during a 3-year (1993-96) study. The Floridan aquifer system, a carbonate aquifer system composed of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semi-confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer, is the major source of water supply in northeastern Florida. The Lower Floridan aquifer is further subdivided into the Upper zone, a semi-confining unit, and the Fernandina permeable zone. As a result of increased withdrawals, heads in the aquifer system have declined and at the same time chloride concentrations have increased in the water from many wells in Duval County. A better understanding of the sources of and pathways for movement of brackish water is needed so that water managers can monitor the movement of brackish water and plan future water development. Most of the wells in Duval County deeper than 900 feet penetrate the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Upper zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer. Transmissivity estimates for these zones range from 2,000 to 194,000 feet squared per day. Permeability in the Upper zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is primarily related to secondary porosity developed along bedding planes, joints, and fractures as a result of paleokarst processes. The Upper zone is about 300 to 500 feet thick in Duval County, based on the geophysical logs of about 40 wells ranging in depth from about 1,000 to 2,200 feet. In some areas the Upper zone has a single flow zone, but in other areas, two distinct flow zones are apparent. Water samples collected during this study confirm the continued increase in chloride concentrations in both the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Upper zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer. Most of the observed increases are in the eastern part of the county, but a pattern in the locations of wells yielding water with chloride increases is not discernible. In some areas, zones bearing brackish water are underlain by zones of

  7. Inventory of drainage wells and potential sources of contaminants to drainage-well inflow in Southwest Orlando, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, George Fred

    1993-01-01

    Potential sources of contaminants that could pose a threat to drainage-well inflow and to water in the Floridan aquifer system in southwest Orlando, Florida, were studied between October and December 1990. Drainage wells and public-supply wells were inventoried in a 14-square-mile area, and available data on land use and activities within each drainage well basin were tabulated. Three public-supply wells (tapping the Lower Floridan aquifer) and 38 drainage wells (open to the Upper Floridan aquifer) were located in 17 drainage basins within the study area. The primary sources of drainage-well inflow are lake overflow, street runoff, seepage from the surficial aquifer system, and process-wastewater disposal. Drainage-well inflow from a variety of ares, including resi- dential, commercial, undeveloped, paved, and industrial areas, are potential sources of con- taminants. The four general types of possible contaminants to drainage-well inflow are inorganic chemicals, organic compounds, turbidity, and microbiological contaminants. Potential contami- nant sources include plant nurseries, citrus groves, parking lots, plating companies, auto- motive repair shops, and most commonly, lake- overflow water. Drainage wells provide a pathway for contaminants to enter the Upper Floridan aquifer and there is a potential for contaminants to move downward from the Upper Floridan to the Lower Floridan aquifer.

  8. Reconnaissance of chemical and physical characteristics of selected bottom sediments of the Caloosahatchee River and estuary, tributaries, and contiguous bays, Lee County, Florida, July 20-30, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario; Marot, M.E.; Holmes, C.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes a reconnaissance study, conducted July 20-30, 1998, of chemical and physical characteristics of recently deposited bottom sediments in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary. Recently deposited sediments were identified using an isotopic chronometer, Beryllium-7 (7Be), a short-lived radioisotope. Fifty-nine sites were sampled in an area that encompasses the Caloosahatchee River (River) about three miles upstream from the Franklin Lock (S-79), the entire tidally affected length of the river (estuary), and the contiguous water bodies of Matlacha Pass, San Carlos Bay, Estero Bay, Tarpon Bay, and Pine Island Sound in Lee County, Florida. Bottom sediments were sampled for 7Be at 59 sites. From the results of the 7Be analysis, 30 sites were selected for physical and chemical analysis. Sediments were analyzed for particle size, total organic carbon (TOC), trace elements, and toxic organic compounds, using semiquantitative methods for trace elements and organic compounds. The semiquantitative scans of trace elements indicated that cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations, when normalized to aluminum, were above the natural background range at 24 of 30 sites. Particle size and TOC were used to characterize sediment deposition patterns and organic content. Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (CaPAHs) were determined at 30 sites using immunoassay analysis. The semiquantitative immunoassay analyses of toxic organic compounds indicated that all of the samples contained DDT, cyclodienes as chlordane (pesticides), and CaPAHs. PCBs were not detected. Based on analyses of the 30 sites, sediments at 10 of these sites were analyzed for selected trace elements and toxic organic compounds, including pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs, using quantitative laboratory procedures. No arsenic or cadmium was detected. Zinc was detected at two sites with concentrations greater than the lower limit of the range of

  9. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    To construct a digital simulation of a plume of brackish water in the surficial Biscayne aquifer of central Dade County, Florida, that originated from a flowing artesian well, it was necessary to quantify the rate of spillage and the consequent point-source loading of the aquifer. However, a flow-rate measurement (2,350 gallons per minute) made 2 months after drilling of the well in 1944 was inconsistent with later measurements (1,170 gallons per minute) in 1964, 1965, and 1969. Possible explanations were the: (1) drawdown of the aquifer over time; (2) raising of the altitude at which the water was discharged; (3) installation of 80 feet of 8-inch liner; (4) an increase in the density of the flowing water; and (5) gradual deterioration of the well casing. The first approach to reconciling the measured flow rates was to apply a form of the equation for constant-drawdown analysis often used to estimate aquifer transmissivity. Next, a numerical simulation analysis was made that pro- vided the means to account for friction loss in the well and recharge across vertically adjacent con- fining layers and from lateral boundaries. The numerical analysis required the construction of a generalized model of the subsurface from the surficial Biscayne aquifer to the cavernous, dolomitic Boulder Zone at a depth of 3,000 feet. Calibration of the generalized flow model required that the moddle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system separating the artesian flow zone in the Upper Floridan aquifer from the Lower Floridan aquifer (the Boulder Zone) have a vertical hydraulic conductivity of at least 1 foot per day. The intermediate confining unit separating the flow zone from the surficial Biscayne aquifer was assigned a much lower hydraulic conductivity (0.01 foot per day or less). The model indicated that the observed mounding of Upper Floridan aquifer heads along the axis of the Florida Peninsula was related to the variable depth of the freshwater and brackish-water zone

  10. Evaluation of a cavity-riddled zone of the shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John North

    1980-01-01

    The shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., contains a cavity-riddled zone extending north and south about 5 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. The zone lies at approximately 60 feet below land surface and varies from 15 to 50 feet in thickness. It is approximately 3 miles in width. Aquifer material is calcareous quartz sand-stone in the cavity zone, whereas the remainder of the consolidated aquifer material is primarily limestone. The zone is overlain by several thin clay beds which provide varying degrees of confinement. The transmissivity of the cavity-riddled zone of the aquifer in the area of investigation is approximately 11,000 square feet per day. Preliminary evaluation indicates that large volumes of water of suitable quality for public supply can be developed from the zone, except in an area adjacent to a landfill where leachate has adversely affected water quality. (USGS)

  11. Water-quality data from a landfill-leachate treatment and disposal site, Pinellas County, Florida, January 1979-August 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, G.L.; Fernandez, Mario

    1981-01-01

    Water-quality data collected between January 1979 and August 1980 at the landfill leachate treatment site in Pinellas County, Fla., are presented. Data include field and laboratory measurements of physical properties, major chemical constituents , nitrogen and phosphorus species, chemical oxygen demand, trace metals, coliform bacteria, taxonomy of macroinvertebrates and phytoplankton, and chlorophyll analyses. Data were collected as part of a study to determine water-quality changes resulting from aeration and ponding of leachate pumped from landfill burial trenches and for use in determining the rate of movement and quality changes as the leachate migrates through the surficial aquifer. Samples were collected from 81 surficial-aquifer water-quality monitoring wells constructed in January 1975, February 1979, and March 1979, and 8 surface-water quality monitoring sites established in January 1975, February 1978, and November 1978. (USGS)

  12. Health assessment for Sapp Battery Salvage, Jackson County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD980602882. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-11

    Changes to the calculation of acceptable soil levels (ASL) for priority heavy metals at the Sapp Battery National Priorities List site in Jackson County are discussed. Original calculations assumed that the most sensitive population for exposure would be small children in the area and that as a result of hand-to-mouth behavior, a 15 kg child might ingest 1 gram of contaminated soil per day. Recommended maximum contaminant levels of 20 micrograms/l of drinking water and an assumed soil ingestion of 1 gram will result in a calculated ASL of 80 mg/kg (ppm) for lead. Modifications to the ASLs for cadmium and antimony are required due to the change in the assumption of soil ingestion. By setting clean-up standards to these ASL values, persons possibly coming into daily contact with the Sapp Battery site will not be expected to suffer short- or long-term detriments to health.

  13. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Sewage Treatment Plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Sewage Treatment Plant - No. 1 Pump House in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Pump House No. 1, Hillsborough Garden Drive & Tampa Boulevard, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  14. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Sewage Treatment Plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Sewage Treatment Plant - No. 1 Pump House in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FLOOR PLANS AND SECTIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Pump House No. 1, Hillsborough Garden Drive & Tampa Boulevard, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  15. Hydrogeology, Water Quality, and Distribution and Sources of Salinity in the Floridan Aquifer System, Martin and St. Lucie Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2004-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a valuable source for agricultural and municipal water supply in Martin and St. Lucie Counties, despite its brackish water. Increased withdrawals, however, could increase salinity and threaten the quality of withdrawn water. The Floridan aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomitic limestone, and dolomite and is divided into three hydrogeologic units: the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. An informal geologic unit at the top of the Upper Floridan aquifer, referred to as the basal Hawthorn/Suwannee unit, is bound above by a marker unit in the Hawthorn Group and at its base by the Ocala Limestone; a map of this unit shows an area where substantial eastward thickening begins near the coast. This change in thickness is used to divide the study area into inland and coastal areas. In the Upper Floridan aquifer, an area of elevated chloride concentration greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter and water temperature greater than 28 degrees Celsius exists in the inland area and trends northwest through north-central Martin County and western St. Lucie County. A structural feature coincides with this area of greater salinity and water temperature; this feature is marked by a previously mapped northwest-trending basement fault and, based on detailed mapping in this study of the structure at the top of the basal Hawthorn/Suwannee unit, an apparent southeast-trending trough. Higher hydraulic head also has been mapped in this northwest-trending area. Another area of high chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan aquifer occurs in the southern part of the coastal area (in eastern Martin County and northeastern Palm Beach County); chloride concentration in this area is more than 2,000 milligrams per liter and is as great as 8,000 milligrams per liter. A dissolved-solids concentration of less than 10,000 milligrams per liter defines the brackish-water zone in the Floridan aquifer

  16. Movement of the saltwater interface in the surficial aquifer system in response to hydrologic stresses and water-management practices, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dausman, Alyssa M.; Langevin, Christian D.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the relation between water-level fluctuations and saltwater intrusion in Broward County, Florida. The objective was achieved through data collection at selected wells in Broward County and through the development of a variable-density ground-water flow model. The numerical model is representative of many locations in Broward County that contain a well field, control structure, canal, the Intracoastal Waterway, and the Atlantic Ocean. The model was used to simulate short-term movement (from tidal fluctuations to monthly changes) and long-term movement (greater than 10 years) of the saltwater interface resulting from changes in rainfall, well-field withdrawals, sea-level rise, and upstream canal stage. The SEAWAT code, which is a combined version of the computer codes, MODFLOW and MT3D, was used to simulate the complex variable-density flow patterns. Model results indicated that the canal, control structure, and sea level have major effects on ground-water flow. For periods greater than 10 years, the upstream canal stage controls the movement and location of the saltwater interface. If upstream canal stage is decreased by 1 foot (0.3048 meter), the saltwater interface takes 50 years to move inland and stabilize. If the upstream canal stage is then increased by 1 foot (0.3048 meter), the saltwater interface takes 90 years to move seaward and stabilize. If sea level rises about 48 centimeters over the next 100 year as predicted, then inland movement of the saltwater interface may cause well-field contamination. For periods less than 10 years, simulation results indicated that a 3-year drought with increased well-field withdrawals probably will not have long-term effects on the position of the saltwater interface in the Biscayne aquifer. The saltwater interface returns to its original position in less than 10 years. Model results, however, indicated that the interface location in the lower part of the surficial aquifer system takes

  17. Interior view of entry hall in Communication Center (now Break ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of entry hall in Communication Center (now Break Room and Storage Area), facing north - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  18. Geochemical and isotopic composition of ground water with emphasis on sources of sulfate in the upper Floridan Aquifer in parts of Marion, Sumter, and Citrus counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sacks, Laura A.

    1996-01-01

    In inland areas of northwest central Florida, sulfate concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer are extremely variable and sometimes exceed drinking water standards (250 milligrams per liter). This is unusual because the aquifer is unconfined and near the surface, allowing for active recharge. The sources of sulfate and geochemical processes controlling ground-water composition were evaluated in this area. Water was sampled from thirty-three wells in parts of Marion, Sumter, and Citrus Counties, within the Southwest Florida Water Management District; these included at least a shallow and a deep well at fifteen separate locations. Ground water was analyzed for major ions, selected trace constituents, dissolved organic carbon, and stable isotopes (sulfur-34 of sulfate and sulfide, carbon-13 of inorganic carbon, deuterium, and oxygen-18). Sulfate concentrations ranged from less than 0.2 to 1,400 milligrams per liter, with higher sulfate concentrations usually in water from deeper wells. The samples can be categorized into a low sulfate group (less than 30 milligrams per liter) and a high sulfate group (greater than 30 milligrams per liter). For the high sulfate water, concentrations of calcium and magnesium increased concurrently with sulfate. Chemical and isotopic data and mass-balance modeling indicate that the composition of high sulfate waters is controlled by dedolomitization reactions (dolomite dissolution and calcite precipitation, driven by dissolution of gypsum). Gypsum occurs deeper in the aquifer than open intervals of sampled wells. Upward flow has been documented in deeper parts of the aquifer in the study area, which may be driven by localized discharge areas or rapid flow in shallow parts of the aquifer. Mixing between shallow ground water and sulfate-rich water that dissolved gypsum at the base of the aquifer is probably responsible for the range of concentrations observed in the study area. Other solutes that increased with sulfate apparently

  19. Approach for delineation of contributing areas and zones of transport to selected public-supply wells using a regional ground-water flow model, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, R.A.; Patterson, R.D.; Orzol, L.L.; Dixon, Joann

    2001-01-01

    Rapid urban development and population growth in Palm Beach County, Florida, have been accompanied with the need for additional freshwater withdrawals from the surficial aquifer system. To maintain water quality, County officials protect capture areas and determine zones of transport of municipal supply wells. A multistep process was used to help automate the delineation of wellhead protection areas. A modular ground-water flow model (MODFLOW) Telescopic Mesh Refinement program (MODTMR) was used to construct an embedded flow model and combined with particle tracking to delineate zones of transport to supply wells; model output was coupled with a geographic information system. An embedded flow MODFLOW model was constructed using input and output file data from a preexisting three-dimensional, calibrated model of the surficial aquifer system. Three graphical user interfaces for use with the geographic information software, ArcView, were developed to enhance the telescopic mesh refinement process. These interfaces include AvMODTMR for use with MODTMR; AvHDRD to build MODFLOW river and drain input files from dynamically segmented linear (canals) data sets; and AvWELL Refiner, an interface designed to examine and convert well coverage spatial data layers to a MODFLOW Well package input file. MODPATH (the U.S. Geological Survey particle-tracking postprocessing program) and MODTOOLS (the set of U.S. Geological Survey computer programs to translate MODFLOW and MODPATH output to a geographic information system) were used to map zones of transport. A steady-state, five-layer model of the Boca Raton area was created using the telescopic mesh refinement process and calibrated to average conditions during January 1989 to June 1990. A sensitivity analysis of various model parameters indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in recharge rates, hydraulic conductivity for layer 1, and leakance for layers 3 and 4 (Biscayne aquifer). Recharge (58 percent); river (canal

  20. Hydrogeology, water quality, and potential for contamination of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Silver Springs ground-water basin, central Marion County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer, composed of a thick sequence of very porous limestone and dolomite, is the principal source of water supply in the Silver Springs ground-water basin of central Marion County, Florida. The karstic nature of the local geology makes the aquifer susceptible to contaminants from the land surface. Contaminants can enter the aquifer by seepage through surficial deposits and through sinkholes and drainage wells. Potential contaminants include agricultural chemicals, landfill leachates and petroleum products from leaking storage tanks and accidental spills. More than 560 sites of potential contamination sources were identified in the basin in 1990. Detailed investigation of four sites were used to define hydrologic conditions at representative sites. Ground-water flow velocities determined from dye trace studies ranged from about 1 foot per hour under natural flow conditions to about 10 feet per hour under pumping conditions, which is considerably higher than velocities estimated using Darcy's equation for steady-state flow in a porous medium. Water entering the aquifer through drainage wells contained bacteria, elevated concentrations of nutrients, manganese and zinc, and in places, low concentrations of organic compounds. On the basis of results from the sampling of 34 wells in 1989 and 1990, and from the sampling of water entering the Upper Floridan aquifer through drainage wells, there has been no widespread degradation of water quality in the study area. In an area of karst, particularly one in which fracture flow is significant, evaluating the effects from contaminants is difficult and special care is required when interpolating hydrogeologic data from regional studies to a specific. (USGS)

  1. Hydrologic data summary for the St. Lucie River Estuary, Martin and St. Lucie Counties, Florida, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Patino, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    A hydrologic analysis was made at three canal sites and four tidal sites along the St. Lucie River Estuary in southeastern Florida from 1998 to 2001. The data included for analysis are stage, 15-minute flow, salinity, water temperature, turbidity, and suspended-solids concentration. During the period of record, the estuary experienced a drought, major storm events, and high-water discharge from Lake Okeechobee. Flow mainly occurred through the South Fork of the St. Lucie River; however, when flow increased through control structures along the C-23 and C-24 Canals, the North Fork was a larger than usual contributor of total freshwater inflow to the estuary. At one tidal site (Steele Point), the majority of flow was southward toward the St. Lucie Inlet; at a second tidal site (Indian River Bridge), the majority of flow was northward into the Indian River Lagoon. Large-volume stormwater discharge events greatly affected the St. Lucie River Estuary. Increased discharge typically was accompanied by salinity decreases that resulted in water becoming and remaining fresh throughout the estuary until the discharge events ended. Salinity in the estuary usually returned to prestorm levels within a few days after the events. Turbidity decreased and salinity began to increase almost immediately when the gates at the control structures closed. Salinity ranged from less than 1 to greater than 35 parts per thousand during the period of record (1998-2001), and typically varied by several parts per thousand during a tidal cycle. Suspended-solids concentrations were observed at one canal site (S-80) and two tidal sites (Speedy Point and Steele Point) during a discharge event in April and May 2000. Results suggest that most deposition of suspended-solids concentration occurs between S-80 and Speedy Point. The turbidity data collected also support this interpretation. The ratio of inorganic to organic suspended-solids concentration observed at S-80, Speedy Point, and Steele Point

  2. Ground-water quality near the northwest 58th Street solid-waste disposal facility, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H.C.; Hull, John E.; Klein, Howard

    1978-01-01

    The Northwest 58th Street solid-waste disposal facility, 3 miles west of a major Dade County municipal water-supply well field, overlays the Biscayne aquifer, a permeable, solution-riddled limestone which transmits leachates eastward at a calculated rate of 2.9 feet per day. A discrete, identifiable leachate plume has been recognized under and downgradient from the waste disposal facility. Concentrations of sodium, ammonia, and dissolved solids decreased with depth beneath the disposal area and downgradient in response to an advective and convective dispersion. At a distance of about one-half downgradient, the rate of contribution of leachate from the source to the leading edge of the plume was about equal to the rate of loss of leachate from the leading edge of the plume by diffusion and dilution by rainfall infiltration during the period August 1973 - July 1975. Heavy metals and pesticides are filtered, adsorbed by aquifer materials, or are precipitated near the disposal area. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Occurrence and use of ground water in the Venice-Englewood area, Sarasota and Charlotte counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutcliffe, Horace; Thompson, Thomas H.

    1983-01-01

    In a 75-square-mile area of coastal Sarasota and Charlotte Counties, demand for water is increasing. Groundwater, the principal source of supply, is distributed largely by public water systems. Principal water-bearing formations in descending order, include the surficial aquifer, artesian zone 1 in the Tamiami Formation, zone 2 in the upper part of the Hawthorn Formation, zone 3 in the lower part of the Hawthorn Formation and upper part of the Tampa Limestone, and zones 4 and 5 which comprise the Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer, except near tidewater, provides limited supplies of freshwater to wells. Artesian zone 1 is the major aquifer for public supply. It is contaminated by saline water in some areas, either as a result of inundation by storm-driven tides or by upwar leakage of mineralized water from underlying aquifers through uncased or improperly constructed wells. The city of Venice obtains some water from zone 2, but the water is brackish in much of the area. The water is suitable for irrigation in parts of the area. Except for local use of water for watering livestock and maintaining ponds, the water from zones 3, 4, and 5 is little used because of its poor quality. (USGS)

  4. Assessment of the fresh-and brackish-water resources underlying Dunedin and adjacent areas on northern Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, L.A.; Swenson, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The city of Dunedin is enhancing their potable ground-water resources through desalination of brackish ground water. An assessment of the fresh- and brackish-water resources in the Upper Floridan aquifer was needed to estimate the changes that may result from brackish-water development. The complex hydrogeologic framework underlying Dunedin and adjacent areas of northern Pinellas County is conceptualized as a multilayered sequence of permeable zones and confining and semiconfining units. The permeable zones contain vertically spaced, discrete, water-producing zones with differing water quality. Water levels, water-level responses, and water quality are highly variable among the different permeable zones. The Upper Floridan aquifer is best characterized as a local flow system in most of northern Pinellas County. Pumping from the Dunedin well field is probably not influencing water levels in the aquifer outside Dunedin, but has resulted in localized depressions in the potentiometric surface surrounding production-well clusters. The complex geologic layering combined with the effects of production-well distribution probably contribute to the spatial and temporal variability in chloride concentrations in the Dunedin well field. Chloride concentrations in ground water underlying the Dunedin well field vary both vertically and laterally. In general, water-quality rapidly changes below depths of 400 feet below sea level. Additionally, randomly distributed water-producing zones with higher chloride concentrations may occur at shallow, discrete intervals above 400 feet. A relation between chloride concentration and distance from St. Joseph Sound is not apparent; however, a possible relation exists between chloride concentration and production-well density. Chloride-concentration data from production wells show a consistently increasing pattern that has accelerated since the late 1980's. Chloride-concentration data from 15 observation wells show increasing trends for 6 wells

  5. Efficiency of a stormwater detention pond in reducing loads of chemical and physical constituents in urban streamflow, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kantrowitz, I.H.; Woodham, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A multipurpose wet stormwater detention pond in Pinellas Park, Florida was studied to determine its effectiveness in reducing the load of selected water-quality constituents commonly found in urban streamflow. Water-quality samples, and data on streamflow and precipitation were collected at the outflow and principal inflow of detention area 3 on Saint Joe Creek. To compare the constituent loads entering and leaving the detention pond, flows and water quality were monitored simultaneously at the inflow and outflow sites for six storms, and were monitored intermittently during periods of base flow. Lodas od 19 selected chemical and physical constituents were determined. Because all the stormwater entering the detention pond was not measured at the inflow site, computed stormwater inflow loads were adjusted to account for loads from the unmonitored areas. The ratio of storm- water volume measured at the outflow site to stormwater volume measured at the inflow site was used to adjust inflow loads for individual storms. Pond efficiencies for selected water- quality constituents for each of the storms were estimated by dividing the difference in outflow and adjusted inflow loads by the adjusted inflow load. Stormwater loads of the major ions (chloride, calcium and bicarbonate) and dissolved solids at the outflow site exceeded loads at the inflow site, partly as a result of mixing with base flow stored within the pond. However, the detention pond was effective in reducing the stormwater load of such urban-runoff contaminants as metals, nutrients, suspended solids, and biochemical and chemical oxygen demand. Estimated median pond efficiencies for reducing constituent loads ranged from 25 to more than 60 percent for metals, 2 to 52 percent for nutrients, 2 to 52 percent for nutrients, 7 to 11 percent for two measurements of suspended solids, and 16 to 49 percent for the oxygen- consuming substances. The reductions of constituent loads in stormwater are probably a result of

  6. Hydrologic Conditions that Influence Streamflow Losses in a Karst Region of the Upper Peace River, Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.; Lewelling, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    The upper Peace River from Bartow to Fort Meade, Florida, is described as a groundwater recharge area, reflecting a reversal from historical groundwater discharge patterns that existed prior to the 1950s. The upper Peace River channel and floodplain are characterized by extensive karst development, with numerous fractures, crevasses, and sinks that have been eroded in the near-surface and underlying carbonate bedrock. With the reversal in groundwater head gradients, river water is lost to the underlying groundwater system through these karst features. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the hydrologic conditions that influence streamflow losses in the karst region of the upper Peace River. The upper Peace River is located in a basin that has been altered substantially by phosphate mining and increases in groundwater use. These alterations have changed groundwater flow patterns and caused streamflow declines through time. Hydrologic factors that have had the greatest influence on streamflow declines in the upper Peace River include the lowering of the potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer beneath the riverbed elevation due to below-average rainfall (droughts), increases in groundwater use, and the presence of numerous karst features in the low-water channel and floodplain that enhance the loss of streamflow. Seepage runs conducted along the upper Peace River, from Bartow to Fort Meade, indicate that the greatest streamflow losses occurred along an approximate 2-mile section of the river beginning about 1 mile south of the Peace River at Bartow gaging station. Along the low-water and floodplain channel of this 2-mile section, there are about 10 prominent karst features that influence streamflow losses. Losses from the individual karst features ranged from 0.22 to 16 cubic feet per second based on measurements made between 2002 and 2007. The largest measured flow loss for all the karst features was about 50 cubic

  7. Distribution, movement, and fate of nitrate in the surficial aquifer beneath citrus groves, Indian River, Martin, and St Lucie Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandall, Christy A.

    2000-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system beneath citrus groves in Indian River, Martin, and St. Lucie Counties, Florida, was studied to determine the effects of citrus agriculture on ground-water quality. The surficial aquifer is the primary drinking-water source for Martin and St. Lucie Counties and furnishes about 33 percent of the drinking-water for Indian River County. Water-quality samples and water-level data were collected from December 1996 through October 1998. Nitrate concentrations in ground water exceeded 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s maximum contaminant level for nitrate reported as nitrogen, in 5 percent of the samples from citrus groves. These exceedances occurred in samples from wells with depths of 10 feet or less at citrus groves, and mostly in samples collected during or immediately following fertilizer applications. Samples from wells with depths of 20-25 feet contained little or no nitrate. The decreased nitrate concentrations in ground water with depth was not consistent with chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations, two other common indicators of agricultural activity. Chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations remained elevated in ground-water samples from all depths at citrus groves; median chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations in samples from citrus sites were 125 and 779 mg/L, respectively. In comparison, samples from the reference site had maximum chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations of 61 and 366 mg/L, respectively. Based on the age of ground water at 20-25 foot depths (3-50 years, measured with tritium and helium-3 concentration ratios), nitrate concentrations also should have remained elevated with depth because fertilizers have been used for at least 20-30 years at these citrus groves. Nitrate concentrations decreased with depth as a result of denitrification. This could have occurred because favorable conditions for denitrification existed in the aquifer, including high

  8. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... portion of the base at latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  9. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... portion of the base at latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  10. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... portion of the base at latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  11. Effects of two stormwater management methods on the quality of water in the upper Biscayne aquifer at two commercial areas in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.; Irwin, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continued effort to assess the effects of urban stormwater recharge on the water quality of the Biscayne aquifer in southeast Florida. In this report, the water-quality effects on shallow ground water resulting from stormwater disposal by exfiltration trench and grassy swale were investigated at two small commercial areas in Dade County, Florida. One study area (airport ) was located near the Miami International Airport and had a drainage area of about 10 acres overlying a sandy soil; the other study area ( free zone ) was located at the Miami International Free Trade Zone and had a drainage area of about 20 acres overlying limestone. The monitoring design for each study area consisted of seven sites and included water-quality sampling of the stormwater in the catch basin of the exfiltration trench, ground water from two wells 1 foot from the trench (trench wells), two wells 20 feet from the trench, and ground water from two wells at the swale from April 1985 through May 1986. Eleven water-quality variables (target variables) commonly found in high levels in urban stormwater runoff were used as tracers to estimate possible changes in ground-water quality that may have been caused by stormwater recharge. Comparison of the distribution of target variables indicated that the concentrations tended to be greater in the stormwater in the exfiltration trench than in water from the two wells 1 foot from the trench at both study areas. The concentration difference for several target variables was statistically significant at the 5-percent level. Lead, for example, had median concentrations of 23 and 4 micrograms per liter, respectively, in stormwater and water from the two trench wells at the airport study area, and 38 and 2 micrograms per liter, respectively, in stormwater and groundwater at the free zone. Similar reductions in concentrations between stormwater and water from the two trench wells were indicated for zinc at both study areas and also

  12. Notoedric mange in the Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi).

    PubMed

    Maehr, D S; Greiner, E C; Lanier, J E; Murphy, D

    1995-04-01

    Notoedric mange (Notoedres cati) was found in a neonate Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi) and presumably its mother on 22 June 1992 and 8 February 1993, respectively, in Collier County, Florida (USA). Both infestations were treated successfully with 0.2 mg/kg ivermectin. This is the first known case of notoedric mange in the endangered Florida panther.

  13. Tools and data acquisition of borehole geophysical logging for the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant in support of a groundwater, surface-water, and ecological monitoring plan, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs were obtained from selected exploratory coreholes in the vicinity of the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant. The geophysical logging tools used and logging sequences performed during this project are summarized herein to include borehole logging methods, descriptions of the properties measured, types of data obtained, and calibration information.

  14. Condolence books: language and meaning in the mourning for Hillsborough and Diana.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article reports empirical research into public books of condolence signed following two key mourning events within British culture: the 1989 Hillsborough soccer stadium disaster and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. The author suggests that not only do condolence books provide valuable historical record of the way contemporary society mourns, but also that they reflect attempts to language loss in ways that can be used to evaluate the extent of society's engagement with death. In so doing, he points to ways in which condolence messages signed following these events oscillate between "conservative structures of meaning" (Marris, 1974) and contemporary "structures of feeling" (Williams, 1971). In turn he suggests that such distinctions--between public and private, modernity and tradition--are destabilized by the postmodern cultural forms that these events appeared to inaugurate. In addition, and in the purported absence of expressivist mourning rituals (Gorer, 1965), the author suggests that condolence books may provide a useful social platform for the social expression of grief.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 122 - Counties With Unincorporated Urbanized Areas Greater Than 100,000, But Less Than 250,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 162,202 Colorado Arapahoe 103,248 Florida Broward 142,329 Escambia 167,463 Hillsborough 398,593 Lee 102,337 Manatee 123,828 Orange 378,611 Palm Beach 360,553 Pasco 148,907 Pinellas 255,772 Polk 121,528... 52,923 Washington 116,687 South Carolina Greenville 147,464 Richland 130,589 Virginia Arlington...

  16. A Community Affair in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Margo

    2012-01-01

    Volusia County (Florida) Schools' Career and Technical Education (CTE) program has a high school graduation rate of 95 percent. That beats the districtwide rate of 78 percent. That's not all: The 4,500 students enrolled in 33 different career programs at 10 high schools have higher grade point averages in general and do better in Advanced…

  17. Scleria lacustris (Cyperaceae), an aquatic and wetland sedge introduced to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacono, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    A non-native species of Scleria, S. lacustris is reported from six counties and three major hydrologic regions in Florida. Biogeography and habitat in Florida are addressed. A description, key features and illustration are presented.

  18. Building America Case Study: Supplemental Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump in the Hot-Humid Climate, Brevard and Volusia Counties, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2016-02-01

    "The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes), ducted and space coupled heat pump water heater (8 homes), exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes), window retrofit (3 homes), smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics), heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes), and variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  19. Factors Affecting School Quality in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that are theorized to be determinants of school quality in the 67 counties of Florida from 2000 to 2011. The model constructed for this purpose is comprised of a mix of independent variables that include county educational attainment (number of high school graduates and State University System enrollees) and…

  20. Factors affecting compliance with colorectal cancer screening among households residing in the largely Haitian community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; de la Vega, Pura Rodriguez; Castro, Grettel; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-05-01

    The United States Black population is disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of incidence and mortality. Studies suggest that screening rates are lower among Blacks compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). However, studies on CRC screening within Black subgroups are lacking. This study examined disparities in blood stool test (BST) compliance and colonoscopy use by race/ethnicity (Haitian, NHW, non-Hispanic Black [NHB], and Hispanic) among randomly selected households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida.This study used cross-sectional, health and wellness data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within 951 households in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012. BST compliance and colonoscopy use were self-reported and defined, conservatively, as the use of BST within the past 2 years and the ever use of colonoscopy by any household member. Factors associated with BST compliance and colonoscopy use were identified using logistic regression models. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member ≥50 years (n = 666).Nearly half of the households were compliant with BST (rate [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 45% [41%-49%]) and completed colonoscopy (rate [95% CI] = 53% [49%-58%]). Compliance with BST was not associated with race/ethnicity (P = 0.76). Factors independently associated with BST compliance included low educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.63, P = 0.03), being single (AOR = 0.47, P = 0.004), retirement (AOR = 1.96, P = 0.01), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.24, P = 0.01). Colonoscopy use was lower among Haitian households (46%) compared with NHW (63%), NHB (62%), and Hispanic households (54%) (P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with colonoscopy use included identifying as NHB (compared with Haitian) (AOR = 1.80, P = 0.05), being single (AOR = 0.44, P = 0

  1. Origins and delineation of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and changes in the distribution of saltwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Intrusion of saltwater into parts of the shallow karst Biscayne aquifer is a major concern for the 2.5 million residents of Miami-Dade County that rely on this aquifer as their primary drinking water supply. Saltwater intrusion of this aquifer began when the Everglades were drained to provide dry land for urban development and agriculture. The reduction in water levels caused by this drainage, combined with periodic droughts, allowed saltwater to flow inland along the base of the aquifer and to seep directly into the aquifer from the canals. The approximate inland extent of saltwater was last mapped in 1995. An examination of the inland extent of saltwater and the sources of saltwater in the aquifer was completed during 2008–2011 by using (1) all available salinity information, (2) time-series electromagnetic induction log datasets from 35 wells, (3) time-domain electromagnetic soundings collected at 79 locations, (4) a helicopter electromagnetic survey done during 2001 that was processed, calibrated, and published during the study, (5) cores and geophysical logs collected from 8 sites for stratigraphic analysis, (6) 8 new water-quality monitoring wells, and (7) analyses of 69 geochemical samples. The results of the study indicate that as of 2011 approximately 1,200 square kilometers (km2) of the mainland part of the Biscayne aquifer were intruded by saltwater. The saltwater front was mapped farther inland than it was in 1995 in eight areas totaling about 24.1 km2. In many of these areas, analyses indicated that saltwater had encroached along the base of the aquifer. The saltwater front was mapped closer to the coast than it was in 1995 in four areas totaling approximately 6.2 km2. The changes in the mapped extent of saltwater resulted from improved spatial information, actual movement of the saltwater front, or a combination of both. Salinity monitoring in some of the canals in Miami-Dade County between 1988 and 2010 indicated influxes of saltwater, with maximum

  2. On the Season, a Report of a Public Health Project Conducted Among Negro Migrant Agricultural Workers in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Robert H.; Northcutt, Travis J., Jr.

    A 5-year project to develop public health services for migrant workers was initiated in Florida in 1956. The project staff consisted of 8 public health personnel: 2 public health nurses, a public health educator, a public health nutritionist, a medical social worker, a part-time sanitarian, a liaison worker, and a secretary. Two practicing…

  3. Educational Plant Survey. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences on Campus--Alachua County. April 4-5, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a systematic study and evaluation of the existing educational plants of the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), along with a determination of future plant needs. Section 1 contains an introduction to the educational plant survey, including statutory foundations, procedural…

  4. Final Environmental Assessment for Maintaining the Rim Canal at Avon Park Air Force Range, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    South Highlands Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Polk County Developmental Services Drawer CS05 Bartow, Florida 33831-9005 South Florida Water ...the Rim Canal. These numbers were queried by APAFR GIS databases as of April 2010. APAFR is located in Polk and Highlands Counties in Central...Sebring, Florida. The major highways serving the range are US Highway 27 and Polk and Highlands County Road 64. APAFR is the largest bombing and gunnery

  5. 75 FR 29671 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Florida; Approval of Section 110(a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ...; and the Southeast Florida Area comprises Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach Counties. These maintenance..., Florida submitted redesignation requests for Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach Counties in association with... Emissions Inventory Southeast Florida Tampa Bay Jacksonville Miami-Dade Broward Palm Beach...

  6. 77 FR 53225 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Seminole Tribe of Florida Fee-to-Trust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Fee-to-Trust, City of Coconut Creek, Broward County, FL AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior... (BIA) as lead agency, with the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Tribe), City of Coconut Creek (City), and...-Trust Project, City of Coconut Creek, Florida, Broward County, Florida. This notice announces that...

  7. Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1953 architectural drawings by Horowick & Lee, Architects, Jacksonville, Florida) EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Photography Laboratory, 2617 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  8. Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1953 architectural drawings by Horowick & Lee, Architects, Jacksonville, Florida) FLOOR PLAN AND SCHEDULES - MacDill Air Force Base, Photography Laboratory, 2617 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  9. School Desegregation; A Report Card from the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John

    This report provides an account of the desegregation process in several southern states. It contains detailed case studies of five southern school districts (Charlotte-Mecklenburg County, North Carolina; Williamsburg County, South Carolina; Clarke County, Georgia; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Hillsborough County, Florida) and shorter profiles of six…

  10. Marketing Fresh Produce to Local Schools: The North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Cultivating Schools as Customers in a Local Market: The New North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Acquiring Capital and Establishing a Credit History: The North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Success of the New North Florida Cooperative: A Progress Report on Producer Direct Sales to School Districts. Small Farmer Success Story. Bulletins 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    These four bulletins describe how a group of limited-resource small farmers in northern Florida's Jackson County, the USDA, the West Florida Resource Conservation and Development Council, Florida A&M University, and the Federation of Southern Cooperatives organized the New North Florida Cooperative to increase farm income by introducing…

  11. Influence of evaporation, ground water, and uncertainty in the hydrologic budget of Lake Lucerne, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Terrie Mackin; Swancar, Amy

    1997-01-01

    A detailed hydrologic budget was constructed of a seepage lake of sinkhole origin in the karst terrain of central Florida. During the drought period studied, lake evaporation computed by the energy-budget and mass-transfer methods was the largest component in the budget, followed by rainfall. Ground-water inflow contributed about one-third of the total inflow. Lake leakage was about one-fourth of the evaporative losses and was increased substantially by pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer.

  12. Potential for water-quality degradation of interconnected aquifers in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.; Brendle, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    area was defined where there is a potential for water- quality degradation due to improperly cased wells. This area was delineated based on where there is an upward component of ground-water flow and where there is an occurrence of poor-quality water. The delineated area includes parts of Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte, De Soto, and Hardee Counties. To prevent further contamination of the aquifers, the Southwest Florida Water Management District began the Quality of Water Improvement Program in 1974 to restore hydrologic conditions altered by improperly constructed wells or deteriorating casings. As of May 1994, more than 3,000 wells have been inspected and approximately 1,350 have been plugged. To minimize interaquifer contamination, existing wells, especially ones with black-iron casing, should be inspected and, if necessary, repaired with new casing or plugged.

  13. Relations between precipitation, groundwater withdrawals, and changes in hydrologic conditions at selected monitoring sites in Volusia County, Florida, 1995--2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Louis C.

    2012-01-01

    A study to examine the influences of climatic and anthropogenic stressors on groundwater levels, lake stages, and surface-water discharge at selected sites in northern Volusia County, Florida, was conducted in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water-level data collected at 20 monitoring sites (17 groundwater and 3 lake sites) in the vicinity of a wetland area were analyzed with multiple linear regression to examine the relative influences of precipitation and groundwater withdrawals on changes in groundwater levels and lake stage. Analyses were conducted across varying periods of record between 1995 and 2010 and included the effects of groundwater withdrawals aggregated from municipal water-supply wells located within 12 miles of the project sites. Surface-water discharge data at the U.S. Geological Survey Tiger Bay canal site were analyzed for changes in flow between 1978 and 2001. As expected, water-level changes in monitoring wells located closer to areas of concentrated groundwater withdrawals were more highly correlated with withdrawals than were water-level changes measured in wells further removed from municipal well fields. Similarly, water-level changes in wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, the source of municipal supply, were more highly correlated with groundwater withdrawals than were water-level changes in wells tapping the shallower surficial aquifer system. Water-level changes predicted by the regression models over precipitation-averaged periods of record were underestimated for observations having large positive monthly changes (generally greater than 1.0 foot). Such observations are associated with high precipitation and were identified as points in the regression analyses that produced large standardized residuals and/or observations of high influence. Thus, regression models produced by multiple linear regression analyses may have better predictive capability in wetland environments when applied to periods of average or below average

  14. Hookworms of feral cats in Florida.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tara Creel; Foster, Garry W; Forrester, Donald J

    2003-07-10

    Thirty feral cats (Felis catus) from Alachua county (northern Florida) and 30 from Palm Beach county (southern Florida) were examined for hookworms. Two species, Ancylostoma tubaeforme and Ancylostoma braziliense, were identified. Forty-five cats (75%) were infected with A. tubaeforme, with a mean intensity of 48 hookworms per cat. Twenty cats (33%) were infected with A. braziliense, with a mean intensity of 28 worms per cat. The prevalence of A. tubaeforme was greater than that of A. braziliense in Alachua (P=0.002) and Palm Beach (P=0.004) counties. The intensity of A. tubaeforme infections was higher in Palm Beach county than Alachua county (P=0.013). The intensities of A. tubaeforme and A. braziliense were positively correlated (increased together) in Palm Beach county (P=0.011). These hookworms have also been identified in bobcats (Felis rufus), gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Florida. The prevalence of A. tubaeforme was significantly greater in feral cats than those reported in bobcats (P<0.001). The prevalence of A. braziliense was significantly greater in feral cats than in those reported in gray foxes (P=0.008). The hookworm that infects Florida panthers and bobcats, A. pluridentatum, was not found.

  15. Dengue in Florida (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  16. Potentiometric surface of the intermediate aquifer system, west- central Florida, May 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewelling, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    The intermediate aquifer system within the Southwest Florida Water Management District underlies a 5,000 sq mi area of De Soto, Sarasota, Hardee, Manatee, and parts of Charlotte, Hillsborough, Highlands, and Polk Counties. The intermediate aquifer system occurs between the overlying surficial aquifer system and the underlying Floridan aquifer system, and consists of layers of sand, shell, clay, marl, limestone, and dolom of the Tamiami, Hawthorn, and Tampa Formations of late Tertiary age. The intermediate aquifer system contains one or more water-bearing units separated by discontinuous confining units. This aquifer system is the principal source of potable water in the southwestern part of the study area and is widely used as a source of water in other parts where wells are open to the intermediate aquifer system or to both the intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems. Yields of individual wells open to the intermediate aquifer system range from a few gallons to several hundred gallons per minute. The volume of water withdrawn from the intermediate aquifer system is considerably less than that withdrawn from the Floridan aquifer system in the study area. The surface was mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and is represented on maps by contours that connect points of equal altitude. The compos potentiometric surface of all water-bearing units within the intermediate aquifer system is shown. In areas where multiple aquifers exist, wells open to all aquifers were selected for water level measurements whenever possible. In the southwestern and lower coastal region of the study area, two aquifers and confining units are described for the intermediate aquifer system: the Tamiami-upper Hawthorn aquifer and the underlying lower Hawthorn-upper Tampa aquifer. The potentiometric surface of the Tamiami-upper Hawthorn aquifer is also shown. Water levels are from wells drilled and open exclusively to that aquifer. The exact boundary for the

  17. An Ecological Study of the Lagoons Surrounding the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida. Volume I; Experimental Results and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, T. A.; Lasater, J. A.; Clark, K. B.; Kalajian, E. H.; Dubbelday, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    The studies reported here are the result of a three year effort to define the major biological, microbiological, chemical and geological characteristics of the water of the Indian River lagoon around the Kennedy Space Center and to determine the movements of those waters within and between the various basins. This work was the result of a jointly funded agreement between the Florida Institute of Technology and John F. Kennedy Space Center, NASA under NASA Grant NGR 10-015-008, dated April 11, 1972. This cost sharing grant was renewed for each of two successive years. Sampling operations were terminated August 31, 1975.

  18. Estimating Hydraulic Properties of the Floridan Aquifer System by Analysis of Earth-Tide, Ocean-Tide, and Barometric Effects, Collier and Hendry Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Aquifers are subjected to mechanical stresses from natural, non-anthropogenic, processes such as pressure loading or mechanical forcing of the aquifer by ocean tides, earth tides, and pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere. The resulting head fluctuations are evident even in deep confined aquifers. The present study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the research that has been done on the use of these phenomena for estimating the values of aquifer properties, and determining which of the analytical techniques might be useful for estimating hydraulic properties in the dissolved-carbonate hydrologic environment of southern Florida. Fifteen techniques are discussed in this report, of which four were applied. An analytical solution for head oscillations in a well near enough to the ocean to be influenced by ocean tides was applied to data from monitor zones in a well near Naples, Florida. The solution assumes a completely non-leaky confining unit of infinite extent. Resulting values of transmissivity are in general agreement with the results of aquifer performance tests performed by the South Florida Water Management District. There seems to be an inconsistency between results of the amplitude ratio analysis and independent estimates of loading efficiency. A more general analytical solution that takes leakage through the confining layer into account yielded estimates that were lower than those obtained using the non-leaky method, and closer to the South Florida Water Management District estimates. A numerical model with a cross-sectional grid design was applied to explore additional aspects of the problem. A relation between specific storage and the head oscillation observed in a well provided estimates of specific storage that were considered reasonable. Porosity estimates based on the specific storage estimates were consistent with values obtained from measurements on core samples. Methods are described for determining aquifer diffusivity by comparing the

  19. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Hillsborough County Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  20. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Hillsborough County Public Schools. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  1. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Hillsborough County Public Schools. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  2. Estimated sand and gravel resources of the South Merrimack, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, 7.5-minute quadrangle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, D.M.; Drew, L.J.; Fowler, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    A computer methodology is presented that allows natural aggregate producers, local governmental, and nongovernmental planners to define specific locations that may have sand and gravel deposits meeting user-specified minimum size, thickness, and geographic and geologic criteria, in areas where the surficial geology has been mapped. As an example, the surficial geologic map of the South Merrimack quadrangle was digitized and several digital geographic information system databases were downloaded from the internet and used to estimate the sand and gravel resources in the quadrangle. More than 41 percent of the South Merrimack quadrangle has been mapped as having sand and (or) gravel deposited by glacial meltwaters. These glaciofluvial areas are estimated to contain a total of 10 million m3 of material mapped as gravel, 60 million m3 of material mapped as mixed sand and gravel, and another 50 million m3 of material mapped as sand with minor silt. The mean thickness of these areas is about 1.95 meters. Twenty tracts were selected, each having individual areas of more than about 14 acres4 (5.67 hectares) of stratified glacial-meltwater sand and gravel deposits, at least 10-feet (3.0 m) of material above the watertable, and not sterilized by the proximity of buildings, roads, streams and other bodies of water, or railroads. The 20 tracts are estimated to contain between about 4 and 10 million short tons (st) of gravel and 20 and 30 million st of sand. The five most gravel-rich tracts contain about 71 to 82 percent of the gravel resources in all 20 tracts and about 54-56 percent of the sand. Using this methodology, and the above criteria, a group of four tracts, divided by narrow areas sterilized by a small stream and secondary roads, may have the highest potential in the quadrangle for sand and gravel resources. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006.

  3. Hydrogeology, estimated impact, and regional well monitoring of effects of subsurface wastewater injection, Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1981-01-01

    Six proposed injection sites are located in Pinellas County, Fla., and the city of St. Petersburg. Projected maximum injection rate, if all sites become operational, will be about 40 million gallons per day. The injection zone at the proposed sites is in a consistently dolomitized section of the Avon Park Limestone in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer. The injection zone contains saline ground water that has a chloride concentration of 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Pressure and velocity changes were computed at selected regional locations in the upper and lower parts of the Floridan aquifer. Results of the model computations suggest that the regional impact after 20 years of injection will be small. Three locations are proposed for regional monitoring of subsurface injection. They are in the vicinity of the intersection of highways U.S. 19 and U.S. 60 in Pinellas County, Sun City in Hillsborough County, and the intersection of Sheldon Road and Gunn Highway in Hillsborough County. (USGS)

  4. Survey of Student Interest in Home Economics Wage-Earning Programs and Employment Opportunities in Home Economics Related Occupations in Dade County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Margaret R.

    Occupational areas and coincident student interest in home economics were surveyed in Dade County to provide a basis for future program planning. Surveyed were 11,402 junior and senior high school students enrolled in home and family education courses in May 1972 and 64 employers in home economics related occupations. A series of recommendations…

  5. The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study And Evaluability Assessment. Final Report. Chapin Hall Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This publication reports findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

  6. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Simulation modeling techniques can by used advantageously in estimating artesian flow rates of wells in the upper Floridan Aquifer or for estimating transmissivity based in measured flow rates. The generalized aquifer model was useful in testing conceptual models of the relation between the various aquifers and confining layers beneath the surface of Dade County.

  7. A Gathering Storm: How Palm Beach County Schools Fail Poor and Minority Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Lisa A.; Wheelock, Anne; First, Joan

    This report takes a hard look at the day-to-day workings of Palm Beach County (Florida) schools to explain why the systemic change model of Florida's current reform legislation is likely to fail the students in greatest need of improved schooling. The Palm Beach County School District is the 4th largest district in Florida, and the 15th largest in…

  8. 1. VIEW OF SILVER CITY WITH EAST SIDE OF FLORIDA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF SILVER CITY WITH EAST SIDE OF FLORIDA MOUNTAIN IN BACKGROUND. CAMERA POINTED WEST. (THE SNOW BANK IN THE SADDLE SERVES AS AN ORIENTATION/RELATIONSHIP POINT AND IS INCLUDED IN PHOTOGRAPH ID-31-G-1.) - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  9. 3. WEST SIDE OF FLORIDA MOUNTAIN UPSLOPE FROM CAMERA POINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WEST SIDE OF FLORIDA MOUNTAIN UPSLOPE FROM CAMERA POINTED SOUTH SOUTHEAST. THE LOW POINT ON THE HORIZON LINE ON THE FAR RIGHT OF THE IMAGE IS THE GENERAL DIRECTION TO GO TO UPPER/LOWER NOTTINGHAM. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  10. Using state-of-the-art technology to evaluate saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The fresh groundwater supplies of many communities have been adversely affected or limited by saltwater intrusion. An insufficient understanding of the origin of intruded saltwater may lead to inefficient or ineffective water-resource management. A 2008–2012 cooperative U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Miami-Dade County study of saltwater intrusion describes state-of-the art technology used to evaluate the origin and distribution of this saltwater.

  11. Quality of ground water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida, 1996-1998, with emphasis on contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, Anne; McPherson, Benjamin F.; Miller, Ronald L.; Kish, George; Bernard, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The high permeability of the sand and limestone sediments and shallow water table of the Biscayne aquifer make ground water vulnerable to contamination by human activities. To assess potential contamination in the aquifer, untreated ground water was sampled from 30 public-supply wells (40-165 feet deep) in Broward, Miami-Dade, and Palm Beach Counties, 32 shallow wells (10-50 feet deep) in a recently urbanized (residential and light commercial) part of Broward County, and 3 shallow reference wells in Broward County. Results from sample analyses indicate that major ions, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace element concentrations were generally within the range indicative of background concentrations, except for: (1) substantially higher bromide concentrations in water from public-supply wells in southern Miami-Dade County; (2) a few relatively high (greater than 2 milligrams per liter) concentrations of nitrate in water from public-supply wells near agricultural lands in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties; and (3) a few relatively high concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) in water from some shallow urban wells near golf courses. Pesticides were detected in every public-supply well, in most of the shallow, urban monitoring wells (78 percent), and in one reference well; however, no pesticide concentration exceeded any drinking-water standard. Fifteen different pesticides or their degradation products were detected. The most frequently detected pesticides were atrazine and tebuthiuron; less frequently detected were the herbicides diuron, fenuron, prometon, metolachlor, simazine, and 2,6-diethylaniline. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in most of the public-supply wells (77 percent) and shallow, urban wells (91 percent) and in two of the three reference wells. Thirty-two different VOCs were detected in ground water in the Biscayne aquifer, with cis-1,2-dichloroethene the most frequently detected VOC in the public

  12. Destination of Dade County Public High School Graduates. Information Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Cathy

    This study, which uses data from the Florida Department of Education Readiness for College reports, tracks Dade County Public High School (DCPS) graduates' entries into Florida colleges during the year following their graduation. During the 1996-1997 year, 43% (5,773 graduates) did not enter public secondary education in Florida. Of the 7,805…

  13. 77 FR 55787 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Clay County, FL, and Incorporated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Clay County, FL, and Incorporated Areas AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Clay County, Florida, and Incorporated... Clay County, Florida. FEMA is withdrawing the proposed rulemaking and intends to ] publish a Notice...

  14. Hydrology of the southern parts of Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida, with special emphasis on the upper limestone of the Floridan Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, D.E.; Hayes, L.R.; Kwader, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Increasing population in southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties have resulted in regional declines in the potentiometric surface of the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer. Water levels have declined as much as 160 feet since 1940, and during peak seasonal demand as much as 190 feet. The Pensacola clay confining bed inhibits interchange of water between the Floridan aquifer and the surficial sand-and-gravel aquifer. The latter aquifer is of secondary importance as a public supply source. The Bucatunna clay confining bed separates the Floridan into upper and lower limestone units; the Floridan is underlain by the relatively impermeable Lisbon/Tallahatta confining unit. The Floridan aquifer dips south to the Gulf of Mexico, and is recharged by rainfall in northern Okaloosa and Walton Counties and in Alabama. The regional gradient of the potentiometric surface of the upper limestone, and presumably that of the lower limstone also, is south. Pumpage was variable in 1978; from 10.9 to 19.0 million gallons per day in January and June, respectively. Saline water in the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer is less than 10 milligrams per liter inland but may be more than 150 milligrams per liter along the coast. Lower limestone water may exceed 250 milligrams per liter chloride. (USGS)

  15. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1952 architectural drawings by Strategic Air Command, MacDill Air Force Base) BASE LAYOUT, 1952 - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  16. Public-health assessment for American Creosote Works Inc. , Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD008161994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-29

    The American Creosote Works, Inc., National Priorities List (NPL) site, is near Pensacola Bay in Pensacola, Florida. American Creosote operated a wood preserving business from 1902 until 1981. Soils, buried sludge, ground water, sediments, and air are contaminated with numerous of chemicals including; pentachlorophenol, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and benzene. Children trespassing on the site are likely to be exposed to pentachlorophenol, PAHs, and PCDDs/PCDFs in the soil via incidental ingestion and may suffer chloracne, liver damage, and an increased risk of cancer. Incidental ingestion of off-site soil by children may also increase their risk of chloracne and liver damage, but actual health effects depend on the frequency and duration of the exposure. Inhalation of benzene in the on-site air may increase the lifetime risk of cancer for children and other site trespassers. The site is a public health hazard due to the risk of adverse health effects from long term exposure to hazardous chemicals in the air, soil, and ground water.

  17. Guardianship of the Elderly in Tallahassee, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Roger; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined incompetency and guardianship proceedings in Leon County, Florida, by observing court hearings and evaluating probate court records for 1977-82. All incompetency petitions were affirmed by the court, often without evidence describing alleged disabilities. Recommendations for statutory change, judicial remedy, and education and training…

  18. Florida Everglades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Spanning the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairie, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, and hardwood hammocks, as well as marine and estuarine environments. The park is known for its rich bird life, particularly large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron, and a variety of egrets. It is also the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 2, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  19. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  20. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FRONT ELEVATION DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  1. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  2. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) EXTERIOR AND MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  3. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FLOOR PLAN AND BENCH DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Base Theater, 2420 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  4. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Base Theater, 2420 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  5. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FIRST FLOOR AND CEILING PLAN - MacDill Air Force Base, Base Theater, 2420 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  6. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of War Department Theater in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General)STRUCTURAL - FOUNDATIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Base Theater, 2420 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  7. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) CELL BLOCK DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  8. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists

    PubMed Central

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E.; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide. PMID:20824108

  9. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide.

  10. Description and field analysis of a coupled ground-water/surface-water flow model (MODFLOW/BRANCH) with modifications for structures and wetlands in southern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.; Howie, Barbara; Dixon, Joann

    1996-01-01

    A coupled surface-water model (BRANCH) and ground-water model (MODFLOW) model were tested to simulate the interacting wetlands/surface-water/ ground-water system of southern Dade County. Several options created for the MODFLOW ground- ground-water model were used in representing this field situation. The primary option is the MODBRANCH interfacing software, which allows leakage to be accounted for between the MODFLOW ground-water model and the BRANCH dynamic model for simulation of flow in an interconnected network of open channels. A modification to an existing software routine, which is referred to as BCF2, allows cells in MODFLOW to rewet when dry--a requirement in representing the seasonal wetlands in Dade County. A companion to BCF2 is the modified evapotranspiration routine EVT2. The EVT2 routine changes the cells where evapotranspiration occurs, depending on which cells are wet. The Streamlink package represents direct connections between the canals and wetlands at locations where canals open directly into overland flow. Within the BRANCH model, the capability to represent the numerous hydraulic structures, gated spillways, gated culverts, and pumps was added. The application of these modifications to model surface-water/ground-water interactions in southern Dade County demonstrated the usefulness of the coupled MODFLOW/BRANCH model. Ground-water and surface-water flows are both simulated with dynamic models. Flow exchange between models, intermittent wetting and drying, evapotranspiration, and hydraulic structure operations are all represented appropriately. Comparison was made with a simulation using the RIV1 package instead of MODBRANCH to represent the canals. RIV1 represents the canals by user-defined stages, and computes leakage to the aquifer. Greater accuracy in reproducing measured ground- water heads was achieved with MODBRANCH, which also computes dynamic flow conditions in the canals, unlike RIV1. The surface-water integrated flow and transport

  11. Analysis of water-level fluctuations of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett-- two landlocked lakes in a karst terrane in Volusia County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The water levels of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett in Volusia County, Fla., correlate reasonably well during dry spells but only poorly during wet spells. Disparities develop mostly at times when the lake levels rise abruptly owing to rainstorms passing over the lake basins. The lack of correlation is attributed to the uneven distribution of the storm rainfall, even though the average annual rainfall at National Weather Service gages in the general area of the lakes is about the same. Analyses of the monthly rainfall data show that the rainfall variability between gages is sufficient to account for most of the disparity between monthly changes in the levels of the two lakes. The total annual rainfall at times may differ between rainfall gages by as much as 15 to 20 inches. Such differences tend to balance over the long term but may persist in the same direction for two or more years, causing apparent anomalies in lake-level fluctuations. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Simulation of steady-state ground water and spring flow in the upper Floridan aquifer of coastal Citrus and Hernando Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    A digital groundwater flow model was developed to approximate steady-state predevelopment flow conditions in the Upper Floridan aquifer of coastal west-central Florida. The aquifer is the major source of water and natural spring flow in the area. The aquifer was simulated as a one-layer system with constant vertical recharge and discharge rates. Calibrated transmissivities ranged from 8,640 sq ft/day in the northern part of the area to nearly 13,000,000 sq ft/day near large springs. Calibrated inflows were about 2,708 cu ft/sec; of this, about 2,565 cu ft/sec discharged as natural spring flow and 137 cu ft/sec discharged as upward leakage along the coast. The model was used to show how the system might respond to large manmade stresses. Withdrawal of 116 cu ft/sec from a hypothetical regional well field resulted in potentiometric-surface drawdowns ranging from 0.1 to 1.7 ft and declines of generally less than 0.2 ft along the coast. Total spring flow decreased 5%, and the effect on individual springs varied from 0.1 to 8.0%. Withdrawal of 62 cu ft/sec from the 4-sq-mi node at each spring resulted in six of seven springs to the south of the Chassahowitzka River contributing 50% of their flow to pumpage. Springs located north of the Chassahowitzka River contributed as much as 18% of their flow to pumpage. (USGS)

  13. Quality of water and bottom sediments, and nutrient and dissolved-solids loads in the Apopka-Beauclair Canal, Lake County, Florida, 1986-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Nutrient-rich water enters Lake Beauclair and other lakes downstream from Lake Apopka in the Ocklawaha River chain of lakes in central Florida. Two sources of the nutrient-rich water are Lake Apopka outflow and drainage from farming operations adjacent to the Apopka-Beauclair Canal. Two flow and water- quality monitoring sites were established to measure nutrient and dissolved-solids loads at the outflow from lake Apopka and at a control structure on the Apopka-Beauclair Canal downstream from farming activities. Samples were collected biweekly for analysis of nutrients and monthly for analysis of major ions for 4 years. Most of the nutrient load transported through the lock and dam on the Apopka-Beauclair Canal was transported during periods of high discharge. In April 1987, when discharges were as high as 589 cubic feet per second, loads transported through the lock and dam accounted for 59 percent of the ammonia-plus- organic nitrogen load, 61 percent of the total nitrogen load, and 59 percent of the phosphorus load transported during the 1987 water year. Constituent concentrations in annual bottom sediment samples from the canal indicated that most of the constituent load is not being transported down- stream. An alternative approach was derived for determining the relative constituent load from farm input along the canal: Load computations using this approach indicated that, with the exception of phosphorus, nutrient and dissolved-solids loads due to farm activity along the canal account for 10 percent or less of the total load at the Apopka-Beauclair canal lock and dam. (USGS)

  14. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-02-25

    during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Mean October water levels during 2000–2009 were generally higher than during 1990–1999 in much of western Miami-Dade County, but were lower in a large part of eastern Miami-Dade County.

  15. Estimating ground-water exchange with lakes using water-budget and chemical mass-balance approaches for ten lakes in ridge areas of Polk and Highlands counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sacks, L.A.; Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Water budget and chemical mass-balance approaches were used to estimate ground-water exchange with 10 lakes in ridge areas of Polk and Highlands Counties, Florida. At each lake, heads were monitored in the surficial aquifer system and deeper Upper Floridan aquifer, lake stage and rainfall were measured continuously, and lakes and wells were sampled three times between October 1995 and December 1996. The water-budget approach computes net ground-water flow (ground-water inflow minus outflow) as the residual of the monthly waterbudget equation. Net ground-water flow varied seasonally at each of the 10 lakes, and was notably different between lakes, illustrating short-term differences in ground-water fluxes. Monthly patterns in net ground-water flow were related to monthly patterns of other hydrologic variables such as rainfall, ground-water flow patterns, and head differences between the lake and the Upper Floridan aquifer. The chemical mass-balance approach combines the water budget and solute or isotope mass-balance equations, and assumes steady-state conditions. Naturally occurring tracers that were analyzed for include calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and bromide, the isotopes deuterium and oxygen-18. Chloride and sodium were the most successful solute tracers; however, their concentrations in ground water typically varied spatially, and in places were similar to that in lake water, limiting their sensitivity as tracers. In contrast, the isotopes were more robust tracers because the isotopic composition of ground water was relatively uniform and was distinctly different from the lake water. Groundwater inflow computed using the chemical massbalance method varied significantly between lakes, and ranged from less than 10 to more than 150 inches per year. Both water-budget and chemical mass-balance approaches had limitations, but the multiple lines of evidence gained using both approaches improved the understanding of the role of ground water in the

  16. Hydrogeology and Migration of Septic-Tank Effluent in the Surficial Aquifer System in the Northern Midlands Area, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1992-01-01

    The northern Midlands area in Palm Beach County is an area of expected residential growth, but its flat topography, poor drainage, and near-surface marl layers retard rainfall infiltration and cause frequent flooding. Public water supplies and sewer services are not planned for the area, thus, residents must rely on domestic wells and septic tanks. The water table in the northern Midlands area is seldom more than 5 feet below land surface, and regional ground-water flows are east, southwest, and south from the north-central part of the area where ground-water levels are highest. Ground-water quality in the western part of the area and in the Loxahatchee Slough is greatly influenced by residual seawater emplaced during the Pleistocene Epoch. Chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water in the surficial aquifer system in these areas often exceed secondary drinking-water standards. Residual seawater has been more effectively flushed from the more permeable sediments elsewhere in the eastern and southwestern parts of the study area. Test at three septic-tank sites showed traces of effluent in ground water (38-92 feet from the septic tank outlets) and that near-surface marl layers greatly impede the downward migration of the effluent in the surficial aquifer system throughout the northern midlands.

  17. Occurrence of Organic Compounds in Source and Finished Samples from Seven Drinking-Water Treatment Facilities in Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, conducted a reconnaissance study in 2008 to determine the occurrence of 228 organic compounds in raw, source (untreated) and finished (treated) drinking water at seven municipal water-treatment facilities in Miami-Dade County. Results of this sampling study showed that 25 (about 11 percent) of the 228 organic compounds were detected in at least one source water sample and 22 (about 10 percent) were detected in at least one finished water sample. The concentrations of organic compounds in source water samples were less than or equal to 0.2 (u or mu)g/L (micrograms per liter). The concentrations of organic compounds in finished water samples were generally less than or equal to 0.5 (u or mu)g/L, with the exception of bromoform (a possible disinfection byproduct) at estimated concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 2.8 (u or mu)g/L and diethyl phthalate (a plasticizer compound) at 2 (u or mu)g/L.

  18. The application of k-shell x-ray fluorescence to determine bone lead burden and its correlation with hypertension among African Americans in Gadsden County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson-Edwards, Patrice

    Photons from k shell x-ray fluorescence illuminates lead atoms by measuring the characteristic x-rays which indicate the abundance of 210Pb present in a sample. The measurement utilizes a 109Cd source and a low-energy germanium detector, which has emerged as the best available technique for estimating cumulative exposure to lead in adults and for predicting lead-associated risks for adult chronic disease outcomes such as hypertension. The main focus of this study, was to show the correlation between bone lead concentration at the tibia (mean +/- standard deviation of 7+/-1 ppm) and patella (mean +/- standard deviation of 6+/-1 ppm) bone sites and hypertension (mean +/- standard deviation of the systolic standing 143+/-18mmHg, systolic sitting 140+/-17mmHg, diastolic standing 88+/-14 mmHg, and diastolic sitting 81+/-9 mmHg), among the 67 Gadsden County subjects that participated in this study. This was accomplished using FAMU's setup for the detector. The gamma rays emitted by the 109Cd source are scattered by atomic electrons in the k-shell. Excited electrons in the k-shell then spontaneously fluoresce at 88 keV as a signature of lead in the bone. The 88 keV photons are then detected at an angle of 180 degrees with respect to the incident x-ray direction and are detected by the Canberra Germanium solid-state detector bathed in liquid nitrogen. Results show that in this population all lead biomarkers (tibia lead, patella lead, and blood lead) were not significant contributors to the occurrence of hypertension. In the final logistic regression analysis, age and gender were predictors for the occurrence of hypertension at the p<0.05 level in the overall population. This study will help contribute to the understanding of the body's management of lead toxicity and to KXRF techniques currently used in physics research.

  19. Effects of surface runoff and treated wastewater recharge on quality of water in the Floridan aquifer system, Gainesville Area, Alachua County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Rates of recharge to the Floridan aquifer system at four sites in Alachua County were estimated and water samples were analyzed to determine if the recharge water had any effects on the water quality of the aquifer. A total of about 33 million gal/day (mgd) recharges the upper part of the aquifer system at Haile Sink, Alachua Sink, and drainage wells near Lake Alice. At the Kanapaha Wastewater Treatment Plant, injection wells recharge an average of 6.1 mgd into the lower zone of the system. The samples of water entering the aquifer system collected at the four sites generally conformed to the drinking water standards recommended by the EPA in 1983. Bacteria and nutrient concentrations were more variable in the recharge water than were other constituents. Organic compounds such as diazinon, lindane, and malathion were occasionally detected in all recharge water, but concentrations never exceeded recommended limits. Bacteria were detected in most wells sampled near the Gainesville recharge sites. The highest counts were from wells near Alachua Sink. At only one site was there a significant difference between the quality of the recharge water and water from the wells sampled, although the recharge water tended to be lower in calcium and iron than water from the Floridan aquifer system. A sample from a well about 150 ft down-gradient of a drainage well near Lake Alice consisted of turbid water with a total phosphorus concentration of 75 mg/l and total nitrogen concentration of 57 ml/l. Water flowing into the drainage well from the lake had a total nitrogen concentration of 1.6 mg/l. Apparently, nutrient rich suspended sediment in inflow to the drainage well settles out of the water and accumulates in cavities in the limestone. Estimated loads entering the aquifer include 3,500 kg/d of chloride, < 0.4 kg/day of lead, 310 kg/day of nitrogen, and 150 kg/day of phosphorus. The effects of the loads were not detected in most monitor wells. Apparently, some of the

  20. Effects of lowering interior canal stages on salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer in Southeast Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.

    1975-01-01

    Land in southeast Palm Beach County is undergoing a large-scale change in use, from agricultural to residential. To accommodate residential use, a proposal has been made by developers to the Board of the Lake Worth Drainage District to lower the canal stages in the interior part of the area undergoing change. This report documents one of the possible effects of such lowering. Of particular interest to the Board was whether the lower canal stages would cause an increase in salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer along the coast. The two main tools used in the investigation were a digital model for aquifer evaluation and an analytical technique for predicting the movement of the salt-water front in response to a change of ground-water flow into the ocean. The method of investigation consisted of developing a digital ground-water flow model for three east-west test strips. They pass through the northern half of municipal well fields in Lake Worth, Delray Beach, and Boca Raton. The strips were first modeled with no change in interior canal stages. Then they were modeled with a change in canal stages of 2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.6 metres). Also, two land development schemes were tested. One was for a continuation of the present level of land development, simulated by continuing the present pumpage rates. The second scheme was for land development to continue until the maximum allowable densities were reached, simulated by increasing the pumping rates. The results of the test runs for an east-west strip through Lake Worth show that lowering part of the interior canal water levels 3 feet (1.0 metre), as done in 1961, does not affect the aquifer head or salt-water intrusion along the coastal area of Lake Worth. As a result, no effect in the coastal area would be expected as a result of canal stage lowering in other, interior parts of the study area. Results from the other test runs show that lowering interior canal water levels by as much as 4 feet (1.2 metres) would

  1. Hydrogeologic setting, water budget, and preliminary analysis of ground-water exchange at Lake Starr, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.; O'Hare, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Starr, a 134-acre seepage lake of multiple-sinkhole origin on the Lake Wales Ridge of central Florida, was the subject of a detailed water-budget study from August 1996 through July 1998. The study monitored the effects of hydrogeologic setting, climate, and ground-water pumping on the water budget and lake stage. The hydrogeologic setting of the Lake Starr basin differs markedly on the two sides of the lake. Ground water from the surficial aquifer system flows into the lake from the northwest side of the basin, and lake water leaks out to the surficial aquifer system on the southeast side of the basin. Lake Starr and the surrounding surficial aquifer system recharge the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The rate of recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer is determined by the integrity of the intermediate confining unit and by the downward head gradient between the two aquifers. On the inflow side of the lake, the intermediate confining unit is more continuous, allowing ground water from the surficial aquifer system to flow laterally into the lake. Beneath the lake and on the southeast side of the basin, breaches in the intermediate confining unit enhance downward flow to the Upper Floridan aquifer, so that water flows both downward and laterally away from the lake through the ground-water flow system in these areas. An accurate water budget, including evaporation measured by the energy-budget method, was used to calculate net ground-water flow to the lake, and to do a preliminary analysis of the relation of net ground-water fluxes to other variables. Water budgets constructed over different timeframes provided insight on processes that affect ground-water interactions with Lake Starr. Weekly estimates of net ground-water flow provided evidence for the occurrence of transient inflows from the nearshore basin, as well as the short-term effects of head in the Upper Floridan aquifer on ground-water exchange with the lake. Monthly water budgets showed the effects

  2. 76 FR 68439 - BCX Tank Superfund Site; Jacksonville, Duval County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... AGENCY BCX Tank Superfund Site; Jacksonville, Duval County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Tank Superfund Site located in Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida for publication. DATES: The Agency... name BCX Tank Superfund Site by one of the following methods:...

  3. Evaluation of Emerging Contaminants of Concern at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Seasonal Events, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, Arthur C.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has identified highly treated wastewater as a possible water source for the restoration of natural water flows and hydroperiods in selected coastal areas, including the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands. One potential source of reclaimed wastewater for the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands is the effluent from the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant in southern Miami-Dade County. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Wastewater Reuse Technology Pilot Project Delivery Team, initiated a study to assess the presence of emerging contaminants of concern in the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant influent and effluent using current wastewater-treatment methods. As part of the study, 24-hour composite and discrete samples were collected at six locations (influent at plants 1 and 2, effluent pump, reuse train, chlorine dioxide unit, and ultraviolet pilot unit) at the plant during: (1) a dry-season, low-flow event on March 2-3, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 83.7 million gallons per day; (2) a wet-season, average-flow event on July 20-21, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 89.7 million gallons per day; and (3) high-rate disinfection tests on October 5 and 20, 2004, with average flow rates of 84.1 and 119.6 million gallons per day, respectively. During these four sampling events, 26, 27, 29, and 35 constituents were detected, respectively. The following transformations in concentration were determined in the waste stream: -100 to 180 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 85 percent at the reuse train on March 2-3, 2004, and -100 to 1,609 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 832 percent at the reuse train on July 20-21, 2004; -100 to -37 percent at the effluent pump, -100 to -62 percent at the reuse train, -100 to -56 percent at the chlorine dioxide unit, and -100 to -40 percent at the ultraviolet pilot unit on October 5, 2004; and -100 to -4 percent at the

  4. Tropidosteptes forestierae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae: Mirinae): A new species of plant bug injuring ornamental Florida swampprivet, Forestiera segregata (Oleaceae), in South Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mirine plant bug Tropidosteptes forestierae, n. sp. is described from Collier County, Florida, where it was found causing serious injury to an extensive ornamental hedge of Florida swampprivet, Forestiera segretata (Jacq.) Krug & Urb. (Oleaceae). Adults, the fifth instar, and egg are described; ...

  5. Hydrology of Central Florida Lakes - A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lakes are among the most valued natural resources of central Florida. The landscape of central Florida is riddled with lakeswhen viewed from the air, it almost seems there is more water than land. Florida has more naturally formed lakes than other southeastern States, where many lakes are created by building dams across streams. The abundance of lakes on the Florida peninsula is a result of the geology and geologic history of the State. An estimated 7,800 lakes in Florida are greater than 1 acre in surface area. Of these, 35 percent are located in just four counties (fig. 1): Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Polk (Hughes, 1974b). Lakes add to the aesthetic and commercial value of the area and are used by many residents and visitors for fishing, boating, swimming, and other types of outdoor recreation. Lakes also are used for other purposes such as irrigation, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Residents and visitors commonly ask questions such as Whyare there so many lakes here?, Why is my lake drying up (or flooding)?, or Is my lake spring-fed? These questions indicate that the basic hydrology of lakes and the interaction of lakes with ground water and surface water are not well understood by the general population. Because of the importance of lakes to residents of central Florida and the many questions and misconceptions about lakes, this primer was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The USGS has been collecting hydrologic data in central Florida since the 1920s, obtaining valuable information that has been used to better understand the hydrology of the water resources of central Florida, including lakes. In addition to data collection, as of 1994, the USGS had published 66 reports and maps on central Florida lakes (Garcia and Hoy, 1995). The main purpose of this primer is to describe the hydrology of lakes in central

  6. Culex (Culex) declarator, a mosquito species new to Florida.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Richard F; Shroyer, Donald A

    2004-09-01

    One specimen of a mosquito new to Florida, Culex declarator, was first found in 1998 in Indian River County. A 2nd specimen was collected in 2002. Beginning in September 2003, Cx. declarator adults were regularly encountered in routine mosquito surveillance sampling, with more than 300 specimens appearing in 45 collections. Prior to our find, the U.S. distrubution was thought to be restricted to south Texas. The full extent of this species' distribution in Florida has yet to be determined.

  7. Sequence-Stratigraphic Analysis of the Regional Observation Monitoring Program (ROMP) 29A Test Corehole and Its Relation to Carbonate Porosity and Regional Transmissivity in the Floridan Aquifer System, Highlands County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, W. C.; Cunningham, K.J.; Renken, R.A.; Wacker, M.A.; Carlson, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis was made to describe and interpret the lithology of a part of the Upper Floridan aquifer penetrated by the Regional Observation Monitoring Program (ROMP) 29A test corehole in Highlands County, Florida. This information was integrated into a one-dimensional hydrostratigraphic model that delineates candidate flow zones and confining units in the context of sequence stratigraphy. Results from this test corehole will serve as a starting point to build a robust three-dimensional sequence-stratigraphic framework of the Floridan aquifer system. The ROMP 29A test corehole penetrated the Avon Park Formation, Ocala Limestone, Suwannee Limestone, and Hawthorn Group of middle Eocene to Pliocene age. The part of the Avon Park Formation penetrated in the ROMP 29A test corehole contains two composite depositional sequences. A transgressive systems tract and a highstand systems tract were interpreted for the upper composite sequence; however, only a highstand systems tract was interpreted for the lower composite sequence of the deeper Avon Park stratigraphic section. The composite depositional sequences are composed of at least five high-frequency depositional sequences. These sequences contain high-frequency cycle sets that are an amalgamation of vertically stacked high-frequency cycles. Three types of high-frequency cycles have been identified in the Avon Park Formation: peritidal, shallow subtidal, and deeper subtidal high-frequency cycles. The vertical distribution of carbonate-rock diffuse flow zones within the Avon Park Formation is heterogeneous. Porous vuggy intervals are less than 10 feet, and most are much thinner. The volumetric arrangement of the diffuse flow zones shows that most occur in the highstand systems tract of the lower composite sequence of the Avon Park Formation as compared to the upper composite sequence, which contains both a backstepping transgressive systems tract and a prograding highstand systems tract. Although the porous and permeable

  8. Water quality of Tampa Bay, Florida, June 1972-May 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, Carole L.; Goodwin, Carl R.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the water quality of Tampa Bay, Florida, was initiated in 1970 to provide background information to evaluate the effects of widening and deepening the ship channel to the port of Tampa. This report provides results of water-quality sampling in the bay from 1972 to 1976, prior to dredging. Measurements of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance, biochemical oxygen demand, and total organic carbon were made as well as measurements for several nutrient, metal, and pesticide parameters. Many parameters were measured at as many as three points in the vertical. These data indicate that Tampa Bay is well-mixed vertically with little density stratification. Time histories of average temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance and nutrient values within four subareas of Tampa Bay are given to reveal seasonal or other trends during the period of record. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance, nutrient, biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and metal data are also presented as areal distributions. Nutrient concentrations were generally higher in Hillsborough Bay than in other sub-areas of Tampa Bay. Biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and total organic nitrogen distribution patterns show regions of highest concentrations to be along bay shorelines near population centers. Of the metals analyzed, all were present in concentrations of less than 1 milligram per liter. (USGS)

  9. Florida Information Resource Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Francis C.

    1986-01-01

    The Florida Information Resource Network (FIRN) is an effort by the Florida education community and the Florida Legislature to provide an electronic link among all agencies, institutions, and schools in the public education system. The communications link, perhaps one of the most advanced in the nation, has three purposes: (1) to provide equal…

  10. Mangos of Florida, country contribution: Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Florida; geographical distribution of mangos in Florida; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests an...

  11. Florida "State" Migrant Health Project. Third Annual Progress Report, 1965-1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    The Third Annual Report on the Florida Migrant Health Project covered migrant health activities engaged in by 14 counties for the period May 1, 1965, through April 30, 1966. The project was designed to develop a basic statewide program of health services for migrant farm workers and their dependents in Florida. Three of the 12 objectives included…

  12. Genetic relatedness of dengue viruses in Key West, Florida, USA, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Santiago, Gilberto A; Margolis, Harold; Stark, Lillian

    2013-04-01

    Sequencing of dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) strains isolated in Key West/Monroe County, Florida, indicate endemic transmission for >2 years of a distinct and predominant sublineage of the American-African genotype. DENV-1 strains isolated elsewhere in Florida grouped within a separate Central American lineage. Findings indicate endemic transmission of DENV into the continental United States.

  13. Factors Predicting Lawsuits against Nursing Homes in Florida 1997-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher E.; Dobalian, Aram; Burkhard, Janet; Hedgecock, Deborah K.; Harman, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We explore how nursing home characteristics affect the number of lawsuits filed against the facilities in Florida during the period from 1997 to 2001. Design and Methods: We examined data from 478 nursing homes in 30 Florida counties from 1997 to 2001. We obtained the data from Westlaw's Adverse Filings: Lawsuits database, the Online…

  14. Results of Test-Hole Drilling in Well-Field Areas North of Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    A total of 32 test holes were drilled in well-field areas of Hillsborough, Pasco, and Pinellas Counties in the early 1970's to collect information on the hydraulic and geologic properties of shallow formations overlying the Upper Floridan aquifer. Lithologic profiles were compiled and geohydrologic units identified for each test hole. At most test holes, natural-gamma logs were run to identify the confining unit that separates the surficial aquifer system from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Selected core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for vertical hydraulic conductivity, grain size, sorting, specific gravity, effective porosity, cation-exchange capacity, and mineralogy. Following drilling, casing was installed in each test hole and water levels were monitored. The data were used in the preparation of regional water-level maps and in the construction of a numerical model of ground-water flow in the well-field areas.

  15. Citrus County Schools Copyright Guidelines Recommended by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus County School District, Inverness, FL.

    This document contains copyright guidelines determined appropriate for the Citrus County School System (Florida) by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists in May, 1992. These guidelines are based on interpretation and understanding of current copyright law as applied to education and implemented in school districts in the United…

  16. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  17. Estimation of capture zones and drawdown at the Northwest and West Well Fields, Miami-Dade County, Florida, using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis: recent (2004) and proposed conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakefield, Linzy K.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Travel-time capture zones and drawdown for two production well fields, used for drinking-water supply in Miami-Dade County, southeastern Florida, were delineated by the U.S Geological Survey using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis. The well fields, designed to supply a combined total of approximately 250 million gallons of water per day, pump from the highly transmissive Biscayne aquifer in the urban corridor between the Everglades and Biscayne Bay. A transient groundwater flow model was developed and calibrated to field data to ensure an acceptable match between simulated and observed values for aquifer heads and net exchange of water between the aquifer and canals. Steady-state conditions were imposed on the transient model and a post-processing backward particle-tracking approach was implemented. Multiple stochastic realizations of horizontal hydraulic conductivity, conductance of canals, and effective porosity were simulated for steady-state conditions representative of dry, average and wet hydrologic conditions to calculate travel-time capture zones of potential source areas of the well fields. Quarry lakes, formed as a product of rock-mining activities, whose effects have previously not been considered in estimation of capture zones, were represented using high hydraulic-conductivity, high-porosity cells, with the bulk hydraulic conductivity of each cell calculated based on estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, lake depths and aquifer thicknesses. A post-processing adjustment, based on calculated residence times using lake outflows and known lake volumes, was utilized to adjust particle endpoints to account for an estimate of residence-time-based mixing of lakes. Drawdown contours of 0.1 and 0.25 foot were delineated for the dry, average, and wet hydrologic conditions as well. In addition, 95-percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the capture zones and drawdown contours to delineate a zone of uncertainty about the median estimates

  18. Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1941 architectural drawings by Standard Oil Company Engineering Department of Louisville, KY) ELEVATIONS & SECTION - MacDill Air Force Base, Service Station, 7303 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  19. Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1941 architectural drawings by Standard Oil Company Engineering Department of Louisville, KY) PLAN - MacDill Air Force Base, Service Station, 7303 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  20. Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1941 architectural drawings by Standard Oil Company Engineering Department of Louisville, KY) SITE PLAN - MacDill Air Force Base, Service Station, 7303 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL