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  1. Downregulation of HIPK2 Increases Resistance of Bladder Cancer Cell to Cisplatin by Regulating Wip1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Yi; Xue, Wenrui; Xu, Yue; Zhu, Yichen; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy regimen is a reasonable alternative to cystectomy in advanced/metastatic bladder cancer, but acquisition of cisplatin resistance is common in patients with bladder cancer. Previous studies showed that loss of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) contributes to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, the role of HIPK2 in regulating chemoresistance of cancer cell is not fully understood. In the present study, we found that HIPK2 mRNA and protein levels are significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell in vivo and in vitro. Downregulation of HIPK2 increases the cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner during cisplatin treatment, whereas overexpression of HIPK2 reduces the cell viability. HIPK2 overexpression partially overcomes cisplatin resistance in RT4-CisR cell. Furthermore, we showed that Wip1 (wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1) expression is upregulated in RT4-CisR cell compared with RT4 cell, and HIPK2 negatively regulates Wip1 expression in bladder cancer cell. HIPK2 and Wip1 expression is also negatively correlated after cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of HIPK2 sensitizes chemoresistant bladder cancer cell to cisplatin by regulating Wip1 expression. Conclusions These data suggest that HIPK2/Wip1 signaling represents a novel pathway regulating chemoresistance, thus offering a new target for chemotherapy of bladder cancer. PMID:24846322

  2. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-04-15

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress - such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage - is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors. PMID:26972256

  3. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-04-15

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress - such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage - is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  4. Identification of Hipk2 as an essential regulator of white fat development.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Jonas; Pelorosso, Facundo G; Quigley, David A; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan

    2014-05-20

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2) has previously been implicated in the control of several transcription factors involved in embryonic development, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and tumor development, but very little is understood about the exact mechanisms through which Hipk2 influences these processes. Analysis of gene expression in normal tissues from genetically heterogeneous mouse or human populations can reveal network motifs associated with the structural or functional components of the tissue, and may predict roles for genes of unknown function. Here we have applied this network strategy to uncover a role for the Hipk2 gene in the transcriptional system controlling adipogenesis. Both in vitro and in vivo models were used to show that knockdown or loss of Hipk2 specifically inhibits white adipose cell differentiation and tissue development. In addition, loss of Hipk2 leads to induction of pockets of multilocular brown fat-like cells in remaining white adipose depots, which express markers of brown and beige fat such as uncoupling protein 1 and transmembrane protein 26. These changes are accompanied by increased insulin sensitivity in Hipk2 knockout mice and reduced high-fat diet-induced weight gain, highlighting a potential role for this kinase in diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Our study underscores the versatility and power of a readily available tissue, such as skin, for network modeling of systemic transcriptional programs involved in multiple pathways, including lipid metabolism and adipogenesis.

  5. From top to bottom: the two faces of HIPK2 for regulation of the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; De La Vega, Laureano; Munoz, Eduardo; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) triggers a complex network of signaling pathways that result in changed gene expression patterns in order to cope with this challenge. Recent work has identified the serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 as a novel regulatory protein participating in hypoxic gene regulation. HIPK2 can affect apical as well as downstream events during the hypoxic response. Under normoxic conditions, HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah2 weakens mutual binding and destabilizes the phosphorylated E3 ligase. Low oxygen levels result in strongly increased HIPK2/Siah2 interactions that lead to efficient polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of the kinase. At the apical level, the Siah2 inhibiting phosphorylations are lost, thus allowing Siah2-dependent proteolysis of dioxygenases which in turn allows for activation of transcription factor HIF. Downstream events of the hypoxic response are affected by the proteasomal elimination of HIPK2 from gene repressing complexes, an event that allows for full induction of gene expression. Thus HIPK2 can regulate a subset of HIF-dependent and -independent genes during the hypoxic response.

  6. Targeting COX-2/PGE2 Pathway in HIPK2 Knockdown Cancer Cells: Impact on Dendritic Cell Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Garufi, Alessia; Pistritto, Giuseppa; Ceci, Claudia; Di Renzo, Livia; Santarelli, Roberta; Faggioni, Alberto; Cirone, Mara; D’Orazi, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Background Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a multifunctional protein that exploits its kinase activity to modulate key molecular pathways in cancer to restrain tumor growth and induce response to therapies. For instance, HIPK2 knockdown induces upregulation of oncogenic hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity leading to a constitutive hypoxic and angiogenic phenotype with increased tumor growth in vivo. HIPK2 inhibition, therefore, releases pathways leading to production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Tumor-produced inflammatory mediators other than promote tumour growth and vascular development may permit evasion of anti-tumour immune responses. Thus, dendritic cells (DCs) dysfunction induced by tumor-produced molecules, may allow tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. Here we evaluated the molecular mechanism of PGE2 production after HIPK2 depletion and how to modulate it. Methodology/Principal findings We show that HIPK2 knockdown in colon cancer cells resulted in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) upregulation and COX-2-derived PGE2 generation. At molecular level, COX-2 upregulation depended on HIF-1 activity. We previously reported that zinc treatment inhibits HIF-1 activity. Here, zinc supplementation to HIPK2 depleted cells inhibited HIF-1-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2/VEGF production. At translational level, while conditioned media of both siRNA control and HIPK2 depleted cells inhibited DCs maturation, conditioned media of only zinc-treated HIPK2 depleted cells efficiently restored DCs maturation, seen as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, cytokine IL-10 release, and STAT3 phosphorylation. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that: 1) HIPK2 knockdown induced COX-2 upregulation, mostly depending on HIF-1 activity; 2) zinc treatment downregulated HIF-1-induced COX-2 and inhibited PGE2/VEGF production; and 3) zinc treatment of HIPK2

  7. HIPK2 modulates p53 activity towards pro-apoptotic transcription

    PubMed Central

    Puca, Rosa; Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Sacchi, Ada; Rechavi, Gideon; Givol, David; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background Activation of p53-mediated gene transcription is a critical cellular response to DNA damage and involves a phosphorylation-acetylation cascade of p53. The discovery of differences in the response to different agents raises the question whether some of the p53 oncosuppressor functions might be exerted by different posttranslational modifications. Stress-induced homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates p53 at serine-46 (Ser46) for p53 apoptotic activity; p53 acetylation at different C-terminus lysines including p300-mediated lysine-382 (Lys382) is also required for full activation of p53 transcriptional activity. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the interplay among HIPK2, p300, and p53 in p53 acetylation and apoptotic transcriptional activity in response to drug by using siRNA interference, p300 overexpression or deacetylase inhibitors, in cancer cells. Results Knockdown of HIPK2 inhibited both adriamycin-induced Ser46 phosphorylation and Lys382 acetylation in p53 protein; however, while combination of ADR and zinc restored Ser46 phosphorylation it did not recover Lys382 acetylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies showed that HIPK2 was required in vivo for efficient p300/p53 co-recruitment onto apoptotic promoters and that both p53 modifications at Ser46 and Lys382 were necessary for p53 apoptotic transcription. Thus, p53Lys382 acetylation in HIPK2 knockdown as well as p53 apoptotic activity in response to drug could be rescued by p300 overexpression. Similar effect was obtained with the Sirt1-inhibitor nicotinamide. Interestingly trichostatin A (TSA), the inhibitor of histone deacetylase complexes (HDAC) did not have effect, suggesting that Sirt1 was the deacetylase involved in p53 deacetylation in HIPK2 knockdown. Conclusion These results reveal a novel role for HIPK2 in activating p53 apoptotic transcription. Our results indicate that HIPK2 may regulate the balance between p53 acetylation and deacetylation

  8. MYCN sensitizes human neuroblastoma to apoptosis by HIPK2 activation through a DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Petroni, Marialaura; Veschi, Veronica; Prodosmo, Andrea; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Massimi, Isabella; Carbonari, Maurizio; Dominici, Carlo; McDowell, Heather P; Rinaldi, Christian; Screpanti, Isabella; Frati, Luigi; Bartolazzi, Armando; Gulino, Alberto; Soddu, Silvia; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    MYCN amplification occurs in approximately 20% of human neuroblastomas and is associated with early tumor progression and poor outcome, despite intensive multimodal treatment. However, MYCN overexpression also sensitizes neuroblastoma cells to apoptosis. Thus, uncovering the molecular mechanisms linking MYCN to apoptosis might contribute to designing more efficient therapies for MYCN-amplified tumors. Here we show that MYCN-dependent sensitization to apoptosis requires activation of p53 and its phosphorylation at serine 46. The p53(S46) kinase HIPK2 accumulates on MYCN expression, and its depletion by RNA interference impairs p53(S46) phosphorylation and apoptosis. Remarkably, MYCN induces a DNA damage response that accounts for the inhibition of HIPK2 degradation through an ATM- and NBS1-dependent pathway. Prompted by the rare occurrence of p53 mutations and by the broad expression of HIPK2 in our human neuroblastoma series, we evaluated the effects of the p53-reactivating compound Nutlin-3 on this pathway. At variance from other tumor histotypes, in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma, Nutlin-3 further induced HIPK2 accumulation, p53(S46) phosphorylation, and apoptosis, and in combination with clastogenic agents purged virtually the entire cell population. Altogether, our data uncover a novel mechanism linking MYCN to apoptosis that can be triggered by the p53-reactivating compound Nutlin-3, supporting its use in the most difficult-to-treat subset of neuroblastoma.

  9. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2

    PubMed Central

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S.; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  10. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J; King, Cason R; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  11. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  12. miR-141 regulates TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition through repression of HIPK2 expression in renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUANHANG; TONG, JUNRONG; HE, FENG; YU, XINPEI; FAN, LIMING; HU, JING; TAN, JIANGPING; CHEN, ZHENGLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, cancer progression and organ fibrosis. The proximal tubular epithelial cells undergo EMT, resulting in matrix-producing fibroblasts and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. The profibrotic cytokine, TGF-β, is now recognized as the main pathogenic driver that has been shown to induce EMT in tubular epithelial cells. Increasing evidence indicate that HIPK2 dysfunction may play a role in fibroblasts behavior, and therefore, HIPK2 may be considered as a novel potential target for anti-fibrosis therapy. Recently, members of the miR-200 family (miR-200a, b and c and miR-141) have been shown to inhibit EMT. However, the steps of the multifactorial renal fibrosis progression that these miRNAs regulate, particularly miR-141, are unclear. To study the functional importance of miR-141 in EMT, a well-established in vitro EMT assay was used to demonstrate renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis; transforming growth factor-β1-induced EMT in HK-2 cells. Overexpression of miR-141 in HK-2 cells, either with or without TGF-β1 treatment, hindered EMT by enhancing E-cadherin and decreasing vimentin and fibroblast-specific protein 1 expression. miR-141 expression was repressed during EMT in a dose- and time-dependent manner through upregulation of HIPK2 expression. Ectopic expression of HIPK2 promoted EMT by decreasing E-cadherin. Furthermore, co-transfection of miR-141 with the HIPK2 ORF clone partially inhibited EMT by restoring E-cadherin expression. miR-141 downregulated the expression of HIPK2 via direct interaction with the 3′-untranslated region of HIPK2. Taken together, these findings aid in the understanding of the role and mechanism of miR-141 in regulating renal fibrosis via the TGF-β1/miR-141/HIPK2/EMT axis, and miR-141 may represent novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in the treatment of renal fibrosis. PMID:25421593

  13. Autoregulatory control of the p53 response by caspase-mediated processing of HIPK2

    PubMed Central

    Gresko, Ekaterina; Roscic, Ana; Ritterhoff, Stefanie; Vichalkovski, Anton; del Sal, Giannino; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 phosphorylates the p53 protein at Ser 46, thus promoting p53-dependent gene expression and subsequent apoptosis. Here, we show that DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs cause degradation of endogenous HIPK2 dependent on the presence of a functional p53 protein. Early induced p53 allows caspase-mediated cleavage of HIPK2 following aspartic acids 916 and 977. The resulting C-terminally truncated HIPK2 forms show an enhanced induction of the p53 response and cell death, thus allowing the rapid amplification of the p53-dependent apoptotic program during the initiation phase of apoptosis by a regulatory feed-forward loop. The active HIPK2 fragments are further degraded during the execution and termination phase of apoptosis, thus ensuring the occurrence of HIPK2 signaling only during the early phases of apoptosis induction. PMID:16601678

  14. Src kinase modulates the apoptotic p53 pathway by altering HIPK2 localization

    PubMed Central

    Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src is a master regulator of cell proliferation. Hyperactive Src is a potent oncogene and a driver of cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a tumor suppressor mediating growth suppression and apoptosis upon genotoxic stress through phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46. Here we show that Src phosphorylates HIPK2 and changes its subcellular localization. Using mass spectrometry we identified 9 Src-mediated Tyr-phosphorylation sites within HIPK2, 5 of them positioned in the kinase domain. By means of a phosphorylation-specific antibody we confirm that Src mediates phosphorylation of HIPK2 at Tyr354. We demonstrate that ectopic expression of Src increases the half-life of HIPK2 by interfering with Siah-1-mediated HIPK2 degradation. Moreover, we find that hyperactive Src binds HIPK2 and redistributes HIPK2 from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm, where both kinases partially colocalize. Accordingly, we find that hyperactive Src decreases chemotherapeutic drug-induced p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and apoptosis activation. Together, our results suggest that Src kinase suppresses the apoptotic p53 pathway by phosphorylating HIPK2 and relocalizing the kinase to the cytoplasm. PMID:24196445

  15. Autophosphorylation and Pin1 binding coordinate DNA damage-induced HIPK2 activation and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bitomsky, Nadja; Conrad, Elisa; Moritz, Christian; Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Sombroek, Dirk; Schultheiss, Kathrin; Glas, Carolina; Greiner, Vera; Herbel, Christoph; Mantovani, Fiamma; del Sal, Giannino; Peri, Francesca; Hofmann, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive genome damage activates the apoptosis response. Protein kinase HIPK2 is a key regulator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we deciphered the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 activation and show its relevance for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cellulo and in vivo. HIPK2 autointeracts and site-specifically autophosphorylates upon DNA damage at Thr880/Ser882. Autophosphorylation regulates HIPK2 activity and mutation of the phosphorylation-acceptor sites deregulates p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and apoptosis in cellulo. Moreover, HIPK2 autophosphorylation is conserved between human and zebrafish and is important for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in vivo. Mechanistically, autophosphorylation creates a binding signal for the phospho-specific isomerase Pin1. Pin1 links HIPK2 activation to its stabilization by inhibiting HIPK2 polyubiquitination and modulating Siah-1–HIPK2 interaction. Concordantly, Pin1 is required for DNA damage-induced HIPK2 stabilization and p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and is essential for induction of apotosis both in cellulo and in zebrafish. Our results identify an evolutionary conserved mechanism regulating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24145406

  16. HIPK2: a versatile switchboard regulating the transcription machinery and cell death.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Roscic, Ana; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2007-01-15

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of transcription factors and accessory components of the transcription machinery. HIPK2 is activated in response to DNA-damaging agents or morphogenic signals and accordingly HIPK2-guided gene expression programs trigger differentiation and development or alternatively apoptosis. The kinase contributes to the regulation of remarkably diverse pathways such as p53 activation or Wnt signaling. Here we discuss recent findings from biochemical and functional experiments that allow a deeper understanding of the pleiotropic effects mediated by HIPK2.

  17. MDM4/HIPK2/p53 cytoplasmic assembly uncovers coordinated repression of molecules with anti-apoptotic activity during early DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Mancini, F; Pieroni, L; Monteleone, V; Lucà, R; Fici, L; Luca, E; Urbani, A; Xiong, S; Soddu, S; Masetti, R; Lozano, G; Pontecorvi, A; Moretti, F

    2016-01-14

    The p53 inhibitor, MDM4 (MDMX) is a cytoplasmic protein with p53-activating function under DNA damage conditions. Particularly, MDM4 promotes phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46, a modification that precedes different p53 activities. We investigated the mechanism by which MDM4 promotes this p53 modification and its consequences in untransformed mammary epithelial cells and tissues. In response to severe DNA damage, MDM4 stimulates p53Ser46(P) by binding and stabilizing serine-threonine kinase HIPK2. Under these conditions, the p53-inhibitory complex, MDM4/MDM2, dissociates and this allows MDM4 to promote p53/HIPK2 functional interaction. Comparative proteomic analysis of DNA damage-treated cells versus -untreated cells evidenced a diffuse downregulation of proteins with anti-apoptotic activity, some of which were targets of p53Ser46(P)/HIPK2 repressive activity. Importantly, MDM4 depletion abolishes the downregulation of these proteins indicating the requirement of MDM4 to promote p53-mediated transcriptional repression. Consistently, MDM4-mediated HIPK2/p53 activation precedes HIPK2/p53 nuclear translocation and activity. Noteworthy, repression of these proteins was evident also in mammary glands of mice subjected to γ-irradiation and was significantly enhanced in transgenic mice overexpressing MDM4. This study evidences the flexibility of MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer, which allows the development of a positive activity of cytoplasmic MDM4 towards p53-mediated transcriptional function. Noteworthy, this activity uncovers coordinated repression of molecules with shared anti-apoptotic function which precedes active cell apoptosis and that are frequently overexpressed and/or markers of tumour phenotype in human cancer. PMID:25961923

  18. Restoring wtp53 activity in HIPK2 depleted MCF7 cells by modulating metallothionein and zinc.

    PubMed

    Puca, Rosa; Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Bossi, Gianluca; Sacchi, Ada; Rechavi, Gideon; Givol, David; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of p53 transactivation activity is important for p53 apoptotic function. We have shown that stable knockdown of HIPK2 induces p53 misfolding with inhibition of p53 target gene transcription. In this study we established a lentiviral-based system for doxycyclin (Dox)-induced conditional interference of HIPK2 expression to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in p53 deregulation. We found that HIPK2 knockdown induced metallothionein 2A (MT2A) upregulation as assessed by RT-PCR analysis, increased promoter acetylation, and increased promoter luciferase activity. The MT2A upregulation correlated with resistance to Adriamycin (ADR)-driven apoptosis and with p53 inhibition. Thus, acute knockdown of HIPK2 (HIPK2i) induced misfolded p53 protein in MCF7 breast cancer cells and inhibited p53 DNA-binding and transcription activities in response to ADR treatment. Previous works show that MT may modulate p53 activity through zinc exchange. Here, we found that inhibition of MT2A expression by siRNA in the HIPK2i cells restored p53 transcription activity. Similarly zinc supplementation to HIPK2i cells restored p53 transcription activity and drug-induced apoptosis. These data support the notion that MT2A is involved in p53 deregulation and strengthen the possibility that combination of chemotherapy and zinc might be useful to treat tumors with inactive wtp53. PMID:18996371

  19. Activation of HIPK2 Promotes ER Stress-Mediated Neurodegeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sebum; Shang, Yulei; Redmond, Stephanie A; Urisman, Anatoly; Tang, Amy A; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Alma L; Pak, Ryan A; Jovičić, Ana; Gitler, Aaron D; Wang, Jinhua; Gray, Nathanael S; Seeley, William W; Siddique, Teepu; Bigio, Eileen H; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q; Chan, Jonah R; Huang, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    Persistent accumulation of misfolded proteins causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a prominent feature in many neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we report the identification of homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as the essential link that promotes ER-stress-induced cell death via the IRE1α-ASK1-JNK pathway. ER stress, induced by tunicamycin or SOD1(G93A), activates HIPK2 by phosphorylating highly conserved serine and threonine residues (S359/T360) within the activation loop of the HIPK2 kinase domain. In SOD1(G93A) mice, loss of HIPK2 delays disease onset, reduces cell death in spinal motor neurons, mitigates glial pathology, and improves survival. Remarkably, HIPK2 activation positively correlates with TDP-43 proteinopathy in NEFH-tTA/tetO-hTDP-43ΔNLS mice, sporadic ALS and C9ORF72 ALS, and blocking HIPK2 kinase activity protects motor neurons from TDP-43 cytotoxicity. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of HIPK2 activation in ER-stress-mediated neurodegeneration and its potential role as a biomarker and therapeutic target for ALS. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  20. Interplay between Mdm2 and HIPK2 in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is activated to induce cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in the DNA damage response (DDR). p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 by HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2) is a critical event in apoptosis induction. Interestingly, HIPK2 is degraded by Mdm2 (a negative regulator of p53), whereas Mdm2 is downregulated by HIPK2 through several mechanisms. Here, we develop a four-module network model for the p53 pathway to clarify the role of interplay between Mdm2 and HIPK2 in the DDR evoked by ultraviolet radiation. By numerical simulations, we reveal that Mdm2-dependent HIPK2 degradation promotes cell survival after mild DNA damage and that inhibition of HIPK2 degradation is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. In response to severe damage, p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 is promoted by the accumulation of HIPK2 due to downregulation of nuclear Mdm2 in the later phase of the response. Meanwhile, the concentration of p53 switches from moderate to high levels, contributing to apoptosis induction. We show that the presence of three mechanisms for Mdm2 downregulation, i.e. repression of mdm2 expression, inhibition of its nuclear entry and HIPK2-induced degradation, guarantees the apoptosis of irreparably damaged cells. Our results agree well with multiple experimental observations, and testable predictions are also made. This work advances our understanding of the regulation of p53 activity in the DDR and suggests that HIPK2 should be a significant target for cancer therapy. PMID:24829283

  1. An inducible autoregulatory loop between HIPK2 and Siah2 at the apex of the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; de la Vega, Laureano; Möller, Andreas; Bowtell, David D L; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) results in reprogrammed gene expression patterns that induce multifaceted cellular responses. Here we identify a regulated interaction between the serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 and the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah2 as a mechanism controlling the hypoxic response. Under normoxic conditions, several mechanisms ensure HIPK2 stability: only a fraction of HIPK2 is found in association with Siah2, whereas HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of this E3 ligase at positions 26, 28 and 68 weakens mutual binding and destabilizes its phosphorylated interaction partner. Hypoxic conditions allow a markedly increased HIPK2/Siah2 interaction and result in efficient polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of the kinase. Accordingly, hypoxia-induced HIPK2 elimination is markedly reduced in Siah2-deficient cells. As HIPK2 has an important role as a negative regulator of gene expression, its elimination from promoter-associated repressor complexes allows the induction of a substantial fraction of hypoxia-induced genes.

  2. Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah; Kim, Eui Tae; Lee, Seung-Rock; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2011-04-15

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

  3. Apoptosis induced by a HIPK2 full-length-specific siRNA is due to off-target effects rather than prevalence of HIPK2-Δe8 isoform.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Verdina, Alessandra; Gatti, Veronica; Virdia, Ilaria; Toietta, Gabriele; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Soddu, Silvia

    2016-01-12

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are widely used to study gene function and extensively exploited for their potential therapeutic applications. HIPK2 is an evolutionary conserved kinase that binds and phosphorylates several proteins directly or indirectly related to apoptosis. Recently, an alternatively spliced isoform skipping 81 nucleotides of exon 8 (Hipk2-Δe8) has been described. Selective depletion of Hipk2 full-length (Hipk2-FL) with a specific siRNA that spares the Hipk2-Δe8 isoform has been shown to strongly induce apoptosis, suggesting an unpredicted dominant-negative effect of Hipk2-FL over the Δe8 isoform. From this observation, we sought to take advantage and assessed the therapeutic potential of generating Hipk2 isoform unbalance in tumor-initiating cells derived from colorectal cancer patients. Strong reduction of cell viability was induced in vitro and in vivo by the originally described exon 8-specific siRNA, supporting a potential therapeutic application. However, validation analyses performed with additional exon8-specific siRNAs with different stabilities showed that all exon8-targeting siRNAs can induce comparable Hipk2 isoform unbalance but only the originally reported e8-siRNA promotes cell death. These data show that loss of viability does not depend on the prevalence of Hipk2-Δe8 isoform but it is rather due to microRNA-like off-target effects. PMID:26625198

  4. Apoptosis induced by a HIPK2 full-length-specific siRNA is due to off-target effects rather than prevalence of HIPK2-Δe8 isoform

    PubMed Central

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Verdina, Alessandra; Gatti, Veronica; Virdia, Ilaria; Toietta, Gabriele; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Soddu, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are widely used to study gene function and extensively exploited for their potential therapeutic applications. HIPK2 is an evolutionary conserved kinase that binds and phosphorylates several proteins directly or indirectly related to apoptosis. Recently, an alternatively spliced isoform skipping 81 nucleotides of exon 8 (Hipk2-Δe8) has been described. Selective depletion of Hipk2 full-length (Hipk2-FL) with a specific siRNA that spares the Hipk2-Δe8 isoform has been shown to strongly induce apoptosis, suggesting an unpredicted dominant-negative effect of Hipk2-FL over the Δe8 isoform. From this observation, we sought to take advantage and assessed the therapeutic potential of generating Hipk2 isoform unbalance in tumor-initiating cells derived from colorectal cancer patients. Strong reduction of cell viability was induced in vitro and in vivo by the originally described exon 8-specific siRNA, supporting a potential therapeutic application. However, validation analyses performed with additional exon8-specific siRNAs with different stabilities showed that all exon8-targeting siRNAs can induce comparable Hipk2 isoform unbalance but only the originally reported e8-siRNA promotes cell death. These data show that loss of viability does not depend on the prevalence of Hipk2-Δe8 isoform but it is rather due to microRNA-like off-target effects. PMID:26625198

  5. PEBP2-β/CBF-β–dependent phosphorylation of RUNX1 and p300 by HIPK2: implications for leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Hee-Jun; Voon, Dominic Chih-Cheng; Bae, Suk-Chul

    2008-01-01

    The heterodimeric transcription factor RUNX1/PEBP2-β (also known as AML1/CBF-β) is essential for definitive hematopoiesis. Here, we show that interaction with PEBP2-β leads to the phosphorylation of RUNX1, which in turn induces p300 phosphorylation. This is mediated by homeodomain interacting kinase 2 (HIPK2), targeting Ser249, Ser273, and Thr276 in RUNX1, in a manner that is also dependent on the RUNX1 PY motif. Importantly, we observed the in vitro disruption of this phosphorylation cascade by multiple leukemogenic genetic defects targeting RUNX1/CBFB. In particular, the oncogenic protein PEBP2-β-SMMHC prevents RUNX1/p300 phosphorylation by sequestering HIPK2 to mislocalized RUNX1/β-SMMHC complexes. Therefore, phosphorylation of RUNX1 appears a critical step in its association with and phosphorylation of p300, and its disruption may be a common theme in RUNX1-associated leukemogenesis. PMID:18695000

  6. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets {beta}-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of {beta}-catenin and results in the accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of {beta}-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of {beta}-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin, thereby potentiated {beta}-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of {beta}-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of {beta}-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

  7. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  8. Autoregulatory control of the p53 response by Siah-1L-mediated HIPK2 degradation.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; de la Vega, Laureano; Muñoz, Eduardo; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2009-10-01

    The different activities of the tumor suppressor p53 are tightly regulated by various negative and positive feedback loops, which allow accurate control of its function. Here we show that the p53-inducible ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah-1L can bind to the p53 phosphorylating kinase HIPK2 and thus allows its ubiquitination and proteasomal elimination. Siah-1L also eliminates the HIPK family member HIPK3, indicating that its activity is not restricted to one member of the HIPK family. The stimulating effect of HIPK2 on p53-triggered transcription is counteracted by Siah-1L, thus showing the occurrence of another negative feedback loop controlling the p53 response.

  9. HIF-1α antagonizes p53-mediated apoptosis by triggering HIPK2 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Puca, Rosa; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Many human diseases are characterized by the development of tissue hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates fundamental cellular processes in response to changes in oxygen concentration, such as angiogenesis, survival, and alterations in metabolism. The levels of HIF-1α subunit are increased in most solid tumors not only by low oxygen but also by growth factors and oncogenes and correlate with patient prognosis and treatment failure. The link between HIF-1α and apoptosis, a major determinant of cancer progression and treatment outcome, is poorly understood. Here we show that HIF-1α protects against drug-induced apoptosis by antagonizing the function of the tumor suppressor p53. HIF-1α upregulation induced proteasomal degradation of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2), the p53 apoptotic activator. Inhibition of HIF-1α by siRNA, HIF-1α-dominant negative or by zinc re-established the HIPK2 levels and the p53-mediated chemosensitivity in tumor cells. Our findings identify a novel circuitry between HIF-1α and p53, and provide a paradigm for HIPK2 dictating cell response to antitumor therapies. PMID:21248371

  10. HIPK2 is a new drug target for anti-fibrosis therapy in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Melinda M.; Lee, Kyung; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    In vitro and animal studies continue to elucidate the mechanisms of fibrosis and have led to advancements in treatment for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cirrhosis, but the search for treatments for renal fibrosis has been more disappointing. Here, we will discuss homeodomain-interacting-protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), a novel regulator of fibrosis that acts upstream of major fibrosis signaling pathways. Its key role in renal fibrosis has been validated in vitro and in several murine models of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). PMID:25972814

  11. Overexpression of Dlx2 leads to postnatal condyle degradation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhu, Xiaofang; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Dandan; Lu, Jingting; Ouyang, Ningjuan; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2016-01-01

    Distal-less homeobox 2 (Dlx2), a member of the Dlx family of transcription factors, is important for the development of craniofacial tissues. Previous studies based on knock-out mutant mice revealed that Dlx2 primarily disturbed the development of tissues from maxillary arch. The present study used a transgenic mouse model to specifically overexpress Dlx2 in neural crest cells in order to investigate the role of Dlx2 overexpression in post-natal condyle in mice. The model was constructed and the phenotype observed using gross observation, micro-CT scan and histological examination. The model determined that overexpression of Dlx2 may lead to postnatal condyle malformation, subchondral bone degradation and irregular histological structure of the condylar cartilage. In addition, the expression of osteocalcin in the condyle region was markedly downregulated, whereas expression of msh homeobox 2 was upregulated. The results of the present study suggest that Dlx2 overexpression in cranial neural crest cells would disrupt the development of post-natal condyle, which demonstrates that the expression level and the spatiotemporal expression patterns of Dlx2 may be important in regulating the development of post-natal condyle in mice, and also offered a possible temporal-mandibular joint osteoarthritis model animal for future studies. PMID:27315306

  12. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2009-12-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells.

  13. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong

    2009-01-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells. PMID:20054488

  14. Ectopic overexpression of the cell wall invertase gene CIN1 leads to dehydration avoidance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Alfonso; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Arias, Cintia L; Balibrea, María Encarnación; Bru, Roque; Fragner, Lena; Ghanem, Michel E; González, María de la Cruz; Hernández, Jose A; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; van der Graaff, Eric; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Zellnig, Günther; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Drought stress conditions modify source-sink relations, thereby influencing plant growth, adaptive responses, and consequently crop yield. Invertases are key metabolic enzymes regulating sink activity through the hydrolytic cleavage of sucrose into hexose monomers, thus playing a crucial role in plant growth and development. However, the physiological role of invertases during adaptation to abiotic stress conditions is not yet fully understood. Here it is shown that plant adaptation to drought stress can be markedly improved in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) by overexpression of the cell wall invertase (cwInv) gene CIN1 from Chenopodium rubrum. CIN1 overexpression limited stomatal conductance under normal watering regimes, leading to reduced water consumption during the drought period, while photosynthetic activity was maintained. This caused a strong increase in water use efficiency (up to 50%), markedly improving water stress adaptation through an efficient physiological strategy of dehydration avoidance. Drought stress strongly reduced cwInv activity and induced its proteinaceous inhibitor in the leaves of the wild-type plants. However, the CIN1-overexpressing plants registered 3- to 6-fold higher cwInv activity in all analysed conditions. Surprisingly, the enhanced invertase activity did not result in increased hexose concentrations due to the activation of the metabolic carbohydrate fluxes, as reflected by the maintenance of the activity of key enzymes of primary metabolism and increased levels of sugar-phosphate intermediates under water deprivation. The induced sink metabolism in the leaves explained the maintenance of photosynthetic activity, delayed senescence, and increased source activity under drought stress. Moreover, CIN1 plants also presented a better control of production of reactive oxygen species and sustained membrane protection. Those metabolic changes conferred by CIN1 overexpression were accompanied by increases in the concentrations of the

  15. Ectopic overexpression of the cell wall invertase gene CIN1 leads to dehydration avoidance in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Albacete, Alfonso; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Arias, Cintia L.; Balibrea, María Encarnación; Bru, Roque; Fragner, Lena; Ghanem, Michel E.; González, María de la Cruz; Hernández, Jose A.; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; van der Graaff, Eric; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Zellnig, Günther; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drought stress conditions modify source–sink relations, thereby influencing plant growth, adaptive responses, and consequently crop yield. Invertases are key metabolic enzymes regulating sink activity through the hydrolytic cleavage of sucrose into hexose monomers, thus playing a crucial role in plant growth and development. However, the physiological role of invertases during adaptation to abiotic stress conditions is not yet fully understood. Here it is shown that plant adaptation to drought stress can be markedly improved in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) by overexpression of the cell wall invertase (cwInv) gene CIN1 from Chenopodium rubrum. CIN1 overexpression limited stomatal conductance under normal watering regimes, leading to reduced water consumption during the drought period, while photosynthetic activity was maintained. This caused a strong increase in water use efficiency (up to 50%), markedly improving water stress adaptation through an efficient physiological strategy of dehydration avoidance. Drought stress strongly reduced cwInv activity and induced its proteinaceous inhibitor in the leaves of the wild-type plants. However, the CIN1-overexpressing plants registered 3- to 6-fold higher cwInv activity in all analysed conditions. Surprisingly, the enhanced invertase activity did not result in increased hexose concentrations due to the activation of the metabolic carbohydrate fluxes, as reflected by the maintenance of the activity of key enzymes of primary metabolism and increased levels of sugar-phosphate intermediates under water deprivation. The induced sink metabolism in the leaves explained the maintenance of photosynthetic activity, delayed senescence, and increased source activity under drought stress. Moreover, CIN1 plants also presented a better control of production of reactive oxygen species and sustained membrane protection. Those metabolic changes conferred by CIN1 overexpression were accompanied by increases in the concentrations of

  16. Ectopic overexpression of the cell wall invertase gene CIN1 leads to dehydration avoidance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Alfonso; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Arias, Cintia L; Balibrea, María Encarnación; Bru, Roque; Fragner, Lena; Ghanem, Michel E; González, María de la Cruz; Hernández, Jose A; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; van der Graaff, Eric; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Zellnig, Günther; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Drought stress conditions modify source-sink relations, thereby influencing plant growth, adaptive responses, and consequently crop yield. Invertases are key metabolic enzymes regulating sink activity through the hydrolytic cleavage of sucrose into hexose monomers, thus playing a crucial role in plant growth and development. However, the physiological role of invertases during adaptation to abiotic stress conditions is not yet fully understood. Here it is shown that plant adaptation to drought stress can be markedly improved in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) by overexpression of the cell wall invertase (cwInv) gene CIN1 from Chenopodium rubrum. CIN1 overexpression limited stomatal conductance under normal watering regimes, leading to reduced water consumption during the drought period, while photosynthetic activity was maintained. This caused a strong increase in water use efficiency (up to 50%), markedly improving water stress adaptation through an efficient physiological strategy of dehydration avoidance. Drought stress strongly reduced cwInv activity and induced its proteinaceous inhibitor in the leaves of the wild-type plants. However, the CIN1-overexpressing plants registered 3- to 6-fold higher cwInv activity in all analysed conditions. Surprisingly, the enhanced invertase activity did not result in increased hexose concentrations due to the activation of the metabolic carbohydrate fluxes, as reflected by the maintenance of the activity of key enzymes of primary metabolism and increased levels of sugar-phosphate intermediates under water deprivation. The induced sink metabolism in the leaves explained the maintenance of photosynthetic activity, delayed senescence, and increased source activity under drought stress. Moreover, CIN1 plants also presented a better control of production of reactive oxygen species and sustained membrane protection. Those metabolic changes conferred by CIN1 overexpression were accompanied by increases in the concentrations of the

  17. Overexpression of the Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase in the Forebrain Leads to Deficits of Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition. PMID:25568126

  18. Overexpression of Fto leads to increased food intake and results in obesity.

    PubMed

    Church, Chris; Moir, Lee; McMurray, Fiona; Girard, Christophe; Banks, Gareth T; Teboul, Lydia; Wells, Sara; Brüning, Jens C; Nolan, Patrick M; Ashcroft, Frances M; Cox, Roger D

    2010-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified SNPs within FTO, the human fat mass and obesity-associated gene, that are strongly associated with obesity. Individuals homozygous for the at-risk rs9939609 A allele weigh, on average, ~3 kg more than individuals with the low-risk T allele. Mice that lack FTO function and/or Fto expression display increased energy expenditure and a lean phenotype. We show here that ubiquitous overexpression of Fto leads to a dose-dependent increase in body and fat mass, irrespective of whether mice are fed a standard or a high-fat diet. Our results suggest that increased body mass results primarily from increased food intake. Mice with increased Fto expression on a high-fat diet develop glucose intolerance. This study provides the first direct evidence that increased Fto expression causes obesity in mice. PMID:21076408

  19. Overexpression of Fto leads to increased food intake and results in obesity.

    PubMed

    Church, Chris; Moir, Lee; McMurray, Fiona; Girard, Christophe; Banks, Gareth T; Teboul, Lydia; Wells, Sara; Brüning, Jens C; Nolan, Patrick M; Ashcroft, Frances M; Cox, Roger D

    2010-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified SNPs within FTO, the human fat mass and obesity-associated gene, that are strongly associated with obesity. Individuals homozygous for the at-risk rs9939609 A allele weigh, on average, ~3 kg more than individuals with the low-risk T allele. Mice that lack FTO function and/or Fto expression display increased energy expenditure and a lean phenotype. We show here that ubiquitous overexpression of Fto leads to a dose-dependent increase in body and fat mass, irrespective of whether mice are fed a standard or a high-fat diet. Our results suggest that increased body mass results primarily from increased food intake. Mice with increased Fto expression on a high-fat diet develop glucose intolerance. This study provides the first direct evidence that increased Fto expression causes obesity in mice.

  20. Overexpression of the type 1 adenylyl cyclase in the forebrain leads to deficits of behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanmao; Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition.

  1. Overexpressed CacyBP/SIP leads to the suppression of growth in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiren; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Jie; Liu, Lili; Chen, Yu; Han, Shuang; Zhang, Yanqi; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-05-18

    Calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a target protein of S100, has been identified as a component of a novel ubiquitinylation complex leading to {beta}-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer. However, the roles of CacyBP/SIP in renal cell carcinoma still remain unclear. In the present study, we had analyzed the expression of the CacyBP/SIP protein in human renal cancer cells and clinical tissue samples. The possible roles of CacyBP/SIP in regulating the malignant phenotype of renal cancer cells were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the expression of CacyBP/SIP was markedly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of CacyBP/SIP in A498 cells inhibited the proliferation of this cell and delayed cell cycle progression significantly, which might be related to the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 through reducing {beta}-catenin protein. CacyBP/SIP also suppressed colony formation in soft agar and its tumorigenicity in nude mice. Taken together, our work showed that CacyBP/SIP, as a novel down-regulated gene in renal cell carcinoma, suppressed proliferation and tumorigenesis of renal cancer cells.

  2. TFIIH-dependent MMP-1 overexpression in trichothiodystrophy leads to extracellular matrix alterations in patient skin

    PubMed Central

    Arseni, Lavinia; Lanzafame, Manuela; Compe, Emmanuel; Fortugno, Paola; Afonso-Barroso, António; Peverali, Fiorenzo A.; Lehmann, Alan R.; Zambruno, Giovanna; Egly, Jean-Marc; Stefanini, Miria; Orioli, Donata

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the XPD subunit of the DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH result in distinct clinical entities, including the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the multisystem disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD), which share only cutaneous photosensitivity. Gene-expression profiles of primary dermal fibroblasts revealed overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), the gene encoding the metalloproteinase that degrades the interstitial collagens of the extracellular matrix (ECM), in TTD patients mutated in XPD compared with their healthy parents. The defect is observed in TTD and not in XP and is specific for fibroblasts, which are the main producers of dermal ECM. MMP-1 transcriptional up-regulation in TTD is caused by an erroneous signaling mediated by retinoic acid receptors on the MMP-1 promoter and leads to hypersecretion of active MMP-1 enzyme and degradation of collagen type I in the ECM of cell/tissue systems and TTD patient skin. In agreement with the well-known role of ECM in eliciting signaling events controlling cell behavior and tissue homeostasis, ECM alterations in TTD were shown to impact on the migration and wound-healing properties of patient dermal fibroblasts. The presence of a specific inhibitor of MMP activity was sufficient to restore normal cell migration, thus providing a potential approach for therapeutic strategies. This study highlights the relevance of ECM anomalies in TTD pathogenesis and in the phenotypic differences between TTD and XP. PMID:25605938

  3. Epigenetic Mechanisms Leading to Overexpression of HMGA Proteins in Human Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Daniela; Esposito, Francesco; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the high-mobility group A (HMGA)1 and HMGA2 proteins is a feature of all human pituitary adenoma (PAs) subtypes. However, amplification and/or rearrangement of the HMGA2 have been described in human prolactinomas, but rarely in other pituitary subtypes, and no genomic amplification of HMGA1 was detected in PAs. Here, we summarize the functional role of HMGA proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis and the epigenetic mechanisms contributing to HMGA overexpression in these tumors focusing on recent studies indicating a critical role of non-coding RNAs in modulating HMGA protein levels. PMID:26137461

  4. Activin C Antagonizes Activin A in Vitro and Overexpression Leads to Pathologies in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Elspeth; Jetly, Niti; O'Bryan, Moira K.; Meachem, Sarah; Srinivasan, Deepa; Behuria, Supreeti; Sanchez-Partida, L. Gabriel; Woodruff, Teresa; Hedwards, Shelley; Wang, Hong; McDougall, Helen; Casey, Victoria; Niranjan, Birunthi; Patella, Shane; Risbridger, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Activin A is a potent growth and differentiation factor whose synthesis and bioactivity are tightly regulated. Both follistatin binding and inhibin subunit heterodimerization block access to the activin receptor and/or receptor activation. We postulated that the activin-βC subunit provides another mechanism regulating activin bioactivity. To test our hypothesis, we examined the biological effects of activin C and produced mice that overexpress activin-βC. Activin C reduced activin A bioactivity in vitro; in LNCaP cells, activin C abrogated both activin A-induced Smad signaling and growth inhibition, and in LβT2 cells, activin C antagonized activin A-mediated activity of an follicle-stimulating hormone-β promoter. Transgenic mice that overexpress activin-βC exhibited disease in testis, liver, and prostate. Male infertility was caused by both reduced sperm production and impaired sperm motility. The livers of the transgenic mice were enlarged because of an imbalance between hepatocyte proliferation and apoptosis. Transgenic prostates showed evidence of hypertrophy and epithelial cell hyperplasia. Additionally, there was decreased evidence of nuclear Smad-2 localization in the testis, liver, and prostate, indicating that overexpression of activin-βC antagonized Smad signaling in vivo. Underlying the significance of these findings, human testis, liver, and prostate cancers expressed increased activin-βC immunoreactivity. This study provides evidence that activin-βC is an antagonist of activin A and supplies an impetus to examine its role in development and disease. PMID:19095948

  5. Overexpression of a Drosophila homolog of apolipoprotein D leads to increased stress resistance and extended lifespan.

    PubMed

    Walker, David W; Muffat, Julien; Rundel, Colin; Benzer, Seymour

    2006-04-01

    Increased Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) expression has been reported in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and stroke, and in the aging brain . However, whether ApoD is toxic or a defense is unknown. In a screen to identify genes that protect Drosophila against acute oxidative stress, we isolated a fly homolog of ApoD, Glial Lazarillo (GLaz). In independent transgenic lines, overexpression of GLaz resulted in increased resistance to hyperoxia (100% O(2)) as well as a 29% extension of lifespan under normoxia. These flies also displayed marked improvements in climbing and walking ability after sublethal exposure to hyperoxia. Overexpression of Glaz also increased resistance to starvation without altering lipid or protein content. To determine whether GLaz might be important in protection against reperfusion injury, we subjected the flies to hypoxia, followed by recovery under normoxia. Overexpression of GLaz was protective against behavioral deficits caused in normal flies by this ischemia/reperfusion paradigm. This and the accompanying paper by Sanchez et al. (in this issue of Current Biology) are the first to manipulate the levels of an ApoD homolog in a model organism. Our data suggest that human ApoD may play a protective role and thus may constitute a therapeutic target to counteract certain neurological diseases.

  6. Overexpression of NGF in mouse urothelium leads to neuronal hyperinnervation, pelvic sensitivity, and changes in urinary bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Schnegelsberg, Birthe; Sun, Tung-Tien; Cain, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anindya; Nunn, Philip A.; Ford, Anthony P. D. W.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    NGF has been suggested to play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction by mediating inflammation, as well as morphological and functional changes, in sensory and sympathetic neurons innervating the urinary bladder. To further explore the role of NGF in bladder sensory function, we generated a transgenic mouse model of chronic NGF overexpression in the bladder using the urothelium-specific uroplakin II (UPII) promoter. NGF mRNA and protein were expressed at higher levels in the bladders of NGF-overexpressing (NGF-OE) transgenic mice compared with wild-type littermate controls from postnatal day 7 through 12–16 wk of age. Overexpression of NGF led to urinary bladder enlargement characterized by marked nerve fiber hyperplasia in the submucosa and detrusor smooth muscle and elevated numbers of tissue mast cells. There was a marked increase in the density of CGRP- and substance P-positive C-fiber sensory afferents, neurofilament 200-positive myelinated sensory afferents, and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive sympathetic nerve fibers in the suburothelial nerve plexus. CGRP-positive ganglia were also present in the urinary bladders of transgenic mice. Transgenic mice had reduced urinary bladder capacity and an increase in the number and amplitude of nonvoiding bladder contractions under baseline conditions in conscious open-voiding cystometry. These changes in urinary bladder function were further associated with an increased referred somatic pelvic hypersensitivity. Thus, chronic urothelial NGF overexpression in transgenic mice leads to neuronal proliferation, focal increases in urinary bladder mast cells, increased urinary bladder reflex activity, and pelvic hypersensitivity. NGF-overexpressing mice may, therefore, provide a useful transgenic model for exploring the role of NGF in urinary bladder dysfunction. PMID:20032263

  7. Ubiquitous Gasp1 overexpression in mice leads mainly to a hypermuscular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Myostatin, a member of the TGFβ superfamily, is well known as a potent and specific negative regulator of muscle growth. Targeting the myostatin signalling pathway may offer promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of muscle-wasting disorders. In the last decade, various myostatin-binding proteins have been identified to be able to inhibit myostatin activity. One of these is GASP1 (Growth and Differentiation Factor-Associated Serum Protein-1), a protein containing a follistatin domain as well as multiple domains associated with protease inhibitors. Despite in vitro data, remarkably little is known about in vivo functions of Gasp1. To further address the role of GASP1 during mouse development and in adulthood, we generated a gain-of-function transgenic mouse model that overexpresses Gasp1 under transcriptional control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/enhancer. Results Overexpression of Gasp1 led to an increase in muscle mass observed not before day 15 of postnatal life. The surGasp1 transgenic mice did not display any other gross abnormality. Histological and morphometric analysis of surGasp1 rectus femoris muscles revealed an increase in myofiber size without a corresponding increase in myofiber number. Fiber-type distribution was unaltered. Interestingly, we do not detect a change in total fat mass and lean mass. These results differ from those for myostatin knockout mice, transgenic mice overexpressing the myostatin propeptide or follistatin which exhibit both muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and show minimal fat deposition. Conclusions Altogether, our data give new insight into the in vivo functions of Gasp1. As an extracellular regulatory factor in the myostatin signalling pathway, additional studies on GASP1 and its homolog GASP2 are required to elucidate the crosstalk between the different intrinsic inhibitors of the myostatin. PMID:23046573

  8. Overexpression of phytochelatin synthase in Arabidopsis leads to enhanced arsenic tolerance and cadmium hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Lee, David; Chen, Alice; Schroeder, Julian I; Balish, Rebecca S; Meagher, Richard B

    2004-12-01

    Phytochelatin synthase (PCS) catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of phytochelatins, which are a family of cysteine-rich thiol-reactive peptides believed to play important roles in processing many thiol-reactive toxicants. A modified Arabidopsis thaliana PCS sequence (AtPCS1) was active in Escherichia coli. When AtPCS1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis from a strong constitutive Arabidopsis actin regulatory sequence (A2), the A2::AtPCS1 plants were highly resistant to arsenic, accumulating 20-100 times more biomass on 250 and 300 microM arsenate than wild type (WT); however, they were hypersensitive to Cd(II). After exposure to cadmium and arsenic, the overall accumulation of thiol-peptides increased to 10-fold higher levels in the A2::AtPCS1 plants compared with WT, as determined by fluorescent HPLC. Whereas cadmium induced greater increases in traditional PCs (PC2, PC3, PC4), arsenic exposure resulted in the expression of many unknown thiol products. Unexpectedly, after arsenate or cadmium exposure, levels of the dipeptide substrate for PC synthesis, gamma-glutamyl cysteine (gamma-EC), were also dramatically increased. Despite these high thiol-peptide concentrations, there were no significant increases in concentrations of arsenic and cadmium in above-ground tissues in the AtPCS1 plants relative to WT plants. The potential for AtPCS1 overexpression to be useful in strategies for phytoremediating arsenic and to compound the negative effects of cadmium are discussed.

  9. Overexpression of AaWRKY1 Leads to an Enhanced Content of Artemisinin in Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weimin; Fu, Xueqing; Pan, Qifang; Tang, Yueli; Shen, Qian; Lv, Zongyou; Yan, Tingxiang; Shi, Pu; Li, Ling; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin is an effective component of drugs against malaria. The regulation of artemisinin biosynthesis is at the forefront of artemisinin research. Previous studies showed that AaWRKY1 can regulate the expression of ADS, which is the first key enzyme in artemisinin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, AaWRKY1 was cloned, and it activated ADSpro and CYPpro in tobacco using dual-LUC assay. To further study the function of AaWRKY1, pCAMBIA2300-AaWRKY1 construct under 35S promoter was generated. Transgenic plants containing AaWRKY1 were obtained, and four independent lines with high expression of AaWRKY1 were analyzed. The expression of ADS and CYP, the key enzymes in artemisinin biosynthetic pathway, was dramatically increased in AaWRKY1-overexpressing A. annua plants. Furthermore, the artemisinin yield increased significantly in AaWRKY1-overexpressing A. annua plants. These results showed that AaWRKY1 increased the content of artemisinin by regulating the expression of both ADS and CYP. It provides a new insight into the mechanism of regulation on artemisinin biosynthesis via transcription factors in the future. PMID:27064403

  10. Overexpression of AaWRKY1 Leads to an Enhanced Content of Artemisinin in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weimin; Fu, Xueqing; Pan, Qifang; Tang, Yueli; Shen, Qian; Lv, Zongyou; Yan, Tingxiang; Shi, Pu; Li, Ling; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin is an effective component of drugs against malaria. The regulation of artemisinin biosynthesis is at the forefront of artemisinin research. Previous studies showed that AaWRKY1 can regulate the expression of ADS, which is the first key enzyme in artemisinin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, AaWRKY1 was cloned, and it activated ADSpro and CYPpro in tobacco using dual-LUC assay. To further study the function of AaWRKY1, pCAMBIA2300-AaWRKY1 construct under 35S promoter was generated. Transgenic plants containing AaWRKY1 were obtained, and four independent lines with high expression of AaWRKY1 were analyzed. The expression of ADS and CYP, the key enzymes in artemisinin biosynthetic pathway, was dramatically increased in AaWRKY1-overexpressing A. annua plants. Furthermore, the artemisinin yield increased significantly in AaWRKY1-overexpressing A. annua plants. These results showed that AaWRKY1 increased the content of artemisinin by regulating the expression of both ADS and CYP. It provides a new insight into the mechanism of regulation on artemisinin biosynthesis via transcription factors in the future. PMID:27064403

  11. Overexpression of ARGOS Genes Modifies Plant Sensitivity to Ethylene, Leading to Improved Drought Tolerance in Both Arabidopsis and Maize.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinrui; Habben, Jeffrey E; Archibald, Rayeann L; Drummond, Bruce J; Chamberlin, Mark A; Williams, Robert W; Lafitte, H Renee; Weers, Ben P

    2015-09-01

    Lack of sufficient water is a major limiting factor to crop production worldwide, and the development of drought-tolerant germplasm is needed to improve crop productivity. The phytohormone ethylene modulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to abiotic stress. Recent research has shown that modifying ethylene biosynthesis and signaling can enhance plant drought tolerance. Here, we report novel negative regulators of ethylene signal transduction in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). These regulators are encoded by the ARGOS gene family. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of maize ARGOS1 (ZmARGOS1), ZmARGOS8, Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1 (AtOSR1), and AtOSR2 reduced plant sensitivity to ethylene, leading to enhanced drought tolerance. RNA profiling and genetic analysis suggested that the ZmARGOS1 transgene acts between an ethylene receptor and CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 in the ethylene signaling pathway, affecting ethylene perception or the early stages of ethylene signaling. Overexpressed ZmARGOS1 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane, where the ethylene receptors and the ethylene signaling protein ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 and REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 reside. In transgenic maize plants, overexpression of ARGOS genes also reduces ethylene sensitivity. Moreover, field testing showed that UBIQUITIN1:ZmARGOS8 maize events had a greater grain yield than nontransgenic controls under both drought stress and well-watered conditions. PMID:26220950

  12. Overexpression of ARGOS Genes Modifies Plant Sensitivity to Ethylene, Leading to Improved Drought Tolerance in Both Arabidopsis and Maize.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinrui; Habben, Jeffrey E; Archibald, Rayeann L; Drummond, Bruce J; Chamberlin, Mark A; Williams, Robert W; Lafitte, H Renee; Weers, Ben P

    2015-09-01

    Lack of sufficient water is a major limiting factor to crop production worldwide, and the development of drought-tolerant germplasm is needed to improve crop productivity. The phytohormone ethylene modulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to abiotic stress. Recent research has shown that modifying ethylene biosynthesis and signaling can enhance plant drought tolerance. Here, we report novel negative regulators of ethylene signal transduction in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). These regulators are encoded by the ARGOS gene family. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of maize ARGOS1 (ZmARGOS1), ZmARGOS8, Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1 (AtOSR1), and AtOSR2 reduced plant sensitivity to ethylene, leading to enhanced drought tolerance. RNA profiling and genetic analysis suggested that the ZmARGOS1 transgene acts between an ethylene receptor and CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 in the ethylene signaling pathway, affecting ethylene perception or the early stages of ethylene signaling. Overexpressed ZmARGOS1 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane, where the ethylene receptors and the ethylene signaling protein ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 and REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 reside. In transgenic maize plants, overexpression of ARGOS genes also reduces ethylene sensitivity. Moreover, field testing showed that UBIQUITIN1:ZmARGOS8 maize events had a greater grain yield than nontransgenic controls under both drought stress and well-watered conditions.

  13. Overexpression of phytochelatin synthase in Arabidopsis leads to enhanced arsenic tolerance and cadmium hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Lee, David; Chen, Alice; Schroeder, Julian I; Balish, Rebecca S; Meagher, Richard B

    2004-12-01

    Phytochelatin synthase (PCS) catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of phytochelatins, which are a family of cysteine-rich thiol-reactive peptides believed to play important roles in processing many thiol-reactive toxicants. A modified Arabidopsis thaliana PCS sequence (AtPCS1) was active in Escherichia coli. When AtPCS1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis from a strong constitutive Arabidopsis actin regulatory sequence (A2), the A2::AtPCS1 plants were highly resistant to arsenic, accumulating 20-100 times more biomass on 250 and 300 microM arsenate than wild type (WT); however, they were hypersensitive to Cd(II). After exposure to cadmium and arsenic, the overall accumulation of thiol-peptides increased to 10-fold higher levels in the A2::AtPCS1 plants compared with WT, as determined by fluorescent HPLC. Whereas cadmium induced greater increases in traditional PCs (PC2, PC3, PC4), arsenic exposure resulted in the expression of many unknown thiol products. Unexpectedly, after arsenate or cadmium exposure, levels of the dipeptide substrate for PC synthesis, gamma-glutamyl cysteine (gamma-EC), were also dramatically increased. Despite these high thiol-peptide concentrations, there were no significant increases in concentrations of arsenic and cadmium in above-ground tissues in the AtPCS1 plants relative to WT plants. The potential for AtPCS1 overexpression to be useful in strategies for phytoremediating arsenic and to compound the negative effects of cadmium are discussed. PMID:15653797

  14. Complex chromosomal rearrangements leading to MECOM overexpression are recurrent in myeloid malignancies with various 3q abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baldazzi, Carmen; Luatti, Simona; Zuffa, Elisa; Papayannidis, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Marzocchi, Giulia; Ameli, Gaia; Bardi, Maria Antonella; Bonaldi, Laura; Paolini, Rossella; Gurrieri, Carmela; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Cuneo, Antonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cavo, Michele; Testoni, Nicoletta

    2016-04-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving 3q26 are recurrent findings in myeloid malignancies leading to MECOM overexpression, which has been associated with a very poor prognosis. Other 3q abnormalities have been reported and cryptic MECOM rearrangements have been identified in some cases. By fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, we investigated 97 acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome patients with various 3q abnormalities to determine the role and the frequency of the involvement of MECOM. We identified MECOM rearrangements in 51 patients, most of them showed 3q26 involvement by chromosome banding analysis (CBA): inv(3)/t(3;3) (n = 26) and other balanced 3q26 translocations (t(3q26)) (n = 15); the remaining cases (n = 10) showed various 3q abnormalities: five with balanced translocations involving 3q21 or 3q25; two with homogenously staining region (hsr) on 3q; and three with other various 3q abnormalities. Complex rearrangements with multiple breakpoints on 3q, masking 3q26 involvement, were identified in cases with 3q21/3q25 translocations. Furthermore, multiple breaks were observed in two cases with t(3q26), suggesting that complex rearrangement may also occur in apparently simple t(3q26). Intrachromosomal gene amplification was another mechanism leading to MECOM overexpression in two cases with hsr on 3q. In the last three cases, FISH analysis revealed 3q26 involvement that was missed by CBA because of metaphases' suboptimal quality. All cases with MECOM rearrangements showed overexpression by real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, MECOM rearrangements can occur in patients with 3q abnormalities even in the absence of specific 3q26 involvement, underlining that their frequency is underestimated. As MECOM rearrangement has been associated with very poor prognosis, its screening should be performed in patients with any 3q abnormalities.

  15. Complex chromosomal rearrangements leading to MECOM overexpression are recurrent in myeloid malignancies with various 3q abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baldazzi, Carmen; Luatti, Simona; Zuffa, Elisa; Papayannidis, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Marzocchi, Giulia; Ameli, Gaia; Bardi, Maria Antonella; Bonaldi, Laura; Paolini, Rossella; Gurrieri, Carmela; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Cuneo, Antonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cavo, Michele; Testoni, Nicoletta

    2016-04-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving 3q26 are recurrent findings in myeloid malignancies leading to MECOM overexpression, which has been associated with a very poor prognosis. Other 3q abnormalities have been reported and cryptic MECOM rearrangements have been identified in some cases. By fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, we investigated 97 acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome patients with various 3q abnormalities to determine the role and the frequency of the involvement of MECOM. We identified MECOM rearrangements in 51 patients, most of them showed 3q26 involvement by chromosome banding analysis (CBA): inv(3)/t(3;3) (n = 26) and other balanced 3q26 translocations (t(3q26)) (n = 15); the remaining cases (n = 10) showed various 3q abnormalities: five with balanced translocations involving 3q21 or 3q25; two with homogenously staining region (hsr) on 3q; and three with other various 3q abnormalities. Complex rearrangements with multiple breakpoints on 3q, masking 3q26 involvement, were identified in cases with 3q21/3q25 translocations. Furthermore, multiple breaks were observed in two cases with t(3q26), suggesting that complex rearrangement may also occur in apparently simple t(3q26). Intrachromosomal gene amplification was another mechanism leading to MECOM overexpression in two cases with hsr on 3q. In the last three cases, FISH analysis revealed 3q26 involvement that was missed by CBA because of metaphases' suboptimal quality. All cases with MECOM rearrangements showed overexpression by real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, MECOM rearrangements can occur in patients with 3q abnormalities even in the absence of specific 3q26 involvement, underlining that their frequency is underestimated. As MECOM rearrangement has been associated with very poor prognosis, its screening should be performed in patients with any 3q abnormalities. PMID:26815134

  16. Pulmonary overexpression of IL-9 induces Th2 cytokine expression, leading to immune pathology

    PubMed Central

    Temann, Ulla-Angela; Ray, Prabir; Flavell, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    IL-9 is a pleiotropic cytokine with multiple functions on many cell types involved in the pathology of human asthma. The constitutive overexpression of IL-9 in the lungs of transgenic mice resulted in an asthma-like phenotype. To define the contribution of IL-9 to lung inflammation we generated transgenic mice in which lung-specific expression of the IL-9 transgene is inducible by doxycycline. Transgene induction resulted in lymphocytic and eosinophilic infiltration of the lung, airway epithelial cell hypertrophy with mucus production, and mast cell hyperplasia, similar to that seen in mice that constitutively expressed IL-9 in their lungs. Various cytokines, including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, were expressed in the lung in response to IL-9. Blockade of IL-4 or IL-5 following IL-9 induction reduced airway eosinophilia without affecting mucus production. In contrast, neutralization of IL-13 completely abolished both lung inflammation and mucus production. These findings suggest that pathologic changes in the lung require additional signals beyond IL-9, provided by IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, to develop fully. PMID:11781348

  17. Overexpression of optineurin E50K disrupts Rab8 interaction and leads to a progressive retinal degeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Zai-Long; Akahori, Masakazu; Obazawa, Minoru; Minami, Masayoshi; Noda, Toru; Nakaya, Naoki; Tomarev, Stanislav; Kawase, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Noda, Setsuko; Sasaoka, Masaki; Shimazaki, Atsushi; Takada, Yuichiro; Iwata, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of bilateral blindness affecting nearly 8 million people worldwide. Glaucoma is characterized by a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). However, patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG), a subtype of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), develop the disease without IOP elevation. The molecular pathways leading to the pathology of NTG and POAG are still unclear. Here, we describe the phenotypic characteristics of transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type (Wt) or mutated optineurin (Optn). Mutations E50K, H486R and Optn with a deletion of the first (amino acids 153–174) or second (amino acids 426–461) leucine zipper were used for overexpression. After 16 months, histological abnormalities were exclusively observed in the retina of E50K mutant mice with loss of RGCs and connecting synapses in the peripheral retina leading to a thinning of the nerve fiber layer at the optic nerve head at normal IOP. E50K mice also showed massive apoptosis and degeneration of entire retina, leading to approximately a 28% reduction of the retina thickness. At the molecular level, introduction of the E50K mutation disrupts the interaction between Optn and Rab8 GTPase, a protein involved in the regulation of vesicle transport from Golgi to plasma membrane. Wt Optn and an active GTP-bound form of Rab8 complex were localized at the Golgi complex. These data suggest that alternation of the Optn sequence can initiate significant retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:20388642

  18. Overexpression of Brucella putative glycosyltransferase WbkA in B. abortus RB51 leads to production of exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dabral, Neha; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis in mammals. Brucella strains containing the O-polysaccharide in their cell wall structure exhibit a smooth phenotype whereas the strains devoid of the polysaccharide show rough phenotype. B. abortus strain RB51 is a stable rough attenuated mutant which is used as a licensed live vaccine for bovine brucellosis. Previous studies have shown that the wboA gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for the synthesis of O-polysaccharide, is disrupted in B. abortus RB51 by an IS711 element. Although complementation of strain RB51 with a functional wboA gene results in O-polysaccharide synthesis in the cytoplasm, it does not result in smooth phenotype. The aim of this study was to determine if overexpression of Brucella WbkA or WbkE, two additional putative glycosyltransferases essential for O-polysaccharide synthesis, in strain RB51 would result in the O-polysaccharide synthesis and smooth phenotype. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of wbkA or wbkE gene in RB51 does not result in O-polysaccharide expression as shown by Western blotting with specific antibodies. However, wbkA, but not wbkE, overexpression leads to the development of a clumping phenotype and the production of exopolysaccharide(s) containing mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Moreover, we found that the clumping recombinant strain displays increased adhesion to polystyrene plates. The recombinant strain was similar to strain RB51 in its attenuation characteristic and in its ability to induce protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in mice. PMID:26157707

  19. Overexpression of Brucella putative glycosyltransferase WbkA in B. abortus RB51 leads to production of exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dabral, Neha; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Seleem, Mohamed N; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis in mammals. Brucella strains containing the O-polysaccharide in their cell wall structure exhibit a smooth phenotype whereas the strains devoid of the polysaccharide show rough phenotype. B. abortus strain RB51 is a stable rough attenuated mutant which is used as a licensed live vaccine for bovine brucellosis. Previous studies have shown that the wboA gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for the synthesis of O-polysaccharide, is disrupted in B. abortus RB51 by an IS711 element. Although complementation of strain RB51 with a functional wboA gene results in O-polysaccharide synthesis in the cytoplasm, it does not result in smooth phenotype. The aim of this study was to determine if overexpression of Brucella WbkA or WbkE, two additional putative glycosyltransferases essential for O-polysaccharide synthesis, in strain RB51 would result in the O-polysaccharide synthesis and smooth phenotype. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of wbkA or wbkE gene in RB51 does not result in O-polysaccharide expression as shown by Western blotting with specific antibodies. However, wbkA, but not wbkE, overexpression leads to the development of a clumping phenotype and the production of exopolysaccharide(s) containing mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Moreover, we found that the clumping recombinant strain displays increased adhesion to polystyrene plates. The recombinant strain was similar to strain RB51 in its attenuation characteristic and in its ability to induce protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in mice.

  20. Overexpression of Galectin-7 in Mouse Epidermis Leads to Loss of Cell Junctions and Defective Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Tien; Deshayes, Frédérique; Delacour, Delphine; Pichard, Evelyne; Advedissian, Tamara; Sidhu, Sukhvinder S.; Viguier, Mireille; Magnaldo, Thierry; Poirier, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Background The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo. Methods We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury. Results The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis. Conclusion These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations. PMID:25741714

  1. Overexpressed TGF-β in subchondral bone leads to mandibular condyle degradation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Niu, L; Yu, S; Zhen, G; Xian, L; Yu, B; Yang, K; Liu, P; Cao, X; Wang, M

    2014-02-01

    Emerging evidence has implied that subchondral bone plays an important role during osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. This study was undertaken to investigate whether abnormalities of the condylar subchondral bone lead to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA. We used an osteoblast-specific mutant TGF-β1 transgenic mouse, the CED mouse, in which high levels of active TGF-β1 occur in bone marrow, leading to abnormal bone remodeling. Subchondral bone changes in the mandibular condyles were investigated by micro-CT, and alterations in TMJ condyles were confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Abnormalities in the condylar subchondral bone, characterized as fluctuant bone mineral density and microstructure and increased but uncoupled activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were apparent in the 1- and 4-month CED mouse groups, while obvious cartilage degradation, in the form of cell-free regions and proteoglycan loss, was observed in the 4-month CED group. In addition, increased numbers of apoptotic chondrocytes and MMP9- and VEGF-positive chondrocytes were observed in the condylar cartilage in the 4-month CED group, but not in the 1-month CED group, compared with their respective age-matched controls. This study demonstrated that progressive degradation of mandibular condylar cartilage could be induced by the abnormal remodeling of the underlying subchondral bone during TMJOA progression. PMID:24309371

  2. Cdc14B depletion leads to centriole amplification and its overexpression prevents unscheduled centriole duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jun; Plumley, Hyekyung; Rhee, David; Johnson, Dabney K; Dunlap, John; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2008-01-01

    Centrosome duplication is tightly controlled in coordination with DNA replication. The molecular mechanism of centrosome duplication remains unclear. Previous studies found that a fraction of human proline-directed phosphatase Cdc14B associates with centrosomes. However, Cdc14B's involvement in centrosome cycle control has never been explored. Here, we show that depletion of Cdc14B by RNA interference leads to centriole amplification in both HeLa and normal human fibroblast BJ and MRC-5 cells. Induction of Cdc14B expression through a regulatable promoter significantly attenuates centriole amplification in prolonged S-phase arrested cells and proteasome inhibitor Z-L3VS-treated cells. This inhibitory function requires centriole-associated Cdc14B catalytic activity. Together, these results suggest a potential function for Cdc14B phosphatase in maintaining the fidelity of centrosome duplication cycle.

  3. Geminin overexpression prevents the completion of topoisomerase IIα chromosome decatenation, leading to aneuploidy in human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    localization and function. CKIε kinase overexpression or Cdc7 kinase silencing, which we show phosphorylates TopoIIα in vitro, restored DNA decatenation and chromosome segregation in geminin-silenced cells before triggering cell death. In vivo, at normal concentration, geminin recruits the deSUMOylating sentrin-specific proteases SENP1 and SENP2 enzymes to deSUMOylate chromosome-bound TopoIIα and promote its release from chromosomes following completion of DNA decatenation. In cells overexpressing geminin, premature departure of TopoIIα from chromosomes is thought to be due to the fact that geminin recruits more of these deSUMOylating enzymes, or recruits them earlier, to bound TopoIIα. This triggers premature release of TopoIIα from chromosomes, which we propose induces aneuploidy in HME cells, since chromosome breakage generated through this mechanism were not sensed and/or repaired and the cell cycle was not arrested. Expression of mitosis-inducing proteins such as cyclin A and cell division kinase 1 was also increased in these cells because of the overexpression of geminin. Conclusions TopoIIα recruitment and its chromosome decatenation function require a normal level of geminin. Geminin silencing induces a cytokinetic checkpoint in which Cdc7 phosphorylates TopoIIα and inhibits its chromosomal recruitment and decatenation and/or segregation function. Geminin overexpression prematurely deSUMOylates TopoIIα, triggering its premature departure from chromosomes and leading to chromosomal abnormalities and the formation of aneuploid, drug-resistant cancer cells. On the basis of our findings, we propose that therapeutic targeting of geminin is essential for improving the therapeutic potential of TopoIIα agents. PMID:21595939

  4. Osteoblast-specific overexpression of amphiregulin leads to transient increase in femoral cancellous bone mass in mice.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Mithila; Lehner, Diana; Handschuh, Stephan; Jay, Freya F; Erben, Reinhold G; Schneider, Marlon R

    2015-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor ligand amphiregulin (AREG) has been implicated in bone physiology and in bone anabolism mediated by intermittent parathyroid hormone treatment. However, the functions of AREG in bone have been only incipiently evaluated in vivo. Here, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing AREG specifically in osteoblasts (Col1-Areg). pQCT analysis of the femoral metaphysis revealed increased trabecular bone mass at 4, 8, and 10weeks of age in Col1-Areg mice compared to control littermates. However, the high bone mass phenotype was transient and disappeared in older animals. Micro-CT analysis of the secondary spongiosa confirmed increased trabecular bone volume and trabecular number in the distal femur of 4-week-old AREG-tg mice compared to control littermates. Furthermore, μ-CT analysis of the primary spongiosa revealed unaltered production of new bone trabeculae in distal femora of Col1-Areg mice. Histomorphometric analysis revealed a reduced number of osteoclasts in 4-week-old Col1-Areg mice, but not at later time points. Cancellous bone formation rate remained unchanged in Col1-Areg mice at all time points. In addition, bone mass and bone turnover in lumbar vertebral bodies were similar in Col1-Areg and control mice at all ages examined. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts isolated from neonatal calvariae did not differ between Col1-Areg and control mice. Taken together, these data suggest that AREG overexpression in osteoblasts induces a transient high bone mass phenotype in the trabecular compartment of the appendicular skeleton by a growth-related, non-cell autonomous mechanism, leading to a positive bone balance with unchanged bone formation and lowered bone resorption.

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana ERI, the homolog of C. elegans Enhancer of RNAinterference, leads to enhanced growth

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Rhonda C.; Hönig, Gunnar; Brandt, Ronny; Arana-Ceballos, Fernando; Neitsch, Cathleen; Reuter, Gunter; Altmann, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adopt a wide range of strategies to adapt to change. Gene silencing describes the ability of organisms to modulate the expression of susceptible genes at certain times at the transcriptional or the translational level. In all known eukaryotic organisms 21-nt long short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the effector molecules of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), while 24-nt long siRNAs are involved in PTGS in plants. Mutant studies in Caenorhabditis elegans lead to the identification of the enzyme ERI (Enhancer of RNAinterference) with enhanced PTGS. Although the genes involved in growth vigor and growth rate are still unknown, it becomes clearer that the population of small RNAs plays a role in the very early phase of plant development. To pinpoint the link between growth and siRNAs, the expression of Arabidopsis uni-gene Enhancer of RNAi (ERI) homolog from C. elegans was modulated. Increased degradation of small RNAs was achieved by ectopic AtERI overexpression in planta. Based on global small RNA analysis, AtERI overexpression affects mainly the population of 21 mers, excluding miRNAs. To identify target genes, AtERI gain-of-function mutants were analyzed, and differentially abundant small RNAs were identified. Plants with an elevated level of AtERI were bigger in all three light intensities analyzed, indicating an inhibitory function of particular small RNAs in plant growth, with differences in relative growth rates depending on developmental stage and light intensity. Understanding the role of these siRNAs could open new avenues for enhancing plant growth. PMID:26257748

  6. Overexpression of EVI1 interferes with cytokinesis and leads to accumulation of cells with supernumerary centrosomes in G0/1 phase.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Kadin; Herbst, Friederike; Ball, Claudia; Glimm, Hanno; Krämer, Alwin; Löffler, Harald

    2012-09-15

    Ectopic viral integration site 1 (EVI1), a transcription factor frequently overexpressed in myeloid neoplasias, has been implicated in the generation of malignancy-associated centrosomal aberrations and chromosomal instability. Here, we sought to investigate the underlying cause of centrosome amplification in EVI1-overexpressing cells. We found that overexpression of EVI1-HA in U2OS cells induced supernumerary centrosomes, which were consistently associated with enlarged nuclei or binuclear cells. Live cell imaging experiments identified cytokinesis failure as the underlying cause of this phenotype. In accordance with previous reports, EVI1 overexpression induced a partial cell cycle arrest in G0/1 phase, accompanied by elevated cyclin D1 and p21 levels, reduced Cdk2 activity and activation of the p53 pathway. Supernumerary centrosomes predominantly occurred in resting cells, as identified by low levels of the proliferation marker Ki-67, leading to the conclusion that they result from tetraploidization after cytokinesis failure and are confined to G0/1-arrested tetraploid cells. Depletion of p53 using siRNA revealed that further polyploidization of these cells was inhibited by the p53-dependent tetraploidy checkpoint. PMID:22894935

  7. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2) promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Results Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Conclusions Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive. PMID:22472516

  8. Oncogenic Kras Expression in Postmitotic Neurons Leads to S100A8-S100A9 Protein Overexpression and Gliosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Myung-Jeom; Liu, Yangang; Zhong, Xiaofen; Du, Juan; Peterson, Nicholas; Kong, Guangyao; Li, Hongda; Wang, Jinyong; Salamat, Shahriar; Chang, Qiang; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that up-regulation of Ras signaling in neurons promotes gliosis and astrocytoma formation in a cell nonautonomous manner. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To address this question, we generated compound mice (LSL Kras G12D/+;CamKII-Cre) that express oncogenic Kras from its endogenous locus in postmitotic neurons after birth. These mice developed progressive gliosis, which is associated with hyperactivation of Ras signaling pathways. Microarray analysis identified S100A8 and S100A9 as two secreted molecules that are significantly overexpressed in mutant cortices. In contrast to their usual predominant expression in myeloid cells, we found that overexpression of S100A8 and S100A9 in the mutant cortex is primarily in neurons. This neuronal expression pattern is associated with increased infiltration of microglia in mutant cortex. Moreover, purified S100A8-S100A9 but not S100A8 or S100A9 alone promotes growth of primary astrocytes in vitro through both TLR4 and receptor of advanced glycation end product receptors. In summary, our results identify overexpression of S100A8-S100A9 in neurons as an early step in oncogenic Kras-induced gliosis. These molecules expressed in nonhematopoietic cells may be involved in tumorigenesis at a stage much earlier than what has been reported previously. PMID:22577135

  9. Deficiency and Also Transgenic Overexpression of Timp-3 Both Lead to Compromised Bone Mass and Architecture In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Mark; Poulet, Blandine; Pollard, Andrea S.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Chang, Yu-Mei; Francis-West, Philippa; Bou-Gharios, George; Pitsillides, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) regulates extracellular matrix via its inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and membrane-bound sheddases. Timp-3 is expressed at multiple sites of extensive tissue remodelling. This extends to bone where its role, however, remains largely unresolved. In this study, we have used Micro-CT to assess bone mass and architecture, histological and histochemical evaluation to characterise the skeletal phenotype of Timp-3 KO mice and have complemented this by also examining similar indices in mice harbouring a Timp-3 transgene driven via a Col-2a-driven promoter to specifically target overexpression to chondrocytes. Our data show that Timp-3 deficiency compromises tibial bone mass and structure in both cortical and trabecular compartments, with corresponding increases in osteoclasts. Transgenic overexpression also generates defects in tibial structure predominantly in the cortical bone along the entire shaft without significant increases in osteoclasts. These alterations in cortical mass significantly compromise predicted tibial load-bearing resistance to torsion in both genotypes. Neither Timp-3 KO nor transgenic mouse growth plates are significantly affected. The impact of Timp-3 deficiency and of transgenic overexpression extends to produce modification in craniofacial bones of both endochondral and intramembranous origins. These data indicate that the levels of Timp-3 are crucial in the attainment of functionally-appropriate bone mass and architecture and that this arises from chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:27519049

  10. Inducible Conditional Vascular-Specific Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta/Delta Leads to Rapid Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Vukolic, Ana; Baudouy, Delphine; Michiels, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors which function as ligand-activated transcription factors. Among them, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARβ/δ) is highly expressed in the heart and thought to have cardioprotective functions due to its beneficial effects in metabolic syndrome. As we already showed that PPARβ/δ activation resulted in an enhanced cardiac angiogenesis and growth without impairment of heart function, we were interested to determine the effects of a specific activation of PPARβ/δ in the vasculature on cardiac performance under normal and in chronic ischemic heart disease conditions. We analyzed the effects of a specific PPARβ/δ overexpression in endothelial cells on the heart using an inducible conditional vascular-specific mouse model. We demonstrate that vessel-specific overexpression of PPARβ/δ induces rapid cardiac angiogenesis and growth with an increase in cardiomyocyte size. Upon myocardial infarction, vascular overexpression of PPARβ/δ, despite the enhanced cardiac vessel formation, does not protect against chronic ischemic injury. Our results suggest that the proper balance of PPARβ/δ activation in the different cardiac cell types is required to obtain beneficial effects on the outcome in chronic ischemic heart disease. PMID:27057154

  11. Overexpression of the laeA gene leads to increased production of cyclopiazonic acid in Aspergillus fumisynnematus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eun Jin; Kim, Na Kyeong; Lee, Doyup; Kim, Won Gon; Lee, Inhyung

    2015-11-01

    To explore novel bioactive compounds produced via activation of secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters, we overexpressed an ortholog of laeA, a gene that encodes a global positive regulator of secondary metabolism in Aspergillus fumisynnematus F746. Overexpression of the laeA gene under the alcA promoter resulted in the production of less pigment, shorter conidial head chains, and fewer conidia. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that SM production in OE::laeA was significantly increased, and included new metabolites that were not detected in the wild type. Among them, a compound named F1 was selected on the basis of its high production levels and antibacterial effects. F1 was purified by column chromatography and preparative TLC and identified as cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) by LC/MS, which had been previously known as mycotoxin. As A. fumisynnematus was not known to produce CPA, these results suggest that overexpression of the laeA gene can be used to explore the synthesis of useful bioactive compounds, even in a fungus for which the genome sequence is unavailable.

  12. Overexpression of Guanylate Cyclase Activating Protein 2 in Rod Photoreceptors In Vivo Leads to Morphological Changes at the Synaptic Ribbon

    PubMed Central

    López-Begines, Santiago; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Cuenca, Nicolás; Llorens, Jordi; de la Villa, Pedro; Méndez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase activating proteins are EF-hand containing proteins that confer calcium sensitivity to retinal guanylate cyclase at the outer segment discs of photoreceptor cells. By making the rate of cGMP synthesis dependent on the free intracellular calcium levels set by illumination, GCAPs play a fundamental role in the recovery of the light response and light adaptation. The main isoforms GCAP1 and GCAP2 also localize to the synaptic terminal, where their function is not known. Based on the reported interaction of GCAP2 with Ribeye, the major component of synaptic ribbons, it was proposed that GCAP2 could mediate the synaptic ribbon dynamic changes that happen in response to light. We here present a thorough ultrastructural analysis of rod synaptic terminals in loss-of-function (GCAP1/GCAP2 double knockout) and gain-of-function (transgenic overexpression) mouse models of GCAP2. Rod synaptic ribbons in GCAPs−/− mice did not differ from wildtype ribbons when mice were raised in constant darkness, indicating that GCAPs are not required for ribbon early assembly or maturation. Transgenic overexpression of GCAP2 in rods led to a shortening of synaptic ribbons, and to a higher than normal percentage of club-shaped and spherical ribbon morphologies. Restoration of GCAP2 expression in the GCAPs−/− background (GCAP2 expression in the absence of endogenous GCAP1) had the striking result of shortening ribbon length to a much higher degree than overexpression of GCAP2 in the wildtype background, as well as reducing the thickness of the outer plexiform layer without affecting the number of rod photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that preservation of the GCAP1 to GCAP2 relative levels is relevant for maintaining the integrity of the synaptic terminal. Our demonstration of GCAP2 immunolocalization at synaptic ribbons at the ultrastructural level would support a role of GCAPs at mediating the effect of light on morphological remodeling changes of synaptic

  13. Overexpression of ARGOS Genes Modifies Plant Sensitivity to Ethylene, Leading to Improved Drought Tolerance in Both Arabidopsis and Maize[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinrui; Habben, Jeffrey E.; Archibald, Rayeann L.; Drummond, Bruce J.; Chamberlin, Mark A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lafitte, H. Renee; Weers, Ben P.

    2015-01-01

    Lack of sufficient water is a major limiting factor to crop production worldwide, and the development of drought-tolerant germplasm is needed to improve crop productivity. The phytohormone ethylene modulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to abiotic stress. Recent research has shown that modifying ethylene biosynthesis and signaling can enhance plant drought tolerance. Here, we report novel negative regulators of ethylene signal transduction in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). These regulators are encoded by the ARGOS gene family. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of maize ARGOS1 (ZmARGOS1), ZmARGOS8, Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1 (AtOSR1), and AtOSR2 reduced plant sensitivity to ethylene, leading to enhanced drought tolerance. RNA profiling and genetic analysis suggested that the ZmARGOS1 transgene acts between an ethylene receptor and CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 in the ethylene signaling pathway, affecting ethylene perception or the early stages of ethylene signaling. Overexpressed ZmARGOS1 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane, where the ethylene receptors and the ethylene signaling protein ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 and REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 reside. In transgenic maize plants, overexpression of ARGOS genes also reduces ethylene sensitivity. Moreover, field testing showed that UBIQUITIN1:ZmARGOS8 maize events had a greater grain yield than nontransgenic controls under both drought stress and well-watered conditions. PMID:26220950

  14. Overexpression of Poplar Xylem Sucrose Synthase in Tobacco Leads to a Thickened Cell Wall and Increased Height

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhigang; Qu, Zanshuang; Zhang, Lijie; Zhao, Shuanjing; Bi, Zhihong; Ji, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is considered the first key enzyme for secondary growth because it is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose and UDP into UDP-glucose and fructose. Although SuSy enzymes preferentially functions in the direction of sucrose cleavage at most cellular condition, they also catalyze the synthetic reaction. We isolated a gene that encodes a SuSy from Populus simonii×Populus nigra and named it PsnSuSy2 because it shares high similarity to SuSy2 in Populus trichocarpa. RT-PCR revealed that PsnSuSy2 was highly expressed in xylem, but lowly expressed in young leaves. To characterize its functions in secondary growth, multiple tobacco overexpression transgenic lines of PnsSuSy2 were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The PsnSuSy2 expression levels and altered wood properties in stem segments from the different transgenic lines were carefully characterized. The results demonstrated that the levels of PsnSuSy2 enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, total soluble sugars, fructose and glucose increased significantly, while the sucrose level decreased significantly. Consequently, the cellulose content and fiber length increased, whereas the lignin content decreased, suggesting that PsnSuSy2 plays a significant role in cleaving sucrose into UDP-glucose and fructose to facilitate cellulose biosynthesis and that promotion of cellulose biosynthesis suppresses lignin biosynthesis. Additionally, the noticeable increase in the lodging resistance in transgenic tobacco stem suggested that the cell wall characteristics were altered by PsnSuSy2 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to study the cell wall morphology of stem, and surprisingly, we found that the secondary cell wall was significantly thicker in transgenic tobacco. However, the thickened secondary cell wall did not negatively affect the height of the plants because the PsnSuSy2- overexpressing lines grew taller than the

  15. Overexpression of a phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 leads to an increase in triacylglycerol production in oleaginous Rhodococcus strains.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Martín A; Comba, Santiago; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2015-03-01

    Oleaginous Rhodococcus strains are able to accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG). Phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to yield diacylglycerol (DAG), a key precursor for TAG biosynthesis. Studies to establish its role in lipid metabolism have been mainly focused in eukaryotes but not in bacteria. In this work, we identified and characterized a putative PAP type 2 (PAP2) encoded by the ro00075 gene in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1. Heterologous expression of ro00075 in Escherichia coli resulted in a fourfold increase in PAP activity and twofold in DAG content. The conditional deletion of ro00075 in RHA1 led to a decrease in the content of DAG and TAG, whereas its overexpression in both RHA1 and Rhodococcus opacus PD630 promoted an increase up to 10 to 15 % by cellular dry weight in TAG content. On the other hand, expression of ro00075 in the non-oleaginous strain Rhodococcus fascians F7 promoted an increase in total fatty acid content up to 7 % at the expense of free fatty acid (FFA), DAG, and TAG fractions. Moreover, co-expression of ro00075/atf2 genes resulted in a fourfold increase in total fatty acid content by a further increase of the FFA and TAG fractions. The results of this study suggest that ro00075 encodes for a PAP2 enzyme actively involved in TAG biosynthesis. Overexpression of this gene, as single one or with an atf gene, provides an alternative approach to increase the biosynthesis and accumulation of bacterial oils as a potential source of raw material for biofuel production.

  16. [Cloning of GmHSFA1 gene and its overexpression leading to enhancement of heat tolerance in transgenic soybean].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jun; Ye, Chun-Jiang; Lü, Hui-Ying; Xu, Min-Xin; Li, Wei; Zhang, Li-Ming; Wang, Chao; Luo, Shu-Ping; Zhu, Bao-Ge

    2006-11-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) are important in regulating heat stress response by mediating expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes in various plant species. In the present study, a novel GmHSFA1 with an ORF of 1,533 bp (full-length cDNA sequence of 1,781 bp) was cloned from soybean genome via comparative genomic approach and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). This gene encodes 510 amino acids consisting of a protein of 56.2 kDa (GenBank accession number: AY458843). Similar to other HSFs, GmHSFA1 has the basic modular structure including DBD, OD, NLS, and CTAD. BLAST analysis revealed the identity of 52.46% between amino acid sequences between GmHSFA1 and LpHSFA1 that has the highest similarity to GmHSFA1 in all HSFA1s in various plant species. The results from RT-PCR, Northern blotting, and transformation showed: 1) GmHsfA1 exhibited the constitutive expression patterns in different tissues of soybean; 2) The expression level of GmHsfA1 in transgenic plants was notably higher than that in non-transgenic plants; 3) Overexpression of GmHsfA1 activated transcription of GmHSP22 in transgenic plants under normal conditions and enhanced obviously expressions of GmHSP23 and GmHSP70 in transgenic plants under heat stress conditions; 4) Heat tolerant temperature (as high as 52 degrees C) of transgenic plants was remarkably higher than that of non-transgenic plants. These results preliminarily proved that the overexpression of GmHsfA1 possibly led to the notable enhancement of heat-tolerant level of transgenic plants by mediating the activation of transcription or improvement of expression of some GmHSPs in the GmHsfA1's downstream in transgenic plants, suggesting GmHSFA1 is a novel and functional heat shock transcription factor of soybean.

  17. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  18. Genomic loss of EZH2 leads to epigenetic modifications and overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The role of EZH2 in cancer is complex and may vary depending on cancer type or stage. We examined the effect of altered EZH2 levels on H3K27 methylation, HOX gene expression, and malignant phenotype in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. We also studied links between EZH2 expression and prognosis in MDS patients. Patients with high-grade MDS exhibited lower levels of EZH2 expression than those with low-grade MDS. Low EZH2 expression was associated with high percentages of blasts, shorter survival, and increased transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MDS patients frequently had reductions in EZH2 copy number. EZH2 knockdown increased tumor growth capacity and reduced H3K27me3 levels in both MDS-derived leukemia cells and in a xenograft model. H3K27me3 levels were reduced and HOX gene cluster expression was increased in MDS patients. EZH2 knockdown also increased HOX gene cluster expression by reducing H3K27me3, and H3K27 demethylating agents increased HOX gene cluster expression in MDS-derived cell lines. These findings suggest genomic loss of EZH2 contributes to overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in MDS through epigenetic modifications. PMID:26812882

  19. PABA/NO lead optimization: Improved targeting of cytotoxicity to glutathione S-transferase P1-overexpressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youseung; Maciag, Anna E; Cao, Zhao; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K; Holland, Ryan J

    2015-08-01

    PABA/NO [O(2)-{2,4-dinitro-5-[4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy]phenyl} 1-(N,N-dimethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate] is a nitric oxide (NO)-releasing arylating agent designed to be selectively activated by reaction with glutathione (GSH) on catalysis by glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), an enzyme frequently overexpressed in cancer cells. PABA/NO has proven active in several cancer models in vitro and in vivo, but its tendency to be metabolized via a variety of pathways, some that generate inactive metabolites and hydrolysis products, limits its potential as a drug. Here we show that a simple replacement of cyano for nitro at the 4 position to give compound 4b ('p-cyano-PABA/NO') has the dual effect of slowing the undesired side reactions while enhancing the proportion of NO release and arylating activity on catalysis by GSTP1. Compound 4b showed increased resistance to hydrolysis and uncatalyzed reaction with GSH, along with a more favorable product distribution in the presence of GSTP1. It also showed significant proapoptotic activity. The data suggest p-cyano-PABA/NO to be a more promising prodrug than PABA/NO, with better selectivity toward cancer cells.

  20. Premature Termination of MexR Leads to Overexpression of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study was undertaken to investigate the mutations that are present in mexR gene of multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from a tertiary referral hospital of north east India. Methods 76 MDR clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from the patients who were admitted to or attended the clinics of Silchar medical college and hospital. They were screened phenotypically for the presence of efflux pump activity by an inhibitor based method. Acquired resistance mechanisms were detected by multiplex PCR. Real time PCR was performed to study the expression of mexA gene of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in isolates with increase efflux pump activity. mexR gene of the isolates with overexpressed MexAB-OprM efflux pump was amplified, sequenced and analysed. Results Out of 76 MDR isolates, 24 were found to exhibit efflux pump activity phenotypically against ciprofloxacin and meropenem. Acquired resistance mechanisms were absent in 11 of them and among those isolates, 8 of them overexpressed MexAB-OprM. All the 8 isolates possessed mutation in mexR gene. 11 transversions, 4 transitions, 2 deletion mutations and 2 insertion mutations were found in all the isolates. However, the most significant observation was the formation of a termination codon at 35th position which resulted in the termination of the polypeptide and leads to overexpression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusions This study highlighted emergence of a novel mutation which is probably associated with multi drug resistance. Therefore, further investigations and actions are needed to prevent or at least hold back the expansion and emergence of newer mutations in nosocomial pathogens which may compromise future treatment options. PMID:26866484

  1. Lead uptake increases drought tolerance of wild type and transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) overexpressing gsh 1.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, Sladjana; Lang, Friedericke; Djukic, Matilda; Djunisijevic-Bojovic, Danijela; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-09-01

    Growth and development of plants largely depends on their adaptation ability in a changing climate. This is particularly true on heavy metal contaminated soils, but the interaction of heavy metal stress and climate on plant performance has not been intensively investigated. The aim of the present study was to elucidate if transgenic poplars (Populus tremula x P. alba) with enhanced glutathione content possess an enhanced tolerance to drought and lead (Pb) exposure (single and in combination) and if they are good candidates for phytoremediation of Pb contaminated soil. Lead exposure reduced growth and biomass accumulation only in above-ground tissue of wild type poplar, although most of lead accumulated in the roots. Drought caused a decline of the water content rather than reduced biomass production, while Pb counteracted this decline in the combined exposure. Apparently, metals such as Pb possess a protective function against drought, because they interact with abscisic acid dependent stomatal closure. Lead exposure decreased while drought increased glutathione content in leaves of both plant types. Lead accumulation was higher in the roots of transgenic plants, presumably as a result of chelation by glutathione. Water deprivation enhanced Pb accumulation in the roots, but Pb was subject to leakage out of the roots after re-watering. Transgenic plants showed better adaptation under mild drought plus Pb exposure partially due to improved glutathione synthesis. However, the transgenic plants cannot be considered as a good candidate for phytoremediation of Pb, due to its small translocation to the shoots and its leakage out of the roots upon re-watering. PMID:27396669

  2. Overexpression of Pa_1_10620 encoding a mitochondrial Podospora anserina protein with homology to superoxide dismutases and ribosomal proteins leads to lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Böhl, Lena; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-02-01

    In biological systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent 'double edged swords': as signaling molecules they are essential for proper development, as reactive agents they cause molecular damage and adverse effects like degeneration and aging. A well-coordinated control of ROS is therefore of key importance. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are enzymes active in the detoxification of superoxide. The number of isoforms of these proteins varies among species. Here we report the characterization of the putative protein encoded by Pa_1_10620 that has been previously annotated to code for a mitochondrial ribosomal protein but shares also sequence domains with SODs. We report that the gene is transcribed in P. anserina cultures of all ages and that the encoded protein localizes to mitochondria. In strains overexpressing Pa_1_10620 in a genetic background in which PaSod3, the mitochondrial MnSOD of P. anserina, is deleted, no SOD activity could be identified in isolated mitochondria. However, overexpression of the gene leads to lifespan extension suggesting a pro-survival function of the protein in P. anserina. PMID:25151510

  3. Epigenetic alterations leading to TMPRSS4 promoter hypomethylation and protein overexpression predict poor prognosis in squamous lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Maria; Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Redrado, Miriam; de Aberasturi, Arrate L.; Segura, Victor; Bodegas, Maria Elena; Pajares, Maria J.; Pio, Ruben; Freire, Javier; Gomez-Roman, Javier; Montuenga, Luis M.; Esteller, Manel; Sandoval, Juan; Calvo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, which highlights the need of innovative therapeutic options. Although targeted therapies can be successfully used in a subset of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (ADC), they are not appropriate for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In addition, there is an unmet need for the identification of prognostic biomarkers that can select patients at risk of relapse in early stages. Here, we have used several cohorts of NSCLC patients to analyze the prognostic value of both protein expression and DNA promoter methylation status of the prometastatic serine protease TMPRSS4. Moreover, expression and promoter methylation was evaluated in a panel of 46 lung cancer cell lines. We have demonstrated that a high TMPRSS4 expression is an independent prognostic factor in SCC. Similarly, aberrant hypomethylation in tumors, which correlates with high TMPRSS4 expression, is an independent prognostic predictor in SCC. The inverse correlation between expression and methylation status was also observed in cell lines. In vitro studies showed that treatment of cells lacking TMPRSS4 expression with a demethylating agent significantly increased TMPRSS4 levels. In conclusion, TMPRSS4 is a novel independent prognostic biomarker regulated by epigenetic changes in SCC and a potential therapeutic target in this tumor type, where targeted therapy is still underdeveloped. PMID:26989022

  4. Gene amplification is a relatively frequent event leading to ZBTB7A (Pokemon) overexpression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulou, K; Pateras, I S; Evangelou, K; Tsantoulis, P K; Liontos, M; Kittas, C; Tiniakos, D G; Kotsinas, A; Cordon-Cardo, C; Gorgoulis, V G

    2007-11-01

    ZBTB7A (Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is the suppression of the p14ARF tumour suppressor gene. Although ZBTB7A expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, there are no reports dealing with its expression in solid tumours. Given that p14(ARF) inhibits MDM2, the main negative regulator of p53, we hypothesized that overexpression of ZBTB7A could lead indirectly to p53 inactivation. To this end, we examined the status of ZBTB7A and its relationship with tumour kinetics (proliferation and apoptosis) and nodal members of the p53 network in a panel of 83 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). We observed, in the majority of the samples, prominent expression of ZBTB7A in the cancerous areas compared to negligible presence in the adjacent normal tissue elements. Gene amplification (two- to five-fold) was found in 27.7% of the cases, denoting its significance as a mechanism driving ZBTB7A overproduction in NSCLCs. In the remaining non-amplified group of carcinomas, analysis of the mRNA and protein expression patterns suggested that deregulation at the transcriptional and post-translational level accounts for ZBTB7A overexpression. Proliferation was associated with ZBTB7A expression (p = 0.033) but not apoptosis. The association with proliferation was reflected in the positive correlation between ZBTB7A expression and tumour size (p = 0.018). The overexpression of ZBTB7A in both p53 mutant and p53 wild-type cases, implies either a synergistic effect or that ZBTB7A exerts its oncogenic properties independently of the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis. The concomitant expression of ZBTB7A with p14(ARF) (p = 0.039), instead of the anticipated inverse relation, supports the latter notion. In conclusion, regardless of the pathway followed, the distinct expression of ZBTB7A in cancerous areas and the association with proliferation and tumour size pinpoints a role for this novel cell cycle regulator in the

  5. Gene amplification is a relatively frequent event leading to ZBTB7A (Pokemon) overexpression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulou, K; Pateras, I S; Evangelou, K; Tsantoulis, P K; Liontos, M; Kittas, C; Tiniakos, D G; Kotsinas, A; Cordon-Cardo, C; Gorgoulis, V G

    2007-11-01

    ZBTB7A (Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is the suppression of the p14ARF tumour suppressor gene. Although ZBTB7A expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, there are no reports dealing with its expression in solid tumours. Given that p14(ARF) inhibits MDM2, the main negative regulator of p53, we hypothesized that overexpression of ZBTB7A could lead indirectly to p53 inactivation. To this end, we examined the status of ZBTB7A and its relationship with tumour kinetics (proliferation and apoptosis) and nodal members of the p53 network in a panel of 83 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). We observed, in the majority of the samples, prominent expression of ZBTB7A in the cancerous areas compared to negligible presence in the adjacent normal tissue elements. Gene amplification (two- to five-fold) was found in 27.7% of the cases, denoting its significance as a mechanism driving ZBTB7A overproduction in NSCLCs. In the remaining non-amplified group of carcinomas, analysis of the mRNA and protein expression patterns suggested that deregulation at the transcriptional and post-translational level accounts for ZBTB7A overexpression. Proliferation was associated with ZBTB7A expression (p = 0.033) but not apoptosis. The association with proliferation was reflected in the positive correlation between ZBTB7A expression and tumour size (p = 0.018). The overexpression of ZBTB7A in both p53 mutant and p53 wild-type cases, implies either a synergistic effect or that ZBTB7A exerts its oncogenic properties independently of the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis. The concomitant expression of ZBTB7A with p14(ARF) (p = 0.039), instead of the anticipated inverse relation, supports the latter notion. In conclusion, regardless of the pathway followed, the distinct expression of ZBTB7A in cancerous areas and the association with proliferation and tumour size pinpoints a role for this novel cell cycle regulator in the

  6. Inhibitory effects of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 on the aorta-gonad-mapharsen hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Naoki; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Mochita, Miyuki; Taga, Tetsuya . E-mail: taga@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-01-01

    Definitive hematopoiesis starts in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mouse embryo. Our previous studies revealed that STAT3, a gp130 downstream transcription factor, is required for AGM hematopoiesis and that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates serine-727 of STAT3. HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase known to be involved in transcriptional repression and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the role of HIPK2 in hematopoiesis in mouse embryo. HIPK2 transcripts were found in fetal hematopoietic tissues such as the mouse AGM region and fetal liver. In cultured AGM cells, HIPK2 protein was detected in adherent cells. Functional analyses of HIPK2 were carried out by introducing wild-type and mutant HIPK2 constructs into AGM cultures. Production of CD45{sup +} hematopoietic cells was suppressed by forced expression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures. This suppression required the kinase domain and nuclear localization signals of HIPK2, but the kinase activity was dispensable. HIPK2-overexpressing AGM-derived nonadherent cells did not form cobblestone-like colonies in cultures with stromal cells. Furthermore, overexpression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures impeded the expansion of CD45{sup low}c-Kit{sup +} cells, which exhibit the immature hematopoietic progenitor phenotype. These data indicate that HIPK2 plays a negative regulatory role in AGM hematopoiesis in the mouse embryo.

  7. Downregulation of the Musca domestica peptidoglycan recognition protein SC (PGRP-SC) leads to overexpression of antimicrobial peptides and tardy pupation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yifu; Tang, Ting; Gu, Jihai; Sun, Lingling; Gao, Xiaobin; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Xiaochun; Liu, Fengsong; Wang, Jianhui

    2015-10-01

    PGRP (peptidoglycan recognition protein) is a conserved protein family that recognizes the peptidoglycan in bacterial cell wall and causes the activation of various innate immune responses. Previous studies have reported that PGRP-SCs in Drosophila dampen the activation of Immune Deficiency (Imd) pathway to microbial infection, and participate in the lifespan extension of the insects. To facilitate understanding the function of PGRP-SCs from an evolutionary angle, we identified and functionally characterized the PGRP-SC gene in the housefly Musca domestica, a species that has adapted to a septic environment much harsher than the natural habitat of Drosophila. The gene designated as MdPGRP-SC was found most abundantly expressed in the 3rd instar larvae, and is expressed at this developmental stage predominantly in the gut. MdPGRP-SC was virtually unchanged in whole larvae after a septic injury at the second larval instar, while two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), diptericin and attacin, were upregulated in the first 24h but not later. Through dsRNA microinjection, MdPGRP-SC was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi), and caused the significant increased expression of diptericin and attacin. The pupation of MdPGRP-SC-depleted larvae was severely suppressed compared to controls. Opposite to the expression trend of MdPGRP-SC, a spontaneous active expression of diptericin and attacin was found in pre-pupae but not in third instar larvae. Taken together, our study reveals that downregulation of MdPGRP-SC leads to the overexpression of the AMPs, and is involved in the larvae-to-pupa transition of housefly.

  8. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  9. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  10. Overexpression of a pectin methylesterase inhibitor in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to altered growth morphology of the stem and defective organ separation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kerstin; Levesque-Tremblay, Gabriel; Fernandes, Anwesha; Wormit, Alexandra; Bartels, Sebastian; Usadel, Bjoern; Kermode, Allison

    2013-01-01

    The methylesterification status of cell wall pectins, mediated through the interplay of pectin methylesterases (PMEs) and pectin methylesterase inhibitors (PMEIs), influences the biophysical properties of plant cell walls. We found that the overexpression of a PMEI gene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants caused the stems to develop twists and loops, most strongly around points on the stem where leaves or inflorescences failed to separate from the main stem. Altered elasticity of the stem, underdevelopment of the leaf cuticle, and changes in the sugar composition of the cell walls of stems were evident in the PMEI overexpression lines. We discuss the mechanisms that potentially underlie the aberrant growth phenotypes. PMID:24675171

  11. Overexpression of the PP2A regulatory subunit Tap46 leads to enhanced plant growth through stimulation of the TOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Ahn, Hee-Kyung; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-02-01

    Tap46, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), plays an essential role in plant growth and development through a functional link with the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathway. Here, we have characterized the molecular mechanisms behind a gain-of-function phenotype of Tap46 and its relationship with TOR to gain further insights into Tap46 function in plants. Constitutive overexpression of Tap46 in Arabidopsis resulted in overall growth stimulation with enlarged organs, such as leaves and siliques. Kinematic analysis of leaf growth revealed that increased cell size was mainly responsible for the leaf enlargement. Tap46 overexpression also enhanced seed size and viability under accelerated ageing conditions. Enhanced plant growth was also observed in dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible Tap46 overexpression Arabidopsis lines, accompanied by increased cellular activities of nitrate-assimilating enzymes. DEX-induced Tap46 overexpression and Tap46 RNAi resulted in increased and decreased phosphorylation of S6 kinase (S6K), respectively, which is a sensitive indicator of endogenous TOR activity, and Tap46 interacted with S6K in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, inactivation of TOR by estradiol-inducible RNAi or rapamycin treatment decreased Tap46 protein levels, but increased PP2A catalytic subunit levels. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that Tap46 overexpression induced transcriptional modulation of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, ribosome biogenesis, and lignin biosynthesis. These findings suggest that Tap46 modulates plant growth as a positive effector of the TOR signalling pathway and Tap46/PP2Ac protein abundance is regulated by TOR activity.

  12. Overexpression of miR156 in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) results in various morphological alterations and leads to improved biomass production

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chunxiang; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Zhou, Chuanen; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Ji-Yi; Matts, Jessica; Wolf, Jennifer; Mann, David G J; Stewart, C Neal; Tang, Yuhong; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has been developed into a dedicated herbaceous bioenergy crop. Biomass yield is a major target trait for genetic improvement of switchgrass. microRNAs have emerged as a prominent class of gene regulatory factors that has the potential to improve complex traits such as biomass yield. A miR156b precursor was overexpressed in switchgrass. The effects of miR156 overexpression on SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL) genes were revealed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Morphological alterations, biomass yield, saccharification efficiency and forage digestibility of the transgenic plants were characterized. miR156 controls apical dominance and floral transition in switchgrass by suppressing its target SPL genes. Relatively low levels of miR156 overexpression were sufficient to increase biomass yield while producing plants with normal flowering time. Moderate levels of miR156 led to improved biomass but the plants were non-flowering. These two groups of plants produced 58%–101% more biomass yield compared with the control. However, high miR156 levels resulted in severely stunted growth. The degree of morphological alterations of the transgenic switchgrass depends on miR156 level. Compared with floral transition, a lower miR156 level is required to disrupt apical dominance. The improvement in biomass yield was mainly because of the increase in tiller number. Targeted overexpression of miR156 also improved solubilized sugar yield and forage digestibility, and offered an effective approach for transgene containment. PMID:22239253

  13. The overexpression of the pine transcription factor PpDof5 in Arabidopsis leads to increased lignin content and affects carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rueda-López, Marina; Cañas, Rafael A; Canales, Javier; Cánovas, Francisco M; Ávila, Concepción

    2015-12-01

    PpDof 5 is a regulator of the expression of glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) genes in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissues of maritime pine. We have used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system to study PpDof 5 function in planta, generating transgenic lines overexpressing the pine transcription factor. The overexpression of PpDof 5 resulted in a substantial increase of lignin content with a simultaneous regulation of carbon and nitrogen key genes. In addition, partitioning in carbon and nitrogen compounds was spread via various secondary metabolic pathways. These results suggest pleiotropic effects of PpDof 5 expression on various metabolic pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Plants overexpressing PpDof 5 exhibited upregulation of genes encoding enzymes for sucrose and starch biosynthesis, with a parallel increase in the content of soluble sugars. When the plants were grown under nitrate as the sole nitrogen source, they exhibited a significant regulation of the expression of genes involved mainly in signaling, but similar growth rates to wild-type plants. However, plants grown under ammonium exhibited major induction of the expression of photosynthetic genes and differential expression of ammonium and nitrate transporters. All these data suggest that in addition to controlling ammonium assimilation, PpDof 5 could be also involved in the regulation of other pathways in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in pine trees. PMID:26333592

  14. Neurturin Overexpression in Skin Enhances Expression of TRPM8 in Cutaneous Sensory Neurons and Leads to Behavioral Sensitivity to Cold and Menthol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Jing, Xiaotang; DeBerry, Jennifer J.; Schwartz, Erica S.; Molliver, Derek C.; Albers, Kathryn M.; Davis, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurturin (NRTN) is a member of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of ligands that exerts its actions via Ret tyrosine kinase and GFRα2. Expression of the Ret/GFRα2 co-receptor complex is primarily restricted to the peripheral nervous system and is selectively expressed by sensory neurons that bind the isolectin B4 (IB4). To determine how target-derived NRTN affects sensory neuron properties, transgenic mice that overexpress NRTN in keratinocytes (NRTN-OE mice) were analyzed. Overexpression of NRTN increased the density of PGP9.5-positive, but not calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive, free nerve endings in footpad epidermis. GFRα2- immunopositive somata were hypertrophied in NRTN-OE mice. Electron microscopic analysis further revealed hypertrophy of unmyelinated sensory axons and a subset of myelinated axons. Overexpression of NRTN increased the relative level of mRNAs encoding GFRα2 and Ret, the ATP receptor P2X3 (found in IB4-positive, GFRα2-expressing sensory neurons), the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 2a, and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily member M8 (TRPM8) in sensory ganglia. Behavioral testing of NRTN-OE mice revealed an increased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli in glabrous skin of the hind paw. NRTN-OE mice also displayed increased behavioral sensitivity to cool temperature (17°C-20°C) and oral sensitivity to menthol. The increase in cool and menthol sensitivity correlated with a significant increase in TRPM8 expression and the percentage of menthol-responsive cutaneous sensory neurons. These data indicate that the expression level of NRTN in the skin modulates gene expression in cutaneous sensory afferents and behavioral sensitivity to thermal, chemical and mechanical stimuli. PMID:23365243

  15. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA HOTAIR leads to chemoresistance by activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yang, Siqin; Su, Ning; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Jinjin; Qiu, Haifeng; He, Xiaoying

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) is significantly correlated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in human ovarian cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the roles of HOTAIR in the initiation and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer. As our data show, HOTAIR overexpression promoted cell cycle progression (and thus cell proliferation) by activating the wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Likewise, knockdown of HOTAIR suppressed cell proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G1 phase via inhibition of wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the results of primary culture demonstrated that elevated HOTAIR expression correlated positively with chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. In vitro and in vivo, HOTAIR induced cellular resistance to cisplatin by activating the wnt/β-catenin pathway, which could be reversed by pre-treatment with the wnt/β-catenin inhibitor, XAV939. In conclusion, HOTAIR promotes the initiation and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer by activating wnt/β-catenin signaling, suggesting that HOTAIR might be a potent therapeutic target for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26341496

  16. Overexpression of the maize GRF10, an endogenous truncated growth-regulating factor protein, leads to reduction in leaf size and plant height.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Dengfeng; Xue, Ming; Qian, Jianjun; He, Yan; Wang, Shoucai

    2014-11-01

    It has long been thought that growth-regulating factors (GRFs) gene family members act as transcriptional activators to play important roles in multiple plant developmental processes. However, the recent characterization of Arabidopsis GRF7 showed that it functions as a transcriptional repressor of osmotic stress-responsive genes. This highlights the complex and diverse mechanisms by which different GRF members use to take action. In this study, the maize (Zea mays L.) GRF10 was functionally characterized to improve this concept. The deduced ZmGRF10 protein retains the N-terminal QLQ and WRC domains, the characteristic regions as protein-interacting and DNA-binding domains, respectively. However, it lacks nearly the entire C-terminal domain, the regions executing transactivation activity. Consistently, ZmGRF10 protein maintains the ability to interact with GRF-interacting factors (GIFs) proteins, but lacks transactivation activity. Overexpression of ZmGRF10 in maize led to a reduction in leaf size and plant height through decreasing cell proliferation, whereas the yield-related traits were not affected. Transcriptome analysis revealed that multiple biological pathways were affected by ZmGRF10 overexpression, including a few transcriptional regulatory genes, which have been demonstrated to have important roles in controlling plant growth and development. We propose that ZmGRF10 aids in fine-tuning the homeostasis of the GRF-GIF complex in the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:24854713

  17. Overexpression of the maize GRF10, an endogenous truncated growth-regulating factor protein, leads to reduction in leaf size and plant height.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Dengfeng; Xue, Ming; Qian, Jianjun; He, Yan; Wang, Shoucai

    2014-11-01

    It has long been thought that growth-regulating factors (GRFs) gene family members act as transcriptional activators to play important roles in multiple plant developmental processes. However, the recent characterization of Arabidopsis GRF7 showed that it functions as a transcriptional repressor of osmotic stress-responsive genes. This highlights the complex and diverse mechanisms by which different GRF members use to take action. In this study, the maize (Zea mays L.) GRF10 was functionally characterized to improve this concept. The deduced ZmGRF10 protein retains the N-terminal QLQ and WRC domains, the characteristic regions as protein-interacting and DNA-binding domains, respectively. However, it lacks nearly the entire C-terminal domain, the regions executing transactivation activity. Consistently, ZmGRF10 protein maintains the ability to interact with GRF-interacting factors (GIFs) proteins, but lacks transactivation activity. Overexpression of ZmGRF10 in maize led to a reduction in leaf size and plant height through decreasing cell proliferation, whereas the yield-related traits were not affected. Transcriptome analysis revealed that multiple biological pathways were affected by ZmGRF10 overexpression, including a few transcriptional regulatory genes, which have been demonstrated to have important roles in controlling plant growth and development. We propose that ZmGRF10 aids in fine-tuning the homeostasis of the GRF-GIF complex in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  18. Overexpression of an Isoprenyl Diphosphate Synthase in Spruce Leads to Unexpected Terpene Diversion Products That Function in Plant Defense1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Raimund; Berasategui, Aileen; Paetz, Christian; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schmidt, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Spruce (Picea spp.) and other conifers employ terpenoid-based oleoresin as part of their defense against herbivores and pathogens. The short-chain isoprenyl diphosphate synthases (IDS) are situated at critical branch points in terpene biosynthesis, producing the precursors of the different terpenoid classes. To determine the role of IDS and to create altered terpene phenotypes for assessing the defensive role of terpenoids, we overexpressed a bifunctional spruce IDS, a geranyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase in white spruce (Picea glauca) saplings. While transcript level (350-fold), enzyme activity level (7-fold), and in planta geranyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate levels (4- to 8-fold) were significantly increased in the needles of transgenic plants, there was no increase in the major monoterpenes and diterpene acids of the resin and no change in primary isoprenoids, such as sterols, chlorophylls, and carotenoids. Instead, large amounts of geranylgeranyl fatty acid esters, known from various gymnosperm and angiosperm plant species, accumulated in needles and were shown to act defensively in reducing the performance of larvae of the nun moth (Lymantria monacha), a conifer pest in Eurasia. These results show the impact of overexpression of an IDS and the defensive role of an unexpected accumulation product of terpenoid biosynthesis with the potential for a broader function in plant protection. PMID:24346420

  19. Overexpression of the Aspergillus niger GatA transporter leads to preferential use of D-galacturonic acid over D-xylose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pectin is a structural heteropolysaccharide of the primary cell walls of plants and as such is a significant fraction of agricultural waste residues that is currently insufficiently used. Its main component, D-galacturonic acid, is an attractive substrate for bioconversion. The complete metabolic pathway is present in the genome of Aspergillus niger, that is used in this study. The objective was to identify the D-galacturonic acid transporter in A. niger and to use this transporter to study D-galacturonic acid metabolism. We have functionally characterized the gene An14g04280 that encodes the D-galacturonic acid transporter in A. niger. In a mixed sugar fermentation it was found that the An14g04280 overexpression strain, in contrast to the parent control strain, has a preference for D-galacturonic acid over D-xylose as substrate. Overexpression of this transporter in A. niger resulted in a strong increase of D-galacturonic acid uptake and induction of the D-galacturonic acid reductase activity, suggesting a metabolite controlled regulation of the endogenous D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway. PMID:25177540

  20. RNA Interference of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Gene Expression in THP-1 Cell Line Leads to Toll-Like Receptor-4 Overexpression/Activation As Well As Up-modulation of Annexin-II1

    PubMed Central

    Maratheftis, Christos I; Giannouli, Stavroula; Spachidou, Maria P; Panayotou, George; Voulgarelis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a candidate transcription factor for the regulation of the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) gene. Using a small interfering RNA-based (siRNA) process to silence IRF-1 gene expression in the leukemic monocytic cell line THP-1, we investigated whether such a modulation would alter TLR-4 expression and activation status in these cells. The siIRF-1 cells expressed elevated levels of TLR-4 mRNA and protein compared to controls by 90% and 77%, respectively. ICAM.1 protein expression and apoptosis levels were increased by 8.35- and 4.25-fold, respectively. The siIRF-1 cells overexpressed Bax mRNA compared to controls. Proteomic analysis revealed upmodulation of the Annexin-II protein in siIRF-1 THP-1 cells. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with an absence of full-length IRF-1 mRNA also overexpressed Annexin-II. It is plausible that this overexpression may lead to the activation of TLR-4 contributing to the increased apoptosis characterizing MDS. PMID:18084608

  1. Overexpression of Plasmodium berghei ATG8 by Liver Forms Leads to Cumulative Defects in Organelle Dynamics and to Generation of Noninfectious Merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Christiane; Ehrenman, Karen; Mlambo, Godfree; Mishra, Satish; Kumar, Kota Arun; Sacci, John B.; Sinnis, Photini

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmodium parasites undergo continuous cellular renovation to adapt to various environments in the vertebrate host and insect vector. In hepatocytes, Plasmodium berghei discards unneeded organelles for replication, such as micronemes involved in invasion. Concomitantly, intrahepatic parasites expand organelles such as the apicoplast that produce essential metabolites. We previously showed that the ATG8 conjugation system is upregulated in P. berghei liver forms and that P. berghei ATG8 (PbATG8) localizes to the membranes of the apicoplast and cytoplasmic vesicles. Here, we focus on the contribution of PbATG8 to the organellar changes that occur in intrahepatic parasites. We illustrated that micronemes colocalize with PbATG8-containing structures before expulsion from the parasite. Interference with PbATG8 function by overexpression results in poor development into late liver stages and production of small merosomes that contain immature merozoites unable to initiate a blood infection. At the cellular level, PbATG8-overexpressing P. berghei exhibits a delay in microneme compartmentalization into PbATG8-containing autophagosomes and elimination compared to parasites from the parental strain. The apicoplast, identifiable by immunostaining of the acyl carrier protein (ACP), undergoes an abnormally fast proliferation in mutant parasites. Over time, the ACP staining becomes diffuse in merosomes, indicating a collapse of the apicoplast. PbATG8 is not incorporated into the progeny of mutant parasites, in contrast to parental merozoites in which PbATG8 and ACP localize to the apicoplast. These observations reveal that Plasmodium ATG8 is a key effector in the development of merozoites by controlling microneme clearance and apicoplast proliferation and that dysregulation in ATG8 levels is detrimental for malaria infectivity. PMID:27353755

  2. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) receptors: Deficiency in tumor results in scant HBV infection and overexpression in peritumor leads to higher recurrence risk

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Fan, Qing-Min; Yu, Guo-Feng; Yu, Dan-Dan; Gao, Lu; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis and recurrence. Here, we sought to characterize intratumoral and peritumoral expression of HBsAg and its specific receptors in HBsAg-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further examined their correlation with the recurrence-free survival (RFS). HCC tissue and adjacent normal tissue specimens were acquired from HBsAg-positive patients. The presence of HBsAg and receptors, as well as hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were detected by tissue microassay and immunohistochemistry. Necroinflammatory activity was evaluated by HE staining. The mean IOD of HBsAg and HBV DNA in the intratumoral tissues was markedly lower than that in the peritumoral tissues (P < 0.001). Pearson correlation analysis further showed a significant correlation between the expression of HBsAg and NTCP (r = 0.461, P < 0.001) or ASGPR (r = 0.506, P < 0.001) in peritumoral tissues. And the peritumoral HBsAg and receptors presented a positive association with necroinflammatory activity (P < 0.05). Inflammation induced by HBV infection presented a positive association with HPCs activation (P < 0.05). Additionally, due to lack of HBV receptors, HPCs was not preferentially infected with HBV, but activated HPCs had a significant correlation with HBsAg expression in peritumoral tissues, and the peritumoral HPCs activation was associated with RFS of HCC patients, therefore, the overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor were also with higher recurrence risk (P < 0.05). In conclusion, lack of HBV receptors resulted in scant HBV infection in tumor cells, and overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor was strongly associated with higher recurrence risk in HCC patients. PMID:26515593

  3. Overexpression of Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response and Autophagic Turnover of Thick Filament-associated Proteins in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kwartler, Callie S.; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V.; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A.; Epstein, Henry F.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. PMID:24711452

  4. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Maziah, M; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g(-1) in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  5. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Maziah, M.; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g−1 in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  6. A Novel Function for the nm23-Hl Gene: Overexpression in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells Leads to the Formation of Basement Membrane and Growth Arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Petersen, Ole W; Steeg, Patricia S; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a culture system using reconstituted basement membrane components in which normal human mammary epithelial cells exhibit several aspects of the development and differentiation process, including formation of acinar-like structures, production and basal deposition of basement membrane components, and production and apical secretion of sialomucins. Cell lines and cultures from human breast carcinomas failed to recapitulate this process. The data indicate the importance of cellular interactions with the basement membrane in the regulation of normal breast differentiation and, potentially, its loss in neoplasia. Our purpose was to use this assay to investigate the role of the putative metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 in mammary development and differentiation. The metastatic human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, clones transfected with a control pCMVBamneo vector, and clones transfected with pCMVBamneo vector containing nm23-H1 complementary DNA (the latter of which exhibited a substantial reduction in spontaneous metastatic potential in vivo) were cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane. Clones were examined for formation of acinus-like spheres, deposition of basement membrane components, production of sialomucin, polarization, and growth arrest. In contrast to the parental cell line and control transfectants, MDA-MB-435 breast carcinoma cells overexpressing Nm23-H1 protein regained several aspects of the normal phenotype within reconstituted basement membrane. Nm23-H1 protein-positive cells formed organized acinus-like spheres, deposited the basement membrane components type IV collagen and, to some extent, laminin to the outside of the spheres, expressed sialomucin, and growth arrested. Growth arrest of Nm23-H1 protein-positive cells was preceded by and correlated with formation of a basement membrane, suggesting a causal relationship. The data indicate a previously unidentified cause-and-effect relationship between nm23-H1 gene

  7. Over-expression of the Gerbera hybrida At-SOC1-like1 gene Gh-SOC1 leads to floral organ identity deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Ruokolainen, Satu; Ng, Yan Peng; Albert, Victor A.; Elomaa, Paula; Teeri, Teemu H.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The family of MADS box genes is involved in a number of processes besides controlling floral development. In addition to supplying homeotic functions defined by the ABC model, they influence flowering time and transformation of vegetative meristem into inflorescence meristem, and have functions in roots and leaves. Three Gerbera hybrida At-SOC1-like genes (Gh-SOC1–Gh-SOC3) were identified among gerbera expressed sequence tags. Methods Evolutionary relationships between SOC1-like genes from gerbera and other plants were studied by phylogenetic analysis. The function of the gerbera gene Gh-SOC1 in gerbera floral development was studied using expression analysis, protein–protein interaction assays and reverse genetics. Transgenic gerbera lines over-expressing or downregulated for Gh-SOC1 were obtained using Agrobacterium transformation and investigated for their floral phenotype. Key Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the closest paralogues of At-SOC1 are Gh-SOC2 and Gh-SOC3. Gh-SOC1 is a more distantly related paralogue, grouping together with a number of other At-SOC1 paralogues from arabidopsis and other plant species. Gh-SOC1 is inflorescence abundant and no expression was seen in vegetative parts of the plant. Ectopic expression of Gh-SOC1 did not promote flowering, but disturbed the development of floral organs. The epidermal cells of ray flower petals appeared shorter and their shape was altered. The colour of ray flower petals differed from that of the wild-type petals by being darker red on the adaxial side and greenish on the abaxial surface. Several protein–protein interactions with other gerbera MADS domain proteins were identified. Conclusions The At-SOC1 paralogue in gerbera shows a floral abundant expression pattern. A late petal expression might indicate a role in the final stages of flower development. Over-expression of Gh-SOC1 led to partial loss of floral identity, but did not affect flowering time. Lines where Gh

  8. Overexpression of an endo-1,4-β-glucanase V gene (EGV) from Trichoderma reesei leads to the accumulation of cellulase activity in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Liu, F; Hu, Y F; Xia, M; Cheng, B J; Zhu, S W; Ma, Q

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic expression of cellulase in biomass can reduce the cost of biofuel conversion. This trait modification technique is highly beneficial for biofuel production. In this study, we isolated an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase gene (EGV) from Trichoderma reesei and inserted this gene downstream of a fragment encoding the signal peptide Apo-SP in a modified pCAMBIA1301 vector to obtain an Apo-SP and AsRed fusion protein. Transient expression of this fusion protein in onion epidermal cells showed that the Apo-SP signal was localized to the plastids. EGV transgenic rice plants that did not carry screening marker genes were obtained through overexpression of the pDTB double T-DNA vector. Western blotting showed that EGV was expressed in the dry straw of T0 generation transgenic rice plants and in fresh leaves of the T1 generation. More importantly, our results also showed that the peptide product of EGV in the transgenic plants folded correctly and was capable of digesting the cellulase substrate CMC. Additionally, cellulase activity remained stable in the straw that had been dried at room temperature for three months. This study presents an important technical approach for the development of transgenic rice straw that has stable cellulase activity and can be used for biofuel conversion. PMID:26782396

  9. Overexpression of an endo-1,4-β-glucanase V gene (EGV) from Trichoderma reesei leads to the accumulation of cellulase activity in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Liu, F; Hu, Y F; Xia, M; Cheng, B J; Zhu, S W; Ma, Q

    2015-12-21

    The ectopic expression of cellulase in biomass can reduce the cost of biofuel conversion. This trait modification technique is highly beneficial for biofuel production. In this study, we isolated an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase gene (EGV) from Trichoderma reesei and inserted this gene downstream of a fragment encoding the signal peptide Apo-SP in a modified pCAMBIA1301 vector to obtain an Apo-SP and AsRed fusion protein. Transient expression of this fusion protein in onion epidermal cells showed that the Apo-SP signal was localized to the plastids. EGV transgenic rice plants that did not carry screening marker genes were obtained through overexpression of the pDTB double T-DNA vector. Western blotting showed that EGV was expressed in the dry straw of T0 generation transgenic rice plants and in fresh leaves of the T1 generation. More importantly, our results also showed that the peptide product of EGV in the transgenic plants folded correctly and was capable of digesting the cellulase substrate CMC. Additionally, cellulase activity remained stable in the straw that had been dried at room temperature for three months. This study presents an important technical approach for the development of transgenic rice straw that has stable cellulase activity and can be used for biofuel conversion.

  10. Variant Rett syndrome in a girl with a pericentric X-chromosome inversion leading to epigenetic changes and overexpression of the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Vieira, José Pedro; Lopes, Fátima; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Sousa, Maria Vânia; Moura, Sofia; Sousa, Susana; Costa, Bruno M; Barbosa, Mafalda; Ylstra, Bauke; Temudo, Teresa; Lourenço, Teresa; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. We investigated the genetic basis of disease in a female patient with a Rett-like clinical. Karyotype analysis revealed a pericentric inversion in the X chromosome -46,X,inv(X)(p22.1q28), with breakpoints in the cytobands where the MECP2 and CDKL5 genes are located. FISH analysis revealed that the MECP2 gene is not dislocated by the inversion. However, and in spite of a balanced pattern of X inactivation, this patient displayed hypomethylation and an overexpression of the MECP2 gene at the mRNA level in the lymphocytes (mean fold change: 2.55±0.38) in comparison to a group of control individuals; the expression of the CDKL5 gene was similar to that of controls (mean fold change: 0.98±0.10). No gains or losses were detected in the breakpoint regions encompassing known or suspected transcription regulatory elements. We propose that the de-regulation of MECP2 expression in this patient may be due to alterations in long-range genomic interactions caused by the inversion and hypothesize that this type of epigenetic de-regulation of the MECP2 may be present in other RTT-like patients.

  11. Overexpression of H1 Calponin in Osteoblast Lineage Cells Leads to a Decrease in Bone Mass by Disrupting Osteoblast Function and Promoting Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Chen, Maomao; Chen, Siyu; Li, Can; Xie, Yangli; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yaozong; Zhao, Ling; He, Qifen; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2013-01-01

    H1 calponin (CNN1) is known as a smooth muscle-specific, actin-binding protein which regulates smooth muscle contractive activity. Although previous studies have shown that CNN1 has effect on bone, the mechanism is not well defined. To investigate the role of CNN1 in maintaining bone homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Cnn1 under the control of the osteoblast-specific 3.6-kb Col1a1 promoter. Col1a1-Cnn1 transgenic mice showed delayed bone formation at embryonic stage and decreased bone mass at adult stage. Morphology analyses showed reduced trabecular number, thickness and defects in bone formation. The proliferation and migration of osteoblasts were decreased in Col1a1-Cnn1 mice due to alterations in cytoskeleton. The early osteoblast differentiation of Col1a1-Cnn1 mice was increased, but the late stage differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts derived from Col1a1-Cnn1 mice were significantly decreased. In addition to impaired bone formation, the decreased bone mass was also associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining revealed increased osteoclast numbers in tibias of 2-month-old Col1a1-Cnn1 mice, and increased numbers of osteoclasts co-cultured with Col1a1-Cnn1 osteoblasts. The ratio of RANKL to OPG was significantly increased in Col1a1-Cnn1 osteoblasts. These findings reveal a novel function of CNN1 in maintaining bone homeostasis by coupling bone formation to bone resorption. PMID:23044709

  12. Over-Expression of Porcine Myostatin Missense Mutant Leads to A Gender Difference in Skeletal Muscle Growth between Transgenic Male and Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dezun; Gao, Pengfei; Qian, Lili; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Jiang, Shengwang; Xiao, Gaojun; Cui, Wentao

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a transforming growth factor-β family member, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and growth. Piedmontese cattle breeds have a missense mutation, which results in a cysteine to tyrosine substitution in the mature myostatin protein (C313Y). This loss-of-function mutation in myostatin results in a double-muscled phenotype in cattle. Myostatin propeptide is an inhibitor of myostatin activity and is considered a potential agent to stimulate muscle growth in livestock. In this study, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing porcine myostatin missense mutant (pmMS), C313Y, and wild-type porcine myostatin propeptide (ppMS), respectively, to examine their effects on muscle growth in mice. Enhanced muscle growth was observed in both pmMS and ppMS transgenic female mice and also in ppMS transgenic male mice. However, there was no enhanced muscle growth observed in pmMS transgenic male mice. To explore why there is such a big difference in muscle growth between pmMS and ppMS transgenic male mice, the expression level of androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR45 was measured by Western blot. Results indicated that AR45 expression significantly increased in pmMS transgenic male mice while it decreased dramatically in ppMS transgenic male mice. Our data demonstrate that both pmMS and ppMS act as myostatin inhibitors in the regulation of muscle growth, but the effect of pmMS in male mice is reversed by an increased AR45 expression. These results provide useful insight and basic theory to future studies on improving pork quality by genetically manipulating myostatin expression or by regulating myostatin activity. PMID:26305245

  13. Over-expression of a pepper plastid lipid-associated protein in tobacco leads to changes in plastid ultrastructure and plant development upon stress.

    PubMed

    Rey, P; Gillet, B; Römer, S; Eymery, F; Massimino, J; Peltier, G; Kuntz, M

    2000-03-01

    Proteins homologous to fibrillin, a pepper plastid lipid-associated protein involved in carotenoid storage in fruit chromoplasts, have been recently identified in leaf chloroplasts from several species and shown to be induced upon environmental stress. To further investigate the role of the protein, transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants over-expressing fibrillin using a constitutive promoter were generated. Transgenics grown under standard light intensities (300 micromol photons m-2 sec-1) were found to contain substantial amounts of fibrillin in flowers and leaves. In leaves, the protein was immunolocalized within chloroplasts in both stromal and thylakoid subfractions. No change was noticed in thylakoid structures from transgenics, but chloroplasts contained an increased number of plastoglobules organized in clusters. In petals, leucoplasts were also found to contain more agglutinated plastoglobules. The effects of environmental factors on fibrillin gene expression and protein localization were studied in tobacco leaves. Less fibrillin was present in plants grown under low light intensities, which can be explained by the involvement of a light-dependent splicing step in the control of fibrillin gene expression in leaves. Analysis of protein subfractions from plants subjected to drought or high light showed that both stresses resulted in fibrillin association with thylakoids. Whereas no growth difference between wild-type (WT) and transgenic plants was noticed under low light conditions, transgenics exhibit a longer main stem, enhanced development of lateral stems and accelerated floral development under higher light intensities. These data suggest that fibrillin-related proteins fulfil an important function in plant development in relation to environmental constraints. PMID:10758499

  14. Over-Expression of Porcine Myostatin Missense Mutant Leads to A Gender Difference in Skeletal Muscle Growth between Transgenic Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dezun; Gao, Pengfei; Qian, Lili; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Jiang, Shengwang; Xiao, Gaojun; Cui, Wentao

    2015-08-24

    Myostatin, a transforming growth factor-β family member, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and growth. Piedmontese cattle breeds have a missense mutation, which results in a cysteine to tyrosine substitution in the mature myostatin protein (C313Y). This loss-of-function mutation in myostatin results in a double-muscled phenotype in cattle. Myostatin propeptide is an inhibitor of myostatin activity and is considered a potential agent to stimulate muscle growth in livestock. In this study, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing porcine myostatin missense mutant (pmMS), C313Y, and wild-type porcine myostatin propeptide (ppMS), respectively, to examine their effects on muscle growth in mice. Enhanced muscle growth was observed in both pmMS and ppMS transgenic female mice and also in ppMS transgenic male mice. However, there was no enhanced muscle growth observed in pmMS transgenic male mice. To explore why there is such a big difference in muscle growth between pmMS and ppMS transgenic male mice, the expression level of androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR45 was measured by Western blot. Results indicated that AR45 expression significantly increased in pmMS transgenic male mice while it decreased dramatically in ppMS transgenic male mice. Our data demonstrate that both pmMS and ppMS act as myostatin inhibitors in the regulation of muscle growth, but the effect of pmMS in male mice is reversed by an increased AR45 expression. These results provide useful insight and basic theory to future studies on improving pork quality by genetically manipulating myostatin expression or by regulating myostatin activity.

  15. Combined exposure to protons and 56Fe leads to overexpression of Il13 and reactivation of repetitive elements in the mouse lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nzabarushimana, Etienne; Prior, Sara; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Pathak, Rupak; Allen, Antiño R.; Latendresse, John; Olsen, Reid H. J.; Raber, Jacob; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Koturbash, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Interest in deep space exploration underlines the needs to investigate the effects of exposure to combined sources of space radiation. The lung is a target organ for radiation, and exposure to protons and heavy ions as radiation sources may lead to the development of degenerative disease and cancer. In this study, we evaluated the pro-fibrotic and epigenetic effects of exposure to protons (150 MeV/nucleon, 0.1 Gy) and heavy iron ions (56Fe, 600 MeV/nucleon, 0.5 Gy) alone or in combination (protons on Day 1 and 56Fe on Day 2) in C57BL/6 male mice 4 weeks after irradiation. Exposure to 56Fe, proton or in combination, did not result in histopathological changes in the murine lung. At the same time, combined exposure to protons and 56Fe resulted in pronounced molecular alterations in comparison with either source of radiation alone. Specifically, we observed a substantial increase in the expression of cytokine Il13, loss of expression of DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1, and reactivation of LINE-1, SINE B1 retrotransposons, and major and minor satellites. Given the deleterious potential of the observed effects that may lead to development of chronic lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and cancer, future studies devoted to the investigation of the long-term effects of combined exposures to proton and heavy ions are clearly needed.

  16. Overexpression of a Novel Arabidopsis Gene Related to Putative Zinc-Transporter Genes from Animals Can Lead to Enhanced Zinc Resistance and Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    van der Zaal, Bert J.; Neuteboom, Leon W.; Pinas, Johan E.; Chardonnens, Agnes N.; Schat, Henk; Verkleij, Jos A.C.; Hooykaas, Paul J.J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the isolation of an Arabidopsis gene that is closely related to the animal ZnT genes (Zn transporter). The protein encoded by the ZAT (Zn transporter of Arabidopsis thaliana) gene has 398 amino acid residues and is predicted to have six membrane-spanning domains. To obtain evidence for the postulated function of the Arabidopsis gene, transgenic plants with the ZAT coding sequence under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were analyzed. Plants obtained with ZAT in the sense orientation exhibited enhanced Zn resistance and strongly increased Zn content in the roots under high Zn exposure. Antisense mRNA-producing plants were viable, with a wild-type level of Zn resistance and content, like plants expressing a truncated coding sequence lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the protein. The availability of ZAT can lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of Zn homeostasis and resistance in plants. PMID:10069843

  17. Fine particulate matter leads to reproductive impairment in male rats by overexpressing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Ning; Yan, Chao; Liu, Dong-Yao; Peng, Jin-Pu; Chen, Jin-Jun; Zhou, Yue; Long, Chun-Lan; He, Da-Wei; Lin, Tao; Shen, Lian-Ju; Wei, Guang-Hui

    2015-09-17

    Maintenance of male reproductive function depends on normal sperm generation during which process Sertoli cells play a vital role. Studies found that fine particulate matter (PM) causes decreased male sperm quality, mechanism of which unestablished. We aim to investigate the definite mechanism of PM impairment on male reproduction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were daily exposed to normal saline (NS) or PM2.5 with the doses of 9 mg/kg.b.w and 24 mg/kg.b.w. via intratracheal instillation for seven weeks. Reproductive function was tested by mating test and semen analysis after last exposure. Testes were collected to assess changes in histomorphology, and biomarkers including connexin 43 (Cx43), superoxide dismutase (SOD), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt). Male rats exposed to PM2.5 showed noticeable decreased fertility, significantly reduced sperm count, increased sperm abnormality rate and severe testicular damage in histomorphology. After PM2.5 exposure, the levels of Cx43 was significantly downregulated, and SOD was upregulated and downregulated significantly with different dose, respectively. Protein expression of PI3K and p-Akt dramatically enhanced, and the later one being located in Sertoli cells, the upward or declining trend was in dose dependent. PM2.5 exposure leads to oxidative stress impairment via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on male reproduction in rats.

  18. Targeting Hypoxia in Cancer Cells by Restoring Homeodomain Interacting Protein-Kinase 2 and p53 Activity and Suppressing HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Puca, Rosa; Sacchi, Ada; Rechavi, Gideon; Givol, David; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) by phosphorylating serine 46 (Ser46) is a crucial regulator of p53 apoptotic function. HIPK2 is also a transcriptional co-repressor of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) restraining tumor angiogenesis and chemoresistance. HIPK2 can be deregulated in tumors by several mechanisms including hypoxia. Here, we sought to target hypoxia by restoring HIPK2 function and suppressing HIF-1α, in order to provide evidence for the involvement of both HIPK2 and p53 in counteracting hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Upon exposure of colon and lung cancer cells to hypoxia, by either low oxygen or cobalt, HIPK2 function was impaired allowing for increased HIF-1α expression and inhibiting the p53-apoptotic response to drug. Cobalt suppressed HIPK2 recruitment onto HIF-1α promoter. Hypoxia induced expression of the p53 target MDM2 that downregulates HIPK2, thus MDM2 inhibition by siRNA restored the HIPK2/p53Ser46 response to drug. Zinc supplementation to hypoxia-treated cells increased HIPK2 protein stability and nuclear accumulation, leading to restoration of HIPK2 binding to HIF-1α promoter, repression of MDR1, Bcl2, and VEGF genes, and activation of the p53 apoptotic response to drug. Combination of zinc and ADR strongly suppressed tumor growth in vivo by inhibiting HIF-1 pathway and upregulating p53 apoptotic target genes. Conclusions/Significance We show here for the first time that hypoxia-induced HIPK2 deregulation was counteracted by zinc that restored HIPK2 suppression of HIF-1 pathway and reactivated p53 apoptotic response to drug, underscoring the potential use of zinc supplementation in combination with chemotherapy to address hypoxia and improve tumor treatment. PMID:19714248

  19. let-7 Overexpression Leads to an Increased Fraction of Cells in G2/M, Direct Down-regulation of Cdc34, and Stabilization of Wee1 Kinase in Primary Fibroblasts*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Legesse-Miller, Aster; Elemento, Olivier; Pfau, Sarah J.; Forman, Joshua J.; Tavazoie, Saeed; Coller, Hilary A.

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs play a critically important role in a wide array of biological processes including those implicated in cancer, neuro-degenerative and metabolic disorders, and viral infection. Although we have begun to understand microRNA biogenesis and function, experimental demonstration of their functional effects and the molecular mechanisms by which they function remains a challenge. Members of the let-7/miR-98 family play a critical role in cell cycle control with respect to differentiation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that exogenous addition of pre-let-7 in primary human fibroblasts results in a decrease in cell number and an increased fraction of cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase. Combining microarray techniques with DNA sequence analysis to identify potential let-7 targets, we discovered 838 genes with a let-7 binding site in their 3′-untranslated region that were down-regulated upon overexpression of let-7b. Among these genes is cdc34, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme of the Skp1/cullin/F-box (SCF) complex. Cdc34 protein levels are strongly down-regulated by let-7 overexpression. Reporter assays demonstrated direct regulation of the cdc34 3′-untranslated region by let-7. We hypothesized that low Cdc34 levels would result in decreased SCF activity, stabilization of the SCF target Wee1, and G2/M accumulation. Consistent with this hypothesis, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of Wee1 reversed the G2/M phenotype induced by let-7 overexpression. We conclude that Cdc34 is a functional target of let-7 and that let-7 induces down-regulation of Cdc34, stabilization of the Wee1 kinase, and an increased fraction of cells in G2/M in primary fibroblasts. PMID:19126550

  20. Primary over-expression of AβPP in muscle does not lead to the development of inclusion body myositis in a new lineage of the MCK-AβPP transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Johnsen, Russell D; Griffiths, Lisa; Needham, Merrilee; Fabian, Victoria A; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether primary over-expression of AβPP in skeletal muscle results in the development of features of inclusion body myositis (IBM) in a new lineage of the MCK-AβPP transgenic mouse. Quantitative histological, immunohistochemical and western blotting studies were performed on muscles from 3 to 18 month old transgenic and wild-type C57BL6/SJL mice. Electron microscopy was also performed on muscle sections from selected animals. Although western blotting confirmed that there was over-expression of full length AβPP in transgenic mouse muscles, deposition of amyloid-β and fibrillar amyloid could not be demonstrated histochemically or with electron microscopy. Additionally, other changes typical of IBM such as rimmed vacuoles, cytochrome C oxidase-deficient fibres, upregulation of MHC antigens, lymphocytic inflammatory infiltration and T cell fibre invasion were absent. The most prominent finding in both transgenic and wild-type animals was the presence of tubular aggregates which was age-related and largely restricted to male animals. Expression of full length AβPP in this MCK-AβPP mouse lineage did not reach the levels required for immunodetection or deposition of amyloid-β as in the original transgenic strains, and was not associated with the development of pathological features of IBM. These negative results emphasise the potential pitfalls of re-deriving transgenic mouse strains in different laboratories. PMID:24205796

  1. Overexpression of the waaZ Gene Leads to Modification of the Structure of the Inner Core Region of Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide, Truncation of the Outer Core, and Reduction of the Amount of O Polysaccharide on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Frirdich, Emilisa; Lindner, Buko; Holst, Otto; Whitfield, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The waa gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core region in Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Homologs of the waaZ gene product are encoded by the waa gene clusters of Salmonella enterica and E. coli strains with the K-12 and R2 core types. Overexpression of WaaZ in E. coli and S. enterica led to a modified LPS structure showing core truncations and (where relevant) to a reduction in the amount of O-polysaccharide side chains. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to determine the predominant LPS structures in an E. coli isolate with an R1 core (waaZ is lacking from the type R1 waa gene cluster) with a copy of the waaZ gene added on a plasmid. Novel truncated LPS structures, lacking up to 3 hexoses from the outer core, resulted from WaaZ overexpression. The truncated molecules also contained a KdoIII residue not normally found in the R1 core. PMID:12591884

  2. Knocking down p53 with siRNA does not affect the overexpression of p21WAF-1 after exposure of IMR-90 hTERT fibroblasts to a sublethal concentration of H2O2 leading to premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Zdanov, Stephanie; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Toussaint, Olivier

    2007-04-01

    Premature senescence of IMR-90 human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) expressing telomerase was induced by exposure to sublethal concentration of H(2)O(2), with appearance of several biomarkers of cellular senescence like enlarged cell shape, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA ss-gal) activity, and cell cycle arrest. The induction of stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was associated with a transient increase in DNA-binding activity of p53 and an increased expression of p21(WAF-1). p53 small interferent RNA (siRNA) affected the basal level of p21(WAF-1) mRNA but did not affect the overexpression of p21(WAF-1) after stress. This siRNA approach confirms previous results obtained with other methods. PMID:17460194

  3. Overexpression of Poplar PtrWRKY89 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Leads to a Reduction of Disease Resistance by Regulating Defense-Related Genes in Salicylate- and Jasmonate-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanzhong; Guo, Li; Liu, Rui; Jiao, Bo; Zhao, Xin; Ling, Zhengyi; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play key roles in plant defenses against pathogens and several WRKY transcription factors have been shown to have a role in SA/JA crosstalk. In a previous study, overexpression of the poplar WRKY gene PtrWRKY89 enhanced resistance to pathogens in transgenic poplars. In this study, the promoter of PtrWRKY89 (ProPtrWRKY89) was isolated and used to drive GUS reporter gene. High GUS activity was observed in old leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis containing ProPtrWRKY89-GUS construct and GUS expression was extremely induced by SA solution and SA+MeJA mixture but not by MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that PtrWRKY89 acted as a transcription activator in the nucleus. Constitutive expression of PtrWRKY89 in Arabidopsis resulted in more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea compared to wild-type plants. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed that marker genes of SA and JA pathways were down-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis after pathogen inoculations. Overall, our results indicated that PtrWRKY89 modulates a cross talk in resistance to P. syringe and B. cinerea by negatively regulating both SA and JA pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27019084

  4. Overexpression of Poplar PtrWRKY89 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Leads to a Reduction of Disease Resistance by Regulating Defense-Related Genes in Salicylate- and Jasmonate-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Jiao, Bo; Zhao, Xin; Ling, Zhengyi; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play key roles in plant defenses against pathogens and several WRKY transcription factors have been shown to have a role in SA/JA crosstalk. In a previous study, overexpression of the poplar WRKY gene PtrWRKY89 enhanced resistance to pathogens in transgenic poplars. In this study, the promoter of PtrWRKY89 (ProPtrWRKY89) was isolated and used to drive GUS reporter gene. High GUS activity was observed in old leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis containing ProPtrWRKY89-GUS construct and GUS expression was extremely induced by SA solution and SA+MeJA mixture but not by MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that PtrWRKY89 acted as a transcription activator in the nucleus. Constitutive expression of PtrWRKY89 in Arabidopsis resulted in more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea compared to wild-type plants. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed that marker genes of SA and JA pathways were down-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis after pathogen inoculations. Overall, our results indicated that PtrWRKY89 modulates a cross talk in resistance to P. syringe and B. cinerea by negatively regulating both SA and JA pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27019084

  5. Decreased Expression of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) Leads to Reduced Glucuronidation of Flavonoids in UGT1A1-Overexpressing HeLa Cells: The Role of Futile Recycling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhou, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xingwang; Wu, Baojian

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the role of futile recycling (or deglucuronidation) in the disposition of two flavonoids (i.e., genistein and apigenin) was explored using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (or HeLa1A1 cells). Glucuronidation of the flavonoids by HeLa1A1 cell lysate followed the substrate inhibition kinetics (Vmax = 0.10 nmol/min/mg, Km = 0.54 μM, and Ksi = 2.0 μM for genistein; Vmax = 0.19 nmol/min/mg, Km = 0.56 μM, and Ksi = 3.7 μM for apigenin). Glucuronide was efficiently generated and excreted after incubation of the cells with the aglycone (at doses of 1.25-20 nmol). The excretion rates were 0.40-0.69 and 0.84-1.1 nmol/min/mg protein for genistein glucuronide (GG) and apigenin glucuronide (AG), respectively. Furthermore, glucuronide excretion and total glucuronidation were significantly reduced in MRP4 knocked-down as compared to control cells. The alterations were well characterized by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model incorporating the process of futile recycling (defined by a first-order rate constant, Kde). The derived Kde values were 15 and 25 h(-1) for GG and AG, respectively. This was well consistent with the in vitro observation that AG was subjected to more efficient futile recycling compared to GG. In conclusion, futile recycling was involved in cellular glucuronidation, accounting for transporter-dependent glucuronidation of flavonoids.

  6. Perinatal asphyxia leads to PARP-1 overactivity, p65 translocation, IL-1β and TNF-α overexpression, and apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonatal rats: prevention by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration.

    PubMed

    Neira-Peña, T; Rojas-Mancilla, E; Munoz-Vio, V; Perez, R; Gutierrez-Hernandez, M; Bustamante, D; Morales, P; Hermoso, M A; Gebicke-Haerter, P; Herrera-Marschitz, M

    2015-05-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a leading cause of neuronal damage in newborns, resulting in long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, in part due to impairment of mesostriatal and mesolimbic neurocircuitries. The insult can be as severe as to menace the integrity of the genome, triggering the overactivation of sentinel proteins, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 overactivation implies increased energy demands, worsening the metabolic failure and depleting further NAD(+) availability. Using a global PA rat model, we report here evidence that hypoxia increases PARP-1 activity, triggering a signalling cascade leading to nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65, modulating the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α, pro-inflammatory molecules, increasing apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonate rats, monitored with Western blots, qPCR, TUNEL and ELISA. PARP-1 activity increased immediately after PA, reaching a maximum 1-8 h after the insult, while activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway was observed 8 h after the insult, with a >twofold increase of p65 nuclear translocation. IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA levels were increased 24 h after the insult, together with a >twofold increase in apoptotic-like cell death. A single dose of the PARP-1 inhibitor nicotinamide (0.8 mmol/kg, i.p.), 1 h post delivery, prevented the effect of PA on PARP-1 activity, p65 translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and apoptotic-like cell death. The present study demonstrates that PA leads to PARP-1 overactivation, increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death in mesencephalon, effects prevented by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration, supporting the idea that PARP-1 inhibition represents a therapeutic target against the effects of PA.

  7. Overexpression of CD45RA isoforms in carriers of the C77G mutation leads to hyporeactivity of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Pokoyski, C; Lienen, T; Rother, S; Schock, E; Plege-Fleck, A; Geffers, R; Schwinzer, R

    2015-12-01

    Disorders in regulatory T-cell (T(reg)) function can result in the breakdown of immunological self-tolerance. Thus, the identification of mechanisms controlling the activity of T(reg) is of great relevance. We used T(reg) from individuals carrying the C77G polymorphism as models to study the role of CD45 molecules in humans. C77G prevents splicing of CD45 exon A thereby leading to an aberrant expression pattern of CD45 isoforms in affected individuals. Resting and in vitro expanded/activated CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) T(reg) from carriers of C77G strongly expressed CD45RA isoforms whereas these isoforms were almost absent in cells from individuals with wild-type CD45. C77G T(reg) showed diminished upregulation of activation markers, lower phosphorylation of p56(lck)(Y505) and a reduced proliferative potential when stimulated with anti-TcR or anti-TcR plus CD28 mAb suggesting decreased responsiveness to activating stimuli. In addition, the capacity to suppress proliferation of conventional CD4(+) T cells was impaired in C77G T(reg). Furthermore, microarray studies revealed distinct gene expression patterns in T(reg) from C77G carriers. These data suggest that the changes in CD45 isoform combination resulting from the C77G mutation alter the responsiveness of T(reg) to TcR-mediated signaling. Targeting CD45 isoform expression might be a useful approach to modulate T(reg) function.

  8. Flagella Overexpression Attenuates Salmonella Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Suo, Zhiyong; Jun, SangMu; Robison, Amanda; Li, Jinquan; Lim, Timothy; Cao, Ling; Hoyt, Teri; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE), was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to discern whether flagella overexpression could induce similar attenuation. To test its feasibility, flagellar filament subunit FliC and flagellar regulon master regulator FlhDC were overexpressed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium wild-type strain H71. The results show that the expression of either FliC or FlhDC alone, and co-expression of the two, significantly attenuates Salmonella. The flagellated bacilli were unable to replicate within macrophages and thus were not lethal to mice. In-depth investigation suggests that flagellum-mediated AGE was due to the disruptive effects of flagella on the bacterial membrane, resulting in heightened susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide and bile. Furthermore, flagellum-attenuated Salmonella elicited elevated immune responses to Salmonella presumably via FliC’s adjuvant effect and conferred robust protection against wild-type Salmonella challenge. PMID:23056473

  9. Gene Overexpression: Uses, Mechanisms, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The classical genetic approach for exploring biological pathways typically begins by identifying mutations that cause a phenotype of interest. Overexpression or misexpression of a wild-type gene product, however, can also cause mutant phenotypes, providing geneticists with an alternative yet powerful tool to identify pathway components that might remain undetected using traditional loss-of-function analysis. This review describes the history of overexpression, the mechanisms that are responsible for overexpression phenotypes, tests that begin to distinguish between those mechanisms, the varied ways in which overexpression is used, the methods and reagents available in several organisms, and the relevance of overexpression to human disease. PMID:22419077

  10. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) promote Wnt/Wg signaling through stabilization of beta-catenin/Arm and stimulation of target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wendy; Swarup, Sharan; Chen, Joanna; Ishitani, Tohru; Verheyen, Esther M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway represents a conserved signaling cascade involved in diverse biological processes. Misregulation of Wnt/Wg signal transduction has profound effects on development. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) represent a novel family of serine/threonine kinases. Members of this group (in particular Hipk2) are implicated as important factors in transcriptional regulation to control cell growth, apoptosis and development. Here, we provide genetic and phenotypic evidence that the sole Drosophila member of this family, Hipk, functions as a positive regulator in the Wg pathway. Expression of hipk in the wing rescues loss of the Wg signal, whereas loss of hipk can enhance decreased wg signaling phenotypes. Furthermore, loss of hipk leads to diminished Arm protein levels, whereas overexpression of hipk promotes the Wg signal by stabilizing Arm, resulting in activation of Wg responsive targets. In Wg transcriptional assays, Hipk enhanced Tcf/Arm-mediated gene expression in a kinase-dependent manner. In addition, Hipk can bind to Arm and Drosophila Tcf, and phosphorylate Arm. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, Hipk was found to promote the stabilization of Arm. We observe similar molecular interactions between Lef1/beta-catenin and vertebrate Hipk2, suggesting a direct and conserved role for Hipk proteins in promoting Wnt signaling. PMID:19088090

  11. Where Will LEAD Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    After setting forth eight assumptions concerning the education of educational administrators, findings about the Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD) program are discussed. The analysis is based on the first-year applications, telephone conversations with staff at a majority of the project sites, and additional material…

  12. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  13. DEK over-expression promotes mitotic defects and micronucleus formation

    PubMed Central

    Matrka, Marie C; Hennigan, Robert F; Kappes, Ferdinand; DeLay, Monica L; Lambert, Paul F; Aronow, Bruce J; Wells, Susanne I

    2015-01-01

    The DEK gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds chromatin and is involved in various fundamental nuclear processes including transcription, RNA splicing, DNA replication and DNA repair. Several cancer types characteristically over-express DEK at the earliest stages of transformation. In order to explore relevant mechanisms whereby DEK supports oncogenicity, we utilized cancer databases to identify gene transcripts whose expression patterns are tightly correlated with that of DEK. We identified an enrichment of genes involved in mitosis and thus investigated the regulation and possible function of DEK in cell division. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that DEK dissociates from DNA in early prophase and re-associates with DNA during telophase in human keratinocytes. Mitotic cell populations displayed a sharp reduction in DEK protein levels compared to the corresponding interphase population, suggesting DEK may be degraded or otherwise removed from the cell prior to mitosis. Interestingly, DEK overexpression stimulated its own aberrant association with chromatin throughout mitosis. Furthermore, DEK co-localized with anaphase bridges, chromosome fragments, and micronuclei, suggesting a specific association with mitotically defective chromosomes. We found that DEK over-expression in both non-transformed and transformed cells is sufficient to stimulate micronucleus formation. These data support a model wherein normal chromosomal clearance of DEK is required for maintenance of high fidelity cell division and chromosomal integrity. Therefore, the overexpression of DEK and its incomplete removal from mitotic chromosomes promotes genomic instability through the generation of genetically abnormal daughter cells. Consequently, DEK over-expression may be involved in the initial steps of developing oncogenic mutations in cells leading to cancer initiation PMID:25945971

  14. DEK over-expression promotes mitotic defects and micronucleus formation.

    PubMed

    Matrka, Marie C; Hennigan, Robert F; Kappes, Ferdinand; DeLay, Monica L; Lambert, Paul F; Aronow, Bruce J; Wells, Susanne I

    2015-01-01

    The DEK gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds chromatin and is involved in various fundamental nuclear processes including transcription, RNA splicing, DNA replication and DNA repair. Several cancer types characteristically over-express DEK at the earliest stages of transformation. In order to explore relevant mechanisms whereby DEK supports oncogenicity, we utilized cancer databases to identify gene transcripts whose expression patterns are tightly correlated with that of DEK. We identified an enrichment of genes involved in mitosis and thus investigated the regulation and possible function of DEK in cell division. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that DEK dissociates from DNA in early prophase and re-associates with DNA during telophase in human keratinocytes. Mitotic cell populations displayed a sharp reduction in DEK protein levels compared to the corresponding interphase population, suggesting DEK may be degraded or otherwise removed from the cell prior to mitosis. Interestingly, DEK overexpression stimulated its own aberrant association with chromatin throughout mitosis. Furthermore, DEK co-localized with anaphase bridges, chromosome fragments, and micronuclei, suggesting a specific association with mitotically defective chromosomes. We found that DEK over-expression in both non-transformed and transformed cells is sufficient to stimulate micronucleus formation. These data support a model wherein normal chromosomal clearance of DEK is required for maintenance of high fidelity cell division and chromosomal integrity. Therefore, the overexpression of DEK and its incomplete removal from mitotic chromosomes promotes genomic instability through the generation of genetically abnormal daughter cells. Consequently, DEK over-expression may be involved in the initial steps of developing oncogenic mutations in cells leading to cancer initiation.

  15. The effect of aquaporin 5 overexpression on the Ras signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Kim, Myoung Sook; Jang, Se Jin; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-03-07

    Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) has been shown to be overexpressed in multiple cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Furthermore, it has been reported that ectopic expression of AQP5 leads to many phenotypic changes characteristic of transformation. However, the biochemical mechanism leading to transformation in AQP5-overexpressing cells has not been clearly elucidated. In this report, the overexpression of AQP5 in NIH3T3 cells demonstrated a significant effect on Ras activity and, thus, cell proliferation. Furthermore, this influence was shown to be mediated by phosphorylation of the PKA consensus site of AQP5. This is the first evidence demonstrating an association between AQP5 and a signaling pathway, namely the Ras signal transduction pathway, which may be the basis of the oncogenic properties seen in AQP-overexpressing cells.

  16. SUN2 Overexpression Deforms Nuclear Shape and Inhibits HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Sonia; di Nunzio, Francesca; Kieffer, Camille; Porrot, Françoise; Opp, Silvana; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a previous screen of putative interferon-stimulated genes, SUN2 was shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection in an uncharacterized manner. SUN2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein belonging to the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton complex. We have analyzed here the role of SUN2 in HIV infection. We report that in contrast to what was initially thought, SUN2 is not induced by type I interferon, and that SUN2 silencing does not modulate HIV infection. However, SUN2 overexpression in cell lines and in primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells inhibits the replication of HIV but not murine leukemia virus or chikungunya virus. We identified HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains that are unaffected by SUN2, suggesting that the effect is specific to particular viral components or cofactors. Intriguingly, SUN2 overexpression induces a multilobular flower-like nuclear shape that does not impact cell viability and is similar to that of cells isolated from patients with HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia or with progeria. Nuclear shape changes and HIV inhibition both mapped to the nucleoplasmic domain of SUN2 that interacts with the nuclear lamina. This block to HIV replication occurs between reverse transcription and nuclear entry, and passaging experiments selected for a single-amino-acid change in capsid (CA) that leads to resistance to overexpressed SUN2. Furthermore, using chemical inhibition or silencing of cyclophilin A (CypA), as well as CA mutant viruses, we implicated CypA in the SUN2-imposed block to HIV infection. Our results demonstrate that SUN2 overexpression perturbs both nuclear shape and early events of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE Cells encode proteins that interfere with viral replication, a number of which have been identified in overexpression screens. SUN2 is a nuclear membrane protein that was shown to inhibit HIV infection in such a screen, but how it blocked HIV infection was not known. We show that SUN2 overexpression blocks the infection of certain

  17. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  18. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  19. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  20. Overexpression of Mafb in Podocytes Protects against Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoh, Keigyou; Ojima, Masami; Okamura, Midori; Nakamura, Megumi; Hamada, Michito; Shimohata, Homare; Moriguchi, Takashi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that the transcription factor Mafb is essential for podocyte differentiation and foot process formation. Podocytes are susceptible to injury in diabetes, and this injury leads to progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress Mafb in podocytes using the nephrin promoter/enhancer. To examine a potential pathogenetic role for Mafb in diabetic nephropathy, Mafb transgenic mice were treated with either streptozotocin or saline solution. Diabetic nephropathy was assessed by renal histology and biochemical analyses of urine and serum. Podocyte-specific overexpression of Mafb had no effect on body weight or blood glucose levels in either diabetic or control mice. Notably, albuminuria and changes in BUN levels and renal histology observed in diabetic wild-type animals were ameliorated in diabetic Mafb transgenic mice. Moreover, hyperglycemia-induced downregulation of Nephrin was mitigated in diabetic Mafb transgenic mice, and reporter assay results suggested that Mafb regulates Nephrin directly. Mafb transgenic glomeruli also overexpressed glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidative stress enzyme, and levels of the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine decreased in the urine of diabetic Mafb transgenic mice. Finally, Notch2 expression increased in diabetic glomeruli, and this effect was enhanced in diabetic Mafb transgenic glomeruli. These data indicate Mafb has a protective role in diabetic nephropathy through regulation of slit diaphragm proteins, antioxidative enzymes, and Notch pathways in podocytes and suggest that Mafb could be a therapeutic target. PMID:24722438

  1. Overexpression of Mafb in podocytes protects against diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Morito, Naoki; Yoh, Keigyou; Ojima, Masami; Okamura, Midori; Nakamura, Megumi; Hamada, Michito; Shimohata, Homare; Moriguchi, Takashi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    We previously showed that the transcription factor Mafb is essential for podocyte differentiation and foot process formation. Podocytes are susceptible to injury in diabetes, and this injury leads to progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress Mafb in podocytes using the nephrin promoter/enhancer. To examine a potential pathogenetic role for Mafb in diabetic nephropathy, Mafb transgenic mice were treated with either streptozotocin or saline solution. Diabetic nephropathy was assessed by renal histology and biochemical analyses of urine and serum. Podocyte-specific overexpression of Mafb had no effect on body weight or blood glucose levels in either diabetic or control mice. Notably, albuminuria and changes in BUN levels and renal histology observed in diabetic wild-type animals were ameliorated in diabetic Mafb transgenic mice. Moreover, hyperglycemia-induced downregulation of Nephrin was mitigated in diabetic Mafb transgenic mice, and reporter assay results suggested that Mafb regulates Nephrin directly. Mafb transgenic glomeruli also overexpressed glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidative stress enzyme, and levels of the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine decreased in the urine of diabetic Mafb transgenic mice. Finally, Notch2 expression increased in diabetic glomeruli, and this effect was enhanced in diabetic Mafb transgenic glomeruli. These data indicate Mafb has a protective role in diabetic nephropathy through regulation of slit diaphragm proteins, antioxidative enzymes, and Notch pathways in podocytes and suggest that Mafb could be a therapeutic target.

  2. Skeletal overexpression of gremlin impairs bone formation and causes osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Pereira, Renata C; Jorgetti, Vanda; Olson, Sarah; Economides, Aris N; Canalis, Ernesto

    2005-02-01

    Skeletal cells synthesize bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and BMP antagonists. Gremlin, a BMP antagonist, is expressed in osteoblasts and opposes BMP effects on osteoblastic differentiation and function in vitro. However, its effects in vivo are not known. To investigate the actions of gremlin on bone remodeling in vivo, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing gremlin under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. Gremlin transgenics exhibited bone fractures and reduced bone mineral density by 20-30%, compared with controls. Static and dynamic histomorphometry of femurs revealed that gremlin overexpression caused reduced trabecular bone volume and the appearance of woven bone. Polarized light microscopy revealed disorganized collagen bundles at the endosteal cortical surface. Gremlin transgenic mice displayed a 70% decrease in the number of osteoblasts/trabecular area and reduced mineral apposition and bone formation rates. In vivo bromodeoxyuridine labeling and marrow stromal cell cultures demonstrated an inhibitory effect of gremlin on osteoblastic cell replication, but no change on apoptosis was detected. Marrow stromal cells from gremlin transgenics displayed a reduced response to BMP on phosphorylated mothers against decapentaplegic 1/5/8 phosphorylation and reduced free cytosolic beta-catenin levels. In conclusion, transgenic mice overexpressing gremlin in the bone microenvironment have decreased osteoblast number and function leading to osteopenia and spontaneous fractures. PMID:15539560

  3. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... homes. • Most people, especially children, who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or ... and six if they are at risk of lead poisoning (see: ). Who can I call to get more ...

  4. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be found in all parts of our environment. Much of it comes from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may still have lead paint. You could be exposed to lead by Eating food or drinking water that contains lead. Water pipes in older homes ...

  5. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  6. Inhibition of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells by overexpression of p300.

    PubMed

    Miller, K A; Chung, J; Lo, D; Jones, J C; Thimmapaya, B; Weitzman, S A

    2000-03-17

    The transcriptional coactivator p300 is essential for normal embryonic development and cellular differentiation. We have been studying the role of p300 in the transcription of a variety of genes, and we became interested in the role of this coactivator in the transcription of genes important in breast epithelial cell biology. From MCF-10A cells (spontaneously immortalized, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells), we developed cell lines that stably overexpress p300. These p300-overexpressing cells displayed reduced adhesion to culture dishes and were found to secrete an extracellular matrix deficient in laminin-5. Laminin-5 is the major extracellular matrix component produced by breast epithelium. Immunofluorescence studies, as well as experiments using normal matrix, confirmed that the decreased adhesion of p300-overexpressing cells is due to laminin-5-deficient extracellular matrix and not due to loss of laminin-5 receptors. Northern blots revealed markedly decreased levels of expression of two of the genes (designated LAMA3 and LAMC2) encoding the alpha3 and gamma2 chains of the laminin-5 heterotrimer in the cells that overexpress p300, whereas LAMB3 mRNA, encoding the third or beta3 chain of laminin-5, was not markedly reduced. Transient transfection experiments with a vector containing a murine LAMA3 promoter demonstrate that overexpressing p300 down-regulates the LAMA3 promoter. In summary, overexpression of p300 leads to down-regulation of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells, resulting in decreased adhesion. PMID:10713141

  7. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  8. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  9. Lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, P J; Todd, A C

    1994-01-01

    Lead poisoning is the most common disease of environmental origin in the United States today. Adult lead poisoning results primarily from exposure by inhalation in the workplace. Pediatric lead poisoning results principally from the ingestion of lead from environmental media, including paint chips, dust, soil, drinking water, ceramics, and medications. Lead is toxic to many organ systems, among them developing erythrocytes, the kidneys, and the nervous system. Lead-induced toxicity to the central nervous system causes delayed development, diminished intelligence, and altered behavior. In young children, this effect has been demonstrated convincingly to occur at blood lead levels between 10 and 20 micrograms per dl. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dl or higher be considered evidence of increased lead absorption, and the National Academy of Sciences has concurred in that recommendation. Unresolved issues in need of further study include the frequency of screening young children for lead, the question of whether women should be offered screening for lead before conceiving a pregnancy, the role of x-ray fluorescence analysis in assessing lead in bone, and the appropriate legislative response of the United States government to lead-based paint abatement. PMID:7941534

  10. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead is still found in some modern faucets. Soil contaminated by decades of car exhaust or years ... house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil near highways and houses. Hobbies involving soldering, stained ...

  11. Kif14 overexpression accelerates murine retinoblastoma development.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Michael; Shadmand, Mehdi; Sulaiman, Rania S; Sishtla, Kamakshi; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Corson, Timothy W

    2016-10-15

    The mitotic kinesin KIF14 has an essential role in the recruitment of proteins required for the final stages of cytokinesis. Genomic gain and/or overexpression of KIF14 has been documented in retinoblastoma and a number of other cancers, such as breast, lung and ovarian carcinomas, strongly suggesting its role as an oncogene. Despite evidence of oncogenic properties in vitro and in xenografts, Kif14's role in tumor progression has not previously been studied in a transgenic cancer model. Using a novel Kif14 overexpressing, simian virus 40 large T-antigen retinoblastoma (TAg-RB) double transgenic mouse model, we aimed to determine Kif14's role in promoting retinal tumor formation. Tumor initiation and development in double transgenics and control TAg-RB littermates were documented in vivo over a time course by optical coherence tomography, with subsequent ex vivo quantification of tumor burden. Kif14 overexpression led to an accelerated initiation of tumor formation in the TAg-RB model and a significantly decreased tumor doubling time (1.8 vs. 2.9 weeks). Moreover, overall percentage tumor burden was also increased by Kif14 overexpression. These data provide the first evidence that Kif14 can promote tumor formation in susceptible cells in vivo. PMID:27270502

  12. Overexpression of OsDof12 affects plant architecture in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Li, Dayong; Li, Dejun; Liu, Xue; Zhao, Xianfeng; Li, Xiaobing; Li, Shigui; Zhu, Lihuang

    2015-01-01

    Dof (DNA binding with one finger) proteins, a class of plant-specific transcription factors, are involved in plant growth and developmental processes and stress responses. However, their biological functions remain to be elucidated, especially in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Previously, we have reported that OsDof12 can promote rice flowering under long-day conditions. Here, we further investigated the other important agronomical traits of the transgenic plants overexpressing OsDof12 and found that overexpressing OsDof12 could lead to reduced plant height, erected leaf, shortened leaf blade, and smaller panicle resulted from decreased primary and secondary branches number. These results implied that OsDof12 is involved in rice plant architecture formation. Furthermore, we performed a series of Brassinosteroid (BR)-responsive tests and found that overexpression of OsDof12 could also result in BR hyposensitivity. Of note, in WT plants the expression of OsDof12 was found up-regulated by BR treatment while in OsDof12 overexpression plants two positive BR signaling regulators, OsBRI1 and OsBZR1, were significantly down-regulated, indicating that OsDof12 may act as a negative BR regulator in rice. Taken together, our results suggested that overexpression of OsDof12 could lead to altered plant architecture by suppressing BR signaling. Thus, OsDof12 might be used as a new potential genetic regulator for future rice molecular breeding.

  13. Overexpression of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase C regulates oxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2011-01-01

    Light absorbed by colored intermediates of chlorophyll biosynthesis is not utilized in photosynthesis; instead, it is transferred to molecular oxygen, generating singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). As there is no enzymatic detoxification mechanism available in plants to destroy (1)O(2), its generation should be minimized. We manipulated the concentration of a major chlorophyll biosynthetic intermediate i.e., protochlorophyllide in Arabidopsis by overexpressing the light-inducible protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase C (PORC) that effectively phototransforms endogenous protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide leading to minimal accumulation of the photosensitizer protochlorophyllide in light-grown plants. In PORC overexpressing (PORCx) plants exposed to high-light, the (1)O(2) generation and consequent malonedialdehyde production was minimal and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II remained unaffected demonstrating that their photosynthetic apparatus and cellular organization were intact. Further, PORCx plants treated with 5-aminolevulinicacid when exposed to light, photo-converted over-accumulated protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide, reduced the generation of (1)O(2) and malonedialdehyde production and reduced plasma membrane damage. So PORCx plants survived and bolted whereas, the 5-aminolevulinicacid-treated wild-type plants perished. Thus, overexpression of PORC could be biotechnologically exploited in crop plants for tolerance to (1)O(2)-induced oxidative stress, paving the use of 5-aminolevulinicacid as a selective commercial light-activated biodegradable herbicide. Reduced protochlorophyllide content in PORCx plants released the protochlorophyllide-mediated feed-back inhibition of 5-aminolevulinicacid biosynthesis that resulted in higher 5-aminolevulinicacid production. Increase of 5-aminolevulinicacid synthesis upregulated the gene and protein expression of several downstream chlorophyll biosynthetic enzymes elucidating a regulatory net work of expression of

  14. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) overexpression attenuates agricultural organic dust extract-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kl; Wyatt, Ta; Wells, Sm; Klein, Eb; Robinson, Je; Romberger, Dj; Poole, Ja

    2014-03-01

    Modern, industrialized farming practices have lead to working conditions that include high levels of airborne dust. Agricultural workers inhale these complex organic dusts on a daily basis, leading to airway inflammation and higher risk for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mechanisms regulating the organic dust-induced airway inflammatory response are not well-defined. We investigated whether overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) would lead to diminished pulmonary inflammation in an animal model of organic dust extract exposure. We instilled wild-type (WT) and DDAH overexpressing mice with an aqueous organic dust extract (ODE) collected from a swine confinement building. We found that inflammatory indices such as neutrophil influx and inflammatory cytokine production was lower in the DDAH overexpressing mice compared to WT after organic dust extract (ODE) instillation. We went on to determine how DDAH was mediating the decrease in inflammation induced by ODE. PKCα and PKCε play an essential role in the ODE inflammatory response. In a model of lung slices from WT and DDAH overexpressing mice, we demonstrated an increase in PKCα and PKCε in the WT mice exposed to ODE. This increase was diminished in the DDAH overexpressing mice exposed to ODE. We also tested an important component of the ODE, peptidoglycan (PGN). We noted a similar decrease in neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in the DDAH overexpressing animals instilled with PGN compared to WT. In conclusion, our studies found a role for DDAH in regulating the ODE-triggered activation of epithelial PKCα and PKCε, a previously unrecognized mechanism of action. This ultimately results in diminished pulmonary inflammation.

  15. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) overexpression attenuates agricultural organic dust extract-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, KL; Wyatt, TA; Wells, SM; Klein, EB; Robinson, JE; Romberger, DJ; Poole, JA

    2013-01-01

    Modern, industrialized farming practices have lead to working conditions that include high levels of airborne dust. Agricultural workers inhale these complex organic dusts on a daily basis, leading to airway inflammation and higher risk for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mechanisms regulating the organic dust-induced airway inflammatory response are not well-defined. We investigated whether overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) would lead to diminished pulmonary inflammation in an animal model of organic dust extract exposure. We instilled wild-type (WT) and DDAH overexpressing mice with an aqueous organic dust extract (ODE) collected from a swine confinement building. We found that inflammatory indices such as neutrophil influx and inflammatory cytokine production was lower in the DDAH overexpressing mice compared to WT after organic dust extract (ODE) instillation. We went on to determine how DDAH was mediating the decrease in inflammation induced by ODE. PKCα and PKCε play an essential role in the ODE inflammatory response. In a model of lung slices from WT and DDAH overexpressing mice, we demonstrated an increase in PKCα and PKCε in the WT mice exposed to ODE. This increase was diminished in the DDAH overexpressing mice exposed to ODE. We also tested an important component of the ODE, peptidoglycan (PGN). We noted a similar decrease in neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in the DDAH overexpressing animals instilled with PGN compared to WT. In conclusion, our studies found a role for DDAH in regulating the ODE-triggered activation of epithelial PKCα and PKCε, a previously unrecognized mechanism of action. This ultimately results in diminished pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25221746

  16. An apple rootstock overexpressing a peach CBF gene alters growth and flowering in the scion but does not impact cold hardiness or dormancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The C-repeat Binding Factor (CBF) transcription factor is involved in responses to low temperature and water deficit in many plant species. Overexpression of CBF genes leads to enhanced freezing tolerance and growth inhibition in many species. The overexpression of a peach CBF (PpCBF1) gene in a t...

  17. Overexpression of neurofilament H disrupts normal cell structure and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Smith, George M.; Li, Ping; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Studying exogenously expressed tagged proteins in live cells has become a standard technique for evaluating protein distribution and function. Typically, expression levels of experimentally introduced proteins are not regulated, and high levels are often preferred to facilitate detection. However, overexpression of many proteins leads to mislocalization and pathologies. Therefore, for normative studies, moderate levels of expression may be more suitable. To understand better the dynamics of intermediate filament formation, transport, and stability in a healthy, living cell, we inserted neurofilament heavy chain (NFH)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs in adenoviral vectors with tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoters. This system allows for turning on or off the synthesis of NFH-GFP at a selected time, for a defined period, in a dose-dependent manner. We used this inducible system for live cell imaging of changes in filament structure and cell shape, motility, and transport associated with increasing NFH-GFP expression. Cells with low to intermediate levels of NFH-GFP were structurally and functionally similar to neighboring, nonexpressing cells. In contrast, overexpression led to pathological alterations in both filament organization and cell function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Leading Democratically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  19. Hand1 overexpression inhibits medulloblastoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Guda, Maheedhara R; Martin, Sarah E; Antony, Reuben; Fernandez, Karen; Lin, Julian; Tsung, Andrew J; Velpula, Kiran K

    2016-08-19

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. Current treatment includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, ongoing treatment in patients is further classified according to the presence or absence of metastasis. Since metastatic medulloblastoma are refractory to current treatments, there is need to identify novel biomarkers that could be used to reduce metastatic potential, and more importantly be targeted therapeutically. Previously, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced uPAR overexpression is associated with increased accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that uPAR protein act as cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand1. Among the histological subtypes classical and desmoplastic subtypes account for the majority while large cell/anaplastic variant is most commonly associated with metastatic disease. In this present study using immunohistochemical approach and patient data mining for the first time, we demonstrated that Hand1 expression is observed to be downregulated in all the subtypes of medulloblastoma. Previously we showed that Hand1 overexpression regulated medulloblastoma angiogenesis and here we investigated the role of Hand1 in the context of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Moreover, UW228 and D283 cells overexpressing Hand1 demonstrated decreased-expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, β-catenin and SOX2); metastatic marker (SMA); and increased expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin). Strikingly, human pluripotent stem cell antibody array showed that Hand1 overexpression resulted in substantial decrease in pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Otx2, Flk1) suggesting that Hand1 expression may be essential to attenuate the EMT and our findings underscore a novel role for Hand1 in medulloblastoma metastasis.

  20. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  1. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  2. LEAD STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Aub, Joseph C.; Reznikoff, Paul; Smith, Dorothea E.

    1924-01-01

    It appears, from the investigations in other laboratories, that the anemia observed in cases of lead poisoning is due to destruction of blood rather than to diminished production of blood. The method of poisoning cells in vitro with lead was adopted in order to study this phenomenon, and distinct effects were thereby obtained, even when only 0.001 mg. of lead is added to approximately 5 billion washed red corpuscles. In order to obtain optimum results the usual dosage employed was ten times this or 0.01 mg. per 5 billion cells. The following changes were observed in cells so treated. 1. Such a marked increase in the resistance to hypotonic salt solution develops that complete hemolysis does not occur until the cells are exposed to a saline solution of 0.05 per cent. Untreated cells are completely hemolyzed in 0.25 or 0.225 per cent saline. 2. This reaction is quantitative and varies with the concentration of lead used. Under the conditions of our experiments this phenomenon seems to be unique. The effects of arsenic are very slight in comparison. 3. While from this reaction it may be concluded that lead increases cellular resistance, it also appears that it shortens the life of blood cells. This may be demonstrated by the much more rapid appearance of hemolysis than normal when the cells are merely allowed to stand in Ringer solution of any dilution. 4. In rabbits with acute lead poisoning these same phenomena may be noted in vivo. 5. Both phenomena may be changed in vitro by varying the time and temperature of the reaction and the concentration of lead, as Fici has already pointed out. 6. If normal cells stand in Ringer solution for 6 hours something diffuses into the solution which largely reduces the action of lead. After repeated washing these cells react with lead in the usual manner. 7. Small amounts of serum react with lead and eliminate its effects. Red blood cells, treated with a mixture of lead and blood serum, show normal hemolysis in hypotonic salt

  3. Bub1 overexpression induces aneuploidy and tumor formation through Aurora B kinase hyperactivation

    PubMed Central

    Ricke, Robin M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.

    2011-01-01

    High expression of the protein kinase Bub1 has been observed in a variety of human tumors and often correlates with poor clinical prognosis, but its molecular and cellular consequences and role in tumorigenesis are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Bub1 in mice leads to near-diploid aneuploidies and tumor formation. We found that chromosome misalignment and lagging are the primary mitotic errors responsible for the observed aneuploidization. High Bub1 levels resulted in aberrant Bub1 kinase activity and hyperactivation of Aurora B kinase. When Aurora B activity is suppressed, pharmacologically or via BubR1 overexpression, chromosome segregation errors caused by Bub1 overexpression are largely corrected. Importantly, Bub1 transgenic mice overexpressing Bub1 developed various kinds of spontaneous tumors and showed accelerated Myc-induced lymphomagenesis. Our results establish that Bub1 has oncogenic properties and suggest that Aurora B is a critical target through which overexpressed Bub1 drives aneuploidization and tumorigenesis. PMID:21646403

  4. Overexpression of MMP-7 increases collagen 1A2 in the aging kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarz, Anna; Nichols, LaNita A; Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth A; Chen, Gang; Akintola, Adebayo D; Catania, Jeffery M; Burghardt, Robert C; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Parrish, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The percentage of the U.S. population over 65 is rapidly increasing, as is the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The kidney is susceptible to age-dependent alterations in structure, specifically tubulointerstitial fibrosis that leads to CKD. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were initially characterized as extracellular matrix (ECM) proteinases; however, it is clear that their biological role is much larger. We have observed increased gene expression of several MMPs in the aging kidney, including MMP-7. MMP-7 overexpression was observed starting at 16 months, with over a 500-fold upregulation in 2-year-old animals. Overexpression of MMP-7 is not observed in age-matched, calorically restricted controls that do not develop fibrosis and renal dysfunction, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis. In order to delineate the contributions of MMP-7 to renal dysfunction, we overexpressed MMP-7 in NRK-52E cells. High-throughput sequencing of the cells revealed that two collagen genes, Col1a2 and Col3a1, were elevated in the MMP-7 overexpressing cells. These two collagen genes were also elevated in aging rat kidneys and temporally correlated with increased MMP-7 expression. Addition of exogenous MMP-7, or conditioned media from MMP-7 overexpressing cells also increased Col1A2 expression. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA), src, and MAPK signaling at p38 and ERK was able to attenuate the MMP-7 upregulation of Col1a2. Consistent with this finding, increased phosphorylation of PKA, src, and ERK was seen in MMP-7 overexpressing cells and upon exogenous MMP-7 treatment of NRK-52E cells. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which MMP-7 contributes to the development of fibrosis leading to CKD. PMID:24273653

  5. Overexpression of MMP-7 Increases Collagen 1A2 in the Aging Kidney.

    PubMed

    Oelusarz, Anna; Nichols, Lanita A; Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth A; Chen, Gang; Akintola, Adebayo D; Catania, Jeffery M; Burghardt, Robert C; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Parrish, Alan R

    2013-10-01

    The percentage of the U.S. population over 65 is rapidly increasing, as is the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The kidney is susceptible to age-dependent alterations in structure, specifically tubulointerstitial fibrosis, that lead to CKD. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were initially characterized as extracellular matrix (ECM) proteinases; however it is clear that their biological role is much larger. We have observed increased gene expression of several MMPs in the aging kidney, including MMP-7. MMP-7 overexpression was observed starting at 16 months, and over a 500 fold up-regulation in 2 year-old animals. Overexpression of MMP-7 is not observed in age-matched, calorically restricted controls that do not develop fibrosis and renal dysfunction, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis. In order to delineate the contributions of MMP-7 to renal dysfunction, we overexpressed MMP-7 in NRK-52E cells. High-throughput sequencing of the cells revealed that two collagen genes, Col1a2 and Col3a1, were elevated in the MMP-7 overexpressing cells. These two collagen genes were also elevated in aging rat kidneys and temporally correlated with increased MMP-7 expression. Addition of exogenous MMP-7, or conditioned media from MMP-7 overexpressing cells also increased Col1A2 expression. Inhibition of PKA, src, and MAPK signaling at p38 and ERK was able to attenuate the MMP-7 up-regulation of Col1a2. Consistent with this finding, increased phosphorylation of PKA, src and ERK was seen in MMP-7 overexpressing cells and upon exogenous MMP-7 treatment of NRK-52E cells. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which MMP-7 contributes to the development of fibrosis leading to CKD. PMID:24273653

  6. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  7. Novel insights about the MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Fabiola

    2016-03-01

    MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and MDM4 (double minute 4 human homolog, also known as MDMX) inhibit the activity of tumor protein p53 (TP53, best known as p53) through their heterodimerization. New evidence indicates that under stress conditions the heterodimer is modified, leading to different activities of the single molecules. In particular, following lethal DNA damage, MDM2 and MDM4 dissociate and MDM4 promotes the stabilization of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and the phosphorylation of p53, resulting in transcriptional repression of antiapoptotic targets of p53/HIPK2. PMID:27308591

  8. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  9. Overexpressed TP73 induces apoptosis in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Robert C; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Lin, Linda L; Skapura, Darlene G; Rajan, Jessen A; Adesina, Adekunle M; Perlaky, Laszlo; Irwin, Meredith S; Kim, John YH

    2007-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Children who relapse usually die of their disease, which reflects resistance to radiation and/or chemotherapy. Improvements in outcome require a better understanding of the molecular basis of medulloblastoma growth and treatment response. TP73 is a member of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors and mediates apoptotic responses to genotoxic stress. In this study, we assessed expression of TP73 RNA species in patient tumor specimens and in medulloblastoma cell lines, and manipulated expression of full-length TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 to assess their effects on growth. Methods We analyzed medulloblastoma samples from thirty-four pediatric patients and the established medulloblastoma cell lines, Daoy and D283MED, for expression of TP73 RNA including the full-length transcript and the 5'-terminal variants that encode the ΔNp73 isoform, as well as TP53 RNA using quantitative real time-RTPCR. Protein expression of TAp73 and ΔNp73 was quantitated with immunoblotting methods. Clinical outcome was analyzed based on TP73 RNA and p53 protein expression. To determine effects of overexpression or knock-down of TAp73 and ΔNp73 on cell cycle and apoptosis, we analyzed transiently transfected medulloblastoma cell lines with flow cytometric and TUNEL methods. Results Patient medulloblastoma samples and cell lines expressed full-length and 5'-terminal variant TP73 RNA species in 100-fold excess compared to non-neoplastic brain controls. Western immunoblot analysis confirmed their elevated levels of TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 proteins. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed trends toward favorable overall and progression-free survival of patients whose tumors display TAp73 RNA overexpression. Overexpression of TAp73 or ΔNp73 induced apoptosis under basal growth conditions in vitro and sensitized them to cell death

  10. Tetraethyl lead

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetraethyl lead ; CASRN 78 - 00 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  11. Nucleophosmin is overexpressed in thyroid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pianta, Annalisa; Puppin, Cinzia; Franzoni, Alessandra; Fabbro, Dora; Di Loreto, Carla; Bulotta, Stefania; Deganuto, Marta; Paron, Igor; Tell, Gianluca; Puxeddu, Efisio; Filetti, Sebastiano; Russo, Diego; Damante, Giuseppe

    2010-07-02

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a protein that contributes to several cell functions. Depending on the context, it can act as an oncogene or tumor suppressor. No data are available on NPM expression in thyroid cells. In this work, we analyzed both NPM mRNA and protein levels in a series of human thyroid tumor tissues and cell lines. By using immunohistochemistry, NPM overexpression was detected in papillary, follicular, undifferentiated thyroid cancer, and also in follicular benign adenomas, indicating it as an early event during thyroid tumorigenesis. In contrast, various levels of NPM mRNA levels as detected by quantitative RT-PCR were observed in tumor tissues, suggesting a dissociation between protein and transcript expression. The same behavior was observed in the normal thyroid FRTL5 cell lines. In these cells, a positive correlation between NPM protein levels, but not mRNA, and proliferation state was detected. By using thyroid tumor cell lines, we demonstrated that such a post-mRNA regulation may depend on NPM binding to p-Akt, whose levels were found to be increased in the tumor cells, in parallel with reduction of PTEN. In conclusion, our present data demonstrate for the first time that nucleophosmin is overexpressed in thyroid tumors, as an early event of thyroid tumorigenesis. It seems as a result of a dysregulation occurring at protein and not transcriptional level related to an increase of p-Akt levels of transformed thyrocytes.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase 14 overexpression reduces corneal scarring.

    PubMed

    Galiacy, S D; Fournié, P; Massoudi, D; Ancèle, E; Quintyn, J-C; Erraud, A; Raymond-Letron, I; Rolling, F; Malecaze, F

    2011-05-01

    Once a corneal scar develops, surgical management remains the only option for visual rehabilitation. Corneal transplantation is the definitive treatment for a corneal scar. In addition to the challenges posed by graft rejections and other postoperative complications, the lack of high-quality donor corneas can limit the benefits possible with keratoplasty. The purpose of our study was to evaluate a new therapeutic strategy for treating corneal scarring by targeting collagen deposition. We overexpressed a fibril collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14)) to prevent collagen deposition in the scar tissue. We demonstrated that a single and simple direct injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector expressing murine MMP14 can modulate gene expression of murine stromal keratocytes. This tool opens new possibilities with regard to treatment. In a mouse model of corneal full-thickness incision, we observed that MMP14 overexpression reduced corneal opacity and expression of the major genes involved in corneal scarring, especially type III collagen and α-smooth muscle actin. These results represent proof of concept that gene transfer of MMP14 can reduce scar formation, which could have therapeutic applications after corneal trauma.

  13. In vivo clonal overexpression of neuroligin 3 and neuroligin 2 in neurons of the rat cerebral cortex: Differential effects on GABAergic synapses and neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Christopher D; Chiou, Tzu-Ting; Miralles, Celia P; Harris, Rachel S; Fiondella, Christopher G; Loturco, Joseph J; De Blas, Angel L

    2015-06-15

    We studied the effect of clonal overexpression of neuroligin 3 (NL3) or neuroligin 2 (NL2) in the adult rat cerebral cortex following in utero electroporation (IUEP) at embryonic stage E14. Overexpression of NL3 leads to a large increase in vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (vGAT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65 in the GABAergic contacts that the overexpressing neurons receive. Overexpression of NL2 produced a similar effect but to a lesser extent. In contrast, overexpression of NL3 or NL2 after IUEP does not affect vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) in the glutamatergic contacts that the NL3 or NL2-overexpressing neurons receive. The NL3 or NL2-overexpressing neurons do not show increased innervation by parvalbumin-containing GABAergic terminals or increased parvalbumin in the same terminals that show increased vGAT. These results indicate that the observed increase in vGAT and GAD65 is not due to increased GABAergic innervation but to increased expression of vGAT and GAD65 in the GABAergic contacts that NL3 or NL2-overexpressing neurons receive. The majority of bright vGAT puncta contacting the NL3-overexpressing neurons have no gephyrin juxtaposed to them, indicating that many of these contacts are nonsynaptic. This contrasts with the majority of the NL2-overexpressing neurons, which show plenty of synaptic gephyrin clusters juxtaposed to vGAT. Besides having an effect on GABAergic contacts, overexpression of NL3 interferes with the neuronal radial migration, in the cerebral cortex, of the neurons overexpressing NL3.

  14. In vivo clonal overexpression of neuroligin 3 and neuroligin 2 in neurons of the rat cerebral cortex. Differential effects on GABAergic synapses and neuronal migration

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Christopher D.; Chiou, Tzu-Ting; Miralles, Celia P.; Harris, Rachel S.; Fiondella, Christopher G.; LoTurco, Joseph J.; De Blas, Angel L.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of clonal overexpression of neuroligin 3 (NL3) or neuroligin 2 (NL2) in the adult rat cerebral cortex following in utero electroporation (IUEP) at embryonic stage E14. Overexpression of NL3 leads to a large increase in vGAT and GAD65 in the GABAergic contacts that the overexpressing neurons receive. Overexpression of NL2 produced a similar effect but to a lesser extent. In contrast, overexpression of NL3 or NL2 after IUEP, does not affect vGlut1 in the glutamatergic contacts that the NL3 or NL2 overexpressing neurons receive. The NL3 or NL2 overexpressing neurons do not show increased innervation by parvalbumin-containing GABAergic terminals or increased parvalbumin in the same terminals that show increased vGAT. These results indicate that the observed increase in vGAT and GAD65 is not due to increased GABAergic innervation but to increased expression of vGAT and GAD65 in the GABAergic contacts that NL3 or NL2 overexpressing neurons receive. The majority of bright vGAT puncta contacting the NL3 overexpressing neurons have no gephyrin juxtaposed to them indicating that many of these contacts are non-synaptic. This contrasts with the majority of the NL2 overexpressing neurons, which show plenty of synaptic gephyrin clusters juxtaposed to vGAT. Besides having an effect on GABAergic contacts, overexpression of NL3 interferes with the neuronal radial migration, in the cerebral cortex, of the neurons overexpressing NL3. PMID:25565602

  15. Statins Reduce Melanoma Development and Metastasis through MICA Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Rochaix, Philippe; Mariamé, Bernard; Couderc, Bettina; Favre, Gilles; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Survival of melanoma patients after metastases detection remains short. Several clinical trials have shown moderate efficiency in improving patient survival, and the search for pharmacological agents to enhance the immune response and reduce melanoma metastases is still necessary. Statins block the mevalonate pathway, which leads to decreases in GTPase isoprenylation and activity, particularly those of the Ras superfamily. They are widely used as hypocholesterolemic agents in cardiovascular diseases and several studies have shown that they also have protective effects against cancers. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that treatment of melanoma cells with inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, such as statins, favor the development of specific adaptive immune responses against these tumors. In the present study, we tested statin impact on the innate immune response against human metastatic melanoma cells. Our data shows that treatment of two human melanoma cell lines with statins induced a weak but significant increase of MHC class I Chain-related protein A (MICA) membrane expression. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma is involved in this statin-induced MICA overexpression, which is independent of Ras and Rho GTPase signaling pathways. Interestingly, this MICA overexpression makes melanoma cells more sensitive to in vitro lysis by NK cells. The impact of statin treatment on in vivo development of melanoma tumors and metastases was investigated in nude mice, because murine NK cells, which express NKG2D receptors, are able to recognize and kill human tumor cells expressing MICA. The results demonstrated that both local tumor growth and pulmonary metastases were strongly inhibited in nude mice injected with statin-treated melanoma cells. These results suggest that statins could be effective in melanoma immunotherapy treatments. PMID:23493799

  16. Genetic manipulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt in rice: overexpression of truncated glutamate decarboxylase (GAD2) and knockdown of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) lead to sustained and high levels of GABA accumulation in rice kernels.

    PubMed

    Shimajiri, Yasuka; Oonishi, Takayuki; Ozaki, Kae; Kainou, Kumiko; Akama, Kazuhito

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid commonly present in all organisms. Because cellular levels of GABA in plants are mainly regulated by synthesis (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD) and catabolism (GABA-transaminase, GABA-T), we attempted seed-specific manipulation of the GABA shunt to achieve stable GABA accumulation in rice. A truncated GAD2 sequence, one of five GAD genes, controlled by the glutelin (GluB-1) or rice embryo globulin promoters (REG) and GABA-T-based trigger sequences in RNA interference (RNAi) cassettes controlled by one of these promoters as well, was introduced into rice (cv. Koshihikari) to establish stable transgenic lines under herbicide selection using pyriminobac. T₁ and T₂ generations of rice lines displayed high GABA concentrations (2-100 mg/100 g grain). In analyses of two selected lines from the T₃ generation, there was a strong correlation between GABA level and the expression of truncated GAD2, whereas the inhibitory effect of GABA-T expression was relatively weak. In these two lines both with two T-DNA copies, their starch, amylose, and protein levels were slightly lower than non-transformed cv. Koshihikari. Free amino acid analysis of mature kernels of these lines demonstrated elevated levels of GABA (75-350 mg/100 g polished rice) and also high levels of several amino acids, such as Ala, Ser, and Val. Because these lines of seeds could sustain their GABA content after harvest (up to 6 months), the strategy in this study could lead to the accumulation GABA and for these to be sustained in the edible parts.

  17. Photosynthesis of root chloroplasts developed in Arabidopsis lines overexpressing GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Daichi; Noguchi, Ko; Fujinuma, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sugimoto, Keiko; Niyogi, Krishna K; Wada, Hajime; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2013-08-01

    In plants, genes involved in photosynthesis are encoded separately in nuclei and plastids, and tight cooperation between these two genomes is therefore required for the development of functional chloroplasts. Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are involved in chloroplast development, directly targeting photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes for up-regulation. Although overexpression of GLKs leads to chloroplast development in non-photosynthetic organs, the mechanisms of coordination between the nuclear gene expression influenced by GLKs and the photosynthetic processes inside chloroplasts are largely unknown. To elucidate the impact of GLK-induced expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes on the construction of photosynthetic systems, chloroplast morphology and photosynthetic characteristics in greenish roots of Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing GLKs were compared with those in wild-type roots and leaves. Overexpression of GLKs caused up-regulation of not only their direct targets but also non-target nuclear and plastid genes, leading to global induction of chloroplast biogenesis in the root. Large antennae relative to reaction centers were observed in wild-type roots and were further enhanced by GLK overexpression due to the increased expression of target genes associated with peripheral light-harvesting antennae. Photochemical efficiency was lower in the root chloroplasts than in leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that the imbalance in the photosynthetic machinery decreases the efficiency of light utilization in root chloroplasts. Despite the low photochemical efficiency, root photosynthesis contributed to carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, GLK overexpression increased CO₂ fixation and promoted phototrophic performance of the root, showing the potential of root photosynthesis to improve effective carbon utilization in plants.

  18. Overexpression of microRNA-99a Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Bai, Jian; Ding, Liang; Gu, Rong; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is associated with significantly increased risk of heart failure, one of the leading medical causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are known to be involved in pathological cardiac remodeling. However, whether miR-99a participates in the signaling cascade leading to cardiac hypertrophy is unknown. To evaluate the role of miR-99a in cardiac hypertrophy, we assessed the expression of miR-99a in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by isoprenaline (ISO)/angiotensin-II (Ang II) and in mice model of cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Expression of miR-99a was evaluated in these hypertrophic cells and hearts. We also found that miR-99a expression was highly correlated with cardiac function of mice with heart failure (8 weeks after TAC surgery). Overexpression of miR-99a attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in TAC mice and cellular hypertrophy in stimuli treated cardiomyocytes through down-regulation of expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These results indicate that miR-99a negatively regulates physiological hypertrophy through mTOR signaling pathway, which may provide a new therapeutic approach for pressure-overload heart failure. PMID:26914935

  19. Overexpression of membrane proteins using Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Bornert, Olivier; Alkhalfioui, Fatima; Logez, Christel; Wagner, Renaud

    2012-02-01

    Among the small number of expression systems validated for the mass production of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs), the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris stands as one of the most efficient hosts. This system has been used to produce crystallization-grade proteins for a variety of EMPs, from which high-resolution 3D structures have been determined. This unit describes a set of guidelines and instructions to overexpress membrane proteins using the P. pastoris system. Using a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) as a model EMP, these protocols illustrate the necessary steps, starting with the design of the DNA sequence to be expressed, through the preparation and analysis of samples containing the corresponding membrane protein of interest. In addition, recommendations are given on a series of experimental parameters that can be optimized to substantially improve the amount and/or the functionality of the expressed EMPs.

  20. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  1. Over-expression of catalase in myeloid cells confers acute protection following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Brown, Milton E; Che, Pao Lin; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chiang, Bryce; Taylor, W Robert; Davis, Michael E

    2014-05-21

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  2. Creating drought- and salt-tolerant cotton by overexpressing a vacuolar pyrophosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Shen, Guoxin; Kuppu, Sundaram; Gaxiola, Roberto; Payton, Paxton

    2011-06-01

    Increased expression of an Arabidopsis vacuolar pyrophosphatase gene, AVP1, leads to increased drought and salt tolerance in transgenic plants, which has been demonstrated in laboratory and field conditions. The molecular mechanism of AVP1-mediated drought resistance is likely due to increased proton pump activity of the vacuolar pyrophosphatase, which generates a higher proton electrochemical gradient across the vacuolar membrane, leading to lower water potential in the plant vacuole and higher secondary transporter activities that prevent ion accumulation to toxic levels in the cytoplasm. Additionally, overexpression of AVP1 appears to stimulate auxin polar transport, which in turn stimulates root development. The larger root system allows AVP1-overexpressing plants to absorb water more efficiently under drought and saline conditions, resulting in stress tolerance and increased yields. Multi-year field-trial data indicate that overexpression of AVP1 in cotton leads to at least 20% more fiber yield than wild-type control plants in dry-land conditions, which highlights the potential use of AVP1 in improving drought tolerance in crops in arid and semiarid areas of the world. 

  3. Over-expression of Topoisomerase II Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    John, Riffat; Ganeshan, Uma; Singh, Badri N; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K; Sopory, Sudhir K; Rajam, Manchikatla V

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases are unique enzymes having an ability to remove or add DNA supercoils and untangle the snarled DNA. They can cut, shuffle, and religate DNA strands and remove the torsional stress during DNA replication, transcription or recombination events. In the present study, we over-expressed topoisomerase II (TopoII) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) and examined its role in growth and development as well as salt (NaCl) stress tolerance. Several putative transgenic plants were generated and the transgene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses, and RT-PCR analysis respectively. Percent seed germination, shoot growth, and chlorophyll content revealed that transgenic lines over-expressing the NtTopoIIα-1 gene exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt (150 and 200 mM NaCl) stress. Moreover, over-expression of TopoII lead to the elevation in proline and glycine betaine levels in response to both concentrations of NaCl as compared to wild-type. In response to NaCl stress, TopoII over-expressing lines showed reduced lipid peroxidation derived malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. These results suggest that TopoII plays a pivotal role in salt stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27630644

  4. Over-expression of Topoisomerase II Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    John, Riffat; Ganeshan, Uma; Singh, Badri N.; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K.; Sopory, Sudhir K.; Rajam, Manchikatla V.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases are unique enzymes having an ability to remove or add DNA supercoils and untangle the snarled DNA. They can cut, shuffle, and religate DNA strands and remove the torsional stress during DNA replication, transcription or recombination events. In the present study, we over-expressed topoisomerase II (TopoII) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) and examined its role in growth and development as well as salt (NaCl) stress tolerance. Several putative transgenic plants were generated and the transgene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses, and RT-PCR analysis respectively. Percent seed germination, shoot growth, and chlorophyll content revealed that transgenic lines over-expressing the NtTopoIIα-1 gene exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt (150 and 200 mM NaCl) stress. Moreover, over-expression of TopoII lead to the elevation in proline and glycine betaine levels in response to both concentrations of NaCl as compared to wild-type. In response to NaCl stress, TopoII over-expressing lines showed reduced lipid peroxidation derived malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. These results suggest that TopoII plays a pivotal role in salt stress tolerance in plants.

  5. Over-expression of Topoisomerase II Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    John, Riffat; Ganeshan, Uma; Singh, Badri N.; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K.; Sopory, Sudhir K.; Rajam, Manchikatla V.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases are unique enzymes having an ability to remove or add DNA supercoils and untangle the snarled DNA. They can cut, shuffle, and religate DNA strands and remove the torsional stress during DNA replication, transcription or recombination events. In the present study, we over-expressed topoisomerase II (TopoII) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) and examined its role in growth and development as well as salt (NaCl) stress tolerance. Several putative transgenic plants were generated and the transgene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses, and RT-PCR analysis respectively. Percent seed germination, shoot growth, and chlorophyll content revealed that transgenic lines over-expressing the NtTopoIIα-1 gene exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt (150 and 200 mM NaCl) stress. Moreover, over-expression of TopoII lead to the elevation in proline and glycine betaine levels in response to both concentrations of NaCl as compared to wild-type. In response to NaCl stress, TopoII over-expressing lines showed reduced lipid peroxidation derived malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. These results suggest that TopoII plays a pivotal role in salt stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27630644

  6. Overexpression of the transcription factor Hand1 causes predisposition towards arrhythmia in mice.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Ross A; Zuberi, Zia; Gomes, John; Orford, Robert; Dupays, Laurent; Felkin, Leanne E; Clark, James E; Magee, Anthony I; Ehler, Elisabeth; Birks, Emma J; Barton, Paul J R; Tinker, Andrew; Mohun, Timothy J

    2009-07-01

    Elevated levels of the cardiac transcription factor Hand1 have been reported in several adult cardiac diseases but it is unclear whether this change is itself maladaptive with respect to heart function. To test this possibility, we have developed a novel, inducible transgenic system, and used it to overexpress Hand1 in adult mouse hearts. Overexpression of Hand1 in the adult mouse heart leads to mild cardiac hypertrophy and a reduction in life expectancy. Treated mice show no significant fibrosis, myocyte disarray or congestive heart failure, but have a greatly reduced threshold for induced ventricular tachycardia, indicating a predisposition to cardiac arrhythmia. Within 48 h, they show a significant loss of connexin43 protein from cardiac intercalated discs, with increased intercalated disc beta-catenin expression at protein and RNA levels. These changes are sustained during prolonged Hand1 overexpression. We propose that cardiac overexpression of Hand1 offers a useful mouse model of arrhythmogenesis and elevated HAND1 may provide one of the molecular links between the failing heart and arrhythmia.

  7. Opposing effects of target overexpression reveal drug mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Adam C.; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of a drug's molecular target often increases drug resistance, offering a pathway for adaptive evolution and a tool for target identification. It is unclear though why this phenomenon applies to some drugs but not others. Here we gradually overexpressed antibiotic targets in Escherichia coli and found that drug resistance can increase, remain unchanged, decrease, or even change non-monotonically. Even a single target can produce opposing responses to its different inhibitors. We explain these contradicting effects with quantitative models of enzyme inhibition that account for fitness costs and the biochemical activity or inactivity of drug-enzyme complexes. Thus, target overexpression confers resistance or sensitivity as a predictable property of drug mechanism, explaining its variable presence in nature as a resistance mechanism. Though overexpression screens may fail at identifying unknown targets, overexpressing known or putative targets provides a systematic approach to distinguish between simple inhibition and complex mechanisms of drug action. PMID:24980690

  8. Overexpression of Glycolate Oxidase Confers Improved Photosynthesis under High Light and High Temperature in Rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li-Li; Lu, Yu-Sheng; Li, Yong; Yang, Chengwei; Peng, Xin-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    While glycolate oxidase (GLO) is well known as a key enzyme for the photorespiratory metabolism in plants, its physiological function and mechanism remains to be further clarified. Our previous studies have shown that suppression of GLO in rice leads to stunted growth and inhibited photosynthesis (Pn) which is positively and linearly correlated with decreased GLO activities. It is, therefore, of interest to further understand whether Pn can be improved when GLO is up-regulated? In this study, four independent overexpression rice lines, with gradient increases in GLO activity, were generated and functionally analyzed. Phenotypic observations showed that the growth could be improved when GLO activities were increased by 60 or 100%, whereas reduced growth was noticed when the activity was further increased by 150 or 210%. As compared with WT plants, all the overexpression plants exhibited significantly improved Pn under conditions of high light and high temperature, but not under normal conditions. In addition, the overexpression plants were more resistant to the MV-induced photooxidative stress. It was further demonstrated that the antioxidant enzymes, and the antioxidant metabolite glutathione was not significantly altered in the overexpression plants. In contrast, H2O2 and salicylic acid (SA) were correspondingly induced upon the GLO overexpression. Taken together, the results suggest that GLO may play an important role for plants to cope with high light and high temperature, and that H2O2 and SA may serve as signaling molecules to trigger stress defense responses but antioxidant reactions appear not to be involved in the defense. PMID:27540387

  9. Overexpression of Glycolate Oxidase Confers Improved Photosynthesis under High Light and High Temperature in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Li-Li; Lu, Yu-sheng; Li, Yong; Yang, Chengwei; Peng, Xin-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    While glycolate oxidase (GLO) is well known as a key enzyme for the photorespiratory metabolism in plants, its physiological function and mechanism remains to be further clarified. Our previous studies have shown that suppression of GLO in rice leads to stunted growth and inhibited photosynthesis (Pn) which is positively and linearly correlated with decreased GLO activities. It is, therefore, of interest to further understand whether Pn can be improved when GLO is up-regulated? In this study, four independent overexpression rice lines, with gradient increases in GLO activity, were generated and functionally analyzed. Phenotypic observations showed that the growth could be improved when GLO activities were increased by 60 or 100%, whereas reduced growth was noticed when the activity was further increased by 150 or 210%. As compared with WT plants, all the overexpression plants exhibited significantly improved Pn under conditions of high light and high temperature, but not under normal conditions. In addition, the overexpression plants were more resistant to the MV-induced photooxidative stress. It was further demonstrated that the antioxidant enzymes, and the antioxidant metabolite glutathione was not significantly altered in the overexpression plants. In contrast, H2O2 and salicylic acid (SA) were correspondingly induced upon the GLO overexpression. Taken together, the results suggest that GLO may play an important role for plants to cope with high light and high temperature, and that H2O2 and SA may serve as signaling molecules to trigger stress defense responses but antioxidant reactions appear not to be involved in the defense. PMID:27540387

  10. Heterologous Overexpression of Poplar SnRK2 Genes Enhanced Salt Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xueqing; Yu, Xiang; Hori, Chiaki; Demura, Taku; Ohtani, Misato; Zhuge, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Subfamily 2 of SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK2) plays important roles in plant abiotic stress responses as a global positive regulator of abscisic acid signaling. In the genome of the model tree Populus trichocarpa, 12 SnRK2 genes have been identified, and some are upregulated by abiotic stresses. In this study, we heterologously overexpressed the PtSnRK2 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and found that overexpression of PtSnRK2.5 and PtSnRK2.7 genes enhanced stress tolerance. In the PtSnRK2.5 and PtSnRK2.7 overexpressors, chlorophyll content, and root elongation were maintained under salt stress conditions, leading to higher survival rates under salt stress compared with those in the wild type. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that PtSnRK2.7 overexpression affected stress-related metabolic genes, including lipid metabolism and flavonoid metabolism, even under normal growth conditions. However, the stress response genes reported to be upregulated in Arabidopsis SRK2C/SnRK2.6 and wheat SnRK2.8 overexpressors were not changed by PtSnRK2.7 overexpression. Furthermore, PtSnRK2.7 overexpression widely and largely influenced the transcriptome in response to salt stress; genes related to transport activity, including anion transport-related genes, were characteristically upregulated, and a variety of metabolic genes were specifically downregulated. We also found that the salt stress response genes were greatly upregulated in the PtSnRK2.7 overexpressor. Taken together, poplar subclass 2 PtSnRK2 genes can modulate salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis, through the activation of cellular signaling pathways in a different manner from that by herbal subclass 2 SnRK2 genes. PMID:27242819

  11. Negative regulation of DNMT3A de novo DNA methylation by frequently overexpressed UHRF family proteins as a mechanism for widespread DNA hypomethylation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuanhui; Li, Pishun; Fang, Lan; Zhu, Haijun; Xu, Liangliang; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Junying; Li, Fei; Feng, Yan; Li, Yan; Li, Jialun; Wang, Ruiping; Du, James X; Li, Jiwen; Chen, Taiping; Ji, Hongbin; Han, Jackie; Yu, Wenqiang; Wu, Qihan; Wong, Jiemin

    2016-01-01

    Global DNA hypomethylation is a most common epigenetic alteration in cancer, but the mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies demonstrate that UHRF1 but not UHRF2 is required for mediating DNA maintenance methylation by DNMT1. Here we report unexpectedly a conserved function for UHRF1 and UHRF2: inhibiting de novo DNA methylation by functioning as E3 ligases promoting DNMT3A degradation. UHRF1/2 are frequently overexpressed in cancers and we present evidence that UHRF1/2 overexpression downregulates DNMT3A proteins and consequently leads to DNA hypomethylation. Abrogating this negative regulation on DNMT3A or overexpression of DNMT3A leads to increased DNA methylation and impaired tumor growth. We propose a working model that UHRF1/2 safeguards the fidelity of DNA methylation and suggests that UHRF1/2 overexpression is likely a causal factor for widespread DNA hypomethylation in cancer via suppressing DNMT3A. PMID:27462454

  12. Diet high in fructose leads to an overexpression of lipocalin-2 in rat fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Xu, Min; Seyhan, Hatice Ali; Ahmad, Shakil; Mihm, Sabine; Ramadori, Giuliano; Schultze, Frank Christian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) expression and its possible role and mechanism(s) of production in rat models of diet-inducible fatty liver. METHODS: Fatty liver was triggered in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed either with liquid Lieber-DeCarli (LDC) or LDC + 70% cal fructose (L-HFr) diet for 4 or 8 wk. Chow-nourished animals served as controls. Hepatic expression of LCN-2 and other metabolic and inflammatory mediators was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Serum LCN-2, fasting leptin, and lipid profile were evaluated via Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Radioimmunoassay, and colorimetric assays, respectively. The localization of LCN-2 in the liver was detected by using immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, HE stain was used to evaluate hepatic fat degeneration and inflammation. RESULTS: Both LDC-fed and L-HFr-fed rat histologically featured fatty liver. In the liver, mRNA transcriptions of Mcp-1, a2-m, Il-8 and Glut5 were increased in the L-HFr group at both time points (P < 0.001), while the transcription of Tlr4, Inos, and Tnf-α was significantly up-regulated at week 4. Interestingly, hepatic Lcn-2 expression was 90-fold at week 4 and 507-fold at week 8 higher in L-HFr-subjected rats vs control (P < 0.001). In contrast to HDL-cholesterol, systemic levels of LCN-2, fasting leptin and triglycerides were elevated in the L-HFr regimen (P < 0.001). Moreover, protein expression of hepatic LCN-2, CD14, phospho-MAPK, caspase-9, cytochrome c and 4-hydroxynonenal was increased in the L-HFr group. Conversely, the hepatic expression of PGC-1α (a mitochondrial-biogenic protein) was reduced in the L-HFr category at week 8. The localization of LCN-2 in the liver was predominantly restricted to MPO+ granulocytes. CONCLUSION: Fructose diet up-regulates hepatic LCN-2 expression, which correlates with the increased indicators of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. The LCN-2 may be involved in liver protection. PMID:24587658

  13. Overexpression of Akt1 Enhances Adipogenesis and Leads to Lipoma Formation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, R. Samuel; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chen, Te-Hao; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is a complex, multifactorial disorder influenced by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Obesity increases the risk of contracting many chronic diseases or metabolic syndrome. Researchers have established several mammalian models of obesity to study its underlying mechanism. However, a lower vertebrate model for conveniently performing drug screening against obesity remains elusive. The specific aim of this study was to create a zebrafish obesity model by over expressing the insulin signaling hub of the Akt1 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings Skin oncogenic transformation screening shows that a stable zebrafish transgenic of Tg(krt4Hsa.myrAkt1)cy18 displays severely obese phenotypes at the adult stage. In Tg(krt4:Hsa.myrAkt1)cy18, the expression of exogenous human constitutively active Akt1 (myrAkt1) can activate endogenous downstream targets of mTOR, GSK-3α/β, and 70S6K. During the embryonic to larval transitory phase, the specific over expression of myrAkt1 in skin can promote hypertrophic and hyperplastic growth. From 21 hour post-fertilization (hpf) onwards, myrAkt1 transgene was ectopically expressed in several mesenchymal derived tissues. This may be the result of the integration position effect. Tg(krt4:Hsa.myrAkt1)cy18 caused a rapid increase of body weight, hyperplastic growth of adipocytes, abnormal accumulation of fat tissues, and blood glucose intolerance at the adult stage. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed the majority of key genes on regulating adipogenesis, adipocytokine, and inflammation are highly upregulated in Tg(krt4:Hsa.myrAkt1)cy18. In contrast, the myogenesis- and skeletogenesis-related gene transcripts are significantly downregulated in Tg(krt4:Hsa.myrAkt1)cy18, suggesting that excess adipocyte differentiation occurs at the expense of other mesenchymal derived tissues. Conclusion/Significance Collectively, the findings of this study provide direct evidence that Akt1 signaling plays an important role in balancing normal levels of fat tissue in vivo. The obese zebrafish examined in this study could be a new powerful model to screen novel drugs for the treatment of human obesity. PMID:22623957

  14. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Overexpression enhances Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Karsten; Mondon, Carl E.; Schrader, Joerg; Konishi, Hakuoh; Cooke, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) may modulate insulin-induced uptake of glucose in insulin-sensitive tissues. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). We hypothesized that a reduction in endogenous ADMA would increase NO synthesis and thereby enhance insulin sensitivity. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis we employed a transgenic mouse in which we overexpressed human dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH-I). The DDAH-I mice had lower plasma ADMA at all ages (22–70 weeks) by comparison to wild-type (WT) littermates. With a glucose challenge, WT mice showed a prompt increase in ADMA, whereas DDAH-I mice had a blunted response. Furthermore, DDAH-I mice had a blunted increase in plasma insulin and glucose levels after glucose challenge, with a 50% reduction in the insulin resistence index, consistent with enhanced sensitivity to insulin. In liver, we observed an increased Akt phosphorylation in the DDAH-I mice after i.p. glucose challenge. Incubation of skeletal muscle from WT mice ex vivo with ADMA (2μM) markedly suppressed insulin-induced glycogen synthesis in fast-twitch but not slow-twitch muscle. Conclusions These findings suggest that the endogenous NOS inhibitor ADMA reduces insulin sensitivity, consistent with previous observations that NO plays a role in insulin sensitivity. PMID:18239148

  15. Mechanisms and consequences of TGF-ß overexpression by podocytes in progressive podocyte disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Soon

    2012-01-01

    In patients with progressive podocyte disease, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and membranous nephropathy, upregulation of transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) is observed in podocytes. Mechanical pressure or biomechanical strain in podocytopathies may cause overexpression of TGF-ß and angiotensin II (Ang II). Oxidative stress induced by Ang II may activate the latent TGF-ß, which then activates Smads and Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in podocytes. Enhanced TGF-ß activity in podocytes may lead to thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) by overproduction of GBM proteins and impaired GBM degradation in podocyte disease. It may also lead to podocyte apoptosis and detachment from the GBM, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes, initiating the development of glomerulosclerosis. Furthermore, activated TGF-ß/Smad signaling by podocytes may induce connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor overexpression, which could act as a paracrine effector mechanism on mesangial cells to stimulate mesangial matrix synthesis. In proliferative podocytopathies, such as cellular or collapsing FSGS, TGF-ß-induced ERK activation may play a role in podocyte proliferation, possibly via TGF-ß-induced EMT of podocytes. Collectively, these data bring new mechanistic insights into our understanding of the TGF-ß overexpression by podocytes in progressive podocyte disease.

  16. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  17. Beclin1 overexpression inhibitis proliferation, invasion and migration of CaSki cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Jia-hua; Sui, Yu-xia; Jin, Long; Yang, Yin; Lin, Sai-mei; Shi, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the autophagy-related gene Beclin1 on proliferation, invasion and metastasis of the cervical cancer CaSki cells and its possible mechanism in vitro were here targeted. After the overexpression vector pcDNA3.1-Beclin1 and RNA interference vector pSUPER-Beclin1 were transfected into CaSki cells in vitro, stable expression cell lines demonstration Beclin1 expression was upregulated, and VEGF and MMP-9 expression were decreased, leading to cell arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. MTT assays further revealed proliferation of cells was significantly inhibited in Beclin1-overexpressing transfectant cells, with invasion and metastasis also being inhibited in Transwell chamber assays. The present results suggest that Beclin1 inhibits invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer CaSki cells in vitro. Mechanisms probably involve Beclin1 inhibition of cell proliferation, and decreased expression of VEGF and MMP-9 proteins.

  18. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  19. SERCA overexpression reduces hydroxyl radical injury in murine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Hiranandani, Nitisha; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Janssen, Paul M L

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (*OH) are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion injury and are observed in clinical situations, including acute heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Acute transient exposure to *OH causes an intracellular Ca(2+) overload and leads to impaired contractility. We investigated whether upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase function (SERCA) can attenuate *OH-induced dysfunction. Small, contracting right ventricular papillary muscles from wild-type (WT) SERCA1a-overexpressing (transgenic, TG) and SERCA2a heterogeneous knockout (HET) mice were directly exposed to *OH. This brief 2-min exposure led to a transient elevation of diastolic force (F(dia)) and depression of developed force (F(dev)). In WT mice, F(dia) increased to 485 +/- 49% and F(dev) decreased to 11 +/- 3%. In sharp contrast, in TG mice F(dia) increased only to 241 +/- 17%, whereas F(dev) decreased only to 51 +/- 5% (P < 0.05 vs. WT). In HET mice, F(dia) rose more than WT (to 597 +/- 20%, P < 0.05), whereas F(dev) was reduced in a similar amount. After approximately 45 min after *OH exposure, a new steady state was reached: F(dev) returned to 37 +/- 6% and 32 +/- 6%, whereas F(dia) came back to 238 +/- 28% and 292 +/- 17% in WT and HET mice, respectively. In contrast, the sustained dysfunction was significantly less in TG mice: F(dia) and F(dev) returned to 144 +/- 20% and 67 +/- 6%, respectively. Before exposure to *OH, there is decrease in phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation at Ser16 (pPLBSer16) and PLB phosphorylation at Thr17 (pPLBThr17) in TG mice and an increase in pPLBSer16 and pPLBThr17 in HET mice versus WT. After exposure to *OH there is decrease in pPLBSer16 in WT, TG, and HET mice but no significant change in the level of pPLBThr17 in any group. The results indicate that SERCA overexpression can reduce the *OH-induced contractile dysfunction in murine myocardium, whereas a reduced SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity aggravates this injury. Loss of

  20. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  1. HIPK family kinases bind and regulate the function of the CCR4-NOT complex

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Gil, Alfonso; Ritter, Olesja; Hornung, Juliane; Stekman, Hilda; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kracht, Michael; Schmitz, M. Lienhard

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 functions as a regulator of developmental processes and as a signal integrator of a wide variety of stress signals, such as DNA damage, hypoxia, and reactive oxygen intermediates. Because the kinase is generated in a constitutively active form, its expression levels are restricted by a variety of different mechanisms. Here we identify the CCR4-NOT complex as a new regulator of HIPK2 abundance. Down-regulation or knockout of the CCR4-NOT complex member CNOT2 leads to reduced HIPK2 protein levels without affecting the expression level of HIPK1 or HIPK3. A fraction of all HIPK family members associates with the CCR4-NOT components CNOT2 and CNOT3. HIPKs also phosphorylate the CCR4-NOT complex, a feature that is shared with their yeast progenitor kinase, YAK1. Functional assays reveal that HIPK2 and HIPK1 restrict CNOT2-dependent mRNA decay. HIPKs are well known regulators of transcription, but the mutual regulation between CCR4-NOT and HIPKs extends the regulatory potential of these kinases by enabling posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:27122605

  2. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, Marie; Kim, Hyun; Warringer, Jonas; Melén, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-25

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing approximately 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies.

  3. [Overexpression of FKS1 to improve yeast autolysis-stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2015-09-01

    With the development of high gravity brewing, yeast cells are exposed to multiple brewing-associated stresses, such as increased osmotic pressure, enhanced alcohol concentration and nutritional imbalance. These will speed up yeast autolysis, which seriously influence beer flavor and quality. To increase yeast anti-autolytic ability, FKS1 overexpression strain was constructed by 18S rDNA. The concentration of β-1,3-glucan of overexpression strain was 62% higher than that of wild type strain. Meantime, FKS1 overexpression strain increased anti-stress ability at 8% ethanol, 0.4 mol/L NaCl and starvation stress. Under simulated autolysis, FKS1 showed good anti-autolytic ability by slower autolysis. These results confirms the potential of FKS1 overexpression to tackle yeast autolysis in high-gravity brewing. PMID:26955712

  4. Overexpression of c-Myc alters G(1)/S arrest following ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joon-Ho; Dickson, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    Study of the mechanism(s) of genomic instability induced by the c-myc proto-oncogene has the potential to shed new light on its well-known oncogenic activity. However, an underlying mechanism(s) for this phenotype is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of c-Myc overexpression on the DNA damage-induced G(1)/S checkpoint, in order to obtain mechanistic insights into how deregulated c-Myc destabilizes the cellular genome. The DNA damage-induced checkpoints are among the primary safeguard mechanisms for genomic stability, and alterations of cell cycle checkpoints are known to be crucial for certain types of genomic instability, such as gene amplification. The effects of c-Myc overexpression were studied in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as one approach to understanding the c-Myc-induced genomic instability in the context of mammary tumorigenesis. Initially, flow-cytometric analyses were used with two c-Myc-overexpressing, nontransformed immortal lines (184A1N4 and MCF10A) to determine whether c-Myc overexpression leads to alteration of cell cycle arrest following ionizing radiation (IR). Inappropriate entry into S phase was then confirmed with a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay measuring de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Direct involvement of c-Myc overexpression in alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was then confirmed by utilizing the MycER construct, a regulatable c-Myc. A transient excess of c-Myc activity, provided by the activated MycER, was similarly able to induce the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Significantly, the transient expression of full-length c-Myc in normal mortal HMECs also facilitated entry into S phase and the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Furthermore, irradiated, c-Myc-infected, normal HMECs developed a sub-G(1) population and a >4N population of cells. The c-Myc-induced alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was also compared to the effects of expression of MycS (N

  5. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  6. Overexpressed HDAC4 is associated with poor survival and promotes tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Shi-Juan; Wang, Meng-He; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Zheng, X.F. Steven; Wang, Hui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate histone deacetylation, leading to transcriptional repression, which is involved in many diseases, including age-related tissue degeneration, heart failure and cancer. In this study, we were aimed to investigate the expression, clinical significance and biological function of HDAC4 in esophageal carcinoma (EC). We found that HDAC4 mRNA and protein are overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and cell lines. HDAC4 overexpression is associated with higher tumor grade, advanced clinical stage and poor survival. Mechanistically, HDAC4 promotes proliferation and G1/S cell cycle progression in EC cells by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21 and p27 and up-regulating CDK2/4 and CDK-dependent Rb phosphorylation. HDAC4 also enhances ESCC cell migration. Furthermore, HDAC4 positively regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by increasing the expression of Vimentin and decreasing the expression of E-Cadherin/α-Catenin. Together, our study shows that HDAC4 overexpression is important for the oncogenesis of EC, which may serve as a useful prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for this malignancy. PMID:27295551

  7. The effect of cdk-5 overexpression on tau phosphorylation and spatial memory of rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Yipeng; Wang, Jianzhi

    2004-06-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hyperphosphorylation of tau may be the underlying mechanism for the cytoskeletal abnormalities and neuronal death. It was reported that cyclin-dependent kinase5 (cdk-5) could phosphorylate tau at most AD-related epitopes in vitro. In this study, we investigated the effect of cdk-5 overexpression on tau phosphorylation and spatial memory in rat. We demonstrated that 24 h after transfection into rat hippocampus, cdk-5 was overexpressed and induced a reduced staining with antibody tau-1 and an enhanced staining with antibodies 12e8 and PHF-1, suggesting hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser199/202, Ser262/356 and Ser396/404 sites. Additionally, the cdk-5 transfected rats showed long latency to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze compared to the control rat. 48 h after transfection, the level of cdk-5 was decreased significantly, and the latency of rats to find the hidden platform was prolonged. It implies that in vivo overexpression of cdk-5 leads to impairment of spatial memory in rat and tau hyperphosphorylation may be the underlying mechanism.

  8. MACROD2 overexpression mediates estrogen independent growth and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Morassa; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Cravero, Karen; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Wong, Hong Yuen; Scharpf, Rob; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Garay, Joseph P.; Wang, Grace M.; Beaver, Julia A.; Cochran, Rory L.; Blair, Brian G.; Rosen, D. Marc; Erlanger, Bracha; Argani, Pedram; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is effective for treating estrogen receptor-alpha (ER) positive breast cancers. However, few molecular mediators of tamoxifen resistance have been elucidated. Here we describe a previously unidentified gene, MACROD2 that confers tamoxifen resistance and estrogen independent growth. We found MACROD2 is amplified and overexpressed in metastatic tamoxifen-resistant tumors. Transgene overexpression of MACROD2 in breast cancer cell lines results in tamoxifen resistance, whereas RNAi-mediated gene knock down reverses this phenotype. MACROD2 overexpression also leads to estrogen independent growth in xenograft assays. Mechanistically, MACROD2 increases p300 binding to estrogen response elements in a subset of ER regulated genes. Primary breast cancers and matched metastases demonstrate MACROD2 expression can change with disease evolution, and increased expression and amplification of MACROD2 in primary tumors is associated with worse overall survival. These studies establish MACROD2 as a key mediator of estrogen independent growth and tamoxifen resistance, as well as a potential novel target for diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25422431

  9. Response of transgenic poplar overexpressing cytosolic glutamine synthetase to phosphinothricin.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María Belén; Jing, Zhong Ping; Kirby, Edward G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Gallardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the main enzyme involved in ammonia assimilation in plants and is the target of phosphinothricin (PPT), an herbicide commonly used for weed control in agriculture. As a result of the inhibition of GS, PPT also blocks photorespiration, resulting in the depletion of leaf amino acid pools leading to the plant death. Hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba INRA clone 7171-B4) overexpressing cytosolic GS is characterized by enhanced vegetative growth [Gallardo, F., Fu, J., Cantón, F.R., García-Gutiérrez, A., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 1999. Expression of a conifer glutamine synthetase gene in transgenic poplar. Planta 210, 19-26; Fu, J., Sampalo, R., Gallardo, F., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 2003. Assembly of a cytosolic pine glutamine synthetase holoenzyme in leaves of transgenic poplar leads to enhanced vegetative growth in young plants. Plant Cell Environ. 26, 411-418; Jing, Z.P., Gallardo, F., Pascual, M.B., Sampalo, R., Romero, J., Torres de Navarra, A., Cánovas, F.M., 2004. Improved growth in a field trial of transgenic hybrid poplar overexpressing glutamine synthetase. New Phytol. 164, 137-145], increased photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacities [El-Khatib, R.T., Hamerlynck, E.P., Gallardo, F., Kirby, E.G., 2004. Transgenic poplar characterized by ectopic expression of a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene exhibits enhanced tolerance to water stress. Tree Physiol. 24, 729-736], enhanced tolerance to water stress (El-Khatib et al., 2004), and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency [Man, H.-M., Boriel, R., El-Khatib, R.T., Kirby, E.G., 2005. Characterization of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase under conditions of varying nitrogen availability. New Phytol. 167, 31-39]. In vitro plantlets of GS transgenic poplar exhibited enhanced resistance to PPT when compared with non-transgenic controls. After 30 days exposure to PPT at an equivalent dose of 275 g ha(-1), growth

  10. Compensation of the AKT signaling by ERK signaling in transgenic mice hearts overexpressing TRIM72

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Young-Mi; Mahoney, Sarah Jane

    2013-06-10

    The AKT and ERK signaling pathways are known to be involved in cell hypertrophy, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although there is evidence for crosstalk between these two signaling pathways in cellulo, there is less evidence for cross talk in vivo. Here, we show that crosstalk between AKT and ERK signaling in the hearts of TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice (TRIM72-Tg) with alpha-MHC promoter regulates and maintains their heart size. TRIM72, a heart- and skeletal muscle-specific protein, downregulates AKT-mTOR signaling via IRS-1 degradation and reduces the size of rat cardiomyocytes and the size of postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts. TRIM72 expression was upregulated by hypertrophic inducers in cardiomyocytes, while IRS-1 was downregulated by IGF-1. TRIM72 specifically regulated IGF-1-dependent AKT-mTOR signaling, resulting in a reduction of the size of cardiomyocytes. Postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts were smaller than control-treated hearts with inhibition of AKT-mTOR signaling. However, adult TRIM72-Tg hearts were larger than of control despite the suppression of AKT-mTOR signaling. Activation of ERK, PKC-α, and JNK were observed to be elevated in adult TRIM72-Tg, and these signals were mediated by ET-1 via the ET receptors A and B. Altogether, these results suggest that AKT signaling regulates cardiac hypertrophy in physiological conditions, and ERK signaling compensates for the absence of AKT signaling during TRIM72 overexpression, leading to pathological hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • TRIM72 inhibits AKT signaling through ubiquitination of IRS-1 in cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates the size of cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates size of postnatal TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts. • Adult TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts showed cardiac dysfunction. • Adult TRIM72 transgenic mice hearts showed higher expression of endothelin receptors.

  11. Overexpression of the short endoglin isoform reduces renal fibrosis and inflammation after unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Pérez-Roque, Lucía; Núñez-Gómez, Elena; Oujo, Bárbara; Arévalo, Miguel; Ruiz-Remolina, Laura; Cuesta, Cristina; Langa, Carmen; Pérez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Lopez-Novoa, José M

    2016-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) is one of the most studied cytokines involved in renal tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, which is characterized by myofibroblast abundance and proliferation, and high buildup of extracellular matrix in the tubular interstitium leading to organ failure. Endoglin (Eng) is a 180-kDa homodimeric transmembrane protein that regulates a great number of TGF-β1 actions in different biological processes, including ECM synthesis. High levels of Eng have been observed in experimental models of renal fibrosis or in biopsies from patients with chronic kidney disease. In humans and mice, two Eng isoforms are generated by alternative splicing, L-Eng and S-Eng that differ in the length and composition of their cytoplasmic domains. We have previously described that L-Eng overexpression promotes renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). However, the role of S-Eng in renal fibrosis is unknown and its study would let us analyze the possible function of the cytoplasmic domain of Eng in this process. For this purpose, we have generated a mice strain that overexpresses S-Eng (S-ENG(+)) and we have performed an UUO in S-ENG(+) and their wild type (WT) control mice. Our results indicate that obstructed kidney of S-ENG(+) mice shows lower levels of tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, less inflammation and less interstitial cell proliferation than WT littermates. Moreover, S-ENG(+) mice show less activation of Smad1 and Smad2/3 pathways. Thus, S-Eng overexpression reduces UUO-induced renal fibrosis and some associated mechanisms. As L-Eng overexpression provokes renal fibrosis we conclude that Eng-mediated induction of renal fibrosis in this model is dependent on its cytoplasmic domain. PMID:27321931

  12. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  13. Overexpression of Serpinb1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells increases recombinant IgG productivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan; Brooks, Jeanne; Sealover, Natalie; George, Henry J; Kayser, Kevin J

    2015-01-10

    We report the discovery and validation of a novel CHO cell engineering target for improving IgG expression, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B, member 1 (Serpinb1). Transcriptomic studies using microarrays revealed that Serpinb1 was up-regulated in cultures with IgG heavy and light chain transcription transiently repressed compared with cultures treated with non-targeting siRNA. As proof of concept, a lentiviral vector was employed to overexpress the Chinese Hamster Serpinb1 in a CHOZN(®) Glutamine Synthetase (-/-) recombinant IgG producing CHO line. The lentiviral stable pool demonstrated 4.2-fold SERPINB1 overexpression compared with the non-transduced control. The peak viable cell density (VCD) and peak IgG volumetric productivity of the lentiviral stable pool increased 1.3 and 2.0 fold, respectively, compared with the non-transduced control. For host cell engineering, a plasmid encoding SERPINB1 was transfected into the CHOZN(®) GS (-/-) host cell line to create several stable pools. Single-cell clones isolated from the pools were characterized for their SERPINB1 expression levels and growth. The clone (SERPINB1_OE_27) with the highest SERPINB1 expression had decreased peak viable cell density and exponential phase growth rate. Selected SERPINB1 OE clones were subsequently evaluated for their IgG expression capabilities using GS selection. Clone SERPINB1_OE_42 with moderate SERPINB1 overexpression demonstrated increased IgG productivity in "bulk" selection. We conclude that manipulating Serpinb1 expression can lead to increased recombinant IgG productivity, but the effect in host cell lines may vary by clone and by overexpression level. This work represents the ongoing effort in applying "-omics" findings to novel CHO host cell line engineering.

  14. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  15. Targeted overexpression of amelotin disrupts the microstructure of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Nakayama, Yohei; Holcroft, James; Nguyen, Van; Somogyi-Ganss, Eszter; Snead, Malcolm L; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L; Ganss, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We have previously identified amelotin (AMTN) as a novel protein expressed predominantly during the late stages of dental enamel formation, but its role during amelogenesis remains to be determined. In this study we generated transgenic mice that produce AMTN under the amelogenin (Amel) gene promoter to study the effect of AMTN overexpression on enamel formation in vivo. The specific overexpression of AMTN in secretory stage ameloblasts was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The gross histological appearance of ameloblasts or supporting cellular structures as well as the expression of the enamel proteins amelogenin (AMEL) and ameloblastin (AMBN) was not altered by AMTN overexpression, suggesting that protein production, processing and secretion occurred normally in transgenic mice. The expression of Odontogenic, Ameloblast-Associated (ODAM) was slightly increased in secretory stage ameloblasts of transgenic animals. The enamel in AMTN-overexpressing mice was much thinner and displayed a highly irregular surface structure compared to wild type littermates. Teeth of transgenic animals underwent rapid attrition due to the brittleness of the enamel layer. The microstructure of enamel, normally a highly ordered arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals, was completely disorganized. Tomes' process, the hallmark of secretory stage ameloblasts, did not form in transgenic mice. Collectively our data demonstrate that the overexpression of amelotin has a profound effect on enamel structure by disrupting the formation of Tomes' process and the orderly growth of enamel prisms.

  16. PGM2 overexpression improves anaerobic galactose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae galactose is initially metabolized through the Leloir pathway after which glucose 6-phosphate enters glycolysis. Galactose is controlled both by glucose repression and by galactose induction. The gene PGM2 encodes the last enzyme of the Leloir pathway, phosphoglucomutase 2 (Pgm2p), which catalyses the reversible conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate. Overexpression of PGM2 has previously been shown to enhance aerobic growth of S. cerevisiae in galactose medium. Results In the present study we show that overexpression of PGM2 under control of the HXT7'promoter from an integrative plasmid increased the PGM activity 5 to 6 times, which significantly reduced the lag phase of glucose-pregrown cells in an anaerobic galactose culture. PGM2 overexpression also increased the anaerobic specific growth rate whereas ethanol production was less influenced. When PGM2 was overexpressed from a multicopy plasmid instead, the PGM activity increased almost 32 times. However, this increase of PGM activity did not further improve aerobic galactose fermentation as compared to the strain carrying PGM2 on the integrative plasmid. Conclusion PGM2 overexpression in S. cerevisiae from an integrative plasmid is sufficient to reduce the lag phase and to enhance the growth rate in anaerobic galactose fermentation, which results in an overall decrease in fermentation duration. This observation is of particular importance for the future development of stable industrial strains with enhanced PGM activity. PMID:20507616

  17. Neuroendocrine and reproductive consequences of overexpression of growth hormone in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bartke, A; Cecim, M; Tang, K; Steger, R W; Chandrashekar, V; Turyn, D

    1994-09-01

    Availability of recombinant growth hormone (GH) and development of long-acting formulations of this material will undoubtedly lead to widespread use of GH in animal industry and in medicine. GH can act, directly or indirectly, on multiple targets, but its influence on the reproductive system and on the hormonal control of reproduction is poorly understood. Overexpression of GH genes in transgenic animals provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of long-term GH excess. Transgenic mice overexpressing bovine, ovine, or rat GH (hormones with actions closely resembling, if not identical to, those of endogenous [mouse] GH), exhibit enhancement of growth, increased adult body size, and reduced life-span as well as a number of endocrine and reproductive abnormalities. Ectopic overexpression of bovine GH (bGH) driven by metallothionein or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoters is associated with altered activity of hypothalamic neurons which produce somatostatin, loss of adenohypophyseal GH releasing hormone (GHRH) receptors, and suppression of endogenous (mouse) GH release. Elevation of plasma levels of GH (primarily bGH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) in these transgenic mice leads to increases in the number of hepatic GH and prolactin (PRL) receptors, in the serum levels of GH-binding protein (GHBP), in the percent of GHBP complexed with GH, and in the circulating insulin levels. In addition, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels are elevated. Plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), as well as its synthesis and release, are not consistently affected, but follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels are suppressed, apparently due to pre- and post-translational effects. Pituitary lactotrophs exhibit characteristics of chronic enhancement of secretory activity, and plasma PRL levels are elevated. Prolactin responses to mating or to pharmacological blockade of dopamine synthesis are abnormal. Reproductive life span and

  18. Transgenic overexpression of transforming growth factor alpha bypasses the need for c-Ha-ras mutations in mouse skin tumorigenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vassar, R; Hutton, M E; Fuchs, E

    1992-01-01

    The induction of skin papillomas in mice can be divided into two different stages. Chemical initiation frequently elicits mutations in the Ha-ras gene, leading to the constitutive activation of ras. The second step, promotion, involves repetitive topical application of phorbol esters or wounding, leading to epidermal hyperproliferation and papilloma formation. We have found that overexpression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in the basal epidermal layer of transgenic mice yielded papillomas directly upon wounding or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment without the need for an initiator. Moreover, papillomas from TGF-alpha mice did not exhibit mutations in the Ha-ras gene. Interestingly, TGF-alpha acted synergistically with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to enhance epidermal hyperproliferation. Our results demonstrate a central role for TGF-alpha overexpression in tumorigenesis and provide an important animal model for the study of skin tumorigenesis. Images PMID:1406654

  19. Overexpression of the FoxO1 Ameliorates Mesangial Cell Dysfunction in Male Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guijun; Zhou, Yingni; Guo, Feng; Ren, Lei; Wu, Lina; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Ma, Xiaojun; Wang, Qingzhu

    2015-07-01

    The dysfunction of mesangial cells (MCs) in high-glucose (HG) conditions plays pivotal role in inducing glomerular sclerosis by causing the imbalance between generation and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, which ultimately leads to diabetic nephropathy. This study was designed to determine the function of forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), an important transcription factors in regulating cell metabolism and oxidative stress, in MCs in HG conditions. Up-regulation of fibronectin, collagen type IV, and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) was observed under HG conditions in vivo and in vitro, accompanied with elevation of protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation and reduction of FoxO1 bioactivity. After overexpression of constitutively active (CA) FoxO1 in vivo and in vitro by using lentivirus vector, in vivo and in vitro, FoxO1 expression and activity was increased, in accordance with up-regulation of antioxidative genes (catalase and superoxide dismutase, leading to alleviated oxidative stress as well as attenuated Akt activity, whereas overexpression of wild type-FoxO1 only expressed partial effect. Moreover, CA-FoxO1 decreased the expression of fibronectin, collagen type IV, and PAI-1, causing amelioration of renal pathological changes and decrease of ECM protein deposition in glomerulus. Overexpression of CA-FoxO1 in renal cortex also decreased activin type-I receptor-like kinase-5 levels and increased signaling mothers against decapentaplegic (Smad) 7 levels, and simultaneously inhibited Smad3 phosphorylation. Results from in vitro study indicated that increased combination of FoxO1 and Smad3 may interfere with the function of Smad3, including Smad3 phosphorylation and translocation, interaction with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein, and binding with PAI-1 promoter. Together, our findings shed light on the novel function of FoxO1 in inhibiting ECM deposition, which is beneficial to ameliorate MC dysfunction. PMID

  20. UHRF1 overexpression drives DNA hypomethylation and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mudbhary, Raksha; Hoshida, Yujin; Chernyavskaya, Yelena; Jacob, Vinitha; Villanueva, Augusto; Fiel, M. Isabel; Chen, Xintong; Kojima, Kensuke; Thung, Swan; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lachenmayer, Anja; Revill, Kate; Alsinet, Clara; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Desai, Anal; SenBanerjee, Sucharita; Ukomadu, Chinweike; Llovet, Josep M.; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY UHRF1 is an essential regulator of DNA methylation that is highly expressed in many cancers. Here, we use transgenic zebrafish, cultured cells and human tumors to demonstrate that UHRF1 is an oncogene. UHRF1 overexpression in zebrafish hepatocytes destabilizes and delocalizes DNMT1, causes DNA hypomethylation and Tp53-mediated senescence. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) emerges when senescence is bypassed. tp53 mutation both alleviates senescence and accelerates tumor onset. Human HCCs recapitulate this paradigm, as UHRF1 overexpression defines a subclass of aggressive HCCs characterized by genomic instability, TP53 mutation and abrogation of the TP53-mediated senescence program. We propose that UHRF1 overexpression is a mechanism underlying DNA hypomethylation in cancer cells and that senescence is a primary means of restricting tumorigenesis due to epigenetic disruption. PMID:24486181

  1. SND1 overexpression deregulates cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Imaz, Hiart; Rueda, Yuri; Fresnedo, Olatz

    2016-09-01

    SND1 is a multifunctional protein participating, among others, in gene transcription and mRNA metabolism. SND1 is overexpressed in cancer cells and promotes viability and tumourigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This study shows that cholesterol synthesis is increased in SND1-overexpressing hepatoma cells. Neither newly synthesised nor extracellularly supplied cholesterol are able to suppress this increase; however, inhibition of cholesterol esterification reverted the activated state of sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and cholesterogenesis. These results highlight SND1 as a potential regulator of cellular cholesterol distribution and homeostasis in hepatoma cells, and support the rationale for the therapeutic use of molecules that influence cholesterol management when SND1 is overexpressed. PMID:27238764

  2. Nerve Allografts Supplemented with Schwann Cells Overexpressing GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Katherine B.; Jesuraj, Nithya J.; Viader, Andreu; MacEwan, Matthew; Newton, Piyaraj; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine if supplementation of acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) with Schwann Cells overexpressing GDNF (G-SCs) would enhance functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury. Methods SCs expanded in vitro were infected with a lentiviral vector to induce GDNF overexpression. Wild type-SCs (WT-SCs) and G-SCs were seeded into ANAs used to repair a 14mm nerve gap defect. Animals were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for histomorphometric and muscle force analysis. Results At 6 weeks, histomorphometry revealed that ANAs supplemented with G-SCs promoted similar regeneration compared to the isograft at midgraft. However, G-SCs failed to promote regeneration into the distal stump. At 12 weeks, ANAs with G-SCs had lower maximum and specific force production compared to controls. Discussion The combined results suggest that consistent overexpression of GDNF by G-SCs trapped axons in the graft and prevented functional regeneration. PMID:23169341

  3. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  4. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    Lead poisoning - nutritional considerations; Toxic metal - nutritional considerations ... utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially in young children. Tap water from lead ...

  5. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  6. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  7. Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptor Is Reduced in -Synuclein Overexpressing Models of Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Carmela; Dzamko, Nicolas; Madsen, Peder; Nyegaard, Mette; Pohlmann, Regina; Søndergaard, Rikke V.; Lassen, Louise B.; Andresen, Thomas L.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Jensen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to defects in autophagy as a common denominator in most neurodegenerative conditions. Progressive functional decline in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway (ALP) occurs with age, and the consequent impairment in protein processing capacity has been associated with a higher risk of neurodegeneration. Defects in cathepsin D (CD) processing and α-synuclein degradation causing its accumulation in lysosomes are particularly relevant for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanism by which alterations in CD maturation and α-synuclein degradation leads to autophagy defects in PD neurons is still uncertain. Here we demonstrate that MPR300 shuttling between endosomes and the trans Golgi network is altered in α-synuclein overexpressing neurons. Consequently, CD is not correctly trafficked to lysosomes and cannot be processed to generate its mature active form, leading to a reduced CD-mediated α-synuclein degradation and α-synuclein accumulation in neurons. MPR300 is downregulated in brain from α-synuclein overexpressing animal models and in PD patients with early diagnosis. These data indicate MPR300 as crucial player in the autophagy-lysosomal dysfunctions reported in PD and pinpoint MRP300 as a potential biomarker for PD. PMID:27509067

  8. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  9. Overexpression of Robo2 causes defects in the recruitment of metanephric mesenchymal cells and ureteric bud branching morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jiayao; Li, Qinggang; Xie, Yuansheng; Zhang, Xueguang; Cui, Shaoyuan; Shi, Suozhu; Chen, Xiangmei

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 caused reduced UB branching and glomerular number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fewer MM cells surrounding the UB after overexpression of Robo2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No abnormal Epithelial Morphology of UB or apoptosis of mm cells in the kidney. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 affected MM cells migration and caused UB deficit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced glomerular number can also be caused by fewer MM cells. -- Abstract: Roundabout 2 (Robo2) is a member of the membrane protein receptor family. The chemorepulsive effect of Slit2-Robo2 signaling plays vital roles in nervous system development and neuron migration. Slit2-Robo2 signaling is also important for maintaining the normal morphogenesis of the kidney and urinary collecting system, especially for the branching of the ureteric bud (UB) at the proper site. Slit2 or Robo2 mouse mutants exhibit multilobular kidneys, multiple ureters, and dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and collecting duct system, which lead to vesicoureteral reflux. To understand the effect of Robo2 on kidney development, we used microinjection and electroporation to overexpress GFP-Robo2 in an in vitro embryonic kidney model. Our results show reduced UB branching and decreased glomerular number after in vitro Robo2 overexpression in the embryonic kidneys. We found fewer metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cells surrounding the UB but no abnormal morphology in the branching epithelial UB. Meanwhile, no significant change in MM proliferation or apoptosis was observed. These findings indicate that Robo2 is involved in the development of embryonic kidneys and that the normal expression of Robo2 can help maintain proper UB branching and glomerular morphogenesis. Overexpression of Robo2 leads to reduced UB branching caused by fewer surrounding MM cells, but MM cell apoptosis is not involved in this effect. Our study demonstrates that

  10. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  11. Where Will LEAD Lead? An Update on My LEAD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    Issues in the future of a federal collaborative program, Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD), are discussed in this paper. Problems attributed to LEAD are its antagonistic posture to educational administration programs in higher education and political conflicts of interest. Methodology involved analysis of successful LEAD…

  12. Potential lead exposures from lead crystal decanters.

    PubMed Central

    Appel, B R; Kahlon, J K; Ferguson, J; Quattrone, A J; Book, S A

    1992-01-01

    We measured the concentrations of lead leached into 4% acetic acid, white port, and a synthetic alcoholic beverage that were stored in lead crystal decanters for 1-, 2-, and 10-day periods at room temperature. In decanters from 14 different manufacturers, measured lead concentrations ranged from 100 to 1800 micrograms/L. The pH of the leaching medium is probably the dominant factor determining the extent of lead leached, with greater leaching occurring at lower pH values. The consumption of alcoholic beverages stored in lead crystal decanters is judged to pose a hazard. PMID:1456345

  13. Lead in petrol. The isotopic lead experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Facchetti, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Many studies were dedicated to the evaluation of the impact of automotive lead on the environment and to the assessment of its absorption in the human population. They can be subdivided into two groups, those based on changes of air and blood lead concentrations and those based on changes of air and blood lead isotopic compositions. According to various authors, 50-66% of the lead added to petrol is mobilized in the atmosphere, while most of the remainder adheres to the walls of the exhaust system from which it is expelled by mechanical and thermal shocks in the forms of easily sedimented particles. The fraction directly emitted by engine exhaust fumes is found in the form of fine particles, which can be transferred a long way from the emitting sources. However important the contribution of petrol lead to the total airborne lead may be, our knowledge does not permit a straightforward calculation of the percentage of petrol lead in total blood lead, which of course can also originate from other sources (e.g., industrial, natural). To evaluate this percentage in 1973, the idea of the Isotopic Lead Experiment (ILE project) was conceived to label, on a regional scale, petrol with a nonradioactive lead of an isotopic composition sufficiently different from that of background lead and sufficiently stable in time. This Account summarizes the main results obtained by the ILE project.

  14. Bone lead, hypertension, and lead nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P.

    1988-06-01

    There is considerable clinical evidence that excessive lead absorption causes renal failure with hypertension and predisposes individuals to hypertension even in the absence of detectable renal failure. Recent analyses of transiliac bone biopsies indicate that unsuspected elevated bone leads may reflect the cause (or contributing cause) of end-stage renal disease in 5% of the European dialysis population. In these patients, bone lead levels were four times higher than in unexposed cadavers (6 micrograms/g wet weight) and approximated levels found in lead workers (30 micrograms/g). At present, the most reliable index of the body lead burden is the CaNa2 EDTA lead mobilization test. In vivo tibial X-ray-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a more practical noninvasive technique for assessing bone lead, which should find widespread application as a diagnostic tool and for epidemiologic studies.

  15. Laboratory and field studies of guayule modified to overexpress HMGR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the genetic modification of guayule to overexpress the isoprenoid pathway enzyme HMGR. The rubber content of two-month old in vitro transformed plantlets showed a 65% increase in rubber over the control for one line (HMGR6), and lower resin for another (HMGR2). In field evaluations HMGR6...

  16. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  17. Lead poisoning in children.

    PubMed

    Dapul, Heda; Laraque, Danielle

    2014-08-01

    There is no safe lead level in children. Primary prevention is the most effective way to bring about the complete removal of lead from the environment and eliminate lead poisoning as a public health concern. The National Lead Information Center can be reached via the Internet at www.epa.gov/lead and www.hud.gov/lead, or via phone at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

  18. Transgenic overexpression of mitofilin attenuates diabetes mellitus-associated cardiac and mitochondria dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharendra; Nichols, Cody E.; Lewis, Sara E.; Shepherd, Danielle L.; Jagannathan, Rajaganapathi; Croston, Tara L.; Tveter, Kevin J.; Holden, Anthony A.; Baseler, Walter A.; Hollander, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitofilin, also known as heart muscle protein, is an inner mitochondrial membrane structural protein that plays a central role in maintaining cristae morphology and structure. It is a critical component of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex which is important for mitochondrial architecture and cristae morphology. Our laboratory has previously reported alterations in mitochondrial morphology and proteomic make-up during type 1 diabetes mellitus, with mitofilin being significantly down-regulated in interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM). The goal of this study was to investigate whether overexpression of mitofilin can limit mitochondrial disruption associated with the diabetic heart through restoration of mitochondrial morphology and function. A transgenic mouse line overexpressing mitofilin was generated and mice injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin using a multi low-dose approach. Five weeks following diabetes mellitus onset, cardiac contractile function was assessed. Restoration of ejection fraction and fractional shortening was observed in mitofilin diabetic mice as compared to wild-type controls (P<0.05 for both). Decrements observed in electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, III, IV and V activities, state 3 respiration, lipid peroxidation as well as mitochondria membrane potential in type 1 diabetic IFM were restored in mitofilin diabetic mice (P<0.05 for all). Qualitative analyses of electron micrographs revealed restoration of mitochondrial cristae structure in mitofilin diabetic mice as compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore measurement of mitochondrial internal complexity using flow cytometry displayed significant reduction in internal complexity in diabetic IFM which was restored in mitofilin diabetic IFM (P<0.05). Taken together these results suggest that transgenic overexpression of mitofilin preserves mitochondrial structure, leading to restoration of mitochondrial function and attenuation of

  19. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-10-15

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR{sup −/−} and SHP{sup −/−} mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR{sup −/−} mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR{sup −/−} mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR{sup −/−} mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR{sup −/−}/SHP{sup Tg}) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR{sup −/−} mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR{sup −/−} mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR{sup −/−} mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency.

  20. Field Evaluation of Transgenic Switchgrass Plants Overexpressing PvMYB4 for Reduced Biomass Recalcitrance

    DOE PAGES

    Baxter, Holly L.; Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Yee, Kelsey L.; Mazarei, Mitra; Rodriguez, Miguel; Thompson, Olivia A.; Shen, Hui; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Sykes, Robert W.; et al

    2015-01-07

    High biomass yields and minimal agronomic input requirements have made switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L., a leading candidate lignocellulosic bioenergy crop. Large-scale lignocellulosic biofuel production from such crops is limited by the difficulty to deconstruct cell walls into fermentable sugars: the recalcitrance problem. In this study, we assessed the field performance of switchgrass plants overexpressing the switchgrass MYB4 (PvMYB4) transcription factor gene. PvMYB4 transgenic switchgrass can have great lignin reduction, which commensurately increases sugar release and biofuel production. Our results over two growing seasons showed that one transgenic event (out of eight) had important gains in both biofuel (32% more) andmore » biomass (63% more) at the end of the second growing season relative to non-transgenic controls. These gains represent a doubling of biofuel production per hectare, which is the highest gain reported from any field-grown modified feedstock. In contrast to this transgenic event, which had relatively low ectopic overexpression of the transgene, five of the eight transgenic events planted did not survive the first field winter. The dead plants were all high-overexpressing events that performed well in the earlier greenhouse studies. Disease susceptibility was not compromised in any transgenic events over the field experiments. These results demonstrate the power of modifying the expression of an endogenous transcription factor to improve biofuel and biomass simultaneously, and also highlight the importance of field studies for "sorting" transgenic events. In conclusion, further research is needed to develop strategies for fine-tuning temporal-spatial transgene expression in feedstocks to optimize desired phenotypes.« less

  1. Induced overexpression of OCT4A in human embryonic stem cells increases cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Steven C; Chang, David F; Hong, Chang-Mu; Xia, Ping; Senadheera, Dinithi; Trump, Lisa; Mishra, Suparna; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2014-06-15

    Our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-renewal and differentiation is incomplete. The level of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4), a critical regulator of pluripotency, is precisely controlled in mouse embryonic stem cells. However, studies of human OCT4 are often confounded by the presence of three isoforms and six expressed pseudogenes, which has complicated the interpretation of results. Using an inducible lentiviral overexpression and knockdown system to manipulate OCT4A above or below physiological levels, we specifically examine the functional role of the OCT4A isoform in hESC. (We also designed and generated a comparable series of vectors, which were not functional, for the overexpression and knockdown of OCT4B.) We show that specific knockdown of OCT4A results in hESC differentiation, as indicated by morphology changes, cell surface antigen expression, and upregulation of ectodermal genes. In contrast, inducible overexpression of OCT4A in hESC leads to a transient instability of the hESC phenotype, as indicated by changes in morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and transcriptional profile, that returns to baseline within 5 days. Interestingly, sustained expression of OCT4A past 5 days enhances hESC cloning efficiency, suggesting that higher levels of OCT4A can support self-renewal. Overall, our results indicate that high levels of OCT4A increase hESC cloning efficiency and do not induce differentiation (whereas OCT4B expression cannot be induced in hESC), highlighting the importance of isoform-specific studies in a stable and inducible expression system for human OCT4. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of an efficient method for conditional gene expression in hESC.

  2. Overexpression of sweetpotato expansin cDNA (IbEXP1) increases seed yield in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung Myung; Kwak, Man Sup; Noh, Seol Ah; Oh, Mi-Joung; Kim, Youn-Sung; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2014-08-01

    Results of transcriptome analyses suggest that expansin genes play an active role in seed development and yield, but gain- or loss-of-function studies have not yet elucidated the functional role(s) of the expansin gene(s) in these processes. We have overexpressed a sweetpotato expansin gene (IbEXP1) in Arabidopsis under the control of cauliflower mosaic 35S promoter in an attempt to determine the effect of the expansin gene in seed development and yield in heterologous plants. The growth rate was enhanced in IbEXP1-overexpressing (ox) plants relative to wild-type Col-0 plants during early vegetative growth stage. At the reproductive stage, the number of rosette leaves was higher in IbEXP1-ox plants than that in Col-0 plants, and siliques were thicker. IbEXP1-ox plants produced larger seeds, accumulated more protein and starch in each seed, and produced more inflorescence stems and siliques than Col-0 plants, leading to a 2.1-2.5-fold increase in total seed yield per plant. The transcript level of IbEXP1 was up-regulated in response to brassinosteroid (BR) treatment in sweetpotato, and the transcript levels of three BR-responsive genes, fatty acid elongase 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase 1, HAIKU1 and MINISEED3, were also increased in IbEXP1-ox Arabidopsis plants, suggesting a possible involvement of IbEXP1 in at least one of the BR signaling pathways. Based on these results, we suggest that overexpression of IbEXP1 gene in heterologous plants is effective in increasing seed size and number and, consequently, seed yield.

  3. Astrocyte-Dependent Vulnerability to Excitotoxicity in Spermine Oxidase-Overexpressing Mouse.

    PubMed

    Cervetto, Chiara; Vergani, Laura; Passalacqua, Mario; Ragazzoni, Milena; Venturini, Arianna; Cecconi, Francesco; Berretta, Nicola; Mercuri, Nicola; D'Amelio, Marcello; Maura, Guido; Mariottini, Paolo; Voci, Adriana; Marcoli, Manuela; Cervelli, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing spermine oxidase (SMO) in the cerebral cortex (Dach-SMO mice) showed increased vulnerability to excitotoxic brain injury and kainate-induced epileptic seizures. To investigate the mechanisms by which SMO overexpression leads to increased susceptibility to kainate excitotoxicity and seizure, in the cerebral cortex of Dach-SMO and control mice we assessed markers for astrocyte proliferation and neuron loss, and the ability of kainate to evoke glutamate release from nerve terminals and astrocyte processes. Moreover, we assessed a possible role of astrocytes in an in vitro model of epileptic-like activity in combined cortico-hippocampal slices recorded with a multi-electrode array device. In parallel, as the brain is a major metabolizer of oxygen and yet has relatively feeble protective antioxidant mechanisms, we analyzed the oxidative status of the cerebral cortex of both SMO-overexpressing and control mice by evaluating enzymatic and non-enzymatic scavengers such as metallothioneins. The main findings in the cerebral cortex of Dach-SMO mice as compared to controls are the following: astrocyte activation and neuron loss; increased oxidative stress and activation of defense mechanisms involving both neurons and astrocytes; increased susceptibility to kainate-evoked cortical epileptogenic activity, dependent on astrocyte function; appearance of a glutamate-releasing response to kainate from astrocyte processes due to activation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in Dach-SMO mice. We conclude that reactive astrocytosis and activation of glutamate release from astrocyte processes might contribute, together with increased reactive oxygen species production, to the vulnerability to kainate excitotoxicity in Dach-SMO mice. This mouse model with a deregulated polyamine metabolism would shed light on roles for astrocytes in increasing vulnerability to excitotoxic neuron injury.

  4. Overexpression of α-synuclein simultaneously increases glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation and reduces glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Hertz, Ellen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Leinartaité, Lina; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Li, Jie; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-12

    Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn)-containing protein aggregates throughout the nervous system is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms whereby α-syn exerts neurodegeneration remain to be fully understood. Here we show that overexpression of α-syn in transgenic mice leads to increased phosphorylation of glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR1 and NR2B in substantia nigra and striatum as well as reduced glucocerebrosidase (GCase) levels. Similarly, molecular studies performed in mouse N2A cells stably overexpressing human α-syn ((α-syn)N2A) showed that phosphorylation states of the same NMDAR subunits were increased, whereas GCase levels and lysosomal GCase activity were reduced. (α-syn)N2A cells showed an increased sensitivity to neurotoxicity towards 6-hydroxydopamine and NMDA. However, wildtype N2A, but not (α-syn)N2A cells, showed a further reduction in viability when co-incubated with 6-hydroxydopamine and the lysosomal inhibitors NH4Cl and leupeptin, suggesting that α-syn per se perturbs lysosomal functions. NMDA treatment reduced lysosomal GCase activity to the same extent in (α-syn)N2A cells as in wildtype N2A cells, indicating that the α-syn-dependent difference in NMDA neurotoxicity is unrelated to an altered GCase activity. Nevertheless, these data provide molecular evidence that overexpression of α-syn simultaneously induces two potential neurotoxic hits by increasing glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation, consistent with increased NMDA receptors functionality, and reducing GCase activity. PMID:26610904

  5. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice. PMID:26771609

  6. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  7. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-13

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice.

  8. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F.; Roe, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complication in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity and carbonyl formation. Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival following LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice following LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O2−, and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury following LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by antioxidant NAC and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. PMID:22902401

  9. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who consumed the…

  10. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene confers drought tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H(2)O(2) content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses.

  11. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  12. Overexpression of Cystathionine γ-Lyase Suppresses Detrimental Effects of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, Pauline M; Baratashvili, Madina; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Kuijpers, Lucas; Huitema, Sippie; Schaap, Onno; Giepmans, Ben N G; Kuipers, Jeroen; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Bos, Eelke M; Szabó, Csaba; Kampinga, Harm H; Dijkers, Pascale F; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Filipovic, Milos R; van Goor, Harry; Sibon, Ody C M

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene resulting in toxic protein aggregation. Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered secondary factors contributing to the progression of this neurodegenerative disease. There is no cure that halts or reverses the progressive neurodegeneration of SCA3. Here we show that overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase, a central enzyme in cysteine metabolism, is protective in a Drosophila model for SCA3. SCA3 flies show eye degeneration, increased oxidative stress, insoluble protein aggregates, reduced levels of protein persulfidation and increased activation of the innate immune response. Overexpression of Drosophila cystathionine γ-lyase restores protein persulfidation, decreases oxidative stress, dampens the immune response and improves SCA3-associated tissue degeneration. Levels of insoluble protein aggregates are not altered; therefore, the data implicate a modifying role of cystathionine γ-lyase in ameliorating the downstream consequence of protein aggregation leading to protection against SCA3-induced tissue degeneration. The cystathionine γ-lyase expression is decreased in affected brain tissue of SCA3 patients, suggesting that enhancers of cystathionine γ-lyase expression or activity are attractive candidates for future therapies. PMID:26467707

  13. The GRK2 Overexpression Is a Primary Hallmark of Mitochondrial Lesions during Early Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Obrenovich, Mark E.; Palacios, Hector H.; Gasimov, Eldar; Leszek, Jerzy; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to vascular damage as an early contributor to the development of two leading causes of age-associated dementia, namely Alzheimer disease (AD) and AD-like pathology such as stroke. This review focuses on the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) as they relate to dementia and how the cardio and cerebrovasculature is involved in AD pathogenesis. The exploration of GRKs in AD pathogenesis may help bridge gaps in our understanding of the heart-brain connection in relation to neurovisceral damage and vascular complications of AD. The a priori basis for this inquiry stems from the fact that kinases of this family regulate numerous receptor functions in the brain, myocardium and elsewhere. The aim of this review is to discuss the finding of GRK2 overexpression in the context of early AD pathogenesis. Also, we consider the consequences for this overexpression as a loss of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) regulation, as well as suggest a potential role for GPCRs and GRKs in a unifying theory of AD pathogenesis through the cerebrovasculature. Finally, we synthesize this newer information in an attempt to put it into context with GRKs as regulators of cellular function, which makes these proteins potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for future pharmacological intervention. PMID:20204079

  14. OsLBD3-7 Overexpression Induced Adaxially Rolled Leaves in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Shao, Qinghao; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bin; Li, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate leaf rolling enhances erect-leaf habits and photosynthetic efficiency, which consequently improves grain yield. Here, we reported the novel lateral organ boundaries domain (LBD) gene OsLBD3-7, which is involved in the regulation of leaf rolling. OsLBD3-7 works as a transcription activator and its protein is located on the plasma membrane and in the nucleus. Overexpression of OsLBD3-7 leads to narrow and adaxially rolled leaves. Microscopy of flag leaf cross-sections indicated that overexpression of OsLBD3-7 led to a decrease in both bulliform cell size and number. Transcriptional analysis showed that key genes that had been reported to be negative regulators of bulliform cell development were up-regulated in transgenic plants. These results indicated that OsLBD3-7 might acts as an upstream regulatory gene of bulliform cell development to regulate leaf rolling, which will give more insights on the leaf rolling regulation mechanism. PMID:27258066

  15. Muscle-specific Drp1 overexpression impairs skeletal muscle growth via translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Touvier, T; De Palma, C; Rigamonti, E; Scagliola, A; Incerti, E; Mazelin, L; Thomas, J-L; D'Antonio, M; Politi, L; Schaeffer, L; Clementi, E; Brunelli, S

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion are essential processes in the maintenance of the skeletal muscle function. The contribution of these processes to muscle development has not been properly investigated in vivo because of the early lethality of the models generated so far. To define the role of mitochondrial fission in muscle development and repair, we have generated a transgenic mouse line that overexpresses the fission-inducing protein Drp1 specifically in skeletal muscle. These mice displayed a drastic impairment in postnatal muscle growth, with reorganisation of the mitochondrial network and reduction of mtDNA quantity, without the deficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Importantly we found that Drp1 overexpression activates the stress-induced PKR/eIF2α/Fgf21 pathway thus leading to an attenuated protein synthesis and downregulation of the growth hormone pathway. These results reveal for the first time how mitochondrial network dynamics influence muscle growth and shed light on aspects of muscle physiology relevant in human muscle pathologies. PMID:25719247

  16. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants.

  17. Viral-mediated Ntf3 overexpression disrupts innervation and hearing in nondeafened guinea pig cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Young; Kurioka, Takaomi; Nelson, Megan M; Prieskorn, Diane M; Swiderski, Donald L; Takada, Yohei; Beyer, Lisa A; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-01-01

    Synaptopathy in the cochlea occurs when the connection between inner hair cells and the auditory nerve is disrupted, leading to impaired hearing and nerve degeneration. Experiments using transgenic mice have shown that overexpression of NT3 by supporting cells repairs synaptopathy caused by overstimulation. To accomplish such therapy in the clinical setting, it would be necessary to activate the neurotrophin receptor on auditory neurons by other means. Here we test the outcome of NT3 overexpression using viral-mediated gene transfer into the perilymph versus the endolymph of the normal guinea pig cochlea. We inoculated two different Ntf3 viral vectors, adenovirus (Adv) or adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the perilymph, to facilitate transgene expression in the mesothelial cells and cochlear duct epithelium, respectively. We assessed outcomes by comparing Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds prior to that at baseline to thresholds at 1 and 3 weeks after inoculation, and then performed histologic evaluation of hair cells, nerve endings, and synaptic ribbons. We observed hearing threshold shifts as well as disorganization of peripheral nerve endings and disruption of synaptic connections between inner hair cells and peripheral nerve endings with both vectors. The data suggest that elevation of NT3 levels in the cochlear fluids can disrupt innervation and degrade hearing. PMID:27525291

  18. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  19. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants. PMID:24329902

  20. Viral-mediated Ntf3 overexpression disrupts innervation and hearing in nondeafened guinea pig cochleae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Young; Kurioka, Takaomi; Nelson, Megan M; Prieskorn, Diane M; Swiderski, Donald L; Takada, Yohei; Beyer, Lisa A; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-01-01

    Synaptopathy in the cochlea occurs when the connection between inner hair cells and the auditory nerve is disrupted, leading to impaired hearing and nerve degeneration. Experiments using transgenic mice have shown that overexpression of NT3 by supporting cells repairs synaptopathy caused by overstimulation. To accomplish such therapy in the clinical setting, it would be necessary to activate the neurotrophin receptor on auditory neurons by other means. Here we test the outcome of NT3 overexpression using viral-mediated gene transfer into the perilymph versus the endolymph of the normal guinea pig cochlea. We inoculated two different Ntf3 viral vectors, adenovirus (Adv) or adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the perilymph, to facilitate transgene expression in the mesothelial cells and cochlear duct epithelium, respectively. We assessed outcomes by comparing Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds prior to that at baseline to thresholds at 1 and 3 weeks after inoculation, and then performed histologic evaluation of hair cells, nerve endings, and synaptic ribbons. We observed hearing threshold shifts as well as disorganization of peripheral nerve endings and disruption of synaptic connections between inner hair cells and peripheral nerve endings with both vectors. The data suggest that elevation of NT3 levels in the cochlear fluids can disrupt innervation and degrade hearing.

  1. Overexpression of a NAC transcription factor delays leaf senescence and increases grain nitrogen concentration in wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, D; Derkx, A P; Liu, D-C; Buchner, P; Hawkesford, M J

    2015-07-01

    Increasing the duration of leaf photosynthesis during grain filling using slow-senescing functional stay-green phenotypes is a possible route for increasing grain yields in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). However, delayed senescence may negatively affect nutrient remobilisation and hence reduce grain protein concentrations and grain quality. A novel NAC1-type transcription factor (hereafter TaNAC-S) was identified in wheat, with gene expression located primarily in leaf/sheath tissues, which decreased during post-anthesis leaf senescence. Expression of TaNAC-S in the second leaf correlated with delayed senescence in two doubled-haploid lines of an Avalon × Cadenza population (lines 112 and 181), which were distinct for leaf senescence. Transgenic wheat plants overexpressing TaNAC-S resulted in delayed leaf senescence (stay-green phenotype). Grain yield, aboveground biomass, harvest index and total grain N content were unaffected, but NAC over-expressing lines had higher grain N concentrations at similar grain yields compared to non-transgenic controls. These results indicate that TaNAC-S is a negative regulator of leaf senescence, and that delayed leaf senescence may lead not only to increased grain yields but also to increased grain protein concentrations.

  2. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase Gene Confers Drought Tolerance in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses. PMID:23326325

  3. Viral-mediated Ntf3 overexpression disrupts innervation and hearing in nondeafened guinea pig cochleae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Young; Kurioka, Takaomi; Nelson, Megan M; Prieskorn, Diane M; Swiderski, Donald L; Takada, Yohei; Beyer, Lisa A; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-01-01

    Synaptopathy in the cochlea occurs when the connection between inner hair cells and the auditory nerve is disrupted, leading to impaired hearing and nerve degeneration. Experiments using transgenic mice have shown that overexpression of NT3 by supporting cells repairs synaptopathy caused by overstimulation. To accomplish such therapy in the clinical setting, it would be necessary to activate the neurotrophin receptor on auditory neurons by other means. Here we test the outcome of NT3 overexpression using viral-mediated gene transfer into the perilymph versus the endolymph of the normal guinea pig cochlea. We inoculated two different Ntf3 viral vectors, adenovirus (Adv) or adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the perilymph, to facilitate transgene expression in the mesothelial cells and cochlear duct epithelium, respectively. We assessed outcomes by comparing Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds prior to that at baseline to thresholds at 1 and 3 weeks after inoculation, and then performed histologic evaluation of hair cells, nerve endings, and synaptic ribbons. We observed hearing threshold shifts as well as disorganization of peripheral nerve endings and disruption of synaptic connections between inner hair cells and peripheral nerve endings with both vectors. The data suggest that elevation of NT3 levels in the cochlear fluids can disrupt innervation and degrade hearing. PMID:27525291

  4. Overexpression of ankyrin1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; MacGregor, Anne; Hong, Seung-Mo; Ayars, Michael; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Borges, Michael; Kanda, Mitsuro; Li, Ang; Vincent, Audrey; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The methylation status of a promoter influences gene expression and aberrant methylation during tumor development has important functional consequences for pancreatic and other cancers. Using methylated CpG island amplification and promoter microarrays, we identified ANK1 as hypomethylated in pancreatic cancers. Expression analysis determined ANK1 as commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancers relative to normal pancreas. ANK1 was co-expressed with miR-486 in pancreatic cancer cells. Stable knockdown of ANK1 in the pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC1 led to changes in cell morphology, and decreases in colony formation. Stable knockdown of ANK1 also marked reduced the growth of tumors in athymic nude mice. Among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, those with pancreatic cancers expressing ANK1 had a poorer prognosis than those without ANK1 expression. These findings indicate a role for ANK1 overexpression in mediating pancreatic cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27144336

  5. Overexpression of esterase D in kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Loughna, S.; Moore, G. ); Gau, G.; Blunt, S. ); Nicolaides, K. )

    1993-10-01

    Human trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is compatible with life, but prolonged survival is rare. Anomalies often involve the urogenital, cardiac, craniofacial, and central nervous systems. It is possible that these abnormalities may be due to the overexpression of developmentally important genes on chromosome 13. The expression of esterase D (localized to chromosome 13q14.11) has been investigated in both muscle and kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses and has been compared with normal age- and sex-matched fetal tissues, by using northern analysis. More than a twofold increase in expression of esterase D was found in the kidney of two trisomy 13 fetuses, with normal levels in a third. Overexpression was not seen in the muscle tissues from these fetuses. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Prognostic significance of CD168 overexpression in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The expression of cluster of differentiation 168 (CD168), a cell surface receptor for hyaluronan, is associated with cancer progression and metastases. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of CD168 by immunohistochemistry in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to examine the association between CD168 expression and clinicopathological features, including survival. A total of 78 tissue specimens obtained from consecutive CRC patients exhibiting various tumor node metastasis (TNM) stages were immunostained for the analysis of CD168 expression. The prognostic value of CD168 was subsequently evaluated. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that CD168 overexpression was significantly associated with overall survival (P<0.05); however, no significant association was identified between CD168 expression and tumor location, tumor differentiation or TNM stage. Overexpression of CD168 was closely associated with poorer patient survival, which indicates that it may present a useful indicator for clinical prognosis.

  7. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paula A; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M

    2015-12-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  8. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  9. Impact of Adiponectin Overexpression on Allergic Airways Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Verbout, Norah G.; Williams, Alison S.; Kasahara, David I.; Wurmbrand, Allison P.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Shore, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma. Obese individuals have decreased circulating adiponectin, an adipose-derived hormone with anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that transgenic overexpression of adiponectin would attenuate allergic airways inflammation and mucous hyperplasia in mice. To test this hypothesis, we used mice overexpressing adiponectin (Adipo Tg). Adipo Tg mice had marked increases in both serum adiponectin and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid adiponectin. Both acute and chronic ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge protocols were used. In both protocols, OVA-induced increases in total BAL cells were attenuated in Adipo Tg versus WT mice. In the acute protocol, OVA-induced increases in several IL-13 dependent genes were attenuated in Adipo Tg versus WT mice, even though IL-13 per se was not affected. With chronic exposure, though OVA-induced increases in goblet cells numbers per millimeter of basement membrane were greater in Adipo Tg versus WT mice, mRNA abundance of mucous genes in lungs was not different. Also, adiponectin overexpression did not induce M2 polarization in alveolar macrophages. Our results indicate that adiponectin protects against allergen-induced inflammatory cell recruitment to the airspaces, but not development of goblet cell hyperplasia. PMID:23861690

  10. Overexpression of VEGF165b in Podocytes Reduces Glomerular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne; Oltean, Sebastian; Neal, Chris R.; Kaura, Amit; Bevan, Heather; Wood, Emma; Sage, Leslie M.; Lanati, Silvia; Nowak, Dawid G.; Salmon, Andy H.J.; Bates, David

    2010-01-01

    The observation that therapeutic agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) associate with renal toxicity suggests that VEGF plays a role in the maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. Alternative mRNA splicing produces the VEGFxxxb family, which consists of antiangiogenic peptides that reduce permeability and inhibit tumor growth; the contribution of these peptides to normal glomerular function is unknown. Here, we established and characterized heterozygous and homozygous transgenic mice that overexpress VEGF165b specifically in podocytes. We confirmed excess production of glomerular VEGF165b by reverse transcriptase–PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA in both heterozygous and homozygous animals. Macroscopically, the mice seemed normal up to 18 months of age, unlike the phenotype of transgenic podocyte-specific VEGF164-overexpressing mice. Animals overexpressing VEGF165b, however, had a significantly reduced normalized glomerular ultrafiltration fraction with accompanying changes in ultrastructure of the glomerular filtration barrier on the vascular side of the glomerular basement membrane. These data highlight the contrasting properties of VEGF splice variants and their impact on glomerular function and phenotype. PMID:20688932

  11. Conditional overexpression of transgenes in megakaryocytes and platelets in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hao G.; Yu, Guangyao; Makitalo, Maria; Yang, Dan; Xie, Hou-Xiang; Jones, Matthew R.; Ravid, Katya

    2005-01-01

    Megakaryocyte (MK)–specific transgene expression has proved valuable in studying thrombotic and hemostatic processes. Constitutive expression of genes, however, could result in altered phenotypes due to compensatory mechanisms or lethality. To circumvent these limitations, we used the tetracycline/doxycycline (Tet)–off system to conditionally over-express genes in megakaryocytes and platelets in vivo. We generated 3 transactivator transgenic lines expressing the Tet transactivator element (tTA), under the control of the MK-specific platelet factor 4 promoter (PF4-tTA-VP16). Responder lines were simultaneously generated, each with a bidirectional minimal cytomegalovirus (CMV)–tTA responsive promoter driving prokaryotic β-galactosidase gene, as a cellular reporter, and a gene of interest (in this case, the mitotic regulator Aurora-B). A transactivator founder line that strongly expressed PF4-driven tTA–viral protein 16 (VP16) was crossbred to a responder line. The homozygous double-transgenic mouse line exhibited doxycycline-dependent transgene overexpression in MKs and platelets. Using this line, platelets were conveniently indicated at sites of induced stress by β-galactosidase staining. In addition, we confirmed our earlier report on effects of constitutive expression of Aurora-B, indicating a tight regulation at protein level and a modest effect on MK ploidy. Hence, we generated a new line, PF4-tTA-VP16, that is available for conditionally overexpressing genes of interest in the MK/platelet lineage in vivo. PMID:15890684

  12. Overexpression of calreticulin sensitizes SERCA2a to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Kageyama, Kan; Kondo, Takahito

    2005-04-22

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca(2+)-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac disorder in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. The in vitro activity of SERCA2a and uptake of (45)Ca(2+) into isolated microsomes were suppressed by H(2)O(2) in CRT-overexpressing cells compared with controls. Moreover, SERCA2a protein was degraded via a proteasome-dependent pathway following the formation of a complex with CRT under the stress with H(2)O(2). Thus, we conclude that overexpression of CRT enhances the inactivation and degradation of SERCA2a in the cells under oxidative stress, suggesting some pathophysiological functions of CRT in Ca(2+) homeostasis of myocardiac disease. PMID:15766574

  13. Role of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae in bacterial swimming.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ling; Suo, Zhiyong; Lim, Timothy; Jun, Sangmu; Deliorman, Muhammedin; Riccardi, Carol; Kellerman, Laura; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I is a protective antigen and has been overexpressed in bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella Typhimurium H683, to generate vaccines. Effects that overexpressed CFA/I may engender on the bacterial host remain largely unexplored. To investigate, we constructed a high CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC2, and compared it to a low CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC, and to a non-CFA/I expression strain, H683-pY. The results showed that H683-pC2 was less able to migrate into semisolid agar (0.35%) than either H683-pC or H683-pY. Bacteria that migrated showed motility halo sizes of H683-pC2 < H683-pC < H683-pY. In the liquid culture media, H683-pC2 cells precipitated to the bottom of the tube, while those of H683-pY did not. In situ imaging revealed that H683-pC2 bacilli tended to auto-agglutinate within the semisolid agar, while H683-pY bacilli did not. When the cfaBE fimbrial fiber encoding genes were deleted from pC2, the new plasmid, pC2(-), significantly recovered bacterial swimming capability. Our study highlights the negative impact of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae on bacterial swimming motility. PMID:22562964

  14. Overexpression of calreticulin sensitizes SERCA2a to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Kageyama, Kan; Kondo, Takahito

    2005-04-22

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca(2+)-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac disorder in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. The in vitro activity of SERCA2a and uptake of (45)Ca(2+) into isolated microsomes were suppressed by H(2)O(2) in CRT-overexpressing cells compared with controls. Moreover, SERCA2a protein was degraded via a proteasome-dependent pathway following the formation of a complex with CRT under the stress with H(2)O(2). Thus, we conclude that overexpression of CRT enhances the inactivation and degradation of SERCA2a in the cells under oxidative stress, suggesting some pathophysiological functions of CRT in Ca(2+) homeostasis of myocardiac disease.

  15. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Hans; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by overexpression of the single genes as well as a combined deregulation of up to all six riboflavin synthesis genes. Results Overexpression of the first gene of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RIB1) is already sufficient to obtain yellow colonies and the accumulation of riboflavin in the supernatant of shake flask cultures growing on glucose. Sequential deregulation of all the genes, by exchange of their native promoter with the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP) increases the riboflavin accumulation significantly. Conclusion The regulation of the pathway is distributed over more than one gene. High cell density cultivations of a P. pastoris strain overexpressing all six RIB genes allow the accumulation of 175 mg/L riboflavin in the supernatant. The basis for rational engineering of riboflavin production in P. pastoris has thus been established. PMID:18664246

  16. Trefoil factor 3 is overexpressed in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Garraway, Isla P; Seligson, David; Said, Jonathan; Horvath, Steve; Reiter, Robert E

    2004-11-01

    The trefoil factors are secreted peptides produced by normal intestinal mucosa. Members of the trefoil family are overexpressed in a variety of cancers and are associated with tumor invasion, resistance to apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent cDNA array analyses suggest that human intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) may be overexpressed in human prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a prostate cancer tissue microarray containing tumor tissue samples from 246 primary radical retropubic prostatectomy cases with antibodies specific for TFF3. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and morphologically normal prostatic epithelium were represented on this array. Additionally, 18 metastatic lesions were also stained. Two independent pathologists scored the tissue arrays, with positive cases defined as those containing TFF3 staining in a majority of target cells within any spots representing the appropriate designated histology. Forty-two percent of 236 cases containing prostate cancer stained positive for TFF3, while only 10% of 145 cases containing normal tissue and 18% of 91 cases containing BPH, stained positive. Seven of 18 (39%) metastatic lesions analyzed stained positive. Although TFF3 expression correlates significantly with prostate cancer, TFF3 expression did not correlate with Gleason grade, tumor stage, or rate of recurrence. These studies validate that TFF3 is overexpressed in a subset of primary and metastic prostate cancers.

  17. EphA2 overexpression promotes ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunhua; Shahzad, Mian M.K.; Wang, Hua; Landen, Charles N.; Kim, Seung W.; Allen, Julie; Nick, Alpa M.; Jennings, Nicholas; Kinch, Michael S.; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Silencing EphA2 has been shown to result in anti-tumor efficacy. However, it is not known whether increasing EphA2 expression specifically results in increased tumor growth and progression. We examined the effects of stable EphA2 transfection into poorly invasive ovarian cancer cells with regard to in vitro invasive and in vivo metastatic potential. Results In low cell density, EphA2-overexpressing A2780 cells (A2780-EphA2) displayed less cell-cell contact, increased cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachment and anchorage-independent cell growth compared to empty vector controls. There was no significant effect on anchorage-dependent cell proliferation, migration or invasion. Increased expression of EphA2 promoted tumor growth and enhanced the metastatic potential in A2780-EphA2 human ovarian cancer xenografts. The overexpression of EphA2 resulted in enhanced microvessel density (MVD), but had no effect on tumor cell proliferation. Methods EphA2 gene was introduced into A2780 cells by retroviral infection. The effects of increased EphA2 expression were examined on cellular morphology, and anchorage-dependent and independent cell growth. Furthermore, the effect of EphA2 overexpression on metastatic ability was determined using an orthotopic nude mouse model of ovarian carcinoma. Conclusions EphA2 promotes tumor growth by enhancing cell-ECM adhesion, increasing anchorage-independent growth and promoting angiogenesis. PMID:18443431

  18. Role of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae in bacterial swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ling; Suo, Zhiyong; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Deliorman, Muhammedin; Riccardi, Carol; Kellerman, Laura; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I is a protective antigen and has been overexpressed in bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella Typhimurium H683, to generate vaccines. Effects that overexpressed CFA/I may engender on the bacterial host remain largely unexplored. To investigate, we constructed a high CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC2, and compared it to a low CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC, and to a non-CFA/I expression strain, H683-pY. The results showed that H683-pC2 was less able to migrate into semisolid agar (0.35%) than either H683-pC or H683-pY. Bacteria that migrated showed motility halo sizes of H683-pC2 < H683-pC < H683-pY. In the liquid culture media, H683-pC2 cells precipitated to the bottom of the tube, while those of H683-pY did not. In situ imaging revealed that H683-pC2 bacilli tended to auto-agglutinate within the semisolid agar, while H683-pY bacilli did not. When the cfaBE fimbrial fiber encoding genes were deleted from pC2, the new plasmid, pC2(-), significantly recovered bacterial swimming capability. Our study highlights the negative impact of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae on bacterial swimming motility.

  19. Overexpression of neurofilament subunit M accelerates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Tung, V W

    2000-06-01

    Neurofilaments are composed of three polypeptide subunits (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). They are the most abundant cytoskeletal element in large myelinated axons and play a central role in development of axonal caliber. To perform this role, neurofilaments are transported from their site of synthesis, the cell bodies, to the distal axons. Previous studies showed that overexpression of NF-M in transgenic mice led to accumulation of neurofilaments in neurons and a reduction in the number of neurofilaments in axons, suggesting that axonal transport of neurofilaments was slowed. To determine whether this was the case, we measured axonal transport velocities in the wild type and transgenic mice overexpressing NF-M by the classical pulse-labeling method using 35S-methionine. We found that neurofilament transport in peripheral motor axons can be described with a model consistent with two linear velocities. Contrary to expectations, both velocities were accelerated by overexpression of NF-M. These results suggest that subunit composition in neurofilaments play a regulatory role in neurofilament transport. In addition, these results show that there are regional differences in neurofilament transport along long axons and these differences may be the basis for selective regional accumulation of neurofilaments in various neurological disorders.

  20. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  1. Polymer-DNA Nanoparticle-Induced CXCR4 Overexpression Improves Stem Cell Engraftment and Tissue Regeneration in a Mouse Hindlimb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Deveza, Lorenzo; Choi, Jeffrey; Lee, Jerry; Huang, Ngan; Cooke, John; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease affects nearly 202 million individuals worldwide, sometimes leading to non-healing ulcers or limb amputations in severe cases. Genetically modified stem cells offer potential advantages for therapeutically inducing angiogenesis via augmented paracrine release mechanisms and tuned dynamic responses to environmental stimuli at disease sites. Here, we report the application of nanoparticle-induced CXCR4-overexpressing stem cells in a mouse hindlimb ischemia model. We found that CXCR4 overexpression improved stem cell survival, modulated inflammation in situ, and accelerated blood reperfusion. These effects, unexpectedly, led to complete limb salvage and skeletal muscle repair, markedly outperforming the efficacy of the conventional angiogenic factor control, VEGF. Importantly, assessment of CXCR4-overexpressing stem cells in vitro revealed that CXCR4 overexpression induced changes in paracrine signaling of stem cells, promoting a therapeutically desirable pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory phenotype. These results suggest that nanoparticle-induced CXCR4 overexpression may promote favorable phenotypic changes and therapeutic efficacy of stem cells in response to the ischemic environment. PMID:27279910

  2. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia.

  3. Neuroprotective potential of pleiotrophin overexpression in the striatonigral pathway compared with overexpression in both the striatonigral and nigrostriatal pathways.

    PubMed

    Gombash, S E; Manfredsson, F P; Mandel, R J; Collier, T J; Fischer, D L; Kemp, C J; Kuhn, N M; Wohlgenant, S L; Fleming, S M; Sortwell, C E

    2014-07-01

    Intrastriatal injection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 2/1 (rAAV2/1) to overexpress the neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN) provides neuroprotection for tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), increases THir neurite density in the striatum (ST) and reverses functional deficits in forepaw use following 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxic insult. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene transfer studies suggest that optimal neuroprotection is dependent on the site of nigrostriatal overexpression. The present study was conducted to determine whether enhanced neuroprotection could be accomplished via simultaneous rAAV2/1 PTN injections into the ST and SN compared with ST injections alone. Rats were unilaterally injected in the ST alone or injected in both the ST and SN with rAAV2/1 expressing either PTN or control vector. Four weeks later, all rats received intrastriatal injections of 6-OHDA. Rats were euthanized 6 or 16 weeks relative to 6-OHDA injection. A novel selective total enumeration method to estimate nigral THir neuron survival was validated to maintain the accuracy of stereological assessment. Long-term nigrostriatal neuroprotection and functional benefits were only observed in rats in which rAAV2/1 PTN was injected into the ST alone. Results suggest that superior preservation of the nigrostriatal system is provided by PTN overexpression delivered to the ST and restricted to the ST and SN pars reticulata and is not improved with overexpression of PTN within SNpc neurons.

  4. Overexpression, Membrane Preparation, and Purification of a Typical Multidrug ABC Transporter BmrA.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Benjamin; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    The production and purification is normally the first step in any biophysical or biochemical study of a new target protein. For membrane proteins, due to their generally low expression levels and hydrophobic properties this is often a major hurdle. Some multidrug transporters are members of one of the largest families of membrane proteins, the ABC ("ATP-binding cassette"), and are responsible for the uptake and export of a wide variety of molecules. This can lead to resistance when those molecules are antibiotics or chemotherapy drugs. To better understand their role in multidrug resistance pure and active protein is required. Here we outline a protocol to produce a highly pure and functionally active multidrug transporter BmrA that is suitable for use in biophysical and biochemical studies. We show that BmrA can be heterologously overexpressed in huge amount in E. coli and extracted from the membrane in a functionally active form. PMID:27485334

  5. Overexpression of circadian clock protein cryptochrome (CRY) 1 alleviates sleep deprivation-induced vascular inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bing; Deng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance of the circadian clock by sleep deprivation has been proposed to be involved in the regulation of inflammation. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian oscillator components in regulating the pro-inflammatory process during sleep deprivation remains poorly understood. Using a sleep deprivation mouse model, we showed here that sleep deprivation increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines expression and decreased the expression of cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) in vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, the adhesion molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin were elevated in vascular endothelial cells and the monocytes binding to vascular endothelial cells were also increased by sleep deprivation. Interestingly, overexpression of CRY1 in a mouse model by adenovirus vector significantly inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, and NF-κB signal pathway activation, as well as the binding of monocytes to vascular endothelial cells. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that CRY1 could repress the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that overexpression of CRY1 inhibited the basal concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), leading to decreased protein kinase A activity, which resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p65. Taken together, these results suggested that the overexpression of CRY1 inhibited sleep deprivation-induced vascular inflammation that might be associated with NF-κB and cAMP/PKA pathways.

  6. Enhancing blast disease resistance by overexpression of the calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK4 in rice.

    PubMed

    Bundó, Mireia; Coca, María

    2016-06-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for more than half of the human population, and blast disease is the most serious disease affecting global rice production. In this work, the isoform OsCPK4 of the rice calcium-dependent protein kinase family is reported as a regulator of rice immunity to blast fungal infection. It shows that overexpression of OsCPK4 gene in rice plants enhances resistance to blast disease by preventing fungal penetration. The constitutive accumulation of OsCPK4 protein prepares rice plants for a rapid and potentiated defence response, including the production of reactive oxygen species, callose deposition and defence gene expression. OsCPK4 overexpression leads also to constitutive increased content of the glycosylated salicylic acid hormone in leaves without compromising rice yield. Given that OsCPK4 overexpression was known to confer also salt and drought tolerance in rice, the results reported in this article demonstrate that OsCPK4 acts as a convergence component that positively modulates both biotic and abiotic signalling pathways. Altogether, our findings indicate that OsCPK4 is a potential molecular target to improve not only abiotic stress tolerance, but also blast disease resistance of rice crops.

  7. Serotonin accumulation in transgenic rice by over-expressing tryptophan decarboxylase results in a dark brown phenotype and stunted growth.

    PubMed

    Kanjanaphachoat, Parawee; Wei, Bi-Yin; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Wang, I-Wen; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Yu, Su-May; Yen, Ming-Liang; Chiu, Sheng-Hsien; Lai, Chien-Chen; Chen, Liang-Jwu

    2012-04-01

    A mutant M47286 with a stunted growth, low fertility and dark-brown phenotype was identified from a T-DNA-tagged rice mutant library. This mutant contained a copy of the T-DNA tag inserted at the location where the expression of two putative tryptophan decarboxylase genes, TDC-1 and TDC-3, were activated. Enzymatic assays of both recombinant proteins showed tryptophan decarboxylase activities that converted tryptophan to tryptamine, which could be converted to serotonin by a constitutively expressed tryptamine 5' hydroxylase (T5H) in rice plants. Over-expression of TDC-1 and TDC-3 in transgenic rice recapitulated the stunted growth, darkbrown phenotype and resulted in a low fertility similar to M47286. The degree of stunted growth and dark-brown color was proportional to the expression levels of TDC-1 and TDC-3. The levels of tryptamine and serotonin accumulation in these transgenic rice lines were also directly correlated with the expression levels of TDC-1 and TDC-3. A mass spectrometry assay demonstrated that the darkbrown leaves and hulls in the TDC-overexpressing transgenic rice were caused by the accumulation of serotonin dimer and that the stunted growth and low fertility were also caused by the accumulation of serotonin and serotonin dimer, but not tryptamine. These results represent the first evidence that over-expression of TDC results in stunted growth, low fertility and the accumulation of serotonin, which when converted to serotonin dimer, leads to a dark brown plant color.

  8. FGFR2 is overexpressed in myxoid liposarcoma and inhibition of FGFR signaling impairs tumor growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Künstlinger, Helen; Fassunke, Jana; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Brors, Benedikt; Heydt, Carina; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wardelmann, Eva; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas account for more than one third of liposarcomas and about 10% of all adult soft tissue sarcomas. The tumors are characterized by specific chromosomal translocations leading to the chimeric oncogenes FUS-DDIT3 or EWS1R-DDIT3. The encoded fusion proteins act as aberrant transcription factors. Therefore, we implemented comparative expression analyses using whole-genome microarrays in tumor and fat tissue samples. We aimed at identifying differentially expressed genes which may serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers or as therapeutic targets. Microarray analyses revealed overexpression of FGFR2 and other members of the FGF/FGFR family. Overexpression of FGFR2 was validated by qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis in primary tumor samples. Treatment of the myxoid liposarcoma cell lines MLS 402 and MLS 1765 with the FGFR inhibitors PD173074, TKI258 (dovitinib) and BGJ398 as well as specific siRNAs reduced cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and delayed cell migration. Combination of FGFR inhibitors with trabectedin further increased the effect. Our study demonstrates overexpression of FGFR2 and a functional role of FGFR signaling in myxoid liposarcoma. As FGFR inhibition showed effects on proliferation and cell migration and induced apoptosis in vitro, our data indicate the potential use of FGFR inhibitors as a targeted therapy for these tumors. PMID:26036639

  9. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  10. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua; David Roelant; Sachin Kumar

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste.

  11. Exposures to lead.

    PubMed

    Callan, Anna C; Hinwood, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health hosted a workshop on Exposures to Lead. Speakers from Australia and the United States of America addressed current research knowledge on lead exposures and health effects in children, risk assessment and communication issues in dealing with lead exposure sources, different methods for assessing exposure, and the variety of scenarios where lead still remains a pollutant of concern. Mining continues to be a source of lead for many communities, and approaches to reducing exposures in these settings present particular challenges. A Perth Declaration for the Global Reduction of Childhood Lead Exposure was signed by participants of the meeting and is aimed at increasing attention to the need to continue to assess lead in the environment and to develop strategies to reduce lead in the environment and exposure by communities. PMID:21714377

  12. Exposures to lead.

    PubMed

    Callan, Anna C; Hinwood, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health hosted a workshop on Exposures to Lead. Speakers from Australia and the United States of America addressed current research knowledge on lead exposures and health effects in children, risk assessment and communication issues in dealing with lead exposure sources, different methods for assessing exposure, and the variety of scenarios where lead still remains a pollutant of concern. Mining continues to be a source of lead for many communities, and approaches to reducing exposures in these settings present particular challenges. A Perth Declaration for the Global Reduction of Childhood Lead Exposure was signed by participants of the meeting and is aimed at increasing attention to the need to continue to assess lead in the environment and to develop strategies to reduce lead in the environment and exposure by communities.

  13. PHOTOEMISSION PROPERTIES OF LEAD.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; RAO,T.; WARREN,J.; SEKUTOWICZ,J.; LEFFERTS,R.; LIPSKI,A.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we present a study of the photoemission properties of lead at several UV wavelengths, including a study of the damage threshold of electroplated lead under laser cleaning. A quantum efficiency in excess of 0.1% has been achieved for a laser cleaned, electroplated lead sample with a laser wavelength of 193 nm. Niobium cathodes have been measured for comparison, and lead is found to be a superior photoemitter for all measured wavelengths.

  14. Transplacental transport of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurotoxicity is the major health effect from exposure to lead for infants and young children, and there is current concern regarding possible toxic effects of lead on the child while in utero. there is no placental-fetal barrier to lead transport. Maternal and fetal blood lead levels are nearly identical, so lead passes through the placenta unencumbered. Lead has been measured in the fetal brain as early as the end of the first trimester (13 weeks). There is a similar rate of increase in brain size and lead content throughout pregnancy in the fetus of mothers in the general population, so concentration of lead probably does not differ greatly during gestation unless exposure of the mother changes. Cell-specific sensitivity to the toxic effects of lead, however, may be greater the younger the fetus. Lead toxicity to the nervous system is characterized by edema or swelling of the brain due to altered permeability of capillary endothelial cells. Experimental studies suggest that immature endothelial cells forming the capillaries of the developing brain are less resistant to the effects of lead, permitting fluid and cations including lead to reach newly formed components of the brain, particularly astrocytes and neurons. Also, the ability of astrocytes and neurons to sequester lead in the form of lead protein complexes occurs only in the later stages of fetal development, permitting lead in maturing brain cells to interact with vital subcellular organelles, particularly mitochondria, which are the major cellular energy source. Intracellular lead also affects binding sites for calcium which, in turn, may affect numerous cell functions including neurotransmitter release.

  15. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  16. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  17. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Determine if your family is at risk for lead poisoning with the Lead Poisoning Home Checklist (PDF) . Top of page What do I do if I think my child or I have been exposed to lead? Talk to your pediatrician, general physician, or local ...

  18. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  19. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  20. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  1. Lead and children

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan R.; Sanborn, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to screening for and preventing children’s exposure to lead. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to lead exposure and poisoning. We reviewed English-language articles published in 2003 to 2008. Most cited studies provide level 2 or 3 evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Lead is a developmental neurotoxin. Children are most commonly exposed and they are most vulnerable. Lead exposure has been associated with many cognitive and motor deficits, as well as distractibility and other characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although children’s blood lead levels have declined considerably over the past 3 decades with removal of lead from gasoline and paint, children can still be exposed to lead from lead paint in older homes, toys, and other sources. Because post-exposure treatment cannot reverse the cognitive effects of lead exposure, preventing lead exposure is essential. CONCLUSION Family physicians have an important role in screening for children at high risk of lead exposure, and in educating families to prevent the exposure of children to lead. PMID:20547517

  2. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  3. Lead in Christmas lights.

    PubMed

    Laquatra, Joseph; Coyne, Lelia M; Pierce, Mark R

    2008-12-01

    A recent California proposition led to awareness that lead is a stabilizer in the Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) jacketing that covers conductors in Christmas lights. The objective of this study is to examine the level of accessible lead in Christmas lights. Following U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Lead Inspectors' procedures, researchers at Cornell University and in Nebraska conducted wipe samples and total lead content samples of newly purchased and older Christmas light sets. Samples were analyzed for lead content. Lead was present in varying amounts on all samples. The amount of lead from the Nebraska samples, normalized to length of strings, was independent of analyzing laboratory, analysis method, age of string, and repeat sampling, both immediately and after extended storage. A later analysis of these same strings by the Cornell team showed diminished quantities. Amounts of surface lead normalized to crude estimates of the area of light string indicated surface concentrations in excess of U.S. EPA clearance level for lead on window sills. Whether exposure to lead in Christmas lights affects blood lead levels in humans is unknown. No standards exist for lead content in this product, and no protocols exist for conducting tests on it. Therefore, consumers may wish to exercise caution to reduce possible exposure.

  4. Identification of Developmental Regulatory Genes in Aspergillus Nidulans by Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Marhoul, J. F.; Adams, T. H.

    1995-01-01

    Overexpression of several Aspergillus nidulans developmental regulatory genes has been shown to cause growth inhibition and development at inappropriate times. We set out to identify previously unknown developmental regulators by constructing a nutritionally inducible A. nidulans expression library containing small, random genomic DNA fragments inserted next to the alcA promoter [ alcA (p) ] in an A. nidulans transformation vector. Among 20,000 transformants containing random alcA (p) genomic DNA fusion constructs, we identified 66 distinct mutant strains in which alcA (p) induction resulted in growth inhibition as well as causing other detectable phenotypic changes. These growth inhibited mutants were divided into 52 FIG (Forced expression Inhibition of Growth) and 14 FAB (Forced expression Activation of brlA) mutants based on whether or not alcA (p) induction resulted in accumulation of mRNA for the developmental regulatory gene brlA. In four FAB mutants, alcA (p) induction not only activated brlA expression but also caused hyphae to differentiate into reduced conidiophores that produced viable spores from the tips as is observed after alcA (p) :: brlA induction. Sequence analyses of the DNA fragments under alcA (p) control in three of these four sporulating strains showed that in two cases developmental activation resulted from overexpression of previously uncharacterized genes, whereas in the third strain, the alcA (p) was fused to brlA. The potential uses for this strategy in identifying genes whose overexpression results in specific phenotypic changes like developmental induction are discussed. PMID:7713416

  5. Identification of developmental regulatory genes in Aspergillus nidulans by overexpression.

    PubMed

    Marhoul, J F; Adams, T H

    1995-02-01

    Overexpression of several Aspergillus nidulans developmental regulatory genes has been shown to cause growth inhibition and development at inappropriate times. We set out to identify previously unknown developmental regulators by constructing a nutritionally inducible A. nidulans expression library containing small, random genomic DNA fragments inserted next to the alcA promoter [alcA(p)] in an A. nidulans transformation vector. Among 20,000 transformants containing random alcA(p) genomic DNA fusion constructs, we identified 66 distinct mutant strains in which alcA(p) induction resulted in growth inhibition as well as causing other detectable phenotypic changes. These growth inhibited mutants were divided into 52 FIG (Forced expression Inhibition of Growth) and 14 FAB (Forced expression Activation of brlA) mutants based on whether or not alcA(p) induction resulted in accumulation of mRNA for the developmental regulatory gene brlA. In four FAB mutants, alcA(p) induction not only activated brlA expression but also caused hyphae to differentiate into reduced conidiophores that produced viable spores from the tips as is observed after alcA(p)::brlA induction. Sequence analyses of the DNA fragments under alcA(p) control in three of these four sporulating strains showed that in two cases developmental activation resulted from overexpression of previously uncharacterized genes, whereas in the third strain, the alcA(p) was fused to brlA. The potential uses for this strategy in identifying genes whose overexpression results in specific phenotypic changes like developmental induction are discussed.

  6. Overexpression of KCNN3 results in sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Mills, Robert W.; Tucker, Nathan R.; Simonson, Bridget; Macri, Vincenzo; Lemoine, Marc D.; Das, Saumya; Milan, David J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus for atrial fibrillation at the KCNN3 gene. Since the KCNN3 gene encodes for a small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, we hypothesized that overexpression of the SK3 channel increases susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Methods and results We characterized the cardiac electrophysiological phenotype of a mouse line with overexpression of the SK3 channel. We generated homozygote (SK3T/T) and heterozygote (SK3+/T) mice with overexpression of the channel and compared them with wild-type (WT) controls. We observed a high incidence of sudden death among SK3T/T mice (7 of 19 SK3T/T mice). Ambulatory monitoring demonstrated that sudden death was due to heart block and bradyarrhythmias. SK3T/T mice displayed normal body weight, temperature, and cardiac function on echocardiography; however, histological analysis demonstrated that these mice have abnormal atrioventricular node morphology. Optical mapping demonstrated that SK3T/T mice have slower ventricular conduction compared with WT controls (SK3T/T vs. WT; 0.45 ± 0.04 vs. 0.60 ± 0.09 mm/ms, P = 0.001). Programmed stimulation in 1-month-old SK3T/T mice demonstrated inducible atrial arrhythmias (50% of SK3T/T vs. 0% of WT mice) and also a shorter atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 43 ± 6 vs. 52 ± 9 ms, P = 0.02). Three-month-old SK3T/T mice on the other hand displayed a trend towards a more prolonged atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 61 ± 1 vs. 52 ± 6 ms, P = 0.06). Conclusion Overexpression of the SK3 channel causes an increased risk of sudden death associated with bradyarrhythmias and heart block, possibly due to atrioventricular nodal dysfunction. PMID:24296650

  7. Overexpression and purification of halophilic proteins in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Allers, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Halophilic enzymes function optimally at high salt concentrations and are active at low water availability. Such conditions are encountered at elevated concentrations of solutes such as salts and sugars, and at high concentrations of organic solvents. However, expression in heterologous hosts such as Escherichia coli can cause problems, since halophilic proteins typically misfold and aggregate in conditions of low ionic strength. We have harnessed the sophisticated genetic tools available for the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, to develop a system for the overexpression and purification of halophilic proteins under native conditions. PMID:21327063

  8. Overexpression of miR-506 suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells by targeting astrocyte elevated gene-1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Qin, Li; Miao, Sen; Wang, Xiangshan; Wu, Xuejian

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRs) are implicated in tumor development and progression; however, their specific roles in osteosarcoma are not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of miR-506 in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. The expression levels of miR-506 and astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) mRNA were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein levels of AEG-1, β-catenin, c-myc and cyclin D1 were determined using western blot analysis. The effects of miR-506 and AEG-1 on cell viability, colony forming ability and apoptosis were assessed using MTT assay, colony formation assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Lucifer reporter assays were used to demonstrate whether AEG-1 is a direct target of miR-506. The present study identified that miR-506 was downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and cells. Overexpression of miR-506 suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Overexpression of miR-506 significantly inhibited the luciferase activity of AEG-1 with a wild-type 3′-untranslated region, providing clear evidence that AEG-1 was a direct and functional downstream target of miR-506. Similar to the overexpression of miR-506, downregulation of AEG-1 lead to an inhibitory effect on osteosarcoma in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-506 or downregulation of AEG-1 inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and inhibition of this pathway by β-catenin small interfering RNA or CGP049090, a small molecule inhibitor, suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in vitro. Overall, the present data indicated that miR-506 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting AEG-1 in osteosarcoma via the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  9. Overexpression of miR-506 suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells by targeting astrocyte elevated gene-1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Qin, Li; Miao, Sen; Wang, Xiangshan; Wu, Xuejian

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRs) are implicated in tumor development and progression; however, their specific roles in osteosarcoma are not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of miR-506 in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. The expression levels of miR-506 and astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) mRNA were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein levels of AEG-1, β-catenin, c-myc and cyclin D1 were determined using western blot analysis. The effects of miR-506 and AEG-1 on cell viability, colony forming ability and apoptosis were assessed using MTT assay, colony formation assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Lucifer reporter assays were used to demonstrate whether AEG-1 is a direct target of miR-506. The present study identified that miR-506 was downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and cells. Overexpression of miR-506 suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Overexpression of miR-506 significantly inhibited the luciferase activity of AEG-1 with a wild-type 3′-untranslated region, providing clear evidence that AEG-1 was a direct and functional downstream target of miR-506. Similar to the overexpression of miR-506, downregulation of AEG-1 lead to an inhibitory effect on osteosarcoma in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-506 or downregulation of AEG-1 inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and inhibition of this pathway by β-catenin small interfering RNA or CGP049090, a small molecule inhibitor, suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in vitro. Overall, the present data indicated that miR-506 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting AEG-1 in osteosarcoma via the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27602115

  10. Overexpression of Inhibitor of DNA-Binding 2 Attenuates Pulmonary Fibrosis through Regulation of c-Abl and Twist

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Agarwal, Manisha; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Wolters, Paul J.; Kim, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a multicellular process leading to excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Factors that affect lung epithelial cell proliferation and activation may be important regulators of the extent of fibrosis after injury. We and others have shown that activated alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) directly contribute to fibrogenesis by secreting mesenchymal proteins, such as type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial cell acquisition of mesenchymal features during carcinogenesis and fibrogenesis is regulated by several mesenchymal transcription factors. Induced expression of direct inhibitors to these mesenchymal transcription factors offers a potentially novel therapeutic strategy. Inhibitor of DNA-binding 2 (Id2) is an inhibitory helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is highly expressed by lung epithelial cells during development and has been shown to coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation of cancer cells. We found that overexpression of Id2 in primary AECs promotes proliferation by inhibiting a retinoblastoma protein/c-Abl interaction leading to greater c-Abl activity. Id2 also blocks transforming growth factor β1–mediated expression of type I collagen by inhibiting Twist, a prominent mesenchymal basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. In vivo, Id2 induced AEC proliferation and protected mice from lung fibrosis. By using a high-throughput screen, we found that histone deacetylase inhibitors induce Id2 expression by adult AECs. Collectively, these findings suggest that Id2 expression by AECs can be induced, and overexpression of Id2 affects AEC phenotype, leading to protection from fibrosis. PMID:25661109

  11. Law: toxic lead aftermath

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, E.A.

    1983-03-01

    The paper describes the events which began with an EPA proposal to weaken the lead-in-gas regulations. Because of the outcry from environmentalists and expert testimony from the medical community, the EPA reversed its policy and issued new standards which would reduce lead emissions between 1983 and 1990 by 34 percent (128,000 tons). Scientific evidence presented showed a clear reduction in blood lead levels from 1976-1980 which paralleled decreases of lead in gasoline. Results from lead poisoning clinics which linked chronic low lead exposures to decreased classroom performance and other learning disabilities were presented. Lawyers from several environmental groups took the agency to court on the related issue of attaining national ambient air quality standards for lead. (JMT)

  12. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John=

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  13. Prothymosin α overexpression contributes to the development of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Su, Bing-Hua; Tseng, Yau-Lin; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Shiang, Ya-Chieh; Wu, Pensee; Li, Kuo-Jung; Yen, Te-Hsin; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Emphysema is one of the disease conditions that comprise chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prothymosin α transgenic mice exhibit an emphysema phenotype, but the pathophysiological role of prothymosin α in emphysema remains unclear. Here we show that prothymosin α contributes to the pathogenesis of emphysema by increasing acetylation of histones and nuclear factor-kappaB, particularly upon cigarette smoke exposure. We find a positive correlation between prothymosin α levels and the severity of emphysema in prothymosin α transgenic mice and emphysema patients. Prothymosin α overexpression increases susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema, and cigarette smoke exposure further enhances prothymosin α expression. We show that prothymosin α inhibits the association of histone deacetylases with histones and nuclear factor-kappaB, and that prothymosin α overexpression increases expression of nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9, which are found in the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These results demonstrate the clinical relevance of prothymosin α in regulating acetylation events during the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  14. YAP overexpression affects tooth morphogenesis and enamel knot patterning.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Zhao, S; Wang, X P

    2014-05-01

    Teeth develop through distinct morphological stages. At the cap stage, a compactly clustered and concentrically arranged cell mass, the enamel knot, appears at the tip of the enamel organ. Cells in this knot express sets of key molecules, and as such have been proposed to act as a signaling center directing tooth morphogenesis and tooth cusp formation. YAP is a transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo signaling pathway that is essential for the proper regulation of organ growth. In this study, we analyzed the tooth phenotype in transgenic mice that overexpressed a constitutively active form of YAP in the dental epithelium. We found that overexpression of YAP resulted in deformed tooth morphogenesis with widened dental lamina. In addition, the enamel knot was mislocated to the upper portion of the enamel organ, where it remained devoid of proliferating cells and contained apoptotic cells with intense Edar transcripts and reduced E-cadherin expression. Interestingly, some signaling molecules, such as Shh, Fgf4, and Wnt10a, were not expressed in this mislocated enamel knot, but remained at the tip of the enamel organ. Analysis of these data suggests that the signaling center is induced by reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and its induction may be independent of the enamel knot.

  15. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  16. Prognostic value of CAPZA1 overexpression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOUNG-JOON; JEONG, SANG-HO; HONG, SOON-CHAN; CHO, BOK-IM; HA, WOO-SONG; PARK, SOON-TAE; CHOI, SANG-KYUNG; JUNG, EUN-JUNG; JU, YOUNG-TAE; JEONG, CHI-YOUNG; KIM, JAE WON; LEE, CHANG WON; YOO, JIYUN; KO, GYUNG HYUCK

    2013-01-01

    F-actin capping protein α1 subunit (CAPZA1) was previously identified in a proteomic analysis of human gastric cancer clinical specimens and selected for further study. The association between CAPZA1 overexpression, detected by immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathological features including survival were evaluated. In vitro gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were utilized to assess the function of CPAZA1 in malignancy. Univariate analysis revealed that poorly differentiated disease, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, advanced T stage, positive lymph nodes, high TNM stage, D2 lymph node dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy and CAPZA1 underexpression were significantly associated with cancer-related death (p<0.05); however, only high TNM stage remained significantly associated by multivariate analysis (p<0.01). CAPZA1 overexpression was associated with well differentiated histology, smaller tumor size, lower T stage, absence of lymph node metastasis, lower TNM stage, lower recurrence rate and longer survival time, compared to CAPZA1 underexpression. In vitro, forced expression of CAPZA1 caused a significant decrease in gastric cancer cell migration and invasion, whereas CAPZA1 depletion had the opposite effect. The present study suggests that CAPZA1 could be a marker of good prognosis in gastric cancer and shows that CAPZA1 is associated with decreased cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:23545944

  17. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B.; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A.; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E.; Cohen, Richard A.; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S.; McComb, Mark E.; Bachschmid, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a ‘Tandem Mass Tag’ (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation. PMID:26642319

  18. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  19. RACK-1 overexpression protects against goniothalamin-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Inayat-Hussain, S.H.; Wong, L.T.; Chan, K.M.; Rajab, N.F.; Din, L.B.; Harun, R.; Kizilors, A.; Saxena, N.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, M.; Farzaneh, F.; Williams, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    Goniothalamin, a styryllactone, has been shown to induce cytotoxicity via apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. In this study, we have examined the potential role of several genes, which were stably transfected into T-cell lines and which regulate apoptosis in different ways, on goniothalamin-induced cell death. Overexpression of full-length receptor for activated protein C-kinase 1 (RACK-1) and pc3n3, which up-regulates endogenous RACK-1, in both Jurkat and W7.2 T cells resulted in inhibition of goniothalamin-induced cell death as assessed by MTT and clonogenic assays. However, overexpression of rFau (antisense sequence to Finkel–Biskis–Reilly murine sarcoma virus-associated ubiquitously expressed gene) in W7.2 cells did not confer resistance to goniothalamin-induced cell death. Etoposide, a clinically used cytotoxic agent, was equipotent in causing cytotoxicity in all the stable transfectants. Assessment of DNA damage by Comet assay revealed goniothalamin-induced DNA strand breaks as early as 1 h in vector control but this effect was inhibited in RACK-1 and pc3n3 stably transfected W7.2 cells. This data demonstrate that RACK-1 plays a crucial role in regulating cell death signalling pathways induced by goniothalamin. PMID:19698770

  20. Tubular Overexpression of Angiopoietin-1 Attenuates Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heedoo; Kim, Yeawon; Liu, Tuoen; Guo, Qiusha; Geminiani, Julio J.; Austin, Paul F.; Chen, Ying Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the pivotal role of microvasculature injury in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) is a secreted vascular growth factor that binds to the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor. Ang-1/Tie2 signaling is critical for regulating blood vessel development and modulating vascular response after injury, but is dispensable in mature, quiescent vessels. Although dysregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has been well studied in renal pathologies, much less is known about the role of the Ang-1/Tie2 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. Previous studies have shown contradicting effects of overexpressing Ang-1 systemically on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis when different engineered forms of Ang-1 are used. Here, we investigated the impact of site-directed expression of native Ang-1 on the renal fibrogenic process and peritubular capillary network by exploiting a conditional transgenic mouse system [Pax8-rtTA/(TetO)7 Ang-1] that allows increased tubular Ang-1 production in adult mice. Using a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) fibrosis model, we demonstrate that targeted Ang-1 overexpression attenuates myofibroblast activation and interstitial collagen I accumulation, inhibits the upregulation of transforming growth factor β1 and subsequent phosphorylation of Smad 2/3, dampens renal inflammation, and stimulates the growth of peritubular capillaries in the obstructed kidney. Our results suggest that Ang-1 is a potential therapeutic agent for targeting microvasculature injury in renal fibrosis without compromising the physiologically normal vasculature in humans. PMID:27454431

  1. Overexpression of calpastatin inhibits L8 myoblast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnoy, Sivia; E-mail: sivia@post.tau.ac.il; Maki, Masatoshi; Kosower, Nechama S.

    2005-07-08

    The formation of skeletal muscle fibers involves cessation of myoblast division, myoblast alignment, and fusion to multinucleated myofibers. Calpain is one of the factors shown to be involved in myoblast fusion. Using L8 rat myoblasts, we found that calpain levels did not change significantly during myoblast differentiation, whereas calpastatin diminished prior to myoblast fusion and reappeared after fusion. The transient diminution in calpastatin allows the Ca{sup 2+}-promoted activation of calpain and calpain-induced membrane proteolysis, which is required for myoblast fusion. Here we show that calpastatin overexpression in L8 myoblasts does not inhibit cell proliferation and alignment, but prevents myoblast fusion and fusion-associated protein degradation. In addition, calpastatin appears to modulate myogenic gene expression, as indicated by the lack of myogenin (a transcription factor expressed in differentiating myoblasts) in myoblasts overexpressing calpastatin. These results suggest that, in addition to the role in membrane disorganization in the fusing myoblasts, the calpain-calpastatin system may also modulate the levels of factors required for myoblast differentiation.

  2. Intraarticular overexpression of Smad7 ameliorates experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Yao; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang; Wang, Chrong-Reen

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are autoimmune disorders with a crosstalk between their pathogenesis such as increased expression of TNF in the target organs. Despite a successful clinical trial with an oral Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide in CD, intraarticular (i.a.) modulation of Smad7 expression has not been performed in rheumatoid joint yet. In this study, contradictory to the findings in CD mucosa, higher levels of pSmad2/3 were found in RA synovium. In vitro experiments with synovial fibroblasts revealed that higher acetylated Smad7 expression was associated with lower activation status. Abundant expression of synovial pSmad2/3 with increased levels during the progression of arthritis was detected in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. To prove the concept that overexpressing Smad7 as a therapeutic strategy in rheumatoid joint, the i.a. injection of lentiviral vectors carrying Smad7 (LVSmad7) was carried out in CIA mice. In LVSmad7-injected joints, there were lower arthritis and histological scores with less synovitis, synovial hyperplasia and erosion on cartilage and bone as well as reduced IL-17 and TNF expression levels in comparison with other control groups. In conclusion, we demonstrate that lentiviral vector-mediated i.a. overexpression of Smad7 can ameliorate rheumatoid joint, implicating a pharmacological development of Smad7-based molecular strategy in RA. PMID:27731365

  3. Metabolomics Revealed an Association of Metabolite Changes and Defective Growth in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 Overexpressing ecm during Growth on Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Jing; Wang, Qianwen; Sadilek, Martin; Yang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 is a facultative methylotroph capable of growth on both single-carbon and multi-carbon compounds. The ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC) pathway is one of the central assimilatory pathways in M. extorquens during growth on C1 and C2 substrates. Previous studies had shown that ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase functioned as a control point during the transition from growth on succinate to growth on ethylamine. In this study we overexpressed ecm, phaA, mcmAB and found that upregulating ecm by expressing it from the strong constitutive mxaF promoter caused a 27% decrease in growth rate on methanol compared to the strain with an empty vector. Targeted metabolomics demonstrated that most of the central intermediates in the ecm over-expressing strain did not change significantly compared to the control strain; However, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) was 4.5-fold lower and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was 1.6-fold higher. Moreover, glyoxylate, a toxic and highly regulated essential intermediate, was determined to be 2.6-fold higher when ecm was overexpressed. These results demonstrated that overexpressing ecm can manipulate carbon flux through the EMC pathway and divert it from the carbon and energy storage product PHB, leading to an accumulation of glyoxylate. Furthermore, untargeted metabolomics discovered two unusual metabolites, alanine (Ala)–meso-diaminopimelic acid (mDAP) and Ala–mDAP–Ala, each over 45-fold higher in the ecm over-expressing strain. These two peptides were also found to be highly produced in a dose-dependent manner when glyoxylate was added to the control strain. Overall, this work has explained a direct association of ecm overexpression with glyoxylate accumulation up to a toxic level, which inhibits cell growth on methanol. This research provides useful insight for manipulating the EMC pathway for efficiently producing high-value chemicals in M. extorquens. PMID:27116459

  4. Overexpression of eIF5 or its protein mimic 5MP perturbs eIF2 function and induces ATF4 translation through delayed re-initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Caitlin; Thompson, Brytteny; Hustak, Samantha; Moore, Chelsea; Nakashima, Akio; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Reid, Megan; Cox, Christian; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Luna, Rafael E.; Anderson, Abbey; Tagami, Hideaki; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Slone, Emily Archer; Yoshino, Ken-ichi; Asano, Masayo; Gillaspie, Sarah; Nietfeld, Jerome; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre; Rothenburg, Stefan; Masai, Hisao; Wagner, Gerhard; Beeser, Alexander; Kikkawa, Ushio; Fleming, Sherry D.; Asano, Katsura

    2016-01-01

    ATF4 is a pro-oncogenic transcription factor whose translation is activated by eIF2 phosphorylation through delayed re-initiation involving two uORFs in the mRNA leader. However, in yeast, the effect of eIF2 phosphorylation can be mimicked by eIF5 overexpression, which turns eIF5 into translational inhibitor, thereby promoting translation of GCN4, the yeast ATF4 equivalent. Furthermore, regulatory protein termed eIF5-mimic protein (5MP) can bind eIF2 and inhibit general translation. Here, we show that 5MP1 overexpression in human cells leads to strong formation of 5MP1:eIF2 complex, nearly comparable to that of eIF5:eIF2 complex produced by eIF5 overexpression. Overexpression of eIF5, 5MP1 and 5MP2, the second human paralog, promotes ATF4 expression in certain types of human cells including fibrosarcoma. 5MP overexpression also induces ATF4 expression in Drosophila. The knockdown of 5MP1 in fibrosarcoma attenuates ATF4 expression and its tumor formation on nude mice. Since 5MP2 is overproduced in salivary mucoepidermoid carcinoma, we propose that overexpression of eIF5 and 5MP induces translation of ATF4 and potentially other genes with uORFs in their mRNA leaders through delayed re-initiation, thereby enhancing the survival of normal and cancer cells under stress conditions. PMID:27325740

  5. Metabolomics revealed an association of metabolite changes and defective growth in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 overexpressing ecm during growth on methanol

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Jinyu; Good, Nathan M.; Hu, Bo; Yang, Jing; Wang, Qianwen; Sadilek, Martin; Yang, Song; Berg, Ivan A.

    2016-04-26

    Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 is a facultative methylotroph capable of growth on both single-carbon and multi-carbon compounds. The ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC) pathway is one of the central assimilatory pathways in M. extorquens during growth on C1 and C2 substrates. Previous studies had shown that ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase functioned as a control point during the transition from growth on succinate to growth on ethylamine. In this study we overexpressed ecm, phaA, mcmAB and found that upregulating ecm by expressing it from the strong constitutive mxaF promoter caused a 27% decrease in growth rate on methanol compared to the strain with an empty vector. Targetedmore » metabolomics demonstrated that most of the central intermediates in the ecm over-expressing strain did not change significantly compared to the control strain; However, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) was 4.5-fold lower and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was 1.6-fold higher. Moreover, glyoxylate, a toxic and highly regulated essential intermediate, was determined to be 2.6-fold higher when ecm was overexpressed. These results demonstrated that overexpressing ecm can manipulate carbon flux through the EMC pathway and divert it from the carbon and energy storage product PHB, leading to an accumulation of glyoxylate. Furthermore, untargeted metabolomics discovered two unusual metabolites, alanine (Ala)-meso-diaminopimelic acid (mDAP) and Ala-mDAP-Ala, each over 45-fold higher in the ecm overexpressing strain. These two peptides were also found to be highly produced in a dose-dependent manner when glyoxylate was added to the control strain. Overall, this work has explained a direct association of ecm overexpression with glyoxylate accumulation up to a toxic level, which inhibits cell growth on methanol. Lastly, this research provides useful insight for manipulating the EMC pathway for efficiently producing high-value chemicals in M. extorquens.« less

  6. Lead Poison Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial function in insulin resistant muscle cells: effect of catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marina R; Sampaio, Igor H; Teodoro, Bruno G; Sousa, Thais A; Zoppi, Claudio C; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Alberici, Luciane C; Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Batista, Thiago M; Cappelli, Ana Paula Gameiro; Reis, Rosana I; Frasson, Danúbia; Kettelhut, Isis C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Carneiro, Everardo M; Curi, Rui; Silveira, Leonardo R

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial redox state plays a central role in the link between mitochondrial overloading and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which the ROS induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells is not completely understood. We examined the association between mitochondrial function and H2O2 production in insulin resistant cells. Our hypothesis is that the low mitochondrial oxygen consumption leads to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with reduced PGC1α transcription and low content of phosphorylated CREB. The cells were transfected with either the encoded sequence for catalase overexpression or the specific siRNA for catalase inhibition. After transfection, myotubes were incubated with palmitic acid (500μM) and the insulin response, as well as mitochondrial function and fatty acid metabolism, was determined. The low mitochondrial oxygen consumption led to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with β-oxidation of fatty acids. Rotenone was observed to reduce the ratio of ROS production. The elevated H2O2 production markedly decreased the PGC1α transcription, an effect that was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. The catalase transfection prevented the reduction in the phosphorylated level of Akt and upregulated the levels of phosphorylated CREB. The mitochondrial function was elevated and H2O2 production reduced, thus increasing the insulin sensitivity. The catalase overexpression improved mitochondrial respiration protecting the cells from fatty acid-induced, insulin resistance. This effect indicates that control of hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial respiration preventing the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism associated with CREB phosphorylation and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  8. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression.

  9. Cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of PAL31 overexpression in glial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a series of reactive changes and causes severe neurological deficits. A pronounced inflammation contributes to secondary pathology after SCI. Astroglia respond to SCI by proliferating, migrating, and altering phenotype. The impact of reactive gliosis on the pathogenesis of SCI is not fully understood. Our previous study has identified an inflammatory modulating protein, proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein (PAL31) which is upregulated in the microglia/macrophage of injured cords. Because PAL31 participates in cell cycle progression and reactive astroglia often appears in the injured cord, we aim to examine whether PAL31 is involved in glial modulation after injury. Results Enhanced PAL31 expression was shown not only in microglia/macrophages but also in spinal astroglia after SCI. Cell culture study reveal that overexpression of PAL31 in mixed glial cells or in C6 astroglia significantly reduced LPS/IFNγ stimulation. Further, enhanced PAL31 expression in C6 astroglia protected cells from H2O2 toxicity; however, this did not affect its proliferative activity. The inhibiting effect of PAL31 on LPS/IFNγ stimulation was observed in glia or C6 after co-culture with neuronal cells. The results demonstrated that the overexpressed PAL31 in glial cells protected neuronal damages through inhibiting NF-kB signaling and iNOS. Conclusions Our data suggest that PAL31upregulation might be beneficial after spinal cord injury. Reactive gliosis might become a good target for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:25034417

  10. Overexpression of BiP in tobacco alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed Central

    Leborgne-Castel, N; Jelitto-Van Dooren, E P; Crofts, A J; Denecke, J

    1999-01-01

    To study the role of the lumenal binding protein (BiP) in the transport and secretion of proteins, we have produced plants with altered BiP levels. Transgenic plants overexpressing BiP showed dramatically increased BiP mRNA levels but only a modest increase in BiP protein levels. The presence of degradation products in BiP overproducers suggests a regulatory mechanism that increases protein turnover when BiP is abundant. Antisense inhibition of BiP synthesis was not successful, demonstrating that even a minor reduction in the basal BiP level is deleterious to cell viability. Overexpression of BiP leads to downregulation of the basal transcript levels of endogenous BiP genes and greatly reduces the unfolded protein response. The data confirm that BiP transcription is regulated via a feedback mechanism that involves monitoring of BiP protein levels. To test BiP activity in vivo, we designed a functional assay, using the secretory protein alpha-amylase and a cytosolic enzyme as a control for cell viability. During tunicamycin treatment, an overall reduction of alpha-amylase synthesis was observed when compared with the cytosolic marker. We show that the tunicamycin effect is due to the depletion of BiP in the endoplasmic reticulum because coexpressed BiP alone is able to restore efficient alpha-amylase synthesis. This is a novel assay to monitor BiP activity in promoting secretory protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:10072404

  11. Significant overexpression of DVL1 in Taiwanese colorectal cancer patients with liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Yii; Yen, Li-Chen; Liu, Hsueh-Chiao; Liu, Po-Ping; Chung, Fu-Yen; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2013-10-14

    Undetected micrometastasis plays a key role in the metastasis of cancer in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The aim of this study is to identify a biomarker of CRC patients with liver metastasis through the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Microarray and bioinformatics analysis of 10 CRC cancer tissue specimens compared with normal adjacent tissues revealed that 31 genes were up-regulated (gene expression ratio of cancer tissue to paired normal tissue > 2) in the cancer patients. We used a weighted enzymatic chip array (WEnCA) including 31 prognosis-related genes to investigate CTCs in 214 postoperative stage I-III CRC patients and to analyze the correlation between gene expression and clinico-pathological parameters. We employed the immunohistochemistry (IHC) method with polyclonal mouse antibody against DVL1 to detect DVL1 expression in 60 CRC patients. CRC liver metastasis occurred in 19.16% (41/214) of the patients. Using univariate analysis and multivariate proportional hazards regression analysis, we found that DVL1 mRNA overexpression had a significant, independent predictive value for liver metastasis in CRC patients (OR: 5.764; 95% CI: 2.588-12.837; p < 0.0001 on univariate analysis; OR: 3.768; 95% CI: 1.469-9.665; p = 0.006 on multivariate analysis). IHC staining of the immunoreactivity of DVL1 showed that DVL1 was localized in the cytoplasm of CRC cells. High expression of DVL1 was observed in 55% (33/60) of CRC tumor specimens and was associated significantly with tumor depth, perineural invasion and liver metastasis status (all p < 0.05). Our experimental results demonstrated that DVL1 is significantly overexpressed in CRC patients with liver metastasis, leading us to conclude that DVL1 could be a potential prognostic and predictive marker for CRC patients.

  12. Targeting the ABCG2-overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells by PPARγ agonists

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K W; Tomlinson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multidrug resistance (MDR), usually mediated by overexpression of efflux transporters such as P-gp, ABCG2 and/or MRP1, remains a major obstacle hindering successful cancer chemotherapy. There has been great interest in the development of inhibitors towards these transporters to circumvent resistance. However, since the inhibition of transporter is not specific to cancer cells, a decrease in the cytotoxic drug dosing may be needed to prevent excess toxicity, thus undermining the potential benefit brought about by a drug efflux inhibitor. The design of potent MDR modulators specific towards resistant cancer cells and devoid of drug-drug interactions will be needed to effect MDR reversal. Experimental Approach Recent evidence suggests that the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway may be exploited to alter ABCG2 subcellular localization, thereby circumventing MDR. Three PPARγ agonists (telmisartan, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone) that have been used in the clinics were tested for their effect on the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and possible reversal of ABCG2-mediated drug resistance. Key Results The PPARγ agonists were found to be weak ABCG2 inhibitors by drug efflux assay. They were also shown to elevate the reduced PTEN expression in a resistant and ABCG2-overexpressing cell model, which inhibit the PI3K-Akt pathway and lead to the relocalization of ABCG2 from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasma, thus apparently circumventing the ABCG2-mediated MDR. Conclusions and Implications Since this PPARγ/PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway regulating ABCG2 is only functional in drug-resistant cancer cells with PTEN loss, the PPARγ agonists identified may represent promising agents targeting resistant cells for MDR reversal. PMID:24032744

  13. Lead and growth.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Masayuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Lead is highly toxic to the human body and children are much more vulnerable to lead toxicity than adults. Many studies have revealed that relatively low levels of blood lead can adversely affect human health, especially childhood growth and development. Blood lead levels (BLL) of children and adults have been decreasing recently almost all over the world, but a safety level for blood lead does not exist, and lead exposure is still a serious health problem especially for fetuses and children. Maternal lead burden causes fetal lead exposure and increases the risk of abortions, prematurity, low birth weight, and some minor anomalies. Infant BLL are inversely associated with weight gain. A negative relationship between somatic growth and BLL in children has been revealed. It has been suggested that lead exposure causes decrease of gonadotropin secretion of adolescents and delay of pubertal development. Several studies have revealed that children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have higher BLL than children who are not. Children should be protected from cigarette smoke for the purpose of avoiding the risk of increased BLL which might adversely affect their intellectual development and physical growth.

  14. Toxicological properties of lead.

    PubMed Central

    Damstra, T

    1977-01-01

    The pathological effects of lead on the renal, nervous, reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems have been reviewed. Emphasis is placed on reported subclinical effects due to chronic, low-level lead exposure. The crucial issue of whether subtle behavioral, intellectual, and developmental impairment occurs in young children, as a result of lead-induced CNS damage is discussed in detail. This issue remains unresolved. Further studies are needed in order to determine the long-term health effects of continuous, low-level lead exposure. PMID:198205

  15. Acute lead arsenate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tallis, G A

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of acute lead arsenate poisoning which occurred in South Australia during a 12 month interval are described. The case reports demonstrate a number of features of the characteristic clinical syndrome which may follow ingestion of lead arsenate. The recommended management is immediate gastric lavage and subsequent chelation therapy with calcium EDTA and dimercaprol. Early gastric lavage may prevent significant lead absorption. However, arsenic acid (produced in the stomach when lead arsenate reacts with hydrochloric acid) is relatively water soluble and prompt gastric lavage is unlikely to prevent extensive arsenic absorption. It remains controversial as to whether chelation with dimercaprol prevents arsenical neuropathy.

  16. Lead poisoning: case studies

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J N; Taylor, A; Bennett, P N

    2002-01-01

    Early clinical features of lead toxicity are non-specific and an occupational history is particularly valuable. Lead in the body comprises 2% in the blood (t1/2 35 days) and 95% in bone and dentine (t1/2 20–30 years). Blood lead may remain elevated for years after cessation from long exposure, due to redistribution from bone. Blood lead concentration is the most widely used marker for inorganic lead exposure. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration in blood usefully reflects lead exposure over the prior 3 months. Symptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 µmol l−1 (50 µg dl−1) or in any event >3.8 µmol l−1 (80 µg dl−1) should receive sodium calciumedetate i.v., followed by succimer by mouth for 19 days. Asymptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 µmol l−1 (50 µg dl−1) may be treated with succimer alone. Sodium calciumedetate should be given with dimercaprol to treat lead encephalopathy. PMID:11994050

  17. Overexpression of Tyro3 receptor tyrosine kinase leads to the acquisition of taxol resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chuhee

    2015-07-01

    The majority of patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed at the advanced stages (III/IV) and their 5-year-survival rate is relatively low. One of the major causes of the poor prognosis of ovarian cancer is the development of resistance to first-line chemotherapy, including platinum and taxol. Therefore, improvements in current understanding of chemoresistance is required for the successful treatment of ovarian cancer. In the present study, taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3/TR, were established by exposing parental SKOV3 cells to increasing concentrations of taxol. . Briefly, cells were treated with 1.5 nM (for 4 weeks), 3 nM (for 4 weeks), 6 nM (for 5 weeks), 12 nM (for 5 weeks) and 24 nM taxol (for 8 weeks) over 6 months. The SKOV3/TR cells were found to be smaller in size and rounder in shape compared with their parental cells. Cell viability and colony formation assays demonstrated an increase in the population doubling time of the SKOV3/TR cells, indicating a reduction in the proliferative capacity of these cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis revealed that, among the TAM receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the mRNA and protein expression levels of Tyro3 RTK were increased, while those of Axl and Mer RTK were decreased in the SKOV3/TR cells. In addition, restoration of the level of Tyro3 by transfecting Tyro3-specific small interfering RNA into the SKOV3/TR cells reduced the proliferative capacity of the cells, indicating that upregulation of the expression of Tyro3 in SKOV3/TR cells may promote survival in the presence of taxol, which eventually resulted in the acquisition of resistance upon taxol treatment. The present study subsequently found that, in the SKOV3/TR cells, the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was elevated, and antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) exerted more profound antiproliferative effects compared with the parental cells. The western blot analysis demonstrated that treatment of the SKOV3/TR cells with NAC reduced the protein expression of Tyro3, and the inhibitory effect of NAC on the phosphorylation of Akt was increased, which may have had a positive effect on the proliferation of the SKOV3/TR cells. The levels of phosphorylation and protein expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) were not affected by NAC treatment, indicating that the phosphorylation of Akt, but not expression or phosphorylation of STAT3, was associated with the increased intracellular ROS level in the SKOV3/TR cells. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrated that the acquired taxol resistance of ovarian cancer cells was associated with ROS-dependent upregulation in the expression of Tyro3 RTK and the subsequent activation of Akt.

  18. Over-expressing a yeast ornithine decarboxylase gene in transgenic roots of Nicotiana rustica can lead to enhanced nicotine accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hamill, J D; Robins, R J; Parr, A J; Evans, D M; Furze, J M; Rhodes, M J

    1990-07-01

    Transformed root cultures of Nicotiana rustica have been generated in which the gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coding for ornithine decarboxylase has been integrated. The gene, driven by the powerful CaMV35S promoter with an upstream duplicated enhancer sequence, shows constitutive expression throughout the growth cycle of some lines, as demonstrated by the analysis of mRNA and enzyme activity. The presence of the yeast gene and enhanced ornithine decarboxylase activity is associated with an enhanced capacity of cultures to accumulate both putrescine and the putrescine-derived alkaloid, nicotine. Even, however, with the very powerful promoter used in this work the magnitude of the changes seen is typically only in the order of 2-fold, suggesting that regulatory factors exist which limit the potential increase in metabolic flux caused by these manipulations. Nevertheless, it is demonstrated that flux through a pathway to a plant secondary product can be elevated by means of genetic manipulation. PMID:2103440

  19. Recovering lead from batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Prengaman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to recover lead from scrap batteries. These processes recover lead via hydrometallurgical processing of the paste component of the battery followed by electrowinning. A number of pilot plant operations have been conducted, but thus far none of the processes have become operational.

  20. Leadership, Leaders, and Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Arguably, the most important need in society today is to create individuals who will take action positively and progressively to lead in the private organization, in the the public institution, or in the governmental agency. Leadership action should not be held hostage by the notion that only those in formal positions of leadership can lead.…

  1. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treated earlier before the damaging effects of lead poisoning occur. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ... exceed 10μg/dL, the threshold used to indicate lead poisoning. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) estimates one ...

  2. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    This publication is a guide to help social and health workers plan a preventive campaign against lead poisoning, a cause of mental retardation other neurological handicaps, and death among children. The main victims are 1- to 6-year-olds living in areas where deteriorating housing prevails. Among the causes of lead poisoning are: ingestion of…

  3. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  4. Lead toxicity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Lead toxicity is an important environmental disease and its effects on the human body are devastating. There is almost no function in the human body which is not affected by lead toxicity. Though in countries like US and Canada the use of lead has been controlled up to a certain extent, it is still used vehemently in the developing countries. This is primarily because lead bears unique physical and chemical properties that make it suitable for a large number of applications for which humans have exploited its benefits from historical times and thus it has become a common environmental pollutant. Lead is highly persistent in the environment and because of its continuous use its levels rise in almost every country, posing serious threats. This article reviews the works listed in the literature with recent updates regarding the toxicity of lead. Focus is also on toxic effects of lead on the renal, reproductive and nervous system. Finally the techniques available for treating lead toxicity are presented with some recent updates. PMID:27486361

  5. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  6. LEAD IN CANDLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulate to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of ...

  7. Lead polluters get punished

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Justice last week cracked down on 36 US companies for polluting the environment with lead. EPA slapped fines totaling more than $10 million on 12 of the offending companies, and Justice filed 24 civil complaints. Hank Habicht, deputy administrator of the EPA, said that his agency's initiative comes after 8 months of intense - and presumably successful - efforts at locating and documenting lead pollution in the soil, air, and water supply. Most feared has been lead's ability to damage the intellectual development of children. This caused the agency, Habicht said, to look beyond the usual suspect - lead in the water supply - to lead-laced dirt in residential areas. Meanwhile, the Department of Justice is using the EPA contamination data as well. Twenty US attorneys have been assigned to pore over the federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Water Act and the Superfund Law, in order to file civil complaints.

  8. Lead toxicity: current concerns.

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. Images FIGURE 2. PMID:8354166

  9. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  10. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  11. Noggin 1 overexpression in retinal progenitors affects bipolar cell generation.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Bridi, Simone; Bozza, Angela; Bozzi, Yuri; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Casarosa, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Waves of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) and their antagonists are present during initial eye development, but their possible roles in retinogenesis are still unknown. We have recently shown that noggin 1, a BMP antagonist, renders pluripotent cells able to differentiate into retinal precursors, and might be involved in the maintenance of retinal structures in the adult vertebrate eye. Here, we report that noggin 1, differently from noggin 2 and noggin 4, is expressed during all phases of Xenopus laevis retinal development. Gain-of-function experiments by electroporation in the optic vesicle show that overexpression of noggin 1 significantly decreases the number of bipolar cells in the inner nuclear layer of the retina, without significantly affecting the generation of the other retinal cell types. Our data suggest that BMP signaling could be involved in the differentiation of retinal progenitors into specific retinal subtypes during late phases of vertebrate retinal development. PMID:27389985

  12. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  13. Electrophysiology and metabolism of caveolin-3-overexpressing mice.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jan M; Horikawa, Yousuke T; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Vincent, Kevin P; Tyan, Leonid; Yu, Judith K; McCulloch, Andrew D; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Patel, Hemal H; Roth, David M

    2016-05-01

    Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) plays a critical role in organizing signaling molecules and ion channels involved in cardiac conduction and metabolism. Mutations in Cav-3 are implicated in cardiac conduction abnormalities and myopathies. Additionally, cardiac-specific overexpression of Cav-3 (Cav-3 OE) is protective against ischemic and hypertensive injury, suggesting a potential role for Cav-3 in basal cardiac electrophysiology and metabolism involved in stress adaptation. We hypothesized that overexpression of Cav-3 may alter baseline cardiac conduction and metabolism. We examined: (1) ECG telemetry recordings at baseline and during pharmacological interventions, (2) ion channels involved in cardiac conduction with immunoblotting and computational modeling, and (3) baseline metabolism in Cav-3 OE and transgene-negative littermate control mice. Cav-3 OE mice had decreased heart rates, prolonged PR intervals, and shortened QTc intervals with no difference in activity compared to control mice. Dobutamine or propranolol did not cause significant changes between experimental groups in maximal (dobutamine) or minimal (propranolol) heart rate. Cav-3 OE mice had an overall lower chronotropic response to atropine. The expression of Kv1.4 and Kv4.3 channels, Nav1.5 channels, and connexin 43 were increased in Cav-3 OE mice. A computational model integrating the immunoblotting results indicated shortened action potential duration in Cav-3 OE mice linking the change in channel expression to the observed electrophysiology phenotype. Metabolic profiling showed no gross differences in VO2, VCO2, respiratory exchange ratio, heat generation, and feeding or drinking. In conclusion, Cav-3 OE mice have changes in ECG intervals, heart rates, and cardiac ion channel expression. These findings give novel mechanistic insights into previously reported Cav-3 dependent cardioprotection. PMID:27023865

  14. Overexpression of alpha2C-adrenoceptors impairs water maze navigation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, M; Sirviö, J; Riekkinen, M; Sallinen, J; Scheinin, M; Riekkinen, P

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of overexpression of alpha2C-adrenoceptors in water maze navigation in mice transgenically manipulated to have a threefold overexpression of the alpha2C-adrenoreceptors. Alpha2C-adrenoreceptors overexpressing mice swam more in the peripheral annulus of the pool and did not find the hidden escape platform as well as the wild type control mice. A subtype-nonselective alpha2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, atipamezole (ATI, 1000 microg/kg, s.c.), fully reversed the deficit in platform finding and search strategy in overexpressing mice. Noradrenaline depletion (-95%) induced by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) did not impair platform finding of wild type or overexpressing mice. The DSP-4 lesion slightly increased swimming in the peripheral annulus in wild type mice, but not in overexpressing mice. The DSP-4 lesion produced a dissociable effect on the action of atipamezole to improve platform finding and search strategy in overexpressing mice: atipamezole did not alleviate the platform finding deficit in DSP-4 lesioned overexpressing mice, but normalized their abnormal search strategy. These results suggest that the abnormal search pattern and deficit in the accuracy of platform finding are mediated by constitutive activity of overexpressed alpha2C-adrenoreceptors.

  15. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB. PMID:25300351

  16. Accelerated telomere shortening and replicative senescence in human fibroblasts overexpressing mutant and wild-type lamin A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectable WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes.

  17. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Litkouhi, Babak; Kwong, Joseph; Lo, Chun-Min; Smedley, James G; McClane, Bruce A; Aponte, Margarita; Gao, Zhijian; Sarno, Jennifer L; Hinners, Jennifer; Welch, William R; Berkowitz, Ross S; Mok, Samuel C; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2007-01-01

    Background Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ) protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4-expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. Methods Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular) resistance (Rb) in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. Results Claudin-4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. Conclusions C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies. PMID:17460774

  18. Lead-free piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuyoshi; Takao, Hisaaki; Tani, Toshihiko; Nonoyama, Tatsuhiko; Takatori, Kazumasa; Homma, Takahiko; Nagaya, Toshiatsu; Nakamura, Masaya

    2004-11-01

    Lead has recently been expelled from many commercial applications and materials (for example, from solder, glass and pottery glaze) owing to concerns regarding its toxicity. Lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics are high-performance piezoelectric materials, which are widely used in sensors, actuators and other electronic devices; they contain more than 60 weight per cent lead. Although there has been a concerted effort to develop lead-free piezoelectric ceramics, no effective alternative to PZT has yet been found. Here we report a lead-free piezoelectric ceramic with an electric-field-induced strain comparable to typical actuator-grade PZT. We achieved this through the combination of the discovery of a morphotropic phase boundary in an alkaline niobate-based perovskite solid solution, and the development of a processing route leading to highly <001> textured polycrystals. The ceramic exhibits a piezoelectric constant d33 (the induced charge per unit force applied in the same direction) of above 300picocoulombs per newton (pCN-1), and texturing the material leads to a peak d33 of 416pCN-1. The textured material also exhibits temperature-independent field-induced strain characteristics.

  19. Overexpression of Mitochondria Mediator Gene TRIAP1 by miR-320b Loss Is Associated with Progression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Xianyue; Wen, Xin; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yaqin; Liu, Na; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic strategy for advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is still challenging. It is an urgent need to uncover novel treatment targets for NPC. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying NPC tumorigenesis and progression is essential for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we showed that TP53-regulated inhibitor of apoptosis (TRIAP1) was aberrantly overexpressed and associated with poor survival in NPC patients. TRIAP1 overexpression promoted NPC cell proliferation and suppressed cell death in vitro and in vivo, whereas TRIAP1 knockdown inhibited cell tumorigenesis and enhanced apoptosis through the induction of mitochondrial fragmentation, membrane potential alteration and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol. Intersecting with our previous miRNA data and available bioinformatic algorithms, miR-320b was identified and validated as a negative regulator of TRIAP1. Further studies showed that overexpression of miR-320b suppressed NPC cell proliferation and enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, while silencing of miR-320b promoted tumor growth and suppressed apoptosis. Additionally, TRIAP1 restoration abrogated the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induced by miR-320b. Moreover, the loss of miR-320b expression was inversely correlated with TRIAP1 overexpression in NPC patients. This newly identified miR-320b/TRIAP1 pathway provides insights into the mechanisms leading to NPC tumorigenesis and unfavorable clinical outcomes, which may represent prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for NPC treatment. PMID:27428374

  20. Transgenic tobacco simultaneously overexpressing glyphosate N-acetyltransferase and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase are more resistant to glyphosate than those containing one gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunjun; Cao, Gaoyi; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Shengxue; Ren, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Guoying

    2015-08-01

    5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and glyphosate N-acetyltransferase (GAT) can detoxify glyphosate by alleviating the suppression of shikimate pathway. In this study, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing AM79 aroA, GAT, and both of them, respectively, to evaluate whether overexpression of both genes could confer transgenic plants with higher glyphosate resistance. The transgenic plants harboring GAT or AM79 aroA, respectively, showed good glyphosate resistance. As expected, the hybrid plants containing both GAT and AM79 aroA exhibited improved glyphosate resistance than the transgenic plants overexpressing only a single gene. When grown on media with high concentration of glyphosate, seedlings containing a single gene were severely inhibited, whereas plants expressing both genes were affected less. When transgenic plants grown in the greenhouse were sprayed with glyphosate, less damage was observed for the plants containing both genes. Metabolomics analysis showed that transgenic plants containing two genes could maintain the metabolism balance better than those containing one gene after glyphosate treatment. Glyphosate treatment did not lead to a huge increase of shikimate contents of tobacco leaves in transgenic plants overexpressing two genes, whereas significant increase of shikimate contents in transgenic plants containing only a single gene was observed. These results demonstrated that pyramiding both aroA and GAT in transgenic plants can enhance glyphosate resistance, and this strategy can be used for the development of transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops.

  1. COPS5 amplification and overexpression confers tamoxifen-resistance in ERα-positive breast cancer by degradation of NCoR

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Renquan; Hu, Xiaobo; Zhou, Junmei; Sun, Jiajun; Zhu, Alan Z.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Hui; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan; Zhu, Ping; Guo, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Oestrogen receptor α (ERα) antagonists are used in endocrine therapies for ERα-positive (ERα+) breast cancer patients. Unfortunately the clinical benefit is limited due to intrinsic and acquired drug resistance. Here using integrated genomic and functional studies, we report that amplification and/or overexpression of COPS5 (CSN5/JAB1) confers resistance to tamoxifen. Amplification and overexpression of COPS5, a catalytic subunit of the COP9 complex, is present in about 9% of the ERα+ primary breast cancer and more frequently (86.7%, 26/30) in tamoxifen-refractory tumours. Overexpression of COPS5, through its isopeptidase activity, leads to ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of NCoR, a key corepressor for ERα and tamoxifen-mediated suppression of ERα target genes. Importantly, COPS5 overexpression causes tamoxifen-resistance in preclinical breast cancer models in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that genetic inhibition of the isopeptidase activity of COPS5 is sufficient to re-sensitize the resistant breast cancer cells to tamoxifen-treatment, offering a potential therapeutic approach for endocrine-resistant breast cancer patients. PMID:27375289

  2. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... of the lenses in your eyes. They affect vision and are very common in older people. More ...

  3. Human lead absorption -- Texas.

    PubMed

    1997-09-19

    In December 1971, the City-County Health Department in El Paso, Texas, discovered that an ore smelter in El Paso was discharging large quantities of lead and other metallic wastes into the air. Between 1969 and 1971, this smelter had released 1,116 tons of lead, 560 tons of zinc, 12 tons of cadmium, and 1.2 tons of arsenic into the atmosphere through its stacks.

  4. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  5. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  6. Enhanced vascularization of cultured skin substitutes genetically modified to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Supp, D M; Supp, A P; Bell, S M; Boyce, S T

    2000-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes have been used as adjunctive therapies in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds, but they are limited by lack of a vascular plexus. This deficiency leads to greater time for vascularization compared with native skin autografts and contributes to graft failure. Genetic modification of cultured skin substitutes to enhance vascularization could hypothetically lead to improved wound healing. To address this hypothesis, human keratinocytes were genetically modified by transduction with a replication incompetent retrovirus to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor, a specific and potent mitogen for endothelial cells. Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates inoculated with human fibroblasts and either vascular endothelial growth factor-modified or control keratinocytes were prepared, and were cultured in vitro for 21 d. Northern blot analysis demonstrated enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in genetically modified keratinocytes and in cultured skin substitutes prepared with modified cells. Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor-modified cultured skin substitutes secreted greatly elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor protein throughout the entire culture period. The bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor protein secreted by the genetically modified cultured skin substitutes was demonstrated using a microvascular endothelial cell growth assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified and control cultured skin substitutes were grafted to full-thickness wounds on athymic mice, and elevated vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression was detected in the modified grafts for at least 2 wk after surgery. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified grafts exhibited increased numbers of dermal blood vessels and decreased time to vascularization compared with controls. These results indicate that genetic modification of

  7. Environmental lead in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, L.A.; Badillo, F. )

    1991-01-01

    From the data presented here, it can be concluded that environmental exposure to lead is a particularly severe problem in Mexico. As has been shown, there are very important sources of exposure to this metal: (a) for rural populations who manufacture and/or utilize lead-glazed pottery, (b) for urban populations who are exposed to high air lead concentrations due to the continued use of lead fuel additives, (c) for workers of several industries, mainly those of batteries and pigments, (d) for consumers who routinely eat canned foods such as hot peppers and fruit products, and (e) for the general population living in the vicinity of smelters, refineries and other industries that emit lead. Therefore, in Mexico only those native populations living in very primitive communities, far away from all civilized life, could be expected to be free from this exposure. At the same time, and despite the relatively few data available, it can be stated that the exposure to lead of populations in Mexico could be approaching levels that might be highly hazardous, in particular for the neuropsychological health of children. Regarding the presence of lead in the environment, despite the fact that the available studies are not enough, it is evident that pollution by this metal is widespread and that there is a serious lack of studies for most regions of the country, including several that might be expected to be highly polluted. At the same time, it is evident that the official attention paid to the problem, either in regulations, support of further studies, or implementation of effective control measures has been far from the level needed according to the available data.

  8. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Martine; Pratt, Thomas; Liu, Min; Jeffery, Glen; Price, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey) and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+) showed that (1) the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2) the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and contralateral optic tracts at the

  9. The PSE1 gene modulates lead tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Yang, Libo; Wu, Xi; Ni, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Haikun; Zhang, Qi’an; Fang, Ling; Sheng, Yibao; Ren, Yongbing; Cao, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a dangerous heavy metal contaminant with high toxicity to plants. However, the regulatory mechanism of plant Pb tolerance is poorly understood. Here, we showed that the PSE1 gene confers Pb tolerance in Arabidopsis. A novel Pb-sensitive mutant pse1-1 (Pb-sensitive1) was isolated by screening T-DNA insertion mutants. PSE1 encodes an unknown protein with an NC domain and was localized in the cytoplasm. PSE1 was induced by Pb stress, and the pse1-1 loss-of-function mutant showed enhanced Pb sensitivity; overexpression of PSE1 resulted in increased Pb tolerance. PSE1-overexpressing plants showed increased Pb accumulation, which was accompanied by the activation of phytochelatin (PC) synthesis and related gene expression. In contrast, the pse1-1 mutant showed reduced Pb accumulation, which was associated with decreased PC synthesis and related gene expression. In addition, the expression of PDR12 was also increased in PSE1-overexpressing plants subjected to Pb stress. Our results suggest that PSE1 regulates Pb tolerance mainly through glutathione-dependent PC synthesis by activating the expression of the genes involved in PC synthesis and at least partially through activating the expression of the ABC transporter PDR12/ABCG40. PMID:27335453

  10. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  11. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  12. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  13. Galectin-3 impairment of MYCN-dependent apoptosis-sensitive phenotype is antagonized by nutlin-3 in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Veschi, Veronica; Petroni, Marialaura; Cardinali, Beatrice; Dominici, Carlo; Screpanti, Isabella; Frati, Luigi; Bartolazzi, Armando; Gulino, Alberto; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    MYCN amplification occurs in about 20-25% of human neuroblastomas and characterizes the majority of the high-risk cases, which display less than 50% prolonged survival rate despite intense multimodal treatment. Somehow paradoxically, MYCN also sensitizes neuroblastoma cells to apoptosis, understanding the molecular mechanisms of which might be relevant for the therapy of MYCN amplified neuroblastoma. We recently reported that the apoptosis-sensitive phenotype induced by MYCN is linked to stabilization of p53 and its proapoptotic kinase HIPK2. In MYCN primed neuroblastoma cells, further activation of both HIPK2 and p53 by Nutlin-3 leads to massive apoptosis in vitro and to tumor shrinkage and impairment of metastasis in xenograft models. Here we report that Galectin-3 impairs MYCN-primed and HIPK2-p53-dependent apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells. Galectin-3 is broadly expressed in human neuroblastoma cell lines and tumors and is repressed by MYCN to induce the apoptosis-sensitive phenotype. Despite its reduced levels, Galectin-3 can still exert residual antiapoptotic effects in MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cells, possibly due to its specific subcellular localization. Importantly, Nutlin-3 represses Galectin-3 expression, and this is required for its potent cell killing effect on MYCN amplified cell lines. Our data further characterize the apoptosis-sensitive phenotype induced by MYCN, expand our understanding of the activity of MDM2-p53 antagonists and highlight Galectin-3 as a potential biomarker for the tailored p53 reactivation therapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastomas.

  14. Overexpression of a tea flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene confers tolerance to salt stress and Alternaria solani in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Monika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Flavan-3-ols are the major flavonoids present in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves. These are known to have antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties in vitro. Flavanone 3-hydroxylase is considered to be an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway leading to accumulation of flavan-3-ols in tea. Expression analysis revealed the upregulation in transcript levels of C. sinensis flavanone 3-hydroxylase (CsF3H) encoding gene under salt stress. In this study, the biotechnological potential of CsF3H was evaluated by gene overexpression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). Overexpression of CsF3H cDNA increased the content of flavan-3-ols in tobacco and conferred tolerance to salt stress and fungus Alternaria solani infection. Transgenic tobaccos were observed for increase in primary root length, number of lateral roots, chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme expression and their activities. Also, they showed lesser malondialdehyde content and electrolyte leakage compared to control tobacco plants. Further, transgenic plants produced higher degree of pectin methyl esterification via decreasing pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity in roots and leaves under unstressed and salt stressed conditions. The effect of flavan-3-ols on pectin methyl esterification under salt stressed conditions was further validated through in vitro experiments in which non-transgenic (wild) tobacco seedlings were exposed to salt stress in presence of flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and epigallocatechin. The in vitro exposed seedlings showed similar trend of increase in pectin methyl esterification through decreasing PME activity as observed in CsF3H transgenic lines. Taken together, overexpression of CsF3H provided tolerance to salt stress and fungus A. solani infection to transgenic tobacco through improved antioxidant system and enhanced pectin methyl esterification. PMID:24880475

  15. Field Evaluation of Transgenic Switchgrass Plants Overexpressing PvMYB4 for Reduced Biomass Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Holly L.; Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Yee, Kelsey L.; Mazarei, Mitra; Rodriguez, Miguel; Thompson, Olivia A.; Shen, Hui; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Sykes, Robert W.; Chen, Fang; Davis, Mark F.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Davison, Brian H.; Dixon, Richard A.; Stewart, C. Neal

    2015-01-07

    High biomass yields and minimal agronomic input requirements have made switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L., a leading candidate lignocellulosic bioenergy crop. Large-scale lignocellulosic biofuel production from such crops is limited by the difficulty to deconstruct cell walls into fermentable sugars: the recalcitrance problem. In this study, we assessed the field performance of switchgrass plants overexpressing the switchgrass MYB4 (PvMYB4) transcription factor gene. PvMYB4 transgenic switchgrass can have great lignin reduction, which commensurately increases sugar release and biofuel production. Our results over two growing seasons showed that one transgenic event (out of eight) had important gains in both biofuel (32% more) and biomass (63% more) at the end of the second growing season relative to non-transgenic controls. These gains represent a doubling of biofuel production per hectare, which is the highest gain reported from any field-grown modified feedstock. In contrast to this transgenic event, which had relatively low ectopic overexpression of the transgene, five of the eight transgenic events planted did not survive the first field winter. The dead plants were all high-overexpressing events that performed well in the earlier greenhouse studies. Disease susceptibility was not compromised in any transgenic events over the field experiments. These results demonstrate the power of modifying the expression of an endogenous transcription factor to improve biofuel and biomass simultaneously, and also highlight the importance of field studies for "sorting" transgenic events. In conclusion, further research is needed to develop strategies for fine-tuning temporal-spatial transgene expression in feedstocks to optimize desired phenotypes.

  16. Overexpression of a tea flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene confers tolerance to salt stress and Alternaria solani in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Monika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Flavan-3-ols are the major flavonoids present in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves. These are known to have antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties in vitro. Flavanone 3-hydroxylase is considered to be an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway leading to accumulation of flavan-3-ols in tea. Expression analysis revealed the upregulation in transcript levels of C. sinensis flavanone 3-hydroxylase (CsF3H) encoding gene under salt stress. In this study, the biotechnological potential of CsF3H was evaluated by gene overexpression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). Overexpression of CsF3H cDNA increased the content of flavan-3-ols in tobacco and conferred tolerance to salt stress and fungus Alternaria solani infection. Transgenic tobaccos were observed for increase in primary root length, number of lateral roots, chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme expression and their activities. Also, they showed lesser malondialdehyde content and electrolyte leakage compared to control tobacco plants. Further, transgenic plants produced higher degree of pectin methyl esterification via decreasing pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity in roots and leaves under unstressed and salt stressed conditions. The effect of flavan-3-ols on pectin methyl esterification under salt stressed conditions was further validated through in vitro experiments in which non-transgenic (wild) tobacco seedlings were exposed to salt stress in presence of flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and epigallocatechin. The in vitro exposed seedlings showed similar trend of increase in pectin methyl esterification through decreasing PME activity as observed in CsF3H transgenic lines. Taken together, overexpression of CsF3H provided tolerance to salt stress and fungus A. solani infection to transgenic tobacco through improved antioxidant system and enhanced pectin methyl esterification.

  17. Transient Hepatic Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Induces Free Cholesterol and Lipid Droplet Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sonja M.; Laggai, Stephan; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Ogris, Manfred; Libert, Claude; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Although insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) has been reported to be overexpressed in steatosis and steatohepatitis, a causal role of IGF2 in steatosis development remains elusive. Aim of our study was to decipher the role of IGF2 in steatosis development. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of an Igf2 plasmid used for transient Igf2 overexpression employing codon-optimized plasmid DNA resulted in a strong induction of hepatic Igf2 expression. The exogenously delivered Igf2 had no influence on endogenous Igf2 expression. The downstream kinase AKT was activated in Igf2 animals. Decreased ALT levels mirrored the cytoprotective effect of IGF2. Serum cholesterol was increased and sulfo-phospho-vanillin colorimetric assay confirmed lipid accumulation in Igf2-livers while no signs of inflammation were observed. Interestingly, hepatic cholesterol and phospholipids, determined by thin layer chromatography, and free cholesterol by filipin staining, were specifically increased. Lipid droplet (LD) size was not changed, but their number was significantly elevated. Furthermore, free cholesterol, which can be stored in LDs and has been reported to be critical for steatosis progression, was elevated in Igf2 overexpressing mice. Accordingly, Hmgcr/HmgCoAR was upregulated. To have a closer look at de novo lipid synthesis we investigated expression of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBF1 and its target genes. SREBF1 was induced and also SREBF1 target genes were slightly upregulated. Interestingly, the expression of Cpt1a, which is responsible for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, was induced. Hepatic IGF2 expression induces a fatty liver, characterized by increased cholesterol and phospholipids leading to accumulation of LDs. We therefore suggest a causal role for IGF2 in hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27199763

  18. Transient Hepatic Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Induces Free Cholesterol and Lipid Droplet Formation.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Sonja M; Laggai, Stephan; Van Wonterg, Elien; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Ogris, Manfred; Libert, Claude; Kiemer, Alexandra K

    2016-01-01

    Although insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) has been reported to be overexpressed in steatosis and steatohepatitis, a causal role of IGF2 in steatosis development remains elusive. Aim of our study was to decipher the role of IGF2 in steatosis development. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of an Igf2 plasmid used for transient Igf2 overexpression employing codon-optimized plasmid DNA resulted in a strong induction of hepatic Igf2 expression. The exogenously delivered Igf2 had no influence on endogenous Igf2 expression. The downstream kinase AKT was activated in Igf2 animals. Decreased ALT levels mirrored the cytoprotective effect of IGF2. Serum cholesterol was increased and sulfo-phospho-vanillin colorimetric assay confirmed lipid accumulation in Igf2-livers while no signs of inflammation were observed. Interestingly, hepatic cholesterol and phospholipids, determined by thin layer chromatography, and free cholesterol by filipin staining, were specifically increased. Lipid droplet (LD) size was not changed, but their number was significantly elevated. Furthermore, free cholesterol, which can be stored in LDs and has been reported to be critical for steatosis progression, was elevated in Igf2 overexpressing mice. Accordingly, Hmgcr/HmgCoAR was upregulated. To have a closer look at de novo lipid synthesis we investigated expression of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBF1 and its target genes. SREBF1 was induced and also SREBF1 target genes were slightly upregulated. Interestingly, the expression of Cpt1a, which is responsible for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, was induced. Hepatic IGF2 expression induces a fatty liver, characterized by increased cholesterol and phospholipids leading to accumulation of LDs. We therefore suggest a causal role for IGF2 in hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27199763

  19. Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 2 induces a supernormal cardiac function by enhancing redox-dependent mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Luther, Daniel J; Meszaros, J Gary; Chilian, William M; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2015-11-01

    During heightened cardiac work, O2 consumption by the heart benefits energy production via mitochondria. However, some electrons leak from the respiratory chain and yield superoxide, which is rapidly metabolized into H2O2 by SOD2. To understand the systemic effects of the metabolic dilator, H2O2, we studied mice with cardiac-specific SOD2 overexpression (SOD2-tg), which increases the H2O2 produced by cardiac mitochondria. Contrast echocardiography was employed to evaluate cardiac function, indicating that SOD2-tg had a significantly greater ejection fraction and a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) that was partially normalized by intravenous injection of catalase. Norepinephrine-mediated myocardial blood flow (MBF) was significantly enhanced in SOD2-tg mice. Coupling of MBF to the double product (Heart Rate×MAP) was increased in SOD2-tg mice, indicating that the metabolic dilator, "spilled" over, inducing systemic vasodilation. The hypothesis that SOD2 overexpression effectively enhances mitochondrial function was further evaluated. Mitochondria of SOD2-tg mice had a decreased state 3 oxygen consumption rate, but maintained the same ATP production flux under the basal and L-NAME treatment conditions, indicating a higher bioenergetic efficiency. SOD2-tg mitochondria produced less superoxide, and had lower redox activity in converting cyclic hydroxylamine to stable nitroxide, and a lower GSSG concentration. EPR analysis of the isolated mitochondria showed a significant decrease in semiquinones at the SOD2-tg Qi site. These results support a more reductive physiological setting in the SOD2-tg murine heart. Cardiac mitochondria exhibited no significant differences in the respiratory control index between WT and SOD2-tg. We conclude that SOD2 overexpression in myocytes enhances mitochondrial function and metabolic vasodilation, leading to a phenotype of supernormal cardiac function.

  20. Overexpression of mineralocorticoid receptors does not affect memory and anxiety-like behavior in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Kuil, Laura E.; Arp, Marit; Oitzl, Melly S.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Krugers, Harm J.; Joels, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) have been implicated in behavioral adaptation and learning and memory. Since—at least in humans—MR function seems to be sex-dependent, we examined the behavioral relevance of MR in female mice exhibiting transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Transgenic MR overexpression did not affect contextual fear memory or cued fear learning and memory. Moreover, MR overexpressing and control mice discriminated equally well between fear responses in a combined cue and context fear conditioning paradigm. Also context-memory in an object recognition task was unaffected in MR overexpressing mice. We conclude that MR overexpression in female animals does not affect fear conditioned responses and object recognition memory. PMID:26236208

  1. Targeted Overexpression of TGF-α in the Corneal Epithelium of Adult Transgenic Mice Induces Changes in Anterior Segment Morphology and Activates Noncanonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Liu, Hongshan; Yamanaka, Osamu; Hardie, William D.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Liu, Chia-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) transduces its signal through the epidermal growth factor receptor and is essential for corneal epithelial homeostasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that overexpression of TGF-α in the developing eye leads to anterior segment dysgenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we examined the effects of TGF-α overexpression on adult ocular surface homeostasis. Methods. Binary Tet-On transgenic Krt12rtTA/tet-O-TGF-α mice were subjected to doxycycline (Dox) induction to overexpress TGF-α in the corneal epithelium. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured by noninvasive tonometry. The enucleated eyes of the experimental mice were subjected to histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and biochemistry examination. Results. Histologic and immunofluorescent examination showed that double-transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-α manifested peripheral anterior synechiae. Elevation of IOP, activation of glial cells, and loss of retinal ganglion cells were also observed. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the expressions of genes (RXRα, PITX2, and FOXC1) related to anterior segment dysgenesis were downregulated. Canonical Wnt signaling was suppressed, whereas noncanonical Wnt ligands (Wnt4 and Wnt5a) were upregulated. Increased myosin light chain phosphorylation suggested that noncanonical Wnt signaling is activated in affected eyes. Conclusions. Overexpression of TGF-α in the corneal epithelium induces changes in anterior segment morphology. Corneal endothelial abnormalities are associated with the activation of the noncanonical Wnt and RhoA/ROCK signaling axis, indicating a potential application of RhoA/ROCK inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy for certain types of secondary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:23412089

  2. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. PMID:26297039

  3. Overexpression of mouse TTF-2 gene causes cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Tian; Shi, Jia-Yu; Wu, Min; Wang, Yan; Li, Ling; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Qian; Huang, Lei; Shi, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In humans, mutations of the gene encoding for thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2 or FOXE1) result in Bamforth syndrome. Bamforth syndrome is characterized by agenesis, cleft palate, spiky hair and choanal atresia. TTF-2 null mice (TTF-2−/−) also exhibit cleft palate, suggesting its involvement in the palatogenesis. However, the molecular pathology and genetic regulation by TTF2 remain largely unknown. In the present study, the recombinant expression vector pBROAD3-TTF-2 containing the promoter of the mouse ROSA26 gene was created to form the structural gene of mouse TTF-2 and was microinjected into the male pronuclei of fertilized ova. Sequence analysis confirmed that the TTF-2 transgenic mouse model was established successfully. The transgenic mice displayed a phenotype of cleft palate. In addition, we found that TTF-2 was highly expressed in the medial edge epithelium (MEE) from the embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) to E14.5 in TTF-2 transgenic mice. These observations suggest that overexpression of TTF-2 during palatogenesis may contribute to formation of cleft palate. PMID:22304410

  4. Overexpression and topology of bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase PglB

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lei; Woodward, Robert; Ding, Yan; Liu, Xian-wei; Yi, Wen; Bhatt, Veer S.; Chen, Min; Zhang, Lian-wen; Wang, Peng George

    2010-04-16

    Campylobacter jejuni contains a post-translational N-glycosylation system in which a STT3 homologue, PglB, functions as the oligosaccharyltransferase. Herein, we established a method for obtaining relatively large quantities of homogenous PglB proteins. PglB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli C43(DE3) at a level of 1 mg/L cell cultures. The activity of purified PglB was verified using a chemically synthesized sugar donor: N-acetylgalactosamine-diphospho-undecaprenyl (GalNAc-PP-Und) and a synthesized peptide acceptor. The result confirms that PglB is solely responsible for the oligosaccharyltransferase activity and complements the finding that PglB exhibits relaxed sugar substrate specificity. In addition, we performed the topology mapping of PglB using the PhoA/LacZ fusion method. The topological model shows that PglB possesses 11 transmembrane segments and two relatively large periplasmic regions other than the C-terminal domain, which is consistent with the proposal of the common N{sub cyt}-C{sub peri} topology with 11 transmembrane segments for the STT3 family proteins.

  5. Dysferlin overexpression in skeletal muscle produces a progressive myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Louise E.; Newton, Kimberly; Krishnan, Gomathi; Bronson, Roderick; Boyle, Alexandra; Krivickas, Lisa S.; Brown, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The dose-response effects of dysferlin transgenesis were analyzed to determine if the dysferlin-deficient myopathies are good candidates for gene replacement therapy. Methods We have generated three lines of transgenic mice, expressing low, mid and high levels of full-length human dysferlin from a muscle-specific promoter. Transgenic skeletal muscle was analyzed and scored for morphological and functional deficits. Results Overexpression of dysferlin in mice resulted in a striking phenotype of kyphosis, irregular gait and reduced muscle mass and strength. Moreover, protein dosage correlated with phenotype severity. In contrast to dysferlin-null skeletal muscle, no evidence of sarcolemmal impairment was revealed. Rather, increased levels of Ca2+-regulated, dysferlin-binding proteins and ER stress chaperone proteins were observed in muscle lysates from transgenic mice as compared to controls. Interpretation Expression levels of dysferlin are important for appropriate function without deleterious or cytotoxic effects. As a corollary, we propose that future endeavors in gene replacement for correction of dysferlinopathy should be tailored to take account of this. PMID:20373350

  6. MMSET is overexpressed in cancers: Link with tumor aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Klein, Bernard Moreaux, Jerome

    2009-02-20

    MMSET is expressed ubiquitously in early development and its deletion is associated with the malformation syndrome called Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It is involved in the t(4; 14) (p16; q32) chromosomal translocation, which is the second most common translocation in multiple myeloma (MM) and is associated with the worst prognosis. MMSET expression has been shown to promote cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth and tumorigenicity in multiple myeloma. MMSET expression has been recently shown to increase with ascending tumor proliferation activity in glioblastoma multiforme. These data demonstrate that MMSET could be implicated in tumor emergence and/or progression. Therefore, we compared the expression of MMSET in 40 human tumor types - brain, epithelial, lymphoid - to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. We found significant overexpression of MMSET in 15 cancers compared to their normal counterparts. Furthermore MMSET is associated with tumor aggressiveness or prognosis in many types of these aforementioned cancers. Taken together, these data suggest that MMSET potentially acts as a pathogenic agent in many cancers. The identification of the targets of MMSET and their role in cell growth and survival will be key to understand how MMSET is associated with tumor development.

  7. Overexpression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Andréll, Juni

    2013-01-01

    The number of structures of integral membrane proteins from higher eukaryotes is steadily increasing due to a number of innovative protein engineering and crystallization strategies devised over the last few years. However, it is sobering to reflect that these structures represent only a tiny proportion of the total number of membrane proteins encoded by a mammalian genome. In addition, the structures determined to date are of the most tractable membrane proteins, i.e., those that are expressed functionally and to high levels in yeast or in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. However, some membrane proteins that are expressed inefficiently in these systems can be produced at sufficiently high levels in mammalian cells to allow structure determination. Mammalian expression systems are an under-used resource in structural biology and represent an effective way to produce fully functional membrane proteins for structural studies. This review will discuss examples of vertebrate membrane protein overexpression in mammalian cells using a variety of viral, constitutive or inducible expression systems. PMID:22963530

  8. Changes in gene expression associated with FTO overexpression in mice.

    PubMed

    Merkestein, Myrte; McTaggart, James S; Lee, Sheena; Kramer, Holger B; McMurray, Fiona; Lafond, Mathilde; Boutens, Lily; Cox, Roger; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the first intron of the fat-mass-and-obesity-related gene FTO are associated with increased body weight and adiposity. Increased expression of FTO is likely underlying this obesity phenotype, as mice with two additional copies of Fto (FTO-4 mice) exhibit increased adiposity and are hyperphagic. FTO is a demethylase of single stranded DNA and RNA, and one of its targets is the m6A modification in RNA, which might play a role in the regulation of gene expression. In this study, we aimed to examine the changes in gene expression that occur in FTO-4 mice in order to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms by which FTO influences body weight and adiposity. Our results indicate an upregulation of anabolic pathways and a downregulation of catabolic pathways in FTO-4 mice. Interestingly, although genes involved in methylation were differentially regulated in skeletal muscle of FTO-4 mice, no effect of FTO overexpression on m6A methylation of total mRNA was detected. PMID:24842286

  9. Reduced antimony accumulation in ARM58-overexpressing Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Carola; Tejera Nevado, Paloma; Zander, Dorothea; Clos, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Antimony-based drugs are still the mainstay of chemotherapy against Leishmania infections in many countries where the parasites are endemic. The efficacy of antimonials has been compromised by increasing numbers of resistant infections, the basis of which is not fully understood and likely involves multiple factors. By using a functional cloning strategy, we recently identified a novel antimony resistance marker, ARM58, from the parasite Leishmania braziliensis that protects the parasites against antimony-based antileishmanial compounds. Here we show that the Leishmania infantum homologue also confers resistance against antimony but not against other antileishmanial drugs and that its function depends critically on one of four conserved domains of unknown function. This critical domain requires at least two hydrophobic amino acids and is predicted to form a transmembrane structure. Overexpression of ARM58 in antimony-exposed parasites reduces the intracellular Sb accumulation by over 70%, indicating a role for ARM58 in Sb extrusion pathways, but without involvement of energy-dependent transporter proteins.

  10. Over-Expression of Meteorin Drives Gliogenesis Following Striatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jordan L.; Ermine, Charlotte M.; Jørgensen, Jesper R.; Parish, Clare L.; Thompson, Lachlan H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that damage to brain structures adjacent to neurogenic regions can result in migration of new neurons from neurogenic zones into the damaged tissue. The number of differentiated neurons that survive is low, however, and this has led to the idea that the introduction of extrinsic signaling factors, particularly neurotrophic proteins, may augment the neurogenic response to a level that would be therapeutically relevant. Here we report on the impact of the relatively newly described neurotrophic factor, Meteorin, when over-expressed in the striatum following excitotoxic injury. Birth-dating studies using bromo-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) showed that Meteorin did not enhance injury-induced striatal neurogenesis but significantly increased the proportion of new cells with astroglial and oligodendroglial features. As a basis for comparison we found under the same conditions, glial derived neurotrophic factor significantly enhanced neurogenesis but did not effect gliogenesis. The results highlight the specificity of action of different neurotrophic factors in modulating the proliferative response to injury. Meteorin may be an interesting candidate in pathological settings involving damage to white matter, for example after stroke or neonatal brain injury. PMID:27458346

  11. Effects on capacitance by overexpression of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, D. Zhou, A.; Kiesel, M.; Feldbauer, K.; Terpitz, U.; Haase, W.; Schneider-Hohendorf, T.; Bamberg, E.; Sukhorukov, V.L.

    2008-05-16

    Functional Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) overexpression of about 10{sup 4} channels/{mu}m{sup 2} in the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells was studied by patch-clamp and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Simultaneous electrorotation measurements revealed that ChR2 expression was accompanied by a marked increase of the area-specific membrane capacitance (C{sub m}). The C{sub m} increase apparently resulted partly from an enlargement of the size and/or number of microvilli. This is suggested by a relatively large C{sub m} of 1.15 {+-} 0.08 {mu}F/cm{sup 2} in ChR2-expressing cells measured under isotonic conditions. This value was much higher than that of the control HEK293 cells (0.79 {+-} 0.02 {mu}F/cm{sup 2}). However, even after complete loss of microvilli under strong hypoosmolar conditions (100 mOsm), the ChR2-expressing cells still exhibited a significantly larger C{sub m} (0.85 {+-} 0.07 {mu}F/cm{sup 2}) as compared to non-expressing control cells (0.70 {+-} 0.03 {mu}F/cm{sup 2}). Therefore, a second mechanism of capacitance increase may involve changes in the membrane permittivity and/or thickness due to the embedded ChR2 proteins.

  12. Caveolin-1 overexpression in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Nazhvani, Ali Dehghani; Azizi, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Caveolin-1, a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, is supposed to have different regulatory roles as promoter or suppressor in many human cancers. However, no published study concerned its expression in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of Cav-1 in the most common benign and malignant salivary gland tumors and evaluate its correlation with proliferation activity. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, immunohistochemical expression of caveolin-1 and Ki67 were evaluated in 49 samples, including 11 normal salivary glands, 15 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PA), 13 adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCC), and 10 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC). The expression of Cav-1 was seen in 18 % of normal salivary glands and 85 % of tumors. The immunoreaction in the tumors was significantly higher than normal tissues (P = 0.001), but the difference between benign and malignant tumors was not significant (P = 0.07). Expression of Cav-1 was correlated with Ki67 labeling index in PAs, but not in malignant tumors. Cav-1 expression was not in association with tumor size and stage. Overexpression of Cav-1 was found in salivary gland tumors in comparison with normal tissues, but no significant difference was observed between benign and malignant tumors. Cav-1 was inversely correlated with proliferation in PA. Therefore, this marker may participate in tumorigenesis of salivary gland tumors and may be a potential biomarker for cancer treatments.

  13. [Overexpression of Aspergillus candidus lactase and analysis of enzymatic properties].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Fan, Yun-liu; Yao, Bin

    2005-04-01

    The lactase gene lacb' from Aspergillus candidus was fused behind alpha-factor signal sequence in the Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC9, then integrated into the genome of P. pastoris by recombination events. The P. pastoris recombinants for lactase overexpression were screened by enzyme activity analysis and SDS-PAGE. The lactase expressed in P. pastoris was glycosylated protein with an apparent molecular weight of 130 kD, while the deglycosylated lactase treated with Endo H had an apparent molecular weight of about 110 kD. The expression level of secreted lactase protein in recombinant P. pastoris was 6 mg/mL with enzymatic activity of 3600 U/mL in the 5 L fermenter, which was the highest among that of all kinds of recombinant strains reported now. The optimal pH and optimal temperature of the lactase are 5.2 and 60 degrees C. The Vmax, Km, and specific activity of the lactase are 3.3 micromol/min, 1.7 mmol/L and 706.5 +/- 2.6 U/mg, respectively. Compare to the lactase from Aspergillus oryzae ATCC 20423, the expressed lactase from A. candidus have better enzymatic properties including the high thermostability, high specific activity and wide pH range for enzyme reaction.

  14. Nectin 4 Overexpression in Ovarian Cancer Tissues and Serum

    PubMed Central

    DeRycke, Melissa S.; Pambuccian, Stefan E.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Ghidouche, Abderrezak; Lopez, Marc; Bliss, Robin L.; Geller, Melissa A.; Argenta, Peter A.; Harrington, Katherine M.; Skubitz, Amy P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer is difficult owing to the lack of specific and sensitive tests available. Previously, we found expression of nectin 4 to be increased in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovaries. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR validated the overexpression of nectin 4 messenger RNA in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovarian cell lines and tissues. Protein levels of nectin 4 were elevated in ovarian cancer cell lines and tissue compared with normal ovarian cell lines as demonstrated by Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarray slides. Cleaved nectin 4 was detectable in a number of patient serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In patients with benign gynecologic diseases with high serum CA125 levels, nectin 4 was not detected in the majority of cases, suggesting that nectin 4 may serve as a potential biomarker that helps discriminate benign gynecologic diseases from ovarian cancer in a panel with CA125. PMID:20959669

  15. Changes in Gene Expression Associated with FTO Overexpression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Holger B.; McMurray, Fiona; Lafond, Mathilde; Boutens, Lily; Cox, Roger; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the first intron of the fat-mass-and-obesity-related gene FTO are associated with increased body weight and adiposity. Increased expression of FTO is likely underlying this obesity phenotype, as mice with two additional copies of Fto (FTO-4 mice) exhibit increased adiposity and are hyperphagic. FTO is a demethylase of single stranded DNA and RNA, and one of its targets is the m6A modification in RNA, which might play a role in the regulation of gene expression. In this study, we aimed to examine the changes in gene expression that occur in FTO-4 mice in order to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms by which FTO influences body weight and adiposity. Our results indicate an upregulation of anabolic pathways and a downregulation of catabolic pathways in FTO-4 mice. Interestingly, although genes involved in methylation were differentially regulated in skeletal muscle of FTO-4 mice, no effect of FTO overexpression on m6A methylation of total mRNA was detected. PMID:24842286

  16. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  17. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  18. Girls Leading Outward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Heather; Reyes, Jazmin; Moceri, Dominic C.; Morana, Laura; Elias, Maurice J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a program implemented in Red Bank Middle School in New Jersey to help at-risk, minority middle school girls realize their leadership potential. The GLO (Girls Leading Outward) program was developed by the Developing Safe and Civil Schools Project at Rutgers University and is facilitated by university students. Selected middle…

  19. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    Designed as a public information pamphlet, the text discusses the problem of lead poisoning in children. The preventable nature of the problem is stressed as well as needed action on the part of the public, physicians and other health workers, and the legislators. The pamphlet emphasizes that each of these areas is essential in preventing death or…

  20. Change, Lead, Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Linda; von Frank, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Redefine leadership in your school, and create capacity through school leadership teams that successfully coordinate professional learning. "Change, Lead, Succeed" shows school leaders and teachers in leadership roles what they need to know to effectively create a culture for change. Find out what distinguishes a school leadership team from other…

  1. Leading through Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerzon, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about leading significant learning opportunities through conflict of ideas in a school system. Catalyzing school change can turn emotional differences of opinion into learning opportunities. Leaders who want to deal effectively with these challenging, often tense situations need to be more than good managers. They need to be…

  2. Leading for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

    2010-01-01

    As the dropout problem has grown--and as increasing numbers of students have started to see dropping out as a viable option for expressing their disaffection with school--practitioners, policymakers, and researchers have looked more closely at the factors that lead students to disengage from school and have attempted to find ways to create…

  3. Lead Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-02-16

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in{sup 3}, an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  4. ALL AGES LEAD MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model for Lead in Children (version 0.99d) was released in March 1994, and has been widely accepted in the risk assessment community as a tool for implementing the site specific risk assessment process when the issue is childhood...

  5. Leading by Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2013-01-01

    A lot has changed in the principalship since the principal was the head teacher in a school. Current principals are building administrators and that is likely to continue, the authors posit. Nonetheless, they report their study focusing on leadership's role in formative assessment concluded that in order to lead learning the principal must…

  6. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Plasmodesmata Germin-Like Proteins Disrupts Root Growth and Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Kang, Byung-Ho; Zeng, Fanchang; Lucas, William J.

    2012-01-01

    In plants, a population of non-cell-autonomous proteins (NCAPs), including numerous transcription factors, move cell to cell through plasmodesmata (PD). In many cases, the intercellular trafficking of these NCAPs is regulated by their interaction with specific PD components. To gain further insight into the functions of this NCAP pathway, coimmunoprecipitation experiments were performed on a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plasmodesmal-enriched cell wall protein preparation using as bait the NCAP, pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) PHLOEM PROTEIN16 (Cm-PP16). A Cm-PP16 interaction partner, Nt-PLASMODESMAL GERMIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (Nt-PDGLP1) was identified and shown to be a PD-located component. Arabidopsis thaliana putative orthologs, PDGLP1 and PDGLP2, were identified; expression studies indicated that, postgermination, these proteins were preferentially expressed in the root system. The PDGLP1 signal peptide was shown to function in localization to the PD by a novel mechanism involving the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway. Overexpression of various tagged versions altered root meristem function, leading to reduced primary root but enhanced lateral root growth. This effect on root growth was corrected with an inability of these chimeric proteins to form stable PD-localized complexes. PDGLP1 and PDGLP2 appear to be involved in regulating primary root growth by controlling phloem-mediated allocation of resources between the primary and lateral root meristems. PMID:22960910

  7. Pulmonary hypertension in smoking mice over-expressing protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    De Cunto, G; Cardini, S; Cirino, G; Geppetti, P; Lungarella, G; Lucattelli, M

    2011-04-01

    The mechanism(s) involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in COPD is still the object of investigation. Cigarette smoke (CS) may lead to remodelling of intrapulmonary vessels and dynamic changes in vascular function, at least in some smokers. A role for proteases in PH has been recently put forward. We investigated, in smoking mice, the role of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in the pathogenesis of PH associated with emphysema. We demonstrated that CS exposure can modulate PAR-2 expression in mouse lung. Acute CS exposure induces in wildtype (WT) and in transgenic mice over-expressing PAR-2 (FVB(PAR-2-TgN)) a similar degree of neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. After chronic CS exposure WT and FVB(PAR-2-TgN) mice show emphysema, but only transgenic mice develop muscularisation of small intrapulmonary vessels that precedes the development of PH (~45% increase) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Smoking in FVB(PAR-2-TgN) mice results in an imbalance between vasoconstrictors (especially endothelin-1) and vasodilators (i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase) and enhanced production of growth factors involved both in fibroblast-smooth muscle cell transaction (i.e. platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β) and vascular cell proliferation (PDGF). PAR-2 signalling can influence the production and release of many factors, which may play a role in the development of PH in smokers. PMID:20693251

  8. Overexpression of RAR{beta}4 and p53 in murine lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, M.; Bradley, W.E.C.

    1994-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in western societies. There are four major histological types: small cell, epidemoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma, the adenocarcinoma being the only type generally found in the mouse. Earlier studies have shown that the transgenes coding for isoform 4 of the retinoic acid receptor {beta} and a mutant form of the tumor suppressor p53 are involved in the development of lung cancer. These results led us to ask whether the two genes may contribute to lung carcinogenesis in a synergistic manner. Mice overexpressing a RAR{beta}4-like isoform transgene (which causes very marked hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells) and mutated p53 transgene were crossed and progeny were analyzed after treatment with the lung carcinogen urethane. The results to date suggest that in the double transgenic mice, lung tumor kinetics do not result from cooperation between those transgenes since the effect of the transgenes was additive rather than synergistic. We conclude that RAR{beta}4 and p53 are involved in different tumorigenic pathways.

  9. Overexpression of beta-carotene hydroxylase enhances stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Davison, P A; Hunter, C N; Horton, P

    2002-07-11

    Plant stress caused by extreme environmental conditions is already a principal reason for yield reduction in crops. The threat of global environment change makes it increasingly important to generate crop plants that will withstand such conditions. Stress, particularly stress caused by increased sunlight, leads to the production of reactive oxygen species that cause photo-oxidative cell damage. Carotenoids, which are present in the membranes of all photosynthetic organisms, help protect against such light-dependent oxidative damage. In plants, the xanthophyll cycle (the reversible interconversion of two carotenoids, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin) has a key photoprotective role and is therefore a promising target for genetic engineering to enhance stress tolerance. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana overexpression of the chyB gene that encodes beta-carotene hydroxylase--an enzyme in the zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathway--causes a specific twofold increase in the size of the xanthophyll cycle pool. The plants are more tolerant to conditions of high light and high temperature, as shown by reduced leaf necrosis, reduced production of the stress indicator anthocyanin and reduced lipid peroxidation. Stress protection is probably due to the function of zeaxanthin in preventing oxidative damage of membranes. PMID:12110893

  10. Overexpression of Arabidopsis plasmodesmata germin-like proteins disrupts root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Kang, Byung-Ho; Zeng, Fanchang; Lucas, William J

    2012-09-01

    In plants, a population of non-cell-autonomous proteins (NCAPs), including numerous transcription factors, move cell to cell through plasmodesmata (PD). In many cases, the intercellular trafficking of these NCAPs is regulated by their interaction with specific PD components. To gain further insight into the functions of this NCAP pathway, coimmunoprecipitation experiments were performed on a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plasmodesmal-enriched cell wall protein preparation using as bait the NCAP, pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) PHLOEM PROTEIN16 (Cm-PP16). A Cm-PP16 interaction partner, Nt-PLASMODESMAL GERMIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (Nt-PDGLP1) was identified and shown to be a PD-located component. Arabidopsis thaliana putative orthologs, PDGLP1 and PDGLP2, were identified; expression studies indicated that, postgermination, these proteins were preferentially expressed in the root system. The PDGLP1 signal peptide was shown to function in localization to the PD by a novel mechanism involving the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway. Overexpression of various tagged versions altered root meristem function, leading to reduced primary root but enhanced lateral root growth. This effect on root growth was corrected with an inability of these chimeric proteins to form stable PD-localized complexes. PDGLP1 and PDGLP2 appear to be involved in regulating primary root growth by controlling phloem-mediated allocation of resources between the primary and lateral root meristems.

  11. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor accelerates early vascularization and improves healing of genetically modified cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Supp, Dorothy M; Boyce, Steven T

    2002-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes (CSS) lack a vascular plexus, leading to slower vascularization after grafting than split-thickness skin autograft. CSS containing keratinocytes genetically modified to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were previously shown to exhibit enhanced vascularization up to 2 weeks after grafting to athymic mice. The present study examines whether enhanced vascularization compared with controls persists after stable engraftment is achieved and analyzes VEGF expression, wound contraction, and engraftment. Control and VEGF-modified (VEGF+) CSS were grafted onto full-thickness wounds in athymic mice. VEGF expression was detected in VEGF+ CSS 14 weeks after grafting. Graft contraction was significantly lower in VEGF+ CSS compared with controls, suggesting more stable engraftment and better tissue development. Positive HLA-ABC staining, indicating persistence of human cells, was seen in 86.7% (13/15) of grafted VEGF+ CSS, compared with 58.3% (7/12) of controls. Differences in dermal vascularization between control and VEGF+ grafts were significant 1 week after surgery, but not at later times. However, the distribution of vessels was different, with more vessels in the upper dermis of VEGF+ grafts. These results suggest that VEGF overexpression in genetically modified CSS acts to accelerate early graft vascularization and can contribute to improved healing of full-thickness skin wounds.

  12. Overexpression of snakin-1 gene enhances resistance to Rhizoctonia solani and Erwinia carotovora in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Almasia, Natalia I; Bazzini, Ariel A; Hopp, H Esteban; Vazquez-Rovere, Cecilia

    2008-05-01

    Snakin-1 (SN1), a cysteine-rich peptide with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in vitro, was evaluated for its ability to confer resistance to pathogens in transgenic potatoes. Genetic variants of this gene were cloned from wild and cultivated Solanum species. Nucleotide sequences revealed highly evolutionary conservation with 91-98% identity values. Potato plants (S. tuberosum subsp. tuberosum cv. Kennebec) were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with a construct encoding the S. chacoense SN1 gene under the regulation of the ubiquitous CaMV 35S promoter. Transgenic lines were molecularly characterized and challenged with either Rhizoctonia solani or Erwinia carotovora to analyse whether constitutive in vivo overexpression of the SN1 gene may lead to disease resistance. Only transgenic lines that accumulated high levels of SN1 mRNA exhibited significant symptom reductions of R. solani infection such as stem cankers and damping-off. Furthermore, these overexpressing lines showed significantly higher survival rates throughout the fungal resistance bioassays. In addition, the same lines showed significant protection against E. carotovora measured as: a reduction of lesion areas (from 46.5 to 88.1% with respect to the wild-type), number of fallen leaves and thickened or necrotic stems. Enhanced resistance to these two important potato pathogens suggests in vivo antifungal and antibacterial activity of SN1 and thus its possible biotechnological application.

  13. Transgenic overexpression of cdx1b induces metaplastic changes of gene expression in zebrafish esophageal squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Hao; Liu, Xiuping; Zhang, Chengjin; Cole, Gregory J; Lee, Ju-Ahng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-06-01

    Cdx2 has been suggested to play an important role in Barrett's esophagus or intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the esophagus. To investigate whether transgenic overexpression of cdx1b, the functional equivalent of mammalian Cdx2 in zebrafish, may lead to IM of zebrafish esophageal squamous epithelium, a transgenic zebrafish system was developed by expressing cdx1b gene under the control of zebrafish keratin 5 promoter (krt5p). Gene expression in the esophageal squamous epithelium of wild-type and transgenic zebrafish was analyzed by Affymetrix microarray and confirmed by in situ hybridization. Morphology, mucin expression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by hematoxylin & eosin (HE) staining, Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) Alcian blue staining, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical staining, and TUNEL assay as well. cdx1b was found to be overexpressed in the nuclei of esophageal squamous epithelial cells of the transgenic zebrafish. Ectopic expression of cdx1b disturbed the development of this epithelium in larval zebrafish and induced metaplastic changes in gene expression in the esophageal squamous epithelial cells of adult zebrafish, that is, up-regulation of intestinal differentiation markers and down-regulation of squamous differentiation markers. However, cdx1b failed to induce histological IM, or to modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis in the squamous epithelium of adult transgenic zebrafish.

  14. The Fragaria vesca homolog of suppressor of overexpression of constans1 represses flowering and promotes vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    Mouhu, Katriina; Kurokura, Takeshi; Koskela, Elli A; Albert, Victor A; Elomaa, Paula; Hytönen, Timo

    2013-09-01

    In the annual long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana, suppressor of overexpression of constans1 (SOC1) integrates endogenous and environmental signals to promote flowering. We analyzed the function and regulation of the SOC1 homolog (Fragaria vesca [Fv] SOC1) in the perennial short-day plant woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca). We found that Fv SOC1 overexpression represses flower initiation under inductive short days, whereas its silencing causes continuous flowering in both short days and noninductive long days, similar to mutants in the floral repressor Fv terminal flower1 (Fv TFL1). Molecular analysis of these transgenic lines revealed that Fv SOC1 activates Fv TFL1 in the shoot apex, leading to the repression of flowering in strawberry. In parallel, Fv SOC1 regulates the differentiation of axillary buds to runners or axillary leaf rosettes, probably through the activation of gibberellin biosynthetic genes. We also demonstrated that Fv SOC1 is regulated by photoperiod and Fv flowering locus T1, suggesting that it plays a central role in the photoperiodic control of both generative and vegetative growth in strawberry. In conclusion, we propose that Fv SOC1 is a signaling hub that regulates yearly cycles of vegetative and generative development through separate genetic pathways.

  15. Effect of CD133 overexpression on the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in oral cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Moon, YeonHee; Kim, Donghwi; Sohn, HongMoon; Lim, Wonbong

    2016-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. In OSCC, CD133 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis by inducing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). A small subset of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to give rise to differentiated tumor cells and to predict tumor recurrence and metastases, i.e., CSCs may be metastatic precursors. In this study, we show that ectopic overexpression of CD133 in OSCC cell lines KB, YD9, and YD10B cells significantly promotes the EMT and acquisition of stemness properties. CSC properties were analyzed by colony-formation assay and measurement of OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG expression, and the EMT was monitored by cell migration, a cell invasion assay, and analysis of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and vimentin expression. CD133 overexpression led to formation of irregular spheroid colonies consistent with a stem cell phenotype and increased the expression of OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, N-cadherin, and vimentin. Taken together, these findings show that elevated levels of CD133 lead to OSCC invasiveness and metastasis, associated with the upregulation of EMT and stemness markers.

  16. Overexpression of SOD in Retina; Need for Increase in H202-Detoxifying Enzyme in Same Cellular Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Shinichi; Oveson, Brian C; Iwase, Takeshi; Lu, Lili; Lee, Sun Young; Jo, Young-Joon; Wu, Zhihao; Choi, Eun-Young; Samulski, Richard J.; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa (RP), various mutations cause rod photoreceptor cell death leading to increased oxygen levels in the outer retina, progressive oxidative damage to cones, and gradual loss of cone cell function. We have been exploring the potential of overexpressing components of the endogenous antioxidant defense system to preserve cone cell function in rd10+/+ mice, a model of RP. Rd10+/+ mice deficient in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) showed increased levels of superoxide radicals and carbonyl adducts (a marker of oxidative damage) in the retina, and more rapid loss of cone function than rd10+/+ mice with normal levels of SOD1. This suggests that SOD1 is an important component of the antioxidant defense system of cones, but increased expression of SOD1 in rd10+/+ mice increased oxidative damage and accelerated the loss of cone function. Co-expression of SOD1 with glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4), which like SOD1 is localized in the cytoplasm, but not with catalase targeted to the mitochondria, reduced oxidative damage in the retina and significantly slowed the loss of cone cell function in rd10+/+ mice. Gene transfer resulting in increased expression of SOD2, but not co-expression of SOD2 and mitochondrial Gpx4, resulted in high levels of H2O2 in the retina. These data suggest that in order to provide benefit in RP, over-expression of a SOD must be combined with expression of a peroxide detoxifying enzyme in the same cellular compartment. PMID:21736939

  17. Neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl-2 protooncogene in transgenic mice are protected from axotomy-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dauphin, M; Frankowski, H; Tsujimoto, Y; Huarte, J; Martinou, J C

    1994-01-01

    In vitro, the overexpression of the bcl-2 protooncogene in cultured neurons has been shown to prevent apoptosis induced by neurotrophic factor deprivation. We have generated transgenic mice overexpressing the Bcl-2 protein in neurons, including motoneurons of the facial nucleus. We have tested whether Bcl-2 could protect these motoneurons from experimentally induced cell death in new born mice. To address this question, we performed unilateral lesion of the facial nerve of wild-type and transgenic 2-day-old mice. In wild-type mice, the lesioned nerve and the corresponding motoneuron cell bodies in the facial nucleus underwent rapid degeneration. In contrast, in transgenic mice, facial motoneurons survived axotomy. Not only their cell bodies but also their axons were protected up to the lesion site. These results demonstrate that in vivo Bcl-2 protects neonatal motoneurons from degeneration after axonal injury. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 prevents neuronal cell death in vivo could lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of motoneuron degenerative diseases. Images PMID:8159744

  18. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M.; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J.; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. Results: We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. Conclusion: These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26903873

  19. Dysregulating IRES-dependent translation contributes to over-expression of the Aurora A kinase onco-protein

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Tara; Chen, Juan; Krushel, Les A.

    2014-01-01

    Over-expression of the oncoprotein, Aurora A kinase occurs in multiple types of carcinomas, often early during cell transformation. To identify mechanism(s) contributing to enhanced Aurora A protein expression, we examined normal human lung fibroblast and breast epithelial cells and compared them to non-tumorigenic breast (MCF10A and MCF12A) and tumorigenic breast and cervical epithelial cell lines (MCF-7 and HeLa S3, respectively). A subset of these immortalized lines (MCF10, MCF12A, and HeLa S3) exhibited increased levels of Aurora A protein, independent of tumorigenicity. The increase in Aurora A protein expression in these immortalized cells was not due to increased transcription/RNA stability, protein half-life or cap-dependent translation. Assays utilizing monocistronic and dicistronic RNA constructs revealed that the Aurora A 5′ leader contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES), which is regulated through the cell cycle, peaking in G2/M phase. Moreover, IRES activity was increased in the immortalized cell lines in which Aurora A protein expression was also enhanced. Additional assays indicated that the increased internal initiation is specific to the Aurora A IRES and may be an early event during cancer progression. Taken together, these results identify a novel mechanism contributing to Aurora A kinase over-expression and possibly to immortalization leading to carcinogenesis. PMID:23661421

  20. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Overexpression Can Reverse the Course of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mohamed N; Zhang, Yinzhong; Codipilly, Champa; Zaghloul, Nahla; Patel, Dhara; Wolin, Michael; Miller, Edmund J

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia leads to free radical production, which has a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH). We hypothesized that treatment with extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) could ameliorate the development of PH induced by hypoxia. In vitro studies using pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells showed that cells transfected with EC-SOD had significantly less accumulation of xanthine oxidase and reactive oxygen species than nontransfected cells after hypoxia exposure for 24 h. To study the prophylactic role of EC-SOD, adult male wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) mice, with lung-specific overexpression of human EC-SOD (hEC-SOD), were exposed to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) 10% for 10 d. After exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular mass (RV/S + LV), pulmonary vascular wall thickness (PVWT) and pulmonary artery contraction/relaxation were assessed. TG mice were protected against PH compared with WT mice with significantly lower RVSP (23.9 ± 1.24 versus 47.2 ± 3.4), RV/S + LV (0.287 ± 0.015 versus 0.335 ± 0.022) and vascular remodeling, indicated by PVWT (14.324 ± 1.107 versus 18.885 ± 1.529). Functional studies using pulmonary arteries isolated from mice indicated that EC-SOD prevents hypoxia-mediated attenuation of nitric oxide–induced relaxation. Therapeutic potential was assessed by exposing WT mice to FiO2 10% for 10 d. Half of the group was transfected with plasmid containing cDNA encoding human EC-SOD. The remaining animals were transfected with empty vector. Both groups were exposed to FiO2 10% for a further 10 d. Transfected mice had significantly reduced RVSP (18.97 ± 1.12 versus 41.3 ± 1.5), RV/S + LV (0.293 ± 0.012 versus 0.372 ± 0.014) and PVWT (12.51 ± 0.72 versus 18.98 ± 1.24). On the basis of these findings, we concluded that overexpression of EC-SOD prevents the development of PH and ameliorates established PH. PMID:22045221

  1. TNF-overexpression in Borna disease virus-infected mouse brains triggers inflammatory reaction and epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Katharina; Schaudien, Dirk; Eisel, Ulrich L M; Herzog, Sibylle; Richt, Jürgen A; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Herden, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Proinflammatory state of the brain increases the risk for seizure development. Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV)-infection of mice with neuronal overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) was used to investigate the complex relationship between enhanced cytokine levels, neurotropic virus infection and reaction pattern of brain cells focusing on its role for seizure induction. Viral antigen and glial markers were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Different levels of TNF in the CNS were provided by the use of heterozygous and homozygous TNF overexpressing mice. Transgenic TNF, total TNF (native and transgenic), TNF-receptor (TNFR1, TNFR2), IL-1 and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) mRNA values were measured by real time RT-PCR. BDV-infection of TNF-transgenic mice resulted in non-purulent meningoencephalitis accompanied by epileptic seizures with a higher frequency in homozygous animals. This correlated with lower weight gain, stronger degree and progression of encephalitis and early, strong microglia activation in the TNF-transgenic mice, most obviously in homozygous animals. Activation of astroglia could be more intense and associated with an unusual hypertrophy in the transgenic mice. BDV-antigen distribution and infectivity in the CNS was comparable in TNF-transgenic and wild-type animals. Transgenic TNF mRNA-expression was restricted to forebrain regions as the transgene construct comprised the promoter of NMDA-receptor subunit2B and induced up-regulation of native TNF mRNA. Total TNF mRNA levels did not increase significantly after BDV-infection in the brain of transgenic mice but TNFR1, TNFR2 and IL-1 mRNA values, mainly in the TNF overexpressing brain areas. NR2B mRNA levels were not influenced by transgene expression or BDV-infection. Neuronal TNF-overexpression combined with BDV-infection leads to cytokine up-regulation, CNS inflammation and glial cell activation and confirmed the presensitizing effect of elevated cytokine

  2. LEAD SEVERING CONTRIVANCE

    DOEpatents

    Widmaier, W.

    1958-04-01

    A means for breaking an electrical circuit within an electronic tube during the process of manufacture is described. Frequently such circuits must be employed for gettering or vapor coating purposes, however, since an external pair of corector pins having no use after manufacture, is undesirable, this invention permits the use of existing leads to form a temporary circuit during manufacture, and severing it thereafter. One portion of the temporary circuit, made from a springy material such as tungsten, is spot welded to a fusable member. To cut the circuit an external radiant heat source melts the fusable member, allowing the tensed tungsten spring to contract and break the circuit. This inexpensive arrangement is particularly useful when the tube has a great many external leads crowded into the tube base.

  3. Lapatinib for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Takeda, A; Picot, J; von Keyserlingk, C; Clegg, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lapatinib for the treatment of advanced or metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The scope included women with advanced, metastatic or recurrent HER2-overexpressing breast cancer who have had previous therapy that includes trastuzumab. Outcomes were time to progression, progression-free survival, response rates, overall survival, health-related quality of life and adverse effects. The submission's evidence came from one randomised controlled trial (RCT) of reasonable methodological quality, although it was not powered to detect a statistically significant difference in mean overall survival. Median time to progression was longer in the lapatinib plus capecitabine arm than in the capecitabine monotherapy arm {27.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.4 to 49.4] versus 18.6 [95% CI 9.1 to 36.9] weeks; hazard ratio 0.57 [95% CI 0.43 to 0.77; p = 0.00013]}. Median overall survival was very similar between the groups [67.7 (95% CI 58.9 to 91.6) versus 66.6 (95% CI 49.1 to 75.0) weeks; hazard ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.12; p = 0.177)]. Median progression-free survival was statistically significantly longer in the lapatinib plus capecitabine group than in the capecitabine monotherapy group [27.1 (95% CI 24.1 to 36.9) versus 17.6 (95% CI 13.3 to 20.1) weeks; hazard ratio 0.55 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.74); p = 0.000033]. The manufacturer's economic model to estimate progression-free and overall survival for patients with HER2-positive advanced/metastatic breast cancer who had relapsed following treatment with an anthracycline, a taxane and trastuzumab was appropriate for the disease area. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for lapatinib plus

  4. Sirtuin1 Over-Expression Does Not Impact Retinal Vascular and Neuronal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P.; Hatton, Colman J.; Pei, Dorothy T.; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A.; Smith, Lois E. H.; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy. PMID:24416337

  5. HBV polymerase overexpression due to large core gene deletion enhances hepatoma cell growth by binding inhibition of microRNA-100.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Hui; Tseng, Ying-Hsin; Lin, Wey-Ran; Hung, George; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wang, Tong-Hong; Lee, Wei-Chen; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-02-23

    Different types of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene deletion mutants were identified in chronic hepatitis B patients. However, their clinical roles in different stages of natural chronic HBV infection remained unclear. To address this issue, HBV core genes were sequenced in three gender- and age-matched patient groups diagnosed as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), respectively. Functional analysis of the identified mutants was performed. A novel type of large-fragment core gene deletion (LFCD) was identified exclusively in HCC patients and significantly associated with unfavorable postoperative survival. The presence of LFCDs resulted in generation of precore-polymerase fusion protein or brought the polymerase reading frame under direct control of HBV precore/core promoter, leading to its over-expression. Enhanced cell proliferation and increased tumorigenicity in nude mice were found in hepatoma cells expressing LFCDs. Because of the epsilon-binding ability of HBV polymerase, we hypothesized that the over-expressed polymerase carrying aberrant amino-terminal sequence could bind to cellular microRNAs. Screening of a panel of microRNAs revealed physical association of a precore-polymerase fusion protein with microRNA-100. A binding inhibition effect on microRNA-100 by the precore-polymerase fusion protein with up-regulation of its target, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), was discovered. The binding inhibition and growth promoting effects could be reversed by overexpressing microRNA-100. Together, HCC patients carrying hepatitis B large-fragment core gene deletion mutants had an unfavorable postoperative prognosis. The growth promoting effect was partly due to polymerase overexpression, leading to binding inhibition of microRNA-100 and up-regulation of PLK1. PMID:26824500

  6. Overexpression of the Tomato Pollen Receptor Kinase LePRK1 Rewires Pollen Tube Growth to a Blebbing Mode[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Cai-Ping; Dong, Xin; Liu, Hai-Kuan; Huang, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shu-Jie; Barberini, María Laura; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Muschietti, Jorge; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    The tubular growth of a pollen tube cell is crucial for the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. LePRK1 is a pollen-specific and plasma membrane–localized receptor-like kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). LePRK1 interacts with another receptor, LePRK2, and with KINASE PARTNER PROTEIN (KPP), a Rop guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Here, we show that pollen tubes overexpressing LePRK1 or a truncated LePRK1 lacking its extracellular domain (LePRK1ΔECD) have enlarged tips but also extend their leading edges by producing “blebs.” Coexpression of LePRK1 and tomato PLIM2a, an actin bundling protein that interacts with KPP in a Ca2+-responsive manner, suppressed these LePRK1 overexpression phenotypes, whereas pollen tubes coexpressing KPP, LePRK1, and PLIM2a resumed the blebbing growth mode. We conclude that overexpression of LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbing mode, through KPP- and PLIM2a-mediated bundling of actin filaments from tip plasma membranes. Arabidopsis thaliana pollen tubes expressing LePRK1ΔECD also grew by blebbing. Our results exposed a hidden capability of the pollen tube cell: upon overexpression of a single membrane-localized molecule, LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD, it can switch to an alternative mechanism for extension of the leading edge that is analogous to the blebbing growth mode reported for Dictyostelium and for Drosophila melanogaster stem cells. PMID:25194029

  7. Comparison of tamoxifen and letrozole response in mammary preneoplasia of ER and aromatase overexpressing mice defines an immune-associated gene signature linked to tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Dabydeen, Sarah A; Kang, Keunsoo; Díaz-Cruz, Edgar S; Alamri, Ahmad; Axelrod, Margaret L; Bouker, Kerrie B; Al-Kharboosh, Rawan; Clarke, Robert; Hennighausen, Lothar; Furth, Priscilla A

    2015-01-01

    Response to breast cancer chemoprevention can depend upon host genetic makeup and initiating events leading up to preneoplasia. Increased expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor (ER) is found in conjunction with breast cancer. To investigate response or resistance to endocrine therapy, mice with targeted overexpression of Esr1 or CYP19A1 to mammary epithelial cells were employed, representing two direct pathophysiological interventions in estrogen pathway signaling. Both Esr1 and CYP19A1 overexpressing mice responded to letrozole with reduced hyperplastic alveolar nodule prevalence and decreased mammary epithelial cell proliferation. CYP19A1 overexpressing mice were tamoxifen sensitive but Esr1 overexpressing mice were tamoxifen resistant. Increased ER expression occurred with tamoxifen resistance but no consistent changes in progesterone receptor, pSTAT3, pSTAT5, cyclin D1 or cyclin E levels in association with response or resistance were found. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to seek a transcriptome predictive of tamoxifen resistance using these models and a second tamoxifen-resistant model, BRCA1 deficient/Trp53 haploinsufficient mice. Sixty-eight genes associated with immune system processing were upregulated in tamoxifen-resistant Esr1- and Brca1-deficient mice, whereas genes related to aromatic compound metabolic process were upregulated in tamoxifen-sensitive CYP19A1 mice. Interferon regulatory factor 7 was identified as a key transcription factor regulating these 68 immune processing genes. Two loci encoding novel transcripts with high homology to human immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 1 were uniquely upregulated in the tamoxifen-resistant models. Letrozole proved to be a successful alternative to tamoxifen. Further study of transcriptional changes associated with tamoxifen resistance including immune-related genes could expand our mechanistic understanding and lead to biomarkers predictive of escape or response to endocrine therapies

  8. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  9. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  10. Calpain Activation in Alzheimer's Model Mice Is an Artifact of APP and Presenilin Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takashi; Matsuba, Yukio; Yamazaki, Naomi; Hashimoto, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    Intraneuronal calcium stimulates the calpain-dependent conversion of p35 to p25, a CDK5 activator. It is widely believed that amyloid β peptide (Aβ) induces this conversion that, in turn, has an essential role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. However, in vivo studies on p25 generation used transgenic mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin (PS). Here, using single App knock-in mice, we show that p25 generation is an artifact caused by membrane protein overexpression. We show that massive Aβ42 accumulation without overexpression of APP or presenilin does not produce p25, whereas p25 generation occurred with APP/PS overexpression and in postmortem mouse brain. We further support this finding using mice deficient for calpastatin, the sole calpain-specific inhibitor protein. Thus, the intracerebral environment of the APP/PS mouse brain and postmortem brain is an unphysiological state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We recently estimated using single App knock-in mice that accumulate amyloid β peptide without transgene overexpression that 60% of the phenotypes observed in Alzheimer's model mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) or APP and presenilin are artifacts (Saito et al., 2014). The current study further supports this estimate by invalidating key results from papers that were published in Cell. These findings suggest that more than 3000 publications based on APP and APP/PS overexpression must be reevaluated. PMID:27656030

  11. Overexpression of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductases has no influence on fruit fly aging

    PubMed Central

    Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Cheon Lee, Byung; Kim, Hwa-Young; Kabil, Hadise; Harshman, Lawrence G.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) are enzymes that repair oxidized methionine residues in proteins. This function implicated Msrs in antioxidant defense and the regulation of aging. There are two known Msr types in animals: MsrA specific for the reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide, and MsrB that catalyzes the reduction of methionine-R-sulfoxide. In a previous study, overexpression of MsrA in the nervous system of Drosophila was found to extend lifespan by 70%. Overexpression of MsrA in yeast also extended lifespan, whereas MsrB overexpression did so only under calorie restriction conditions. The effect of MsrB overexpression on lifespan has not yet been characterized in any animal model systems. Here, the GAL4-UAS binary system was used to drive overexpression of cytosolic Drosophila MsrB and mitochondrial mouse MsrB2 in whole body, fatbody, and the nervous system of flies. In contrast to MsrA, MsrB overexpression had no consistent effect on the lifespan of fruit flies on both corn meal and sugar yeast diets. Physical activity, fecundity, and stress resistance were also similar in MsrB-overexpressing and control flies. Thus, MsrA and MsrB, the two proteins with identical function in antioxidant protein repair, have different effects on aging in fruit flies. PMID:19409408

  12. [Overexpression of Penicillium expansum lipase gene in Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cai; Lin, Lin; Shi, Qiao-Qin; Wu, Song-Gang

    2003-03-01

    The alkaline lipase gene of Penicillium expansum (PEL) was coloned into the yeast integrative plasmid pPIC3.5K, which was then transformed into His4 mutant yeast GS115. Recombinant Pichia strains were obtained by minimal olive oil-methanol plates screening and confirmed by PCR. The expression producus of PEL gene was analysis by SDS-PAGE and olive oil plate, the result indicated that PEL gene was functionally overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and up to 95% of the secreted protein. Recombinant lipase had a molecular mass of 28kD, showing a range similar to that of PEL, could hydrolyze olive oil and formed clear halos in the olive oil plates. Four different strategies (different media, pH, glycerol and methanol concentration) were applied to optimize the cultivation conditions, the activity of lipase was up to 260 u/mL under the optimal cultivation conditions. It is pointed out that the absence of the expensive biotin and yeast nitrogen base in the medium increased the lipase production. The possible reason of this result is absence of yeast nitrogen base increased the medium pH during cultivation, and PEL shows a higher stability at this condition. The lipase activity of the supernatant from the culture grown at pH 7 was higher than the one from the culture in the same medium at pH 6.0 is due to the pH stability of PEL too. The results also showed that the methanol and glycerol concentration had a marked effect on the production of lipase.

  13. Overexpression and mutations of p53 in metastatic malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Blaszyk, H; Cunningham, J S; McGovern, R M; Schroeder, J S; Helander, S D; Pittelkow, M R; Sommer, S S; Kovach, J S

    1996-07-29

    Alterations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic abnormalities in human malignancies, but the role of p53 in the etiology of malignant melanomas is unclear. Fifty unselected malignant melanomas were analyzed for p53 overexpression by immunohistochemistry using 3 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Fifteen tumors (29.4%) showed positive staining with at least 2 different antibodies. In the first 20 consecutive tumors exons 5-9 and adjacent splice sites of the p53 gene were analyzed by genomic sequencing. There were 4 mutations in 20 metastatic melanomas. Three of 4 mutations were C:G-->T:A transitions. A search of our database of p53 mutations revealed that out of 8 p53 mutations reported by others, 4 are C:G-->T:A transitions at dipyrimidine sites, and one is a tandem CC-->TT mutation. This mutational pattern is comparable with the pattern of p53 mutations in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the skin and is related to exposure to ultraviolet B (UV-B) wavelength radiation. Taken together with a predominance of UV-induced mutations in the CDKN2/ p16 gene demonstrated in melanoma cell lines, our data support a role of sunlight exposure in the etiology of malignant melanoma. The low frequency of p53 mutants in melanomas compared with other types of skin cancers suggests that although mutations in this gene are likely to be involved in the development of some malignant melanomas, they do not play as large a role as in squamous and basal cell carcinomas of the skin. PMID:8707401

  14. NFκB induces overexpression of bovine FcRn

    PubMed Central

    Cervenak, Judit; Doleschall, Márton; Bender, Balázs; Mayer, Balázs; Schneider, Zita; Doleschall, Zoltán; Zhao, Yaofeng; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Hammarström, Lennart; Oster, Wolfgang; Kacskovics, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Among the many functions of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, it binds to IgG-opsonized antigen complexes and propagates their traffic into lysosomes where antigen processing occurs. We previously reported that transgenic (Tg) mice and rabbits that carry multiple copies and overexpress FcRn have augmented humoral immune responses. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a critical molecule in the signaling cascade in the immune response. NFκB induces human FcRn expression and our previous in silico analysis suggested NFκB binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine (b) FcRn α-chain gene (FCGRT). Here, we report the identification of three NFκB transcription binding sites in the promoter region of this gene using luciferase reporter gene technology, electromobility shift assay and supershift analysis. Stimulation of primary bovine endothelial cells with the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mediates its effect via NFκB, resulted in rapid upregulation of the bFcRn expression and a control gene, bovine E-selectin. This rapid bFcRn gene induction was also observed in the spleen of bFcRn Tg mice treated with intraperitoneally injected LPS, analyzed by northern blot analysis. Finally, NFκB-mediated bFcRn upregulation was confirmed at the protein level in macrophages isolated from the bFcRn Tg mice using flow cytometry with a newly developed FcRn specific monoclonal antibody that does not cross-react with the mouse FcRn. We conclude that NFκB regulates bFcRn expression and thus optimizes its functions, e.g., in the professional antigen presenting cells, and contributes to the much augmented humoral immune response in the bFcRn Tg mice. PMID:24492342

  15. Cholesteatoma Fibroblasts Promote Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Overexpression of Epiregulin

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Mamoru; Kojima, Hiromi; Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Okada, Naoko; Saito, Hirohisa; Moriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether keratinocytes proliferate in response to epiregulin produced by subepithelial fibroblasts derived from middle ear cholesteatoma. Tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing tympanoplasty. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were performed to examine epiregulin expression and localization in cholesteatoma tissues and retroauricular skin tissues. Fibroblasts were cultured from cholesteatoma tissues and from normal retroauricular skin. These fibroblasts were used as feeder cells for culture with a human keratinocyte cell line (PHK16-0b). To investigate the role of epiregulin in colony formation by PHK16-0b cells, epiregulin mRNA expression was knocked down in fibroblasts by using short interfering RNA and epiregulin protein was blocked with a neutralizing antibody. Epiregulin mRNA expression was significantly elevated in cholesteatoma tissues compared with that in normal retroauricular skin. Staining for epiregulin was more intense in the epithelial cells and subepithelial fibroblasts of cholesteatoma tissues than in retroauricular skin. When PHK16-0b cells were cultured with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, their colony-forming efficiency was 50% higher than when these cells were cultured with normal skin fibroblasts. Also, knockdown of epiregulin mRNA in cholesteatoma fibroblasts led to greater suppression of colony formation than knockdown in skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the colony-forming efficiency of PHK16-0b cells was significantly reduced after treatment with an epiregulin neutralizing antibody in co-culture with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, but not in co-culture with skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that keratinocyte hyperproliferation in cholesteatoma is promoted through overexpression of epiregulin by subepithelial fibroblasts via epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, which may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of middle ear cholesteatoma. PMID:23826119

  16. Clonal relatedness is a predictor of spontaneous multidrug efflux pump gene overexpression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Jacinto, Pauline L; Buensalido, Joseph Adrian L; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2015-05-01

    Increased expression of genes encoding multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MDR-EPs) contributes to antimicrobial agent and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Previously identified associations between norA overexpression and spa type t002 meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and a similar yet weaker association between mepA overexpression and type t008 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), in clinical isolates are suggestive of clonal dissemination. It is also possible that related strains are prone to mutations resulting in overexpression of specific MDR-EP genes. Exposure of non-MDR-EP-overexpressing clinical isolates to biocides and dyes can select for MDR-EP-overexpressing mutants. spa types t002 and t008 isolates are predominated by multilocus sequencing typing sequence types (STs) 5 and 8, respectively. In this study, non-MDR-EP gene-overexpressing clinical isolates (MRSA and MSSA) representing ST5 and ST8 were subjected to single exposures of ethidium bromide (EtBr) to select for EtBr-resistant mutants. Measurements of active EtBr transport among mutants were used to demonstrate an efflux-proficient phenotype. Using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, it was found that EtBr-resistant mutants of ST5 and ST8 parental strains predominantly overexpressed mepA (100%) and mdeA (83%), respectively, regardless of meticillin sensitivity. Associations between clonal lineage and MDR-EP gene overexpression differed from those previously observed and suggest the latter is due to clonal spread of efflux-proficient strains. The predilection of in vitro-selected mutants of related strains to overexpress the same MDR-EP gene indicates the presence of a consistent mutational process.

  17. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  18. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial

  19. Leading change: 2--planning.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Joanna

    National initiatives have outlined the importance of involving frontline staff in service improvement, and the ability to influence and manage change has been identified as an essential skill for delivering new models of care. Nurses often have to take the lead in managing change in clinical practice. The second in a three-part series is designed to help nurses at all levels develop the knowledge and skills to function as change agents within their organisations. This article focuses on planning the change and dealing with resistance. PMID:22439509

  20. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  1. Negative Selection and Chromosome Instability Induced by Mad2 Overexpression Delay Breast Cancer but Facilitate Oncogene-Independent Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Rowald, Konstantina; Mantovan, Martina; Passos, Joana; Buccitelli, Christopher; Mardin, Balca R; Korbel, Jan O; Jechlinger, Martin; Sotillo, Rocio

    2016-06-21

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is associated with poor survival and therapeutic outcome in a number of malignancies. Despite this correlation, CIN can also lead to growth disadvantages. Here, we show that simultaneous overexpression of the mitotic checkpoint protein Mad2 with Kras(G12D) or Her2 in mammary glands of adult mice results in mitotic checkpoint overactivation and a delay in tumor onset. Time-lapse imaging of organotypic cultures and pathologic analysis prior to tumor establishment reveals error-prone mitosis, mitotic arrest, and cell death. Nonetheless, Mad2 expression persists and increases karyotype complexity in Kras tumors. Faced with the selective pressure of oncogene withdrawal, Mad2-positive tumors have a higher frequency of developing persistent subclones that avoid remission and continue to grow.

  2. Overexpression of a multiple stress-responsive gene, ZmMPK4, enhances tolerance to low temperature in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Dan; Pan, Jiaowen; Kong, Xiangpei; Liu, Yukun; Sun, Liping; Wang, Li; Li, Dequan

    2012-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play important roles in mediating biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this study, we found that ZmMPK4 protein was predominantly localized in the nucleus. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ZmMPK4 transcription in maize leaves was up-regulated by low temperature, high temperature and exogenous signaling molecules such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate and ethephon. Hydrogen peroxide acted as second messenger to mediate 4°C-induced up-regulation of ZmMPK4 mRNA. Transgenic tobacco of overexpressing ZmMPK4 accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS), more peroxidase and catalase activities, more proline and soluble sugar contents, and more stress-responsive genes expression, leading to enhancing low temperature stress tolerance compared to the control plants. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that ZmMPK4 positively regulates low temperature stress tolerance in plants.

  3. p53 mutations and overexpression in locally advanced breast cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Faille, A.; De Cremoux, P.; Extra, J. M.; Linares, G.; Espie, M.; Bourstyn, E.; De Rocquancourt, A.; Giacchetti, S.; Marty, M.; Calvo, F.

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in the p53 gene were analysed in 39 patients with locally advanced breast cancers (LABCs) (stage III-IV) with inflammatory signs in most cases (UICC stage T4d = 32 patients) by molecular and immunohistochemical (IHC) approaches. All patients were included in the same therapy protocol. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a single-strand conformational polymorphism migration technique (SSCP), the presence of mutations in exons 2-11, covering the entire coding sequence of the p53 gene, was evaluated. Using the mouse specific anti-human p53 monoclonal antibody (PAb 1801), we also looked for overexpression of the p53 protein in tissue sections. In 16 cases shifted bands were reproducibly identified by PCR-SSCP, and all but one (localised to exon 10) were in exons 5-8, the usual mutational hotspots. Fifteen of these 16 samples were sequenced and 14 of the suspected mutations (36%) were confirmed. Most of them (12) were single nucleotide substitutions, and transitions were more frequent (eight cases) than transversions (four cases). Fourteen of the tumour samples were positively stained with the monoclonal antibody PAb 1801, 11 with nuclear staining only, two with mixed cytoplasmic and nuclear staining and one with cytoplasmic staining only. Staining patterns were very heterogeneous in terms of the percentage of positive cells (10-75%) and their distribution in the tissue section (isolated foci or dispersed cells). In 11 of the 14 mutated cases a positive immunostaining was observed. The presence of a p53 mutation was significantly associated with larger tumour diameter (chi 2 = 7.490, P = 0.0062) and the presence of clinical metastases (stage IV) (chi 2 = 10.113, P = 0.0015). A non-statistically significant trend of association was observed between p53 mutation, negative oestrogen receptors and lower response rate to therapy. Our results in this group of patients and the heterogeneity of the staining of tumour cells in tissue sections suggest that p53

  4. Modeling Alzheimer’s Disease in Mouse without Mutant Protein Overexpression: Cooperative and Independent Effects of Aβ and Tau

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qinxi; Li, Hongmei; Cole, Allysa L.; Hur, Ji-Yeun; Li, Yueming; Zheng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, has two pathological hallmarks: Aβ plaques and aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau). Aβ is a cleavage product of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). Presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 (PS2) are the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase, which cleaves APP and mediates Aβ production. Genetic mutations in APP, PSEN1 or PSEN2 can lead to early onset of familial AD (FAD). Although mutations in the tau encoding gene MAPT leads to a subtype of frontotemporal dementia and these mutations have been used to model AD tauopathy, no MAPT mutations have been found to be associated with AD. Results To model AD pathophysiology in mice without the gross overexpression of mutant transgenes, we created a humanized AD mouse model by crossing the APP and PSEN1 FAD knock-in mice with the htau mice which express wildtype human MAPT genomic DNA on mouse MAPT null background (APP/PS1/htau). The APP/PS1/htau mice displayed mild, age-dependent, Aβ plaques and tau hyperphosphorylation, thus successfully recapitulating the late-onset AD pathological hallmarks. Selected biochemical analyses, including p-tau western blot, γ-secretase activity assay, and Aβ ELISA, were performed to study the interaction between Aβ and p-tau. Subsequent behavioral studies revealed that the APP/PS1/htau mice showed reduced mobility in old ages and exaggerated fear response. Genetic analysis suggested that the fear phenotype is due to a synergic interaction between Aβ and p-tau, and it can be completely abolished by tau deletion. Conclusion The APP/PS1/htau model represents a valuable and disease-relevant late-onset pre-clinical AD animal model because it incorporates human AD genetics without mutant protein overexpression. Analysis of the mice revealed both cooperative and independent effects of Aβ and p-tau. PMID:24278307

  5. Effects of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression on Anxiety and Memory after Early Life Stress in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Ter Horst, Judith P; Harris, Anjanette P; Seckl, Jonathan R; Krugers, Harmen J; Joëls, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly in women. Human studies have shown that certain haplotypes of NR3C2, encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), that result in gain of function, may protect against the consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forebrain-specific overexpression of MR in female mice would ameliorate the effects of ELS on anxiety and memory in adulthood. We found that ELS increased anxiety, did not alter spatial discrimination and reduced contextual fear memory in adult female mice. Transgenic overexpression of MR did not alter anxiety but affected spatial memory performance and enhanced contextual fear memory formation. The effects of ELS on anxiety and contextual fear were not affected by transgenic overexpression of MR. Thus, MR overexpression in the forebrain does not represent a major resilience factor to early life adversity in female mice.

  6. Behavioral Characterization of a Mouse Model Overexpressing DSCR1/ RCAN1

    PubMed Central

    Dierssen, Mara; Arqué, Gloria; McDonald, Jerome; Andreu, Nuria; Martínez-Cué, Carmen; Flórez, Jesús; Fillat, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    DSCR1/ RCAN1 is a chromosome 21 gene found to be overexpressed in the brains of Down syndrome (DS) and postulated as a good candidate to contribute to mental disability. However, even though Rcan1 knockout mice have pronounced spatial learning and memory deficits, the possible deleterious effects of its overexpression in DS are not well understood. We have generated a transgenic mouse model overexpressing DSCR1/RCAN1 in the brain and analyzed the effect of RCAN1 overexpression on cognitive function. TgRCAN1 mice present a marked disruption of the learning process in a visuo-spatial learning task. However, no significant differences were observed in the performance of the memory phase of the test (removal session) nor in a step-down passive avoidance task, thus suggesting that once learning has been established, the animals are able to consolidate the information in the longer term. PMID:21364922

  7. Effects of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression on Anxiety and Memory after Early Life Stress in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Ter Horst, Judith P.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Krugers, Harmen J.; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly in women. Human studies have shown that certain haplotypes of NR3C2, encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), that result in gain of function, may protect against the consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forebrain-specific overexpression of MR in female mice would ameliorate the effects of ELS on anxiety and memory in adulthood. We found that ELS increased anxiety, did not alter spatial discrimination and reduced contextual fear memory in adult female mice. Transgenic overexpression of MR did not alter anxiety but affected spatial memory performance and enhanced contextual fear memory formation. The effects of ELS on anxiety and contextual fear were not affected by transgenic overexpression of MR. Thus, MR overexpression in the forebrain does not represent a major resilience factor to early life adversity in female mice. PMID:26858618

  8. Overexpression of DHX32 contributes to the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huayue; Liu, Wenjuan; Fang, Zanxi; Liang, Xianming; Li, Juan; Bai, Yongying; Lin, Lingqing; You, Hanyu; Pei, Yihua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Zhong-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work demonstrates that DHX32 is upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to its adjacent normal tissues. However, how overexpressed DHX32 contributes to CRC remains largely unknown. In this study, we reported that DHX32 was overexpressed in human colon cancer cells. Overexpressed DHX32 promoted SW480 cancer cells proliferation, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased the susceptibility to chemotherapy agent 5-Fluorouracil. Furthermore, PCR array analyses revealed that depleting DHX32 in SW480 colon cancer cells suppressed expression of WISP1, MMP7 and VEGFA in the Wnt pathway, and anti-apoptotic gene BCL2 and CA9, however, elevated expression of pro-apoptotic gene ACSL5. The findings suggested that overexpressed DHX32 played an important role in CRC progression and metastasis and that DHX32 has the potential to serve as a biomarker and a novel therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:25782664

  9. Behavioral characterization of a mouse model overexpressing DSCR1/ RCAN1.

    PubMed

    Dierssen, Mara; Arqué, Gloria; McDonald, Jerome; Andreu, Nuria; Martínez-Cué, Carmen; Flórez, Jesús; Fillat, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    DSCR1/ RCAN1 is a chromosome 21 gene found to be overexpressed in the brains of Down syndrome (DS) and postulated as a good candidate to contribute to mental disability. However, even though Rcan1 knockout mice have pronounced spatial learning and memory deficits, the possible deleterious effects of its overexpression in DS are not well understood. We have generated a transgenic mouse model overexpressing DSCR1/RCAN1 in the brain and analyzed the effect of RCAN1 overexpression on cognitive function. TgRCAN1 mice present a marked disruption of the learning process in a visuo-spatial learning task. However, no significant differences were observed in the performance of the memory phase of the test (removal session) nor in a step-down passive avoidance task, thus suggesting that once learning has been established, the animals are able to consolidate the information in the longer term.

  10. Her-2 overexpression increases the metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Herring, Jeanne M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Weil, Robert J; Stark, Andreas M; Kurek, Raffael; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Halverson, Douglas; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Steinberg, Seth M; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2007-05-01

    Retrospective studies of breast cancer patients suggest that primary tumor Her-2 overexpression or trastuzumab therapy is associated with a devastating complication: the development of central nervous system (brain) metastases. Herein, we present Her-2 expression trends from resected human brain metastases and data from an experimental brain metastasis assay, both indicative of a functional contribution of Her-2 to brain metastatic colonization. Of 124 archival resected brain metastases from breast cancer patients, 36.2% overexpressed Her-2, indicating an enrichment in the frequency of tumor Her-2 overexpression at this metastatic site. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser capture microdissected epithelial cells, Her-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in a cohort of 12 frozen brain metastases were increased up to 5- and 9-fold, respectively, over those of Her-2-amplified primary tumors. Co-overexpression of Her-2 and EGFR was also observed in a subset of brain metastases. We then tested the hypothesis that overexpression of Her-2 increases the colonization of breast cancer cells in the brain in vivo. A subclone of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells that selectively metastasizes to brain (231-BR) overexpressed EGFR; 231-BR cells were transfected with low (4- to 8-fold) or high (22- to 28-fold) levels of Her-2. In vivo, in a model of brain metastasis, low or high Her-2-overexpressing 231-BR clones produced comparable numbers of micrometastases in the brain as control transfectants; however, the Her-2 transfectants yielded 3-fold greater large metastases (>50 microm(2); P < 0.001). Our data indicate that Her-2 overexpression increases the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in the brain in this model system. PMID:17483330

  11. Overexpression of OATP1B3 confers apoptotic resistance in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooin; Belkhiri, Abbes; Lockhart, A. Craig; Merchant, Nipun; Glaeser, Hartmut; Harris, Elizabeth I.; Washington, M. Kay; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Zaika, Alex; Kim, Richard B.; El-Rifai, Wael

    2008-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3, SLCO1B3) is normally expressed in hepatocytes. In this study, we demonstrated frequent overexpression of OATP1B3 in colorectal adenocarcinomas. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 17 colon tumors indicated tumoral overexpression of OATP1B3 by ~100 fold, compared to 20 normal colon samples (p<0.0001). Using immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 93 evaluable colon tumor specimens, we detected immunostaining of OATP1B3 in 75 colon adenocarcinomas (81%) and no immunostaining in normal samples. To determine the functional effects of OATP1B3 expression on drug-induced apoptosis, we used camptothecin and oxaliplatin on a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines stably overexpressing OATP1B3. The results indicated that OATP1B3 overexpression enhanced cell survival in RKO, HCT-8 and HCT116p53+/+ cells that harbor wildtype p53 but not in Caco-2 and HCT116p53-/- cells that lack p53, compared to the respective empty vector controls (p<0.01). The TUNEL assay confirmed that HCT116p53+/+ cells overexpressing OATP1B3 had significantly lower apoptotic levels compared to empty vector control (P<0.001). The overexpression of OATP1B3 reduced the transcriptional activity of p53, with subsequent reductions in transcript and protein levels of its downstream transcription targets (P21WAF1 and PUMA). Overexpression of a point mutation (G583E) variant of OATP1B3 lacking transport activity did not confer an antiapoptotic effect or affect p53 transcriptional activity, suggesting that the antiapoptotic effect of OATP1B3 may be associated with its transport activity. Taken together, our results suggest that OATP1B3 overexpression in colorectal cancer cells may provide a survival advantage by altering p53-dependent pathways. PMID:19074900

  12. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  13. Overexpression of NADH oxidase gene from Deinococcus geothermalis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kazuya, Sase; Tomomi, Iwasaki; Hatsune, Karasaki; Masahide, Ishikawa

    2013-12-01

    When using stable enzyme genes from a thermophile to create a biosensor in Escherichia coli, it is vital that these genes be overexpressed in order to provide a sufficient supply of enzymes. In this study, overexpression of the NADH oxidase (Nox) gene from the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis was successfully achieved with the aim of creating a stable biosensor active at room temperatures. To do so, modification of 10 nucleotides, GAAATTAACT, upstream of the start codon of the Nox gene was necessary.

  14. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  15. Blood Test: Lead (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and when based on a child's risk for lead poisoning. Those who are considered at risk — such as ... How Do I Get My Child Tested for Lead Poisoning? Lead Poisoning Pica Getting a Blood Test (Video) ...

  16. Lead (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have lead in them The good news about lead poisoning is that it’s 100% preventable. That means we ... damage the brain, and may even cause death. Lead poisoning can also cause: Anemia (when your blood doesn’ ...

  17. [Investigation of mutations in transcription factors of efflux pump genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains overexpressing the efflux pumps].

    PubMed

    Kalkandelen, Kemal Turan; Doluca Dereli, Mine

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a significant rise in the number of immunocompromised patients have been observed due to cancer chemotherapy, organ transplantation and HIV infection. As a result of this, the frequency of Candida albicans infections in the clinics have been increased. Fluconazole, as being a well tolerated, easy to use drug with minor side effects, is often the first choice antifungal agent for this patient group, both for therapy and prophylaxis. Especially the long-term use of this drug, causes the selection of resistant strains and leads to the development of fluconazole resistance. The most frequently observed resistance mechanism against fluconazole in C.albicans strains is the transportation of the drug out of the cell via efflux pumps. The efflux pumps mainly involved are Cdr1, Cdr2 ve Mdr1 encoded by CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 genes. It has been shown that, the overexpression of these efflux pump genes was caused by functional mutations in TAC1 and MRR1 genes which encode the transcription factors Tac1p and Mrr1p. This study was aimed to analyze TAC1 and MRR1 genes of 15 C.albicans strains which consist of six fluconazole-susceptible, four susceptible with trailing effect and five fluconazole-resistant isolates plus one resistant strain (DSY292), known to overexpress Mdr1 efflux pump due to P683H mutation in MRR1 gene and one fluconazole-sensitive ATCC 14053 C.albicans strain in terms of mutations with polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Two of the fluconazole-resistant isolates which had overexpression of Cdr1 and Cdr2 pumps known to have overexpression of TAC1 gene, revealed R673Q and A736V mutations. A P683H point mutation, that overexpressed the Mdr1 pump was detected in a fluconazole-resistant strain, which was known to cause MRR1 overexpression. In conclusion, mutations in the transcription factors of the efflux pump genes may play an important role in the resistance against fluconazole among our selected C.albicans strains. PMID:26649419

  18. [Investigation of mutations in transcription factors of efflux pump genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains overexpressing the efflux pumps].

    PubMed

    Kalkandelen, Kemal Turan; Doluca Dereli, Mine

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a significant rise in the number of immunocompromised patients have been observed due to cancer chemotherapy, organ transplantation and HIV infection. As a result of this, the frequency of Candida albicans infections in the clinics have been increased. Fluconazole, as being a well tolerated, easy to use drug with minor side effects, is often the first choice antifungal agent for this patient group, both for therapy and prophylaxis. Especially the long-term use of this drug, causes the selection of resistant strains and leads to the development of fluconazole resistance. The most frequently observed resistance mechanism against fluconazole in C.albicans strains is the transportation of the drug out of the cell via efflux pumps. The efflux pumps mainly involved are Cdr1, Cdr2 ve Mdr1 encoded by CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 genes. It has been shown that, the overexpression of these efflux pump genes was caused by functional mutations in TAC1 and MRR1 genes which encode the transcription factors Tac1p and Mrr1p. This study was aimed to analyze TAC1 and MRR1 genes of 15 C.albicans strains which consist of six fluconazole-susceptible, four susceptible with trailing effect and five fluconazole-resistant isolates plus one resistant strain (DSY292), known to overexpress Mdr1 efflux pump due to P683H mutation in MRR1 gene and one fluconazole-sensitive ATCC 14053 C.albicans strain in terms of mutations with polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Two of the fluconazole-resistant isolates which had overexpression of Cdr1 and Cdr2 pumps known to have overexpression of TAC1 gene, revealed R673Q and A736V mutations. A P683H point mutation, that overexpressed the Mdr1 pump was detected in a fluconazole-resistant strain, which was known to cause MRR1 overexpression. In conclusion, mutations in the transcription factors of the efflux pump genes may play an important role in the resistance against fluconazole among our selected C.albicans strains.

  19. Leading from the boardroom.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jay W; Clark, Robert C

    2008-04-01

    These days, boards are working overtime to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley and other governance requirements meant to protect shareholders from executive wrongdoing. But as directors have become more hands-on with compliance, they've become more hands-off with long-range planning. That exposes corporations and their shareholders to another--perhaps even greater--risk, say professors Lorsch, of Harvard Business School, and Clark, of Harvard Law School. Boards are giving the long term short shrift for a number of reasons. Despite much heavier workloads, directors haven't rethought their patterns of operating - their meetings, committees, and other interactions. Compliance has changed their relationship with executives, however, turning directors into micromanagers who closely probe executives' actions instead of providing high-level guidance. Meanwhile, the pressure to meet quarterly expectations intensifies. Directors need to do a better job of balancing compliance with forward thinking. Boardroom effectiveness hinges most on the quality of directors and their interactions, the authors' research shows. Directors must apply their wisdom broadly, handling compliance work more efficiently and staying out of the weeds on strategic issues. Using their power with management to evangelize for long-term planning, they must take the lead on discussions about financial infrastructure, talent development, and strategy. Reserving sacrosanct time for such discussions, as Philips Electronics' board does at annual retreats, is an effective practice: After one recent retreat, Philips decided to exit the semiconductor business, where it was losing ground. Individual directors also must not shy away from asking tough questions and acting as catalysts on critical issues, such as grooming a successor to the CEO. In short, directors must learn to lead from the boardroom.

  20. Lamin B1 overexpression increases nuclear rigidity in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Marotta, Roberto; Mazzaro, Nadia; Gritti, Marta; Mazzanti, Michele; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Gasparini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The architecture and structural mechanics of the cell nucleus are defined by the nuclear lamina, which is formed by A- and B-type lamins. Recently, gene duplication and protein overexpression of lamin B1 (LB1) have been reported in pedigrees with autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD). However, how the overexpression of LB1 affects nuclear mechanics and function and how it may result in pathology remain unexplored. Here, we report that in primary human skin fibroblasts derived from ADLD patients, LB1, but not other lamins, is overexpressed at the nuclear lamina and specifically enhances nuclear stiffness. Transient transfection of LB1 in HEK293 and neuronal N2a cells mimics the mechanical phenotype of ADLD nuclei. Notably, in ADLD fibroblasts, reducing LB1 protein levels by shRNA knockdown restores elasticity values to those indistinguishable from control fibroblasts. Moreover, isolated nuclei from ADLD fibroblasts display a reduced nuclear ion channel open probability on voltage-step application, suggesting that biophysical changes induced by LB1 overexpression may alter nuclear signaling cascades in somatic cells. Overall, the overexpression of LB1 in ADLD cells alters nuclear mechanics and is linked to changes in nuclear signaling, which could help explain the pathogenesis of this disease.—Ferrera, D., Canale, C., Marotta, R., Mazzaro, N., Gritti, M., Mazzanti, M., Capellari, S., Cortelli, P., Gasparini, L. Lamin B1 overexpression increases nuclear rigidity in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy fibroblasts. PMID:24858279

  1. Overexpression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase in Yarrowia lipolytica affects lipid body size, number and distribution.

    PubMed

    Gajdoš, Peter; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Čertík, Milan; Rossignol, Tristan

    2016-09-01

    In the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, the diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) are major factors for triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis. The Q4 strain, in which the four acyltransferases have been deleted, is unable to accumulate lipids and to form lipid bodies (LBs). However, the expression of a single acyltransferase in this strain restores TAG accumulation and LB formation. Using this system, it becomes possible to characterize the activity and specificity of an individual DGAT. Here, we examined the effects of DGAT overexpression on lipid accumulation and LB formation in Y. lipolytica Specifically, we evaluated the consequences of introducing one or two copies of the Y. lipolytica DGAT genes YlDGA1 and YlDGA2 Overall, multi-copy DGAT overexpression increased the lipid content of yeast cells. However, the size and distribution of LBs depended on the specific DGAT overexpressed. YlDGA2 overexpression caused the formation of large LBs, while YlDGA1 overexpression generated smaller but more numerous LBs. This phenotype was accentuated through the addition of a second copy of the overexpressed gene and might be linked to the distinct subcellular localization of each DGAT, i.e. YlDga1 being localized in LBs, while YlDga2 being localized in a structure strongly resembling the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:27506614

  2. Overexpression of Bmi1 in Lymphocytes Stimulates Skeletogenesis by Improving the Osteogenic Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xichao; Dai, Xiuliang; Wu, Xuan; Ji, Ji; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Yang, Xiangjiao; Miao, Dengshun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether overexpression of Bmi1 in lymphocytes can stimulate skeletogenesis by improving the osteogenic microenvironment, we examined the skeletal phenotype of EμBmi1 transgenic mice with overexpression of Bmi1 in lymphocytes. The size of the skeleton, trabecular bone volume and osteoblast number, indices of proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were increased significantly, ROS levels were reduced and antioxidative capacity was enhanced in EμBmi1 mice compared to WT mice. In PTHrP1–84 knockin (PthrpKI/KI) mice, the expression levels of Bmi1 are reduced and potentially can mediate the premature osteoporosis observed. We therefore generated a PthrpKI/KI mice overexpressing Bmi1 in lymphocytes and compared them with PthrpKI/KI and WT littermates. Overexpression of Bmi1 in PthrpKI/KI mice resulted in a longer lifespan, increased body weight and improvement in skeletal growth and parameters of osteoblastic bone formation with reduced ROS levels and DNA damage response parameters. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of Bmi1 in lymphocytes can stimulate osteogenesis in vivo and partially rescue defects in skeletal growth and osteogenesis in PthrpKI/KI mice. These studies therefore indicate that overexpression of Bmi1 in lymphocytes can stimulate skeletogenesis by inhibiting oxidative stress and improving the osteogenic microenvironment. PMID:27373231

  3. Conditional overexpression of connective tissue growth factor disrupts postnatal lung development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Platteau, Astrid; Chen, Shaoyi; McNamara, George; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a member of an emerging family of immediate-early gene products that coordinates complex biological processes during development, differentiation, and tissue repair. Overexpression of CTGF is associated with mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume and oxygen exposure in newborn lungs. However, the role of CTGF in postnatal lung development and remodeling is not well understood. In the present study, a double-transgenic mouse model was generated with doxycycline-inducible overexpression of CTGF in respiratory epithelial cells. Overexpression of CTGF from Postnatal Days 1-14 resulted in thicker alveolar septa and decreased secondary septal formation. This is correlated with increased myofibroblast differentiation and disorganized elastic fiber deposition in alveolar septa. Overexpression of CTGF also decreased alveolar capillary network formation. There were increased alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and collagen deposition, and dramatic thickening in the peribronchial/peribronchiolar and perivascular regions in the double-transgenic lungs. Furthermore, overexpression of CTGF increased integrin-linked kinase expression, activated its downstream signaling target, Akt, as well as increased mRNA expression of fibronectin. These data demonstrate that overexpression of CTGF disrupts alveologenesis and capillary formation, and induces fibrosis during the critical period of alveolar development. These histologic changes are similar to those observed in lungs of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  4. The story of stolen chaperones: how overexpression of Q/N proteins cures yeast prions.

    PubMed

    Derkatch, Irina L; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-seeding alternate protein conformations. Most yeast prions contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich domains that promote the formation of amyloid-like prion aggregates. Chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, are required to continually break these aggregates into smaller "seeds." Decreasing aggregate size and increasing the number of growing aggregate ends facilitates both aggregate transmission and growth. Our previous work showed that overexpression of 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains facilitates the de novo aggregation of Sup35 into the [PSI(+)] prion, presumably by a cross-seeding mechanism. We now discuss our recent paper, in which we showed that overexpression of most of these same 11 Q/N-rich proteins, including Pin4C and Cyc8, destabilized pre-existing Q/N rich prions. Overexpression of both Pin4C and Cyc8 caused [PSI(+)] aggregates to enlarge. This is incompatible with a previously proposed "capping" model where the overexpressed Q/N-rich protein poisons, or "caps," the growing aggregate ends. Rather the data match what is expected of a reduction in prion severing by chaperones. Indeed, while Pin4C overexpression does not alter chaperone levels, Pin4C aggregates sequester chaperones away from the prion aggregates. Cyc8 overexpression cures [PSI(+)] by inducing an increase in Hsp104 levels, as excess Hsp104 binds to [PSI(+)] aggregates in a way that blocks their shearing.

  5. Overexpression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase in Yarrowia lipolytica affects lipid body size, number and distribution.

    PubMed

    Gajdoš, Peter; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Čertík, Milan; Rossignol, Tristan

    2016-09-01

    In the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, the diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) are major factors for triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis. The Q4 strain, in which the four acyltransferases have been deleted, is unable to accumulate lipids and to form lipid bodies (LBs). However, the expression of a single acyltransferase in this strain restores TAG accumulation and LB formation. Using this system, it becomes possible to characterize the activity and specificity of an individual DGAT. Here, we examined the effects of DGAT overexpression on lipid accumulation and LB formation in Y. lipolytica Specifically, we evaluated the consequences of introducing one or two copies of the Y. lipolytica DGAT genes YlDGA1 and YlDGA2 Overall, multi-copy DGAT overexpression increased the lipid content of yeast cells. However, the size and distribution of LBs depended on the specific DGAT overexpressed. YlDGA2 overexpression caused the formation of large LBs, while YlDGA1 overexpression generated smaller but more numerous LBs. This phenotype was accentuated through the addition of a second copy of the overexpressed gene and might be linked to the distinct subcellular localization of each DGAT, i.e. YlDga1 being localized in LBs, while YlDga2 being localized in a structure strongly resembling the endoplasmic reticulum.

  6. Overexpression of RORγt Enhances Pulmonary Inflammation after Infection with Mycobacterium Avium

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Masashi; Ishii, Yukio; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Ano, Satoshi; Morishima, Yuko; Yoh, Keigyou; Takahashi, Satoru; Ogawa, Kenji; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in humans. The role of Th17 immunity in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacteria, such as MAC, is not currently understood. Transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) is known as the master regulator for Th17 cell development. Here, we investigated the role of RORγt in host responses against MAC infection. Wild-type (WT) mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice were infected with MAC via intratracheal inoculation. Systemic MAC growth was not different between WT mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice. However, neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation following MAC infection was enhanced in RORγt-overexpressing mice compared with that in WT mice. The cytokine expression shifted toward a Th17 phenotype in the lungs of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection; the levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were significantly higher in the lung of these mice than in WT mice. In addition to the increase in IL-17 single-positive T cells, T cells producing both IL-17 and interferon-γ were elevated in the lung of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection. These findings suggest that RORγt overexpression-mediated Th17 bias contributes to local inflammation rather than systemic responses, by regulating neutrophil recruitment into the sites of infection during MAC infection. PMID:26784959

  7. Cell cycle arrest mediated by a pyridopyrimidine is not abrogated by over-expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Soni, R; Chaudhuri, B

    2001-05-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks) is of pivotal importance in tumor cell biology as these kinases are the drivers of cell proliferation. This inhibition can be achieved either by naturally occurring biological proteins or by small molecule compounds. They cause cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis depending upon the specificity and efficacy of the inhibitor in question. We have reported earlier that specific pyridopyrimidines (novel Cdk inhibitors) cause cell cycle arrest in mink lung epithelial cells and the arrest is abrogated by over-expression of Cdk4. In contrast, we show here that one of these inhibitors effectively maintains cell cycle arrest in a leukemic or a breast cancer cell line even after the respective cells over-express an oncogene, either Bcl-2 or cyclin D1. However, in the leukemic cells, Bcl-2 over-expression suppresses apoptosis induced by the pyridopyrimidine. Thus, novel Cdk inhibitors can prove to be useful chemical genetics tools for understanding the underlying mechanisms of growth arrest and/or apoptosis in normal versus tumor cells. This could also lead to the development of improved inhibitors of cell proliferation.

  8. Effect of ceritinib (LDK378) on enhancement of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Xu, Meng; To, Kenneth K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the leading cause of treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy. The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, particularly ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2, play a key role in mediating MDR by pumping anticancer drugs out from cancer cells. Ceritinib (LDK378) is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) currently in phase III clinical trial for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Here, we found that ceritinib remarkably enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 or ABCG2 over-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Ceritinib significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (DOX) by inhibiting ABCB1 or ABCG2-mediated drug efflux in the transporters-overexpressing cells. Mechanistically, ceritinib is likely a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1 and ABCG2 because it competed with [125I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin for photo affinity labeling of the transporters. On the other hand, at the transporters-inhibiting concentrations, ceritinib did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and phosphorylation status of AKT and ERK1/2. Thus the findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of ceritinib and other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in chemo-refractory cancer patients. PMID:26556876

  9. Cerebrolysin treatment attenuates heat shock protein overexpression in the brain following heat stress: an experimental study using immunohistochemistry at light and electron microscopy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Muresanu, Dafin; Sharma, Aruna; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla

    2010-06-01

    The possibility that overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the CNS represents a neurodestructive signal following hyperthermia was examined in a rat model using a potent neuroprotective drug, Cerebrolysin (Ebewe Pharma, Austria). Rats subjected to four hours of heat stress in a biological oxygen demand incubator at 38 degrees C developed profound hyperthermia (41.23 +/- 0.14 degrees C) and overexpressed HSP 72 kD in several brain regions: cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, thalamus, hypothalamus, brain stem, and spinal cord compared to controls. This HSP overexpression closely correlated with the leakage of blood-brain barrier permeability and vasogenic edema formation in these brain areas. HSP positive cells are largely confined in the edematous brain regions showing Evans blue leakage. Pretreatment with Cerebrolysin (5 mL/kg, i.v.) 30 minutes before heat stress markedly attenuated hyperthermia (39.48 +/- 0.23 degrees C, P < 0.01) and the induction of HSP to all the brain regions examined. Leakage of Evans blue albumin and increase in brain water content in these brain areas are also markedly reduced with Cerebrolysin pretreatment. These results are the first to show that Cerebrolysin, if administered before heat stress, attenuates hyperthermia induced stress reaction and HSP 72 kD induction. Taken together, these novel observations suggest that upregulation of HSP 72 kD in brain represents neurodestructive signals and a reduction in cellular stress mechanisms leading to decline in HSP expression is neuroprotective in nature.

  10. Repression of Antibiotic Production and Sporulation in Streptomyces coelicolor by Overexpression of a TetR Family Transcriptional Regulator ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Delin; Seghezzi, Nicolas; Esnault, Catherine; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2010-01-01

    The overexpression of a regulatory gene of the TetR family (SCO3201) originating either from Streptomyces lividans or from Streptomyces coelicolor was shown to strongly repress antibiotic production (calcium-dependent antibiotic [CDA], undecylprodigiosin [RED], and actinorhodin [ACT]) of S. coelicolor and of the ppk mutant strain of S. lividans. Curiously, the overexpression of this gene also had a strong inhibitory effect on the sporulation process of S. coelicolor but not on that of S. lividans. SCO3201 was shown to negatively regulate its own transcription, and its DNA binding motif was found to overlap its −35 promoter sequence. The interruption of this gene in S. lividans or S. coelicolor did not lead to any obvious phenotypes, indicating that when overexpressed SCO3201 likely controls the expression of target genes of other TetR regulators involved in the regulation of the metabolic and morphological differentiation process in S. coelicolor. The direct and functional interaction of SCO3201 with the promoter region of scbA, a gene under the positive control of the TetR-like regulator, ScbR, was indeed demonstrated by in vitro as well as in vivo approaches. PMID:20935121

  11. Relationship between lead mining and blood lead levels in children.

    PubMed

    Murgueytio, A M; Evans, R G; Sterling, D A; Clardy, S A; Shadel, B N; Clements, B W

    1998-01-01

    The authors studied blood lead levels of 226 randomly selected children, aged 6-92 mo, who lived in either a lead-mining area or a nonmining area, and 69 controls. The authors sought to determine to what extent mining activities contributed to blood lead levels in the children. The mean blood lead levels in the study and control groups were 6.52 microg/dl and 3.43 microg/dl, respectively. The corresponding proportions of children with elevated blood lead levels were 17% and 3%. Soil and dust lead levels were up to 10 times higher in the study than the control group. Elevated blood lead levels appeared to result from exposure to both lead-mining waste and lead-based paint. Mining waste was the cause of the higher prevalence of elevated blood lead levels in these children. PMID:9886161

  12. Overexpression of ornithine decarboxylase decreases ventricular systolic function during induction of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Emanuele; Hillary, Rebecca A; Vary, Thomas C; Pegg, Anthony E; Sumner, Andrew D; Caldarera, Claudio M; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Wang, JuFang; Cheung, Joseph Y; Shantz, Lisa M

    2012-02-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first enzyme of polyamine metabolism, is rapidly upregulated in response to agents that induce a pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Transgenic mice overexpressing ODC in the heart (MHC-ODC mice) experience a much more dramatic left ventricular hypertrophy in response to β-adrenergic stimulation with isoproterenol (ISO) compared to wild-type (WT) controls. ISO also induced arginase activity in transgenic hearts but not in controls. The current work studies the cooperation between the cardiac polyamines and L-arginine (L-Arg) availability in MHC-ODC mice. Although ISO-induced hypertrophy is well-compensated, MHC-ODC mice administered L-Arg along with ISO showed a rapid onset of systolic dysfunction and died within 48 h. Myocytes isolated from MHC-ODC mice administered L-Arg/ISO exhibited reduced contractility and altered calcium transients, suggesting an alteration in [Ca(2+)] homeostasis, and abbreviated action potential duration, which may contribute to arrhythmogenesis. The already elevated levels of spermidine and spermine were not further altered in MHC-ODC hearts by L-Arg/ISO treatment, suggesting alternative L-Arg utilization pathways lead to dysregulation of intracellular calcium. MHC-ODC mice administered an arginase inhibitor (Nor-NOHA) along with ISO died almost as rapidly as L-Arg/ISO-treated mice, while the iNOS inhibitor S-methyl-isothiourea (SMT) was strongly protective against L-Arg/ISO. These results point to the induction of arginase as a protective response to β-adrenergic stimulation in the setting of high polyamines. Further, NO generated by exogenously supplied L-Arg may contribute to the lethal consequences of L-Arg/ISO treatment. Since considerable variations in human cardiac polyamine and L-Arg content are likely, it is possible that alterations in these factors may influence myocyte contractility.

  13. An etoposide-resistant lung cancer subline overexpresses the multidrug resistance-associated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, L. A.; Ross, D. D.; Ordonez, J. V.; Yang, W.; Gao, Y.; Tong, Y.; Belani, C. P.; Gutheil, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have characterised an etoposide-resistant subline of the small-cell lung cancer cell line, UMCC-1, derived at our centre. Subline UMCC-1/VP was developed by culturing the parent line in increasing concentrations of etoposide over 16 months. UMCC-1/VP is 20-fold resistant to etoposide by MTT assays, relative to the parent line, and is cross-resistant to doxorubicin, vincristine and actinomycin D, but not to taxol, cisplatin, melphalan, thiotepa or idarubicin. Topoisomerase II immunoblotting demonstrates a 50% reduction of the protein in the resistant subline. The UMCC-1/VP subline demonstrates a marked decrease in the accumulation of [3H]etoposide relative to the parent line, as well as a modest reduction in the accumulation of daunorubicin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrate no detectable mdr1 expression but marked expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) gene in the resistant subline. Northern blotting with an MRP cDNA probe confirms marked overexpression of the MRP gene only in the UMCC-1/VP subline. Western blotting with antisera against MRP peptide confirms a 195 kDa protein band in the UMCC-1/VP subline. Southern blotting experiments demonstrate a 10-fold amplification of the MRP gene in the resistant subline. Depletion of glutathione with buthionine sulphoximine sensitised UMCC-1/VP cells to daunorubicin and etoposide. Our studies indicate that MRP gene expression may be induced by etoposide and may lead to reduced accumulation of the drug. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7669558

  14. Cardiac-specific overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase does not result in severe cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Heger, Jacqueline; Gödecke, Axel; Flögel, Ulrich; Merx, Marc W; Molojavyi, Andrei; Kühn-Velten, W Nikolaus; Schrader, Jürgen

    2002-01-11

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent regulator of myocardial contractility, has been implicated in the development of heart failure; however, no study exists describing the relation between expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), formation of NO in vivo, and cardiac contractility. We have therefore generated transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing iNOS under the cardiospecific alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) promoter. In vitro, iNOS activity in hearts of two transgenic lines was 260- to 400-fold above controls (wild type [WT]), but TG mice were viable and appeared normal. Ventricular mass/body weight ratio did not differ; heart rate and cardiac output as well as mean arterial blood pressure were decreased by 10%. NO(x) levels of hearts and blood of TG mice were 2.5- and 2-fold above WT controls, respectively. In the isolated heart, release of the NO oxidation products nitrate and nitrite, an index of in vivo NOS activity, was 40-fold over WT. However, cardiac hemodynamics and levels of ATP and phosphocreatine were unaltered. The high iNOS activity was associated with reduced cardiac L-arginine in TG hearts to only 15% of the WT, indicating limited substrate availability, whereas L-citrulline was 20-fold elevated. Our findings demonstrate that the heart can tolerate high levels of iNOS activity without detrimental functional consequences. The concept that iNOS-derived NO is the triggering factor in the pathomechanism leading to heart failure therefore needs to be reevaluated. PMID:11786524

  15. Overexpression of CREB in the nucleus accumbens shell increases cocaine reinforcement in self-administering rats.

    PubMed

    Larson, Erin B; Graham, Danielle L; Arzaga, Rose R; Buzin, Nicole; Webb, Joseph; Green, Thomas A; Bass, Caroline E; Neve, Rachael L; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Nestler, Eric J; Self, David W

    2011-11-01

    Chronic exposure to addictive drugs enhances cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated gene expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), and these effects are thought to reduce the positive hedonic effects of passive cocaine administration. Here, we used viral-mediated gene transfer to produce short- and long-term regulation of CREB activity in NAc shell of rats engaging in volitional cocaine self-administration. Increasing CREB expression in NAc shell markedly enhanced cocaine reinforcement of self-administration behavior, as indicated by leftward (long-term) and upward (short-term) shifts in fixed ratio dose-response curves. CREB also increased the effort exerted by rats to obtain cocaine on more demanding progressive ratio schedules, an effect highly correlated with viral-induced modulation of BDNF protein in the NAc shell. CREB enhanced cocaine reinforcement when expressed either throughout acquisition of self-administration or when expression was limited to postacquisition tests, indicating a direct effect of CREB independent of reinforcement-related learning. Downregulating endogenous CREB in NAc shell by expressing a short hairpin RNA reduced cocaine reinforcement in similar tests, while overexpression of a dominant-negative CREB(S133A) mutant had no significant effect on cocaine self-administration. Finally, increasing CREB expression after withdrawal from self-administration enhanced cocaine-primed relapse, while reducing CREB levels facilitated extinction of cocaine seeking, but neither altered relapse induced by cocaine cues or footshock stress. Together, these findings indicate that CREB activity in NAc shell increases the motivation for cocaine during active self-administration or after withdrawal from cocaine. Our results also highlight that volitional and passive drug administration can lead to substantially different behavioral outcomes.

  16. Cardiac-specific overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase does not result in severe cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Heger, Jacqueline; Gödecke, Axel; Flögel, Ulrich; Merx, Marc W; Molojavyi, Andrei; Kühn-Velten, W Nikolaus; Schrader, Jürgen

    2002-01-11

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent regulator of myocardial contractility, has been implicated in the development of heart failure; however, no study exists describing the relation between expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), formation of NO in vivo, and cardiac contractility. We have therefore generated transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing iNOS under the cardiospecific alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) promoter. In vitro, iNOS activity in hearts of two transgenic lines was 260- to 400-fold above controls (wild type [WT]), but TG mice were viable and appeared normal. Ventricular mass/body weight ratio did not differ; heart rate and cardiac output as well as mean arterial blood pressure were decreased by 10%. NO(x) levels of hearts and blood of TG mice were 2.5- and 2-fold above WT controls, respectively. In the isolated heart, release of the NO oxidation products nitrate and nitrite, an index of in vivo NOS activity, was 40-fold over WT. However, cardiac hemodynamics and levels of ATP and phosphocreatine were unaltered. The high iNOS activity was associated with reduced cardiac L-arginine in TG hearts to only 15% of the WT, indicating limited substrate availability, whereas L-citrulline was 20-fold elevated. Our findings demonstrate that the heart can tolerate high levels of iNOS activity without detrimental functional consequences. The concept that iNOS-derived NO is the triggering factor in the pathomechanism leading to heart failure therefore needs to be reevaluated.

  17. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4⁺ T Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study's aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4⁺ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4⁺ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4⁺ IFN-γ⁺ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca(2+) and p-ERK) in CD4⁺ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4⁺ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4⁺IFN-γ⁺ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire.

  18. LEDGF/p75 Overexpression Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Necrosis and Upregulates the Oxidoreductase ERP57/PDIA3/GRP58 in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anamika; Cajigas-Du Ross, Christina K.; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Rojas, Heather; Banerjee, Hiya; Martinez, Shannalee R.; Acevedo-Martinez, Stephanny; Casiano, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) mortality is driven by highly aggressive tumors characterized by metastasis and resistance to therapy, and this aggressiveness is mediated by numerous factors, including activation of stress survival pathways in the pro-inflammatory tumor microenvironment. LEDGF/p75, also known as the DFS70 autoantigen, is a stress transcription co-activator implicated in cancer, HIV-AIDS, and autoimmunity. This protein is targeted by autoantibodies in certain subsets of patients with PCa and inflammatory conditions, as well as in some apparently healthy individuals. LEDGF/p75 is overexpressed in PCa and other cancers, and promotes resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death via the transactivation of survival proteins. We report in this study that overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells attenuates oxidative stress-induced necrosis but not staurosporine-induced apoptosis. This finding was consistent with the observation that while LEDGF/p75 was robustly cleaved in apoptotic cells into a p65 fragment that lacks stress survival activity, it remained relatively intact in necrotic cells. Overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells led to the upregulation of transcript and protein levels of the thiol-oxidoreductase ERp57 (also known as GRP58 and PDIA3), whereas its depletion led to ERp57 transcript downregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcription reporter assays showed LEDGF/p75 binding to and transactivating the ERp57 promoter, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly elevated co-expression of these two proteins in clinical prostate tumor tissues. Our results suggest that LEDGF/p75 is not an inhibitor of apoptosis but rather an antagonist of oxidative stress-induced necrosis, and that its overexpression in PCa leads to ERp57 upregulation. These findings are of significance in clarifying the role of the LEDGF/p75 stress survival pathway in PCa. PMID:26771192

  19. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  20. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells.