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Sample records for hip spacer implantation

  1. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report. PMID:22242097

  2. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip replacement surgery, the damaged portions of the hip joint are removed. The ball (femoral head) is removed ... hip or leg Swelling at or near the hip joint A limp or change in walking ability Noise ( ...

  3. Two-Stage Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Infections Using Antibiotic-Impregnated Cement Spacers of Various Types and Materials

    PubMed Central

    Takahira, Naonobu; Moriya, Mitsutoshi; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Minegishi, Yojiro; Sakai, Rina; Itoman, Moritoshi; Takaso, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers of various types and materials have been used in the treatment of periprosthetic hip infections. We developed a handmade spacer by using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and/or α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes in 36 consecutive patients treated with 2-stage revision total hip arthroplasty by using our antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers. We aimed to analyze the infection control and reinfection rates after revision surgery. Moreover, we analyzed the possible predictors of postoperative reinfection. After exclusion of 1 patient who died immediately after the first-stage surgery, infection was controlled in 33 of the 36 hips (success rate, 91.7%). Two of these 33 hips underwent resection arthroplasty. Of the 36 hips that had been treated with the antibiotic-cement spacer, 31 hips (86.1%) were eligible for the second-stage prosthesis re-implantation. The 31 protocol hip joints of patients followed up for >6 months (mean, 48.6 months). Ten of these 31 hips (32.3%) became reinfected. No possible predictor examined differed significantly between the reinfection-positive and reinfection-negative groups. However, spacers consisting of PMMA cement alone were associated with the highest risk of reinfection. Therefore, α-TCP-containing antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers might decrease the reinfection rate in patients undergoing re-implantation. PMID:24381509

  4. An intramedullary cement spacer in total hip arthroplasty .

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, R G; Thevarajan, K; Kok, C S; Sivapathasundaram, N; George, S V

    1998-02-01

    Revision arthroplasty of the hip is often complicated by infection, bone loss, and perioperative fracture of the femur. A simple, inexpensive spacer that keeps tissue planes intact and prevents soft tissue contracture during the interoperative period of a 2-stage revision is described. This can provide intramedullary support to a fractured or weak femur and enable local antibiotic delivery, as well as permit limited mobilization of the patient. It can be easily fabricated during surgery using universally available materials and can be tailored for specific requirements. Such a spacer was used in 5 cases. The experience is presented, and the technique and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:9526214

  5. [The use of SPACER in the surgical treatment of periendoprosthetic hip infections--own experience].

    PubMed

    Zieńczuk, Witold; Janowiec, Sebastian; Bednarenko, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The work presents the results of the treatment of 6 patients with periendoprosthetic hip infection with the use of the spacer in the Orthopaetic-Traumatic Ward between 01. 09. 2010 and 31. 12. 2013. Each case of infection was treated in two stages. In the first stage, the primary endoprothesis and inflammatory site were removed, and SPACER was implanted. In the second stage, after subsidence of clinical and laboratory symptoms of infection, the surgery was performed involving exchange of the SPACER to a revisory endoprothesis . All the patients were administered Vancomicine intravenously from the day of surgery until the results of bacterial culture were obtained. Then the antibiotic was given intravenously according to the antibiogram for 10 days; in case of negative culture, the therapy with Vancmicinewas continued for 10 days. This was followed by the administration of an oral antibiotic according to antibiogram for 6 weeks, and in case of negative culture, Biseptol 2 x 960 mg was given also for 6 weeks. The second stage of the procedure was carried out between the third and sixth month after the first surgery. In 5 patients inflammatory condition subsided, and a functional result was assessed by the patients as good. In one case inflammation did not heal and the patient remains with "hanging hip"; the result of the treatment was assessed as bad. PMID:26827556

  6. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  7. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  8. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  9. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  10. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  11. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  12. Hip Implant Modified To Increase Probability Of Retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canabal, Francisco, III

    1995-01-01

    Modification in design of hip implant proposed to increase likelihood of retention of implant in femur after hip-repair surgery. Decreases likelihood of patient distress and expense associated with repetition of surgery after failed implant procedure. Intended to provide more favorable flow of cement used to bind implant in proximal extreme end of femur, reducing structural flaws causing early failure of implant/femur joint.

  13. Current status of noncemented hip implants.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H

    1987-01-01

    Recently the operative techniques, instrumentation, design, and material properties of bony ingrowth total hip replacement have been greatly improved. I prefer a hemispherical acetabular component fixed with screws going through the metal shell. The titanium mesh allows microinterlock with new bone, and macrointerlock is obtained by adding bone graft into the unused screw holes. The femoral component, made of Tivanium with titanium mesh attached to it by a new process called diffusion bonding, retains superalloy fatigue strength characteristics. An intimate press fit is assured by the specific operative technique, and both the fiber mesh and the collar provide proximal stress transfer. The design affords a nondestructive method for removal if necessary. The short-term clinical results are promising; most patients function as well as with cemented total hip replacement. The incidence of thigh pain has been significantly reduced since prior reports of cementless total hip replacement; however, a few patients still have thigh pain. The results in revision surgery are also promising, but as in cemented total hip replacement, the functional capacity of revision cases is usually lower than primary cases. There is an increased capacity to correct complex and difficult acetabular problems with this acetabular component. Obviously, long-term data are needed to establish the behavior of these implants over the immediate and long term.

  14. Current status of noncemented hip implants.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H

    1987-01-01

    Recently the operative techniques, instrumentation, design, and material properties of bony ingrowth total hip replacement have been greatly improved. I prefer a hemispherical acetabular component fixed with screws going through the metal shell. The titanium mesh allows microinterlock with new bone, and macrointerlock is obtained by adding bone graft into the unused screw holes. The femoral component, made of Tivanium with titanium mesh attached to it by a new process called diffusion bonding, retains superalloy fatigue strength characteristics. An intimate press fit is assured by the specific operative technique, and both the fiber mesh and the collar provide proximal stress transfer. The design affords a nondestructive method for removal if necessary. The short-term clinical results are promising; most patients function as well as with cemented total hip replacement. The incidence of thigh pain has been significantly reduced since prior reports of cementless total hip replacement; however, a few patients still have thigh pain. The results in revision surgery are also promising, but as in cemented total hip replacement, the functional capacity of revision cases is usually lower than primary cases. There is an increased capacity to correct complex and difficult acetabular problems with this acetabular component. Obviously, long-term data are needed to establish the behavior of these implants over the immediate and long term. PMID:3818349

  15. A preliminary biomechanical study of a novel carbon-fibre hip implant versus standard metallic hip implants.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Rad; Dubov, Anton; Shah, Suraj; Khurshid, Shaheen; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2011-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a widespread surgical approach for treating severe osteoarthritis of the human hip. Aseptic loosening of standard metallic hip implants due to stress shielding and bone loss has motivated the development of new materials for hip prostheses. Numerically, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model that mimicked hip implants was used to compare a new hip stem to two commercially available implants. The hip implants simulated were a novel CF/PA12 carbon-fibre polyamide-based composite hip stem, the Exeter hip stem (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA), and the Omnifit Eon (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA). A virtual axial load of 3 kN was applied to the FE model. Strain and stress distributions were computed. Experimentally, the three hip stems had their distal portions rigidly mounted and had strain gauges placed along the surface at 3 medial and 3 lateral locations. Axial loads of 3 kN were applied. Measurements of axial stiffness and strain were taken and compared to FE analysis. The overall linear correlation between FE model versus experimental strains showed reasonable results for the lines-of-best-fit for the Composite (Pearson R(2)=0.69, slope=0.82), Exeter (Pearson R(2)=0.78, slope=0.59), and Omnifit (Pearson R(2)=0.66, slope=0.45), with some divergence for the most distal strain locations. From FE analysis, the von Mises stress range for the Composite stem was much lower than that in the Omnifit and Exeter implants by 200% and 45%, respectively. The preliminary experiments showed that the Composite stem stiffness (1982 N/mm) was lower than the metallic hip stem stiffnesses (Exeter, 2460 N/mm; Omnifit, 2543 N/mm). This is the first assessment of stress, strain, and stiffness of the CF/PA12 carbon-fibre hip stem compared to standard commercially-available devices.

  16. Controlling the Biomimetic Implant Interface: Modulating Antimicrobial Activity by Spacer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Cate; Vanoosten, Sarah Kay; Boone, Kyle W.; Khvostenko, Dmytro; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection is a common cause of post-operative morbidity, often leading to implant loosening, ultimately requiring revision surgery, increased costs and worse surgical outcomes. Since implant failure starts at the implant surface, creating and controlling the bio-material interface will play a critical role in reducing infection while improving host cell-to-implant interaction. Here, we engineered a biomimetic interface based upon a chimeric peptide that incorporates a titanium binding peptide (TiBP) with an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) into a single molecule to direct binding to the implant surface and deliver an antimicrobial activity against S. mutans and S. epidermidis, two bacteria which are linked with clinical implant infections. To optimize antimicrobial activity, we investigated the design of the spacer domain separating the two functional domains of the chimeric peptide. Lengthening and changing the amino acid composition of the spacer resulted in an improvement of minimum inhibitory concentration by a three-fold against S. mutans. Surfaces coated with the chimeric peptide reduced dramatically the number of bacteria, with up to a nine-fold reduction for S. mutans and a 48-fold reduction for S. epidermidis. Ab initio predictions of antimicrobial activity based on structural features were confirmed. Host cell attachment and viability at the biomimetic interface were also improved compared to the untreated implant surface. Biomimetic interfaces formed with this chimeric peptide offer interminable potential by coupling antimicrobial and improved host cell responses to implantable titanium materials, and this peptide based approach can be extended to various biomaterials surfaces.

  17. Optimal design of composite hip implants using NASA technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Saravanos, D. A.; Davy, D. T.; Waters, S. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using an adaptation of NASA software, we have investigated the use of numerical optimization techniques for the shape and material optimization of fiber composite hip implants. The original NASA inhouse codes, were originally developed for the optimization of aerospace structures. The adapted code, which was called OPORIM, couples numerical optimization algorithms with finite element analysis and composite laminate theory to perform design optimization using both shape and material design variables. The external and internal geometry of the implant and the surrounding bone is described with quintic spline curves. This geometric representation is then used to create an equivalent 2-D finite element model of the structure. Using laminate theory and the 3-D geometric information, equivalent stiffnesses are generated for each element of the 2-D finite element model, so that the 3-D stiffness of the structure can be approximated. The geometric information to construct the model of the femur was obtained from a CT scan. A variety of test cases were examined, incorporating several implant constructions and design variable sets. Typically the code was able to produce optimized shape and/or material parameters which substantially reduced stress concentrations in the bone adjacent of the implant. The results indicate that this technology can provide meaningful insight into the design of fiber composite hip implants.

  18. Successful hip arthroplasty using cementless titanium implants in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Harald; Ramsauer, Thomas; Böhm, Gerhard; Hilzensauer, Gerhard; Dorn, Ulrich; Lintner, Felix

    2002-03-01

    Over a period of eight years, we implanted a total of 76 cementless hip prostheses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical results of 47 patients (70 hips) increased from a mean Harris Hip Score of 33 to 85 after an average of 49 months (range 1-11 years). One threaded cup has had to be revised because of loosening, and one stem because of femoral fracture. At the latest follow-up, 88% of Hofer-Imhof threaded cups had complete bone ingrowth (Type 0); 10% had near-complete bone ingrowth with minimal radiolucency in one third of the bone contact area (Type 1), and 2% had radiolucency in two thirds of the bone contact area (Type 2). Hemispherical push-in cups showed significantly more radiolucency around the cup. For the stems (Uni, Zweymüller SL), 83% showed no radiolucency (Type 0); 17% had radiolucency only very proximally (Type 1). Minor remodelling (Type 1) occurred in 60% of the femoral shafts; 30% had moderate femoral density loss (Type 2), and 10% had severe bone loss and cortical thinning (Type 3). There was no correlation between marked shaft atrophy and clinical symptoms. With regard to radiolucency and remodelling, there was no significant difference between the two types of stem used. Cementless hip arthroplasty using titanium implants has an excellent outcome in the medium term. PMID:11880907

  19. Saving Implants BMP-2 Application in Revision Total Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Emami, R.; Thorey, F.; Krauspe, R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Besides others, there are two major problems in total hip replacement surgery which result in implant failure. First there is aseptic loosening due to a lack of implant biocompatibility or micromovements and second periimplant wear debris induced osteolysis which limits the survival rate of an implant. Regarding to recent data there are only limited therapeutic strategies to heal these bony defects without arthroplasty revision surgery. Since the investigation and characterization of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, a cell and tissue engineering based therapy might be a promising solution to heal endoprosthesis associated bony defects. Moreover the application of growth factors in bone reconstructive surgery is another treatment concept to promote local bone regeneration. Patient and Methods: We report about a 73-year old patient with a painful weight bearing and a large, wear debris induced pelvic osteolysis after total hip arthroplasty. To prevent from salvage surgical procedures and preserve bone, a healing attempted was performed by filling the critical bony defect zone with a BMP-2/MSC composit. Results: Clinical and radiological follow-ups showed a progressive bony healing of the critical size defect area without any complications. Fifteen months after application the patient is still pain free, has no limitations in daily life or sport activities. Conclusion: The case embarks on a strategy of non-embryonic stem cell and growth factor application to heal bony defects at patients with total hip endoprosthesis. PMID:23674982

  20. Iodine-Supported Hip Implants: Short Term Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Kabata, Tamon; Maeda, Toru; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takagi, Tomoharu; Ohmori, Takaaki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new povidone iodine coating technology for titanium hip implants and performed a clinical trial to assess its usefulness in suppressing postoperative infection. Results indicate that iodine-supported titanium has favorable antibacterial activity, biocompatibility, and no cytotoxicity. Thirty joints in 28 patients were treated using iodine-supported implants. Fourteen joints were revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) after periprosthetic infection, 13 were primary THA for immunosuppressive conditions or pyogenic arthritis, and 3 were conversions from hemiarthroplasty to THA for immunosuppressive conditions. Two examinations were conducted sequentially until final follow-up: white blood cell (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured pre- and postoperatively and thyroid hormone levels in the blood were examined. The mean follow-up period was 33 months (14–78). There were no signs of infection in any patient at the last follow-up. WBC and CRP levels returned to normal within several weeks. No abnormalities of thyroid gland function were detected. Loosening of the implants did not occur in any patient. Excellent bone ingrowth and ongrowth were found around prostheses. No cytotoxicity or adverse effects were detected. These results suggest that iodine-supported THA implants can be highly effective in preventing and treating postoperative infections. PMID:26583103

  1. Property changes of UHMW polyethylene hip cup endoprostheses during implantation.

    PubMed

    Eyerer, P; Ke, Y C

    1984-01-01

    In this study it is demonstrated that the combined chemical and mechanical influences of the implant situation cause property changes of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW PE) hip joint cups. Nearly 30 out of 48 loosened cups, retrieved 3 weeks to 11 years after implantation, were investigated. Density measurements show a density increase with implantation time and a dependence of these changes from implant position and loading conditions. The rate of extractable constituents also increases with course of time. An increased in vivo conditioned oxidation of the UHMW PE can be demonstrated by infrared (IR) spectrometry. The density increase can be explained by post-crystallization, which is the result of oxidative chain scission. This leads to a reduction of the average molecular weight of the PE and to an increased extractability of constituents. Since these changes have been recognized as the reasons for aging and failing of UHMW PE, the methods of material characterization used in this study for retrieved implants will help to develop suitable in vitro testing and simulating methods. They are the prerequisite for the necessary improvements of the material properties of UHMW PE. PMID:6544798

  2. Interpreting cobalt blood concentrations in hip implant patients.

    PubMed

    Paustenbach, Dennis J; Galbraith, David A; Finley, Brent L

    2014-02-01

    INTRODUCTION. There has been some recent concern regarding possible systemic health effects resulting from elevated blood cobalt concentrations in patients with cobalt containing hip implants. To date there are no blood cobalt criteria to help guide physicians when evaluating an individual hip implant patient's risk of developing systemic health effects because historically there was little or no concern about systemic cobalt toxicity in implant patients. OBJECTIVE. Our purpose is to describe recently completed research regarding the relationship between blood cobalt concentrations and clinical health effects. We discuss the possibility of systemic health effects in patients with metal containing implants and propose various blood cobalt concentrations that are not associated with an increased risk of developing certain adverse effects. METHODOLOGY. The primary literature search was conducted using PubMed and Web of Science using the following search terms: cobalt AND (toxicity OR health effects OR cardiotoxicity OR hematological OR endocrine OR immunological OR reproductive OR testicular effects OR neurological OR case report OR cohort OR Roncovite). The searches identified 6786 papers of which 122 were considered relevant. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry toxicological profile for cobalt and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessment's documentation on the provisional peer-reviewed toxicity value for cobalt were also utilized to identify secondary literature sources. RESULTS. Our review of the toxicology and medical literature indicates that highly elevated blood cobalt concentrations can result in certain endocrine, hematological, cardiovascular, and neurological effects in animals and/or humans. These studies, in addition to historical clinical findings involving the therapeutic use of cobalt, indicate that significant systemic effects of cobalt will not occur

  3. Antibiotic Spacer Arthroplasty for Revision MTP Arthrodesis: A Novel Means to Build the Implant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bitterman, Adam; Patel, Milap; Gurtowski, James P

    2016-01-01

    Metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA), also known as hallux rigidus (HR), is the most common degenerative arthropathy of the foot and is often the result of trauma. There are multiple methods of addressing the patient’s pain and limited function. Arthrodesis is the gold standard to manage severe MTP arthritis with a highly significant union rate. With various techniques of arthrodesis available, ranging from cannulated screw fixation, Kirschner wires, as well as plate and screw fixation, the orthopedic surgeon has multiple modalities to address this ailment; however, when these fail due to infection, the armament is limited. Through the idea of articulating antibiotic spacers in other regions of the body such as the knee and hip, we present a novel technique to the creation of an antibiotic spacer in the setting of a failed infected MTP arthrodesis.  PMID:27114892

  4. The lubrication performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic hip implant under starved conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingen; Wang, Jing; Yang, Peiran; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication plays an important role in the clinical performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) hip implant in terms of reducing wear and avoiding squeaking. All the previous lubrication analyses of CoC hip implants assumed that synovial fluid was sufficiently supplied to the contact area. The aim of this study was to investigate the lubrication performance of the CoC hip implant under starved conditions. A starved lubrication model was presented for the CoC hip implant. The model was solved using multi-grid techniques. Results showed that the fluid film thickness of the CoC hip implant was affected by fluid supply conditions: with the increase in the supplied fluid layer, the lubrication film thickness approached to that of the fully blooded solution; when the available fluid layer reduced to some level, the fluid film thickness considerably decreased with the supplying condition. The above finding provides new insights into the lubrication performance of hip implants. PMID:26114217

  5. Multiscale design and multiobjective optimization of orthopedic hip implants with functionally graded cellular material.

    PubMed

    Arabnejad Khanoki, Sajad; Pasini, Damiano

    2012-03-01

    Revision surgeries of total hip arthroplasty are often caused by a deficient structural compatibility of the implant. Two main culprits, among others, are bone-implant interface instability and bone resorption. To address these issues, in this paper we propose a novel type of implant, which, in contrast to current hip replacement implants made of either a fully solid or a foam material, consists of a lattice microstructure with nonhomogeneous distribution of material properties. A methodology based on multiscale mechanics and design optimization is introduced to synthesize a graded cellular implant that can minimize concurrently bone resorption and implant interface failure. The procedure is applied to the design of a 2D left implanted femur with optimized gradients of relative density. To assess the manufacturability of the graded cellular microstructure, a proof-of-concept is fabricated by using rapid prototyping. The results from the analysis are used to compare the optimized cellular implant with a fully dense titanium implant and a homogeneous foam implant with a relative density of 50%. The bone resorption and the maximum value of interface stress of the cellular implant are found to be over 70% and 50% less than the titanium implant while being 53% and 65% less than the foam implant.

  6. Design optimization of skeletal hip implant cross-sections using finite-element analysis.

    PubMed

    Beulah, Pearline; Sivarasu, Sudesh; Mathew, Lazar

    2009-01-01

    The major causes for revision surgery after total hip arthroplasty are aseptic loosening, dislocation, wear, design factors, stress shielding on the bone, and mechanical and biological factors. A material with toughness and high wear properties is essential for a good hip implant because these implants fail due to design. Stress shielding is found to be the major cause for the failure of hip implants, and can lead to the implant needing to be replaced or revised, which is painful for the patient and costly for the health care industry. The hip stem designs developed by various manufacturers are solid stems with indentations; stems with collars; collarless, tapered stems; and teardrop-shaped, polished stems without indentations. They are found to have a greater rigidity, and therefore they transfer less load proximally, which results in high proximal stress shielding of the proximal femur. A stem of low stiffness alone would not suffice in achieving a reduced or optimal stress shielding. The existing design proposals to minimize the effect of stress shielding are focused on the use of lightweight materials, composite materials, circular and longitudinal hole patterns, and different hollow-bore depths. A skeletal hip implant with varying cross-sections was designed and finite-element analysis was performed. The skeletal hip implant with a hexagonal cross-section was optimized based on the mass of the implant and the load-bearing capacity. This lightweight, novel design ameliorates implant fixation, minimizes stress shielding, enhances the longevity of the implant, and offers better mobility to the patient. PMID:21083533

  7. High-Tech Hip Implant for Wireless Temperature Measurements In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Georg; Graichen, Friedmar; Dymke, Jörn; Rohlmann, Antonius; Duda, Georg N.; Damm, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    When walking long distances, hip prostheses heat up due to friction. The influence of articulating materials and lubricating properties of synovia on the final temperatures, as well as any potential biological consequences, are unknown. Such knowledge is essential for optimizing implant materials, identifying patients who are possibly at risk of implant loosening, and proving the concepts of current joint simulators. An instrumented hip implant with telemetric data transfer was developed to measure the implant temperatures in vivo. A clinical study with 100 patients is planned to measure the implant temperatures for different combinations of head and cup materials during walking. This study will answer the question of whether patients with synovia with poor lubricating properties may be at risk for thermally induced bone necrosis and subsequent implant failure. The study will also deliver the different friction properties of various implant materials and prove the significance of wear simulator tests. A clinically successful titanium hip endoprosthesis was modified to house the electronics inside its hollow neck. The electronics are powered by an external induction coil fixed around the joint. A temperature sensor inside the implant triggers a timer circuit, which produces an inductive pulse train with temperature-dependent intervals. This signal is detected by a giant magnetoresistive sensor fixed near the external energy coil. The implant temperature is measured with an accuracy of 0.1°C in a range between 20°C and 58°C and at a sampling rate of 2–10 Hz. This rate could be considerably increased for measuring other data, such as implant strain or vibration. The employed technique of transmitting data from inside of a closed titanium implant by low frequency magnetic pulses eliminates the need to use an electrical feedthrough and an antenna outside of the implant. It enables the design of mechanically safe and simple instrumented implants. PMID:22927973

  8. Influence of PEEK Coating on Hip Implant Stress Shielding: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anguiano-Sanchez, Jesica; Martinez-Romero, Oscar; Siller, Hector R.; Diaz-Elizondo, Jose A.; Flores-Villalba, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Stress shielding is a well-known failure factor in hip implants. This work proposes a design concept for hip implants, using a combination of metallic stem with a polymer coating (polyether ether ketone (PEEK)). The proposed design concept is simulated using titanium alloy stems and PEEK coatings with thicknesses varying from 100 to 400 μm. The Finite Element analysis of the cancellous bone surrounding the implant shows promising results. The effective von Mises stress increases between 81 and 92% for the complete volume of cancellous bone. When focusing on the proximal zone of the implant, the increased stress transmission to the cancellous bone reaches between 47 and 60%. This increment in load transferred to the bone can influence mineral bone loss due to stress shielding, minimizing such effect, and thus prolonging implant lifespan. PMID:27051460

  9. Influence of PEEK Coating on Hip Implant Stress Shielding: A Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Anguiano-Sanchez, Jesica; Martinez-Romero, Oscar; Siller, Hector R; Diaz-Elizondo, Jose A; Flores-Villalba, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Ciro A

    2016-01-01

    Stress shielding is a well-known failure factor in hip implants. This work proposes a design concept for hip implants, using a combination of metallic stem with a polymer coating (polyether ether ketone (PEEK)). The proposed design concept is simulated using titanium alloy stems and PEEK coatings with thicknesses varying from 100 to 400 μm. The Finite Element analysis of the cancellous bone surrounding the implant shows promising results. The effective von Mises stress increases between 81 and 92% for the complete volume of cancellous bone. When focusing on the proximal zone of the implant, the increased stress transmission to the cancellous bone reaches between 47 and 60%. This increment in load transferred to the bone can influence mineral bone loss due to stress shielding, minimizing such effect, and thus prolonging implant lifespan. PMID:27051460

  10. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  11. Sheep Hip Arthroplasty Model of Failed Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Baas, Jørgen; Søballe, Kjeld; Rahbek, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Early secure stability of an implant is important for long-term survival. We examined whether micromotion of implants consistently would induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane and thereby prevent osseointegration. One micromotion implant was inserted into one of the medial femoral condyles in ten sheep. The micromotion device consists of an anchor bearing a PMMA implant and a PE plug. During each gait cycle the PE plug will make the PMMA implant axially piston 0.5 mm. After 12 weeks of observation the bone specimens were harvested and a post-mortem control implant was inserted into the contra-lateral medial femoral condyle. Histomorphometrical evaluation showed that the surface on the implant observed for 12 weeks was covered by fibrous tissue. The control implants were covered by lamellar bone. No difference was found with respect to the volume fraction of lamellar bone in a 1 mm zone around the implants. This study indicates that implant micromotion is sufficient to induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane. PMID:26664497

  12. Prevalence of artificial hip implants and use of health services by recipients.

    PubMed

    Sharkness, C M; Hamburger, S; Moore, R M; Kaczmarek, R G

    1993-01-01

    Data from the 1988 Medical Device Implant Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey are used to summarize information about the prevalence of artificial hips among adults in the United States. The 1988 National Health Interview Survey was a cross-sectional survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized United States population, and included 122,310 persons in 47,485 households in a multistage probability sample. The supplement supplied the first population-based estimates of prevalence and morbidity of selected medical devices. Projected to the United States population, the survey results indicate that an estimated 674,000 adults were using 811,000 hip implants. Hip implant recipients were significantly more likely to be older, to be white, and to have lower educational, income, and activity levels than the general population of adults. After age-stratification, however, only differences in activity limitation and race remained. Current economic outlays for hip replacement surgery are substantial. With the aging population, use of health services by patients with artificial hips will probably increase unless measures to reduce the need for replacement surgery are instituted. These measures include reducing injuries and improving biomaterials. Further investigation is needed to examine the activity limitation and racial difference in prevalence found in this study.

  13. Management of metal-on-metal hip implant patients: Who, when and how to revise?

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Reshid; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2016-01-01

    The debate on how best to manage patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants continues. With over 1 million patients affected worldwide, the impact is far reaching. The majority of the aggressive failures of MOM hip implants have been dealt with by revision hip surgery, leaving patients with a much more indolent pattern of failure of devices that have been in situ for more than 10 years. The longer-term outcome for such patients remains unknown, and much debate exists on how best to manage these patients. Regulatory guidance is available but remains open to interpretation due to the lack of current evidence and long-term studies. Metal ion thresholds for concern have been suggested at 7 ppb for hip resurfacing arthroplasty and below this level for large diameter total hip arthroplasties. Soft tissue changes including pseudotumours and muscle atrophy have been shown to progress, but this is not consistent. New advanced imaging techniques are helping to diagnose complications with metal hips and the reasons for failure, however these are not widely available. This has led to some centres to tackle difficult cases through multidisciplinary collaboration, for both surgical management decisions and also follow-up decisions. We summarise current evidence and consider who is at risk, when revision should be undertaken and how patients should be managed. PMID:27190754

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment.

  16. Precaution, governance and the failure of medical implants: the ASR((TM)) hip in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wienroth, Matthias; McCormack, Pauline; Joyce, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Hip implants have provided life-changing treatment, reducing pain and improving the mobility and independence of patients. Success has encouraged manufacturers to innovate and amend designs, engendering patient hopes in these devices. However, failures of medical implants do occur. The failure rate of the Articular Surface Replacement metal-on-metal hip system, implanted almost 100,000 times world-wide, has re-opened debate about appropriate and timely implant governance. As commercial interests, patient hopes, and devices' governance converge in a socio-technical crisis, we analyse the responses of relevant governance stakeholders in the United Kingdom between 2007 and 2014. We argue that there has been a systemic failure of the governance system entrusted with the safety of patients fitted with medical implants. Commercial considerations of medical implants and the status quo of medical implant governance have been given priority over patient safety despite the availability of significant failure data in an example of uncertainty about what constitutes appropriate precautionary action. PMID:26573983

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Implant Rupture after Surgery for Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Yu; Ochi, Hironori; Watari, Taiji; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Treatment methods for delayed union and nonunion of atypical femoral fracture are still controversial. Moreover, no treatment method has been established for implant rupture caused by delayed union and nonunion. We encountered a 74-year-old female in whom nonunion-induced implant rupture occurred after treatment of atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture with internal fixation using a long femoral nail. It was unlikely that sufficient fixation could be obtained by repeating osteosynthesis alone. Moreover, the patient was elderly and early weight-bearing activity was essential for early recovery of ADL. Based on these reasons, we selected one-stage surgery with total hip arthroplasty and osteosynthesis with inverted condylar locking plate as salvage procedures. Bone union was achieved at 6 months after surgery. This case illustrated that osteosynthesis-combined one-staged total hip arthroplasty could be considered as one of the options for nonunion-induced implant rupture of atypical femoral subtrochanteric fracture.

  18. A biomechanical assessment of modular and monoblock revision hip implants using FE analysis and strain gage measurements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bone loss associated with revision surgery or pathology has been the impetus for developing modular revision total hip prostheses. Few studies have assessed these modular implants quantitatively from a mechanical standpoint. Methods Three-dimensional finite element (FE) models were developed to mimic a hip implant alone (Construct A) and a hip implant-femur configuration (Construct B). Bonded contact was assumed for all interfaces to simulate long-term bony ongrowth and stability. The hip implants modeled were a Modular stem having two interlocking parts (Zimmer Modular Revision Hip System, Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and a Monoblock stem made from a single piece of material (Stryker Restoration HA Hip System, Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA). Axial loads of 700 and 2000 N were applied to Construct A and 2000 N to Construct B models. Stiffness, strain, and stress were computed. Mechanical tests using axial loads were used for Construct A to validate the FE model. Strain gages were placed along the medial and lateral side of the hip implants at 8 locations to measure axial strain distribution. Results There was approximately a 3% average difference between FE and experimental strains for Construct A at all locations for the Modular implant and in the proximal region for the Monoblock implant. FE results for Construct B showed that both implants carried the majority (Modular, 76%; Monoblock, 66%) of the 2000 N load relative to the femur. FE analysis and experiments demonstrated that the Modular implant was 3 to 4.5 times mechanically stiffer than the Monoblock due primarily to geometric differences. Conclusions This study provides mechanical characteristics of revision hip implants at sub-clinical axial loads as an initial predictor of potential failure. PMID:20462448

  19. Implant survival and radiographic outcome of total hip replacement in patients less than 20 years old

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Halvorsen, Vera; Nordsletten, Lars; EngesæTer, Ingvild Ø; EngesæTer, Lars B; Marie Fenstad, Anne; Röhrl, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is not recommended for children and very young teenagers because early and repetitive revisions are likely. We investigated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of THR performed in children and teenage patients. Patients and methods We included 111 patients (132 hips) who underwent THR before 20 years of age. They were identified in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, together with information on the primary diagnosis, types of implants, and any revisions that required implant change. Radiographs and Harris hip score (HHS) were also evaluated. Results The mean age at primary THR was 17 (11–19) years and the mean follow-up time was 14 (3–26) years. The 10-year survival rate after primary THR (with the endpoint being any revision) was 70%. 39 patients had at least 1 revision and 16 patients had 2 or more revisions. In the latest radiographs, osteolysis and atrophy were observed in 19% and 27% of the acetabulae and 21% and 62% of the femurs, respectively. The mean HHS at the final follow-up was 83 (15–100). Interpretation The clinical score after THR in these young patients was acceptable, but many revisions had been performed. However, young patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip had lower implant survival. Moreover, the bone stock in these patients was poor, which could complicate future revisions. PMID:27435903

  20. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. C.; Brockett, C.; Williams, S.; Udofia, I.; Fisher, J.; Jin, Z. M.

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  1. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  2. Effect of friction and clearance on kinematics and contact mechanics of dual mobility hip implant.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongchang; Chai, Wei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Manyi; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    The dual mobility hip implant has been introduced recently and increasingly used in total hip replacement to maintain the stability and reduce the risk of post-surgery dislocation. However, the kinematics and contact mechanisms of dual mobility hip implants have not been investigated in detail in the literature. Therefore, finite element method was adopted in this study to investigate dynamics and contact mechanics of a typical metal-on-polymer dual mobility hip implant under different friction coefficient ratios between the inner and the outer articulations and clearances/interferences between the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene liner and the metal back shell. A critical ratio of friction coefficients between the two pairs of contact interfaces was found to mainly determine the rotating surfaces. Furthermore, an initial clearance between the liner and the back shell facilitated the rotation of the liner while an initial interference prevented such a motion at the outer articulating interface. In addition, the contact area and the sliding distance at the outer articulating surface were markedly greater than those at the inner cup-head interface, potentially leading to extensive wear at the outer surface of the liner.

  3. The short stem GHEs in total hip replacement – experience after 380 implantations

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Farag, M.; Schneider, P.; Hitzler, P.; Gulow, J.; Freiherr von Salis-Soglio, G

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Standard straight stems have been recognized as a gold standard implant in the field of hip replacement surgery. However, lately uncemented bone-preserving short stems started to gain more and more popularity. This was reflected in the increasing variety of available models. Up till now, short and mid-term results are available. Patients and methods: In 2002, the cementless short stemmed GHEs was introduced. 380 patients were included in our study between 2002 and 2008. Only GHEs short stems were implanted. The clinical and radiological evaluations were performed in the Orthopaedic Department, Leipzig University Hospitals, on the average of 24 months (3 to 60 months) postoperatively. Results: 365 primary implantations and 15 revision implantations were carried out. Average age 60 years. Favourable clinical and radiological outcome was seen in 361/380 patients (95%). Postoperative complications were seen in 19/380 patients (5%): 8 fissures/fractures (2.1%), 5 infections (1.3%), 4 aseptic loosenings (1.1%), 2 dislocations (0.5%). Conclusions: Short stem implants, including our own experience with GHEs model, are satisfying and promising. They represent a valuable supplementation of the treatment modalities in hip replacement surgery. However, long term results are still awaited. PMID:26504707

  4. Optical measurement system for preparation and after-OP-check of a hip joint endoprothetic implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschke, R.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, Ch.; Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Basan, F.; Grunert, R.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    With 332,000 operations carried out every year, the implantation of an artificial hip joint is one of the most common surgical operations performed in the US. According to prognosis which takes the demographical change into account, the number of these operations will increase in the coming years. One of the essential requirements is the perfect reconstruction of the biomechanical functions, especially the knowledge about the center of the hip rotation and the length of the leg. Based on this information it is possible to ensure the right position of the newly set leg during surgery. The aim of this work is to present and evaluate an optical measurement method in order to gather information about the center of the hip joint and the leg length. An appropriate laboratory setup has been designed and implemented in order to evaluate two different approaches: a structured light-method consisting of a DLP-Beamer or a laser source which projects defined patterns onto the patient and a marker-based system. Together with this both methods are combined with custom software to determine the hip joint center and the leg length with an accuracy of around +/- 0.2 inches. The clinical use of the tested approaches would give the surgeon the opportunity to reset the implant-parameters in the course of the surgery. In this way subsequent illnesses such as scoliotic pelvis can be prevented.

  5. Is staircase walking a risk for the fixation of hip implants?

    PubMed

    Bergmann, G; Graichen, F; Rohlmann, A

    1995-05-01

    Considerable forces and moments act at hip prostheses during most kinds of physical activities. High torque around the stem axis may contribute to implant loosening. With instrumented hip prostheses the joint force and its direction, the bending moment in the frontal plane and the torque were measured in two patients during upstairs, downstairs and level walking. The data give information on whether or not stairclimbing causes a more severe loading situation for the implants than walking. While going upstairs at normal speed the joint force is 10% higher than during walking at 3 km h-1. Downstairs it increases by 20%. The bending moments change by nearly the same amounts. Upstairs the torsional moment is about twice as high as during slow walking. But walking at 5 km h-1 or slow jogging causes forces and moments of similar magnitudes. Even higher loads were observed when the patients stumbled without falling. Although torque during staircase walking is high, extreme values exclusively during stairclimbing are not confirmed by our data. The torsional moments now observed in vivo are close to or even exceed the experimentally determined limits of the torsional strength of implant fixations, found in the literature. Obviously, torsional moments play an important role for the potential loosening of hip prostheses. PMID:7775490

  6. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF): Comparison Between Zero Profile Implants and Anterior Cervical Plate and Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Njoku, Innocent; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Boockvar, John; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interposition grafts combined with anterior plating currently remain the gold standard for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The use of anterior plates increases fusion rates but may be associated with higher rates of postoperative dysphagia. The aim of the current study was to determine the clinical and radiological outcomes following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using zero-profile anchored spacers versus standard interposition grafts with anterior plating. Methods: This was a retrospective case series. A total of 53 male and 51 female consecutive patients (164 total operated levels) who underwent ACDF between 2007 and 2011 were included. The mean clinical follow-up was 15.7 ± 1.2 (SEM) months for patients with zero-profile implants and 14.8 ± 2.1 months for patients with conventional ACDF with anterior plating. Patient demographics, operative details, clinical outcomes, complications, and radiographic imaging were reviewed. Dysphagia was determined using the Bazaz criteria. Results: Clinical outcome scores improved in both groups as measured by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association and Nurick scores. Zero-profile constructs gave rise to significantly less prevertebral soft tissue swelling compared to constructs with anterior plates postoperatively (15.74 ± 0.52 as compared to 20.48 ± 0.85 mm, p < 0.001) and at the latest follow-up (10.88 ± 0.39 mm vs. 13.72 ± 0.67 mm, p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the incidence of dysphagia at the latest follow-up (1.5% vs. 20%, p=0.001, zero-profile vs. anterior plate, respectively). Conclusion: Zero-profile implants lead to functional outcomes similar to standard anterior plate constructs. Avoiding the use of an anterior locking plate may decrease the risk of persistent postoperative dysphagia. PMID:27200226

  7. Good short-term outcome of primary total hip arthroplasty with cementless bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Cementless total hip arthroplasty is currently favored by many orthopedic surgeons. The design of the porous surface is critically important for long-term fixation. We examined the clinical and radiographic outcome of the cementless titanium hip implant with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 hips (92 patients) that had undergone primary cementless total hip arthroplasty with bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants. The mean follow-up period was 7 (3–9) years. Hip joint function was evaluated with the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel hip score, and radiographic changes were determined from anteroposterior radiographs. Results The mean hip score improved from 9.7 preoperatively to 17 at the final follow-up. The overall survival rate was 100% at 9 years, when radiographic loosening or revision for any reason was used as the endpoint. 3 stems in 2 patients subsided more than 3 mm vertically within 1 year after implantation. Radiographs of the interface of the stem and femur were all classified as bone ingrowth fixation. Conclusions The short-term results of this study show good outcome for cementless implants with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. PMID:23043270

  8. In vivo implant fixation of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK hip prostheses in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Ichiro; Takao, Masaki; Bandoh, Shunichi; Bertollo, Nicky; Walsh, William R; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR/PEEK) is theoretically suitable as a material for use in hip prostheses, offering excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and the absence of metal ions. To evaluate in vivo fixation methods of CFR/PEEK hip prostheses in bone, we examined radiographic and histological results for cementless or cemented CFR/PEEK hip prostheses in an ovine model with implantation up to 52 weeks. CFR/PEEK cups and stems with rough-textured surfaces plus hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings for cementless fixation and CFR/PEEK cups and stems without HA coating for cement fixation were manufactured based on ovine computed tomography (CT) data. Unilateral total hip arthroplasty was performed using cementless or cemented CFR/PEEK hip prostheses. Five cementless cups and stems and six cemented cups and stems were evaluated. On the femoral side, all cementless stems demonstrated bony ongrowth fixation and all cemented stems demonstrated stable fixation without any gaps at both the bone-cement and cement-stem interfaces. All cementless cases and four of the six cemented cases showed minimal stress shielding. On the acetabular side, two of the five cementless cups demonstrated bony ongrowth fixation. Our results suggest that both cementless and cemented CFR/PEEK stems work well for fixation. Cup fixation may be difficult for both cementless and cemented types in this ovine model, but bone ongrowth fixation on the cup was first seen in two cementless cases. Cementless fixation can be achieved using HA-coated CFR/PEEK implants, even under load-bearing conditions.

  9. Simulation of the mechanical behavior of a HIP implant. Implant fixed to bone by cementation under arbitrary load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldani, C. R.; Dominguez, A. A.

    2007-11-01

    In a previous work a finite elements model was constructed to simulate a fatigue assay according to the norm IRAM 9422-3. Three materials were studied, two of them are the most used in this type of implant (Stainless steel 3161 and alloy T16A14V) and the third was a new developed titanium alloy (Ti35Nb7Zr5Ta). Static loads were applied to the model according to the highest requirements of the norm and the stress - strain distribution were determined. In this study a simplified analysis of the material's fatigue was done according to the previous work. The best behavior of the titanium alloys vs. the stainless steel was evident. With the objective of studying the behavior of both: the implant and the femur bone, new finite elements models were realized, in which the presence of the bone was considered. Inside the bone, the femoral component of the implant was placed in a similar way of a cemented prosthesis in a total hip arthroplasty. The advantage of the titanium implant related to the stainless steel one, was very clear.

  10. A double mobility acetabular implant for primary hip arthroplasty in patients at high risk of dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, RG; Young, P; Uzoigwe, C; Barkham, B; Yusoff, S; Minhas, THA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dislocation following total hip replacement continues to be a problem for which no completely satisfactory solution has been found. Several methods have been proposed to reduce the incidence of hip dislocations with varying degrees of success, including elevated rim liners, constrained liners and large diameter bearings. We present our experience with the double mobility acetabular component in patients at high risk of instability. Methods This was a retrospective review of 65 primary total hip arthroplasties in 55 patients (15 men, 40 women), performed between October 2005 and November 2009. The majority (80%) of patients had at least two and 26% had at least three risk factors for instability. The mean age was 76 years (range: 44–92 years). The patients were followed up for a mean duration of 60 months (range: 36–85 months). Results Fourteen patients died and one was lost to follow-up, leaving fifty hips for final assessment. Until the final follow-up appointment, no patients had dislocation and none required revision surgery. The mean Oxford hip score improved from 45.0 to 26.5 (p<0.0001). The mean Merle d’Aubigné pain score improved from 1.4 to 4.9 (p<0.0001), the walking score from 2.3 to 3.1 (p<0.07) and the absolute hip function score from 5.4 to 10.8 (p<0.0001). There were no clinical or radiographic signs of loosening. Conclusions The double mobility acetabular component was successful at preventing dislocation during early to medium-term follow-up. However, as data are still lacking with regard to polyethylene wear rates at the additional bearing surface, it would be prudent to restrict the use of this implant to selected patients at high risk of instability. PMID:25350182

  11. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach.

  12. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-09-18

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:27672567

  13. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:27672567

  14. Implant Optimisation for Primary Hip Replacement in Patients over 60 Years with Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of Clinical Outcomes and Implant Costs Using Data from England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Simon S.; Mason, James; Baker, Paul N.; Gregg, Paul J.; Deehan, David J.; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide; hundreds of implant configurations provide options for femoral head size, joint surface material and fixation method with dramatically varying costs. Robust comparative evidence to inform the choice of implant is needed. This retrospective cohort study uses linked national databases from England and Wales to determine the optimal type of replacement for patients over 60 years undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods and Findings Implants included were the commonest brand from each of the four types of replacement (cemented, cementless, hybrid and resurfacing); the reference prosthesis was the cemented hip procedure. Patient reported outcome scores (PROMs), costs and risk of repeat (revision) surgery were examined. Multivariable analyses included analysis of covariance to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score, OHS, and EQ5D index) (9159 linked episodes) and competing risks modelling of implant survival (79,775 procedures). Cost of implants and ancillary equipment were obtained from National Health Service procurement data. Results EQ5D score improvements (at 6 months) were similar for all hip replacement types. In females, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless hip prostheses (hazard ratio, HR = 2.22, p<0.001), when compared to the reference hip. Although improvement in OHS was statistically higher (22.1 versus 20.5, p<0.001) for cementless implants, this small difference is unlikely to be clinically important. In males, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless (HR = 1.95, p = 0.003) and resurfacing implants, HR = 3.46, p<0.001), with no differences in OHS. Material costs were lowest with the reference implant (cemented, range £1103 to £1524) and highest with cementless implants (£1928 to £4285). Limitations include the design of the study, which is intrinsically vulnerable to omitted variables, a paucity of long

  15. The osseous response to corundum blasted implant surfaces in a canine hip model.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Bobyn, J D; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the radiographic and histologic response to corundum blasted implant surfaces of varying roughness in a canine total hip arthroplasty model. Three types of tapered femoral implants were made from titanium alloy and were identical in every respect except surface finish. The entire surface of the femoral implant had a 2.9-, 4.2-, or 6.7-micron average surface roughness (Ra) from blasting with 60-, 24-, or 16-grit corundum particles, respectively. Twenty-two stems in 11 dogs were evaluated at 6 months. Twenty-one of the stems showed osseointegration, whereas in one stem a fibrous interface developed. Abundant new periimplant bone formation occurred, particularly within the intramedullary canal where trabeculae spanned implant to endosteal cortex gaps as large as 5 mm. Bone apposition with the 60-, 24-, and 16-grit stems averaged 31.7%, 32%, and 27.9%, respectively; the differences were not statistically significant. However, the pattern of new bone formation was different in that the average length of each region of bone apposition for the 60- and 24-grit surfaces was 50% greater than that for the coarser 16-grit surface. The observations of this study indicate that because of their highly osteoconductive nature, corundum blasted surfaces represent an important and valuable technology for the design of noncemented implants. PMID:10416415

  16. Nuclear microbeam analysis of wear particles in tissue surrounding failed hip joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Triffitt, J. T.; Williamson, M. C.; Athanasou, N. A.

    1994-05-01

    Particulate wear debris from hip joint replacements is an important factor in determining the response of the surrounding tissue to the implants. Failed replacement joints are surrounded by a layer of fibrous tissue showing an inflammatory response to the wear debris. This reaction leads to bone resorption and the eventual failure of the prosthesis. In preliminary experiments the Oxford scanning proton microprobe has been used to study the composition of wear particles in the membranes surrounding failed implants constructed from Ti/V/Al alloy. The membranes were observed to contain 1-10 μm particles with major constituents from the alloy and also from the cement and polyethylene used in the fitting and construction of the implant. Histological staining shows that these particles are associated with areas of high macrophage activity. Individual PIXE analysis of the metal particles indicates that two populations (high Ti/low Al and low Ti/high Al) may be present. These observations will provide further information on the mechanisms of implant degradation.

  17. Ultrastructural characterization of soft tissues surrounding implanted hip prosthesis by complementary PIXE and TEM methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallot, E.; Benhayoune, H.; Kilian, L.; Balossier, G.; Bonhomme, P.; Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J. L.

    We study soft tissues surrounding hip prostheses from three different patients. We evaluate the elemental composition of different fragments. The tissues are examined by means of two complementary methods in such analysis: Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) coupled with X-ray microanalysis (Energy Dispersive X-ray, EDX). These methods allow to determine locally at `macro' and `micro' level the chemistry of soft tissues. The findings confirmed the presence of metal in soft tissue near the three different hips. The tissues' composition undergoes important modifications with a systematic elevation of trace metal in patients with failed implants. We observe a corrosion which causes the continual release of particles into the tissues. Corrosion alters the shape size and chemical composition of wear particles embedded in soft tissue around the failed hip. EDX analysis showed that the wear particles contained varying quantities of titanium and aluminium. This phenomenon may be related with the variation of time of contact with soft tissues for each particle and Ti solubility.

  18. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Alister J.; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Skinner, John A.; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2009-11-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  19. Do we need hip-ankle radiographs to assess the coronal alignment and implant position after total knee replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Penning, Lenhard

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Restoration of the coronal alignment of the knee is known to be one of the major criteria of a successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It therefore appears to be mandatory to routinely assess the postoperative limb alignment using hip-ankle radiographs and to identify implants that may be at risk of premature failure. However, there is no clear consensus whether weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs or rather standardized a-p knee-radiographs should be used to assess implant position and coronal alignment after TKA. It is the aim of the present study to investigate if implant position and the mechanical alignment after TKA can reproducibly be assessed using standardized a-p knee-radiographs or rather if weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs are needed. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 100 postoperative weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs after conventional primary TKA. The true mechanical and anatomical femorotibial angle as well as coronal implant position (MPTA, LDFA) was assessed using the MediCAD software, which served as a control. The hip-ankle radiographs were then digitally cropped to 80%, 60% and 40% of the leg-length. In each cropped radiograph, tibial coronal implant position was assessed by referencing against the visible mid-shaft, whereas femoral implant position was referenced against the visible mid-shaft (anatomical axis) or against a surrogate mechanical axis, which was drawn perpendicular to the distal tangent of the femoral component. Each measurement was performed by three independent observers. The difference between the alignment parameters in the hip-ankle radiographs were statistically compared with the cropped radiographs and the inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each parameter. Results: The ICC for inter-observer agreement of measurement of the mechanical femorotibial angle was significantly higher in hip-ankle radiographs (.95) when compared with a radiograph cropped

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of Ceramic-on-Ceramic Implants in Stemmed Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sedrakyan, Art; Graves, Stephen; Bordini, Barbara; Pons, Miquel; Havelin, Leif; Mehle, Susan; Paxton, Elizabeth; Barber, Thomas; Cafri, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The rapid decline in use of conventional total hip replacement with a large femoral head size and a metal-on-metal bearing surface might lead to increased popularity of ceramic-on-ceramic bearings as another hard-on-hard alternative that allows implantation of a larger head. We sought to address comparative effectiveness of ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-HXLPE (highly cross-linked polyethylene) implants by utilizing the distributed health data network of the ICOR (International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries), an unprecedented collaboration of national and regional registries and the U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Methods: A distributed health data network was developed by the ICOR and used in this study. The data from each registry are standardized and provided at a level of aggregation most suitable for the detailed analysis of interest. The data are combined across registries for comprehensive assessments. The ICOR coordinating center and study steering committee defined the inclusion criteria for this study as total hip arthroplasty performed without cement from 2001 to 2010 in patients forty-five to sixty-four years of age with osteoarthritis. Six national and regional registries (Kaiser Permanente and HealthEast in the U.S., Emilia-Romagna region in Italy, Catalan region in Spain, Norway, and Australia) participated in this study. Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with use of linear mixed models, with survival probability as the unit of analysis. We present the results of the fixed-effects model and include the results of the random-effects model in an appendix. SAS version 9.2 was used for all analyses. We first compared femoral head sizes of >28 mm and ≤28 mm within ceramic-on-ceramic implants and then compared ceramic-on-ceramic with metal-on-HXLPE. Results: A total of 34,985 patients were included; 52% were female. We found a lower risk of revision associated with use of ceramic-on-ceramic implants when a larger head

  1. A preliminary biomechanical assessment of a polymer composite hip implant using an infrared thermography technique validated by strain gage measurements.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Habiba; Rahim, Ehsan; Shah, Suraj; Dubov, Anton; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad

    2011-07-01

    With the resurgence of composite materials in orthopaedic applications, a rigorous assessment of stress is needed to predict any failure of bone-implant systems. For current biomechanics research, strain gage measurements are employed to experimentally validate finite element models, which then characterize stress in the bone and implant. Our preliminary study experimentally validates a relatively new nondestructive testing technique for orthopaedic implants. Lock-in infrared (IR) thermography validated with strain gage measurements was used to investigate the stress and strain patterns in a novel composite hip implant made of carbon fiber reinforced polyamide 12 (CF/PA12). The hip implant was instrumented with strain gages and mechanically tested using average axial cyclic forces of 840 N, 1500 N, and 2100 N with the implant at an adduction angle of 15 deg to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking gait. Three-dimensional surface stress maps were also obtained using an IR thermography camera. Results showed almost perfect agreement of IR thermography versus strain gage data with a Pearson correlation of R(2) = 0.96 and a slope = 1.01 for the line of best fit. IR thermography detected hip implant peak stresses on the inferior-medial side just distal to the neck region of 31.14 MPa (at 840 N), 72.16 MPa (at 1500 N), and 119.86 MPa (at 2100 N). There was strong correlation between IR thermography-measured stresses and force application level at key locations on the implant along the medial (R(2) = 0.99) and lateral (R(2) = 0.83 to 0.99) surface, as well as at the peak stress point (R(2) = 0.81 to 0.97). This is the first study to experimentally validate and demonstrate the use of lock-in IR thermography to obtain three-dimensional stress fields of an orthopaedic device manufactured from a composite material.

  2. Subsurface changes of a MoM hip implant below different contact zones.

    PubMed

    Pourzal, Robin; Theissmann, Ralf; Williams, Sophie; Gleising, Birgit; Fisher, John; Fischer, Alfons

    2009-04-01

    Metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties undergo distinct release of toxic metal particles and ions. Thus, it is necessary to minimize this. In order to evaluate the wear behaviour of metal-on-metal hip replacements it is essential to understand the micro-structural changes in the sub-surface region. Previous studies revealed that cobalt chromium metal-on-metal implants are able to alter their mechanical behaviour by adjusting the microstructure to load. The reason for this is the so-called mechanical mixing. This means that a nano-crystal layer is formed by rotating clusters of atoms that incorporate denatured proteins from the interfacial medium. This is followed by a layer of rhombic shaped nano-crystals in between sheared epsilon-martensite lathes, twins, and stacking faults. Although the primary wear zone has been well characterized, the sub-surface structure of the stripe wear and the non-contact zone of the hip ball have yet to be analysed. For this study a 28-mm cobalt base alloy femoral head and acetabular cup were analysed. The implant was simulator tested for 5 million cycles with the application of micro-separation resulting in a clearly visible stripe wear appearance. The TEM micrograph of the primary wear zone of the ball confirmed the presence of a sub-surface layer of nano-crystals. The thickness of this layer was approximately 200 nm and the average grain diameter ranged from 35 to 40 nm. Within the stripe wear zone the micrographs also revealed a nano-crystal layer but with a thickness of only 50 nm and an average grain diameter from 15 to 20 nm. The carbon and oxygen content was highest closest to the surface which proves the occurrence of mechanical mixing. The non-contact zone of the ball was analysed as well. When compared to the primary wear zone a nano-crystal layer with similar thickness but with an average grain diameter smaller than 15 nm was observed.

  3. Effect of wear of bearing surfaces on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2005-09-01

    consistent with the minimal wear observed between 1 and 5 million cycles. However, under adverse in vivo conditions associated with start-up and stopping and depleted lubrication, wear of the bearing surfaces can still occur. An increase in the wear depth beyond a certain limit was shown to lead to the constriction of the lubricant film around the edge of the contact conjunction and consequently to a decrease in the lubricant film thickness. Continuous cycles of a running-in wear period followed by a steady state wear period may be inevitable in MOM hip implants. This highlights the importance of minimizing the wear in these devices during the initial running-in period, particularly from design and manufacturing points of view.

  4. Implant based differences in adverse local tissue reaction in failed total hip arthroplasties: a morphological and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) is characterized by periprosthetic soft tissue inflammation composed of a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, extensive soft tissue necrosis, and vascular changes. Multiple hip implant classes have been reported to result in ALTR, and clinical differences may represent variation in the soft tissue response at the cellular and tissue levels. The purpose of this study was to describe similarities and differences in periprosthetic tissue structure, organization, and cellular composition by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry in ALTR resulting from two common total hip arthroplasty (THA) implant classes. Methods Consecutive patients presenting with ALTR from two major hip implant classes (N = 54 patients with Dual-Modular Neck implant; N = 14 patients with Metal-on-Metal implant) were identified from our prospective Osteolysis Tissue Database and Repository. Clinical characteristics including age, sex, BMI, length of implantation, and serum metal ion levels were recorded. Retrieved synovial tissue morphology was graded using light microscopy and cellular composition was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results Length of implantation was shorter in the DMN group versus MoM THA group (21.3 [8.4] months versus 43.6 [13.8] months respectively; p < 0.005) suggesting differences in implant performance. Morphologic examination revealed a common spectrum of neo-synovial proliferation and necrosis in both groups. Macrophages were more commonly present in diffuse sheets (Grade 3) in the MoM relative to DMN group (p = 0.016). Perivascular lymphocytes with germinal centers (Grade 4) were more common in the DMN group, which trended towards significance (p = 0.066). Qualitative differences in corrosion product morphology were seen between the two groups. Immunohistochemistry showed features of a CD4 and GATA-3 rich lymphocyte reaction in both implants, with increased ratios of perivascular T

  5. Contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip implant with an aspherical bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Gao, Leiming; Liu, Feng; Yang, Peiran; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-22

    Diameter and diametral clearance of the bearing surfaces of metal-on-metal hip implants and structural supports have been recognised as key factors to reduce the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures and improve lubrication performance. On the other hand, application of aspherical bearing surfaces can also significantly affect the contact mechanics and lubrication performance by changing the radius of the curvature of a bearing surface and consequently improving the conformity between the head and the cup. In this study, a novel metal-on-metal hip implant employing a specific aspherical bearing surface, Alpharabola, as the acetabular surface was investigated for both contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication under steady-state conditions. When compared with conventional spherical bearing surfaces, a more uniform pressure distribution and a thicker lubricant film thickness within the loaded conjunction were predicted for this novel Alpharabola hip implant. The effects of the geometric parameters of this novel acetabular surface on the pressure distribution and lubricant thickness were investigated. A significant increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a significant decrease in the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures were found with appropriate combinations of these geometric parameters, compared with the spherical bearing surface.

  6. The manufacture of generic replicas of implants for arthroplasty of the hip and knee: is it regulated and will it save money?

    PubMed

    Atrey, A; Heylen, S; Gosling, O; Porteous, M J L; Haddad, F S

    2016-07-01

    Joint replacement of the hip and knee remain very satisfactory operations. They are, however, expensive. The actual manufacturing of the implant represents only 30% of the final cost, while sales and marketing represent 40%. Recently, the patents on many well established and successful implants have expired. Companies have started producing and distributing implants that purport to replicate existing implants with good long-term results. The aims of this paper are to assess the legality, the monitoring and cost saving implications of such generic implants. We also assess how this might affect the traditional orthopaedic implant companies. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:892-900. PMID:27365466

  7. IN VIVO SEVERE CORROSION AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF RETRIEVED MODULAR BODY TITANIUM ALLOY HIP-IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Danieli C.; Urban, Robert M.; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  8. In vivo severe corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of retrieved modular body titanium alloy hip-implants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Danieli C; Urban, Robert M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity, and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination, and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  9. The Effects of Interlocking a Universal Hip Cementless Stem on Implant Subsidence and Mechanical Properties of Cadaveric Canine Femora

    PubMed Central

    Buks, Yonathan; Stover, Susan M.; Garcia‐Nolen, Tanya C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if an interlocking bolt would limit subsidence of the biological fixation universal hip (BFX®) femoral stem under cyclic loading and enhance construct stiffness, yield, and failure properties. Study Design Ex vivo biomechanical study. Animals Cadaveric canine femora (10 pairs). Methods Paired femora implanted with a traditional stem or an interlocking stem (constructs) were cyclically loaded at walk, trot, and gallop loads while implant and bone motions were captured using kinematic markers and high‐speed video. Constructs were then loaded to failure to evaluate failure mechanical properties. Results Implant subsidence was greater (P = .037) for the traditional implant (4.19 mm) than the interlocking implant (0.78 mm) only after gallop cyclic loading, and cumulatively after walk, trot, and gallop cyclic loads (5.20 mm vs. 1.28 mm, P = .038). Yield and failure loads were greater (P = .029 and .002, respectively) for the interlocking stem construct (1155 N and 2337 N) than the traditional stem construct (816 N and 1405 N). Version angle change after cyclic loading was greater (P = .020) for the traditional implant (3.89 degrees) than for the interlocking implant (0.16 degrees), whereas stem varus displacement at failure was greater (P = .008) for the interlocking implant (1.5 degrees) than the traditional implant (0.17 degrees). Conclusion Addition of a stabilizing bolt enhanced construct stability and limited subsidence of a BFX® femoral stem. Use of the interlocking implant may decrease postoperative subsidence. However, in vivo effects of the interlocking bolt on osseointegration, bone remodeling, and stress shielding are unknown. PMID:26767439

  10. Clinical and radiological results after implantation of the femoral neck preserving Delfi M hip prosthesis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Budde, Stefan; Windhagen, Henning; Lerch, Matthias; Broese, Maximilian; Götze, Patricc; Thorey, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Various types of bone preserving total hip prostheses with a proximal force transmission concept have been developed for younger adults, one of these being the implant "Delfi M®", produced by ESKA until 2009. Since the demand could not meet the expectations, the production was stopped due to economic reasons so that only 31 implants of this type were sold and even less actually implanted. This study followed up 15 Delfi M® prostheses in 12 patients for 3.1 years and represents the only existing valid data about this implant.Demographical, preoperative and postoperative data including clinical scores (HOOS and mHHS) were collected retrospectively. Postoperative X-rays were analyzed by an independent radiologist. One implant had to be exchanged due to an infection and another one due to excessive implant migration. The mHHS and the HOOS scores showed a significant improvement after surgery. In the radiological analysis, there were no signs of radiolucent lines or osteolyses.This trial demonstrates good clinical and radiological midterm results for the Delfi M prosthesis. Limitations of this study are a small sample size and a follow-up time of 3 years at only one timepoint.

  11. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-06-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints.

  12. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-01-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints. PMID:27345704

  13. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-01-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints. PMID:27345704

  14. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-06-27

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints.

  15. N-Acetyl-Cysteine as Effective and Safe Chelating Agent in Metal-on-Metal Hip-Implanted Patients: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lonati, Davide; Ragghianti, Benedetta; Ronchi, Anna; Vecchio, Sarah; Locatelli, Carlo Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Systemic toxicity associated with cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) containing metal hip alloy may result in neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, and hypothyroidism. However clinical management concerning chelating therapy is still debated in literature. Here are described two metal-on-metal hip-implanted patients in which N-acetyl-cysteine decreased elevated blood metal levels. A 67-year-old male who underwent Co/Cr hip implant in September 2009 referred to our Poison Control Centre for persisting elevated Co/Cr blood levels (from March 2012 to November 2014). After receiving oral high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine, Co/Cr blood concentrations dropped by 86% and 87% of the prechelation levels, respectively, and persisted at these latter concentrations during the following 6 months of follow-up. An 81-year-old female who underwent Co/Cr hip implant in January 2007 referred to our Centre for detection of high Co and Cr blood levels in June 2012. No hip revision was indicated. After a therapy with oral high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine Co/Cr blood concentrations decreased of 45% and 24% of the prechelation levels. Chelating agents reported in hip-implanted patients (EDTA, DMPS, and BAL) are described in few cases. N-acetyl-cysteine may provide chelating sites for metals and in our cases reduced Co and Cr blood levels and resulted well tolerable. PMID:27148463

  16. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  17. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  18. Toxicology-based cancer causation analysis of CoCr-containing hip implants: a quantitative assessment of genotoxicity and tumorigenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Christian, Whitney V; Oliver, Lindsay D; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Kreider, Marisa L; Finley, Brent L

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, quantitative methods were used to evaluate the weight of evidence regarding a causative relationship between cobalt-chromium (CoCr)-containing hip implants and increased cancer risk. We reviewed approximately 80 published papers and identified no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) and/or lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) values for specific endpoints of interest: genotoxic effects from in vitro studies with human cell lines as well as genotoxicity and tumor formation in animal bioassays. Test articles included Co particles and ions, Cr particles and ions, and CoCr alloy particles as well as CoCr alloy implants. The NOAEL/LOAEL values were compared with body burdens of Co/Cr particles and ions we calculated to exist in systemic tissues of hip implant patients under normal and excessive wear conditions. We found that approximately 40 tumor bioassays have been conducted with CoCr alloy implants or Co/Cr particles and ions at levels hundreds to thousands of times higher than those present in hip implant patients, and none reported a statistically significant increased incidence of systemic tumors. Results from in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays, which are relatively less informative owing to false positives and other factors, also indicated that DNA effects would be highly unlikely to occur as a result of wear debris from a CoCr implant. Hence, the toxicological weight of evidence suggests that CoCr-containing hip implants are unlikely to be associated with an increased risk of systemic cancers, which is consistent with published and ongoing cancer epidemiology studies involving patients with CoCr hip implants.

  19. Fretting-corrosion in Hip Implant Modular Junctions: New Experimental Set-up and Initial Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Royhman, D.; Patel, M.; Runa, M.J.; Jacobs, J.J.; Hallab, N.J.; Wimmer, M.A.; Mathew, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modern hip prostheses feature a modular implant design with at least one tapered junction. This design can lead to several complications due to the introduction of additional interfaces, which are subjected to various loading conditions and micromotion. The main objective of current study is to develop a fretting corrosion apparatus, which is able characterize the mechanical and electrochemical behaviour of various existing metal alloy couples during fretting motion. This study describes the design and the main considerations during the development of a novel fretting corrosion apparatus, as well as determination of the machine compliance and the initial testing results. Machine compliance considerations and frictional interactions of the couples are discussed in detail. For the preliminary tests, metal alloy pins, made of Ti6Al4V and wrought high-carbon CoCrMo were mechanically polished to a surface roughness of less than 20nm. 2 pins (Diameter = 11mm) of either Ti6Al4V or CoCrMo were loaded onto a Ti6Al4V alloy rod at a normal force of 200N. The interface types included: Ti6Al4V-Ti6Al4V-Ti6Al4V, Ti6Al4V-Ti6Al4V-CoCrMo, and CoCrMo-Ti6Al4V-CoCrMo. The Ti6Al4V rod articulated against the metal alloy pins in a sinusoidal fretting motion with a displacement amplitude of ±50μm. Bovine calf serum (30g/L of protein content) was selected as a lubricant and tested at 2 different pH levels (pH 3.0 and 7.6). In all cases, current and friction energy were monitored during the fretting process. The results indicated distinct, material-specific current evolutions and friction energies. No significant differences were observed in electrochemical or mechanical behaviour in response to pH change. In general, Ti6Al4V-Ti6Al4V-Ti6Al4V couples displayed the earliest passivation and superior electrochemical behaviour compared to Ti6Al4V-Ti6Al4V-CoCrMo and CoCrMo-Ti6Al4V-CoCrMo under fretting conditions. In addition, fluctuations in current were observed in specific regions at all

  20. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  1. Are all metal-on-metal hip revision operations contributing to the National Joint Registry implant survival curves?

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Koutsouris, S.; Rajani, R.; Hothi, H.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) has extended its scope to report on hospital, surgeon and implant performance. Data linkage of the NJR to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (LIRC) has previously evaluated data quality for hip primary procedures, but did not assess revision records. Methods We analysed metal-on-metal hip revision procedures performed between 2003 and 2013. A total of 69 929 revision procedures from the NJR and 929 revised pairs of components from the LIRC were included. Results We were able to link 716 (77.1%) revision procedures on the NJR to the LIRC. This meant that 213 (22.9%) revision procedures at the LIRC could not be identified on the NJR. We found that 349 (37.6%) explants at the LIRC completed the full linkage process to both NJR primary and revision databases. Data completion was excellent (> 99.9%) for revision procedures reported to the NJR. Discussion This study has shown that only approximately one third of retrieved components at the LIRC, contributed to survival curves on the NJR. We recommend prospective registry-retrieval linkage as a tool to feedback missing and erroneous data to the NJR and improve data quality. Take home message: Prospective Registry – retrieval linkage is a simple tool to evaluate and improve data quality on the NJR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:33–9. PMID:26733513

  2. Information for Patients Who Have Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... their implants. These problems included: General hypersensitivity reaction (skin rash) Cardiomyopathy Neurological changes including sensory changes (auditory, or visual impairments) Psychological status change ( ...

  3. Distributed Analysis of Hip Implants Using Six National and Regional Registries: Comparing Metal-on-Metal with Metal-on-Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Bearings in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Furnes, Ove; Paxton, Elizabeth; Cafri, Guy; Graves, Stephen; Bordini, Barbara; Comfort, Thomas; Rivas, Moises Coll; Banerjee, Samprit; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background: The regulation of medical devices has attracted controversy recently because of problems related to metal-on-metal hip implants. There is growing evidence that metal-on-metal implants fail early and cause local and systemic complications. However, the failure associated with metal-on-metal head size is not consistently documented and needs to be communicated to patients and surgeons. The purpose of this study is to compare implant survival of metal on metal with that of metal on highly cross-linked polyethylene. Methods: Using a distributed health data network, primary total hip arthroplasties were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries (2001 to 2010). Inclusion criteria were patient age of forty-five to sixty-four years, cementless total hip arthroplasties, primary osteoarthritis diagnosis, and exclusion of the well-known outlier implant ASR (articular surface replacement). The primary outcome was revision for any reason. A meta-analysis of survival probabilities was performed with use of a fixed-effects model. Metal-on-metal implants with a large head size of >36 mm were compared with metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene implants. Results: Metal-on-metal implants with a large head size of >36 mm were used in 5172 hips and metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene implants were used in 14,372 hips. Metal-on-metal total hip replacements with a large head size of >36 mm had an increased risk of revision compared with metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene total hip replacements with more than two years of follow-up, with no difference during the first two years after implantation. The results of the hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) from the multivariable model at various durations of follow-up were 0.95 (0.74 to 1.23) at zero to two years (p = 0.698), 1.42 (1.16 to 1.75) at more than two years to four years (p = 0.001), 1.78 (1.45 to 2.19) at more than four years to six years (p < 0.001), and 2

  4. Biofilm formation by bacteria isolated from retrieved failed prosthetic hip implants in an in vitro model of hip arthroplasty antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tunney, M M; Dunne, N; Einarsson, G; McDowell, A; Kerr, A; Patrick, S

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial infection primarily with Staphylococcus spp. and Propionibacterium acnes remains a significant complication following total hip replacement. In this in vitro study, we investigated the efficacy of gentamicin loading of bone cement and pre- and postoperative administration of cefuroxime in the prevention of biofilm formation by clinical isolates. High and low initial inocula, representative of the number of bacteria that may be present at the operative site as a result of overt infection and skin contamination, respectively, were used. When a high initial inoculum was used, gentamicin loading of the cement did not prevent biofilm formation by the 10 Staphylococcus spp. and the 10 P. acnes isolates tested. Similarly, the use of cefuroxime in the fluid phase with gentamicin-loaded cement did not prevent biofilm formation by four Staphylococcus spp. and four P. acnes isolates tested. However, when a low bacterial inoculum was used, a combination of both gentamicin-loaded cement and cefuroxime prevented biofilm formation by these eight isolates. Our results indicate that this antibiotic combination may protect against infection after intra-operative challenge with bacteria present in low numbers as a result of contamination from the skin but would not protect against bacteria present in high numbers as a result of overt infection of an existing implant.

  5. Effect of manufacturing tolerances on the micromotion at the Morse taper interface in modular hip implants using the finite element technique.

    PubMed

    Shareef, N; Levine, D

    1996-03-01

    This study reports on the examination of the effect of manufacturing tolerances on the micromotion at the Morse taper interface in modular hip implants. The finite element technique was used as a tool of analysis. Special emphasis was placed on the consideration of the transient dynamic conditions under which a prosthesis works inside the human body. In order to simulate approximately the repetitive forces acting on a hip implant during the human walking cycle, a time-variant sinusoidal load was applied on the head of the taper. The locking of the Morse taper joint by the surgeon in the operating room at the time of implantation was simulated by specifying an axial displacement to the female taper component as an initial condition.

  6. Clinical usefulness of blood metal measurements to assess the failure of metal-on-metal hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Barry; Hart, Alister

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, a Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency safety alert concerning all metal-on-metal (MOM) hip replacements recommended measuring chromium and cobalt concentrations when managing patients with painful prostheses. The need for this review is illustrated by the recent surge in requests for these blood tests from orthopaedic surgeons following this alert. The aim is to provide guidance to laboratories in assessing these requests and advising clinicians on interpretation. First, we summarize the basic terminology regarding the types of hip replacements, with emphasis on the MOM type. Second, we describe the clinical concerns over implant-derived wear debris in the local tissues and distant sites. Analytical aspects of the measurement of the relevant metal ions and what factors affect the levels measured are discussed. The application of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques to the measurement of these metals is considered in detail. The biological effects of metal wear products are summarized with local toxicity and systemic biological effects considered, including carcinogenicity, genotoxicity and systemic toxicity. Clinical cases are used to illustrate pertinent points. PMID:22155921

  7. Rationale for one stage exchange of infected hip replacement using uncemented implants and antibiotic impregnated bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Infection of a total hip replacement (THR) is considered a devastating complication, necessitating its complete removal and thorough debridement of the site. It is undoubted that one stage exchange, if successful, would provide the best benefit both for the patient and the society. Still the fear of re-infection dominates the surgeons´ decisions and in the majority of cases directs them to multiple stage protocols. However, there is no scientifically based argument for that practice. Successful eradication of infection with two stage procedures is reported to average 80% to 98%. On the other hand a literature review of Jackson and Schmalzried (CORR 2000) summarizing the results of 1,299 infected hip replacements treated with direct exchange (almost exclusively using antibiotic loaded cement), reports of 1,077 (83%) having been successful. The comparable results suggest, that the major factor for a successful outcome with traditional approaches may be found in the quality of surgical debridement and dead space management. Failures in all protocols seem to be caused by small fragments of bacterial colonies remaining after debridement, whereas neither systemic antibiotics nor antibiotic loaded bone cement (PMMA) have been able to improve the situation significantly. Reasons for failure may be found in the limited sensitivity of traditional bacterial culturing and reduced antibiotic susceptibility of involved pathogens, especially considering biofilm formation. Whenever a new prosthesis is implanted into a previously infected site the surgeon must be aware of increased risk of failure, both in single or two stage revisions. Eventual removal therefore should be easy with low risk of additional damage to the bony substance. On the other hand it should also have potential of a good long term result in case of success. Cemented revisions generally show inferior long term results compared to uncemented techniques; the addition of antibiotics to cement reduces its

  8. A Randomised Multi-centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of the Future Hip to 3 Other Implants in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis; Perthes Disease

  9. Transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip implant under simulated walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2006-01-01

    The transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was performed in this study for a typical metal-on-metal bearing employing a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic cup inlay under dynamic operating conditions of load and speed representative of normal walking. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup. The governing Reynolds and elasticity equations were solved simultaneously by using both finite difference and finite element methods. The predicted transient film thickness from the present study was compared with the estimation based on the quasi-static analysis. It was found that the polyethylene backing employed in the typical metal-on-metal hip bearing, combined with dynamic squeeze-film action, significantly improved the transient lubricant film thickness under cyclic walking and consequently a fluid film lubrication regime was possible for smooth bearing surfaces with an average roughness less than 0.005 microm.

  10. Method of forming tiny silicon nitride spacer for flash EPROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. H.; Wu, K. C.; Hwang, Yuan-Ko; Chen, Shih-Shiung

    2001-04-01

    The silicon nitride spacer technology is widely used in split gate non-volatile memory device sand flash EPROM. A tiny spacer structure is formed on tunnel oxide layer adjacent to the sidewall of floating gate electrode to prevent write disturbance that caused by reverse tunneling. But the processing is very critical for such flash EPROM devices since the dimension the SN spacer are so small. It was influenced not only by SN spacer dry etching but also later photo-resistance strip process of implantation for threshold voltage adjustment. A new method of forming tiny SN spacer by using anisotropic dry etching and isotropic wet etching was presented in this paper.

  11. Pore Geometry Optimization of Titanium (Ti6Al4V) Alloy, for Its Application in the Fabrication of Customized Hip Implants

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sandipan; Panda, Debojyoti; Khutia, Niloy; Chowdhury, Amit Roy

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the mechanical response of representative volume elements of porous Ti-6Al-4V alloy, to arrive at a desired range of pore geometries that would optimize the reduction in stiffness necessary for biocompatibility with the stress concentration arising around the pore periphery, under physiological loading conditions with respect to orthopedic hip implants. A comparative study of the two is performed with the aid of a newly defined optimizing parameter called pore efficiency that takes into consideration both the stiffness quantity and the stress localization around pores. To perform a detailed analysis of the response of the porous structure over the entire spectrum of loading conditions that a hip implant is subjected to in vivo, the mechanical responses of 3D finite element models of cubic and rectangular parallelepiped geometries, with porosities varying over a range of 10% to 60%, are simulated under representative compressive, flexural as well as combined loading conditions. The results that are obtained are used to suggest a range of pore diameters that lower the effective stiffness and modulus of the implant to around 60% of the stiffness and modulus of dense solid implants while keeping the stress levels within permissible limits. PMID:25400663

  12. Fate of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) wear debris in patients with hip implants.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, H; Vidovszky, T; Turner, R T; Rock, M G; Morrey, B F; Bolander, M E

    1993-01-01

    The process of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) breakdown, started at the articular surface of the cup, continues in small fragments after generation. An assiduous interaction between the UHMW-PE particles and the host cells leads to oxidative changes of the UHMW-PE and to size reduction of the particles simultaneous with transporting them toward, and finally by, lymphatic or blood vessels. The particles are mobilized by means of enzymatic, extracellular matrix-degrading activity of cells that have phagocytosed them or adhered to them. Together, these characteristics indicate an attempt by the natural cellular immunity system to eliminate the implant wear debris. Macrophages are the main effector cells acting as scavengers; however, excessive amount of the wear debris evokes phagocytic activity of cells other than macrophages as well. PMID:11539273

  13. Arthroscopic fixation of cell free polymer-based cartilage implants with a bioinspired polymer surface on the hip joint: a cadaveric pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lahner, Matthias; Duif, Christian; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Kaps, Christian; Kalwa, Lukas; Seidl, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the adhesion capacity of a polyglycolic acid- (PGA-) hyaluronan scaffold with a structural modification based on a planar polymer (PM) surface in a cadaver cartilage defect model. Two cadaver specimens were used to serially test multiple chondral matrices. In a cadaver hip model, cell free polymer-based cartilage implants with a planar bioinspired PM surface (PGA-PM-scaffolds) were implanted arthroscopically on 10 mm × 15 mm full-thickness femoral hip cartilage lesions. Unprocessed cartilage implants without a bioinspired PM surface were used as control group. The cartilage implants were fixed without and with the use of fibrin glue on femoral hip cartilage defects. After 50 movement cycles and removal of the distraction, a rearthroscopy was performed to assess the outline attachment and integrity of the scaffold. The fixation techniques without and with fibrin fixation showed marginal differences for outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation after 50 cycles. The PGA-PM-scaffolds with fibrin fixation achieved a higher score in terms of the attachment, integrity, and endpoint fixation than the PGA-scaffold on the cartilage defect. Relating to the outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation, the fixation with PGA-PM-scaffolds accomplished significantly better results compared to the PGA-scaffolds (P = 0.03752, P = 0.03078, P = 0.00512, P = 0.00512). PGA-PM-scaffolds demonstrate increased observed initial fixation strength in cadaver femoral head defects relative to PGA-scaffold, particularly when fibrin glue is used for fixation.

  14. Arthroscopic Fixation of Cell Free Polymer-Based Cartilage Implants with a Bioinspired Polymer Surface on the Hip Joint: A Cadaveric Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Matthias; Duif, Christian; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Kaps, Christian; Kalwa, Lukas; Seidl, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the adhesion capacity of a polyglycolic acid- (PGA-) hyaluronan scaffold with a structural modification based on a planar polymer (PM) surface in a cadaver cartilage defect model. Two cadaver specimens were used to serially test multiple chondral matrices. In a cadaver hip model, cell free polymer-based cartilage implants with a planar bioinspired PM surface (PGA-PM-scaffolds) were implanted arthroscopically on 10 mm × 15 mm full-thickness femoral hip cartilage lesions. Unprocessed cartilage implants without a bioinspired PM surface were used as control group. The cartilage implants were fixed without and with the use of fibrin glue on femoral hip cartilage defects. After 50 movement cycles and removal of the distraction, a rearthroscopy was performed to assess the outline attachment and integrity of the scaffold. The fixation techniques without and with fibrin fixation showed marginal differences for outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation after 50 cycles. The PGA-PM-scaffolds with fibrin fixation achieved a higher score in terms of the attachment, integrity, and endpoint fixation than the PGA-scaffold on the cartilage defect. Relating to the outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation, the fixation with PGA-PM-scaffolds accomplished significantly better results compared to the PGA-scaffolds (P = 0.03752, P = 0.03078, P = 0.00512, P = 0.00512). PGA-PM-scaffolds demonstrate increased observed initial fixation strength in cadaver femoral head defects relative to PGA-scaffold, particularly when fibrin glue is used for fixation. PMID:25247185

  15. [Candida infection in hip alloarthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Prenzel, K L; Isenberg, J; Helling, H J; Rehm, K E

    2003-01-01

    A 46-year-old polytoxicomanic patient underwent a total hip replacement for necrosis of the femoral head. The patient suffered additionally from chronic pancreatitis with insulin-dependent diabetes and polyneuropathy. Three weeks later he developed a deep wound infection followed by surgical revision. The infection persisted despite further revision operations and systemically and locally applied antibiotics. After removal of the prosthesis,microbiology revealed Staphylococcus aureus, enterococcus,and Candida parapsilosis. Five additional revision operations, application of suction-irrigation drainage, and systemically administered antibiotics could not stop the infectious process. The patient was transferred to our institution 3 months after primary surgery. The joint defect was filled with a PMMA Palacos spacer. This time biopsies were only positive for Candida albicans. After 12 days of antifungal therapy with fluconazole,microbiological biopsies were sterile. The spacer was removed and femoral extension applied. After 4 weeks of further antifungal therapy, a revision prosthesis was implanted. Until now no signs of infection have appeared.

  16. The accuracy of Acuros XB algorithm for radiation beams traversing a metallic hip implant - comparison with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko; Kapanen, Mika; Sipilä, Petri; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Pitkänen, Maunu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the clinical benefit of the improved accuracy of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, implemented in a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS), Varian Eclipse, was demonstrated with beams traversing a high-Z material. This is also the first study assessing the accuracy of the AXB algorithm applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique compared to full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In the first phase the AXB algorithm was benchmarked against point dosimetry, film dosimetry, and full MC calculation in a water-filled anthropometric phantom with a unilateral hip implant. Also the validity of the full MC calculation used as reference method was demonstrated. The dose calculations were performed both in original computed tomography (CT) dataset, which included artifacts, and in corrected CT dataset, where constant Hounsfield unit (HU) value assignment for all the materials was made. In the second phase, a clinical treatment plan was prepared for a prostate cancer patient with a unilateral hip implant. The plan applied a hybrid VMAT technique that included partial arcs that avoided passing through the implant and static beams traversing the implant. Ultimately, the AXB-calculated dose distribution was compared to the recalculation by the full MC simulation to assess the accuracy of the AXB algorithm in clinical setting. A recalculation with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) was also performed to quantify the benefit of the improved dose calculation accuracy of type 'c' algorithm (AXB) over type 'b' algorithm (AAA). The agreement between the AXB algorithm and the full MC model was very good inside and in the vicinity of the implant and elsewhere, which verifies the accuracy of the AXB algorithm for patient plans with beams traversing through high-Z material, whereas the AAA produced larger discrepancies. PMID:25207577

  17. Radiographic identification of loose bodies in the traumatized hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, R.A.; Schobert, W.E.; Pais, M.J.; Ahmed, M.; Wilson, W.J.; Farjalla, G.L.; Imray, T.J.

    1982-12-01

    Acrylic spacers and cubes of cortical bone of known dimensions were placed in predetermined locations in cadaver hip joints, which were then studied with plain radiography and linear, hypocycloidal, and computed tomography (CT). Joint space widening was not measurable on plain radiographs of the pelvis when 2-mm spacers were placed anywhere within the hip joint. When 4-mm spacers were used, widening measured 2 mm in the axis of measurement corresponding to the location of the spacer. Linear tomography did not permit identification of the 2-mm cubes; however, hypocycloidal tomography and CT consistently showed them anywhere within the hip joint. Radiation dose and clinical recommendations are discussed.

  18. Custom 3D-printed acetabular implants in hip surgery--innovative breakthrough or expensive bespoke upgrade?

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Custom 3D-printed triflange acetabular cages are a new option in the armamentarium of the revision hip surgeon. This review article defines this technology, its indications, surgical method, advantages, disadvantages, use, current published literature and future applications. PMID:26351112

  19. A Two Phase Treatment of an Infected Hip Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ciriviri, Jasmin; Talevski, Darko; Nestorovski, Zoran; Vraniskoski, Tode; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    The revision of the two phase treatment represents a golden standard in the treatment of infected endoprosthesis. Throughout this study, the results of 21 patients with an infected hip endoprosthesis treated in two phases have been processed, with the use of an antibiotic spacer, within the period of 2009 and 2012. Thereby, a unique protocol for diagnosis and treatment of infections has been applied to all the patients, which entails a preoperational x-ray image, laboratory findings (Se, CRP), as well as a puncture aspiration with a microbiological and biochemical examination of the aspirated fragments. The operational treatment consists of: taking a sample for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis, removal of the implanted endoprosthesis, excision of the avascular and necrotic tissue and installing an antibiotic spacer. Postoperatively, the patients are treated with a parenteral application of an antibiotics based on an antibiogram, throughout a period of two weeks, and later on an oral treatment, a combination of two antibiotics, depending on the antibiogram, within the following four to six weeks. After the appeasement of the local findings and the laboratory results, a revision with a removal of the antibiotic spacer and reimplantation of an endoprosthesis - revisional or primary has been conducted on the patients, depending on the bone deficit. The functionality of the joint is graded based on the Haris Hip Score. The patients are being observed postoperatively for a period of 12 to 36 months. A definite reimplantation has been applied to 20 patients, while one patient has been treated with a resection method. The Haris Hip Score was 45 preoperatively, and 80 postoperatively. The applied protocol of the treatment of infected endoprosthesis is effective in the eradication of the infection and the final reimplantation. PMID:27442385

  20. Validation of primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties on the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland using data from the London Implant Retrieval Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Cook, E.; Whittaker, R.; Hothi, H.; Pappas, Y.; Blunn, G.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroplasty registries are important for the surveillance of joint replacements and the evaluation of outcome. Independent validation of registry data ensures high quality. The ability for orthopaedic implant retrieval centres to validate registry data is not known. We analysed data from the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) for primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties performed between 2003 and 2013. Records were linked to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (RC) for validation. A total of 67 045 procedures on the NJR and 782 revised pairs of components from the RC were included. We were able to link 476 procedures (60.9%) recorded with the RC to the NJR successfully. However, 306 procedures (39.1%) could not be linked. The outcome recorded by the NJR (as either revised, unrevised or death) for a primary procedure was incorrect in 79 linked cases (16.6%). The rate of registry-retrieval linkage and correct assignment of outcome code improved over time. The rates of error for component reference numbers on the NJR were as follows: femoral head category number 14/229 (5.0%); femoral head batch number 13/232 (5.3%); acetabular component category number 2/293 (0.7%) and acetabular component batch number 24/347 (6.5%). Registry-retrieval linkage provided a novel means for the validation of data, particularly for component fields. This study suggests that NJR reports may underestimate rates of revision for many types of metal-on-metal hip replacement. This is topical given the increasing scope for NJR data. We recommend a system for continuous independent evaluation of the quality and validity of NJR data. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:10–18. PMID:25568407

  1. Steady-state elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a metal-on-metal hip implant employing a metallic cup with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene backing.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Wang, F C; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Grigoris, P

    2004-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal hip prosthesis employing a metallic cup with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) backing under a simple steady state rotation representing the flexion/extension during walking. Both Reynolds and elasticity equations were coupled and solved numerically by the finite difference method. The elastic deformation was determined by means of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique using the displacement coefficients obtained from the finite element method. Excellent agreement of the predicted elastic deformation was obtained between the FFT technique and the conventional direct summation method. The number of grid points used in the lubrication analysis was found to be important in predicting accurate film thicknesses, particularly at low viscosities representative of physiological lubricants. The effect of the clearance between the femoral head and the acetabular cup on the predicted lubricant film thickness was shown to be significant, while the effect of load was found to be negligible. Overall, the UHMWPE backing was found not only to reduce the contact pressure as identified in a previous study by the authors (Liu et al., 2003) but also significantly to increase the lubricant film thickness for the 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal hip implant, as compared with a metallic mono-block cup.

  2. Preliminary Results of Implantation in Animal Model and Osteoblast Culture Evaluation of Prototypes of Biomimetic Multispiked Connecting Scaffold for Noncemented Stemless Resurfacing Hip Arthroplasty Endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Uklejewski, Ryszard; Rogala, Piotr; Winiecki, Mariusz; Kędzia, Andrzej; Ruszkowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We present the new fixation method for RHA (resurfacing hip arthroplasty) endoprostheses by means of the biomimetic multispiked connecting scaffold (MSC-Scaffold). Such connecting scaffold can generate new type of RHA endoprostheses, that is stemless and fixed entirely without cement. The preprototypes of this MSC-Scaffold were manufactured with modern additive laser additive technology (SLM). The pilot surgical implantations in animal model (two laboratory swine) of MSC-Scaffold preprototypes have showed after two months neither implant loosening, migration, and nor other early complications. From the results of performed histopathological evaluation of the periscaffold spikes bone tissue and 10-day culture of human osteoblasts (NHOst) we can conclude that (1) the scaffolding effect was obtained and (2) to improve the osseointegration of the scaffold spikes, their material surface should be physicochemically modified (e.g., with hydroxyapatite). Some histopathological findings in the periscaffold domain near the MSC-Scaffold spikes bases (fibrous connective tissue and metallic particles near the MSC-Scaffold spikes bases edges) prompt considering the necessity to optimize the design of the MSC-Scaffold in the regions of its interspike space near the spikes bases edges, to provide more room for new bone formation in this region and for indispensable post-processing (glass pearl blasting) after the SLM manufacturing. PMID:23984397

  3. Investigation of the Actual Causes of Hip Joint Implant Loosening Classified as Aseptic--Analysis of Microbiological Culture Results and Levels of Inflammatory Markers.

    PubMed

    Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Bogut, Agnieszka; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the hip joint prosthesis is considered as one of the most significant postoperative complications in recent years. The laboratory diagnostic procedure used to differentiate periprosthetic infection from aseptic loosening is very difficult because of the biofilm which microorganisms form on the implant surface. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the level of concordance between clinical classification of implant loosening among 50 patients subjected to reimplantation procedure and laboratory investigation of PJI including microbiological culture results and the levels of inflammatory markers assessed in the patients' synovial fluid samples, serum, and full blood. The synovial fluid was collected for leukocyte count, differential cell count, and culture on standard media. The levels of systemic inflammation markers such as the ESR and CRP concentration were determined in serum and full blood. Tissue samples were collected for microbiological studies. Components from endoprostheses were exposed to ultrasound in a process called sonication. Among the parameters measured in serum and full blood the levels of ESR and CRP were higher in the septic group of patients. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid was in correlation with microbiologic identification. The most frequent isolated bacteria was Staphylococcus epidermidis. Culture results from materials such as synovial fluid, sonicate and tissues are crucial to establish the infectious aetiology of the loosening. Microscopic analysis of synovial fluid represents a simple, rapid and accurate method for differentiating PJI from aseptic failure. Sonication increases detection of the infectious process, and culture results are in correlation with the cytologic analysis of synovial fluid.

  4. Infectious prosthetic hip joint loosening: bacterial species involved in its aetiology and their antibiotic resistance profiles against antibiotics recommended for the therapy of implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Marczyński, Wojciech; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Reliable microbiological diagnosis along with surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy are key elements in the management of prosthetic-joint infections (PJIs). The purpose of this study was to characterize antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria involved in the aetiology of PJIs. A total of 33 bacterial isolates cultured from 31 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses were analyzed. The diagnostic approach toward isolation of prosthesis- associated microorganisms included sonication of retrieved implants and conventional cultures of periprosthetic tissues and synovial fluid. The in vitro resistance profiles of bacterial isolates were determined in relation to antibiotics recommended for the therapy of PJIs using the disc diffusion method, E-tests(®) and broth microdilution system. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were predominant microorganisms followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Streptococcus mitis, and Propionibacterium acnes. Twenty out of 30 and 12 out of 30 staphylococcal isolates were methicillin- and multi-drug resistant, respectively. Only two isolates were rifampicinresistant. All staphylococci were susceptible to glycopeptides and linezolid. This paper stresses the pathogenic role of staphylococci in patients suffering from implant loosening and reports high methicillin- and multidrug-resistance rates in these bacteria. Hence, antimicrobial susceptibility tests of individual bacterial isolates must always be performed to guide selection of the optimal therapeutic option.

  5. Investigation of the Actual Causes of Hip Joint Implant Loosening Classified as Aseptic--Analysis of Microbiological Culture Results and Levels of Inflammatory Markers.

    PubMed

    Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Bogut, Agnieszka; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the hip joint prosthesis is considered as one of the most significant postoperative complications in recent years. The laboratory diagnostic procedure used to differentiate periprosthetic infection from aseptic loosening is very difficult because of the biofilm which microorganisms form on the implant surface. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the level of concordance between clinical classification of implant loosening among 50 patients subjected to reimplantation procedure and laboratory investigation of PJI including microbiological culture results and the levels of inflammatory markers assessed in the patients' synovial fluid samples, serum, and full blood. The synovial fluid was collected for leukocyte count, differential cell count, and culture on standard media. The levels of systemic inflammation markers such as the ESR and CRP concentration were determined in serum and full blood. Tissue samples were collected for microbiological studies. Components from endoprostheses were exposed to ultrasound in a process called sonication. Among the parameters measured in serum and full blood the levels of ESR and CRP were higher in the septic group of patients. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid was in correlation with microbiologic identification. The most frequent isolated bacteria was Staphylococcus epidermidis. Culture results from materials such as synovial fluid, sonicate and tissues are crucial to establish the infectious aetiology of the loosening. Microscopic analysis of synovial fluid represents a simple, rapid and accurate method for differentiating PJI from aseptic failure. Sonication increases detection of the infectious process, and culture results are in correlation with the cytologic analysis of synovial fluid. PMID:26373172

  6. Accounting for patient variability in finite element analysis of the intact and implanted hip and knee: a review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark; Bryan, Rebecca; Galloway, Francis

    2013-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly difficult to differentiate the performance of new joint replacement designs using available preclinical test methods. Finite element analysis is commonly used and the majority of published studies are performed on representative anatomy, assuming optimal implant placement, subjected to idealised loading conditions. There are significant differences between patients and accounting for this variability will lead to better assessment of the risk of failure. This review paper provides a comprehensive overview of the techniques available to account for patient variability. There is a brief overview of patient-specific model generation techniques, followed by a review of multisubject patient-specific studies performed on the intact and implanted femur and tibia. In particular, the challenges and limitations of manually generating models for such studies are discussed. To efficiently account for patient variability, the application of statistical shape and intensity models (SSIM) are being developed. Such models have the potential to synthetically generate thousands of representative models generated from a much smaller training set. Combined with the automation of the prosthesis implantation process, SSIM provides a potentially powerful tool for assessing the next generation of implant designs. The potential application of SSIM are discussed along with their limitations. PMID:23255372

  7. Multi-Disciplinary Antimicrobial Strategies for Improving Orthopaedic Implants to Prevent Prosthetic Joint Infections in Hip and Knee

    PubMed Central

    Getzlaf, Matthew A.; Lewallen, Eric A.; Kremers, Hilal M.; Jones, Dakota L.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C.; Lewallen, David G.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2016-01-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria. PMID:26449208

  8. Effect of bearing geometry and structure support on transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongming; Roberts, Paul; Grigoris, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An effective lubrication can significantly reduce wear of metal-on-metal artificial hip joints. The improvement of the lubrication can be achieved through the optimisation of the bearing geometry in terms of a small clearance and/or the structural support such as a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic bearing in a sandwich acetabular cup form. The separate effects of these two factors on fluid film lubrication of 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal total hip joints under walking conditions were numerically investigated in this paper. The results show that a larger lubricant film due to the polyethylene backing can be significantly enhanced by the transient squeeze-film action, particularly during the stance phase, and a similar lubricant film can be developed for both the monolithic cup relying on the smaller clearance and the sandwich cup benefiting from the polyethylene backing. Both cup systems can function in a wide range of lubrication regimes, covering both mixed and fluid film, under the current design and manufacture conditions.

  9. The biomechanics of plate fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures near the tip of a total hip implant: cables, screws, or both?

    PubMed

    Shah, S; Kim, S Y R; Dubov, A; Schemitsch, E H; Bougherara, H; Zdero, R

    2011-09-01

    Femoral shaft fractures after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remain a serious problem, since there is no optimal surgical repair method. Virtually all studies that examined surgical repair methods have done so clinically or experimentally. The present study assessed injury patterns computationally by developing three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models that were validated experimentally. The investigation evaluated three different constructs for the fixation of Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures following THA. Experimentally, three bone plate repair methods were applied to a synthetic femur with a 5 mm fracture gap near the tip of a total hip implant. Repair methods were identical distal to the fracture gap, but used cables only (construct A), screws only (construct B), or cables plus screws (construct C) proximal to the fracture gap. Specimens were oriented in 15 degrees adduction to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking, subjected to 1000 N of axial force, and instrumented with strain gauges. Computationally, a linearly elastic and isotropic 3D FE model was developed to mimic experiments. Results showed excellent agreement between experimental and FE strains, yielding a Pearson linearity coefficient, R2, of 0.92 and a slope for the line of best data fit of 1.06. FE-computed axial stiffnesses were 768 N/mm (construct A), 1023 N/mm (construct B), and 1102 N/mm (construct C). FE surfaces stress maps for cortical bone showed Von Mises stresses, excluding peaks, of 0-8 MPa (construct A), 0-15 MPa (construct B), and 0-20 MPa (construct C). Cables absorbed the majority of load, followed by the plates and then the screws. Construct A yielded peak stress at one of the empty holes in the plate. Constructs B and C had similar bone stress patterns, and can achieve optimal fixation. PMID:22070022

  10. Wear Particles Derived from Metal Hip Implants Induce the Generation of Multinucleated Giant Cells in a 3-Dimensional Peripheral Tissue-Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debargh K.; Potnis, Pushya A.; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1–5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which

  11. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  12. Accuracy of methods for calculating volumetric wear from coordinate measuring machine data of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; McKellop, Harry A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the accuracy and sensitivity of several numerical methods employing spherical or plane triangles for calculating the volumetric wear of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants from coordinate measuring machine measurements. Five methods, one using spherical triangles and four using plane triangles to represent the bearing and the best-fit surfaces, were assessed and compared on a perfect hemisphere model and a hemi-ellipsoid model (i.e. unworn models), computer-generated wear models and wear-tested femoral balls, with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The results showed that the algorithm (Method 1) employing spherical triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surfaces produced adequate accuracy for the wear volume with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The algorithms (Methods 2-4) using plane triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surface also produced accuracies that were comparable to that with spherical triangles. In contrast, if the bearing surface was represented with a mesh of plane triangles and the best-fit surface was taken as a smooth surface without discretization (Method 5), the algorithm produced much lower accuracy with a point spacing of 0.5 mm than Methods 1-4 with a point spacing of 3 mm. PMID:24531891

  13. Accuracy of methods for calculating volumetric wear from coordinate measuring machine data of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; McKellop, Harry A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the accuracy and sensitivity of several numerical methods employing spherical or plane triangles for calculating the volumetric wear of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants from coordinate measuring machine measurements. Five methods, one using spherical triangles and four using plane triangles to represent the bearing and the best-fit surfaces, were assessed and compared on a perfect hemisphere model and a hemi-ellipsoid model (i.e. unworn models), computer-generated wear models and wear-tested femoral balls, with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The results showed that the algorithm (Method 1) employing spherical triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surfaces produced adequate accuracy for the wear volume with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The algorithms (Methods 2-4) using plane triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surface also produced accuracies that were comparable to that with spherical triangles. In contrast, if the bearing surface was represented with a mesh of plane triangles and the best-fit surface was taken as a smooth surface without discretization (Method 5), the algorithm produced much lower accuracy with a point spacing of 0.5 mm than Methods 1-4 with a point spacing of 3 mm.

  14. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. A hip replacement can Relieve pain Help your hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements The ...

  15. Review of cobalt toxicokinetics following oral dosing: Implications for health risk assessments and metal-on-metal hip implant patients.

    PubMed

    Tvermoes, Brooke E; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent L; Unice, Kenneth M

    2015-05-01

    Cobalt (Co) can stimulate erythropoietin production in individuals at doses exceeding 25 mg CoCl2/day. Co has also been shown to exert effects on the thyroid gland, heart and nervous system at sufficient doses. The biological activity of Co is dictated by the concentration of free (unbound) ionic Co(2+). Blood concentrations, as well as, urinary excretion rates of Co are reliable biomarkers for systemic Co exposure. A recent series of human volunteer Co-supplement studies simultaneously measured Co blood and urine concentrations, as well as, Co speciation in serum, and a number of biochemical and clinical parameters. It was found in these studies that peak Co whole blood concentration as high as 117 μg/L were not associated with changes in hematological parameters such as increased red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hgb) or hematocrit (Hct) levels, nor with changes in cardiac, neurological or, thyroid function. Using a Co biokinetic model, the estimated Co systemic tissue concentrations (e.g., liver, kidney, and heart) following 90-days of Co-dietary supplementation with ∼1 mg Co/day were found to be similar to estimated tissue concentrations in implant patients after 10 years of exposure at continuous steady state Co blood concentration of ∼10 μg/L. This study is the first to present modeled Co tissue concentrations at various doses following sub-chronic and chronic exposure. The modeled steady state tissue Co concentrations in combination with the data on adverse health effects in humans should help in the characterization of potential hazards associated with increased blood Co concentrations due to exposure to dietary supplements or cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) containing implants.

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty Dislocations Are More Complex Than They Appear: A Case Report of Intraprosthetic Dislocation of an Anatomic Dual-Mobility Implant After Closed Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Bradford S.; De Martino, Ivan; Sculco, Thomas; Sculco, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty is a successful operation for the treatment of hip pain. One of the common complications of hip arthroplasty is dislocation. While reduction of standard prosthetic dislocations is highly successful, new prostheses add the potential for new complications. Case Report: We present the case of a patient who experienced intraprosthetic dislocation of an anatomic dual-mobility total hip prosthesis after a closed hip reduction and include the prereduction and postreduction radiographic findings. Conclusion: Emergency department physicians should be aware of intraprosthetic dislocation. This complication can be easily missed because the metal/ceramic femoral head appears to be reduced in the acetabulum. PMID:27303232

  17. Comparison of Whole-Blood Metal Ion Levels Among Four Types of Large-Head, Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty Implants: A Concise Follow-up, at Five Years, of a Previous Report.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Lungu, Eugen; Belzile, Etienne; Morin, François; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-02-17

    Few studies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) implants with a large-diameter femoral head and metal-on-metal design have directly compared the progression of metal ion levels over time and the relationship to complications. As we previously reported, 144 patients received one of four types of large-diameter-head, metal-on-metal THA designs (Durom, Birmingham, ASR XL, or Magnum implants). Cobalt, chromium, and titanium ion levels were measured over five years. We compared ion levels and clinical results over time. The Durom group showed the highest levels of cobalt (p ≤ 0.002) and titanium ions (p ≤ 0.03). Both the Durom and Birmingham groups demonstrated significant ongoing cobalt increases up to five years. Eight patients (seven with a Durom implant and one with a Birmingham implant) developed adverse local tissue reaction. Six Durom implants and one Birmingham implant required revision, with one pseudotumor under surveillance at the time of the most recent follow-up. We found that ion generation and related complications varied among designs. More concerning was that, for some designs, ion levels continued to increase. Coupling a cobalt-chromium adapter sleeve to an unmodified titanium femoral trunnion along with a large metal-on-metal bearing may explain the poor performances of two of the designs in the current study. PMID:26888673

  18. Three-dimensional computerized selection of hip prostheses in patients with congenital dislocated hips.

    PubMed

    Gelalis, L D; Xenakis, T A; Hantes, M; Vartziotis, K; Soucacos, P N

    2001-11-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the combined use of computed tomography (CT) and computer-aided design (CAD) in the preoperative evaluation and implant selection in 20 patients (20 hips) with congenital dislocation of the hip who were scheduled to undergo total hip arthroplasty. Computerized selection of the femoral implant with optimum fit and fill was made after a three-dimensional reconstruction of the femoral canal using CT data and CAD. Implantation of all sizes of 5 noncemented and 2 cemented femoral implants was simulated using CATIA software (IBM, Kingstone, NY). When patients underwent surgery, 18 of 20 preselected prostheses agreed by type and size with the prostheses implanted. The remaining 2 preselected implants agreed by type only. In patients with dislocated and dysplastic hips, combined use of CT and CAD allows effective preoperative planning by providing the surgeon with vital information about the proximal femoral canal geometry and the possible femoral implant with optimum fit and fill to be used.

  19. In vitro analysis of the cement mantle of femoral hip implants: development and validation of a CT-scan based measurement tool.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, Thierry; de Mey, Johan; Deklerck, Rudi

    2005-07-01

    We developed, validated and assessed inter- and intraobserver reliability of a CT-scan based measurement tool to evaluate morphological characteristics of the bone-cement-stem complex of hip implants in cadaver femurs. Two different models were investigated: the stem-cavity model using a double tapered polished femoral-stem that is removed after cement curing and the plastic-replica model using a stereolithographic stem replica that is left in place during CT-scanning. Software was developed to segment and analyze connective CT-images and identify the contours of bone, cement, and stem based on their respective gray values. Volume parameters (whole specimen, cement, stem, air contents of bone and cement), concentricity parameters (distances between centroids of stem and cement, cement and bone, stem and bone), contact surfaces (bone/air and cement/bone) and bone cement mantle thickness parameters were calculated. A three-dimensional protocol was developed to evaluate the minimal mantle thickness out of the CT-plane. The average accuracy for surfaces within CT-images was 7.47 mm2 (1.80%), for bone and cement mantle thickness it was 0.51 mm (9.39%), for distances between centroids it was 0.38 mm (18.5%) and contours: 0.27 mm (2.57%). The intra- and interobserver reliability of air content in bone and cement was sub-optimal (intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC) as low as 0.54 with an average ICC of 0.85). All other variables were reliable (ICC>0.81, average ICC: 0.96). This in vitro technique can assess characteristics of cement mantles produced by different cementing techniques, stem types or centralizers.

  20. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  1. Improving Resident Knowledge of Spacers.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Brian; Al Katranji, Khalid; Woodall, Meredith; Shepherd, Meagan; Flesher, Susan L

    2016-10-01

    Studies show the delivery of inhaled medications is maximized when a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with a spacer is utilized. Our residents expressed concern with their knowledge of MDIs and spacers. This study was designed to address those concerns. Residents were given a 12-question pre-intervention, self-assessment questionnaire that explored their overall knowledge and comfort in utilizing MDI with spacers. Participants then received educational intervention via multimedia videos and a demonstration of proper use of MDI with spacer. Participants were given the same questionnaire immediately following the education and again 3 months later. Improvement was significant (P < .05) for each element studied as derived from the 12 questions. Improvement remained significant when these variables were assessed in the 3-month follow-up. In this study, we successfully improved the ability of our residents to deliver quality care by improving their knowledge and confidence in utilizing MDIs with spacers. PMID:27630006

  2. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  3. Hip Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIPS. See your doctor. Use ice and an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve the pain. *3. Do you ... hip pain may be from ARTHRITIS. Try an anti-inflammatory medicine. If you don't feel better, see ...

  4. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your health provider.AspirinThe body breaks down aspirin to get rid of it. Rose hip contains ... of vitamin C might decrease the breakdown of aspirin. Taking large amount of rose hip along with ...

  5. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection.

    PubMed

    Radoicic, Dragan; Milanovic, Milomir; Marinkovic, Jugoslav; Radoicic, Danica

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  6. Unstable total hip arthroplasty: detailed overview.

    PubMed

    Berry, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hip dislocation is one of the most common complications of THA. Good preoperative planning, good postoperative patient education, accurate intraoperative component positioning, rigorous intraoperative testing of hip stability, and good repair of soft tissues during closure all help prevent dislocation. Early postoperative dislocations and first or second dislocations usually are treated with closed reduction and a hip guide brace or hip spica cast, but when dislocation becomes recurrent, surgical treatment usually is needed. When possible, surgical treatment is based on identifying and treating a specific problem leading to the dislocation, such as implant malposition, inadequate soft-tissue tension, or impingement. In selected circumstances, constrained implants or bipolar or tripolar implants provide powerful tools to restore hip stability.

  7. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  8. Nanoparticles based brachytherapy spacers for delivery of localized combined chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Materials and Methods Here we have fabricated Implantable Nanoplatforms or Chemo-Radiation Therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemo-radiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-coglycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix, were physically identical (size) to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5mm×0.8mm). The silica nanoparticles with diameter 250nm conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with anticancer drug, docetaxel. We have evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked using optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue as opposed to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth as opposed to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions The imaging with the Cy7.5-spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel-spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, as opposed to rapid clearance of the drugs when administered systemically. The results demonstrate

  9. Hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Amorim Cabrita, Henrique Antônio Berwanger; de Castro Trindade, Christiano Augusto; de Campos Gurgel, Henrique Melo; Leal, Rafael Demura; de Souza Marques, Ricardo da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff), although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve.

  10. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Spacers for Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Retrospective Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; Meier, Ullrich; Suess, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is the standard surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has an elasticity similar to bone and thus appears well suited for use as the implant in ACDF procedures. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients treated with standing alone PEEK spacers without bone morphogenic protein (BMP) or plating and to examine the influence of the different design of the two spacers on the rate of subsidence and dislocation. Methods: This retrospective comparative study reviewed 335 patients treated by ACDF in a specialized urban hospital for radiculopathy or myelopathy due to degenerative pathologies. The Intromed PEEK spacer was used in 181 patients from 3/2002 to 11/2004, and the AMT SHELL spacer was implanted in 154 patients from 4/2004 to 12/2007. The follow-up rate was 100% at three months post-op and 82.7% (277 patients) at one year. The patients were assessed with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) questionnaire and radiographically. Results: At the one-year follow-up there were 118/277 patients with an excellent clinical outcome on the JOA, 112/277 with a good outcome, 20/277 with a fair outcome, and 27/277 with a poor outcome. Subsidence was observed in 13.3% of patients with the Intromed spacer vs 8.4% of the patients with the AMT SHELL. Dislocation of the spacer was observed in 10 of the 181 patients with Intromed spacers but in none of the 154 patients with Shell spacers. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that ACDF with standing alone PEEK cages leads to excellent and good clinical outcomes. The differences we observed in the subsidence rate between the two spacers were not significant and cannot be related to a single design feature of the spacers. PMID:22016753

  11. Curved-stem Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hip resurfacing is an attractive concept because it preserves rather than removes the femoral head and neck. Most early designs had high failure rates, but one unique design had a femoral stem. Because that particular device appeared to have better implant survival, this study assessed the clinical outcome and long-term survivorship of a hip resurfacing prosthesis. Four hundred forty-five patients (561 hips) were retrospectively reviewed after a minimum of 20 years’ followup or until death; 23 additional patients were lost to followup. Patients received a metal femoral prosthesis with a small curved stem. Three types of acetabular reconstructions were used: (1) cemented polyurethane; (2) metal-on-metal; and (3) polyethylene secured with cement or used as the liner of a two-piece porous-coated implant. Long-term results were favorable with the metal-on-metal combination only. The mean overall Harris hip score was 92 at 2 years of followup. None of the 121 patients (133 hips) who received metal-on-metal articulation experienced failure. The failure rate with polyurethane was 100%, and the failure rate with cemented polyethylene was 41%. Hip resurfacing with a curved-stem femoral component had a durable clinical outcome when a metal-on-metal articulation was used. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18338217

  12. Toxicology of wear particles of cobalt-chromium alloy metal-on-metal hip implants Part II: Importance of physicochemical properties and dose in animal and in vitro studies as a basis for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Kovochich, Michael; Liong, Monty; Finley, Brent L; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Oberdörster, Günter

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the Part II analysis was to evaluate animal and in vitro toxicology studies of CoCr particles with respect to their physicochemistry and dose relevance to metal-on-metal (MoM) implant patients as derived from Part I. In the various toxicology studies, physicochemical characteristics were infrequently considered and administered doses were orders of magnitude higher than what occurs in patients. Co was consistently shown to rapidly release from CoCr particles for distribution and elimination from the body. CoCr micron sized particles appear more biopersistent in vivo resulting in inflammatory responses that are not seen with similar mass concentrations of nanoparticles. We conclude, that in an attempt to obtain data for a complete risk assessment, future studies need to focus on physicochemical characteristics of nano and micron sized particles and on doses and dose metrics relevant to those generated in patients or in properly conducted hip simulator studies.

  13. Conus hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Wagner, M

    2001-01-01

    50 years ago, prosthetic replacement of the hip joint ushered in a new epoch in orthopaedics. Total hip replacement made it possible to remove a severely diseased, painful hip and restore normal function and a normal quality of life to the afflicted patient. The early results of total hip replacement are almost all spectacular and hip replacement has become the most successful type of orthopaedic surgery. These good results using an approach that was technically relatively simple resulted in a temptation to implant prosthetic hip joints with ever increasing frequency in ever younger patients. This led to the emergence of new problems, which were not so clearly recognised at the outset: it emerged that the stability of prosthetic hip joints was of limited duration. This had the following consequence: If a total hip prosthesis is implanted in an elderly person whose remaining life-expectancy is shorter than the longevity of the prosthesis, hip replacement is a life-long solution. We can therefore say that, for a patient who has only 10 to 15 years left to live, their hip problem is solved by total hip replacement. For young people, who still have a long life expectancy in front of them, it is different. They will experience failure of the artificial joint and require further surgery. The commonest and most important type of failure in total hip prostheses is aseptic loosening, which is associated with resorption of bone at the site of the prosthesis. The cause of this phenomenon has only gradually been recognised in the course of the years. Initially, the unanimous opinion was that the methacrylate cement, used to fix the components of the prosthesis in the bone, was the definitive cause of aseptic loosening because fissures and fractures of the cement were almost always found during surgical revision of loosened joints. There was talk of "cement disease" and great efforts were made to improve the quality of the cement and the cementing technique. Moreover, even

  14. Validation of primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties on the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland using data from the London Implant Retrieval Centre: a study using the NJR dataset.

    PubMed

    Sabah, S A; Henckel, J; Cook, E; Whittaker, R; Hothi, H; Pappas, Y; Blunn, G; Skinner, J A; Hart, A J

    2015-01-01

    Arthroplasty registries are important for the surveillance of joint replacements and the evaluation of outcome. Independent validation of registry data ensures high quality. The ability for orthopaedic implant retrieval centres to validate registry data is not known. We analysed data from the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) for primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties performed between 2003 and 2013. Records were linked to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (RC) for validation. A total of 67,045 procedures on the NJR and 782 revised pairs of components from the RC were included. We were able to link 476 procedures (60.9%) recorded with the RC to the NJR successfully. However, 306 procedures (39.1%) could not be linked. The outcome recorded by the NJR (as either revised, unrevised or death) for a primary procedure was incorrect in 79 linked cases (16.6%). The rate of registry-retrieval linkage and correct assignment of outcome code improved over time. The rates of error for component reference numbers on the NJR were as follows: femoral head category number 14/229 (5.0%); femoral head batch number 13/232 (5.3%); acetabular component category number 2/293 (0.7%) and acetabular component batch number 24/347 (6.5%). Registry-retrieval linkage provided a novel means for the validation of data, particularly for component fields. This study suggests that NJR reports may underestimate rates of revision for many types of metal-on-metal hip replacement. This is topical given the increasing scope for NJR data. We recommend a system for continuous independent evaluation of the quality and validity of NJR data.

  15. Review on squeaking hips

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Yadin David; Munir, Selin; Donohoo, Shane; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Squeaking is a well-recognized complication for hard-on-hard bearings. The nature of squeaking is not yet completely understood however it is considered a multifactorial phenomenon. Patient, implant, and surgical factors play a role in squeaking. It is believed that mechanisms damaging the fluid film lubrication in which these bearings function optimally have a critical role. Such mechanisms include edge loading, stripe wear, impingement, third body particles and ceramic fracture. The resonance of metallic parts can produce noise in the human audible range hence the implant metallurgic composition and design may play a role. Implant positioning can facilitate impingement and edge loading enhancing the occurrence of squeaking. The recent introduction of large heads (> 36 mm) 4th generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing may accentuate the conditions facilitating noise formation; however the current literature is insufficient. Clinically, squeaking may manifest in extreme hip positions or during normal gait cycle however it is rarely associated with pain. Evaluations of patients with squeaking include clinical and radiographic assessments. Computer tomography is recommended as it can better reveal ceramic breakage and implant malposition. The treatments for most squeaking patients include reassurance and activity modification. However for some, noise can be a problem, requiring further surgical intervention. In the occurrence of ceramic fracture, implant failure, extreme components malposition, instability and impingement, surgery should be advised. This review will aim to discuss the current literature regarding squeaking. PMID:26601063

  16. Recent Patents and Designs on Hip Replacement Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  17. Recent patents and designs on hip replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  18. Electrostatic precipitator construction having spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-23

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A plurality of identical spacers is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the spacers is an elongated single unitary member and has one end fixed to a surface of one of a pair of adjacent surfaces of the plates and the other end abutting the other of the adjacent surfaces.

  19. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  20. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J.; Veca, Anthony R.; Donck, Harry A.

    1982-01-01

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  1. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  2. Eleven-year results of the ABG I hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Muddu, B. N.

    2006-01-01

    The ABG I uncemented hip prosthesis has demonstrated an unacceptably high failure rate and poor functional outcome in our patients. A prospective review was performed of 38 implanted hips with a mean follow-up of 11 years. Sixteen hips have been revised or are candidates for revision hip surgery, due principally to polyethylene wear and pelvic osteolysis. Contributing factors were likely to be the poor wear characteristics of the polyethylene liners—which were gamma irradiated in air—and the thinness of these liners. Of further concern were the poor pain and function scores in the remaining hips [mean Harris Hip Scores (HHS) of 70 (SD 22) at 11-year follow-up]. The influence of the surgical learning curve on clinical results may have been an important factor. Undersized femoral components were associated with poor pain and functional scores in five patients with HHS < 60. All ABG I hip implants must remain under careful, long-term review. PMID:16521011

  3. Cement augmentation of the acetabulum for revision total hip arthroplasty for infection.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benedict A; Kuchinad, R; Garbedian, S; Backstein, D; Gross, A E; Safir, O A

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotic-loaded cement spacers in first-stage revision hip arthroplasty for infection are associated with a high dislocation and fracture rate. This technical note describes a novel surgical technique, utilizing screws and cement, improving acetabular coverage and reducing the risk of mechanical failure. Fifteen infected hip prostheses underwent removal, cement acetabular augmentation and insertion of a femoral cement spacer. Eleven hips had successful infection eradication and subsequently underwent a second stage revision procedure a mean duration of 15 weeks (9-48) after the first stage. No dislocations or fractures of the cement spacers were observed. This technique affords the potential to reduce the duration of time cement spacers remaining in situ, provides enhanced mechanical stability and improved antibiotic elution through cement-on-cement articulation.

  4. [Hip metallosis caused by wear of a TT-1 stem on a ceramic modular head hip prosthesis --case report].

    PubMed

    Blacha, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The author presents a case of metal stem cone wear caused by a ceramic head. During revision hip arthroplasty procedure a new modular ceramic head was implanted in combination with a stable cemented TT-1 stem. 13 months after surgery the hip became symptomatic and 20 months after the procedure total loosening of the cup was observed. Wear of the stem cone was visible. During the next revision procedure all hip prosthesis elements were removed, soft tissue debridement was performed and a new cemented prosthesis was implanted. One year post-op the hip is pain free.

  5. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  6. Effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Nong, Lu-Ming; DU, Rui; Gao, Gong-Ming; Jiang, Yu-Qing; Xu, Nan-Wei

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical outcomes of 23 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, treated using interspinous spacer implantation alone or combined with posterior lumbar fusion, were retrospectively studied and assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Pre-operative and post-operative interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were determined. The early effects and complications associated with the interspinous spacers were recorded. The surgical procedures performed with the in-space treatment were easy and minimally invasive. The VAS scores and ODI were improved post-operatively compared with pre-operatively. Significant changes in the interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were noted. In-space treatment for degenerative lumbar disease is easy and safe, with good early effects. The in-space system provides an alternative treatment for lumbar degenerative disease.

  7. Removed antibiotic-impregnated cement spacers in two-stage revision joint arthroplasty do not show biofilm formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Justin W; Guillot, Stacey J; Redick, Jan A; Browne, James A

    2012-12-01

    Use of antibiotic-impregnated spacers is common in the two-stage approach to treatment of periprosthetic joint infection despite the lack of information regarding in vivo performance of these implants. Antibiotic elution levels likely often fall below the minimal inhibitory concentration need to inhibit bacterial growth, raising concern that the spacers themselves may provide a potential attachment site for biofilm formation. Advanced microscopy was used in this study to evaluate the surface characteristics of antibiotic-eluting spacers collected at the time of prosthesis reimplantation from 6 patients undergoing two-stage treatment for an infected total joint arthroplasty. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal scanning microscopy of the removed spacers revealed modest fibrous matrix formation and inflammatory cells with no biofilm or bacteria detected. This study supports the continued use of antibiotic spacers in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection.

  8. International variation in hip replacement rates

    PubMed Central

    Merx, H; Dreinhofer, K; Schrader, P; Sturmer, T; Puhl, W; Gunther, K; Brenner, H

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To summarise epidemiological data on the frequency of hip replacements in the countries of the developed world, especially in countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and to investigate whether missing consensus criteria for the indication for total hip replacement (THR) result in different replacement rates. Methods: Country-specific hip replacement rates were collected using the available literature, different data sources of national authorities, and estimates of leading hip replacement manufacturers. Results: According to administrative and literature data sources the reported crude primary THR rate varied between 50 and 130 procedures/100 000 inhabitants in OECD countries in the 1990s. The crude overall hip implantation rate, summarising THR, partial hip replacement, and hip revision procedures, was reported to range from 60 to 200 procedures/100 000 inhabitants in the late 1990s. Moreover, large national differences were seen in the relationship between total and partial hip replacement procedures. Conclusion: The reported differences in hip replacement rates in OECD countries are substantial. They may be due to various causes, including different coding systems, country-specific differences in the healthcare system, in total expenditure on health per capita, in the population age structure, and in different indication criteria for THR. PMID:12594106

  9. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  10. Postfusion magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by a titanium, cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and carbon intervertebral disc spacer.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Heidrich, Gabert

    2007-04-01

    Intervertebral spacers for anterior spine fusion are made of different materials, such as titanium and CoCrMo-alloys or carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). Implant-related susceptibility artifacts can decrease the quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. This cadaveric study aimed to demonstrate the extent that implant-related MRI artifacting affects the postfusion differentiation of the spinal canal (SC) and intervertebral disc space (IDS). In 6 cadaveric porcine spines, we evaluated the postimplantation MRI scans of a titanium, CoCrMo-spacer and CFRP-spacer that differed in shape and surface qualities. A spacer made of human cortical bone was used as a control. A defined evaluation unit was divided into regions of interest (ROI) to characterize the SC and IDS. Considering 15 different MRI sequences read independently by an interobserver-validated team of specialists artifact-affected image quality of the median MRI slice was rated on a score of 0-1-2-3. A maximum score of 15 points for the SC and 9 points for the IDS (100%) was possible. Turbo spin echo sequences produced the best scores for both spacers and the control. Only the control achieved a score of 100%. For the IDS the CoCrMo-spacer, titanium and CFRP-spacer maximally scored 0%, 0% and 74%, for the SC 60%, 80% and 99%, respectively. By using favored T1 TSE sequences the CFRP-spacer represented clear advantages in postfusion spinal imaging. Independent of artifact dimensions the used scoring system allowed us to create an implant-related ranking of MRI scan quality in reference to the bone control.

  11. Alternative bearings in total hip arthroplasty in the young patient.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; Prieto, Hernan; Lewallen, David G

    2013-10-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is an effective treatment option for advanced hip arthritis in elderly patients. Studies in young patients have traditionally shown less durable results. With current implants, surgical technique, and cementless fixation methods, the durability of total hip arthroplasty may now be related to the wear performance of the bearing surfaces. To improve implant longevity, there are several bearing surface choices currently available for this demanding group of patients. Alternatives must be evaluated in terms of the risks and benefits associated with each articulation, and all new technologies must be carefully monitored over the long term. PMID:24095062

  12. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  13. Pyrocarbon spacer as a trapezium replacement for arthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint; a follow-up study of 60 cases.

    PubMed

    Szalay, Gabor; Meyer, Christof; Scheufens, Tanja; Schnettler, Reinhard; Christ, Ralph; Schleicher, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Rhizarthrosis is the most common degenerative joint disease of the hand, affecting about 10% of the population. We report our results with trapezium replacement using a pyrocarbon spacer. Between January 2005 and April 2010, 70 patients underwent trapeziectomy with interposition of a pyrocarbon spacer. Sixty patients were examined at an average follow-up of 23.6 (5-64) months after the operation. Six (8.6%) of the 70 implanted pyrocarbon spacers dislocated. Based on the assessment scale devised by Buck-Gramcko, 19 patients achieved a very good outcome (31.6%), 31 patients (51.6%) had a good outcome, six results were satisfactory (10%) and four patients (6.6%) had a poor result. In this study, trapeziectomy and implantation of a pyrocarbon spacer achieved good or very good results in 83.2% of cases. The high cost of the implant and the observed rate of spacer dislocation should however be considered critically. While the short-term results of this method are encouraging, long-term outcomes will show whether this technique can keep up with the good results of suspension arthroplasty.

  14. Cervical interfacet spacers and maintenance of cervical lordosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Straus, David C; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The cervical interfacet spacer (CIS) is a relatively new technology that can increase foraminal height and area by facet distraction. These offer the potential to provide indirect neuroforaminal decompression while simultaneously enhancing fusion potential due to the relatively large osteoconductive surface area and compressive forces exerted on the grafts. These potential benefits, along with the relative ease of implantation during posterior cervical fusion procedures, make the CIS an attractive adjuvant in the management of cervical pathology. One concern with the use of interfacet spacers is the theoretical risk of inducing iatrogenic kyphosis. This work tests the hypothesis that interfacet spacers are associated with loss of cervical lordosis. METHODS Records from patients undergoing posterior cervical fusion at Rush University Medical Center between March 2011 and December 2012 were reviewed. The FacetLift CISs were used in all patients. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic data were reviewed and the Ishihara indices and cervical lordotic angles were measured and recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA software. RESULTS A total of 64 patients were identified in whom 154 cervical levels were implanted with machined allograft interfacet spacers. Of these, 15 patients underwent anterior-posterior fusions, 4 underwent anterior-posterior-anterior fusions, and the remaining 45 patients underwent posterior-only fusions. In the 45 patients with posterior-only fusions, a total of 110 levels were treated with spacers. There were 14 patients (31%) with a single level treated, 16 patients (36%) with two levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with three levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with four levels treated, 1 patient (2%) with five levels treated, and 4 patients (9%) with six levels treated. Complete radiographic data were available in 38 of 45 patients (84%). On average, radiographic follow-up was obtained at 256.9 days (range 48-524 days

  15. New titanium spacer for cervical laminoplasty: initial clinical experience. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Tani, Satoshi; Suetsua, Futoshi; Mizuno, Junichi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Nagashima, Hiroyasu; Akiyama, Masahiko; Isoshima, Akira; Ohashi, Hiroki; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Abe, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Many commercially available hydroxyapatite (HA) spacers for cervical laminoplasty have been introduced but have disadvantages such as lack of plasticity, easy cracking, and occasional difficulty in fixation by sutures. Here we present the short-term results of a newly designed titanium spacer (Laminoplasty Basket) in open-door cervical laminoplasty, and evaluated clinically and radiologically. The titanium box-shaped spacer with two arms for fixation was easily inserted and fixed into the laminoplasty space with 4-mm or 5-mm length screws after the posterior cervical arch was repositioned for the canal expansion. Twenty-one patients with cervical myelopathy due to spondylosis or ossification of the longitudinal ligament or developmental narrow canal observed for more than 6 months postoperatively were enrolled in this study. The neurological condition of these patients improved from 9.4 points on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale preoperatively to 13.5 points at 6 months after surgery. Postoperative radiological evaluation showed no laminar closure or implant failure and cervical spine curvature was maintained. These results seemed to have no significant difference compared with those using HA spacers. This titanium spacer is a potential substitute for conventional HA or other similar devices in cervical laminoplasty. PMID:21206196

  16. Outcome of total knee replacement following explantation and cemented spacer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Zajonz, Dirk; Bollmann, Juliane; Geissler, Vanessa; Prietzel, Torsten; Moche, Michael; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E.; Josten, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection after total knee replacement (TKR) is one of the serious complications which must be pursued with a very effective therapeutic concept. In most cases this means revision arthroplasty, in which one-setting and two-setting procedures are distinguished. Healing of infection is the conditio sine qua non for re-implantation. This retrospective work presents an assessment of the success rate after a two-setting revision arthroplasty of the knee following periprosthetic infection. It further considers drawing conclusions concerning the optimal timing of re-implantation. Patients and methods: A total of 34 patients have been enclosed in this study from September 2005 to December 2013. 35 re-implantations were carried out following explantation of total knee and implantation of cemented spacer. The patient’s group comprised of 53% (18) males and 47% (16) females. The average age at re-implantation time was 72.2 years (ranging from 54 to 85 years). We particularly evaluated the microbial spectrum, the interval between explantation and re-implantation, the number of surgeries that were necessary prior to re-implantation as well as the postoperative course. Results: We reported 31.4% (11) reinfections following re-implantation surgeries. The number of the reinfections declined with increasing time interval between explantation and re-implantation. Patients who developed reinfections were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 4.47 months. Those patients with uncomplicated course were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 6.79 months. Nevertheless, we noticed no essential differences in outcome with regard to the number of surgeries carried out prior to re-implantation. Mobile spacers proved better outcome than temporary arthrodesis with intramedullary fixation. Conclusion: No uniform strategy of treatment exists after peri-prosthetic infections. In particular, no optimal timing can be stated concerning re-implantation. Our data

  17. Hydrogel Spacer Prospective Multicenter Randomized Controlled Pivotal Trial: Dosimetric and Clinical Effects of Perirectal Spacer Application in Men Undergoing Prostate Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mariados, Neil; Sylvester, John; Shah, Dhiren; Karsh, Lawrence; Hudes, Richard; Beyer, David; Kurtzman, Steven; Bogart, Jeffrey; Hsi, R. Alex; Kos, Michael; Ellis, Rodney; Logsdon, Mark; Zimberg, Shawn; Forsythe, Kevin; Zhang, Hong; Soffen, Edward; Francke, Patrick; Mantz, Constantine; Rossi, Peter; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Perirectal spacing, whereby biomaterials are placed between the prostate and rectum, shows promise in reducing rectal dose during prostate cancer radiation therapy. A prospective multicenter randomized controlled pivotal trial was performed to assess outcomes following absorbable spacer (SpaceOAR system) implantation. Methods and Materials: Overall, 222 patients with clinical stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for treatment planning, followed with fiducial marker placement, and were randomized to receive spacer injection or no injection (control). Patients received postprocedure CT and MRI planning scans and underwent image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). Spacer safety and impact on rectal irradiation, toxicity, and quality of life were assessed throughout 15 months. Results: Spacer application was rated as “easy” or “very easy” 98.7% of the time, with a 99% hydrogel placement success rate. Perirectal spaces were 12.6 ± 3.9 mm and 1.6 ± 2.0 mm in the spacer and control groups, respectively. There were no device-related adverse events, rectal perforations, serious bleeding, or infections within either group. Pre-to postspacer plans had a significant reduction in mean rectal V70 (12.4% to 3.3%, P<.0001). Overall acute rectal adverse event rates were similar between groups, with fewer spacer patients experiencing rectal pain (P=.02). A significant reduction in late (3-15 months) rectal toxicity severity in the spacer group was observed (P=.04), with a 2.0% and 7.0% late rectal toxicity incidence in the spacer and control groups, respectively. There was no late rectal toxicity greater than grade 1 in the spacer group. At 15 months 11.6% and 21.4% of spacer and control patients, respectively, experienced 10-point declines in bowel quality of life. MRI scans at 12 months verified spacer absorption. Conclusions: Spacer

  18. Total hip replacement for arthritis following tuberculosis of hip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Garg, Bhavuk; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present the results of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for post tubercular arthritis of the hip joint. METHODS: Sixty-five patients (45 male, 20 female) with previously treated tuberculosis of the hip joint underwent cementless THA for post tubercular arthritis. The average age at the time of THA was 48 years (range 29 to 65 years). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, chest X-ray and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were done preoperatively to confirm resolution of the disease and to rule out any residual disease. Intra-operative samples were taken for microbiological examination, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and histological examination. Patients were started on anti-tubercular drugs one week before the operation and continued for 6 mo post operatively. The patients were followed up clinically using the Harris hip score as well as radiologically for any loosening of the implants, osteolysis and any recurrence of tuberculosis. Any complications especially the recurrence of the infection was also recorded. RESULTS: The mean interval from completion of antitubercular therapy for tuberculosis to surgery was 4.2 years (range, 2-6 years). Preoperatively, 17 patients had ankylosis whereas 48 patients had functional but painful range of motion. The mean surgical time was 97 min (range, 65-125) whereas the mean blood loss was 600 mL (range, 400-900 mL). The average follow up was 8.3 years (range 6-11 years). The average Harris Hip score improved from 27 preoperatively to 91 at the final follow up. Seventeen patients had acetabular protrusion which was managed with impaction grafting and cementless acetabular cup. The bone graft had consolidated in all these 17 patients at the follow up. Two patients developed discharging sinuses at 9 and 11 mo postoperatively respectively. The discharge tested positive for tuberculosis on the PCR. Both these patients were put on antitubercular therapy for another year. Both of them recovered and had no

  19. Time-Action Analysis (TAA) of the Surgical Technique Implanting the Collum Femoris Preserving (CFP) Hip Arthroplasty. TAASTIC trial Identifying pitfalls during the learning curve of surgeons participating in a subsequent randomized controlled trial (An observational study)

    PubMed Central

    van Oldenrijk, Jakob; Schafroth, Matthias U; Bhandari, Mohit; Runne, Wouter C; Poolman, Rudolf W

    2008-01-01

    Background Two types of methods are used to assess learning curves: outcome assessment and process assessment. Outcome measures are usually dichotomous rare events like complication rates and survival or require an extensive follow-up and are therefore often inadequate to monitor individual learning curves. Time-action analysis (TAA) is a tool to objectively determine the level of efficiency of individual steps of a surgical procedure. Methods/Design We are currently using TAA to determine the number of cases needed for surgeons to reach proficiency with a new innovative hip implant prior to initiating a multicentre RCT. By analysing the unedited video recordings of the first 20 procedures of each surgeon the number and duration of the actions needed for a surgeon to achieve his goal and the efficiency of these actions is measured. We constructed a taxonomy or list of actions which together describe the complete surgical procedure. In the taxonomy we categorised the procedure in 5 different Goal Oriented Phases (GOP): 1. the incision phase 2. the femoral phase 3. the acetabulum phase 4. the stem phase 5. the closure pase Each GOP was subdivided in Goal Oriented Actions (GOA) and each GOA is subdivided in Separate Actions (SA) thereby defining all the necessary actions to complete the procedure. We grouped the SAs into GOAs since it would not be feasible to measure each SA. Using the video recordings, the duration of each GOA was recorded as well as the amount of delay. Delay consists of repetitions, waiting and additional actions. The nett GOA time is the total GOA time – delay and is a representation of the level of difficulty of each procedure. Efficiency is the percentage of nett GOA time during each procedure. Discussion This allows the construction of individual learning curves, assessment of the final skill level for each surgeon and comparison of different surgeons prior to participation in an RCT. We believe an objective and comparable assessment of skill

  20. Current attitudes to cementing techniques in British hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Nejad, A; Birch, N C; Goddard, N J

    1994-11-01

    Aseptic loosening is the major problem in hip joint replacement. Improved cementing techniques have been shown to improve the long-term survival of implants significantly. To assess the use of modern cementing techniques in British surgeons, a detailed questionnaire was sent to all Fellows of The British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) regarding cement preparation, bone preparation, cementing technique and prostheses used in total hip arthroplasty. Excluding retired fellows, surgeons who use no cement, and those who had filled in forms inadequately, 668 responded, who between them performed 43,680 hip arthroplasties per year. In this survey, 21 different types of hip prostheses were implanted by the surgeons; 48% of hips implanted were Charnley type. Of the surgeons, 46% used Palacos with gentamicin as their cement for both the femur and acetabulum. For the femur, 44% of surgeons remove all cancellous bone, 40% use pulse lavage, 59% use a brush to clear debris, 94% dry the femur, 97% plug the femur, 76% use a cement gun and 70% pressurise the cement. For the acetabulum, 88% of surgeons retain the subchondral bone, 40% use pulse lavage, 100% dry the acetabulum, 22% use hypotensive anaesthesia and 58% pressurise the cement. Overall only 25% of surgeons (26% of hips implanted) use 'modern' cementing techniques. This has implications for the number of arthroplasties that may require early revision.

  1. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  2. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results. PMID:27218252

  3. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results.

  4. Gemini surfactants with a disaccharide spacer.

    PubMed

    Menger, F M; Mbadugha, B N

    2001-02-01

    A gemini surfactant is an amphiphile possessing (in sequence) the following: hydrocarbon tail/polar group/spacer/polar group/hydrocarbon tail. Widespread interest in geminis has emerged recently from both industrial and academic laboratories. In the present contribution, two related families of geminis have been synthesized, both with trehalose, a disaccharide, as a polar spacer. One family, Series-A, is nonionic and has amide groups separating the long chains from the trehalose spacer. The other family, Series-B, has quaternary ammonium ions connecting the long chains to the trehalose spacer. It was found that Series-A geminis are water insoluble despite the two amides and multiple hydroxyls. When hydrated or extruded, these geminis form microscopically visible vesicular and tubular structures above their transition temperatures (which were determined calorimetrically). Insoluble monomolecular films, constructed from these geminis, have interfacial areas that are dominated by the sugar spacer although intermolecular chain/chain interactions seem to stabilize the films. Thus, the behavior of Series-A geminis in many ways parallels that of phospholipids and simple double-chain surfactants. It is as if the trehalose is less of a spacer than a large but conventional headgroup. In contrast, cationic Series-B geminis are water soluble and form micelles with critical micelle concentrations an order of magnitude lower than that of corresponding conventional surfactants. Molecular modeling using the Amber force field explains the difference in properties between the two families of geminis. Series-A are tubular in shape and thus prefer bilayer packing as do other amphiphiles in which the headgroups are similar in width to the sum of the tail diameters. Series-B geminis are conical-shaped and pack more readily into spherical micelles. This work entails synthesis, tensiometry, conductance, microscopy, surface balance studies, calorimetry, light scattering, and molecular

  5. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  6. Novel Highly Porous Metal Technology in Artificial Hip and Knee Replacement: Processing Methodologies and Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, John; Poggie, Matthew; Kulesha, Gene; Michael Meneghini, R.

    2013-02-01

    Hip and knee replacement can dramatically improve a patient's quality of life through pain relief and restored function. Fixation of hip and knee replacement implants to bone is critical to the success of the procedure. A variety of roughened surfaces and three-dimensional porous surfaces have been used to enhance biological fixation on orthopedic implants. Recently, highly porous metals have emerged as versatile biomaterials that may enhance fixation to bone and are suitable to a number of applications in hip and knee replacement surgery. This article provides an overview of several processes used to create these implant surfaces.

  7. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  8. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  9. Bursitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Repeated overuse or stress of the hip Rheumatoid arthritis Gout Pseudogout Injury of the hip Infection with bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (or a staph infection) Diabetes Spine problems, such as scoliosis Uneven leg lengths ...

  10. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint. This artificial joint is called a prosthesis. ... be careful that you do not dislocate your artificial hip, especially in the first few months after ...

  11. Separator-spacer for electrochemical systems

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Newby, Kenneth R.; Bellows, Richard J.

    1983-08-02

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  12. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  13. Patient-adapted treatment for prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard P; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Borens, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Hip joint replacement is 1 of the most successful surgical procedures of the last century and the number of replacements implanted is steadily growing. An infected hip arthroplasty is a disaster, it leads to patient suffering, surgeon's frustration and significant costs to the health system. The treatment of an infected hip replacement is challenging, healing rates can be low, functional results poor with decreased patient satisfaction. However, if a patient-adapted treatment of infected hip joints is used a success rate of above 90% can be obtained.Patient-adapted treatment is based on 5 important concepts: teamwork; understanding the biofilm; diagnostic accuracy; correct definition and classification of PJI; and patient-tailored treatment.This review presents a patient-adapted treatment strategy to prosthetic hip infection. It incorporates the best aspects of the single and staged surgical strategies and promotes the short interval philosophy for the 2-stage approach. PMID:26044528

  14. [Biomechanical principles, indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Bednarek, A; Gagała, J; Blacha, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors present indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty in 58 patients (46 females, 12 males) aged 38-84 (mean 65 years). Femoral neck fracture in 51 patients, femoral neck pseudoarthrosis in 3, pathological fracture of the femoral neck in 2 and early type of hip osteoarthritis constituted the indication for bipolar hip replacement. No infection or dislocation has occurred. Mean follow-up was 1.5 years (6-36 months). Revision of the replacement was necessary in one patient due to faulty size of chosen implant. Results in remaining patients were rated excellent to good (mean Harris Hip Score was 93 points) with great range of movement in the operated hip. No signs of acetabular cartilage deterioration or prosthetic protrusion was observed.

  15. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  16. Two-Stage Progressive Femoral Lowering Followed by Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Treating Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type 3 Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    High developmental dysplasia of the hip is commonly treated with total hip arthroplasty and shortening osteotomy. We present a two stage technique, consisting of progressive femoral lowering followed by total hip arthroplasty. The clinico-radiographic results of eleven patients (twelve hips) who were operated on with the two-stage technique were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 11 ± 5 years. At the final follow-up, ten patients (eleven hips) had a mean Harris hip score of 85 ± 5 points with no implant loosening. One patient (one hip) was revised at 5 years due to infection. No neurovascular complications were observed in any patients. With this technique, we could place the cup in the anatomical position and obtain complete limb symmetry with excellent clinical results at long-term. PMID:25599863

  17. [Hemispheric hydroxyapatite coated cups in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Blacha, J; Bednarek, A; Gagała, J

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents principles of implantation as well as clinical and radiological results of hemispheric hydroxyapatite coated cups use in total hip replacement. Eighty-seven patients (60 females, 27 males) aged from 16 to 72 years (mean 49 years) underwent 96 total hip replacements with the use of 51 ABG and 45 OCTOFIT hemispheric cups. Clinical results were satisfactory with an average Harris Hip Score of 89 to 91 at final follow-up. We have found total ingrowth and osteointegration of nearly all cups. In one case of acetabular reconstruction with bone grafts cup migration has been observed and revision was necessary.

  18. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  19. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cristancho, P.; Lenze, E. J.; Avidan, M. S.; Rawson, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip fracture is often complicated by depressive symptoms in older adults. We sought to characterize trajectories of depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture and examine their relationship with functional outcomes and walking ability. We also investigated clinical and psychosocial predictors of these trajectories. Method We enrolled 482 inpatients, aged ≥60 years, who were admitted for hip fracture repair at eight St Louis, MO area hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants with current depression diagnosis and/or notable cognitive impairment were excluded. Depressive symptoms and functional recovery were assessed with the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Functional Recovery Score, respectively, for 52 weeks after fracture. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial variables were gathered at baseline. We modeled depressive symptoms using group-based trajectory analysis and subsequently identified correlates of trajectory group membership. Results Three trajectories emerged according to the course of depressive symptoms, which we termed ‘resilient’, ‘distressed’, and ‘depressed’. The depressed trajectory (10% of participants) experienced a persistently high level of depressive symptoms and a slower time to recover mobility than the other trajectory groups. Stressful life events prior to the fracture, current smoking, higher anxiety, less social support, antidepressant use, past depression, and type of implant predicted membership of the depressed trajectory. Conclusions Depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture are associated with poorer functional status. Clinical and psychosocial variables predicted membership of the depression trajectory. Early identification and intervention of patients in a depressive trajectory may improve functional outcomes after hip fracture. PMID:27032698

  20. The World Hip Trauma Evaluation Study 3

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, N.; Achten, J.; Griffin, X. L.; Costa, M. L.; Reed, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately half of all hip fractures are displaced intracapsular fractures. The standard treatment for these fractures is either hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. The recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on hip fracture management recommends the use of ‘proven’ cemented stem arthroplasty with an Orthopaedic Device Evaluation Panel (ODEP) rating of at least 3B (97% survival at three years). The Thompsons prosthesis is currently lacking an ODEP rating despite over 50 years of clinical use, likely due to the paucity of implant survival data. Nationally, adherence to these guidelines is varied as there is debate as to which prosthesis optimises patient outcomes. Design This study design is a multi-centre, multi-surgeon, parallel, two arm, standard-of-care pragmatic randomised controlled trial. It will be embedded within the WHiTE Comprehensive Cohort Study (ISRCTN63982700). The main analysis is a two-way equivalence comparison between Hemi-Thompson and Hemi-Exeter polished taper with Unitrax head. Secondary outcomes will include radiological leg length discrepancy measured as per Bidwai and Willett, mortality, re-operation rate and indication for re-operation, length of index hospital stay and revision at four months. This study will be supplemented by the NHFD (National Hip Fracture Database) dataset. Discussion Evidence on the optimum choice of prosthesis for hemiarthroplasty of the hip is lacking. National guidance is currently based on expert opinion rather than empirical evidence. The incidence of hip fracture is likely to continue to increase and providing high quality evidence on the optimum Cite this article: A. L. Sims. The World Hip Trauma Evaluation Study 3: Hemiarthroplasty Evaluation by Multicentre Investigation – WHITE 3: HEMI – An Abridged Protocol. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:18–25. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.51.2000473 PMID:26825319

  1. Heterogeneous diversity of spacers within CRISPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; He, Jiankui

    2011-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of anti-viral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face. 1) J. He and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010) 128102

  2. Tube support grid and spacer therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ringsmuth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Jay S.

    1986-01-01

    A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

  3. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  4. Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, John; Kaplan, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

  5. Chronic Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection. A Retrospective, Observational Study on the Treatment Strategy and Prognosis in 130 Non-Selected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Troelsen, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Limited information is available regarding the treatment strategy and prognosis of non-selected patients treated for chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection. Such information is important as no head-to-head studies on treatment strategies are available. The purpose of this study is to report on the treatment strategy and prognosis of a non-selected, consecutive patient population Methods We identified 130 patients in the National Patient Registry, consecutively treated for a chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection between 2003–2008 at 11 departments of orthopaedic surgery. We extracted information regarding patient demographics, treatment and outcome. 82 patients were re-implanted in a two-stage revision (national standard), the remaining 48 were not re-implanted in a two-stage revision. We were able to collect up-to-date information on all patients to date of death or medical chart review with a minimum of 5 years follow-up by the nationwide electronic patient record system Results After primary revision surgery, 53 patients (41%) had a spacer in situ, 64 (50%) had a resection arthroplasty and 13 (9%) did not have the infected implant removed. 63% were re-implanted in a two-stage revision. Re-implantation was performed after an interim period of 14 weeks (IQR 10–18). Patients re-implanted were younger (p-value 0.0006), had a lower CCS score (p-value 0.005), a lower ASA score (p-value 0.0001) and a 68% lower mortality risk in the follow-up period (p-value <0.00001). After adjusting for selected confounders, the mortality risk was no longer significantly different. The 5-year re-infection rate after re-implantation was 14.6% (95%CI 8.0–23.1). Re-infections occurred mainly within 3 years of follow-up. The overall 1-year survival rate was 92% (95%CI 86–96) and the overall 5-year survival rate was 68% (95%CI 59–75). The 5-year survival rate after a two-stage revision was 82% (95%CI 71–89) and in those not re-implanted 45% (95%CI 30–58

  6. Sensitivity to metals in 40 patients with failed hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Milavec-Puretić, V; Orlić, D; Marusić, A

    1998-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to metals and tissue reaction around a failed implant were investigated in 40 patients undergoing revision hip arthroplasty. Metal sensitivity was tested using a standard cutaneous patch test. Nine patients were positive for chromium, nickel, cobalt, metal rust or endoprosthesis scrapings, or combinations of these allergens. Patients with positive or negative patch test did not differ in terms of their age, sex, primary diagnosis, number of endoprosthesis revisions, length of implant function, presence of other metal parts around the implant, circulating immunocomplexes, and histological appearance of the tissue around the implant. We conclude that stainless steel endoprostheses may be safely used for repeated revision hip arthroplasty, and that hypersensitivity to metals probably does not play a significant role in the loosening of the endoprosthesis.

  7. Designing string-of-beads vaccines with optimal spacers.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Benjamin; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-01-26

    String-of-beads polypeptides allow convenient delivery of epitope-based vaccines. The success of a polypeptide relies on efficient processing: constituent epitopes need to be recovered while avoiding neo-epitopes from epitope junctions. Spacers between epitopes are employed to ensure this, but spacer selection is non-trivial.We present a framework to determine optimally the length and sequence of a spacer through multi-objective optimization for human leukocyte antigen class I restricted polypeptides. The method yields string-of-bead vaccines with flexible spacer lengths that increase the predicted epitope recovery rate fivefold while reducing the immunogenicity from neo-epitopes by 44% compared to designs without spacers.

  8. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  9. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery.

  10. A Useful Anatomical Reference Guide for Stem Anteversion during Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Dysplastic Hip.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, Tadashi; Tsuneizumi, Yoshikazu; Lee, Tae Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography scans of 50 dysplastic hips were obtained and reconstructed using preoperative planning software for total hip arthroplasty. The anteversion of the stem implanted parallel to the line connecting the trochanteric fossa and the middle of the medial cortex of the femoral neck (T line) was measured. The cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm above the lesser trochanter were simulated. The mean difference of the anteversion of the stem using the T line and the native femoral anteversion was 2.7° (95% CI: 1.0°-4.5°) and 3.5° (95% CI: 1.5°-5.5°) at cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm respectively. An anteversion using a T line is compatible with native femoral anteversion even in developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:25873282

  11. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and swelling of the tissues around the hip joint. Usually only one hip is affected. This condition ... to reduce the swelling and inflammation around the hip joint. Your child's doctor will probably ask you to ...

  12. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  14. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  15. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... thigh bone. The thigh bone is called the femur. It is part of the hip joint. Hip pain is a related topic. ... to 4 hours. If you have an intertrochanteric fracture (the area below the femur neck), your surgeon will use a special metal ...

  16. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  17. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  18. Uncemented custom femoral components in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose We have developed an individually designed, uncemented femoral component for achievement of improved strain distribution and fixation to the bone, to make uncemented stems more applicable in femurs of abnormal size and shape, and to improve the joint mechanics. Here we describe the design of the implant and present the results of a prospective clinical study with at least 7 years of follow-up. Patients and methods The prostheses are produced by CAD-CAM technique. The design of the stem is based on CT information, and the neck design is based on the surgeon's planning of the center of rotation, femoral head offset, and leg length correction. The first-generation stem produced before 2001 had a proximal HA coating and a sand-blasted distal part that was down-scaled to avoid contact with compact bone. The second-generation stem had a porous coating beneath the HA layer and the distal part of the stem was polished. The implant was used in 762 hips (614 patients) from 1995 until 2009. 191 of these hips were followed for 7 years and 83 others were followed for 10 years, and these hips are included in the present study. Mean age at surgery was 48 (20–65) years. Congenital dysplasia of the hip was the reason for osteoarthritis in 46% and 57% of the hips in respective groups. Merle d'Aubigné score was recorded in 152 and 75 hips in the two groups. Prostheses followed for 10 years, and almost all in the 7-year group, were first-generation stems. Results The 7- and 10-year cumulative revision rates were 1.1% and 2.4%, respectively, with stem revision for any reason as endpoint. The clinical results were similar at 7 and 10 years, with Merle d'Aubigné scores of 17. Intraoperative trochanteric fissures occurred in 2 of the 191 operations (1.0%); both healed after wiring. In hips followed for 7 years, 2 periprosthetic fractures occurred; exchange of the stem was necessary in both. One additional fracture occurred between 7 and 10 years, and it was

  19. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  20. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  1. Numerical optimization of composite hip endoprostheses under different loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Davy, D. T.; Saravanos, D. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The optimization of composite hip implants was investigated. Emphasis was placed on the effect of shape and material tailoring of the implant to improve the implant-bone interaction. A variety of loading conditions were investigated to better understand the relationship between loading and optimization outcome. Comparisons of the initial and optimal models with more complex 3D finite element models were performed. The results indicate that design improvements made using this method result in similar improvements in the 3D models. Although the optimization outcomes were significantly affected by the choice of loading conditions, certain trends were observed that were independent of the applied loading.

  2. Hip hemiarthroplasty: from Venable and Bohlman to Moore and Thompson.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Quiennec, Steffen; Guissou, Isaac

    2014-03-01

    In 1939, Frederick R. Thompson of New York and Austin T. Moore of South Carolina separately developed replacements for the entire ball of the hip. These were used to treat hip fractures and also certain arthritis cases. This type of hemiarthroplasty addressed the problem of the arthritic femoral head only. The diseased acetabulum (hip socket) was not replaced. This prosthesis consisted of a metal stem that was placed into the marrow cavity of the femur, connected in one piece with a metal ball fitted into the hip socket. Bohlman and Austin T. Moore (1939) collaborated for the fabrication and implantation of a custom made 12-inch-long vitallium (metal alloy invented by Venable) femoral head prosthesis for a patient with a recurrent giant cell tumour. This prosthesis functioned well and later on influenced the development of long stem femoral head prostheses.

  3. [A new hip milling machine for preparation of the hip acetabulum for total hip prothesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weigand, H

    1976-08-19

    The problemes of the exact preparation of the hip acetabulum for implantation of total hip prothesis have caused the development of several milling machines. Two sorts of construction predominate. Their disadvantages, especially the fact, that there is now mechanism, while is able to carry of the milled tissue, gave rise to construct a new milling machine. In cooperation with engineers of the branch mechanical engineering a new model was developed. The characteristic features are described and explained by pictures. The milling basket will be fastened on the ground plate by a quick fastener. In this way we get a hemisphere cavity, which is able to absorb all the milled tissue without any residue. A grasp will be connected with the drive shaft and guarantee an exact and rightangeled direction. The clinical tests have shown, that the new milling machine with the grasp especially is qualified for use in the osteoporotic senil bone too.

  4. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  5. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  6. Silver-Coated Hip Megaprosthesis in Oncological Limb Savage Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, G.; D'Adamio, S.; Careri, S.; Rosa, MA.; Maccauro, G.

    2016-01-01

    Silver coating has demonstrated good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Silver-coated megaprostheses have been introduced in oncological musculoskeletal surgery considering the high rate of infection. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 68 cases of primary or metastatic bone tumors, affecting the proximal femur, treated between 2005 and 2016 with wide margins resection and tumor implants reconstruction. All patients were treated by the same surgeon, with antibiotic prophylaxis according to a standard protocol. In 55.9% of patients silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty was implanted; in the remaining 44.1% uncoated megaprostheses were implanted. Patients were reevaluated recording the complications and focusing the analysis on infective complications. The average follow-up was 46.5 months. No patient has shown any sign of local or general silver toxicity. A SEM analysis was conducted on the 3-silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty explanted confirming a severe degradation with a small amount of residual silver on the coating surface. Silver-coated hip prostheses have a lower rate of early infection than traditional implants but showed a reduction of antimicrobial activity for silver coating wear. We recommend using silver-coated prosthesis as primary implants for limb salvage surgery, in primary or metastatic bone tumors affecting the proximal femur, considering the absence of signs of toxicity and the lower rate of early infection. PMID:27642605

  7. Silver-Coated Hip Megaprosthesis in Oncological Limb Savage Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, G.; D'Adamio, S.; Careri, S.; Rosa, MA.; Maccauro, G.

    2016-01-01

    Silver coating has demonstrated good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Silver-coated megaprostheses have been introduced in oncological musculoskeletal surgery considering the high rate of infection. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 68 cases of primary or metastatic bone tumors, affecting the proximal femur, treated between 2005 and 2016 with wide margins resection and tumor implants reconstruction. All patients were treated by the same surgeon, with antibiotic prophylaxis according to a standard protocol. In 55.9% of patients silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty was implanted; in the remaining 44.1% uncoated megaprostheses were implanted. Patients were reevaluated recording the complications and focusing the analysis on infective complications. The average follow-up was 46.5 months. No patient has shown any sign of local or general silver toxicity. A SEM analysis was conducted on the 3-silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty explanted confirming a severe degradation with a small amount of residual silver on the coating surface. Silver-coated hip prostheses have a lower rate of early infection than traditional implants but showed a reduction of antimicrobial activity for silver coating wear. We recommend using silver-coated prosthesis as primary implants for limb salvage surgery, in primary or metastatic bone tumors affecting the proximal femur, considering the absence of signs of toxicity and the lower rate of early infection.

  8. Silver-Coated Hip Megaprosthesis in Oncological Limb Savage Surgery.

    PubMed

    Donati, F; Di Giacomo, G; D'Adamio, S; Ziranu, A; Careri, S; Rosa, Ma; Maccauro, G

    2016-01-01

    Silver coating has demonstrated good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Silver-coated megaprostheses have been introduced in oncological musculoskeletal surgery considering the high rate of infection. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 68 cases of primary or metastatic bone tumors, affecting the proximal femur, treated between 2005 and 2016 with wide margins resection and tumor implants reconstruction. All patients were treated by the same surgeon, with antibiotic prophylaxis according to a standard protocol. In 55.9% of patients silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty was implanted; in the remaining 44.1% uncoated megaprostheses were implanted. Patients were reevaluated recording the complications and focusing the analysis on infective complications. The average follow-up was 46.5 months. No patient has shown any sign of local or general silver toxicity. A SEM analysis was conducted on the 3-silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty explanted confirming a severe degradation with a small amount of residual silver on the coating surface. Silver-coated hip prostheses have a lower rate of early infection than traditional implants but showed a reduction of antimicrobial activity for silver coating wear. We recommend using silver-coated prosthesis as primary implants for limb salvage surgery, in primary or metastatic bone tumors affecting the proximal femur, considering the absence of signs of toxicity and the lower rate of early infection. PMID:27642605

  9. Science writing competition: Hip, hip, hooray!

    PubMed

    Pewsey, Emma

    2013-03-12

    X-rays are best known for showing where bones have fractured, but researchers can also use X-rays to investigate why bones break, which could lead to treatments that reduce the number of elderly people who suffer broken hips.

  10. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. PMID:27615181

  11. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l.

  12. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. PMID:26055146

  13. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. Methods/Design FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. Discussion This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. Trial registration The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813). PMID:24965132

  14. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-07-29

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system of Escherichia coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution so as to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device.

  15. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-07-29

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system of Escherichia coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution so as to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device. PMID:27284167

  16. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  17. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  18. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemiarthroplasty to replace the ball part of your hip joint. You should have received physical therapy while you were in the hospital or at a rehabilitation center before going home from the hospital.

  19. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  20. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as sprinting, kicking, and changing direction while running or moving, can stretch and tear the hip flexors. Runners, people who do martial arts, and football, soccer, and hockey players are more likely to have ...

  1. The Effect of Dislocation Type (Crowe Types I-IV) on Pelvic Development in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: A Radiologic Study of Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Ömer Faruk; Salar, Necmettin; Bilgen, Muhammet Sadık; Mutlu, Müren; Kara, Gökhan Kürşat; Gürsel, Enis

    2015-05-01

    Classification of hip pathology in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) helps in appropriate placement of implants during total hip arthroplasty. We examined preoperative unilateral and bilateral pelvic radiographs of 57 patients (114 hips) undergoing total hip arthroplasty because of DDH. Both sides of the pelvis were visually separated into 3 areas for comparison. When area ratios of hips with Crowe types II, III, and IV DDH were compared with ratios for healthy hips, values in hips with DDH were significantly low for the iliac wings, significantly high for the acetabular regions, and significantly low for the ischial area. Using a line crossing the healthy hip's teardrop and parallel to a line joining the distal sacroiliac joints is useful for calculating limb-length discrepancy. PMID:25499171

  2. Improvement of inhaler efficacy by home-made spacer.

    PubMed

    Sritara, P; Janvitayanuchit, S

    1993-12-01

    The delivery of aerosol from a metered dose inhaler (MDI) was reported to be more efficient with a spacer. Hence, a home-made spacer modified from a 950 ml low cost plastic bottle, was compared with a MDI and with a 750 ml imported spacer (Nebuhaler). On three consecutive days, at the same time of day, 20 adult patients with chronic asthma inhaled two puffs of terbutaline sulphate (0.5 mg), delivered from MDI alone, MDI with a 750 ml Nebuhlaer and MDI with a home-made spacer. The following measurements were made: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and pulse rate. These measurements were carried out immediately before and at 5, 20, 60 min after inhalation of terbutaline. FEV1 was significantly increased (P < 0.05) at 5, 20 and 60 min after administration of terbutaline with MDI via either spacers than with MDI alone but no significant difference was observed between Nebuhaler and the home-made spacer. FVC and pulse rate showed no significant change with each method of administration. In conclusion, terbutaline delivered by MDI and home-made spacer was more effective in bronchodilatation than by MDI alone and was just as effective as MDI and Nebuhaler. The home-made spacer therefore offers a simple, inexpensive and more effective method for delivering aerosol drug. PMID:7798822

  3. Fracture of the Modular Neck in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, A.; Gargallo-Margarit, A.; Barro, V.; Gallardo-Calero, I.; Sallent, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity of the components in total hip arthroplasty has had an increase in popularity in the last decades. We present the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of avascular necrosis of the femoral head due to a hypophyseal adenoma. A total hip modular arthroplasty was implanted. Three and a half years after the surgery the patient attended the emergency room due to acute left hip pain with no prior traumatism. Radiological examination confirmed a fracture of the modular neck. A revision surgery was performed finding an important pseudotumoral well-organized periprosthetic tissue reaction. Through an extended trochanteric osteotomy the femoral component was removed, and a straight-stem revision prosthesis implanted. There are several potential advantages when using modularity in total hip arthroplasty that surgeons may benefit from, but complications have arisen and must be addressed. Various circumstances such as large femoral head with a long varus neck, corrosion, patient's BMI, and activity level may participate in creating the necessary environment for fatigue failure of the implant. PMID:26266069

  4. Perioperative Pulmonary Circulatory Changes During Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty Under Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Salvati, Eduardo A.; Go, George; Ma, Yan; Sharrock, Nigel E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The transient and rarely clinically relevant effect of bone and cement embolization during unilateral joint arthroplasty is a known phenomenon. However, available studies do not address events surrounding bilateral total hip arthroplasties, during which embolic load is presumably doubled. To elucidate events surrounding this increasingly utilized procedure and assess the effect on the pulmonary hemodynamics in the intra- and postoperative period, we studied 24 subjects undergoing cemented bilateral total hip arthroplasty during the same anesthetic session. Materials Twenty four patients without previous pulmonary history undergoing cemented bilateral total hip arthroplasty under controlled epidural hypotension were enrolled. Pulmonary artery catheters were inserted and hemodynamic variables were recorded at baseline, 5 minutes after the implantation of each hip joint, 1 hour and 1 day postoperatively. Mixed venous blood gases and complete blood counts were analyzed at every time point. Results An increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was observed after the second but not the first hip implantation when compared to values at incision. Pulmonary vascular resistance remained elevated 1 hour postoperatively. Pulmonary artery pressures were significantly elevated on post operative day 1 compared to baseline values. The white blood cell count increased in response to the second hip implantation but not the first compared to incision. Conclusion The embolization of material during bilateral total hip arthroplasty is associated with prolonged increases in pulmonary artery pressures and vascular resistance, particularly after the second side. The performance of bilateral procedures should be cautiously considered in patients with diseases suggesting decreased right ventricular reserve. PMID:20814281

  5. Evidence of MRSE on a gentamicin and vancomycin impregnated polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement spacer after two-stage exchange arthroplasty due to periprosthetic joint infection of the knee

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) are often treated by two stage exchange with the use of an antibiotic impregnated spacer. Most of the two-stage exchange algorithms recommend the implantation of an antibiotic-impregnated spacer during the first stage for a period of 2–24 weeks before reimplantation of the new prosthesis. For the spacer to have a therapeutic effect, the local antibiotic concentration must be greater than the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) against the pathogens causing the PJI. It must remain so for the entire spacer period, otherwise recurrence of infection or resistances might occur. The question as to whether a sufficient concentration of antibiotics in vivo is reached for the entire spacer period has not been answered satisfactorily. Case presentation We here present a case of a histologically confirmed chronic PJI 20 month after primary arthroplasty. The primary knee arthroplasty was performed due to osteoarthritis of the joint. Initial assessment did not detect a causative pathogen, and two stage exchange with a vancomycin-gentamycin impregnated spacer was performed. At the time of reimplantation, sonication of the explanted spacer revealed a multi-resistant strain of staphylococcus epidermidis on the device and in the joint. Adaption of the therapy and prolonged treatment successfully eradicated the infection. Conclusion According to the authors’ knowledge, the case presented here confirms for the first time the surface contamination (proven through sonication) of a vancomycin-/gentamicin- impregnated Vancogenx®-spacer with a MRSE after ten weeks of implantation. This case study demonstrates the difficulties still associated with the diagnostics of PJI and the published different two stage treatment regimes with the use of antibiotic impregnated spacers. PMID:24641471

  6. Preventing Leg Length Discrepancy and Instability After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Peter K; Austin, Matthew S; Lavernia, Carlos J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of equal leg lengths and dynamic hip stability are essential elements of a successful total hip arthroplasty. A careful clinical examination, a preoperative plan, and appropriate intraoperative techniques are necessary to achieve these goals. Preoperative identification of patients at risk for residual leg length discrepancy allows surgeons to adjust the surgical approach and/or the type of implant and provide better preoperative patient education. The use of larger femoral heads, high-offset stem options, and enhanced soft-tissue repairs have improved impingement-free range of motion as well as dynamic hip stability and have contributed to an overall reduction in dislocation. Methods for accurate leg length restoration and component positioning include anatomic landmarks, intraoperative radiographs, intraoperative calipers, stability testing, and computer-assisted surgery. If recurrent instability occurs after total hip arthroplasty, the underlying cause for dislocation should be identified and treated; this may include the use of semiconstrained dual-mobility or fully constrained liners, depending on abductor function. Surgeons should be aware of the clinical and surgical techniques for achieving leg length equalization and dynamic hip stability in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27049193

  7. Pervasive generation of oppositely oriented spacers during CRISPR adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shmakov, Sergey; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Semenova, Ekaterina; Logacheva, Maria D.; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    During the process of prokaryotic CRISPR adaptation, a copy of a segment of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid referred to as protospacer is added to the CRISPR cassette and becomes a spacer. When a protospacer contains a neighboring target interference motif, the specific small CRISPR ribonucleic acid (crRNA) transcribed from expanded CRISPR cassette can protect a prokaryotic cell from virus infection or plasmid transformation and conjugation. We show that in Escherichia coli, a vast majority of plasmid protospacers generate spacers integrated in CRISPR cassette in two opposing orientations, leading to frequent appearance of complementary spacer pairs in a population of cells that underwent CRISPR adaptation. When a protospacer contains a spacer acquisition motif AAG, spacer orientation that generates functional protective crRNA is strongly preferred. All other protospacers give rise to spacers oriented in both ways at comparable frequencies. This phenomenon increases the repertoire of available spacers and should make it more likely that a protective crRNA is formed as a result of CRISPR adaptation. PMID:24728991

  8. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  9. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  10. SU-E-J-230: Effect of Metal Hip Prosthesis On the Accuracy of Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W; Merrick, G; Kurko, B; Bittner, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of metal hip prosthesis on the ability to track and localize electromagnetic transponders. Methods: Three Calypso transponders were implanted into two prostate phantoms. The geometric center of the transponders were identified on computed tomography and set as the isocenter. With the phantom stationary on the treatment table and the tracking array 14-cm above the isocenter, data was acquired by the Calypso system at 10 Hz to establish the uncertainty in measurements. Transponder positional data was acquired with unilateral hip prostheses of different metallic compositions and then with bilateral hips placed at variable separation from the phantom. Results: Regardless of hip prosthesis composition, the average vector displacement in the presence of a unilateral prosthesis was < 0.5 mm. The greatest contribution to overall vector displacement occurred in the lateral dimension. With bilateral hip prosthesis, the average vector displacement was 0.3 mm. The displacement in the lateral dimension was markedly reduced compared with a unilateral hip, suggesting that there was a countervailing effect with bilateral hip prosthesis. The greatest average vector displacement was 0.6 mm and occurred when bilateral hip prostheses were placed within 4 cm of the detector array. Conclusion: Unilateral and bilateral hip prostheses did not have any meaningful effect on the ability to accurately track electromagnetic transponders implanted in a prostate phantom. At clinically realistic distances between the hip and detection array, the average tracking error is negligible.

  11. Inhalational drug delivery from seven different spacer devices.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. W.; O'Callaghan, C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A study was performed to determine in vitro the difference in drug output of seven currently available spacer devices when used with different inhaled medications. METHODS: A glass multistage liquid impinger (MSLI) was used to determine the amount of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, 5 mg), salbutamol (100 micrograms), or budesonide (200 micrograms) obtained in various particle size ranges from metered dose inhalers (MDIs) actuated directly into the MSLI or via one of seven different spacer devices; the Fisonair, Nebuhaler, Volumatic, Inspirease, Aerochamber, Aerosol Cloud Enhancer, and Dynahaler. RESULTS: In particles smaller than 5 microns in diameter the dose of DSCG recovered from the Fisonair and Nebuhaler was 118% and 124%, respectively, of that recovered using the MDI alone. The dose recovered from the smaller volume spacers was 90% (Inspirease), 36% (Aerochamber), 33% (Aerosol Cloud Enhancer), and 21% (Dynahaler) of that from the MDI alone. The Volumatic increased the amount of salbutamol in particles smaller than 5 microns to 117% of that from the MDI, and the Inspirease and Aerochamber spacers decreased it by nearly 50%. The amount of budesonide in small particles recovered after use of the Nebuhaler, Inspirease, and the Aerochamber was 92%, 101%, and 78%, respectively, of that from the MDI alone. CONCLUSIONS: Under the test conditions used, large volume spacers such as the Fisonair, Nebuhaler, and Volumatic delivered significantly more DSCG and salbutamol than the smaller spacers tested. The differences between spacers were less for budesonide than the other medications studied. This study shows that there are significant differences in the amount of drug available for inhalation when different spacers are used as inhalational aids with different drugs. Spacer devices need to be fully evaluated for each drug prescribed for them. Images PMID:8795674

  12. The Hyperflexible Hip

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M.; Zaltz, Ira; Larson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Dance, gymnastics, figure skating, and competitive cheerleading require a high degree of hip range of motion. Athletes who participate in these sports use their hips in a mechanically complex manner. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the entire PubMed database (through December 2013) and additional searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Whether innate or acquired, dancers and gymnasts have some hypermobility that allows their hips to be placed in potentially impinging or unstable positions required for their given activity. Such extremes of motion can result in both intra-articular and extra-articular impingement as well as compensatory osseous and muscular pathology. In addition, dancers and gymnasts are susceptible to impingement-induced instability. Dancers with innate generalized hyperlaxity are at increased risk of injury because of their activities and may require longer recovery times to return to play. Both nonoperative and operative treatments (arthroscopic and open) have an important role in returning flexibility athletes to their preoperative levels of sport and dance. Conclusion: Because of the extreme hip motion required and the compensatory soft tissue laxity in dancers and gymnasts, these athletes may develop instability, impingement, or combinations of both. This frequently occurs in the setting of subtle pathoanatomy or in patients with normal bony anatomy. With appropriate surgical indications and the correct operative technique, the treating surgeon can anticipate high levels of return to play for the gymnast and dancer with hip pain. PMID:26137181

  13. Bipolar hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Liu, Shubing; Guan, Changyong; Yu, Fangyuan; Wu, Shenguang; Jiang, Changliang

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to compare hip arthroplasty with internal screw fixation in the repair of intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Of 112 included patient, 70 (81.81 ± 4.88 years) received hip arthroplasty with a prosthesis specially designed for intertrochanteric fractures, and 42 (83.46 ± 5.11 years) underwent plate-screw fixation. The hip arthroplasty group had significantly longer operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and total volume of blood transfused but had shorter time to beginning weight-bearing (5.94 ± 2.76 vs 23.68 ± 22.01 days) and higher postoperative Harris hip score (91.37 ± 4.80 vs 86.14 ± 5.46). In the arthroplasty group, there were 2 dislocations; and in the plate-screw fixation group, there were 5 internal fixation failures. Hip arthroplasty is preferable to internal fixation in elderly patients (age >80 years) with osteoporosis. PMID:21530148

  14. Electrostatic precipatator construction having ladder bar spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-30

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator having ladder bar spacers. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A second plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A third plurality of ladder bars is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates substantially equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the ladder bars has a connector bar secured to one of the pair of adjacent surfaces. Each of the ladder bars has a fourth plurality of holder bars. Each of the holder bars having one end connected to its respective connector bar and extending outwardly from the connector bar toward the other of the pair of adjacent surfaces. A contact on the other end of each holder bar engages the other of the pair of adjacent surfaces to hold the pair of adjacent surfaces apart.

  15. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  16. Modular noncemented total hip arthroplasty for congenital dislocation of the hip. Case report and design rationale.

    PubMed

    Gorski, J M

    1988-03-01

    The highest rate of failure and the greatest technical difficulty in total hip arthroplasty occurs with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). Predisposing factors are failure to secure special femoral components to fit an extremely narrow and straight medullary cavity with space for only a very thin mantle of cement. The acetabulum is usually atrophic, and bone grafts are commonly required to support a small-diameter cup. The young age of the average patient and high levels of activity contribute to cement failure. A new modular cementless prosthesis provides excellent immediate skeletal fixation and pain relief in CDH patients. Five modular components are screwed or press-fit into bone. The modular approach facilitates implantation, reduces inventory, and is adaptable to unforeseen problems. These advantages are ordinarily absent with standard or custom cemented components. Modular components may also permit easier revision. The prosthesis is made of titanium alloy for its superalloy strength, elastic modulus, and bioinertness. By omitting the cement mantle, press-fit is obtained with the largest possible implant. The large size minimizes stem breakage in these young, small bones. Excellent short-term results suggest that modular cementless implants are indicated in some patients with CDH.

  17. Modular noncemented total hip arthroplasty for congenital dislocation of the hip. Case report and design rationale.

    PubMed

    Gorski, J M

    1988-03-01

    The highest rate of failure and the greatest technical difficulty in total hip arthroplasty occurs with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). Predisposing factors are failure to secure special femoral components to fit an extremely narrow and straight medullary cavity with space for only a very thin mantle of cement. The acetabulum is usually atrophic, and bone grafts are commonly required to support a small-diameter cup. The young age of the average patient and high levels of activity contribute to cement failure. A new modular cementless prosthesis provides excellent immediate skeletal fixation and pain relief in CDH patients. Five modular components are screwed or press-fit into bone. The modular approach facilitates implantation, reduces inventory, and is adaptable to unforeseen problems. These advantages are ordinarily absent with standard or custom cemented components. Modular components may also permit easier revision. The prosthesis is made of titanium alloy for its superalloy strength, elastic modulus, and bioinertness. By omitting the cement mantle, press-fit is obtained with the largest possible implant. The large size minimizes stem breakage in these young, small bones. Excellent short-term results suggest that modular cementless implants are indicated in some patients with CDH. PMID:3342552

  18. Dual mobility cups in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Ivan; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios Konstantinos; Sculco, Peter Keyes; Sculco, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered one of the most successful surgical procedures in orthopaedics. With the increase in the number of THAs performed in the world in the next decades, reducing or preventing medical and mechanical complications such as post-operative THA instability will be of paramount importance, particularly in an emerging health care environment based on quality control and patient outcome. Dual mobility acetabular component (also known as unconstrained tripolar implant) was introduced in France at the end of the 1970s as an alternative to standard sockets, to reduce the risk of THA dislocation in patients undergoing primary THA in France. Dual mobility cups have recently gained wider attention in the United States as an alternative option in the prevention and treatment of instability in both primary and revision THA and offer the benefit of increased stability without compromising clinical outcomes and implant longevity. In this article, we review the use of dual mobility cup in total hip arthroplasty in terms of its history, biomechanics, outcomes and complications based on more than 20 years of medical literature. PMID:25035820

  19. Hip impingement: beyond femoroacetabular

    PubMed Central

    Bardakos, Nikolaos V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, femoroacetabular impingement has been at the forefront of clinical practice as a cause of hip pain in young adults. As arthroscopic techniques for the hip continue to evolve, the possible presence of a new group of conditions creating mechanical conflict in and around the hip joint (ischiofemoral, subspine and iliopsoas impingement) has recently been elucidated whilst interest in already known ‘impingement’ syndromes (pelvic-trochanteric and pectineofoveal impingement) is now revived. This article attempts to increase awareness of these relatively uncommon clinical entities by describing their pathomorphology, contact mechanics, treatment and published results available to present. It is hoped that such knowledge will diversify therapeutic options for the clinician, thereby improving outcomes in a small but not negligible portion of patients with previously unexplained persistent symptoms. PMID:27011843

  20. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  1. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  2. Bioinformatics analyses of Shigella CRISPR structure and spacer classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Guangcai; Wang, Yingfang; Hong, Lijuan; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao; Xi, Yuanlin; Yang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are inheritable genetic elements of a variety of archaea and bacteria and indicative of the bacterial ecological adaptation, conferring acquired immunity against invading foreign nucleic acids. Shigella is an important pathogen for anthroponosis. This study aimed to analyze the features of Shigella CRISPR structure and classify the spacers through bioinformatics approach. Among 107 Shigella, 434 CRISPR structure loci were identified with two to seven loci in different strains. CRISPR-Q1, CRISPR-Q4 and CRISPR-Q5 were widely distributed in Shigella strains. Comparison of the first and last repeats of CRISPR1, CRISPR2 and CRISPR3 revealed several base variants and different stem-loop structures. A total of 259 cas genes were found among these 107 Shigella strains. The cas gene deletions were discovered in 88 strains. However, there is one strain that does not contain cas gene. Intact clusters of cas genes were found in 19 strains. From comprehensive analysis of sequence signature and BLAST and CRISPRTarget score, the 708 spacers were classified into three subtypes: Type I, Type II and Type III. Of them, Type I spacer referred to those linked with one gene segment, Type II spacer linked with two or more different gene segments, and Type III spacer undefined. This study examined the diversity of CRISPR/cas system in Shigella strains, demonstrated the main features of CRISPR structure and spacer classification, which provided critical information for elucidation of the mechanisms of spacer formation and exploration of the role the spacers play in the function of the CRISPR/cas system.

  3. Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer for infected tibial nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Min, Li; Xiang, Zhou; Huang, Fuguo; Tu, Chongqi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the curative effect of Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer for infected tibial nonunion with bone defect. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 58 patients with infected tibial nonunion from January 2008 to March 2011 at our institution. Patients were treated with complete debridement, radical sequestrectomy, antibiotic cement spacer implantation, bone transport using the Ilizarov external fixator, and soft tissue reconstruction. Clinical efficacy was assessed using Paley’s grading system and patient satisfaction at the last follow-up. Results: Follow-up ranged from 24 to 63 months (average, 31.6 months). Mean size of the tibial defect was 9.2 cm (range, 6-15 cm). The soft tissue defect was closed successfully in all cases. Patients eventually achieved union with a mean bone union index of 1.2 months/cm at an average of 10.6 months (range, 8-31 months). In terms of Paley grade, 30 patients had excellent results, 23 good, and 5 fair. Functional results were excellent in 28 patients, good in 18, and fair in 12. Thirty-five patients felt extremely satisfied, 18 satisfied, and 5 acceptable with the functional outcome. Complications included pin site infection in 18 cases, limb length discrepancy less than 1.5 cm in 10, knee stiffness in 5, equinus deformity in 4, infectious recurrence in 1 and pin breakage in 1. There was no refracture at the reconstruction site. Conclusion: Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer is a versatile and effective method for treatment of infected tibial nonunion. PMID:26309700

  4. Ceramic on ceramic hip arthroplasty in fused hips

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Taek-Rim; Lee, Tae-Min; Ahn, Yeong-Seub

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most literature in the field of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for fused hips, until date has reported the results of using metal on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene bearings. Results of THA using ceramic on ceramic (CoC) bearings in fused hips have not been published in literature. This study reports the results of cementless THA using CoC articulation perfomed in fused hips. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients (25 hips) with fused hips underwent conversion to THA using CoC bearings and were followed up for a mean 5.4 years. The conventional posterolateral approach was used in 15 hips, a modified two incision technique in 7 hips and a direct lateral approach with greater trochanteric osteotomy in 3 hips. Postoperatively, range of motion exercises were encouraged after 2–3 days of bed rest and subsequent gradual weight bearing using crutches was begun. Results: Mean Harris hip score improved from 42.4 to 84.2 and mean leg lengthening of 36.6 mm was achieved. In the average 5.4 years (range 2.8-9.1 years) followup there were no cases with osteolysis around acetabular cup and femoral stem. In this study, there was no case of ceramic fracture. There was one case of squeaking. Conclusion: This study suggests that cementless THA performed for fused hips with CoC bearings can provide good early clinical results. PMID:26015635

  5. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  6. HIP quench technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.; Westerlund, J.; Zimmerman, F.X.

    1996-12-31

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is a viable production process today for densifying metals, ceramics, and composites to achieve fully dense parts. One major drawback for conventional HIPing is the long ten to twelve hour cycle time resulting in low productivity and high processing cost. Drastic furnace improvements have been made in the late 1980`s with the advent of Uniform Rapid Cooling (URC) called HIP Quenching. This innovation allows floor/floor cycles as short as four to five hours with one hour soak depending on the material to be HIPed. A flow device such as a fan is utilized at the base of the furnace for forced gas convection in promoting main features to: (1) accelerate time for heating, soaking and cooling; (2) add combined solution heat treating; and (3) reduce thermal distortion of parts with varying cross-sections. All three points promise to positively effect better economy with improved property and quality to promote the HIP process further. This paper describes the URC technology and illustrates a couple of HIP Quench studies made for a turbine disc and efficient High Speed Steel powder consolidation.

  7. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  8. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  9. Hip Morphology Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Cristián; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Barahona, Maximiliano; Salazar, Alfonso; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is the result of a mechanical conflict in the hip joint, and its diagnosis is based on clinical and radiological parameters. To our knowledge, there are no published studies describing the radiologic characteristics of FAI in Latin American populations. Purpose: To describe the radiological features associated with FAI in an asymptomatic Chilean population. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We prospectively recruited asymptomatic patients with no history or symptoms of hip pathology who underwent abdomen-pelvis computed tomography (CT) for a nonorthopaedic indication. The acetabular and femoral parameters related to FAI were measured. Results: We studied 101 subjects (202 hips) with a mean age of 36.8 ± 14.4 years. The mean center-edge angle was 39.4° ± 7.2°. The crossover sign was present in 34 cases (33.7%). The mean alpha angle was 49.7° ± 8.3°. Depending on the cut points chosen for FAI-related parameters, between 39.6% and 69.3% of an asymptomatic Chilean population were found to have morphological features related to FAI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the proposed pathological threshold values in the literature cannot be extrapolated to a Chilean population, and this must be taken into consideration when evaluating Latin American patients with hip pain. PMID:26535273

  10. Vibroacoustography for the assessment of total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Hermes A. S.; Wang, Liao; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Kinnick, Randall R.; An, Kai-Nan; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper proposes imaging with 3-dimensional vibroacoustography for postoperatively assessing the uncovered cup area after total hip arthroplasty as a quantitative criterion to evaluate implant fixation. METHODS: A phantom with a bone-like structure covered by a tissue-mimicking material was used to simulate a total hip arthroplasty case. Vibroacoustography images of the uncovered cup region were generated using a two-element confocal ultrasound transducer and a hydrophone inside a water tank. Topological correction based on the geometry of the implant was performed to generate a 3-dimensional representation of the vibroacoustography image and to accurately evaluate the surface. The 3-dimensional area obtained by the vibroacoustography approach was compared to the area evaluated by a 3-dimensional motion capture system. RESULTS: The vibroacoustography technique provided high-resolution, high-contrast, and speckle-free images with less sensitivity to the beam incidence. Using a 3-dimensional-topology correction of the image, we accurately estimated the uncovered area of the implant with a relative error of 8.1% in comparison with the motion capture system measurements. CONCLUSION: Measurement of the cup coverage after total hip arthroplasty has not been well established; however, the covered surface area of the acetabular component is one of the most important prognostic factors. The preliminary results of this study show that vibroacoustography is a 3-dimensional approach that can be used to postoperatively evaluate total hip arthroplasty. The favorable results also provide an impetus for exploring vibroacoustography in other bone or implant surface imaging applications. PMID:23778334

  11. Considerations upon applying tripodic coupling in artificial hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, M. C.; Filote, C.; Ciornei, F. C.; Gradinariu, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    The employment of tripodic joint allows creation of homokinetical transmissions and thus it is expected that at the use of such a transmission for a dynamical system with smooth enough inputs, the outputs should maintain the same characteristics. The present paper presents a comparison between the effect of using a spherical joint in spatial mechanisms - the classical solution for hip joint implant, and the effect of replacing such prosthesis with a tripodic coupling.

  12. Hip resurfacing: a large, US single-surgeon series.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P J

    2016-01-01

    Hip resurfacing has been proposed as an alternative to traditional total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients. Much has been learned following the introduction of metal-on-metal resurfacing devices in the 1990s. The triad of a well-designed device, implanted accurately, in the correct patient has never been more critical than with these implants. Following Food and Drug Administration approval in 2006, we studied the safety and effectiveness of one hip resurfacing device (Birmingham Hip Resurfacing) at our hospital in a large, single-surgeon series. We report our early to mid-term results in 1333 cases followed for a mean of 4.3 years (2 to 5.7) using a prospective, observational registry. The mean patient age was 53.1 years (12 to 84); 70% were male and 91% had osteoarthritis. Complications were few, including no dislocations, no femoral component loosening, two femoral neck fractures (0.15%), one socket loosening (0.08%), three deep infections (0.23%), and three cases of metallosis (0.23%). There were no destructive pseudotumours. Overall survivorship at up to 5.7 years was 99.2%. Aseptic survivorship in males under the age of 50 was 100%. We believe this is the largest United States series of a single surgeon using a single resurfacing system. PMID:26733633

  13. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  14. Hip Arthroscopy: A Brief History.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Safran, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast-growing and evolving field. Like knee and shoulder arthroscopy, hip arthroscopy began as a diagnostic procedure and then progressed to biopsy and resection of abnormalities. Subsequently, it has evolved to repair of various tissues and treatment of underlying causes. As the understanding of the hip joint and its associated pathophysiology grows, indications will continue to expand for this diagnostic and therapeutic modality. This article outlines the historic developments of hip arthroscopy, including advancements in instrumentation and techniques from the days of the first hip arthroscopies to the present day.

  15. Outcome of minimally invasive hip replacement in obese, overweight, and nonobese patients.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Marc W; Schuh, Reinhard; O'Reilly, Michael P; Jones, Lynne C

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether obesity affects implant positioning or early functional outcome after minimally invasive total hip replacement. The authors evaluated 119 patients who had undergone minimally invasive total hip replacement via a direct anterior approach. The patients were segregated according to World Health Organization body mass index categories: nonobese, overweight, or obese. Perioperative variables, resulting cup position, and early outcome (Harris Hip Score) were assessed. The only significant difference among the groups was mean operative time (obese > overweight > nonobese). Although the obese group's 2-year Harris Hip Score was the lowest, all patients had good to excellent results. In conclusion, minimally invasive hip replacement in obese patients provides early outcomes comparable to those in nonobese patients.

  16. Total hip arthroplasty and bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; Ratti, Chiara; Fagetti, Alessandro; Binda, Tommaso

    2011-04-01

    The number of elderly people is steadily increasing: in the United States it will increase from 12.9% to 20% in 2030 with respect to the total population. Italy, with UK, Denmark and Sweden are the countries with the largest number of octogenarians (about 4% of the population) and it is estimated that this rate will increase by 300% over the next 50 years. The number of people affected by osteoarthritis will increase significantly and therefore the number of total hip arthroplasties will progressively increase. The success of an implant depends firstly by a flawless surgical technique, a correct and stable implant fixation and an optimal preoperative planning that should consider the bone quality of the patient, in order to choose a proper implant design. Different approaches could be followed to achieve adequate fixation: northern Europe surgeons prefer the cemented implant, instead American orthopedics generally use systems that allow a direct biological osteointegration. Elderly patients often present with multiple local and general problems that could affect significantly the normal course of a prosthetic surgery procedure and its results: they have bone tissue changes that lead to increased bone fragility and, consequently, difficulties to obtain primary stability. Osteoporotic bone is characterized by reduction of bone mass, decrease of cancellous bone trabeculae and by increased porosity of cortical bone. The bone fragility implies a greater risk of iatrogenic intraoperative fractures. Furthermore, difficulties linked to bone stock deficiencies become even more significant in revision surgery, where cortical bone thinning is associated with enlargement of the isthmus thus making more difficult to obtain distal fixation of prosthetic stems. At the moment, the role played by the drugs used for the treatment of osteoporosis during implant osteointegration is still not clearly understood and is still under investigation.

  17. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures. PMID:25907394

  18. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures.

  19. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  20. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  1. Effect of high hip center on stress for dysplastic hip.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Li, Zongming

    2014-07-01

    High hip center reconstruction has been advocated in treating deficient acetabulum. However, there is no consensus on the clinical outcome of this technique. In addition, it remains unclear to what extend this technique restores the normal hip biomechanics. The goal of this study was to investigate stress above the acetabular dome in response to a range of high hip center positioning for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. This study consisted of 2 main parts, radiologic and biomechanical. Pelvic radiographs of 18 patients were studied to determine the amount of displacement of the hip center in the superior direction compared with the normal side. Second, qualitative and quantitative changes in stress on cortical and trabecular bone in the region of the acetabular dome as a result of superior displacement of the hip center were analyzed with subject-specific finite element models. The results showed that the range of the hip center position in the superior direction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia was 0 to 15 mm above the contralateral femoral head center. When superior displacement of the hip center exceeded 5 mm above the anatomic hip center, cortical bone mass on the 2 thickest cross-sections above the acetabular dome decreased quickly and the stress value on posterolateral cortical bone was obviously lower than the normal level. This study showed that to restore the normal load above the acetabular dome, there is a limit of 5 mm above the anatomic hip center for high hip center acetabular reconstruction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. PMID:24992059

  2. Measuring functional outcome after total hip replacement with subject-specific hip joint loading.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tim; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Dullien, Silvia; Grifka, Joachim; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Renkawitz, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    Total hip replacement is an often-performed orthopedic surgical procedure; the amount of procedures undertaken will increase since our life expectancy is growing. In order to optimize function, hip biomechanics should be restored to as near normal as possible. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether or not it is feasible to compute the vectorial hip reaction force pathways on the head of the prosthesis and the force angles relative to the cup of the prosthesis that occur during gait in total hip replacement patients, serving as an objective measurement of the functional outcome following hip replacement. A three-dimensional gait analysis, measuring ground reaction forces and kinematics, was performed. The data retrieved from the gait analysis was used as the input for the musculoskeletal model to compute vectorial joint reaction forces for data processing. To evaluate the position and orientation of the joint reaction forces, the force path, as well as the force angles for the operated and non-operated joint, has been calculated during the stance phase of the specific leg. The force path for subject 2 on the non-operated side is only located in the posterior-lateral quarter, as is the force path for subject 1. In contrast to this subject, the force path for subject 2 at the operated hip joint can be found only within the anterior quarter of the head of the implant, where it is nearly equally distributed in the medio-lateral half of the prosthesis head. The force-inclination angles on the cup of subject 1, with respect to the plane of the socket face, indicates that the force vector is mainly positioned in the same quadrant when compared with subject 2 (in a cup-fixed coordinate system). The force-anteversion angle behaves similarly to the force-inclination angle, even when the effects are not as pronounced. The proposed methods in this article are aiming to define two functional outcomes of total hip replacement that are related to wear and rim

  3. A Review on the Management of Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alexander MacDonald; Brock, Timothy M.; Heil, Kieran; Holmes, Rachel; Weusten, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is the most common chronic condition affecting patients over the age of 70. The prevalence of osteoarthritis increases with age, and with an aging population, the effect of this disease will represent an ever-increasing burden on health care. The knee is the most common joint affected in osteoarthritis, with up to 41% of limb arthritis being located in the knee, compared to 30% in hands and 19% in hips. We review the current concepts with regard to the disease process and risk factors for developing hip and knee osteoarthritis. We then explore the nonsurgical management of osteoarthritis as well as the operative management of hip and knee arthritis. We discuss the indications for surgical treatment of hip and knee arthritis, looking in particular at the controversies affecting young and obese patients in both hip and knee replacements. Patient and implant related outcomes along with survivorships are addressed as well as the experiences and controversies described in national joint registries. PMID:26464847

  4. Extra-articular Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Context: Snapping hip, or coxa saltans, is a vague term used to describe palpable or auditory snapping with hip movements. As increasing attention is paid to intra-articular hip pathologies such as acetabular labral tears, it is important to be able to identify and understand the extra-articular causes of snapping hip. Evidence Acquisition: The search terms snapping hip and coxa sultans were used in PubMed to locate suitable studies of any publication date (ending date, November 2008). Results: Extra-articular snapping may be caused laterally by the iliotibial band or anteriorly by the iliopsoas tendon. Snapping of the iliopsoas tendon usually requires contraction of the hip flexors and may be difficult to differentiate from intra-articular causes of snapping. Dynamic ultrasound can help detect abrupt tendon translation during movement, noninvasively supporting the diagnosis of extra-articular snapping hip. The majority of cases of snapping hip resolve with conservative treatment, which includes avoidance of aggravating activities, stretching, and anti-inflammatory medication. In recalcitrant cases, surgery to lengthen the iliotibial band or the iliopsoas tendon has produced symptom relief but may result in prolonged weakness. Conclusions: In treating active patients with snapping soft tissues around the hip, clinicians should recognize that the majority of cases resolve without surgical intervention, while being mindful of the potential for concomitant intra-articular and internal snapping hips. PMID:23015936

  5. Drug-Eluting Nasal Implants: Formulation, Characterization, Clinical Applications and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Ankit; Anand, Utkarshini; Ugwu, Malachy C.; Feridooni, Tiam; Massoud, Emad; Agu, Remigius U.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection of the nasal sinuses, also referred to as Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS), severely affects patients’ quality of life. Adhesions, ostial stenosis, infection and inflammation relapses complicate chronic sinusitis treatment strategies. Drug-eluting stents, packings or implants have been suggested as reasonable alternatives for addressing these concerns. This article reviewed potential drug candidates for nasal implants, formulation methods/optimization and characterization methods. Clinical applications and important considerations were also addressed. Clinically-approved implants (Propel™ implant, the Relieva stratus™ MicroFlow spacer, and the Sinu-Foam™ spacer) for CRS treatment was an important focus. The advantages and limitations, as well as future considerations, challenges and the need for additional research in the field of nasal drug implant development, were discussed. PMID:24871904

  6. Clinical outcome of Zweymüller total hip arthroplasty for patients with high congenital hip dislocation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Xu, Zhihong; Shi, Dongquan; Qiu, Xusheng; Dai, Jin; Yuan, Tao; Weng, Wenjie; Jiang, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of high congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH) remains controversial. We report the outcome of hip arthroplasty using a cementless threaded cup and a cementless straight stem in patients with high congenital hip dislocation. Between January 2001 and August 2004, 17 patients with high congenital hip dislocation were treated. During surgery, at least 25% of the cup was anchored in bone. By monitoring somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) of the common peroneal nerve we were able to reduce the femoral head into position in the true acetabulum by releasing soft tissues. A bulk autogenous femoral head bone graft was implanted in 5 patients to achieve at least 75% bony coverage of the acertabular component. Follow-up ranged from 48 months to 91 months with an average of 69.7 months. The mean Harris hip score increased from 43 points preoperatively to 89 points at the time of final follow-up (P<0.001). Radiographic analysis showed bony union of the bone graft in all cases. PMID:21279967

  7. Accuracy of navigation in hip resurfacing with different surgeons and varying anatomy.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Iris; Haselbacher, Matthias; Mayr, Eckart; Kaiser, Peter M; Lenze, Florian W; Keiler, Alexander; Nogler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of a commercial imageless navigation system for hip resurfacing and its reproducibility among different surgeons and for varying femoral anatomy was tested by comparing conventional and navigated implantation of the femoral component on different sawbones in a hip simulator. The position of the component was measured on postoperative radiographs. Variance for varus/valgus alignment and anteversion was higher for conventional implantation. Among the three surgeons, operation time, chosen implant size and anteversion were significantly different for conventional implantation but not for the navigated method. Using navigation, no difference was found for normal and abnormal anatomy. Values obtained with the navigation system were consistent with those measured on radiographs. Navigation appeared to be accurate and helped to reduce outliers. This was true for the three different surgeons and in varying anatomical situations.

  8. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux.

  9. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J J; Severin, Andrew J; Sashital, Dipali G

    2015-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring 'spacer' sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid 'primed' adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR-Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed 'naïve' adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection.

  10. Mandrel and spacer engineering based self-aligned triple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yijian; Cheng, Qi; Kang, Weiling

    2012-03-01

    Self-aligned triple patterning (SATP) technique offers both improved resolution and quasi-2D design flexibility for scaling integrated circuits down to sub-15nm half pitch. By implementation of active layout decomposition/synthesis using mandrel and spacer engineering, SATP process represents a prospective trend that not only drives up the feature density, but also breaks the 1-D gridded limitations posed to future device design. In this paper, we shall present the research progress made in optimizing SATP process to improve its lithographic performance. To solve the previously reported difficulties in etching small mandrels and removing sacrificial spacers, new materials are tested and a promising scheme (using oxide as the mandrel and poly/amorphous Si as the sacrificial spacer) is identified. In the new process, a diluted HF process is applied to shrink the mandrel (oxide) line CD and a highly selective dry etch (which does not attack the mandrel and structural spacer) is developed to strip the sacrificial Si spacers, resulting in significantly improved process performance. We also address the issue of reducing SATP process complexity by exploring the feasibility of a 2-mask concept for specific types of layout.

  11. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux. PMID:24726992

  12. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  13. A novel classification to guide total hip arthroplasty for adult acetabular dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CHEN; CHENG, MENG-QI; CHENG, TAO; MA, RUI-XIANG; KONG, RONG; GUO, YONG-YUAN; QIN, HUI; SHI, SI FENG; ZHANG, XIAN-LONG

    2013-01-01

    In the field of hip arthroplasties, the secondary fixation of the implants depends directly on the quality of the primary stability. A good acetabular fit and metaphyseal filling between the prostheses and implants improve the initial stabilization, and optimize the transmission of forces to the bone. A precise knowledge of the three-dimensional acetabular or femoral shape is essential to the selection of adapted implants. A total of 63 patients diagnosed with developmental dysplasia were analyzed by three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT), and the preoperative radiographic and 3DCT images were used to assess the acetabular/femoral deformities and variations of the hips. All joints were classified as Crowe type I, and bilateral measurements were taken for 10 patients. The acetabular abnormalities were classified according to the type of deficiency and the section angles of the acetabulum, with 26 hips (36%) classified as an anterior deficiency, 13 hips (18%) as a posterior deficiency and 34 hips (46%) as a lateral deficiency. The femoral side deformities were divided into three types according to the anteversion angle of the femur. A gradual increase in anteversion angle led to secondary rotational anomalies, and a narrowing of the canal at the isthmus. A total of 35 hips (48%) were classified as an F1 type deficiency, femur anteversion angle (FAVA) <30°; 32 hips (44%) as F2-type, 30°≤ FAVA ≤40°, with mild abnormalities of the femoral canal rotation and the diameter of the isthmus; and 6 hips (8%) as F3 type, FAVA >40°, with significant abnormalities of the femoral canal rotation and the diameter of the isthmus. This novel classification for adult acetabular dysplasia may provide a useful guide for surgery, and enable an improved selection of a suitable prosthesis. PMID:23935749

  14. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  4. Impact of Polycarbonate Spacers on Resistive Plate Chamber Efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucia, Nicholas

    2008-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory will measure the flavor dependent quark and anti-quark polarizations in the proton through parity violating W-production. A new dedicated muon trigger spectrometer is being built to select high momentum muons from the decay of W bosons. The muon spectrometer relies on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) developed for the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. PHENIX continues to pursue detailed studies of CMS RPC technology to ensure that these detectors will be optimally deployed and operated in PHENIX. In this poster we present two dimensional efficiency measurements with cosmic rays in RPC prototypes. In particular we have studied the impact polycarbonate spacers used to define the 2 mm wide RPC gas gaps have on the detector efficiency. We will present two dimensional efficiency measurements in the region adjacent to the spacers including the radial dependence of the efficiency with respect to the center of the spacer.

  5. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  6. Heterotopic ossification after hip arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Eyal; Sharfman, Zachary T.; Rath, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) after hip arthroscopy is the abnormal formation of mature lamellar bone within extra skeletal soft tissues. HO may lead to pain, impaired range of motion and possibly revision surgery. There has been a substantial amount of recent research on the pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of HO associated with open and arthroscopic hip surgery. This article reviews the literature on the aforementioned topics with a focus on their application in hip arthroscopy. PMID:27011859

  7. Spacer effect on nanostructures and self-assembly in organogels via some bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, new bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers were designed and synthesized. Their gelation behaviors in 23 solvents were investigated, and some of them were found to be low molecular mass organic gelators. The experimental results indicated that these as-formed organogels can be regulated by changing the flexible/rigid segments in spacers and organic solvents. Suitable combination of flexible/rigid segments in molecular spacers in the present cholesteryl gelators is favorable for the gelation of organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations revealed that the gelator molecules self-assemble into different aggregates, from wrinkle and belt to fiber with the change of spacers and solvents. Spectral studies indicated that there existed different H-bond formations between imide groups and assembly modes, depending on the substituent spacers in molecular skeletons. The present work may give some insight into the design and character of new organogelators and soft materials with special molecular structures. PMID:24083361

  8. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty. PMID:23218622

  9. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty.

  10. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    The hip capsule is a highly complex anatomic structure, which influences normal hip motion and biomechanics. A dynamic stabilizing capsular contribution exists in the iliocapsularis and gluteus minimus, among other musculotendinous structures crossing the joint. Variable types and sizes of capsulotomy are necessary to sufficiently visualize and address the bony and soft tissue pathologic source of symptoms. Unrepaired capsulotomies may leave the hip significantly unstable to variable degrees. Capsular closure is a necessary part of a comprehensive arthroscopic hip preservation procedure. Greater titration of the degree of plication may be performed for patients with risk factors for postoperative instability. PMID:27343391

  11. Surface and Subsurface Analyses of Metal-on-Polyethylene Total Hip Replacement Retrievals.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Vicky; Pettersson, Maria; Persson, Cecilia; Larsson, Sune; Grandfield, Kathryn; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-05-01

    Metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) articulations are one of the most reliable implanted hip prostheses. Unfortunately, long-term failure remains an obstacle to the service life. There is a lack of higher resolution research investigating the metallic surface component of MoP hip implants. This study investigates the surface and subsurface features of metallic cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo) femoral head components from failed MoP retrievals. Unused prostheses were used for comparison to differentiate between wear-induced defects and imperfections incurred during implant manufacturing. The predominant scratch morphology observed on the non-implanted references was shallow and linear, whereas the scratches on the retrievals consisted of largely nonlinear, irregular scratches of varying depth (up to 150 nm in retrievals and up to 60 nm in reference samples). Characteristic hard phases were observed on the surface and subsurface material of the cast samples. Across all samples, a 100-400 nm thick nanocrystalline layer was visible in the immediate subsurface microstructure. Although observation of the nanocrystalline layer has been reported in metal-on-metal articulations, its presence in MoP retrievals and unimplanted prostheses has not been extensively examined. The results suggest that manufacturing-induced surface and subsurface microstructural features are present in MoP hip prostheses prior to implantation and naturally, these imperfections may influence the in vivo wear processes after implantation. PMID:26399989

  12. Surface and Subsurface Analyses of Metal-on-Polyethylene Total Hip Replacement Retrievals.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Vicky; Pettersson, Maria; Persson, Cecilia; Larsson, Sune; Grandfield, Kathryn; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-05-01

    Metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) articulations are one of the most reliable implanted hip prostheses. Unfortunately, long-term failure remains an obstacle to the service life. There is a lack of higher resolution research investigating the metallic surface component of MoP hip implants. This study investigates the surface and subsurface features of metallic cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo) femoral head components from failed MoP retrievals. Unused prostheses were used for comparison to differentiate between wear-induced defects and imperfections incurred during implant manufacturing. The predominant scratch morphology observed on the non-implanted references was shallow and linear, whereas the scratches on the retrievals consisted of largely nonlinear, irregular scratches of varying depth (up to 150 nm in retrievals and up to 60 nm in reference samples). Characteristic hard phases were observed on the surface and subsurface material of the cast samples. Across all samples, a 100-400 nm thick nanocrystalline layer was visible in the immediate subsurface microstructure. Although observation of the nanocrystalline layer has been reported in metal-on-metal articulations, its presence in MoP retrievals and unimplanted prostheses has not been extensively examined. The results suggest that manufacturing-induced surface and subsurface microstructural features are present in MoP hip prostheses prior to implantation and naturally, these imperfections may influence the in vivo wear processes after implantation.

  13. Measurements and sensitivities of LWR in poly spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, Guy; Shauly, Eitan; Levi, Shimon; Siany, Amit; Adan, Ofer; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-03-01

    LER and LWR have long been considered a primary issue in process development and monitoring. Development of a low power process flavors emphasizes the effect of LER, LWR on different aspects of the device. Gate level performance, particularly leakage current at the front end of line, resistance and reliability in the back-end layers. Traditionally as can be seen in many publications, for the front end of line the focus is mainly on Poly and Active area layers. Poly spacers contribution to the gate leakage, for example, is rarely discussed. Following our research done on sources of gate leakage, we found leakage current (Ioff) in some processes to be highly sensitive to changes in the width of the Poly spacers - even more strongly to the actual Poly gate CDs. Therefore we decided to measure Poly spacers LWR, its correlation to the LWR in the poly, and its sensitivity to changes in layout and OPC. In our last year publication, we defined the terms LLER (Local Line Edge Roughness) and LLWR (Local Line Width Roughness). The local roughness is measured as the 3-sigma value of the line edge/width in a 5-nm segment around the measurement point. We will use these terms in this paper to evaluate the Poly roughness impact on Poly spacer's roughness. A dedicated test chip was designed for the experiments, having various transistors layout configurations with different densities to cover the all range of process design rules. Applied Materials LER and LWR innovative algorithms were used to measure and characterize the spacer roughness relative to the distance from the active edges and from other spaces. To accurately measure all structures in a reasonable time, the recipes were automatically generated from CAD. On silicon, after poly spacers generation, the transistors no longer resemble the Poly layer CAD layout, their morphology is different compared with Photo/Etch traditional structures , and dimensions vary significantly. In this paper we present metrology and

  14. Graphitic Tribological Layers in Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Pourzal, R.; Wimmer, M. A.; Jacobs, J. J.; Fischer, A.; Marks, L. D.

    2011-12-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, and when nonoperative methods have failed, a prosthetic implant is a cost-effective and clinically successful treatment. Metal-on-metal replacements are an attractive implant technology, a lower-wear alternative to metal-on-polyethylene devices. Relatively little is known about how sliding occurs in these implants, except that proteins play a critical role and that there is a tribological layer on the metal surface. We report evidence for graphitic material in the tribological layer in metal-on-metal hip replacements retrieved from patients. As graphite is a solid lubricant, its presence helps to explain why these components exhibit low wear and suggests methods of improving their performance; simultaneously, this raises the issue of the physiological effects of graphitic wear debris.

  15. Strontium in the bone-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Vestermark, Marianne Toft

    2011-05-01

    Total hip replacement surgery is being performed on an increasingly large part of the population and at increasingly younger age. Because we live and stay physically active longer, and since hip replacement surgery has become quite successful, the treatment is being offered to progressively more patients. Unfortunately, about 17% of hip replacement surgeries currently involve revisions. Consequently, the longevity of both the primary and revision implant is an issue and warrants further investigation. Implants undergoing early instability or even subsidence correlate with an increased risk of aseptic loosening, subsequently requiring revision. Thus, the goal is early fixation by osseointegration of the implant. For revision implants, this is an even greater challenge since an allograft is often needed during surgery to obtain immediate stability of the implant. Bone grafts are rapidly resorbed. Thus, instability of the prosthesis may develop before new bone formation is well established and can mechanically secure the prosthesis. Strontium is a dual action drug; being both bone anabolic and anti-catabolic. In the form of strontiumranelate, it is used in the treatment of osteoporosis. Strontium may potentially improve the early osseointegration and fixation of implants. This dissertation consists of three studies investigating the effect of strontium at the bone-implant interface. The questions were firstly, what is the optimal delivery method for strontium to the interface, and secondly, can strontium exercise its dual action at the interface? The studies were performed in a cementless, experimental gap model in canine. The effects of strontium were evaluated by histomorphometrical analysis of the osseointegration and mechanical push-out test of implant fixation. Different stereological methods were used for the histomorphometrical analysis of each study. The methods used were reviewed critically and found valid. Study I compared a 5% strontium

  16. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  17. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS.

    PubMed

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time.

  18. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  19. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  20. [Clinical evaluation tools of total hip arthroplasties].

    PubMed

    Hamadouche, M

    2006-10-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is one of the most efficient hip surgery procedures enabling improved function in the vast majority of operated patients. The major long-term complication is aseptic loosening due to an inflammatory response to particle wear debris coming from the bearings. Polyethylene is the key culprit. Currently two solutions are proposed: eliminating polyethylene from the prosthetic articulation or reducing material wear. This leads to the need for reliable tools for evaluating short-term results, predictive of long-term outcome. When the innovation concerns reduction of polyethylene wear, short-term wear should be measured with software methods or radiostereometry. If the innovation concerns improvement of polyethyleneless implants, then short-term migration should be measured with EBRA or radiostereometry. In addition, the long-term retrospective evaluation of large series of patients remains of major interest provided that it is performed with survival analysis. These different methods are detailed in this study, indicating the pros and cons for each solution. PMID:17088755

  1. Review of quality of x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faiz; Ahmad, Tayyab; Condon, Finbarr; Lenehan, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Digital templating of x-rays for total hip arthroplasty is used routinely for pre-operative planning. This is to assure that appropriately sized implants are selected to replicate patient's hip biomechanics. Multiple studies have shown that templating does not always correspond to the final implants used. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the x-rays taken pre-operatively for templating for total hip arthroplasty. We undertook a review of a series of pre-operative templating pelvis x-rays in 100 consecutive patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. These x-rays were compared against set criteria to determine their suitability for use for templating. We determined that six x-rays met the criteria whereas ninety four x-rays did not meet the criteria for suitable x-rays. Twenty patients had repeat x-rays. The reasons for unsuitability were inadequate opposite femur (66%), absence or incomplete template (54%), inadequate femur length (47%), external rotation (39%), absence of opposite hip (4%). The twenty repeated x-rays were also reviewed for the same parameters and two (10%) satisfied the established criteria. It is imperative that x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty are done to a strict standard to obtain an x-ray that is appropriate for templating and there is minimal exposure of the patient to irradiation.

  2. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  3. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  4. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  5. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  6. Augmentation of the transverse acetabular ligament in canine caudoventral hip luxation.

    PubMed

    Venzin, C; Montavon, P M

    2007-01-01

    Open surgical fixation was performed on four hip joints in three dogs who were suffering from caudoventral hip luxations for which closed reduction had previously failed. Stabilization of the joint was achieved with a ventral coxofemoral approach, which augmented the function of the transverse acetabular ligament using a sling implant through a bone tunnel (n = 1), a sling implant around two pelvic screws (n = 1), or an internal fixator plate (n = 2). Transverse acetabular ligament augmentation resulted in successful joint stabilization in all cases, and should be considered for the surgical reduction of caudoventral hip luxations in dogs. The use of an internal fixator plate, while preserving soft-tissue blood supply and resulting in minimal to no long-term arthritic changes, may provide an optimal outcome. PMID:18038012

  7. Variations in the trunnion surface topography between different commercially available hip replacement stems.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Walter, William L; Walsh, William Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modular hip implants allows for the adjustment of leg length, offset, and the ability to remove the head for acetabular exposure during primary and revision surgery. The design of the Morse taper facilitates the intimate contact of the conical trunnion of the femoral stem (male component), with the conical bore of the femoral head (female component). Orthopaedic trunnion tapers are not standardized and vary in length, taper angle, and base dimension. Variations in the design and surface characteristics of the trunnion, will directly reflect on the interface at the taper junction and can influence the likelihood of subsequent wear, corrosion and longevity of the implant. The effect of surface topography of trunnions on commercially available hip stems has not yet been considered as a possible contributing factor in the corrosion observed at taper junctions. In this study we analyzed the surface topography and surface roughness of randomly selected commercially available femoral hip stem trunnions to obtain a greater insight into their surface characteristics.

  8. Effect of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite bone cement on bone remodeling following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guo X; Lin, Jian H; Chiu, Peter K Y; Li, Zhao Y; Lu, William W

    2010-01-01

    It is uncertain whether the use of bioactive bone cement has any beneficial effect on local bone adaptation following hip replacement. In this study, twelve goats underwent cemented hip hemiarthroplasty unilaterally, with either PMMA bone cement or strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bioactive bone cement. Nine months later, the femoral cortical bones at different levels were analyzed by microhardness testing and micro-CT scanning. Extensive bone remodeling was found at proximal and mid-levels in both PMMA and Sr-HA groups. However, with regard to the differences of bone mineral density, cortical bone area and bone hardness between implanted and non-implanted femur, less decreases were found in Sr-HA group than PMMA group at proximal and mid-levels, and significant differences were shown for bone area and hardness at proximal level. The results suggested that the use of Sr-HA cement might alleviate femoral bone remodeling after hip replacement. PMID:19728042

  9. Lubricin and smooth muscle α-actin-containing myofibroblasts in the pseudomembranes around loose hip and knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Ready, John E; Brick, Gregory W; Martin, Scott D; Martin, Tamara L; Schmid, Thomas M; Padera, Robert F; Spector, Myron

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the presence and distribution of the lubricating and anti-adhesion glycoprotein lubricin and cells containing the contractile isoform smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) in pseudomembranes around loose hip prostheses. Periprosthetic tissue was obtained at revision arthroplasty of eight aseptic, loose hip implants, and for comparison three loose knee prostheses. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 3 zones: zone 1, within 300μm of the edge of the implant-tissue interface; zone 2, between zones 1 and 3; zone 3, within 300μm of the resected/trimmed edge. The presence of lubricin was extensive in all samples: (1) as a discrete layer at the implant-tissue interface; (2) within the extracellular matrix (ECM); (3) intracellularly. There was significantly more high grade (>50%) lubricin surface staining at the implant-tissue interface compared with the resected edge. While there was also a significant effect of location of high grade ECM lubricin staining, there was no significant effect of implant type (i.e. hip versus knee). All but two hip pseudomembrane samples showed the presence of many SMA-containing cells. There was a significant effect of location on the number of SMA-expressing cells, but not of implant type. These findings might explain why the management of loose prosthesis is so challenging.

  10. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S.; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J. Brouns, Stan J.; Severin, Andrew J.; Sashital, Dipali G.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring ‘spacer’ sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid ‘primed’ adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR–Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed ‘naïve’ adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  11. Filter holder assembly having extended collar spacer ring

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A filter holder assembly is provided that utilizes a fail-safe regenerator unit with an annular spacer ring having an extended metal collar for containment and positioning of a compliant ceramic gasket used in the assembly. The filter holder assembly is disclosed for use with advanced composite, filament wound, and metal candle filters.

  12. Trestle #1, detail of stringers and spacers on northeast end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of stringers and spacers on northeast end of deck. View to southwest - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  13. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  14. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  15. In vitro friction and lubrication of large bearing hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, S; Jones, E; Birkinshaw, C

    2010-01-01

    New material combinations and designs of artificial hip implants are being introduced in an effort to improve proprioception and functional longevity. Larger joints in particular are being developed to improve joint stability, and it is thought that these larger implants will be more satisfactory for younger and more physically active patients. The study detailed here used a hip friction simulator to assess the friction and lubrication properties of large-diameter hip bearings of metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-reinforced-polymer couplings. Joints of different diameters were evaluated to determine what effect, if any, bearing diameter had on lubrication. In addition, the effects of lubricant type are considered, using carboxymethyl cellulose and bovine calf serum, and the physiological lubricant is shown to be considerably more effective at reducing friction. The frictional studies showed that the metal-on-metal joints worked under a mixed lubrication regime, producing similar friction factor values to each other. The addition of bovine calf serum (BCS) reduced the friction. The ceramic-on-reinforced-polymer samples were shown to operate with high friction factors and mixed lubrication. When tested with BCS, the larger-diameter bearings showed a decrease in friction compared with the smaller-size bearings, and the addition of BCS resulted in an increase in friction, unlike the metal-on-metal system. The study demonstrated that the component's diameter had little or no influence on the lubrication and friction of the large bearing combinations tested.

  16. Computed tomography in evaluation of revision hip arthroplasty outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Andrzej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Guziński, Maciej; Drobniewski, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin; Synder, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess contact between Recon Shell reinforcement cages used in revision hip arthroplasty and the bony base. Radiographic examinations were performed with the use of multi-energy computed tomography. Material and methods. We tentatively assess the fixation of Burch-Schneider reinforcement cages (Recon Shell made by Aesculap company) implanted in 10 patients, using two methods of evaluation. An analysis of dual energy CT scans enabled us to assess contact between the reinforcement cages and the bony base. Results. The two methods of evaluation produced different results. The evaluation method based on the division of the acetabular component into a weight-bearing zone and a non-weight-bearing zone (accounting for screw fixation) showed lack of support in the weight-bearing zone in 6 out of 10 cases and direct contact with the implant bed in only one case. The assessment of contact at anchorage holes of reinforcement cages fixed at primary procedures revealed no such support in only one case and the presence of direct contact in 5 cases. There was no correlation between the radiological outcomes and clinical results based on the Harris Hip Score. Conclusions. 1. Multi-energy computed tomography (MARS) is useful in evaluating results of revision hip allo-plasty. 2. The introduction of new imaging techniques for the evaluation of revision procedures demonstrates a need for new, unified methods of outcome assessment adjusted to the characteristics of a particular procedure. PMID:25406920

  17. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  18. The impact of proximal femoral morphology on failure strength with a mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Michael; Al Saied, Mohamed; Morison, Zachary; Sellan, Michael; Waddell, James P; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-12-01

    Mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty is a conservative alternative to conventional total hip replacement and addresses proximal fixation challenges in patients not suitable for hip resurfacing. It is unclear whether proximal femoral morphology impacts the ultimate failure load of mid-head resection implanted femurs, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of native neck-shaft angle (NSA) and coronal implant alignment on proximal femoral strength. In total, 36 synthetic femurs with two different proximal femoral morphologies were utilized in this study. Of them, 18 femurs with a varus NSA of 120° and 18 femurs with a valgus NSA of 135° were each implanted with a mid-head resection prosthesis. Femurs within the two different femoral morphology groups were divided into three equal coronal implant alignment groups: 10° valgus, 10° varus or neutral alignment. Prepared femurs were tested for stiffness and to failure in axial compression. There was no significant difference in stiffness nor failure load between femurs implanted with valgus-, varus- or neutrally aligned implants in femurs with a NSA of 120° (p = 0.396, p = 0.111, respectively). Femurs implanted in valgus orientation were significantly stiffer and failed at significantly higher loads than those implanted in varus alignment in femurs with a NSA of 135° (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). A mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty seems less sensitive to clinically relevant variations of coronal implant alignment and may be more forgiving upon implantation in some femoral morphologies, however, a relative valgus component alignment is recommended.

  19. Radiographic study of the hip joint to determine anthropometric parameters for Indian population.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Vaibhav; Deshpande, Shirish; Kuthe, Abhay; Rasalkar, Darshana D; Paunipagar, Bhawan K; Madhugiri, Tanushree Subhash

    2012-02-01

    Hip replacement surgeries are on the rise in India. However, for these surgeries, most of the implants used are imported and manufactured entirely to suit the geometrical considerations of the western population. Studies in the past have shown that there are anatomical variations in the hip joint for different ethnic backgrounds and geographical locations. There is paucity of anthropometric hip joint data related to Indian population and anthropometric variations in skeletal geometry between Asian and Western counterparts have not yet been thoroughly reviewed and considered for implant manufacturing. The purpose of this anthropometric study is to determine any anatomical variations in the normal hip joint among the Indian population and to statistically compare the mean values with the existing data on western population. 422 Hip radiographs of 211 individuals (141 males and 70 females) with normal and healthy hip joints were evaluated to obtain the horizontal offset, vertical offset and neck shaft angle. For males, mean neck shaft angle was 127.68° (SD = 3.94), horizontal offset was 34.60mm (SD=6.55) and vertical offset was 39.17 mm (SD = 5.86). For females, mean neck shaft angle was 125.92° (SD = 4.75), horizontal offset was 32.96 mm (SD = 7.04) and vertical offset was 36.38 mm (SD = 6.28). When these parameters were compared to the data available from western world, there were significant anatomical variations and it was evident that there is a need to evaluate existing implants in relation to this data and possibly design the implants suited and relevant to Indian population.

  20. A Novel Murine Model of Established Staphylococcal Bone Infection in the Presence of a Fracture Fixation Plate to Study Therapies Utilizing Antibiotic-laden Spacers after Revision Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Mice are the small animal model of choice in biomedical research due to the low cost and availability of genetically engineered lines. However, the devices utilized in current mouse models of implant-associated bone infection have been limited to intramedullary or trans-cortical pins, which are not amenable to treatments involving extensive debridement of a full-thickness bone loss and placement of a segmental antibiotic spacer. To overcome these limitations, we developed a clinically faithful model that utilizes a locking fracture fixation plate to enable debridement of an infected segmental bone defect (full-thickness osteotomy) during a revision surgery, and investigated the therapeutic effects of placing an antibiotic-laden spacer in the segmental bone defect. To first determine the ideal time point for revision following infection, a 0.7 mm osteotomy in the femoral mid-shaft was stabilized with a radiolucent PEEK fixation plate. The defect was inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, and the infection was monitored over 14 days by bioluminescent imaging (BLI). Osteolysis and reactive bone formation were assessed by X-ray and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The active bacterial infection peaked by 5 days post-inoculation, however the stability of the implant fixation became compromised by 10–14 days post-inoculation due to osteolysis around the screws. Thus, day 7 was defined as the ideal time point to perform the revision surgery. During the revision surgery, the infected tissue was debrided and the osteotomy was widened to 3 mm to place a poly-methyl methacrylate spacer, with or without vancomycin. Half of the groups also received systemic vancomycin for the remaining 21 days of the study. The viable bacteria remaining at the end of the study were measured using colony forming unit assays. Volumetric bone changes (osteolysis and reactive bone formation) were directly measured using micro-CT image analysis. Mice that were treated with

  1. Metal release and corrosion effects of modular neck total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowitz, Eike; Krachler, Michael; Thomsen, Marc; Heisel, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Modular neck implants are an attractive treatment tool in total hip replacement. Concerns remain about the mechanical stability and metal ion release caused by the modular connection. Five different implant designs were investigated in an experimental set-up. In vivo conditions were simulated and the long-term titanium release was measured. Finally, the modular connections were inspected for corrosion processes and signs of fretting. No mechanical failure or excessive corrosion could be identified for the implants tested. The titanium releases measured were extremely low compared to in vivo and in vitro studies and were not in a critical range. PMID:19219434

  2. CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in-vivo and in-vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  3. Long-term outcome of a metal-on-polyethylene cementless hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Timothy L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Campbell, Patricia A; Al-Hamad, Mariam; Amstutz, Harlan C

    2014-04-01

    Due to the well-documented problems surrounding metal-on-metal bearings, the use of hip resurfacing has declined. Since the potential benefits of hip resurfacing remain desirable, it may be beneficial to investigate the long-term outcome of hip resurfacings using metal-on-polyethylene in the 1980's. We report the long-term survivorship and modes of failure of a cementless metal-on-polyethylene resurfacing (n = 178) with different porous ingrowth surfaces. While acetabular loosening was absent, a high incidence of femoral failures (femoral loosening = 18.1%, osteolytic neck fracture = 21%) occurred despite using the same ingrowth surface for both components. Ongoing developments using the lessons learned from these previous generation components and utilizing modern low wear materials, e.g., cross-linked polyethylene, may lead to improved implants for future hip resurfacings. PMID:24090660

  4. Joint-preserving surgical options for management of chondral injuries of the hip.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Youssef F; Lindner, Dror; Jackson, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2014-01-01

    Management of injuries to the articular cartilage is complex and challenging; it becomes especially problematic in weight-bearing joints such as the hip. Several causes of articular cartilage damage have been described, including trauma, labral tears, and femoroacetabular impingement, among others. Because articular cartilage has little capacity for healing, nonsurgical management options are limited. Surgical options include total hip arthroplasty, microfracture, articular cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte implantation, mosaicplasty, and osteochondral allograft transplantation. Advances in hip arthroscopy have broadened the spectrum of tools available for diagnosis and management of chondral damage. However, the literature is still not sufficiently robust to draw firm conclusions regarding best practices for chondral defects. Additional research is needed to expand our knowledge of and develop guidelines for management of chondral injuries of the hip.

  5. Performance Analysis and Test on the KAERI Devised Spacer Grids for PWRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kee-Nam; Lee, Soo-Bum

    Spacer grid which is one of the most important structural components in a pressurized light water reactor fuel assembly supports the fuel rods laterally and vertically. Based on design experiences and by scrutinizing the design features of advanced nuclear fuels and the international patents of spacer grids, KAERI has devised its own spacer grid shapes and acquired patents. In this study, a performance evaluation on two new spacer grid shapes devised by KAERI was carried out from mechanical/structural and thermohydraulic view points. And also a performance evaluation on two commercial spacer grid shapes was carried out for the sake of a comparison. The comparisons included the spring characteristics, fuel rod vibration characteristics, fretting wear resistance, impact strength characteristics, CHF enhancement, and pressure drop level of the spacer grid shapes. The comparison results have shown that the performances of the new spacer grid shapes are better or at least not worse than those of the commercial spacer grid shapes.

  6. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them. PMID:24416822

  7. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them.

  8. Effect of spacer layers on current-voltage characteristics of resonant-tunneling diode

    SciTech Connect

    Remnev, M. A. Kateev, I. Yu.; Elesin, V. F.

    2010-08-15

    Using the numerical solution to the Schroedinger equation, current-voltage characteristics of the resonant-tunneling diode with spacer layers were obtained. The dependences of the peak current of the resonant-tunneling diode on the emitter spacer width were plotted. It was shown that the peak current depends periodically on the emitter spacer width. The constructed electron density diagrams showed that the increase in the peak current is associated with the resonant level in the emitter spacer region.

  9. The effect of dynamic hip motion on the micromotion of press-fit acetabular cups in six degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Crosnier, Emilie A; Keogh, Patrick S; Miles, Anthony W

    2016-08-01

    The hip joint is subjected to cyclic loading and motion during activities of daily living and this can induce micromotions at the bone-implant interface of cementless total hip replacements. Initial stability has been identified as a crucial factor to achieve osseointegration and long-term survival. Whilst fixation of femoral stems achieves good clinical results, the fixation of acetabular components remains a challenge. In vitro methods assessing cup stability keep the hip joint in a fixed position, overlooking the effect of hip motion. The effect of hip motion on cup micromotion using a hip motion simulator replicating hip flexion-extension and a six degrees of freedom measurement system was investigated. The results show an increase in cup micromotion under dynamic hip motion compared to Static Flexion. This highlights the need to incorporate hip motion and measure all degrees of freedom when assessing cup micromotion. In addition, comparison of two press-fit acetabular cups with different surface coatings suggested similar stability between the two cups. This new method provides a basis for a more representative protocol for future pre-clinical evaluation of different cup designs.

  10. The effect of dynamic hip motion on the micromotion of press-fit acetabular cups in six degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Crosnier, Emilie A; Keogh, Patrick S; Miles, Anthony W

    2016-08-01

    The hip joint is subjected to cyclic loading and motion during activities of daily living and this can induce micromotions at the bone-implant interface of cementless total hip replacements. Initial stability has been identified as a crucial factor to achieve osseointegration and long-term survival. Whilst fixation of femoral stems achieves good clinical results, the fixation of acetabular components remains a challenge. In vitro methods assessing cup stability keep the hip joint in a fixed position, overlooking the effect of hip motion. The effect of hip motion on cup micromotion using a hip motion simulator replicating hip flexion-extension and a six degrees of freedom measurement system was investigated. The results show an increase in cup micromotion under dynamic hip motion compared to Static Flexion. This highlights the need to incorporate hip motion and measure all degrees of freedom when assessing cup micromotion. In addition, comparison of two press-fit acetabular cups with different surface coatings suggested similar stability between the two cups. This new method provides a basis for a more representative protocol for future pre-clinical evaluation of different cup designs. PMID:27210567

  11. Theoretical and practical aspects in total uncemented hip arthroplasty by using short femoral stem prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Moga, M; Pogarasteanu, ME; Barbilian, A

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthrosis, primary or secondary, is an osteoarthritic degenerative process that affects the hip joint. Primary hip arthrosis has an unknown etiology, and secondary hip arthrosis has well defined causes; of these causes, some are known to lead to arthrosis of the hip in the young age patient. The surgical treatment aims either to preserve the patient’s hip joint, or to replace the joint. The most commonly used procedure at this time is the total hip arthroplasty. The femoral component may have a short or a long stem. The short femoral stem prosthesis is usually impacted by using a unique technique and unique instruments, according to the manufacturer’s specifications. There are several models of short stem femoral prosthesis, but no matter which one is chosen, the surgical indication, the surgical technique and a well-conducted recovery program are important. The choosing of each arthroplastic implant must be made with care, taking into consideration the patient’s benefit, his expectations, and also the surgeon’s experience. PMID:26103643

  12. Have the media influenced the use of hip resurfacing arthroplasty? A review of UK print media

    PubMed Central

    Malviya, A; Stafford, GH; Villar, RJF; Villar, RN

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to look at the different claims made about hip resurfacing arthroplasty in the popular UK print media and how this relates to findings in the scientific literature. METHODS A review of UK popular print media from January 1992 to June 2011 was performed using the Lexis® Library online news database. Only articles discussing the clinical results of hip resurfacing arthroplasty were included. After excluding duplicates, 49 newspaper articles were found suitable for this study. The main outcome measure was the claims made in popular UK print media about hip resurfacing. These were compared with the scientific publication. We reviewed the trend of use of hip resurfacing prostheses during the same period as reported in the National Joint Registry. RESULTS A disparity was found between the claims in the newspapers and published scientific literature. The initial newspaper articles highlighted only the positive aspects of hip resurfacing arthroplasty, without definitive contemporary evidence backing the claims. Most of these claims were refuted by future scientific publications. The initial positive media reports coincided with an increase in the use of hip resurfacing but the decline coincided with negative reports in the scientific literature. CONCLUSIONS The trend of the newspaper articles and that of the number of hip resurfacing prostheses implanted suggests that the media may have been partly responsible for the increased use of this prosthesis. The subsequent decrease was initiated by the scientific literature. PMID:22943335

  13. Changes in bone mineral density around the femoral stem after total hip replacement: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Szpunar, Jacek; Gaździk, Tadeusz Szymon

    2006-02-28

    Background. Degenerative changes in the hip, accompanied by clinically significant pain, decrease the range of motion in physical examination and give characteristic changes in X-ray images. Total hip replacement is most often indicated. The most important factor affecting the usable life of implants is the adaptive rebuilding of osseous tissue in this region. A typical radiological examination showing the hip prosthesis and surrounding osseous tissue gives only late, qualitative indications of possible loosening of the prosthesis. Examination of bone mineral density (DEXA) gives quantitative data on changes occurring in the immediate region of the hip prosthesis, enabling early assessment of prothesis endurance. The aim of our study was to compare proportional changes in the BMD of the proximal femur after cemented and cementless total hip replacement. Material and methods. Densitometry of osseous tissue was done with a LUNAR device, using the Orthopedic computer program, in two groups of female patients after total hip replacement. BMD changes were analyzed occurring around the femoral stem 3 months after surgery using autoanalysis in the 7 Gruen zones. Examinations were done across different types of hip prosthesis. Results. In both groups our preliminary data point to a proportional decrease in BMD in all the analyzed zones. The greatest decreases occurred in zones 1 and 7, the least in zone 4. Conclusions. DEXA allows for quantitative monitoring of changes in osseous tissue in the region around the prosthesis. PMID:17603460

  14. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the S-ROM-A Prosthesis for Anatomically Difficult Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hozumi, Akira; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Tsuru, Nobuhisa; Miyamoto, Chikara; Maeda, Jyunichiro; Chiba, Ko; Goto, Hisataka; Osaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background. The S-ROM-A prosthesis has been designed for the Asian proximal femur with a small deformed shape and narrow canal. In this study, the clinical and radiological results using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Japanese patients with severe deformity due to dysplasia and excessive posterior pelvic tilt were examined. Methods. 94 hips were followed up for a mean of 55 months, with a mean age at surgery of 61 years. The primary diagnoses were 94 coxarthritis cases, including 51 dysplasia and 37 primary OA, 1 avascular necrosis, 2 traumatic arthritis, and 3 Perthes disease. Thirty-one hips had been treated with osteotomy of the hip joints. Preoperative intramedullary canal shapes were stovepipe in 23 hips, normal in 51 hips, and champagne-flute in 5 hips. The maximum pelvic inclination angle was 56°. Results. The mean JOA score improved from 46 points preoperatively to 80 points at final follow-up. On radiological evaluation of the fixation of the implants according to the Engh classification, 92 (97%) hips were classified as “bone ingrown fixation.” Conclusion. In primary THA, using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Asian patients with proximal femoral deformity, even after osteotomy and with posterior pelvic tilt, provided good short- to midterm results. PMID:26582575

  15. The Burch-Schneider antiprotrusio cage in revision hip arthroplasty with acetabular bone defect.

    PubMed

    Blacha, Jan; Gagała, Jacek

    2004-10-30

    Background. This article presents early outcome of revision hip arthroplasties with massive defects of acetabular bone stock using the Burch-Schneider (B-S) antiprotrusio cage. Materials and methods. We prospectively followed 28 hips in 27 patients (17 women and 10 men). The average age of the patients was 68 years (range 40-82). Follow-up ranged from 12 to 53 months (ave. 25 months). Combined bone loss (type III according to the AAOS classification) was the most common (75% of the patients). Bone grafts (morselized and solid) were used to reconstruct deficient acetabula in 25 hips. Results. The patients were satisfied with the surgical result. The mean Harris Hip Score increased 36 points one year after operation and reached 80 points (range 56-93). The antiprotrusio cages were stable in all hips, even in 4 cases of inferior flange malposition. We found no measurable implant migration or graft resorption in any patient. Postoperative dislocation occurred in 3 hips (11%), two of them developed recurrent dislocations. There were no deep infections. Conclusions. Acetabular reconstruction using the Burch-Schneider antiprotrusio cage can be successfully used in managing massive acetabular defects in revision hip arthroplasty. The cage provides the basis for bone repair and protects grafts from excessive stress. Postoperative dislocation is the most common complication.

  16. Modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty. Experimental study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This prospective experimental study evaluated the surgical procedure and results of modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty in dogs. Methods Ten skeletally mature healthy mongrel dogs with weights varying between 19 and 27 kg were used. Cemented modular femoral stems and uncemented porous-coated acetabular cups were employed. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed before surgery and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 360 days post-operation. Results Excellent weight bearing was noticed in the operated limb in seven dogs. Dislocation followed by loosening of the prosthesis was noticed in two dogs, which were therefore properly treated with a femoral head osteotomy. Femoral fracture occurred in one dog, which was promptly treated with full implant removal and femoral osteosynthesis. Conclusions The canine modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty provided excellent functionality of the operated limb. PMID:21736758

  17. Psoas muscle pyogenic abscess in association with infected hip arthroplasty: a rare case of simultaneous bilateral presentation.

    PubMed

    Volpin, Andrea; Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Berizzi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral presentation of psoas abscess with prosthetic joint involvement is extremely rare. A 68-year-old woman presented to us with bilateral dull aching groin pain of 6 months' duration, which flared up in the past month, associated with pyrexial symptoms. She had undergone bilateral hip replacements in the past with uneventful recovery. MRI showed bilateral psoas muscle collection in communication with the hip joints. Preoperative hip aspirate demonstrated frank pus with positivity on Gram stain and radiographs confirmed prosthetic loosening of bilateral hips. The patient subsequently underwent two-stage revision arthroplasty of both infected hip implants. At 5-year follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic with good functional outcome and no recurrence on serial MRI. PMID:25994433

  18. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research.

  19. [What are the recommendations for sport activity following total hip or total knee arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Tsur, Azmon; Volpin, Gershon

    2013-11-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasty are surgical procedures usually performed in older adults aged 65-70 years and more, who suffer from arthritic joint degeneration, in order to relieve pain and improve functioning. In the past decade there have been more and more documentations of younger people, 50-60 years old and even less, who expect to participate in physical activity following these procedures. The trend today is to recommend activities which exert mild pressure on the implants such as swimming, cycling, golf, bowling, walking and cycling. It is not recommended to participate in sports activities that place greater pressure on the implants such as soccer, football, volleyball, handball, basketball, hockey and jogging. Such high-stress activities may cause early loosening of implants, as described in the article by Keren et al. in this issue: "Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty". PMID:24416821

  20. [What are the recommendations for sport activity following total hip or total knee arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Tsur, Azmon; Volpin, Gershon

    2013-11-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasty are surgical procedures usually performed in older adults aged 65-70 years and more, who suffer from arthritic joint degeneration, in order to relieve pain and improve functioning. In the past decade there have been more and more documentations of younger people, 50-60 years old and even less, who expect to participate in physical activity following these procedures. The trend today is to recommend activities which exert mild pressure on the implants such as swimming, cycling, golf, bowling, walking and cycling. It is not recommended to participate in sports activities that place greater pressure on the implants such as soccer, football, volleyball, handball, basketball, hockey and jogging. Such high-stress activities may cause early loosening of implants, as described in the article by Keren et al. in this issue: "Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty".

  1. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  2. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  3. Application of Multi Criteria Optimization Method in Implant Design to Reduce Stress Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizam Ahmad, M.; Shuib, Solehuddin; Hassan, A. Y.; Shokri, A. A.; Ridzwan, M. I. Z.; Ibrahim, M. N. Mohd.

    In this study, method of multi criteria optimization was used to optimise the size of hip implant to reduce the problem of stress shielding. A computer programme was written by using FORTRAN language to achieve this goal. The optimum implant was modelled and analysed by using I-DEAS software. Results were compared with the reference implant. It was shown that, the optimum implant had reduced the problem of stress shielding at almost 50%. This successful result was encouraged by an optimum load transferred along femur/implant interface.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  9. New approach to the treatment of adolescent hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shibo; Zhao, Dewei; Yang, Lei

    2013-07-01

    operation methods. We use the false mortar joint capsule on the cut mortar in the upper part, which forms the false mortar bone cortex. The attachment connected the joint capsule together and turned down the mortar, forming concentric circles; arc grooves were cut high above the acetabular joint, which will turn down the vascular pedicle flap around the bone implant slots with screws, remove bone in the high bone disc and turn over the high board between the full bone. The mortar tolerates the increasing pressure and provides stability of the hip with a vascular pedicle flap and can provide good blood supply to the bone, avoiding the traditional acetabular osteotomy and the absorption of bone caused by a hip subluxation.

  10. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  11. Investigating stress shielding spanned by biomimetic polymer-composite vs. metallic hip stem: A computational study using mechano-biochemical model.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Klika, Václav; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic bone loss in response to total hip arthroplasty is a serious complication compromising patient's life quality as it may cause the premature failure of the implant. Stress shielding as a result of an uneven load sharing between the hip implant and the bone is a key factor leading to bone density decrease. A number of composite hip implants have been designed so far to improve load sharing characteristics. However, they have rarely been investigated from the bone remodeling point of view to predict a long-term response. This is the first study that employed a mechano-biochemical model, which considers the coupling effect between mechanical loading and bone biochemistry, to investigate bone remodeling after composite hip implantation. In this study, periprosthetic bone remodeling in the presence of Carbon fiber polyamide 12 (CF/PA12), CoCrMo and Ti alloy implants was predicted and compared. Our findings revealed that the most significant periprosthetic bone loss in response to metallic implants occurs in Gruen zone 7 (-43% with CoCrMo; -35% with Ti) and 6 (-40% with CoCrMo; -29% with Ti), while zone 4 has the lowest bone density decrease with all three implants (-9%). Also, the results showed that in terms of bone remodeling, the composite hip implant is more advantageous over the metallic ones as it provides a more uniform density change across the bone and induces less stress shielding which consequently results in a lower post-operative bone loss (-9% with CF/PA12 implant compared to -27% and -21% with CoCrMo and Ti alloy implants, respectively). PMID:25460403

  12. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus. PMID:25540492

  13. Biomechanics of lateral interbody spacers: going wider for going stiffer.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Turner, Alexander W L; Dooley, Zachary A; Parikh, Rachit D; Peterson, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the biomechanical stability of a large interbody spacer inserted by a lateral approach and compares the biomechanical differences with the more conventional transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF), with and without supplemental pedicle screw (PS) fixation. Twenty-four L2-L3 functional spinal units (FSUs) were tested with three interbody cage options: (i) 18 mm XLIF cage, (ii) 26 mm XLIF cage, and (iii) 11 mm TLIF cage. Each spacer was tested without supplemental fixation, and with unilateral and bilateral PS fixation. Specimens were subjected to multidirectional nondestructive flexibility tests to 7.5 N·m. The range of motion (ROM) differences were first examined within the same group (per cage) using repeated-measures ANOVA, and then compared between cage groups. The 26 mm XLIF cage provided greater stability than the 18 mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS and 11 mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. The 18 mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS provided greater stability than the 11 mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. This study suggests that wider lateral spacers are biomechanically stable and offer the option to be used with less or even no supplemental fixation for interbody lumbar fusion.

  14. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  15. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  16. Ceramic-on-Ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Twelve-Year-Old Patient: Case Report with a 27-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Save, Ameya V; Varthi, Arya; Talusan, Paul G; Gala, Raj; Nelson, Stephen; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty in the juvenile patient with a severely diseasedjoint can provide long-term pain relief and improvement in function. We present a patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who underwent a Mittelmeier ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty at age 12 in 1986. The implant provided the patient with a functioning hip for 24 years, but subsequently required revision due to femoral component loosening. This case report represents the longest reported clinical follow-up of noncemented, ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty in a juvenile patient and depicts an excellent outcome at 27 years. Our case is also unique in that the Mittelmeier ceramic acetabulum was left in place during revision surgery. In this report, we also describe the senior author's choice of the Mittelmeier hip prosthesis within its historical context and provide a brief review of the literature as it relates to total hip arthroplasty in the juvenile patient. PMID:27509640

  17. Acute periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Potty, Anish G; Corona, Jacqueline; Manning, Blaine T; Le, Amanda; Saleh, Khaled J

    2014-01-01

    Although periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are relatively uncommon after total hip arthroplasty, a variety of patient-, surgeon-, and implant-related risk factors can contribute to the occurrence of this serious complication. These risk factors, combined with the increased use of cementless acetabular cups, will likely result in an increased prevalence of these fractures in the future. By better understanding the risk factors, classification schemes, and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum, orthopaedic surgeons can achieve better outcomes for their patients.

  18. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  19. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  20. [Pseudotumors caused by hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Lohman, Martina; Alberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    More than 100000 hip replacements have been performed in Finland. In the hip replacement operations performed due to osteoarthritis, the artificial joint surfaces are made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) sliding surfaces have received worldwide attention. Soft issue lesions, not always symptomatic, may develop around the joint replacements. These may even require joint revision surgery. PMID:26237883

  1. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  2. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  3. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P.; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery. A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7–21). The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events. During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0–10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05–1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06–1.11). Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  4. Monte Carlo calculations of the impact of a hip prosthesis on the dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffard, Edwige; Gschwind, Régine; Makovicka, Libor; David, Céline

    2006-09-01

    Because of the ageing of the population, an increasing number of patients with hip prostheses are undergoing pelvic irradiation. Treatment planning systems (TPS) currently available are not always able to accurately predict the dose distribution around such implants. In fact, only Monte Carlo simulation has the ability to precisely calculate the impact of a hip prosthesis during radiotherapeutic treatment. Monte Carlo phantoms were developed to evaluate the dose perturbations during pelvic irradiation. A first model, constructed with the DOSXYZnrc usercode, was elaborated to determine the dose increase at the tissue-metal interface as well as the impact of the material coating the prosthesis. Next, CT-based phantoms were prepared, using the usercode CTCreate, to estimate the influence of the geometry and the composition of such implants on the beam attenuation. Thanks to a program that we developed, the study was carried out with CT-based phantoms containing a hip prosthesis without metal artefacts. Therefore, anthropomorphic phantoms allowed better definition of both patient anatomy and the hip prosthesis in order to better reproduce the clinical conditions of pelvic irradiation. The Monte Carlo results revealed the impact of certain coatings such as PMMA on dose enhancement at the tissue-metal interface. Monte Carlo calculations in CT-based phantoms highlighted the marked influence of the implant's composition, its geometry as well as its position within the beam on dose distribution.

  5. Lifestyle and health-related quality of life in Asian patients with total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kimie; Xia, Zhenlan; Liu, Xueqin; Mawatari, Masaaki; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2014-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty reduces pain and restores physical function in patients with hip joint problems. This study examined lifestyle and health-related quality of life before and after total hip arthroplasty in Japanese and Chinese patients. Two hospitals in China recruited 120 patients and 120 Japanese patients matched by age and operative status were drawn from a prospective cohort database. Oxford Hip Score, EuroQol, and characteristics of Asian lifestyle and attitudes toward the operation were assessed. There were no differences between patients from the two countries in quality-of-life-scale scores: postoperative patients had significantly better quality-of-life scores than preoperative patients in both countries. In China, patients who reported that living at home was inconvenient had significantly worse Oxford Hip Scores than those who did not. Mean scores for anxiety items concerning possible dislocation and durability of the implant were significantly higher in Japanese than in Chinese subjects. Our findings suggest that providing information about housing conditions and lifestyles would result in improved quality of life and reduced anxiety in patients with implanted joints.

  6. Lifestyle and health-related quality of life in Asian patients with total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kimie; Xia, Zhenlan; Liu, Xueqin; Mawatari, Masaaki; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2014-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty reduces pain and restores physical function in patients with hip joint problems. This study examined lifestyle and health-related quality of life before and after total hip arthroplasty in Japanese and Chinese patients. Two hospitals in China recruited 120 patients and 120 Japanese patients matched by age and operative status were drawn from a prospective cohort database. Oxford Hip Score, EuroQol, and characteristics of Asian lifestyle and attitudes toward the operation were assessed. There were no differences between patients from the two countries in quality-of-life-scale scores: postoperative patients had significantly better quality-of-life scores than preoperative patients in both countries. In China, patients who reported that living at home was inconvenient had significantly worse Oxford Hip Scores than those who did not. Mean scores for anxiety items concerning possible dislocation and durability of the implant were significantly higher in Japanese than in Chinese subjects. Our findings suggest that providing information about housing conditions and lifestyles would result in improved quality of life and reduced anxiety in patients with implanted joints. PMID:24845456

  7. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073 kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs.

  8. Increased antibiotic release and equivalent biomechanics of a spacer cement without hard radio contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, R G; Kretzer, J P; Vogt, S; Büchner, H; Thomsen, M N; Lehner, B

    2015-10-01

    We compared a novel calcium carbonate spacer cement (Copal® spacem) to well-established bone cements. Electron microscopic structure and elution properties of the antibiotics ofloxacin, vancomycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin were examined. A knee wear simulator model for articulating cement spacers was established. Mechanical tests for bending strength, flexural modulus, and compressive and fatigue strength were performed. The electron microscopic analysis showed a microporous structure of the spacer cement, and this promoted a significantly higher and longer antibiotic elution. All spacer cement specimens released the antibiotics for a period of up to 50days with the exception of the vancomycin loading. The spacer cement showed significantly less wear scars and fulfilled the ISO 5833 requirements. The newly developed spacer cement is a hydrophilic antibiotic carrier with an increased release. Cement without hard radio contrast agents can improve tribological behaviour of spacers, and this may reduce reactive wear particles and abrasive bone defects.

  9. The hip in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bleck, E E

    1980-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery can alleviate the hip flexion, adduction, and medial rotation deformities of the hip and improve the function and appearance of gait. To accomplish this, however, careful examination and prudence in the operative procedure to avoid overdoing and overcorrecting are important. Orthopedic surgery can prevent subluxation and dislocation of the hip before the age of seven years, and consequently repetitive radiographic examinations of the hip in children who have spastic paralysis of the hip musculature should be a routine procedure. Subluxation and dislocation of the hip, when established, can be successfully treated with orthopedic surgical procedures. Physicians must keep in mind that the spastic paralysis of cerebral palsy originates in the brain, and therefore the spasticity cannot be eliminated. The best that can be done is to weaken or remove some muscles as deforming forces and to achieve compromises for continued function. The goal should be optimal independence for the child and adolescent during development, and freedom from pain with deteriorating function due to degenerative arthritis in the adult. PMID:7360505

  10. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  11. Good outcome of total hip replacement in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    King, Garry; Hunt, Linda P; Wilkinson, J Mark; Blom, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have painful deformed hips, but they are seldom treated with hip replacement as the surgery is considered to be high risk. However, few data are available on the outcome of hip replacement in these patients. Patients and methods — We linked Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records to the National Joint Registry for England and Wales to identify 389 patients with CP who had undergone hip replacement. Their treatment and outcomes were compared with those of 425,813 patients who did not have CP. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to describe implant survivorship and the curves were compared using log-rank tests, with further stratification for age and implant type. Reasons for revision were quantified as patient-time incidence rates (PTIRs). Nationally collected patient-reported outcomes (PROMS) before and 6 months after operation were compared if available. Cumulative mortality (Kaplan-Meier) was estimated at 90 days and at 1, 3, and 5 years. Results — The cumulative probability of revision at 5 years post-surgery was 6.4% (95% CI: 3.8–11) in the CP cohort as opposed to 2.9% (CI 2.9–3%) in the non-CP cohort (p < 0.001). Patient-reported outcomes showed that CP patients had worse pain and function preoperatively, but had equivalent postoperative improvement. The median improvement in Oxford hip score at 6 months was 23 (IQR: 14–28) in CP and it was 21 (14–28) in non-CP patients. 91% of CP patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. The cumulative probability of mortality for CP up to 7 years was similar to that in the controls after stratification for age and sex. Interpretation — Hip replacement for cerebral palsy appears to be safe and effective, although implant revision rates are higher than those in patients without cerebral palsy. PMID:26863583

  12. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  13. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  14. Perioperative complications in revision hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, E; Guingand, O; Terracher, R; Mazel, C

    2001-01-01

    Revision hip surgery now constitutes 10-30% of all joint procedures. The morbidity and associated with this demanding operation are not well established. The goal of this paper is to determine these rates and to identify some predictive factors.
    The complication rate ranges from 31,5 to more than 77% in the literature. Life threatening complications represent 1,8 to 8% of these, leading to death in about 1,6%. ASA score and age above 75 appear to be correlated with medical complications. The injection rate varies from 1 to 5,8%, and may be as high as 14% in cases with a past history of infection. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 13 to 65%, reaching severity in 3,3 to 8,3%.
    Surgical complications include dislocation and femoral injuries. Dislocations occur in almost 10%, leading to revision in1-4,2%. Age and the number of previous surgical operations appear to be significant risk factors. Femoral injuries (perforations or femoral fractures) occur in 6-37%, especially in impaction grafting technique and when uncemented implants are used. Age over 75 years and femoral defects appear to be significant risk factors for femoral fractures.
    The rate of complications in revision hip surgery continues to be high, but successful clinical outcome can be attained even in elderly patients. Attentive preoperative exams, good prevention of technical pitfalls, the experience of the surgeon and the use of specific tools may decrease these complications and make this demanding procedure safer.

  15. Innovations in hip arthroplasty three-dimensional modeling and analytical technology (SOMA).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Faizan, Ahmad; Nevelos, Jim; Kreuzer, Stefan; Burgkart, Rainer; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    The modern generations of cementless hip arthroplasty implant designs are based on precise fit and fill of components within the native bony geometry of the proximal femur and the acetabulum for enhanced implant longevity. Variations exist based on a number of population demographics such as age, gender, body mass index, and ethnicity. Recently, establishment of comprehensive electronic computerized tomographic databases from a diverse population worldwide have been key innovations in the field of implant development. This technology provides a potential improvement compared to historical techniques of implant design and manufacturing which involved limited trials on cadavers. Segmentation of the computerized data to generate three-dimensional models allows precise and accurate measurements of anatomical structures and may provide better understanding of anthropometric variations that occur among individuals. Evidence-and population-based computational analyses may provide a better tool for designing orthopaedic implants that deliver an enhanced fit for a more diverse patient population. Moreover, these population-based databases can also verify new designs by means of virtual implantation and analysis on specific or large groups of bones within the database. The aim of this paper is to describe a three dimensional modeling and analytical technology and to review the various applications of this technology in relation to hip arthroplasty.

  16. Scientific evaluation of spinal implants: an ethical necessity.

    PubMed

    Moojen, Wouter A; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Viergever, Roderik F; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-12-15

    The clinical introduction of novel medical devices often occurs without evidence of good methodological quality and with relatively little oversight and regulation. As a consequence, the safety, efficacy, and long-term effects of devices are frequently insufficiently known upon device approval. Recent controversies surrounding the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants, metal-on-metal hip implants, and interspinous implants underscore the need to reconsider how innovation in medical devices can adhere to sound ethical standards without inhibiting surgical research and development. In this article, the introduction of spinal implants is taken as an example to firstly discuss the scientific and ethical challenges of developing, testing, and introducing novel medical devices and to secondly identify avenues for improving the existing regulatory frameworks for such innovation. Two measures for improvement are most feasible in the short term: demanding prospective studies before device introduction and developing registries to monitor and evaluate new medical devices. Level of evidence: 5. PMID:25514748

  17. Improved SB2 orbits for HIP 12081 and HIP 87895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Arenou, F.; Guillout, P.; Pourbaix, D.; Tal-Or, L.; Famaey, B.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazeh, T.

    2013-11-01

    We are observing a selection of about 70 double-lined binaries (SB2s) with the T193/SOPHIE in order to improve their orbital elements. Our goal is to obtain the masses of the components with a 1 % accuracy when the astrometric observations of Gaia are available. After 6 semesters of observations, the two best observed stars are HIP 12081 and HIP 87895. These stars are used to verify that the 1 % accuracy could really be obtained at the end of the programme. The radial velocities of their components were derived using the TODMOR algorithm, and their orbital elements were calculated. It appears that the minimum masses of the components of HIP 12081 are already both obtained with an accuracy around 0.5 %. For HIP 87895, the relative precisions of the minimum masses of the primary and of the secondary component are 2.7 and 1.5 %, respectively, but they were obtained from only 9 spectra and they should be improved once more observations have been obtained. Ancient interferometric observations of HIP 87895 are also taken into account and the actual masses of the components are derived. Although these measurements are far from being as accurate as those expected from Gaia, the relative errors of the masses are only 2.6 and 1.5 % respectively. We thus conclude that our programme would lead to masses with the announced accuracy if the observations are continued.

  18. The Cement Prosthesis-Like Spacer: An Intermediate Halt on the Road to Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sufian S.; Huber, Kim; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Kleer, Barbara; Kohlhof, Hendrik; Schär, Michael; Eggli, Stefan; Kohl, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Background. Periprosthetic infections remain a devastating problem in the field of joint arthroplasty. In the following study, the results of a two-stage treatment protocol for chronic periprosthetic infections using an intraoperatively molded cement prosthesis-like spacer (CPLS) are presented. Methods. Seventy-five patients with chronically infected knee prosthesis received a two-stage revision procedure with the newly developed CPLS between June 2006 and June 2011. Based on the microorganism involved, patients were grouped into either easy to treat (ETT) or difficult to treat (DTT) and treated accordingly. Range of motion (ROM) and the knee society score (KSS) were utilized for functional assessment. Results. Mean duration of the CPLS implant in the DTT group was 3.6 months (range 3–5 months) and in the ETT group 1.3 months (range 0.7–2.5 months). Reinfection rates of the final prosthesis were 9.6% in the ETT and 8.3% in the DTT group with no significant difference between both groups regarding ROM or KSS (P = 0.87, 0.64, resp.). Conclusion. The results show that ETT patients do not necessitate the same treatment protocol as DTT patients to achieve the same goal, emphasizing the need to differentiate between therapeutic regimes. We also highlight the feasibility of CLPS in two-stage protocols. PMID:24198728

  19. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6 A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  20. Impact of ZnO embedded feed spacer on biofilm development in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Avner; Semiat, Raphael; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2013-11-01

    The concept of suppressing biofouling formation using an antibacterial feed spacer was investigated in a bench scale-cross flow system mimicking a spiral wound membrane configuration. An antibacterial composite spacer containing zinc oxide-nanoparticles was constructed by modification of a commercial polypropylene feed spacer using sonochemical deposition. The ability of the modified spacers to repress biofilm development on membranes was evaluated in flow-through cells simulating the flow conditions in commercial spiral wound modules. The experiments were performed at laminar flow (Re = 300) with a 200 kDa molecular weight cut off polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane using Pseudomonas putida S-12 as model biofilm bacteria. The modified spacers reduced permeate flux decrease at least by 50% compared to the unmodified spacers (control). The physical properties of the modified spacer and biofilm development were evaluated using high resolution/energy dispersive spectrometry-scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging (HRSEM, EDS, AFM and CLSM). HRSEM images depicted significantly less bacteria attached to the membranes exposed to the modified spacer, mainly scattered and in a sporadic monolayer structure. AFM analysis indicated the influence of the modification on the spacer surface including a phase change on the upper surface. Dead-live staining assay by CLSM indicated that most of the bacterial cells attached on the membranes exposed to the modified spacer were dead in contrast to a developed biofilm which was predominant in the control samples.

  1. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  2. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  3. Chelate cooperativity and spacer length effects on the assembly thermodynamics and kinetics of divalent pseudorotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Nowosinski, Karol; Löw, Nora L; Dzyuba, Egor V; Klautzsch, Fabian; Schäfer, Andreas; Huuskonen, Juhani; Rissanen, Kari; Schalley, Christoph A

    2012-01-25

    Homo- and heterodivalent crown-ammonium pseudorotaxanes with different spacers connecting the two axle ammonium binding sites have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry. The homodivalent pseudorotaxanes are investigated with respect to the thermodynamics of divalent binding and to chelate cooperativity. The shortest spacer exhibits a chelate cooperativity much stronger than that of the longer spacers. On the basis of crystal structure, this can be explained by a noninnocent spacer, which contributes to the binding strength in addition to the two binding sites. Already very subtle changes in the spacer length, i.e., the introduction of an additional methylene group, cause substantial changes in the magnitude of cooperative binding as expressed in the large differences in effective molarity. With a similar series of heterodivalent pseudorotaxanes, the spacer effects on the barrier for the intramolecular threading step has been examined with the result that the shortest spacer causes a strained transition structure and thus the second binding event occurs slower than that of the longer spacers. The activation enthalpies and entropies show clear trends. While the longer spacers reduce the enthalpic strain that is present in the transition state for the shortest member of the series, the longer spacers become entropically slightly more unfavorable because of conformational fixation of the spacer chain during the second binding event. These results clearly show the noninnocent spacers to complicate the analysis of multivalent binding. An approximate description which considers the binding sites to be connected just by a flexible chain turns out to be more a rough approximation than a good model. The second conclusion from the results presented here is that multivalency is expressed in both the thermodynamics and the kinetics in different ways. A spacer optimized for strong binding is suboptimal for fast pseudorotaxane formation.

  4. Characterization of wear in composite material orthopaedic implants. Part II: The implant/bone interface.

    PubMed

    Albert, K; Schledjewski, R; Harbaugh, M; Bleser, S; Jamison, R; Friedrich, K

    1994-01-01

    Carbon fiber/PEEK polymer (C/PEEK) composite materials are being developed for use as orthopaedic implant materials. Wear is an issue of increasing importance in orthopaedic implants; particulate debris generated by the wearing of biomaterials may be a causal factor leading to osteolysis and implant loosening. Therefore, numerical and experimental studies were completed to characterize the wear of C/PEEK composite materials in comparison to current orthopaedic implant materials. Finite element analyses (FEA) of a composite material hip stem implanted in a femur and loaded at 890 N determined that peak contact stresses will occur at the proximal-medial and distal regions of the implant. These contact stresses were found to be below 1.0 MPa over most of the implant surface; however the peak stress in the proximal-medial region was 1.8 MPa and higher still at the distal portion of the stem. In vivo forces result in contact stress values up to 9.0 MPa. The composite implant exhibited 10-40% lower contact stresses in the distal region compared to a titanium-alloy implant of identical design. Composite material wear samples were slid against porous hydroxylapatite (HA) to simulate the stem/bone interface. An identical series of experiments was run for comparison to a current orthopaedic implant material--Ti6A14V titanium alloy. Two domains of motion were studied; a composite ring-on-HA disc large amplitude sliding wear test; and a composite pin-on-HA disc small amplitude fretting regimen. Nominal contact pressures during testing were 1.4 MPa and 7.6 MPa for sliding and fretting tests, respectively. Fretting and sliding abrasive wear tests resulted in the composite material exhibiting a lower wear rate than the titanium-alloy. The magnitude of the difference was greatly dependent on the contact pressures, sliding amplitudes, and counterface material properties.

  5. In-vivo degradation of poly(carbonate-urethane) based spine implants

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, E.; Bracco, P.; Kurtz, S.M.; Costa, L.; Zanetti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen explanted Dynesys® spinal devices were analyzed for biostability and compared with a reference, never implanted, control. Both poly(carbonate-urethane) (PCU) spacers and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) cords were analyzed. The effect of implantation was evaluated through the observation of physical alterations of the device surfaces, evaluation of the chemical degradation and fluids absorption on the devices and examination of the morphological and mechanical features. PCU spacers exhibited a variety of surface damage mechanisms, the most significant being abrasion and localized, microscopic surface cracks. Evidence of oxidation and chain scission were detected on PCU spacers ATR–FTIR. ATR–FTIR, DSC and hardness measurements also showed a slight heterogeneity in the composition of PCU. The extraction carried out on the PCU spacers revealed the presence of extractable polycarbonate segments. One spacer and all PET cords visually exhibited the presence of adherent biological material (proteins), confirmed by the ATR–FTIR results. GC/MS analyses of the extracts from PET cords revealed the presence of biological fluids residues, mainly cholesterol derivatives and fatty acids, probably trapped into the fiber network. No further chemical alterations were observed on the PET cords. Although the observed physical and chemical damage can be considered superficial, greater attention must be paid to the chemical degradation mechanisms of PCU and to the effect of byproducts on the body. PMID:24043907

  6. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Noordin, Shahryar; Umer, Masood; Hafeez, Kamran; Nawaz, Haq

    2010-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a spectrum of anatomical abnormalities of the hip joint in which the femoral head has an abnormal relationship with the acetabulum. Most studies report an incidence of 1 to 34 cases per 1,000 live births and differences could be due to different diagnostic methods and timing of evaluation. Risk factors include first born status, female sex, positive family history, breech presentation and oligohydramnios. Clinical presentations of DDH depend on the age of the child. Newborns present with hip instability, infants have limited hip abduction on examination, and older children and adolescents present with limping, joint pain, and/or osteoarthritis. Repeated, careful examination of all infants from birth and throughout the first year of life until the child begins walking is important to prevent late cases. Provocative testing includes the Barlow and Ortolani maneuvers. Other signs, such as shorting of the femur with hips and knees flexed (Galeazzi sign), asymmetry of the thigh or gluteal folds, and discrepancy of leg lengths are potential clues. Treatment depends on age at presentation and outcomes are much better when the child is treated early, particularly during the first six months of life. PMID:21808709

  7. Enhancing Asthma Medication Delivery: Spacers and Valved Holding Chambers.

    PubMed

    Schoessler, Sally; Winders, Tonya

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases managed by school nurses, and its management often includes the administration of bronchodilators delivered via a metered dose inhaler (MDI). The use of an MDI requires coordination and mastery of steps that must be performed correctly and in the proper order. These steps are greatly enhanced, especially in the pediatric population, through the use of medical devices-spacers and valved holding chambers. The purpose of this article is to review the rationale and implications for the use of these devices in the school setting. PMID:27194239

  8. Hydrodynamic evidence in support of spacer regions in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, K S; Shaw, B R

    1977-08-12

    Quasi-elastic light scattering and sedimentation velocity methods were used to study the hydrodynamic properties of purified dimer subunits obtained from partial digestion of chicken erythrocyte chromatin with staphylococcal nuclease. The experimental value of 1.87 +/- 0.08 X 10(-7) gram per second for the friction factor of these dimer subunits in low ionic strength buffer cannot be reasonably interpreted in terms of a contiguous sphere model. Analysis by means of an equivalent dimer method suggests that the spacer region accounts for a maximum of 19 percent of the friction properties of the dimer.

  9. Patients' perception of leg length discrepancy post total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Alice; Hill, Janet; Orr, John; Humphreys, Patricia; Rooney, Aidan; Morrow, Esther; Beverland, David

    2015-01-01

    Perception of a leg length discrepancy post total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most common sources of patient dissatisfaction and can have a direct influence on the considered success of the operation.This research examined postoperative perception of imposed limb discrepancies in a group of THA patients compared to a group of participants with no previous hip surgery. Two subgroups of THA patients were involved: those who did not perceive a difference in limb length following THA and those that did.Discrepancies were imposed in 2.5 mm increments. For discrepancies ≥5 mm, a significant number of participants were aware of a difference (74%). There was no significant difference in perception of imposed discrepancies between THA patients and participants with no previous hip surgery. THA patients who perceived a difference in their limb lengths postoperatively had significantly worse pain and oxford scores when compared to THA patients who perceived their limb lengths to be equal. Knowing the boundaries between LLDs that go undetected and those that patients are aware of could guide surgeons when evaluating the balance between correct soft tissue tension and the resulting unequal leg length. From these findings, discrepancies >5 mm are likely to be perceived. Whether this perception would lead directly to a negative outcome score and patient dissatisfaction is more complex to project and likely to be patient specific. Intraoperative methods to aid the controlled positioning of implanted components could help maintain and restore leg length to within an acceptable amount that patients cannot perceive.

  10. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  11. Polyethylene Oxidation in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evolution and New Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Medel, Francisco; Puértolas, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the gold standard acetabular bearing material for hip arthroplasty. Its successful performance has shown consistent results and survivorship in total hip replacement (THR) above 85% after 15 years, with different patients, surgeons, or designs. As THR results have been challenged by wear, oxidation, and liner fracture, relevant research on the material properties in the past decade has led to the development and clinical introduction of highly crosslinked polyethylenes (HXLPE). More stress on the bearing (more active, overweighted, younger patients), and more variability in the implantation technique in different small and large Hospitals may further compromise the clinical performance for many patients. The long-term in vivo performance of these materials remains to be proven. Clinical and retrieval studies after more than 5 years of in vivo use with HXLPE in THR are reviewed and consistently show a substantial decrease in wear rate. Moreover, a second generation of improved polyethylenes is backed by in vitro data and awaits more clinical experience to confirm the experimental improvements. Also, new antioxidant, free radical scavengers, candidates and the reinforcement of polyethylene through composites are currently under basic research. Oxidation of polyethylene is today significantly reduced by present formulations, and this forgiving, affordable, and wellknown material is still reliable to meet today’s higher requirements in total hip replacement. PMID:20111694

  12. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  13. Bone impregnated hip screw in femoral neck fracture: Clinicoradiological results

    PubMed Central

    Sundar Raj, PK; Nuuman, Jiju A; Pattathil, Amish Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoral neck fractures are treated either by internal fixation or arthroplasty. Usually, cannulated cancellous screws are used for osteosynthesis of fracture neck of femur. The bone impregnated hip screw (BIHS) is an alternative implant, where osteosyntehsis is required in femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: The BIHS is a hollow screw with thread diameter 8.3 mm, shank diameter 6.5 mm and wall thickness 2.2 mm and holes in the shaft of the screw with diameter 2 mm, placed in a staggered fashion. Biomechanical and animal experimental studies were done. Clinical study was done in two phases: Phase 1 in a group of volunteers, only with BIHS was used in a pilot study and phase 2 comparative study was done in a group with AO cannulated screws and the other group treated with BIHS. Results: In the phase 1 study, out of 15 patients, only one patient had delayed union. In phase 2, there were 78 patients, 44 patients in BIHS showed early union, compared to the rest 34 cases of AO cannulated screws Out of 44 patients with BIHS, 41 patients had an excellent outcome, 2 had nonunions and one implant breakage was noted. Conclusions: Bone impregnated hip screw has shown to provide early solid union since it incorporates the biomechanical principles and also increases the osteogenic potential and hence, found superior to conventional cannulated cancellous screw. PMID:26015608

  14. Ion implantation and laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three ion implantation and laser annealing projects have been performed by ORNL through the DOE sponsored Seed Money Program. The research has contributed toward improving the characteristics of wear, hardness, and corrosion resistance of some metals and ceramics, as well as the electrical properties of semiconductors. The work has helped to spawn related research, at ORNL and elsewhere, concerning the relationships between microstructure and materials properties. ORNL research has resulted in major advances in extended life and non-corrosive artificial joints (hip and knee), high performance semiconductors, failure resistant ceramics (with potential energy applications), and solar cells. The success of the seed money projects was instrumental in the formation of ORNL's Surface Modification and Characterization Facility (SMAC). More than 60 universities and companies have participated in SMAC programs.

  15. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P.; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Elowitz, Eric; Härtl, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p < 0.001), VAS buttock (4.66 versus 1.97, p = 0.002), VAS leg (4.55 versus 1.96, p < 0.001), and ODI (21.7 versus 12.1, p < 0.001) scores. There was a significant increase in the average disk height (6.49 versus 8.18 mm, p = 0.037) and foraminal height (15.6 versus 18.53 mm, p = 0.0001), and a significant reduction in the listhesis (5.13 versus 3.15 mm, p = 0.005). The subsidence of 0.66 mm (7.4%) observed at the latest follow-up was not significant (p = 0.35). Conclusions Midterm results indicate that expandable PEEK spacers can effectively and durably restore disk and foraminal height and improve

  16. Uncemented porous tantalum acetabular components: early follow-up and failures in 613 primary total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Noiseux, Nicolas O; Long, William J; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2014-03-01

    Uncemented tantalum acetabular components were introduced in 1997. The purpose was to determine the 2- to 10-year results with this implant material in primary total hip arthroplasty. Our registry identified all primary total hip cases with porous tantalum cups implanted from 1997 to 2004. Clinical outcomes and radiographs were studied. 613 cases were identified. Seventeen percent of patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-five reoperations were performed (4.4%). Acetabular cup removal occurred in 6 cases (1.2%). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening. Incomplete radiolucent lines were found on 9.3% of initial postoperative radiographs. At 2 years, 67% had resolved. Zero new radiolucent lines were detected. Two- to 10-year results of porous tantalum acetabular components for primary total hip arthroplasty demonstrate high rates of initial stability and apparent ingrowth.

  17. First series of Exeter small stem primary total hip arthroplasty minimum 5 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tai, Cheh Chin; Nam, Hui Yin; Abbas, Azlina Amir; Merican, Azhar M; Choon, Siew Kit

    2009-12-01

    We carried out a prospective study of 47 Exeter (Stryker Inc, Warsaw, Ind) small stem total hip arthroplasty in 42 patients with an average age of 58 years and a mean follow-up of 8.5 years. The Oxford hip score improved from a preoperative mean of 47 to 17 at last follow-up. More than 87% patients had excellent or good Harris hip scores, and 90% were able to walk with little or no pain. Stem subsidence within the cement mantle was observed in 26% of cases, and none showed evidence of aseptic loosening or implant failure. Two stems were removed due to infection. The survival rate of this implant was 95.7% at 10 years. This first series of Exeter small stem showed excellent medium-term results, comparable to its larger counterparts. PMID:19682839

  18. A 500-ml plastic bottle: an effective spacer for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Asmus, Michael J; Weinberg, Eugene G

    2002-06-01

    Inhaled therapy using a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with attached spacer has been increasingly recognized as the optimal method for delivering asthma medication for acute attacks and chronic prophylaxis. However, in developing countries the cost and availability of commercially produced spacers limit the use of MDI-spacer delivery systems. A 500-ml plastic bottle has been recently adapted to function as a spacer. This article reviews the current data on the efficacy of this bottle-spacer and discusses its advantages and limitations. It is concluded that a modified 500-ml plastic bottle is an effective spacer; modification and use of this device should be incorporated into international guidelines for the management of children with asthma.

  19. Optimal drug release schedule for in-situ radiosensitization of image guided permanent prostate implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Nguyen, Paul L.; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Sridhar, Sri; Makrigiorgos, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Planned in-situ radiosensitization may improve the therapeutic ratio of image guided 125I prostate brachytherapy. Spacers used in permanent implants may be manufactured from a radiosensitizer-releasing polymer to deliver protracted localized sensitization of the prostate. Such devices will have a limited drug-loading capacity, and the drug release schedule that optimizes outcome, under such a constraint, is not known. This work determines the optimal elution schedules for 125I prostate brachytherapy. The interaction between brachytherapy dose distributions and drug distribution around drug eluting spacers is modeled using a linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell kill. Clinical brachytherapy plans were used to calculate the biologic effective dose (BED) for planned radiation dose distributions while adding the spatial distributions of radiosensitizer while varying the temporal release schedule subject to a constraint on the drug capacity of the eluting spacers. Results: The greatest increase in BED is achieved by schedules with the greatest sensitization early in the implant. Making brachytherapy spacers from radiosensitizer eluting polymer transforms inert parts of the implant process into a means of enhancing the effect of the brachytherapy radiation. Such an approach may increase the therapeutic ratio of prostate brachytherapy or offer a means of locally boosting the radiation effect without increasing the radiation dose to surrounding tissues.

  20. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging platform for quantifying in vivo nanoparticle diffusion from drug loaded implants

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Stacey; Belz, Jodi; Kumar, Rajiv; Cormack, Robert A; Sridhar, Srinivas; Niedre, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Drug loaded implants are a new, versatile technology platform to deliver a localized payload of drugs for various disease models. One example is the implantable nanoplatform for chemo-radiation therapy where inert brachytherapy spacers are replaced by spacers doped with nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with chemotherapeutics and placed directly at the disease site for long-term localized drug delivery. However, it is difficult to directly validate and optimize the diffusion of these doped NPs in in vivo systems. To better study this drug release and diffusion, we developed a custom macroscopic fluorescence imaging system to visualize and quantify fluorescent NP diffusion from spacers in vivo. To validate the platform, we studied the release of free fluorophores, and 30 nm and 200 nm NPs conjugated with the same fluorophores as a model drug, in agar gel phantoms in vitro and in mice in vivo. Our data verified that the diffusion volume was NP size-dependent in all cases. Our near-infrared imaging system provides a method by which NP diffusion from implantable nanoplatform for chemo-radiation therapy spacers can be systematically optimized (eg, particle size or charge) thereby improving treatment efficacy of the platform. PMID:27069363

  1. The unstable total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, F; Murena, L; Zatti, G; Cherubino, P

    2008-01-01

    Background: Dislocation is one of the most common complications of total hip arthroplasty with a reported dislocation rate of 3.2%. Despite increased experience with hip replacement, the overall rate has not yet changed. The aim of this paper is to review the most recent literature published on this topic and indexed in Medline, in order to clarify the main risk factors, and to standardize a treatment protocol of such an important complication of prosthetic surgery. Materials and Methods: Medline database was searched using key words: “hip dislocation”, “hip instability” from 1980-2007. Studies were eligible for review and included if they met the following criteria: (1) publication in English, (2) clinical trials (3) review papers. Results: The risk of first-time dislocation as a function of time after the surgery is not well understood. Most, but not all, series have demonstrated that the risk of dislocation is highest during the first few months after hip arthroplasty; however, first-time late dislocation can also occur many years after the procedure. Several risk factors were described, including the surgical approach, the diameter of the head, impingement, component malposition, insufficient abductor musculature. In addition, there are also many treatment options, such as long-term bracing after closed reduction, component reorientation, capsulorraphy, trochanteric advancement, increasing offset, exchange of the modular head and the polyethylene liner, insertion of constrained liner. Conclusion: Preventing hip dislocation is obviously the best strategy. Surgeons must take into account patient and surgical risk factors. For patients at high risk for dislocation the surgeon should accurately restore leg length and femoral offset; the use of larger femoral heads, posterior transosseous repair of the capsulotendinous envelope if posterior approach is chosen or the use of a lateral approach should be considered. Proper patient education and postoperative

  2. Possibility of one-stage surgery to reconstruct bone defects using the modified Masquelet technique with degradable calcium sulfate as a cement spacer: A case report and hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, NAN; QIN, CHENG-HE; MA, YUN-FEI; WANG, LEI; YU, BIN

    2016-01-01

    In addition to autologous bone graft, vascularized fibular autograft and Ilizarov bone transfer, the Masquelet technique is another effective method to reconstruct bone defects. This technique was initially proposed in 1986 and consists of two stages. At the first stage, radical debridement is required and subsequently, a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement spacer is implanted at the site of the bone defects. At the second stage, when the PMMA-induced membrane is formed 6–8 weeks later, the cement spacer is carefully removed in order to not disturb the induced membrane and the bone graft is performed to fill the bone defects. Although this technique has resulted in satisfactory outcomes in the reconstruction of bone defects, the PMMA spacer used to induce membrane is not degradable and requires surgical removal. In recent years, calcium sulfate has been used as a localized antibiotic delivery vehicle and bone substitute due to its superiorities over PMMA, particularly its completely degradable nature. The present study identified that calcium sulfate can also induce the formation of a membrane. In addition, we hypothesized that the degradability of calcium sulfate may allow one-stage reconstruction of bone defects. The current study presents a clinical case report and review of the literature. PMID:26998279

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty around the Inception of the Interface Bioactive Bone Cement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Background To augment cement-bone fixation, Dr. Hironobu Oonishi attempted additional physicochemical bonding through interposition of osteoconductive crystal hydroxyapatite (HA) granules at the cement-bone interface in 1982. He first used the interface bioactive bone cement (IBBC) technique in 12 selected patients (12 hips) in 1982 (first stage) and followed them for 2 years. In 1985, the technique was applied in 25 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (second stage) and the effects were investigated by comparing the side with the IBBC technique and the other side without the IBBC technique. He has employed this technique in all THA patients since 1987 (third stage). Methods In the IBBC technique, HA granules (2 to 3 g) were smeared on the bone surface just before the acetabular and femoral components were cemented. In the first stage, 12 hips were operated using the IBBC technique in 1982. In the second stage, THA was performed without the IBBC technique on one side and with the IBBC technique on the other side within 1 year in 25 patients. In the third stage, THA was performed with the IBBC technique in 285 hips in 1987. Results In the first stage patients, implant loosening was not detected at 30 years after operation. In the second stage patients, revision was required in 7 hips without the IBBC technique due to cup loosening (5 hips) and stem loosening (2 hips), whereas no hip was revised after THA with the IBBC technique at 26 years after operation. In the third stage patients, the incidence of radiolucent lines and osteolysis was very few at 25 years after operation. Conclusions The long-term follow-up of THA performed around the inception of the IBBC technique has revealed low incidences of radiolucent lines, osteolysis, and revision surgery. PMID:27583104

  4. Have cementless and resurfacing components improved the medium-term results of hip replacement for patients under 60 years of age?

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James; Baker, Paul; Gregg, Paul J; Porter, Martyn; Deehan, David J; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The optimal hip replacement for young patients remains unknown. We compared patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), revision risk, and implant costs over a range of hip replacements. Methods We included hip replacements for osteoarthritis in patients under 60 years of age performed between 2003 and 2010 using the commonest brand of cemented, cementless, hybrid, or resurfacing prosthesis (11,622 women and 13,087 men). The reference implant comprised a cemented stem with a conventional polyethylene cemented cup and a standard-sized head (28- or 32-mm). Differences in implant survival were assessed using competing-risks models, adjusted for known prognostic influences. Analysis of covariance was used to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score (OHS) and EQ5D index) in 2014 linked procedures. Results In males, PROMs and implant survival were similar across all types of implants. In females, revision was statistically significantly higher in hard-bearing and/or small-stem cementless implants (hazard ratio (HR) = 4) and resurfacings (small head sizes (< 48 mm): HR = 6; large head sizes (≥ 48 mm): HR = 5) when compared to the reference cemented implant. In component combinations with equivalent survival, women reported significantly greater improvements in OHS with hybrid implants (22, p = 0.006) and cementless implants (21, p = 0.03) (reference, 18), but similar EQ5D index. For men and women, National Health Service (NHS) costs were lowest with the reference implant and highest with a hard-bearing cementless replacement. Interpretation In young women, hybrids offer a balance of good early functional improvement and low revision risk. Fully cementless and resurfacing components are more costly and do not provide any additional benefit for younger patients. PMID:25285617

  5. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve.

  6. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist’s has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  7. Subspine Hip Impingement: An Unusual Cause of Hip Pain in an Elite Weightlifter.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, Dustin C; Moreau, William J; McNamara, Shannen C; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Anterior hip pain can be difficult to diagnose due to the many pathologies and overlapping pain patterns that exist in the hip region. Clinical findings of pain at the anterior inferior iliac spine with passive hip flexion, proximal quadriceps pain and weakness, and painful impingement tests of the hip may be indicative of subspine hip impingement. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of anterior hip pain, including subspine impingement and femoroacetabular impingement in an elite weightlifter. This case also describes how with the correct diagnosis and treatment, the athlete returned to play to her previous level of sport 11 months after a complex hip injury. PMID:27618239

  8. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dennis R

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist's has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  9. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-01-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2249660

  10. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/− 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  11. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/- 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  12. Delivery of beclomethasone dipropionate from a spacer device: what dose is available for inhalation?

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, C.; Cant, M.; Robertson, C.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--It is common for inhaled steroids to be delivered through a large volume spacer device. Comparatively little is known about how this practice affects the dose of drug received by patients compared with drug delivered directly from a metered dose inhaler. METHODS--The amount of beclomethasone dipropionate, contained in particles of various size, available for inhalation from a 750 ml polycarbonate spacer (Volumatic) was determined by impinger measurement and high performance liquid chromatography. Three strengths of metered dose inhalers were studied (50 micrograms, 100 micrograms, and 250 micrograms/actuation). The effect of multiple actuations of beclomethasone dipropionate into a Volumatic spacer, and increasing residence times of drug within the spacer before inhalation, on the amount of drug available to the patient for inhalation was determined. RESULTS--The amount of beclomethasone dipropionate in particles < 5 microns when delivered by a spacer device or directly from a metered dose inhaler was similar. The total amount of beclomethasone dipropionate available for inhalation per actuation decreased by 20 micrograms with the 50 micrograms inhaler, 48 micrograms with the 100 micrograms inhaler, and 161 micrograms with the 250 micrograms inhaler, when given via the spacer compared with delivery directly from a metered dose inhaler. There was a progressive decrease in drug available for inhalation per actuation as the number of actuations into the spacer increased, for all strengths of beclomethasone dipropionate tested. A progressive decrease in drug recovered per actuation was also seen with increasing residence times of drug within the spacer before inhalation. CONCLUSIONS--Use of the spacer device significantly reduced the amount of nonrespirable beclomethasone dipropionate available for inhalation. The amount of beclomethasone dipropionate within respirable particles decreased considerably following multiple actuations into the spacer and with

  13. An analysis of screw fixation of the femoral component in cementless hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Sugiyama, H; Kaiser, A D; Van Hoech, J; Whiteside, L A

    1990-01-01

    A cementless hip stem that allows screw fixation of the collar to cortical bone in the calcar region was found to achieve enhanced rotational stability when implanted in preserved cadaveric human femora. Although the implants with screws showed less tendency for subsidence than the implants without screws, rotational micromotion was not found to be statistically different under light loading conditions. When implanted in composite bone, the addition of screws in the configuration tested was associated with significant metal-on-metal wear during combined compression and rotational cyclic loading. This finding is of concern due to potential wear particle toxicity and possible lowered fatigue life of the prosthesis. Therefore, specific design changes are recommended. PMID:2243211

  14. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  15. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hip Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Hip Replacement Potpuna zamjena kuka - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Hip Replacement 全髋关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  6. Influence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacer-containing enzyme conjugates on functional parameters of steroid immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Nara, Seema; Tripathi, Vinay; Chaube, Shail K; Rangari, Kiran; Singh, Harpal; Kariya, Kiran P; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2008-02-01

    Introduction of spacers in coating steroid antigen or enzyme conjugates or immunogen is known to exert an influence on the sensitivity of steroid enzyme immunoassays. We have introduced hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacers between enzyme and steroid moieties and studied their effects on functional parameters of enzyme immunoassays, using cortisol as a model steroid. Cortisol-3-O-carboxymethyloxime-bovine serum albumin (F-3-O-CMO-BSA) was used as immunogen to raise the antiserum in New Zealand white rabbits. Three enzyme conjugates were prepared using cortisol-21-hemisuccinate (F-21-HS) as carboxylic derivative of cortisol and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an enzyme label. These were F-21-HS-HRP (without spacer), F-21-HS-adipic acid dihydrazide-HRP (adipic acid dihydrazide as hydrophobic spacer), and F-21-HS-urea-HRP (urea as hydrophilic spacer). The influence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacers on the functional parameters of assays such as lower detection limit, ED50, and specificity was studied with reference to enzyme conjugate without spacer. The results of the present investigation revealed that the presence of a hydrophilic spacer in the enzyme conjugate decreases the lower detection limit, decreases the ED50, and marginally improves the specificity of assays. These improvements in functional parameters of assays may be due to the decreased magnitude of the overall hydrophobic interactions existing between the spacer in enzyme conjugate and the antigen binding site of the antibody. PMID:18023401

  7. MODULUS Stem for Developmental Hip Dysplasia: Long-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Francesco M; Piovani, Lucio; Combi, Alberto; Perticarini, Loris

    2015-10-01

    Between October 2001 and December 2010, 143 patients with developmental dysplasia underwent hip arthroplasty surgery using a conical stem with modular necks (MODULUS system, Lima Corporate, Villanova di San Daniele del Friuli, Italy). Thirty (21.0%) patients had both hips replaced, for a total of 173 implants. The mean age at the time of surgery was 55 years (range: 22-81 years). The mean follow-up was 87 months (range: 36-146 months); average Harris Hip Score increased from 42 (range: 23-65) preoperatively to 92 (range: 76-100) at the last follow-up. Stem revision was required in two cases. The MODULUS stem showed good long-term clinical and radiographic results, with a Kaplan-Meier survivorship of 97.6% (95% CI: 94.8-100.0%) at 8 years. PMID:25980775

  8. Primary and revision total hip replacement without cement and with associated femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Holtgrewe, J L; Hungerford, D S

    1989-12-01

    Nine porous-coated total hip prostheses were implanted without cement in nine patients who had a major proximal femoral deformity. Six patients had revision and three, primary total hip replacement. In all nine patients, as well placed corrective osteotomy was needed to successfully perform the arthroplasty. The average time until union of the proximal femoral osteotomy was fifteen weeks for the patients who had a primary arthroplasty and twenty-seven weeks for the patients who had a revision arthroplasty. The average Harris hip-rating score was 94 points for the patients who had a primary arthroplasty and 84 points (range, 60 to 93 points) for those who had a revision arthroplasty. The length of follow-up averaged forty-seven months.

  9. Tribological investigations of the wear couple alumina-CFRP for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Willmann, G

    1998-07-01

    Wear debris is the main reason for aseptic loosening in total hip. Most troublesome is the wear of polyethylene cups. Ceramic femoral heads were introduced about 20 years ago. The combination ceramic-on-polyethylene reduces the wear rate and the loosening rate. But cups of polyethylene are still the weakest link in a hip prosthesis. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was proposed as an alternative for polyethylene. Various test were performed to study the combination metal-on-CFRP, zirconia-on-CFRP, and alumina-on-CFRP. The simulator tests showed that the wear rate of alumina-on-CFRP is in the order of 1-3 microm per year. Based on investigation of retrieved implants the wear rate is 6.3 microm per year. Based on these results the combination alumina femoral heads (Biolox-forte) and CFRP cups (Caproman) could be approved for total hip replacement.

  10. MODULUS Stem for Developmental Hip Dysplasia: Long-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Francesco M; Piovani, Lucio; Combi, Alberto; Perticarini, Loris

    2015-10-01

    Between October 2001 and December 2010, 143 patients with developmental dysplasia underwent hip arthroplasty surgery using a conical stem with modular necks (MODULUS system, Lima Corporate, Villanova di San Daniele del Friuli, Italy). Thirty (21.0%) patients had both hips replaced, for a total of 173 implants. The mean age at the time of surgery was 55 years (range: 22-81 years). The mean follow-up was 87 months (range: 36-146 months); average Harris Hip Score increased from 42 (range: 23-65) preoperatively to 92 (range: 76-100) at the last follow-up. Stem revision was required in two cases. The MODULUS stem showed good long-term clinical and radiographic results, with a Kaplan-Meier survivorship of 97.6% (95% CI: 94.8-100.0%) at 8 years.

  11. Intraoperative Fluoroscopy Improves Component Position During Anterior Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jennings, John D; Iorio, Justin; Kleiner, Matthew T; Gaughan, John P; Star, Andrew M

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this retrospective review was to determine whether fluoroscopic guidance improves acetabular cup abduction and anteversion alignment during anterior total hip arthroplasty. The authors retrospectively reviewed 199 patients (fluoroscopy group, 98; nonfluoroscopy group, 101) who underwent anterior total hip arthroplasty at a single center with and without C-arm fluoroscopy guidance. Included in the study were patients of any age who underwent primary anterior approach total hip arthroplasty performed by a single surgeon, with 6-month postoperative anteroposterior pelvis radiographs. Acetabular cup abduction and anteversion angles were measured and compared between groups. Mean acetabular cup abduction and anteversion angles were 43.4° (range, 26.0°-57.4°) and 23.1° (range, 17°-28°), respectively, in the fluoroscopy group. Mean abduction and anteversion angles were 45.9° (range, 29.7°-61.3°) and 23.1° (range, 17°-28°), respectively, after anterior total hip arthroplasty without the use of C-arm guidance (nonfluoroscopy group). The use of fluoroscopy was associated with a statistically significant difference in cup abduction (P=.002) but no statistically significant difference in anteversion angles. In the fluoroscopy group, 80% of implants were within the combined safe zone compared with 63% in the nonfluoroscopy group. A significantly higher percentage of both acetabular cup abduction angles and combined anteversion and abduction angles were in the safe zone in the fluoroscopy group. Fluoroscopy is not required for proper anteversion placement of acetabular components, but it may increase ideal safe zone placement of components.

  12. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine. PMID:22868068

  13. Clinical Results of the Metha Short Hip Stem: A Perspective for Younger Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Thorey, Fritz; Hoefer, Claudia; Abdi-Tabari, Nima; Lerch, Matthias; Budde, Stefan; Windhagen, Henning

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, various uncemented proximal metaphyseal hip stems were introduced for younger patients as a bone preserving strategy. Initial osteodensitometric analyses of the surrounding bone of short stems indicate an increase of bone mass with secondary bone ingrowth fixation as a predictor of long-term survival of these types of implants. We report the outcome of 151 modular Metha short hip stem implants in 148 patients between March 2005 and October 2007. The mean follow-up was 5.8±0.7 years and the mean age of the patients was 55.7±9.8 years. Along with demographic data and co-morbidities, the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), and also the results of a patient-administered questionnaire were recorded pre-operatively and at follow-up. The mean HHS increased from 46±17 pre-operatively to 90±5 the HOOS improved from 55±16 pre-operatively to 89±10 at the final follow-up. A total of three patients have been revised, two for subsidence with femoral revision and one for infection without femoral revision (Kaplan Meier survival estimate 98%). The radiological findings showed no radiolucent lines in any of the patients. The modular Metha short hip stem was implanted in younger patients, who reported an overall high level of satisfaction. The clinical and radiographic results give support to the principle of using short stems with metaphyseal anchorage. However, long-term results are necessary to confirm the success of this concept in the years to come. PMID:24416478

  14. Intraoperative measurement of rotational stability of femoral components of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H; Mulroy, R D; Maloney, W J; Burke, D W; Chandler, H P; Zalenski, E B

    1991-05-01

    High out-of-plane forces acting on the hip joint can produce important rotational micromotion of the femoral component. This micromotion at the prosthesis interface may be detrimental to the stability of the implant. In cementless femoral implants this could prevent bone ingrowth, and in the cemented component this could cause generation of particulate debris, lysis, and loosening. The introduction of the torque wrench micrometer for assessment of intraoperative femoral component stability can quantify the initial stability of primary cementless femoral components and critically evaluate the stability (at either the initial or revision arthroplasty) of both cemented and cementless femoral components. It allows the surgeon to produce a known torque in the direction and magnitude of the out-of-plane forces that load the hip in vivo. PMID:2019039

  15. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  16. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  17. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  18. A novel surgical tool for the revision hip arthroplasty due to neck stem's fracture.

    PubMed

    Grivas, T B; Magnissalis, E; Papadakis, S

    2015-01-01

    During revision surgery of total hip arthroplasties, surgeons may come across the challenging complication of a proximally fractured femoral stem, which however maintains sufficient distal fixation. Such cases, although rare, are extremely demanding due to lack of available attachments that would assist surgical explantation of the broken implant. It is herein presented a metal sterilisable surgical tool designed for the removal of the femoral stem broken at the level of the "neck". Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 352-355. PMID:27688701

  19. A novel surgical tool for the revision hip arthroplasty due to neck stem’s fracture

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, TB; Magnissalis, E; Papadakis, S

    2015-01-01

    During revision surgery of total hip arthroplasties, surgeons may come across the challenging complication of a proximally fractured femoral stem, which however maintains sufficient distal fixation. Such cases, although rare, are extremely demanding due to lack of available attachments that would assist surgical explantation of the broken implant. It is herein presented a metal sterilisable surgical tool designed for the removal of the femoral stem broken at the level of the “neck”. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 352-355.

  20. Complications in primary total hip arthroplasty: avoidance and management: wear.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Many factors, including polyethylene processing, sterilization method, counterface material, femoral head size, femoral offset, acetabular component position, implant design, and patient activity level, affect the rate of wear in total hip arthroplasty. For patients with life expectancy that exceeds the longevity of the conventional implant materials, an alternative bearing surface (highly cross-linked polyethylene, metal-on-metal, or ceramic-on-ceramic) may be considered. Although laboratory wear tests with these materials are very favorable, clinical outcomes have not been clearly established. When osteolysis does develop in response to particulate debris, the location and progression of the lesions may be quite variable. Asymptomatic stable lesions can be followed clinically and radiographically while symptomatic or enlarging lesions or those that may compromise the integrity of the periprosthetic bone stock require surgery. If acetabular component revision is necessary and an adequate rim of host bone is maintained to support a revision acetabular component, defects can be filled with particulate bone graft. Large segmental defects generally require structural allografts. If the acetabular shell is well fixed in good position and the osteolytic defects are accessible, treatment with curettage and bone grafting of the lesions with liner revision is appropriate to avoid use of a structural allograft. Proximal femoral defects around a well-fixed stem can be managed in a similar manner with curettage and bone grafting. Distal lesions associated with risk of periprosthetic femur fracture or implant loosening require stem revision. Osteoclastic resportion of bone in response to particulate debris can be impaired with use of some drugs such as alendronate. However, the safety and efficacy of alendronate in the clinical management of osteolysis associated with total hip arthroplasty has not been established. PMID:12690853

  1. Mechanical failure of metal-polyethylene sandwich liner in metal-on-metal total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Fetto, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal had been proposed as an optimal articulation in THRs, however, many monoblock prostheses have been recalled in the USA because of significant high rates of early failure. Metal-on-metal prostheses had been implanted in our institution, and this is a case history of a single patient, in whom metal-on-metal THRs with different femoral sizes of heads were implanted. A 57-year-old female patient underwent bilateral total hip replacements with metal-on-metal prostheses using metal-polyethylene "sandwich" liners 9 years ago on the right side and 7 years ago on the left side respectively. The only difference in both sides was the femoral head diameter of 28 mm in right and 34 mm in left. Seven years after the left surgery, the acetabular liner was dissociated, however, metallosis was not detected. Although the larger femoral head was thought to increase hip joint stability, it dictated a reduction in polyethylene thickness in this prosthesis design, and it was 4 mm in the left hip. Recently, metal-on-metal articulations are thought not to be optimal for hip joint bearing surface, however, this clinical failure was due to the polyethylene thickness and quality.

  2. How Do Metal Ion Levels Change over Time in Hip Resurfacing Patients? A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Lucia; Cadossi, Matteo; Chiarello, Eugenio; Fotia, Caterina; Greco, Michelina; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOM-HR) is offered as an alternative to traditional hip arthroplasty for young, active adults with advanced osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, concerns remain regarding wear and corrosion of the bearing surfaces and the resulting increase in metal ion levels. We evaluated three cohorts of patients with Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) at an average follow-up of 2, 5, and 9 years. We asked whether there would be differences in ion levels between the cohorts and inside the gender. Nineteen patients were prospectively analyzed. The correlation with clinical-radiographic data was also performed. Chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium and cobalt levels demonstrated a tendency to decrease over time. Such tendency was present only in females. An inverse correlation between chromium, implant size, and Harris hip score was present at short term; it disappeared over time together with the decreased ion levels. The prospective analysis showed that, although metal ion levels remained fairly constant within each patient, there was a relatively large variation between subjects, so mean data in this scenario must be interpreted with caution. The chronic high exposure should be carefully considered during implant selection, particularly in young subjects, and a stricter monitoring is mandatory. PMID:25580456

  3. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  4. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429142

  5. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Hellman, Michael D.; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg–Calve–Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  6. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Hellman, Michael D; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D; Nho, Shane J

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg-Calve-Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  7. The use of primary total hip arthroplasty in university hospitals of the European Union.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, Thierry; Druyts, Pieter; Casteleyn, Pierre-Paul

    2004-06-01

    Current practice in primary total hip replacement was investigated by postal survey in 125 university hospitals of the European Union (EU). Most hospitals (78.4%) use a hip register and implant cemented as well as uncemented stems (72.0%) and cups (68.8%). In Scandinavian & Anglo-Saxon countries, 42.9% of the departments implant cemented stems in all their patients, and 16.7% implant cemented cups in all their patients. In these countries, modern cementing techniques are commonly used and therapeutic choices are strongly influenced by hip registers. In Southern Europe, cemented cups have been abandoned in 31.1% and modern cementing techniques are less common. Benelux & Germanic countries have a practice in between. Three cemented (Exeter, Charnley, Lubinus) and three uncemented stems (Zweymüller, ABG, Bi-contact) represent 41.9% and 25.3% of stem types in use. Most departments (70.4%) have adopted alternative bearings. Ceramic-ceramic and metal-metal are both used in almost half of the hospitals. Metal-polyethylene has been abandoned in 15.2%. These trends are taught to new generations of surgeons in the EU and could become common practice in a near future. PMID:15287402

  8. Microscopical analysis of synovial fluid wear debris from failing CoCr hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. B.; Brown, A. P.; Cox, A.; Curry, A.; Denton, J.

    2010-07-01

    Metal on metal hip joint prostheses are now commonly implanted in patients with hip problems. Although hip replacements largely go ahead problem free, some complications can arise such as infection immediately after surgery and aseptic necrosis caused by vascular complications due to surgery. A recent observation that has been made at Manchester is that some Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) implants are causing chronic pain, with the source being as yet unidentified. This form of replacement failure is independent of surgeon or hospital and so some underlying body/implant interface process is thought to be the problem. When the synovial fluid from a failed joint is examined particles of metal (wear debris) can be found. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used to look at fixed and sectioned samples of the synovial fluid and this has identified fine (< 100 nm) metal and metal oxide particles within the fluid. TEM EDX and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to examine the composition of the particles, showing them to be chromium rich. This gives rise to concern that the failure mechanism may be associated with the debris.

  9. Dislocation of a dual mobility total hip replacement following fracture of the polyethylene liner.

    PubMed

    Vedrine, Bertrand; Guillaumot, Pierre; Chancrin, Jean-Luc

    2016-05-18

    An eight-year-old male English Setter was referred for management of a dislocation of a cemented dual mobility canine total hip prosthesis that occurred four months after the initial surgery. Revision surgery showed that the dislocation was associated with fracture of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liner. The dislocation was successfully reduced after replacing the liner. A dual mobility acetabular component is composed of a mobile polyethylene liner inside a metallic cemented cup. Chronic wear of the components of a canine dual mobility total hip replacement has not been described previously. The use of this type of implant is fairly recent and limited long term follow-up of the implanted cases may be the explanation. Acute rupture of a polyethylene liner has never been described in humans, the only case of rupture of a polyethylene liner occurred 10 years after implantation. The case presented here of rupture of the polyethylene liner of a dual mobility total hip replacement is a hitherto unreported failure mode in this model of acetabular cup in the dog. PMID:26991949

  10. Vibration of the Package of Rods Linked by Spacer Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, V.; Hlaváč, Z.

    This paper deals with modelling and vibration analysis of the large package of identical parallel rods which are linked by transverse springs (spacer grids) placed on several level spacings. The vibration of rods is caused by the support plate motion. The rod discretization by FEM is based on Rayleigh beam theory. With respect to cyclic and central package rod symmetry, the system is decomposed to identical revolved rod segments. The modal synthesis method with condensation of the rod segments is used for modelling and determination of steady forced vibration of the whole system. The presented method is the first step to modelling of the nuclear fuel assembly vibration caused by kinematical excitation determined by motion of the support plates which are part of the reactor core.

  11. Assessment of modified gold surfaced titanium implants on skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas; Baas, Jorgen; Møller, Per; Bechtold, Joan E; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Noncemented implants are the primary choice for younger patients undergoing total hip replacements. However, the major concern in this group of patients regarding revision is the concern from wear particles, periimplant inflammation, and subsequently aseptic implant loosening. Macrophages have been shown to liberate gold ions through the process termed dissolucytosis. Furthermore, gold ions are known to act in an anti-inflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB-DNA binding. The present study investigated whether partial coating of titanium implants could augment early osseointegration and increase mechanical fixation. Cylindrical porous coated Ti-6Al-4V implants partially coated with metallic gold were inserted in the proximal region of the humerus in ten canines and control implants without gold were inserted in contralateral humerus. Observation time was 4 weeks. Biomechanical push out tests and stereological histomorphometrical analyses showed no statistically significant differences in the two groups. The unchanged parameters are considered an improvement of the coating properties, as a previous complete gold-coated implant showed inferior mechanical fixation and reduced osseointegration compared to control titanium implants in a similar model. Since sufficient early mechanical fixation is achieved with this new coating, it is reasonable to investigate the implant further in long-term studies. PMID:22847873

  12. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.; Bilger, G.; Jones, D.; Symietz, I.

    2002-11-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (α,α) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction 1H( 15N,αγ) 12C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of marrow bone cells on the implanted sample surface with that of titanium.

  13. [Prevention with hip protectors. Biomechanical aspects in falls and hip fractures].

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, J B

    1996-12-01

    The cascade of events leading to hip fracture is: a fall, protective responses, impact to the hip, local energy absorption and bone strength. A fall from standing height on the hip corresponds to a force of about 3500 N and the bone strength of the proximal femur in elderly women and men ranges between 2000 to 6000 N. Efficient hip protective systems have been developed and may be a significant factor in the prevention of hip fractures among the elderly with propensity to fall and osteoporosis. Theoretically, more than 90 per cent of all hip fractures can be prevented, and a substantial reduction in the rate of hip fractures can be obtained, when systematic intervention programs are initiated among nursing home residents. Prevention of hip fractures among home dwellers may be a greater challenge, although preliminary results seem promising. Improvement in design has made the protectors more compliant and may facilitate the aim of preventing hip fractures.

  14. Reproduction of Hip Offset and Leg Length in Navigated Total Hip Arthroplasty: How Accurate Are We?

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Mahajan, Vivek; Deakin, Angela H; Deep, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses how accurately we can restore hip offset and leg length in navigated total hip arthroplasty (THA). 152 consecutive patients with navigated THA formed the study group. The contra-lateral hip formed control for measuring hip offset and leg length. All radiological measurements were made using Orthoview digital software. In the normal hip offset group, the mean is 75.73 (SD- 8.61). In the reconstructed hip offset group, the mean is 75.35 (SD - 7.48). 95.39% had hip offset within 6 mm of opposite side while 96.04% had leg length restored within 6 mm of contra-lateral side. Equivalence test revealed that the two groups of hip offsets were essentially the same. We conclude that computer navigation can successfully reproduce hip offset and leg length accurately.

  15. Modified Open-door Laminoplasty Using Hydroxyapatite Spacers and Miniplates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sung-Won; Kim, Bum-Joon; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lim, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cervical laminoplasty has been widely accepted as one of the major treatments for cervical myelopathy and various modifications and supplementary procedures have been devised to achieve both proper decompression and stability of the cervical spine. We present the retrospectively analyzed results of a modified unilateral open-door laminoplasty using hydroxyapatite (HA) spacers and malleable titanium miniplates. Methods From June 2008 to May 2012, among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, the patients who received laminoplasty were reviewed. Clinical outcome was assessed using Frankel grade and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. The radiologic parameters were obtained from plain films, 3-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. Results A total of 125 cervical laminae were operated in 38 patients. 11 patients received 4-level laminoplasty and 27 patients received 3-level laminoplasty. Postoperatively, the mean Frankel grade and JOA score were significantly improved from 3.97 to 4.55 and from 12.76 to 14.63, respectively (p<0.001). Radiologically, cervical curvature was worsened from 19.09 to 15.60 (p=0.025). The percentage of range of motion preservation was 73.32±22.39%. The axial dimension of the operated spinal canal was increased from 1.75 to 2.70 cm2 (p<0.001). Conclusion In the presenting study, unilateral open-door laminoplasty using HA spacers and miniplates appears to be a safe, rapid and easy procedure to obtain an immediate and rigid stabilization of the posterior elements of the cervical spine. This modified laminoplasty method showed effective expansion of the spinal canal and favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:25346767

  16. Single electron transistor with P-type sidewall spacer gates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Han; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Joung-Eob; Kang, Kwon-Chil; Kim, Kyungwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-07-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) is one of the promising solutions to overcome the scaling limit of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET). Up to now, various kinds of SETs are being proposed and SETs with a dual gate (DG) structure using an electrical potential barrier have been demonstrated for room temperature operation. To operate DG-SETs, however, extra bias of side gates is necessary. It causes new problems that the electrode for side gates and the extra bias for electrical barrier increase the complexity in circuit design and operation power consumption, respectively. For the reason, a new mechanism using work function (WF) difference is applied to operate a SET at room temperature by three electrodes. Its structure consists of an undoped active region, a control gate, n-doped source/drain electrodes, and metal/silicide or p-type silicon side gates, and a SET with metal/silicide gates or p-type silicon gates forms tunnel barriers induced by work function between an undoped channel and grounded side gates. Via simulation, the effectiveness of the new mechanism is confirmed through various silicide materials that have different WF values. Furthermore, by considering the realistic conditions of the fabrication process, SET with p-type sidewall spacer gates was designed, and its brief fabrication process was introduced. The characteristics of its electrical barrier and the controllability of its control gate were also confirmed via simulation. Finally, a single-hole transistor with n-type sidewall spacer gates was designed. PMID:22121580

  17. Frontal plane kinematics of the hip during running: Are they related to hip anatomy and strength?

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Michael; Noehren, Brian; Clasey, Jody L; Shapiro, Robert; Pohl, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive hip adduction has been associated with a number of lower extremity overuse running injuries. The excessive motion has been suggested to be the result of reduced strength of the hip abductor musculature. Hip anatomical alignment has been postulated to influence hip abduction (HABD) strength and thus may impact hip adduction during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hip anatomy, HABD strength, and frontal plane kinematics during running. Peak isometric HABD strength, 3D lower extremity kinematics during running, femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA), and pelvis width-femur length (PW-FL) ratio were recorded for 25 female subjects. Pearson correlations (p<0.05) were performed between variables. A fair relationship was observed between femoral NSA and HABD strength (r=-0.47, p=0.02) where an increased NSA was associated with reduced HABD strength. No relationship was observed between HABD strength and hip adduction during running. None of the anatomical measurements, NSA or PW-FL, were associated with hip adduction during running. Deviations in the femoral NSA have a limited ability to influence peak isometric hip abduction strength or frontal plane hip kinematics during running. Hip abduction strength does also not appear to be linked with changes in hip kinematics. These findings in healthy individuals question whether excessive hip adduction typically seen in female runners with overuse injuries is caused by deviations in hip abduction strength or anatomical structure.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of friction and wear in hip simulators.

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Garvin, Kevin L

    2016-05-01

    We propose and have evaluated a method to measure hip friction during wear testing on a popular multi-station hip simulator. A 6-degree-of-freedom load cell underneath the specimen sensed forces and torques during implant wear testing of simulated walking. This included internal-external and adduction-abduction rotations which are often neglected during friction testing on pendulum-type machines. Robust mathematical analysis and data processing provided friction estimates in three simultaneous orthogonal rotations, over extended multi-million cycle wear tests. We tested various bearing couples including metal-on-plastic, ceramic-on-plastic, and metal-on-metal material couples. In one test series, new and intentionally scratched CoCrMo 40-mm-diameter femoral heads were tested against conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, highly cross-linked, and highly cross-linked with vitamin E versions. The scratching significantly increased friction and doubled the wear of all groups. Before scratching, friction levels for the aforementioned plastic groups were 0.056 ± 0.0060, 0.062 ± 0.0080, and 0.070 ± 0.0045, respectively, but after scratching increased to 0.088 ± 0.018, 0.076 ± 0.0066, and 0.082 ± 0.0049, respectively, all statistically significant increases (p = 0.00059, 0.00005, 0.0115, respectively). In another test series of 44-mm femoral head diameter hips, metal-on-plastic hips with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene showed the lowest friction at 0.045 ± 0.0085, followed by highly cross-linked with 0.046 ± 0.0035 (not significantly different). In a ceramic-on-plastic design with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, higher friction 0.079 ± 0.0070 was measured likely due to that ceramic surface being rougher than usual. Metal-on-metal hips were compared without and with a TiN coating, resulting in 0.049 ± 0.014 and 0.097 ± 0.020 friction factors, respectively

  19. Simultaneous measurement of friction and wear in hip simulators.

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Garvin, Kevin L

    2016-05-01

    We propose and have evaluated a method to measure hip friction during wear testing on a popular multi-station hip simulator. A 6-degree-of-freedom load cell underneath the specimen sensed forces and torques during implant wear testing of simulated walking. This included internal-external and adduction-abduction rotations which are often neglected during friction testing on pendulum-type machines. Robust mathematical analysis and data processing provided friction estimates in three simultaneous orthogonal rotations, over extended multi-million cycle wear tests. We tested various bearing couples including metal-on-plastic, ceramic-on-plastic, and metal-on-metal material couples. In one test series, new and intentionally scratched CoCrMo 40-mm-diameter femoral heads were tested against conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, highly cross-linked, and highly cross-linked with vitamin E versions. The scratching significantly increased friction and doubled the wear of all groups. Before scratching, friction levels for the aforementioned plastic groups were 0.056 ± 0.0060, 0.062 ± 0.0080, and 0.070 ± 0.0045, respectively, but after scratching increased to 0.088 ± 0.018, 0.076 ± 0.0066, and 0.082 ± 0.0049, respectively, all statistically significant increases (p = 0.00059, 0.00005, 0.0115, respectively). In another test series of 44-mm femoral head diameter hips, metal-on-plastic hips with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene showed the lowest friction at 0.045 ± 0.0085, followed by highly cross-linked with 0.046 ± 0.0035 (not significantly different). In a ceramic-on-plastic design with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, higher friction 0.079 ± 0.0070 was measured likely due to that ceramic surface being rougher than usual. Metal-on-metal hips were compared without and with a TiN coating, resulting in 0.049 ± 0.014 and 0.097 ± 0.020 friction factors, respectively

  20. Retrieval analysis of 240 metal-on-metal hip components, comparing modular total hip replacement with hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Matthies, A; Underwood, R; Cann, P; Ilo, K; Nawaz, Z; Skinner, J; Hart, A J

    2011-03-01

    This study compared component wear rates and pre-revision blood metal ions levels in two groups of failed metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties: hip resurfacing and modular total hip replacement (THR). There was no significant difference in the median rate of linear wear between the groups for both acetabular (p = 0.4633) and femoral (p = 0.0872) components. There was also no significant difference in the median linear wear rates when failed hip resurfacing and modular THR hips of the same type (ASR and Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR)) were compared. Unlike other studies of well-functioning hips, there was no significant difference in pre-revision blood metal ion levels between hip resurfacing and modular THR. Edge loading was common in both groups, but more common in the resurfacing group (67%) than in the modular group (57%). However, this was not significant (p = 0.3479). We attribute this difference to retention of the neck in resurfacing of the hip, leading to impingement-type edge loading. This was supported by visual evidence of impingement on the femur. These findings show that failed metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and modular THRs have similar component wear rates and are both associated with raised pre-revision blood levels of metal ions. PMID:21357950

  1. Patterning with amorphous carbon spacer for expanding the resolution limit of current lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Yung; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Choi-Dong; Sim, Guee-Hwang; Jeon, Sung-Min; Park, Sang-Wook; Lee, Byung-Seok; Park, Sung-Ki; Kim, Ji-Soo; Heon, Lee-Sang

    2007-03-01

    Double patterning technique using spacer which can avoid CD (Critical Dimension) uniformity problem mainly caused by overlay issue is one of the methods that could be applied to apply to manufacturing of memory devices. Though double exposure and etch technology (DEET) has comparative advantage in the number of process steps, it is required to dramatically improve overlay performance of current exposure tools for the realization of manufacturing. In this study, negative type-double pattering technique using spacer has been developed as the best way for the application of NAND flash memory device from the view point of CD uniformity and the number of mask layers used to complete double patterning. Negative type-double patterning technique using spacer consists of subsequent steps such as formation of poly line, spacer on sidewall of poly line, SOG gap fill into space between poly lines, SOG etch back, removal of spacer, and finally hard mask etch. We have used amorphous carbon as a spacer material to easily remove spacer from poly lines and adopted SOG material to easily fill in space between poly lines. When negative type-double patterning technique using spacer is applied to NAND flash memory device, we can expect that k1 factor of about 0.14~0.20 could be accomplished successfully.

  2. Transcriptional regulator-mediated activation of adaptation genes triggers CRISPR de novo spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Yingjun; Wang, Xiaodi; Ye, Qing; Li, Huan; Liang, Yunxiang; She, Qunxin; Peng, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of de novo spacer sequences confers CRISPR-Cas with a memory to defend against invading genetic elements. However, the mechanism of regulation of CRISPR spacer acquisition remains unknown. Here we examine the transcriptional regulation of the conserved spacer acquisition genes in Type I-A of Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Csa3a, a MarR-like transcription factor encoded by the gene located adjacent to csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 cluster, but on the reverse strand, was demonstrated to specifically bind to the csa1 and cas1 promoters with the imperfect palindromic sequence. Importantly, it was demonstrated that the transcription level of csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 was significantly enhanced in a csa3a-overexpression strain and, moreover, the Csa1 and Cas1 protein levels were increased in this strain. Furthermore, we demonstrated the hyperactive uptake of unique spacers within both CRISPR loci in the presence of the csa3a overexpression vector. The spacer acquisition process is dependent on the CCN PAM sequence and protospacer selection is random and non-directional. These results suggested a regulation mechanism of CRISPR spacer acquisition where a single transcriptional regulator senses the presence of an invading element and then activates spacer acquisition gene expression which leads to de novo spacer uptake from the invading element.

  3. Long-term results of the threaded Weill cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Raiss, Patric; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Uncemented, threaded acetabular components with smooth surface treatment were widely used in continental Europe in the 1970s and 1980s for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Previously published studies showed high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 116 patients, 127 threaded cups with smooth surface treatment (Weill cup; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) were implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. Mean time of follow-up was 17 years (range 15–20). At the time of follow-up, the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision in 30 hips (24%). Two hips were revised for infection and 23 for aseptic loosening. Four polyethylene liners were exchanged because of excessive wear. One hip was awaiting revision. The survival rate for all acetabular revisions including one hip awaiting revision was 75% (95%CI: 65–85%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. It is important to closely monitor patients with these components as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629480

  4. Long-term results of the threaded Mecron cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian; Raiss, Patric

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, high failure rates of cemented acetabular components, especially in young patients, in the middle- and long-term prompted a search for alternatives. The Mecring was one of the most popular first generation uncemented, threaded cups widely used in the 1980s for arthroplasty of the hip. First generation threaded cups commonly had smooth surface treatment and showed unacceptably high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 209 patients, 221 threaded uncemented acetabular cups with smooth surface treatment (Mecring) had been implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. The mean time of follow-up was 17 (range 15–20) years. In 91 (41%) hips the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision: two hips for infection and 84 (38%) for aseptic loosening. Five hips were awaiting revision. The survival rate for all revisions including hips awaiting revision was 49% (95% CI: 41–57%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. Patients with these components must be closely monitored as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629481

  5. Gait and stair function in total and resurfacing hip arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-06-01

    Standard total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the established surgical treatment for patients older than 65 years with progressive osteoarthritis but survivorship curves wane in patients younger than 50. Resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) is an alternative for younger, active patients reportedly providing superior range of motion. Quantitative investigation of functional recovery following arthroplasty may elucidate limitations that aid in device selection. Although limited long-term kinematic data are available, the early rate of recovery and gait compensations are not well described. This information may aid in refining rehabilitation protocols based on limitations specific to the implant. We presumed hip motion and forces for subjects receiving RHA are more similar to age-matched controls during physically demanding tasks, such as stair negotiation, at early time points than those for THA. In a pilot study, we quantified walking and stair negotiation preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively for seven patients with RHA (mean age, 49 years), seven patients with standard THA (mean age, 52 years), and seven age-matched control subjects (mean age, 56 years). Although both treatment groups demonstrated trends toward functional recovery, the RHA group had greater improvements in hip extension and abduction moment indicating typical loading of the hip. Further investigation is needed to determine if differences persist long term or are clinically meaningful. PMID:19305961

  6. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  7. The Exeter™ Universal Hip in Patients 50 Years or Younger at 10–17 Years’ Followup

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Ben; Gie, Graham A.; Timperley, Andrew J.; Ling, Robin S. M.

    2008-01-01

    The Exeter™ Universal hip (Stryker Inc., Newbury, UK) has reported survival rates of 91.74% at 12 years in all patients with reoperation as an endpoint. However, its performance in younger patients has not been fully established. We reviewed survivorship and the clinical and radiographic outcomes of this hip system implanted in 107 patients (130 hips) 50 years old or younger at the time of surgery. The mean age at surgery was 42 years. The minimum followup was 10 years (mean, 12.5 years; range, 10–17 years) with no patients lost to followup. Twelve hips had been revised. Of these, nine had aseptic loosening of the acetabular component and one cup was revised for focal lysis and pain. One hip was revised for recurrent dislocation and one joint underwent revision for infection. Radiographs demonstrated 14 (12.8%) of the remaining acetabular prostheses were loose but no femoral components were loose. Survivorship of both stem and cup from all causes was 92.6% at an average of 12.5 years. Survivorship of the stem from all causes was 99% and no stem was revised for aseptic loosening. The Exeter™ Universal stem performed well, even in the young, high-demand patient. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196413

  8. Probabilistic analysis of an uncemented total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Dopico-González, Carolina; New, Andrew M; Browne, Martin

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the application of probabilistic design methods to the analysis of the behaviour of an uncemented total hip replacement femoral component implanted in a proximal femur. Probabilistic methods allow variations in factors which control the behaviour of the implanted femur (the input parameters) to be taken into account in determining the performance of the construct. Monte Carlo sampling techniques were applied and the performance indicator was the maximum strain in the bone. The random input parameters were the joint load, the angle of the applied load and the material properties of the bone and the implant. Two Monte Carlo based simulations were applied, direct sampling and latin hypercube sampling. The results showed that the convergence of the mean value of the maximum strain improved gradually as a function of the number of simulations and it stabilised around a value of 0.008 after 6200 simulations. A similar trend was observed for the cumulative distribution function of the output. The strain output was most sensitive to the bone stiffness, followed very closely by the magnitude of the applied load. The application of latin hypercube sampling with 1000 simulations gave similar results to direct sampling with 10,000 simulations in a much reduced time. The results suggested that the number of simulations and the selection of parameters and models are important for the reliability of both the probability values and the sensitivity analyses. PMID:19217340

  9. In-vitro MRI detectability of interbody test spacers made of carbon fibre-reinforced polymers, titanium and titanium-coated carbon fibre-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Buchhorn, Gottfried; Baums, Mike Herbert; Heidrich, Gabert

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different materials affect the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detectability of interbody test spacers (ITS). We evaluated the post-implantation MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences for three different ITS made of titanium, carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP) and titanium-coated CFRP, respectively. The main target variables were total artefact volume (TAV) and median artefact area (MAA). Additionally, implant volume (IV)/TAV and cross section (CS)/MAA ratio were determined. The t test and Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons were used for statistical analysis. TAV and MAA did not differ significantly between CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but were approximately twice as high for the titanium ITS (p < 0.001). MRI detectability was optimum for CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but was limited at the implant-bone interface of the titanium ITS. The material's susceptibility and the implant's dimensions affected MRI artefacting. Based on TAV, the volume of titanium surface coating in the ITS studied has no influence on susceptibility in MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences.

  10. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods - We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results - None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation - We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon's preference. PMID:27329869

  11. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  12. Effect of n-implantation on the corrosive-wear properties of surgical Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Beardsley, G.M.; Buchanan, R.A.; Bacon, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of N-ion implantation on the corrosive-wear properties of Ti-6Al-4V, an alloy used for construction of the femoral component of artificial hip joints in humans, were tested. In corrosive-wear tests designed to simulate pertinent hip-joint parameters, electrochemical corrosion currents were measured for cylindrical samples in saline electrolyte in an arrangement which allowed the samples to be rotated between loaded polyethylene pads simultaneously with the current measurement. To further quantify material removal, Zr markers were ion-implanted into some samples so that, by use of Rutherford backscattering, material removal could be detected by changes in position of the marker relative to the surface. Corrosion currents were greatly reduced by implantation of approximately 20 at. % N, but even implantation of the Zr markers also reduced corrosion currents. The marker experiments confirmed the low rate of material removal for the implanted samples. 10 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  13. Preliminary analysis and design optimization of the short spacer truss of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendy, A. S.; Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Berke, L.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis, dynamic simulation, and design optimization of the short spacer truss of the Space Station Freedom are presented in this report. The short spacer truss will be positioned between the integrated equipment assembly (IEA) and another truss, called the long spacer truss, in the Space Station Freedom. During its launch in the Space Shuttle, the truss will be subjected to considerable in-span distributed inertia loads due to shuttle accelerations. The short spacer truss, therefore, has been modeled as a space frame to account for flexural response. Several parameters have been assumed, since the design specifications are in the process of development; hence the results presented should be considered preliminary. However, the automated analysis and design capabilities that have been developed can readily be used to generate an optimum design of the short spacer truss once the actual specifications have been determined. This report includes static and dynamic analyses of the short spacer truss, which have been obtained with the linear elastic code LE-HOST (in these analyses, LE-HOST data files have been automated to facilitate their future use for different design specifications of the short spacer truss); the dynamic animation of the short spacer truss, which has been carried out by using the results of the dynamic analysis and a post-processing feature of the modeling code PATRAN; and the optimum-weight design of the spacer truss, which was obtained under prescribed stress, displacement, and frequency constraints by using the design code COMETBOARDS. Examination of the analysis and design results revealed that the design could be improved if the configuration of the short spacer truss were modified to a certain extent. A modified configuration, which may simplify fabrication, has been suggested. The performance of this configuration has been evaluated and was found to be satisfactory under both static and dynamic conditions.

  14. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain. PMID:27679733

  15. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Piechota, Małgorzata; Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain. PMID:27679733

  16. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain.

  17. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  18. Excellent results with cementless total hip arthroplasty and alumina-on-alumina pairing: minimum ten-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Alexander M.; Schmidt, Rainer; Holzwarth, Ulrich; Forst, Raimund

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic coupling is thought to be a durable alternative to metal- or alumina-on-polyethylene pairing. No evidence exists suggesting superior clinical and radiological results for hydroxyapatite-coated stems versus uncoated stems. The aim of this study is to report the performance of an alumina-on-alumina bearing cementless total hip arthroplasty and to compare stems with a tapered design with and without hydroxyapatite coating. We prospectively analysed the results of cementless tapered femoral stems (40 hydroxyapatite-coated versus 22 uncoated stems), a metal-backed fibre mesh hydroxyapatite-coated socket and alumina-on-alumina pairing. Of 75 hips studied, 62 were available for follow-up (mean of 10.5 years after surgery). The average Harris hip score was 90. Only one hydroxyapatite-coated stem was revised for aseptic loosening. One instance of non-progressive osteolysis was detected around a screw of a cup. All other components showed radiographic signs of stable ingrowth. Hydroxyapatite coating of the stem had no significant impact on the clinical or radiological results. Total hip arthroplasty with the presented implant and pairing provides a durable standard for all patients requiring hip joint replacement against which all newer generations of cementless implants should be judged. PMID:21079952

  19. Osteonecrosis: avoiding total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2002-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head afflicts approximately 20,000 new patients per year, at an average age of 38. Of the patients seen in our institution, 25% are <25 years old. Without treatment, most of these patients can be expected to need a total hip arthroplasty. Joint-preserving procedures have a significant failure rate, and some have significant morbidity. It is desirable to avoid or delay total hip arthroplasty because most patients with osteonecrosis outlive the current state-of-the-art prostheses. Four issues need to be weighed to arrive at a reasonable algorithm for the preservative treatment of osteonecrosis: i) patient risk factors, ii) morbidity of the proposed procedure, iii) size of the lesion, and iv) stage of the lesion. All of the issues must be considered to make sense out of a complex clinical situation.

  20. Total hip replacement for developmental dysplasia of hip and postoperative nursing.

    PubMed

    Zong, S J; Wang, F; Hu, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical effect of total hip replacement for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and analyze the postoperative nursing. Sixty patients (78 hips) aged 18-75 years (average 58.6±2.31 years) who received total hip replacement for treatment of DDH at the Zhengzhou People’s Hospital, Henan, China, from April 2013 to June 2016 were selected as research subjects. Twenty-four patients were male (30 hips) and 36 were female (48 hips). Of the 60 patients, according to Crowe typing, 24 were type I (30 hips), 26 were type II (34 hips), 6 were type III (8 hips) and 4 were type IV (6 hips). According to the Harris hip score system, the score of all hips was 39.46±3.56 points average (18-56 points) before treatment and resulted as 89.60±4.25 points (79-98 points) at the last follow-up, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Complications such as wound infection, dislocation, fracture of femoral shaft, femoral nerve and injury of sciatic nerve were not found after treatment. A total of 48 cases (58 hips) obtained excellent curative results (93.33% recovery), 8 cases (14 hips) good (92.31% recovery), and 4 cases (6 hips) medium. Total hip replacement proved to be effective in treating DDH and secondary osteoarthritis. Moreover, soft tissue release and an optimum degree recovery of anatomic form and physiological function of the diseased hip is an important basis for reconstructing the acetabulum and stabilizing acetabulum prosthesis. PMID:27049089

  1. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment guidelines for orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26246944

  2. Candida glabrata prosthetic hip infection.

    PubMed

    Bartalesi, Filippo; Fallani, Stefania; Salomoni, Elena; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Meli, Massimo; Pecile, Patrizia; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Latella, Leonardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Novelli, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman carrying a 2-year-old hip prosthesis infected by Candida glabrata dose-dependent susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Resection arthroplasty was performed. Six weeks of caspofungin plus liposomal amphotericin combination therapy achieved joint sterilization and allowed a successfully reimplantation arthroplasty. In addition we review 9 cases of C. glabrata prosthetic joint infection described to date in the literature.

  3. Hip arthroplasty by matching cups.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Y

    1978-01-01

    A total hip surface arthroplasty consisting of matching cups and uncemented prosthetic components is a noteworthy operation. The femoral cup obtains cylindrical support from the femoral head which is reamed in the shape of a cylinder. The acetabular cup is metallic with a polyethylene liner. It is mobile over the bone but its position is constrained by contact with the femoral cup and therefore "self-centering." On the femoral side, the cup must be placed strictly in the axis of the femoral neck. The main consideration in femoral head surface replacement is the vitality of the underlying bone. Necrosis was observed in the earliest clinical trials but there have been no cases of necrosis in the past 3 1/2 years. This is attributed to a more limited surgical approach in which only the anterior part of the gluteus medius is divided and all the posterior elements of the hip are preserved. The acetabulum is sufficiently reamed to receive the cup, which protrudes beyond the external margins of the acetabulum in all positions. Errors have been committed while perfecting the prosthetic material, but the results as determined by a 6 1/2 year follow-up on purely metallic cups are encouraging. Metal-polyethylene cups presently under investigation have almost a 2 year follow-up. The reaction of the acetabulum to an uncemented cup is not yet known. However, the existence of 2 sliding surfaces and the fact that the acetabular cup moves only during the extremes of hip movement, is reason to assume that if the acetabulum is not reamed to expose cancellous bone, the risks of protrusion are minimal or delayed. Total surface arthroplasty by concentric cups has been performed in 335 hips to date. The operation is especially recommended when osteotomy is no longer possible and disabling coxarthrosis is present in relatively young patients. PMID:729253

  4. Measurement outcomes from hip simulators.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Shelton, Julia C

    2016-05-01

    Simulation of wear in total hip replacements has been recognised as an important factor in determining the likelihood of clinical success. However, accurate measurement of wear can be problematic with factors such as number and morphology of wear particles produced as well as ion release proving more important in the biological response to hip replacements than wear volume or wear rate alone. In this study, hard-on-hard (CoCr alloy, AgCrN coating) and hard-on-soft (CoCr alloy and CrN coating on vitamin E blended highly cross-linked polyethylene) bearing combinations were tested in an orbital hip simulator under standard and some adverse conditions. Gravimetric wear rates were determined for all bearings, with cobalt and where applicable, silver release determined throughout testing. Isolation of wear particles from the lubricating fluid was used to determine the influence of different bearing combinations and wear conditions on particle morphology. It was found that cobalt and silver could be measured in the lubricating fluid even when volumetric wear was not detectable. In hard-on-hard bearings, Pearson's correlation of 0.98 was established between metal release into the lubricating fluid and wear volume. In hard-on-soft bearings, coating the head did not influence the polyethylene wear rates measured under standard conditions but did influence the cobalt release; the diameter influenced both polyethylene wear and cobalt release, and the introduction of adverse testing generated smaller polyethylene particles. While hip simulators can be useful to assess the wear performance of a new material or design, measurement of other outcomes may yield greater insight into the clinical behaviour of the bearings in vivo. PMID:26888886

  5. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Elmer E.

    1976-01-01

    Congenital dislocation or subluxation of the hip (congenital acetabular dysplasia) is a complete or partial displacement of the femoral head out of the acetabulum. The physical signs essential for diagnosis are age related. In newborns the tests for instability are the most sensitive. After the neonatal period, and until the age of walking, tightness of the adductor muscles is the most reliable sign. Early diagnosis is vital for successful treatment of this partially genetically determined condition. Various therapeutic measures, ranging from abduction splinting to open reduction and osteotomy, may be required. Following diagnosis in the first month of life, the average treatment time in one recent series was only 2.3 months from initiation of therapy to attainment of a normal hip. When the diagnosis was not made until 3 to 6 months of age, ten months of treatment was required to achieve the same outcome. When the diagnosis is not made, or the treatment is not begun until after the age of 6, a normal hip will probably not develop in any patient. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:1251603

  6. Cover Story: The Miseducation of Hip-Hop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2000-01-01

    Some higher education officials believe that hip-hop music is eating away at the morals, and ultimately the classroom experience, of today's college students. Discusses why the gap exists between student and faculty attitudes toward hip-hop, how hip-hop music represents blackness, how people perceive hip-hop youth, the positive side of hip-hop,…

  7. Alumina-on-alumina total hip replacement for femoral neck fracture in healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement is considered the best option for treatment of displaced intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck (FFN). The size of the femoral head is an important factor that influences the outcome of a total hip arthroplasty (THA): implants with a 28 mm femoral head are more prone to dislocate than implants with a 32 mm head. Obviously, a large head coupled to a polyethylene inlay can lead to more wear, osteolysis and failure of the implant. Ceramic induces less friction and minimal wear even with larger heads. Methods A total of 35 THAs were performed for displaced intracapsular FFN, using a 32 mm alumina-alumina coupling. Results At a mean follow-up of 80 months, 33 have been clinically and radiologically reviewed. None of the implants needed revision for any reason, none of the cups were considered to have failed, no dislocations nor breakage of the ceramic components were recorded. One anatomic cementless stem was radiologically loose. Conclusions On the basis of our experience, we suggest that ceramic-on-ceramic coupling offers minimal friction and wear even with large heads. PMID:21284879

  8. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  9. A Multicenter Approach Evaluating the Impact of Vitamin E-Blended Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, VITAS

    2014-01-01

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  10. Hip involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, K; Fex, E; Johnsson, K; Geborek, P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study early hip involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the detection of hip joint synovitis in RA. METHODS--Study I: The number of hip joint replacements was recorded in a cohort of 113 patients with RA of at least five years disease duration followed from an early stage. Study II: Ultrasonography was evaluated as a method to identify hip joint synovitis in 76 patients with RA of shorter disease duration, by relating it to radiograms and clinical findings. RESULTS--Study I: Twenty one hip joint replacements were performed in 15 of the 113 patients. The median disease duration at the time of first arthroplasty was 48 (range 10-76) months; the annual incidence was approximately constant between two and six years. High disease activity at the start of the study was predictive of requirement for hip prosthesis. Study II: Hip ultrasonography was pathological in 13 of the 76 patients studied, bilaterally in nine. Hip joint synovitis could not be confirmed on clinical grounds only as seven of the patients with positive ultrasonographic findings were asymptomatic, and the remaining six patients had only mild symptoms of hip involvement. Also, six of the 63 patients with normal ultrasonography had mild symptoms. There was no difference regarding demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings in patients with and without hip synovitis. CONCLUSIONS--Early hip joint destruction giving symptoms mostly at a very late stage is frequent in RA. Ultrasonography rather than signs or symptoms could identify patients with hip joint involvement and provide a rationale for early treatment. Images PMID:7880121

  11. Pelvic Incidence in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Ibrahim J.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Restrepo, Santiago; Albert, Todd J.; Radcliff, Kris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability that results in considerable social and medical costs. Mechanics such as posture, alignment and orientation of the hips and the spinal column and the relationship between these factors have been implicated in the development of both hip and spine pathologies. This study aims to test the hypothesis if pelvic incidence varies in patients with and without osteoarthritis. We assessed the relationship between spinopelvic alignment as measured by pelvic incidence (PI) and the presence of hip OA. Methods: We collected supine pelvis CT scans of 1,012 consecutive patients not known to have hip OA. Our first group consisted of 95 patients with moderate to severe hip OA as per radiology reports. The second group included 87 patients with no evidence of hip OA. Power analysis revealed the need for 77 patients per group to find a mean difference in PI of 5° or less between both groups. Two trained physicians independently measured the PI to account for inter-observer reliability. Results: Patients with moderate to severe hip OA had a mean PI of 56.5°±12.8°. The mean PI for patients without hip OA was 57.2°±7.5°. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference between the PI values of the two groups. Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.754 demonstrated a high inter-observer reliability. Conclusion: There was no difference in PI angle of hip OA patients and “healthy” patients. Our measurements of patients without OA were almost identical to the reported normal PI values in the literature. It appears that hip OA is not associated with PI angle, refuting the hypothesis made in previous studies, stating that elevated PI contributes to the future development of hip arthritis. CT scan seems to be a reliable and accurate way of assessing pelvic incidence. PMID:27200390

  12. Enhancing ligand-protein binding in affinity thermoprecipitation: elucidation of spacer effects

    PubMed

    Vaidya; Lele; Kulkarni; Mashelkar

    1999-08-20

    Copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and N-acryloyl amino acid spacers of varying chain length were synthesized. p-Aminobenzamidine (PABA) was chemically linked to the pendant carboxyl groups of these polymers to obtain thermoprecipitating affinity polymers. The inhibition constant (Ki) of these polymers for trypsin decreased, i. e., the efficiency of PABA-trypsin binding increased with increase in the spacer chain length. The polymer to which PABA was linked through a spacer of five methylene groups exhibited eleven times lower Ki than that of the polymer containing PABA without a spacer. Investigations on model inhibitors N-acyl-p-aminobenzamidines showed that this enhancement in trypsin binding by the polymers was due to the spacer as well as to microenvironmental effects. Recovery and specific activity of the trypsin recovered increased with the spacer chain length. Separation of trypsin from a mixture of trypsin and chymotrypsin was also enhanced with the spacer chain length. The inhibition constants of these affinity polymers were not adversely affected by the crowding effect. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10397880

  13. Impact Analysis and Test for the Spacer Grid Assembly of a Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kee-Nam; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Soo-Bum

    A spacer grid assembly is one of the main structural components of the nuclear fuel assembly for a Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR). The spacer grid assembly supports and aligns the fuel rods, guides the fuel assemblies past each other during a handling and, if needed, sustains lateral seismic loads. The ability of a spacer grid assembly to resist these lateral loads is usually characterized in terms of its dynamic and static crush strengths, which are acquired from tests. In this study, a finite element analysis on the dynamic crush strength of spacer grid assembly specimens is carried out. Comparisons show that the analysis results are in good agreement with the test results to within about a 30 % difference range. Therefore, we could predict the crush strength of a spacer grid assembly in advance, before performing a dynamic crush test. And also a parametric study on the crush strength of a spacer grid assembly is carried out by adjusting the weld penetration depth for a sub-sized spacer grid, which also shows a good agreement between the test and analysis results.

  14. Biofouling of spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes: a feed spacer problem.

    PubMed

    Vrouwenvelder, J S; Graf von der Schulenburg, D A; Kruithof, J C; Johns, M L; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2009-02-01

    Biofouling was studied in full-scale and pilot-scale installations, test-rigs and membrane fouling monitors by conventional methods as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Independent of permeate production, the feed spacer channel pressure drop and biomass concentration increased similarly in a nanofiltration pilot installation. In the presence of a feed spacer the absolute feed channel pressure drop increase caused by biomass accumulation was much higher than when a feed spacer was absent: in both spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis systems biofouling is dominantly a feed spacer problem. This conclusion is based on (i) in-situ visual observations of the fouling accumulation, (ii) in-situ non-destructive observations of the fouling accumulation and velocity distribution profiles using MRI, and (iii) differences in pressure drop and biomass development in monitors with and without feed spacer. MRI studies showed that even a restricted biofilm accumulation on the feed channel spacer influenced the velocity distribution profile strongly. Biofouling control should be focused on the development of low fouling feed spacers and hydrodynamic conditions to restrict the impact of biomass accumulation on the feed channel pressure drop increase.

  15. Low in vitro third-body wear on total hip prostheses induced by calcium sulphate used for local antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, R; Wahl, P; Krieg, J; Gautier, E

    2014-01-01

    In case of implant associated infection, implant preservation is associated with high failure rates. Therefore, a removal or exchange of the implant is most often mandatory for treatment success. Alternatively, under certain conditions, local antibiotic delivery can be applied - preserving the implant, using for example calcium sulphate as a resorbable carrier. In this work, third-body wear on total hip prostheses caused by calcium sulphate particles was tested in a hip simulator. Inlays made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against 28 mm CoCrMo heads and 36 mm alumina pairings were tested in triplicate, both with and without calcium sulphate particles in the test liquid. Neither the alumina articulations nor the CoCrMo heads were affected by the calcium sulphate particles since calcium sulphate is a relatively soft material. The polyethylene inlays showed 39-89 % higher wear during exposure compared to references, but wear returned to normal when no more particles were added. Thus, calcium sulphate might be used as antibiotic carrier even in the presence of total hip prostheses without fearing excessive third-body wear. PMID:25340804

  16. [Treatment of chronic hip dislocation in adults by recentered total prosthesis. Apropos of 43 cases].

    PubMed

    Gau, M; Simonnet, J H; Rocca, A; Aubaniac, J M

    1988-01-01

    Forty-three total hip prostheses were inserted in 33 adults suffering from a chronic high dislocation of the hip. Ten patients had a bilateral arthroplasty. The authors decided to keep in this series only hips presenting with a very considerable upward displacement of the femoral head of type IV in Crowe, Maini and Ranawat's classification. All the hips were treated in the same way with pre-operative planning using template tracings to anticipate problems of length and choice of implant. The acetabular cup was placed in the old acetabulum with downward displacement of the femur. The results were studied in 39 prostheses with a mean follow-up of five-and-a-half years (two years to nine-and-a-half years). The mean age of the patients was 48 and-a-half years (28 to 76 years). A satisfactory result was obtained in 79.5 per cent of cases. The mean downward displacement of the femur was 4.8 cm. Complications included one death from pulmonary embolus, two phlebitides, two fractures of the femoral shaft and four dislocations. There were nos cases of sepsis or neurological complications. The authors advise the use of custom-made implants, consider the tactical problems relative to the opposite hip. It is concluded that the value of the method often lies in the transformation of the life of these young patients by a "functional miracle", but the operative indications need to be considered carefully, since the procedures are sometimes extensive, often difficult and always require technical skill.

  17. Optical and structural properties of an Eu implanted gallium nitride quantum dots/aluminium nitride superlattice.

    PubMed

    Peres, M; Neves, A J; Monteiro, T; Magalhães, S; Franco, N; Lorenz, K; Alves, E; Damilano, B; Massies, J; Dussaigne, A; Grandjean, N

    2010-04-01

    GaN/AIN structures made of GaN quantum dots (QDs) separated by AIN spacer layers, were doped with Europium by ion implantation. Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling measurements showed that Eu is incorporated mainly on near-substitutional cation sites within the superlattice region. Only slight deterioration of the crystal quality and no intermixing of the different layers are observed after implantation and annealing. After thermal annealing, photoluminescence associated with Eu3+ ions was observed. From its behaviour under different photon energy excitation and sample temperature we concluded that the Eu-related emitting centres are located inside the GaN QDs or dispersed in the GaN and AIN buffer or spacer layers. The 624 nm PL line, associated with Eu-doped GaN QDs, shows very low thermal quenching, suggesting recombination of confined carriers through rare-earth ion excitation.

  18. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  19. Surgical hip dislocation: techniques for success.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Sink, Ernest L

    2014-01-01

    Surgical hip dislocation (SHD) is a versatile approach used to address both intra-articular and extra-articular pathology around the hip joint in both pediatric and adult patients. It allows anterior dislocation of the femoral head for direct visualization of the hip joint while preserving femoral head vascularity and minimizing trauma to the abductor musculature. Previously described indications for SHD include femoroacetabular impingement, deformity resulting from Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, periarticular trauma, benign lesions of the hip joint, and osteochondral lesions. In this review, we will describe current surgical techniques, indications, and clinical outcomes for SHD. PMID:25207733

  20. Head-neck taper corrosion in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hussenbocus, S; Kosuge, D; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W; Oskouei, R H

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction.