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Sample records for hipotiroidismo neonatal fisiopatogenia

  1. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  2. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  3. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  4. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  5. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  6. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  7. Neonatal Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Whitington, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as “self” and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies. PMID:25755519

  8. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  9. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  10. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  11. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, Antonio; Cimaz, Rolando; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2002-12-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB), defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0-27 d after birth), is a rare disorder closely linked to transplacental transport of maternal antibodies anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. These antibodies may induce a myocarditis, or interact directly with calcium channel proteins with disturbance of transmembrane signaling at the level of the conduction tissue, or interfere with apoptosis. Depending on the severity of the process, the fetus may die in utero or a few days after birth or survive to the perinatal period and have a near-normal life; in most survivors a pace-maker must be implanted. Skin lesions, haematological disorders, and hepatic cholestasis are other transient clinical features of the syndrome. Sinus bradycardia and QT interval prolongation may be observed as well in babies born from anti-Ro/SSA positive mothers. The risk of recurrence of complete block ranges from 10-17%. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Their long-term outcome generally is more reassuring than previously assumed and arthralgias and dry eyes are the most common symptoms. A standard therapy for blocks detected in utero still does not exist. The prevalence of complete CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women and with known connective-tissue disease was 2%. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 2 wk starting from the 16 wk gestation, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women.

  12. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  13. Neonatal leukaemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Handler, M Z; Schwartz, R A

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal leukaemia cutis is a significant neoplasm that may represent a cutaneous manifestation of systemic leukaemia, usually of myeloblastic type. Rarely, it may be or appear to be limited to skin, in which case it is called neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis. By definition, it presents within the first 4 weeks of life and often has a 'blueberry muffin baby' appearance of magenta coloured nodules affecting almost any area of the skin, usually sparing mucous membranes, palms and soles. This clinical pattern is more commonly associated with neonatal infections such rubella and toxoplasmosis, and may be evident with other neonatal neoplasms such as neuroblastoma. Due to the morbidity associated with chemotherapy and reported cases of spontaneous remission without systemic progression in those with neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis without 11q23 translocation, the authors not treating the child with chemotherapy, but to simply monitor for fading of the violaceous nodules, and watch for possible signs of systemic leukaemia.

  14. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  15. Neonatal hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Margaret A

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal hearing screening can be performed using reliable and reproducible methods. Intervention before the age of 6 months with hearing aids and appropriate educational support services will give the infant the best possible opportunity to develop language. Potential barriers to efficient implementation of a neonatal hearing screening program include access to appropriate and timely diagnostic and support services and insurance to cover the services. Without universal neonatal hearing screening, many children with hearing loss will be missed, which will have a direct negative impact on their speech, language, educational, and social development. PMID:12809324

  16. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, Veronique E J; Stam, Edo D; Welborn, Kathleen M; Sas, Theo C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease.

  17. Drug Screening in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2016-01-01

    Gestational substance exposure continues to be a significant problem. Neonates may be exposed to various substances including illicit drugs, prescription drugs, and other legal substances that are best not used during pregnancy because of their potential deleterious effects as possible teratogens or their potential to create dependence and thus withdrawal in the neonate. Screening the newborn for gestational substance exposure is important for both acute care and early intervention to promote the best possible long-term outcomes. This column provides insight into what is known about the extent of substance use by pregnant women, an overview of neonatal biologic matrices for drug testing, and a discussion of the legal implications of neonatal substance screening. PMID:27636697

  18. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  19. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  20. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of readiness for neonatal resuscitation in low-risk maternity settings is challenging. The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) algorithm is a community standard in the United States; yet training is biannual, and exposure to enough critical events to be proficient at timely implementation of the algorithm and the advanced procedures is rare. Evidence supports hands-free leadership to help prevent task saturation and communication to promote patient safety. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation involves the addition of remote, expert NRP leadership (a NICU-based neonatal nurse practitioner) via camera link to augment effectiveness of the low-risk birth center team. Unanticipated outcomes to report include faster times to transfer initiation and neuroprotective cooling. The positive impact of remote NRP leadership could lead to use of telemedicine to support teams at birthing centers throughout the United States as well as around the world.

  1. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Pet, Gillian C

    2015-09-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This article explores some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury is discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  2. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  3. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons.

  4. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  5. Illuminance of neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Moseley, M J; Fielder, A R

    1990-07-01

    We have measured the illuminance (brightness) of seven neonatal units during both the day and the night. When the units were lit solely by fluorescent tubes the mean illuminance was 348 lux (range 192-690). During the day the mean illuminance was 470 lux (range 236-905). The high dependency regions in four of the seven units were significantly brighter than the corresponding low dependency nurseries at all times. In two of these units there is a policy of reducing the amount of artificial light in the low dependency areas at night, and in these the normal mean illuminance was 50 lux. We have measured the general levels of illumination to which a neonate might be exposed; the ocular exposure to light of a neonate depends, however, on both physical and biological factors and more research is required before an accurate estimate can be made.

  6. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  7. Persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Mathew, P M; Young, J M; Abu-Osba, Y K; Mulhern, B D; Hammoudi, S; Hamdan, J A; Sa'di, A R

    1988-03-01

    Over a 3-year period, the diagnosis of persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism (PNH) was made in seven infants, from an unselected cohort of 18,726 births, all of Saudi Arabian origin. Thus the incidence of PNH was one in 2,675 births. The high incidence, associated consanguinity, and occurrence in siblings suggest that PNH may be inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder.

  8. Neonatal antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares Rolim, A M; Castro, M; Santiago, M B

    2006-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a clinical entity characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, adverse obstetric outcome and the presence of antibodies against phospholipids in serum or plasma. The objective of the present study is to describe a rare case of APS that occurred in a neonate born from a patient previously diagnosed as primary APS. A male, preterm born twin infant, whose mother had been diagnosed as primary APS, developed thrombocytopenia, livedo reticularis, pericardial effusion and thrombosis of the left subclavian and external jugular veins concomitantly with severe respiratory tract infection soon after his delivery, that culminated with his death two months after the birth, in spite of the large spectrum antibiotic therapy and all supportive measures. Laboratory findings included high titers of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies and moderate titers of IgG isotype and negative antinuclear antibody, configuring a case of neonatal APS. Neonatal APS is a rare clinical condition, with only a few cases described in the literature. Its occurrence may depend on the passage of antibodies through the placenta or, as it seems to have occurred in the present case, by the production of de novo antibodies by the fetus. The present case illustrates the necessity of a higher surveillance of the neonates born from mothers with primary APS or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for the eventual development of such complication. PMID:16761506

  9. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  10. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  11. Ebstein's anomaly in neonates.

    PubMed

    Moura, C; Guimarães, H; Areias, J C; Moreira, J

    2001-09-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease abnormality in which the tricuspid valve leaflets do not attach normally to the tricuspid valve annulus. The effective tricuspid valve orifice is displaced apically into the right ventricle (RV), near the junction of the inlet and the trabecular parts of the RV. The authors present a retrospective study of the patients with Ebstein's anomaly admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, in the period between January 1993 and March 2000. There were ten patients, representing 0.24% of total neonates and 1.99% of total congenital heart disease admitted to the institution in the same period. Fifty per cent were male and only one case had prenatal diagnosis. Holosystolic murmur (100%) from tricuspid regurgitation and cyanosis (80%) were the most frequent clinical findings. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 90% of the neonates, with a "balloon-shaped" enlarged heart. The main electrocardiographic findings were right atrial enlargement (70%) and arrhythmias (40%). Apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve, to a maximum of 20 mm, and leaflets tethering to underlying RV myocardium were found in all patients. Tricuspid valve regurgitation was found in 90% (severe form in four cases). An atrial intracardiac shunt, mostly right-to-left, was also found in 50%. Digoxin was used (40%) to restore sinus rhythm. Fifty per cent of the neonates received intravenous prostaglandins. Two patients required a surgical procedure. Two patients died in the neonatal period. During the follow-up period (range 0.3-74.6 months), only one episode of supraventricular tachycardia was recorded. At present seven patients are clinically stable, three of them on medication.

  12. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  13. [Neonatal hearing screening].

    PubMed

    Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; van Straaten, H L; Ens-Dokkum, M H; Kauffman-de Boer, M A

    2000-03-25

    Approximately 1 to 2 per thousand live-born infants suffer from a serious perceptive hearing loss. Normal hearing from birth is essential for optimal human development (language and speech, social and emotional development, communicative skills and learning). The earlier the hearing loss is diagnosed the better the prognosis for the infant with a hearing impairment. Suitable methods are now available for neonatal hearing screening: automated measurement of auditory brain stem response and measurement of oto-acoustic emissions. Screening must be viewed as only the first step in a program of diagnosis, treatment and habilitation of these children. The ultimate goal of the implementation of neonatal hearing screening is: identification of bilateral hearing losses before the age of 3 months and start of therapy and counselling before the age of 6 months.

  14. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  15. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  16. Humane Neonatal Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Levin, A

    1999-04-01

    The author has worked for many years in experimental departments in the former Soviet health system. Now, with integration into the western health system, many questions are being asked about high-technology neonatal medicine and whether it is sufficiently humane. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) movement is well known all over the world, but unfortunately it is only used for healthy children in maternity hospitals. A paradoxical situation has been created: the routines of maternity wards comply with the BFHI, whereas a neonatal intensive care unit in the same hospital may not meet the requirements of the BFHI. BFHI mainly cover breastfeeding in maternity hospitals. Humane Neonatal Care Initiatives include minimum aggressive therapy, minimum contact between sick newborns and medical staff, and maximum contact with mothers; the number of tests and examinations should be reduced to a minimum. Eleven steps towards the improvement of psychosocial and medical care in units for sick newborns are presented. This article is intended to provoke serious discussion. PMID:10342526

  17. Pasteurella gallinarum neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, K; Sein, P P; Shahnawaz, M; Hoosen, A A

    2002-01-01

    A 4-day-old baby weighing 1.7 kg was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, Pretoria, with a history of apneic attacks. On examination there was an umbilical sepsis and the neonate was septicemic. The baby had been delivered at home and the umbilical cord had been cut by the grandmother using unclean scissors and chimney soot applied to the umbilical stump. On admission, a septic screen was done and antibiotic treatment was started with penicillin and amikacin. The investigations showed that the baby was slightly anemic, with hemoglobin levels of 10.0 g/dL (14.9-23.7 g/dL), and a pure growth of a Gram-negative bacillus was obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid, blood culture and suprapubic aspirate urine specimens. The Gram-negative bacillus was catalase and oxidase positive and it was identified as Pasteurella gallinarum. Antimicrobial profiling showed the organism to be susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin and amikacin. Despite having received antimicrobial agents to which the etiological agent was susceptible, the neonate died within 5 days of admission. The cause of death was postulated to be due to overwhelming sepsis which resulted in septic shock. PMID:11906503

  18. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  19. Neonatal haemostasis and the management of neonatal thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Will, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Two detailed reviews of the management of neonatal thrombosis were published in 2012; one was an up-dated version of guidance first issued in 2004 and the other was a comprehensive review. Both of these publications gave very similar advice regarding the practical aspects of the indications, dosage and management of antithrombotic therapy. The authors stated that the evidence supporting most of their recommendations for anti-thrombotic therapy in neonates remained weak and so the therapy for a neonate with a thrombosis has to be based on an individualized assessment of estimated risk versus potential benefit. The aim of this present review is to give the treating physician an outline of the unique physiology of neonatal coagulation and how this affects the monitoring, dosing and even the choice of therapeutic strategy for the management of thrombosis in the neonate.

  20. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  1. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, Jill P; Clancy, Robert M

    2003-09-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes, although quite rare, provide an excellent opportunity to examine disease from bench to bedside. During the past year numerous publications have reported basic and clinical research. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in more than 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with conduction abnormalities in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with congenital heart block was at or below one in 50. Although the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease, and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors from the scavenging macrophages, and transdifferentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroblast scarring phenotype. Cross-reactivity of anti-52-kD SSA/Ro antibodies with a serotoninergic cardiac receptor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)4, has been suggested but remains unconfirmed. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to grow, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late-onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements that identify first-degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. Reassuringly, most children with neonatal lupus syndromes do not

  2. [Natal and neonatal teeth].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Manuela; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Natal teeth have been defined as teeth which are present at birth, while neonatal teeth erupt during the first 30 days. Their occurrence is rare, the prevalence ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3000 with a higher frequency in the lip and palate clefts and syndroms. In about 85% natal or neonatal teeth are lower central incisors (60% in pairs), rare are upper teeth, molars and multiple teeth. In almost 90% they are part of the deciduous dentition. A lot of possible causes of early eruption are discussed, but only the relation to hereditary factors seems to be evident. An autosomal dominant trait is often described. The appearance of these teeth is dependent on the degree of maturity, but most of the time it is loose, small, discoloured and hypoplastic. Histologically, enamel hypoplasia with normal prism structure is apparent. No significant disturbances of the dentin structures are observed, only cervically dentin becomes atubular with spaces and enclosed cells. A large vascular pulp and failure of root formation are further investigations. Our microhardness measurements showed values from 24.3-32.4 KHN for enamel and 48.3-62.2 KHN for dentin, while normal deciduous teeth have an enamel hardness of 322.0 +/- 17.5 KHN. The thickness of enamel was never more than 280 microm compared to up to 1200 microm in normal teeth. This shows the retarded development of natal and neonatal teeth, because mineralization has not finished at the time of birth. In accordance with developmental age tooth structure and appearence are normal. In consideration of complications as Riga-Fede-disease, feeding problems, possibility of infection and hypermobility most of the time extraction is the treatment of choice, but in the interest of protecting the child this decision should be made carefully. PMID:17051960

  3. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  4. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

  5. Transient neonatal tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Rice, D N; Houston, I B; Lyon, I C; Macarthur, B A; Mullins, P R; Veale, A M; Guthrie, R

    1989-01-01

    Children who had presented with transient neonatal tyrosinaemia (TNT) were compared with a group of unaffected controls at 7-9 years of age. A comprehensive psychometric assessment revealed significant differences between the groups in adaptive behaviour, psycholinguistic abilities, and speed of learning. In nearly all components of the tests used, higher levels of TNT were associated with lower levels of performance. This study demonstrates that TNT, a condition commonly regarded as benign in the short term, has long-term effects which may be detrimental to the child in school.

  6. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  7. Neonatal hygroscopic condenser humidifier.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, A; Mebius, C; Palmer, K

    1987-01-01

    A hygroscopic condenser humidifier was developed for neonates on mechanical ventilation and was evaluated by laboratory tests and clinically. Humidification provided by the unit was measured in the 10- to 50-ml tidal-volume range at ambient temperatures of 24 degrees C and 38 degrees C. The effect of a leaking patient connection on device performance was investigated. Leakage rates were measured routinely in a neonatal ICU and surgery to determine the clinical significance. In the entire tidal volume and temperature range, the unit provided an inspiratory water content in excess of 30 g/m3 when the leak fraction (volume leaked/volume delivered at Y-piece) was less than 15%. This was found in three out of four cases. In about one out of ten cases, the leak exceeded 30%, which invariably led to corrective action, such as repositioning or changing the endotracheal tube. However, even at a 30% leak, a water content of about 26 g/m3 was still available for humidifying the inspired gas, which corresponds to normal physiologic conditions found in the trachea for nasal breathing of room air.

  8. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day. PMID:26931268

  9. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  10. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  11. Neonatal iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rao, R; Georgieff, M K

    2001-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to iron deficiency. Their total body iron content at birth is low and gets further depleted by clinical practices such as uncompensated phlebotomy losses and exogenous erythropoietin administration during the neonatal period. Early iron deficiency appears to adversely affect cognitive development in human infants. To maintain iron sufficiency and meet the iron demands of catch-up postnatal growth, iron supplementation is prudent in preterm infants. A dose of 2-4 mg/kg/day is recommended for preterm infants who are fed exclusively human milk. A dose of 6 mg/kg/day or more is needed with the use of exogenous erythropoietin or to correct preexisting iron deficiency. However, due to the poor antioxidant capabilities of preterm infants and the potential role of iron in several oxidant-related perinatal disorders, indiscriminate iron supplementation should be avoided.

  12. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  13. Mastitis in a neonatal filly

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca; Lewis, Danyse; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare occurrence in the horse. This report documents a case of mastitis caused by an organism within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae group in a 1-week-old Paint filly. PMID:25565717

  14. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  15. Barrier mechanisms in neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Ingrid; Chip, Sophorn; Vexler, Zinaida S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data continue to reveal that the incidence of perinatal stroke is high, similar to that in the elderly. Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and severe long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, including cerebral palsy. Experimental models of cerebral ischemia in neonatal rodents have shown that the pathophysiology of perinatal brain damage is multifactorial. Cerebral vasculature undergoes substantial structural and functional changes during early postnatal brain development. Thus, the state of the vasculature could affect susceptibility of the neonatal brain to cerebral ischemia. In this review, we discuss some of the most recent findings regarding the neurovascular responses of the immature brain to focal arterial stroke in relation to neuroinflammation. We also discuss a possible role of the neonatal blood-CSF barrier in modulating inflammation and the long-term effects of early neurovascular integrity after neonatal stroke on angiogenesis and neurogenesis. PMID:25426016

  16. A case of neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Malecki, J M

    1991-03-01

    The morbidity and mortality from neonatal tetanus are preventable. It is largely a disease of developing countries. This single case of neonatal tetanus in southern Florida must serve as an indicator for the need for health care professionals to evaluate the degree of utilization of maternal health services and the impact of immunization programs for those women at risk, in this case, women who have migrated from developing countries. PMID:2000534

  17. Risk estimates for neonatal myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Glånz, A; Fråser, F C

    1984-01-01

    Children who inherit the autosomal dominant gene for myotonic dystrophy from their mother rather than their father may develop the severe neonatal type rather than the late onset type. The families of 22 neonatal type probands and 59 late onset type probands were studied to determine the risk of occurrence and recurrence of the neonatal type. The frequency of the neonatal type in sibs of neonatal type probands was 29%, or 37% if cases of neonatal deaths are counted as affected. This is significantly higher than the 6% of the neonatal type found in the offspring of affected women not ascertained through a child with the neonatal type. These data suggest that certain women carrying the gene for myotonic dystrophy are predisposed to have children affected with the neonatal type rather than the late onset type. The female near relatives of these women do not seem to share this predisposition. The data should be useful for genetic counseling. PMID:6748014

  18. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  19. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems.

  20. Neonatal infrared axillary thermometry.

    PubMed

    Seguin, J; Terry, K

    1999-01-01

    The authors compared axillary skin temperatures (AT) measured with an infrared (IR) thermometer (Lightouch Neonate, Exergen Corp) with rectal temperatures (RT) in 16 newly born term infants under radiant warmers (RW) and in cribs. Twelve stable, growing premature infants in incubators were also studied. This new device may be useful because of safety and rapid results (1 second), but clinical accuracy is unknown. For term infants, mean (SD) RT-AT difference was 0.1 (0.48) degree C under RW and 0.25 (0.17) degree C 2 hours later in cribs. For premature infants in incubators the mean RT-AT difference was 0.09 (0.16) degree C. Axillary temperatures measured by IR thermometer approximate RT for newly born term infants in cribs and stable premature infants in incubators. For newly born term infants under RW, RT-AT differences vary more widely, limiting clinical usefulness in this setting. The device, the unique age of this population, and the RW environment may play a role. PMID:9924640

  1. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  2. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  3. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20th week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30th week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  4. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-10-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20(th) week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30(th) week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  5. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  6. Nonpolio enterovirus infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Haston, Julia C; Dixon, Terry C

    2015-05-01

    There are currently 12 species and over 100 serotypes that have been identified in the enterovirus genus, including the coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and polioviruses. Since their discovery 65 years ago, much has been discovered and continues to be researched regarding the pathogenicity and scope of disease of nonpolio enteroviruses. Like many infections, enteroviruses have been found to affect neonates much differently, and often more severely, than older children and adults. Neonatal infections often cause mild illnesses with nonspecific symptoms, but they may also have severe presentations involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hematologic, or central nervous systems. This article provides an overview of what is known about nonpolio enteroviruses in neonates including epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

  7. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  8. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of a... humidity, a control valve through which oxygen may be added, and access ports for nursing care....

  9. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Agrawal, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus. PMID:24741257

  10. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  11. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  12. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  13. Neonatal posterior fossa subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Coker, S; Beltran, R; Fine, M

    1987-07-01

    Hemorrhage into the posterior fossa is a rare neurosurgical emergency in neonates. CT scanning is diagnostic. Blood layering under the apex of the tentorium cerebelli, however, may resemble a dilated vascular structure, and the rigidity of the pressured tentorium may prevent upward transmission of increased intracranial pressure, resulting in a soft fontanelle.

  14. Standardisation of neonatal clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Giuliani, F; Haroon, A; Knight, H E; Albernaz, E; Batra, M; Bhat, B; Bertino, E; McCormick, K; Ochieng, R; Rajan, V; Ruyan, P; Cheikh Ismail, L; Paul, V

    2013-09-01

    The International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21(st) Century (INTERGROWTH-21(st) ) is a large-scale, population-based, multicentre project involving health institutions from eight geographically diverse countries, which aims to assess fetal, newborn and preterm growth under optimal conditions. Given the multicentre nature of the project and the expected number of preterm births, it is vital that all centres follow the same standardised clinical care protocols to assess and manage preterm infants, so as to ensure maximum validity of the resulting standards as indicators of growth and nutrition with minimal confounding. Moreover, it is well known that evidence-based clinical practice guidelines can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. The INTERGROWTH-21(st) Neonatal Group produced an operations manual, which reflects the consensus reached by members of the group regarding standardised definitions of neonatal morbidities and the minimum standards of care to be provided by all centres taking part in the project. The operational definitions and summary management protocols were developed by consensus through a Delphi process based on systematic reviews of relevant guidelines and management protocols by authoritative bodies. This paper describes the process of developing the Basic Neonatal Care Manual, as well as the morbidity definitions and standardised neonatal care protocols applied across all the INTERGROWTH-21(st) participating centres. Finally, thoughts about implementation strategies are presented.

  15. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  16. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  17. Neonatal Informatics: Information Technology to Support Handoffs in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jonathan P; Van Eaton, Erik G; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Communication failures during physician handoffs represent a significant source of preventable adverse events. Computerized sign-out tools linked to hospital electronic medical record systems and customized for neonatal care can facilitate standardization of the handoff process and access to clinical information, thereby improving communication and reducing adverse events. It is important to note, however, that adoption of technological tools alone is not sufficient to remedy flawed communication processes. OBJECTIVES: After completing this article, readers should be able to: Identify key elements of a computerized sign-out tool.Describe how an electronic tool might be customized for neonatal care.Appreciate that technological tools are only one component of the handoff process they are designed to facilitate.

  18. Epidemiology of early neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, N K; Bharambe, M S; Garg, B S; Mathur, J S; Goswami, K

    1994-01-01

    During 1981-1991 at a rural teaching hospital (Kasturba Hospital) of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences in Sevagram, Wardha, India, 454 of 13,939 newborns died during the early neonatal period for an early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR) of 33.7/1000 live births. The ENMR for boys was not significantly different from that for girls (36.1 vs. 28.6). Community medicine specialists analyzed data on these early neonatal deaths to examine distribution of early neonatal mortality, especially its relationship with prematurity, low birth weight, birth order, and by sex. They calculated average percent deaths (APD) per hour to examine the dynamics in early neonatal mortality. The mean age at death was lower among newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (23.47 vs. 26.85 hours; p 0.001). ENMR was higher for newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (41.74% vs. 27.35%; P 0.001). The mean age at death increased as gestation increased (10.34 for 28 weeks; 24.27 for 28-33 weeks, 31.53 for 33-37 weeks, and 34.43 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). ENMR decreased as gestation increased (850 for 28 weeks; 375 for 28-33 weeks, 147.02 for 33-37 weeks, and 8.77 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). The mean age at death increased as birth weight increased for newborns weighing less than 1500 gms through 2000-2500 gms (23.36-37.13 hours; p 0.001). It was lowest among those weighing more 3000 gms (11.55 gms). ENMR fell as birth weight increased (614.33 for 1500 gms, 116.19 for 1500-2000 gms, 19.38 for 2000-2500 gms, 10.99 for 2500-3000 gms, and 5.41 for 3000 gms; p 0.001). The APD/hour for the first hour of life was 3.74% for a relative risk of 12.9. It decreased steadily as the hours of life increased (3.08% for 1-6 hours, 1.19% for 6-24 hours, 0.67% for 24-72 hours, and 0.29% for 72-168 hours). Knowledge of time of likely death can help providers know where they need to focus their attention to prevent early neonatal deaths.

  19. [Heart surgery in neonates (experience with surgery in 420 neonates)].

    PubMed

    Hucín, B; Tláskal, T; Horváth, P; Kostelka, M; Kucera, V; Tax, P; Reich, O; Chaloupecký, V; Skovránek, J; Kopecká, L

    1994-03-01

    In the child cardiocentre in Prague 5-Motol in 1977-1993 a total of 420 neonates with critical inborn heart disease were operated. Obstructive defects of the left heart were found in 178 children, obstructive defects of the right heart in 87, defects with a left-right shunt with pulmonary hypertension in 75, conotruncal malformations in 73 and various operations were made in 7 children. Complete repair of the defect was achieved in 281 neonates, incl. 104 where extracorporeal circulation was used. Palliative operations were made in 139 children. Early mortality during the entire period was 26%, whereby a decrease from 40% to 16% was recorded during the last three years. At present it is possible to repair permanently critical inborn heart disease in the majority of neonates. This is made possible in particular by early non-invasive diagnosis, treatment with prostaglandins E in duct-dependent critical heart disease, optimal time for and selection of most suitable surgery, microsurgical technique, miniaturization of extracorporeal circulation and the method of deep hypothermia. PMID:8184369

  20. DEA based neonatal lung simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, Samuel; Haemmerle, Enrico; Chang, Robin; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain

    2011-04-01

    To reduce the likelihood of ventilator induced lung injury a neonatal lung simulator is developed based on Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs). DEAs are particularly suited for this application due to their natural like response as well as their self-sensing ability. By actively controlling the DEA, the pressure and volume inside the lung simulator can be controlled giving rise to active compliance control. Additionally the capacitance of the DEA can be used as a measurement of volume eliminating the integration errors that plague flow sensors. Based on simulations conducted with the FEA package ABAQUS and experimental data, the characteristics of the lung simulator were explored. A relationship between volume and capacitance was derived based on the self sensing of a bubble actuator. This was then used to calculate the compliance of the experimental bubble actuator. The current results are promising and show that mimicking a neonatal lung with DEAs may be possible.

  1. EEG in the neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, M D; de Villepin-Touzery, A

    2015-03-01

    The execution and interpretation of neonatal EEG adheres to strict and specific criteria related to this very early age. In preterm newborns, the dedicated healthcare staff needs to respect EEG indications and chronology of EEG recordings in order to diagnose and manage various pathologies, and use EEG in addition to cerebral imaging. EEG analysis focuses on a global vision of the recording according to the neonate's state of alertness and various age-related patterns. Monitoring of continuous conventional EEG and simplified EEG signal processing can help screen for seizures and monitor the effect of antiepileptic treatment, as well as appreciating changes in EEG background activity, for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. EEG reports should be highly explanatory to meet the expectations of the physician's clinical request.

  2. Neonatal jaundice: the surgical viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Kling, S

    1980-12-20

    There is good evidence that neonatal hepatitis, biliary hypoplasia, biliary atresia and choledochal cyst are different stages of one disease process for which the term infantile obstructive cholangiopathy has been suggested. Thanks to the work of Kasai and the operation of hepatic portoenterostomy the surgical outlook has greatly improved, although in North America it still leaves much to be desired. One cannot procrastinate too long in the hope that the patient's condition will improve spontaneously, because the surgical results are much better when the operation is performed before the patient is 10 weeks old. This article outlines the steps that should be followed in investigating neonatal jaundice, the nonsurgical measures that can be taken in an attempt to reverse or alleviate the underlying condition, and the specific role of the pediatric surgeon in the management of choledochal cyst and biliary atresia.

  3. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  4. Pleural effusion in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sandeep Krishnanand; Butler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A premature neonate who developed respiratory distress in the first few days of life was found to have a pleural effusion, which reaccumulated following drainage. The effusion was demonstrated to be a chylothorax. He required multiple chest drains and was started on a medium chain triglyceride formula feed. This brought about a full resolution of the effusions and he made a complete recovery. PMID:22688472

  5. [A neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burgo J; van Rijn, Rick R; van Trotsenburg, A S P Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a neonate with ambiguous genitalia, physical examination revealed a phallus. Ultrasonography showed a vagina and uterus, but no gonads. Because of severe undervirilisation in the presence of a uterus, probably due to 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, parents were advised female sex assignment. When after a few weeks the phallus had increased in size, abdominal laparoscopy showed an underdeveloped uterus. Gonadal biopsy confirmed gonadal dysgenesis. Sex assignment was reconsidered and changed into the male gender. PMID:26200425

  6. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  7. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  8. Early-onset neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Kari A; Anderson-Berry, Ann L; Delair, Shirley F; Davies, H Dele

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS.

  9. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications.

  10. Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: a focus on.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Lagrasta, N; Garcìa Garcìa, C; Campos Serna, J; Zicari, E; Marzocca, G

    2002-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a multifactorial worldwide problem, representing the most frequent gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. Extremely common in preterm infants, it is also registered in fullterm low birth weight neonates. Despite extensive research, its etiopathogenesis is not completely understood and this neonatal disease remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This review proposes an interdisciplinary focus on recent developments in NEC etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management. PMID:12608653

  11. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL.

  12. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  13. Individual Differences and Auditory Conditioning in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, W. K.; And Others

    The purposes of this study are (1) to analyze learning ability in newborns using heart rate responses to auditory temporal conditioning and (2) to correlate these with measures on the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale. Twenty normal neonates were tested using the Brazelton Scale on the third day of life. They were also given a…

  14. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  15. Enterobacter cloacae causing pneumatocele in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Glustein, J Z; Kaplan, M

    1994-09-01

    Pneumatocele formation, a cyst-like rarefaction that develops within the lung parenchyma, is an unusual complication of pneumonia in the neonate. It has been reported to occur with Staphlococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We describe a case of a premature neonate with pneumonia and subsequent pneumatocele formation caused by Enterobacter cloacae.

  16. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  17. Brazelton Neonatal Assessment for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, Calvin L.

    This speech addresses the "What,""Why," and "How" of Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Training for school psychologists. "What" concerns the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale, its administration, and what it assesses. Based on the best performance, the infant's score on this scale is scored in the context of six states of consciousness…

  18. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  19. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  20. Osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A J; Stent, A W; Milne, M; Walmsley, E A

    2016-10-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disorder characterised by a defect in osteoclastic bone resorption. This report describes osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey that suffered a displaced tibial fracture. Radiographic examination identified generalised reduction in medullary cavity size, thickened mid-diaphyseal cortices and conical metaphyseal bone extending toward the mid-diaphysis of long bones. Postmortem examination identified additional fractures and brittle bones. Histologically, osteoclasts were absent in multiple bone sections. Diaphyseal cortices consisted of concentric bone lamellae with marrow tissue infiltration. Large wedges of secondary spongiosa extended from the metaphyseal growth plate. Clinical and histopathological features were similar to an osteoclast-deficient, autosomal recessive form of osteopetrosis in humans. PMID:27671079

  1. Internet resources for neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, S

    1999-03-01

    The availability of health information over the Internet has exploded in recent years. Nurses can use the Internet to access information to support professional and clinical interests and join in dialogues with colleagues around the world. The Internet can also be used to identify resources for clients and their families. As with any other information resource, Internet sites must be evaluated for accuracy, currency, and objectivity. The article describes examples of Internet resources and discussion forums for neonatal nurses, use of search engines to find and retrieve information about specific topics, and evaluation of World Wide Web sites.

  2. Bronchopleural fistula in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Shen-Schwarz, S; Dosi, P C; Schwarz, K O; Brown, E G; Strauss, L

    1986-01-01

    Bronchopleural fistula (BPF) produced by endotracheal suction catheter is a known cause of persistent pneumothorax in preterm infants in intensive care nurseries. This report describes the pulmonary pathology of a neonate who had sustained this injury. The observation suggests that the abnormal airflow results in severe damage of the involved lobe and an unusually mild bronchopulmonary dysplasia in the rest of the lung. This is in agreement with the fact that BPF acts as the path of least resistance for the oxygen-rich air from the ventilator.

  3. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  4. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  5. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-09-01

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period. PMID:27601113

  6. Neonatal networks: clinical research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Profit, Jochen; Soll, Roger F

    2015-12-01

    Worldwide, neonatal networks have been formed to address both the research and quality improvement agenda of neonatal-perinatal medicine. Neonatal research networks have led the way in conducting many of the most important clinical trials of the last 25 years, including studies of cooling for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, delivery room management with less invasive support, and oxygen saturation targeting. As we move into the future, increasing numbers of these networks are tackling quality improvement initiatives as a priority of their collaboration. Neonatal quality improvement networks have been in the forefront of the quality movement in medicine and, in the 21st century, have contributed to many of the reported improvements in care. In the coming years, building and maintaining this community of care is critical to the success of neonatal-perinatal medicine.

  7. Redirecting treatment during neonatal transport.

    PubMed

    Dulkerian, Susan J; Douglas, Webra Price; Taylor, Renee McCraine

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal transport teams comprise multidisciplinary health care providers who are skilled in patient care, communication and customer service, and equipment mechanics. They are extensively trained in resuscitation and stabilization, preparing for accelerating care, and their focus is preservation of life. In any situation focused on caring for critically ill patients, ethical issues and questions may arise. For instance, is it compassionate and/or cost-effective to separate mothers and infants when continuing/accelerating care is futile, and when and how should care be redirected from acute and lifesaving care to comfort care and bereavement support for the family? The knowledge and skills required to address such situations and communicate and participate in a redirection of care may not be adequately emphasized in the preparation of the professionals responsible for stabilizing and transporting critically ill newborns. This article raises issues relating to transport and redirecting care such as eligibility for transport, parental request and consent, separation of mothers and infants, palliative and bereavement care, ethical considerations, competitive transport environment, and customer service. A shared mental model is essential. The focus of this article is not to provide answers to all of these issues, but to highlight the complexity of the topic of redirecting treatment during neonatal transport. Redirecting treatment needs to be discussed, and health care professionals should be prepared during their transport team training. Each family and situation must be approached individually, with the acceptance that there will always be more questions than answers. PMID:21540683

  8. To explore the neonatal nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards caring for dying neonates in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Huei; Huang, Li-Chi; Liu, Hsin-Li; Lee, Ho-Yu; Wu, Shu-Ya; Chang, Yue-Cune; Peng, Niang-Huei

    2013-12-01

    (1) To explore attitudes and beliefs of neonatal nurses toward nursing care for dying neonates; (2) to estimate the influence of neonatal nurses' personal and professional characteristics on their attitudes towards end-of life care for dying infants. A cross-sectional design was used. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 80 neonatal nurses. Research setting was four level III NICUs at four medical centers around the central region of Taiwan. Research participants were neonatal nurses who had worked for at least 1 year in one of level III NICUs and had been directly involved with the care of dying infants. Research participants were 80 neonatal nurses (response rate 100 %). Research findings identified eight barriers hindering neonatal palliative care practice. These barriers were insufficient communication due to the lack of an in-service educational program; the lack of available counseling help for neonatal clinicians; inability to express personal opinions, values and beliefs towards neonatal palliative care; insufficient staffing; the lack of unit policies/guidelines for supporting palliative care; the technological imperative; parental demands and personal beliefs about death and previous experience caring for dying infants. Further studies are needed to explore each barrier and to provide in-service neonatal palliative care educational programs that are needed to decrease these barriers.

  9. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  10. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  11. Neonatal melioidosis: a case report from India.

    PubMed

    Noyal, M J C; Harish, B N; Bhat, V; Parija, S C

    2009-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei , is an infectious disease of major public health importance in Southeast Asia and Australia. We report, for the first time from the Indian subcontinent, a case of melioidosis in a neonate, its clinical presentation, microbiological diagnosis, possible mode of transmission and outcome. A pre-term female baby developed respiratory distress soon after birth. The child was febrile, had tachypnea, grunting, normal heart rate with a low pulse volume and poor peripheral perfusion. Chest X-ray revealed right-sided bronchopneumonia. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the blood culture of the neonate collected aseptically. The neonate was successfully treated with meropenem. PMID:19584512

  12. Diagnosis and management of neonatal thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Holzhauer, Susanne; Zieger, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the most common haematological abnormality in newborns admitted to neonatal care units and serves as an important indicator of underlying pathological processes of mother or child. In most cases thrombocytopenia is mild to moderate and resolves within the first weeks of life without any intervention. However, in some neonates thrombocytopenia is severe or may reflect an inborn platelet disorder. As clinical course and outcome of thrombocytopenia depend on the aetiology of thrombocytopenia, an appropriate work-up is essential to guide therapy in neonates with thrombocytopenia and to avoid severe bleeding.

  13. Neonatal peripheral hypotonia: clinical and electromyographic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Parano, E; Lovelace, R E

    1993-06-01

    Hypotonia is a common occurrence in pediatrics, especially in the neonatal period. The hypotonic neonate represents a diagnostic challenge for the general pediatrician because hypotonia may be caused by a lesion at any level in the neuraxis: (1) central nervous system (CNS), (2) peripheral nerves (PN), (3) neuromuscular junction, or (4) muscles. Distinguishing among these pathologies is a particularly arduous task. This review will discuss the clinical approach to neonatal hypotonia with emphasis on disorders of the peripheral nervous system and muscle, and the importance of the electrophysiological study as a diagnostic test.

  14. Retinoblastoma in the perinatal and neonatal child.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Dan S

    2012-08-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare primary intraocular malignancy. Presentation in the neonatal period is not common. With improved genetic testing, screening of the unborn child and neonate is taking on a greater role in the management of these patients. Treatment of retinoblastoma in the neonate is complex and requires a multidisciplinary and highly individualized approach. If possible, focal modalities should be used and external beam radiation avoided. Systemic intravenous chemotherapy may be necessary with regimens including carboplatin, vincristine and etoposide. Such cases are best managed by specialist centers with access to experts in oncology, ophthalmology, radiation therapy, genetics, pathology and anesthesia.

  15. Neonatal sludge: a finding of congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Coban, Dilek; Akın, Mustafa Ali; Akın, Leyla; Yıkılmaz, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most urgent diseases of the neonate. When diagnosed and treated at an early stage, its most important complication, mental retardation, is preventable. The signs of congenital hypothyroidism are nonspecific in neonates. Only 5% of the cases have characteristic clinical findings. One of the most important and earliest signs is prolonged jaundice during the neonatal period. We report herein a case of congenital hypothyroidism, who presented with icterus accompanied with sludge formation into the gallbladder, which disappeared after treatment with L-thyroxine.

  16. Neonatal ovarian cysts: therapeutic dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Widdowson, D J; Pilling, D W; Cook, R C

    1988-01-01

    Seven cases of neonatal ovarian cysts that presented over the past seven years were studied. Complications included torsion and rupture and usually occurred in cysts more than 5 cm in diameter. Surgical removal, either oophorectomy or cystectomy, was the treatment of choice. Because even cystectomy results in loss of normal ovarian tissue, and because spontaneous regression of cysts less than 5 cm in diameter can occur, a more conservative approach is now proposed. Regular ultrasonography alone is recommended if the cysts are less than 5 cm in diameter, and aspiration of the cysts followed by regular ultrasonographs if the cysts are more than 5 cm in diameter. Operation should be reserved for recurrent cysts or for those with complications. Cysts diagnosed antenatally may be aspirated in utero if there are signs of thoracic compression. Images Fig 1a Fig 1b Fig 2 PMID:3046508

  17. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale for predicting skin breakdown in neonates.

    PubMed

    Huffines, B; Logsdon, M C

    1997-01-01

    An instrument was developed to assess neonates at risk for skin breakdown, based on the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk in adults. Using such an instrument to predict, and thus prevent, skin breakdown could decrease costs associated with prolonged hospital stays in neonates. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale (NSRAS) was piloted with 32 neonates. Reliability was high for the subscales of general physical condition, activity, and nutrition, but low in the other three subscales. For predictive validity, sensitivity was 83% and specificity was 81%. The NSRAS appears to be useful in predicting days most likely for skin breakdown to occur.

  18. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone level is influenced by neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy factors.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Vanderpas, Jean; Tafforeau, Jean; Van Oyen, Herman; De Schepper, Jean

    2015-11-01

    The percentage of newborns with a neonatal whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) greater than 5 mIU/L has been used as an indicator of iodine deficiency at the population level. However, TSH levels in newborns may be influenced by many factors other than iodine status. The objective of this study was to identify neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants of neonatal TSH levels in a retrospective cohort study. The study sample included 313 Belgian mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children. The children had a neonatal TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mIU/L at neonatal screening, and blood samples were collected 3 to 5 days after birth. Children with suspected congenital hypothyroidism (neonatal TSH level >15 mIU/L), prematurely born (i.e., <37 weeks), or with a low birth weight (i.e., <2500 g) were excluded. Information about maternal and birth-related determinants was collected from the neonatal screening center via a self-administered questionnaire filled in by the mother together with the child's health booklet. Higher TSH levels were found in spring and winter compared to summer and autumn (P = .011). Higher TSH levels were associated with lifetime smoking behavior (up to child birth) in the mother (P = .005), lower weight gain during pregnancy (P = .014), and longer pregnancies (P = .003). This study showed that several neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants are influencing neonatal TSH level. PMID:26428622

  19. Challenging issues in neonatal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, David A

    2010-07-01

    In an era of quality improvement and 'getting to zero (infections and/or related mortality),' neonatal candidiasis is ripe for evidence-based initiatives. Knowledge of each institution's invasive Candida infection (ICI) incidence and infection-related mortality is critical to evaluate disease burden and effective interventions. Evidenced-based interventions include: antifungal prophylaxis, starting with appropriate dosing, and prompt removal of central venous catheters (CVC). There is A-I evidence supporting antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole, and it should be considered in every neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The literature supports targeting infants <1000 g and/or 1000 g and >or=28 weeks not receiving antifungal prophylaxis. Evaluation of ICI incidence and

  20. Whole blood viscosity of preterm infants - differences to term neonates.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-01-01

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates with the LS 300 allows approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids across the entire physiological shear range. Particular in preterm neonates, which in comparison to term neonates and adults have a substantially lower mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), rheological blood properties play a decisive role to maintain the perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 34 preterm neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. In addition aggregation index, plasma viscosity, hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined. The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of whole blood was achieved by the method of Ostwald. Shear stresses of whole blood of preterm neonates were significantly lower compared to term neonates at similar shear rates (velocity range 6.16 s-1-50 s-1). With hematocrit calculated to 0.40 the related exponent (n) of the viscosity of preterm neonates (by Ostwald) showed a significant lower exponent (n) (0.71 ± 0.07) than term neonates (0.76 ± 0.06). The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of plasma was achieved with the model of Ostwald in preterm neonates as well as in term neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Newton was lower for preterm neonates (0.89 ± 0.19) than for term neonates (1.04 ± 0.16). Concurrent to term neonates the whole blood of preterm neonates showed a very low aggregation index (term neonates 2.97 ± 2.10; preterm neonates 2.37 ± 1.32) and preterm neonates showed higher RBC deformability than term neonates. Because of the physiologically lower MAP and the particular viscous properties of neonatal blood special attention should be given when treating neonates with conventional blood products derived from adult donors. PMID:26444619

  1. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  2. Anaesthetic consideration for neonatal surgical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Pani, Nibedita; Panda, Chinmaya K

    2012-09-01

    A newborn requires constant vigilance, rapid recognition of the events and swift intervention during anaesthesia. The anaesthetic considerations in neonatal surgical emergencies are based on the physiological immaturity of various body systems, poor tolerance of the anaesthetic drugs, associated congenital disorders and considerations regarding the use of high concentration of oxygen. The main goal is for titration of anaesthetics to desired effects, while carefully monitoring of the cardiorespiratory status. The use of regional anaesthesia has shown to be safe and effective. Advancements in neonatology have resulted in the improvement of the survival of the premature and critically ill newborn babies. Most of the disorders previously considered as neonatal surgical emergencies in the past no longer require immediate surgery due to new technology and new methods of treating sick neonates. This article describes the common neonatal surgical emergencies and focuses on factors that affect the anaesthetic management of patients with these disorders.

  3. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable disease.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, H Hunter; Waldo, Ann B; Brown, Zane A; Corey, Lawrence; Drucker, Joan L; Ebel, Charles W; Leone, Peter A; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Whitley, Richard J

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal herpes is a devastating disease, the most serious complication of genital herpes, one of the most common serious congenital or perinatal infections, and the most frequent complication of sexually transmitted infections among children. Nevertheless, neonatal herpes is not reportable to health authorities in most states. The potential for prevention has been enhanced by recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances, and the disease meets widely accepted criteria for reporting, including incidence rates that exceed those of comparable conditions, epidemiologic instability, disease severity, direct and indirect socioeconomic costs, concern by persons at risk, the potential for prevention by public health interventions, and the prospect that the resulting data would influence public health policy. The absence of national surveillance contributes to beliefs by healthcare providers and the public health community that genital and neonatal herpes are uncommon conditions that affect small segments of society, beliefs that directly interfere with prevention. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable condition. PMID:16118598

  4. Perspectives on neonatal nursing: 1985-2005.

    PubMed

    Samson, Linda F

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal nursing practice has been influenced by a number of external forces over the past 20 years. This article explores some of the influences that have altered practice in the 20-year history of the Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Attention is directed to several significant influences such as the development of the Internet and the World Wide Web and the role that information plays in care delivery. Changing practice roles with the continuing evolution of the neonatal nurse practitioner role and the emerging plans for the doctorate of nursing practice are described. The history of professional associations for neonatal nurses and the impact of evidence-based practice are considered. Finally, the legal environment surrounding practice is explored.

  5. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  6. Cranial MRI in neonatal hypernatraemic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, A; Yiğit, S; Firat, M; Oran, O

    2000-05-01

    Severe neonatal hypernatraemia is a life-threatening electrolyte disorder because of its neurological complications. These are brain oedema, intracranial haemorrhages, haemorrhagic infarcts and thromboses. There are few reports concerning the radiological findings in the central nervous system in severe neonatal hypernatraemia. Cranial MRI findings in hypernatraemia have been reported in an older child, but have not been described in newborn infants. We report the cranial MRI findings in a newborn infant with acute renal failure and severe hypernatraemia.

  7. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kenji; Fujita, Riku; Maezawa, Masaki; Fukumoto, Natsuko; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Inokuma, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-08-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  8. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  9. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant, born at 39 weeks' gestation, and diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition and being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Jack's prognosis is poor and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. PMID:27615591

  10. Naloxone during neonatal resuscitation: acknowledging the unknown.

    PubMed

    Guinsburg, Ruth; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2006-03-01

    There are no studies to support or to refute the current recommendations regarding naloxone concentration, routes for administration, and doses in neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room. Given the lack of supporting evidence, naloxone should not be given routinely in the delivery room to depressed neonates whether or not they are exposed to opioids before delivery because no important improvement has been documented and the drug may have potential short- and long-term harmful effects.

  11. Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abdulraheem, Muhydeen Abiodun; Tongo, Olukemi Oluwatoyin; Orimadegun, Adebola Emmanuel; Akinbami, Olukayode Felix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal transport involves moving sick neonates in optimal conditions to ensure good outcomes. It is well organized in most developed countries but receives little attention in developing countries where the highest burden of neonatal mortality exists and a large number of newborns require referrals daily for better medical care. This study sought to evaluate the modes of transport, pre- and intra-transport care of neonates referred to the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods The methods of transporting 401 neonates presenting to the children’s emergency room of the hospital were evaluated as well as the care the babies received during transport. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi square test while continuous variables were compared by the student t-test. Results About a third presented in the first 12hours and 85% in the first week of life, all from within 80km radius. There were 67.1% term, 31.4% preterm and 1.5% post-term neonates, all without prior communication. The modes of transport included private vehicles (43.9%), commercial vehicles (40.6%), motorcycles (9.0%), ambulance (4.0%) and on foot (2.5%). Only 3 (0.7%) were transported in incubators and none in KMC position. Only 42.0% had referral letters and 7.0% were accompanied by medical personnel. Materials available during transport included Ambubags (3.7%), oxygen (3.5%) and some drugs (3.5%). Events during transport were apnoea, 4.7%, vomiting 1.0%, reduced activity 16.2% and seizures 13.7%. 19 (4.7%) neonates were dead on arrival. Pre-transport care included resuscitation (18.2%), intravenous fluid/feeding (24.4%) and supplemental oxygen (14.0%). Conclusion Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria are abysmal with associated high mortality. PMID:27800071

  12. Selenium status in neonates with connatal infection.

    PubMed

    Wiehe, Lennart; Cremer, Malte; Wisniewska, Monika; Becker, Niels-Peter; Rijntjes, Eddy; Martitz, Janine; Hybsier, Sandra; Renko, Kostja; Bührer, Christoph; Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases impair Se metabolism, and low Se status is associated with mortality risk in adults with critical disease. The Se status of neonates is poorly characterised, and a potential impact of connatal infection is unknown. We hypothesised that an infection negatively affects the Se status of neonates. We conducted an observational case-control study at three intensive care units at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Plasma samples were collected from forty-four neonates. On the basis of clinical signs for bacterial infection and concentrations of IL-6 or C-reactive protein, neonates were classified into control (n 23) and infected (n 21) groups. Plasma Se and selenoprotein P (SePP) concentrations were determined by X-ray fluorescence and ELISA, respectively, at day of birth (day 1) and 48 h later (day 3). Se and SePP showed a positive correlation in both groups of neonates. Se concentrations indicative of Se deficit in adults (500 ng/l). During antibiotic therapy, SePP increased significantly from day 1 (1·03 (sd 0·10) mg/l) to day 3 (1·34 (sd 0·10) mg/l), indicative of improved hepatic Se metabolism. We conclude that both Se and SePP are suitable biomarkers for assessing Se status in neonates and for identifying subjects at risk of deficiency. PMID:27267586

  13. A history of neonatal medicine in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaeizadeh, Golnaz; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mamak

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal medicine was officially initiated in the United States of America in 1973, and in the same year, the American Board of Pediatrics held the first subspecialty examination in the field of neonatal-perinatal medicine. The first Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Tehran began its work with great efforts of Prof. Hadi Samaee at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital, approved by the Ministry of Health as the first standard center for training neonatologists. Hence, the first neonatology fellowship program began in 1986 and two years later (1988) its graduate started work at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital. Afterwards, more NICUs were built all over the country and equipped gradually. The Iranian Association of Neonatology and Perinatology were founded in 1998 and 2003, respectively. These two scientific associations jointly made recommendations to health officials to develop consistent educational programs for neonatal and maternal health promotion in Iran. Regionalization of maternal-neonatal health services was also another recommendation which has now been presented to the Ministry of Health as a national program to promote neonatal and maternal health status. Thanks to the measures taken so far over the last few years, the index of neonatal mortality has declined from 26 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 11 per 1,000 live births in 2012.

  14. Antiepileptic drug treatment strategies in neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hernan, A E; Holmes, G L

    2016-01-01

    The highest risk of seizures across the lifespan is in the neonatal period. The enhanced excitability of the immature brain compared to the mature brain is related to the sequential development and expression of essential neurotransmitter signaling pathways. During the neonatal period there is an overabundance of excitatory receptors, and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is potentially depolarizing, as opposed to hyperpolarizing in the older brain. While this enhanced excitability is required for regulation of activity-dependent synapse formation and refining of synaptic connections that are necessary for normal brain development, enhanced excitability predisposes the immature brain to seizures. In addition to being common, neonatal seizures are very difficult to treat; antiepileptic drugs used in older children and adults are less efficacious, and possibly detrimental to brain development. In an effort to target the unique features of neurotransmission in the neonate, bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) and induces a significant shift of EGABA toward more hyperpolarized values in vitro, has been used to treat neonatal seizures. As the understanding of the pathophysiology of genetic forms of neonatal epilepsy has evolved there have been a few successful attempts to pharmacologically target the mutated protein. This approach, while promising, is challenging due to the findings that the genetic syndromes presenting in infancy demonstrate genetic heterogeneity in regard to both the mutated gene and its function. PMID:27323943

  15. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India

    PubMed Central

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. Design We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Results Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Conclusions Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. PMID:25972443

  16. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  17. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    PubMed Central

    Mullowney, Tara; Manson, David; Kim, Raymond; Stephens, Derek; Shah, Vibhuti

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare inherited disease affecting motile cilia lining the respiratory tract. Despite neonatal respiratory distress as an early feature, diagnosis is typically delayed until late childhood. Our objective was to identify characteristics that differentiate PCD from common causes of term neonatal respiratory distress. METHODS: This was a case-control study. Patients with PCD born after 1994 attending a regional PCD clinic who had a history of neonatal respiratory distress (n = 46) were included. Controls (n = 46), term neonates with respiratory distress requiring a chest radiograph, were randomly selected from hospital birth records and matched on gender, birth month/year, and mode of delivery. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between neonatal characteristics and PCD diagnosis. The diagnostic performance of the best predictive variables was estimated by calculating sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PCD cases required more oxygen therapy (39 cases, 29 controls, P = .01), longer duration of oxygen therapy (PCD mean = 15.2 days, control mean = 0.80 days, P < .01), had later onset of neonatal respiratory distress (PCD median = 12 hours, control median = 1 hour, P < .001), and higher frequency of lobar collapse and situs inversus (PCD = 70% and 48% respectively, control = 0% for both, P < .001). Situs inversus, lobar collapse, or oxygen need for >2 days had 87% (95% confidence interval: 74–94) sensitivity and 96% (95% confidence interval: 85–99) specificity for PCD. CONCLUSIONS: When encountering term neonates with unexplained respiratory distress, clinicians should consider PCD in those with lobar collapse, situs inversus, and/or prolonged oxygen therapy (>2 days). PMID:25422025

  18. Assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, E.; Gournay, V.; Calamel, J.; Mouzard, A.; Roze, J.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether it is possible to assess baroreflex sensitivity in neonates by studying only spontaneous variations in systolic blood pressure and heart rate.
METHODS—ECG and non-invasive blood pressure signals were continuously studied in 14 preterm neonates (term 29-32 weeks) and five term neonates (term 40-41 weeks). Non-invasive blood pressure measures were obtained using a Finapres placed around the child's wrist. Both signals (ECG and blood pressure), sampled at 400 Hz, were digitised by an A/D converter and stored in a binary mode on magnetic disk. An inhouse software QRS detection algorithm was used to define R peaks of the QRS complexes with an accuracy greater than 2 ms. Four 4 minute periods were recorded in each infant. The slope of the linear regression of RR intervals versus systolic blood pressure was calculated in each period and the mean value of the four slopes was then considered as the index of baroreflex sensitivity (in ms/mm Hg) in each neonate.
RESULTS—Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity was lower in preterm neonates than in term neonates (mean(SD): 4.07 (2.19) ms/mm Hg vs 10.23 (2.92) ms/mm Hg).
CONCLUSION—Baroreflex sensitivity can be assessed in term and preterm neonates by studying spontaneous variations in systolic blood pressure alone. This method could be useful for studying the ontogeny of baroreflex sensitivity and might therefore provide information about the maturation of the autonomic nervous system.

 Keywords: blood pressure; heart rate; baroreflex sensitivity; autonomic nervous system. PMID:9135289

  19. How to manage neonatal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di Comite, A; Esposito, S; Villani, A; Stronati, M

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the recommendations for managing neonatal tuberculosis (TB) drawn up by a group of Italian scientific societies. The Consensus Conference method was used, and relevant publications in English were identified through a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Group experts concluded that if suspicion is aroused, it is necessary to undertake promptly all of the investigations useful for identifying the disease not only in the newborn, but also in the mother and family contacts because a diagnosis of TB in the family nucleus can guide its diagnosis and treatment in the newborn. If the suspicion is confirmed, empirical treatment should be started. Breast-fed newborns being treated with isoniazid should be given pyridoxine supplementation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Mothers with active-phase TB can breast-feed once they have become smear negative after having received appropriate treatment.

  20. [Neonatal lupus syndrome: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Levesque, K; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Le Bidois, J; Bessières, B; Brouzes, C; Le Mercier, D; Villain, E; Maltret, A; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is associated with transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Children display cutaneous, hematological, liver or cardiac features. Cardiac manifestations include congenital heart block (CHB); endocardial fibroelastosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women with known connective tissue disease is between 1 and 2% and the risk of recurrence is around 19%. Skin and systemic lesions are transient, whereas CHB is definitive and associated with significant morbidity and a mortality of 18%. A pacemaker must be implanted in 2/3 of cases. Myocarditis may be associated or appear secondly. Mothers of children with CHB are usually asymptomatic or display Sjogren's syndrome or undifferentiated connective tissue disease. In anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women, fetal echocardiography should be performed at least every 2 weeks from the 16th to 24th week gestation. An electrocardiogram should be performed for all newborn babies. The benefit of fluorinated corticosteroid therapy for CHB detected in utero remains unclear. Maternal use of hydroxychloroquine may be associated with a decreased recurrent CHB risk in a subsequent offspring. A prospective study is actually ongoing to confirm these findings.

  1. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  2. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146

  3. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  4. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  5. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS. PMID:25425653

  6. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  7. Neonatal Tracheostomy – Issues and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    A, Saadia; GR, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To record and analyse the technical aspects of neonatal tracheostomy and to suggest some solutions. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective observational cohort of 37 cases of neonatal tracheostomies performed over 30 years (1985-2014). Results: Thirty-three of the 37 tracheostomies were done as an elective procedure and four done emergently. Eighteen neonatal tracheostomies were done with a low transverse cervical incision and 19 were done with low vertical cervical incision. Three patients had bleeding while exposing the trachea. Trachea could not easily be identified in 2 cases. Commercial tracheostomy tubes were used in only 20 cases. In 17 patients, the conventional endotracheal tubes 2.5 or 3fr size were used. There were 3 instances of wound infection out of which one has peri-tracheostomy necrotizing cellulitis and the neonate succumbed to sepsis. Two cases had surgical emphysema. No case had pneumothorax. Conclusion: We described tracheostomy in neonates in a resource constrained centre. Various makeshift arrangements can be used in absence of standard supplies. PMID:26034707

  8. Inadvertent Methylergonovine Administration to a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Bryan M.; O’Connell, Charles; Boutin, Mallory A.; Fatayerji, Nabil I.; Sauer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, Newborn Final Diagnosis: Accidental methylergonovine poisoning Symptoms: Respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Methylergonovine is an ergot alkaloid used to treat post-partum hemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Mistaking methylergonovine for vitamin K with accidental administration to the neonate is a rare iatrogenic illness occurring almost exclusively in the delivery room setting. Complications of ergot alkaloids in neonates include respiratory depression, seizures, and death. Case Report: A term infant was inadvertently given 0.1 mg of methylergonovine intramuscularly in the right thigh. The error was only noted when the vial of medication was scanned, after administration, identifying it as methylergonovine rather than vitamin K. The local poison center was notified, and the infant was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for observation. Two hours after transfer, the infant was noted to have oxygen desaturations and required oxygen via nasal cannula. Supplemental oxygen was continued for 4 hours until the neonate was able to maintain normal oxygen saturations in room air. Feeding was started by 10 hours of life, and the infant was discharged home in good condition after a 72-hour stay without further complications. Conclusions: Because of the potential for serious adverse events, vigilance is required to prevent accidental administration of methylergonovine to the neonate as a result of possible confusion with vitamin K in the early post-partum period. PMID:27765939

  9. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS.

  10. Neonatal hypothermia in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, LC

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia among newborns is considered an important contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality in low resource settings. However, in these settings only limited progress has been made towards understanding the risk of mortality subsequent to hypothermia, describing how this relationship is dependent on both the degree or severity of exposure and the gestational age and weight status of the baby, and implementing interventions to mitigate both exposure and the associated risk of poor outcomes. Given the centrality of averting neonatal mortality to achieving global milestones towards reductions in child mortality by 2015, recent years have seen substantial resources and efforts to improve understanding of global epidemiology of neonatal health. In this seminar, a summary of the burden, consequences, and risk factors of neonatal hypothermia in low-resources settings is presented, with a particular focus on community-based data. Context-appropriate interventions for reducing hypothermia exposure and the role of these interventions in reducing global neonatal mortality burden are explored. PMID:21094417

  11. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  12. Attenuated innate immune defenses in very premature neonates during the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Kan, Bernard; Sharma, Ashish A.; van Zanten, Alice; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Brant, Rollin; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-microbial responses have been shown to be profoundly attenuated in very preterm neonates when examined on cord blood. However, we lack data on these responses at the time these neonates are most vulnerable to infections. Methods Multiple cytokine responses to two prototypic Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists: LPS (TLR4) and R848 (TLR7/8) were prospectively measured in preterm neonates born ≤30 weeks of gestation (n=50) during the first 28 days of age using whole blood and single-cell multi-parameter flow cytometry assays. Results were compared to term neonates (n=30) and adult controls (n=25). Results In preterm neonates, LPS and R848 responses remained attenuated in both cord blood and in the first 28 days of age. These responses showed significant maturation over time after adjusting for gestational age and were confirmed in blood monocytes and dendritic cells on a per-cell basis. We detected no major contribution of chorioamnionitis, maternal antenatal corticosteroids or magnesium sulfate treatment, labor, or mode of delivery to the maturation of cytokine responses. Conclusion Innate immune anti-microbial defenses are profoundly attenuated developmentally in very preterm neonates during the neonatal period, suggesting that exogenous factors drive the sustained systemic inflammation that has been linked to increased morbidities in these infants. PMID:26186294

  13. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  14. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  15. Hyperammonemia in neonates receiving intravenous nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Hack, S L; Smith, T M; Platzker, A C; Merritt, R J

    1982-01-01

    Inadequate arginine intake has been suggested as an etiology for hyperammonemia in neonates on parenteral nutrition. We randomized 26 nonasphyxiated neonates to receive amino acid solutions containing either 3.6 or 10.4% of total nitrogen as arginine when intravenous nutrition (IVN) therapy was initiated. Neonates in both amino acid solution study groups were observed to have significantly elevated blood ammonia (BA) concentrations during IVN (p less than 0.01) as compared to pre-IVN levels. Blood ammonia concentrations tended to be higher in infants receiving the 3.6% arginine amino acid solution. Septic infants were at particular risk for hyperammonemia as compared to nonseptic patients (p less than 0.025). Other clinical parameters including birth weight, gestational age, oxygen requirements, enteral nutritional intake, congenital anomalies, and heart disease did not appear to be related to BA concentration.

  16. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  17. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers.

  18. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers. PMID:27582162

  19. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  20. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  1. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  2. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother. PMID:27008754

  3. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother.

  4. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  5. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies.

  6. From Imitation to Conversation: The First Dialogues with Human Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese

    2006-01-01

    The functional maturity of the newborn infant's brain, the resemblances between neonatal imitation and imitation in adults and the possibly lateralized neonatal imitation suggest that the mirror neuron system may contribute to neonatal imitation. Newborn infants not only imitate but also initiate previously imitated gestures, and are able to…

  7. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications.

  8. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  12. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  13. The Tuning of Human Neonates' Preference for Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Hauser, Marc D.; Werker, Janet F.; Martin, Alia

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates prefer listening to speech compared to many nonspeech sounds, suggesting that humans are born with a bias for speech. However, neonates' preference may derive from properties of speech that are not unique but instead are shared with the vocalizations of other species. To test this, thirty neonates and sixteen 3-month-olds were…

  14. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  15. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  18. Ruptured Liver Abscess in Neonates: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Choudhury, SR; Jhanwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hepatic abscess is a rare disease seen mainly in preterm following umbilical catheterisation. Liver abscess in term neonates without any predisposing factor is still rarer and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of liver abscess in term neonates presenting with abdominal mass due to rupture. PMID:27433449

  19. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... the warmed air, a container for water to add humidity, and provision for a portable oxygen bottle....

  20. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  1. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families.

  2. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  3. D-lactic acidosis in neonatal ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ingrid; Gentile, Arcangelo

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic acidosis in calves with neonatal diarrhea was believed to be mainly caused by the loss of bicarbonate via the intestines or the formation of L-lactate during anaerobic glycolysis after tissue hypoperfusion in dehydrated calves. Because D-lactate was not considered to be of interest in human or veterinary medicine, routine diagnostic methods targeted the detection of L-lactate only. The development of stereospecific assays for the measurement of D-lactate facilitated research. This article summarizes the available information on D-lactic metabolic acidosis in neonatal ruminants.

  4. Next generation neonatal health informatics with Artemis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Carolyn; Catley, Christina; James, Andrew; Padbury, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a platform to enable processing of currently uncharted high frequency, high fidelity, synchronous data from medical devices. Such a platform would support the next generation of informatics solutions for neonatal intensive care. We present Artemis, a platform for real-time enactment of clinical knowledge as it relates to multidimensional data analysis and clinical research. Through specific deployment examples at two different neonatal intensive care units, we demonstrate that Artemis supports: 1) instantiation of clinical rules; 2) multidimensional analysis; 3) distribution of services for critical care via cloud computing; and 4) accomplishing 1 through 3 using current technology without a negative impact on patient care. PMID:21893725

  5. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated.

  6. Diagnosing and Managing Neonatal Respiratory Depression

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Max

    1985-01-01

    There are four types of neonatal respiratory depression. Most infants who require resuscitation have clearly depressed respiration at birth. The onset is prenatal in these cases. However, other infants appear normal at birth, cough and breathe a few times, but become acutely depressed in the first minute or so. A third group deteriorates gradually over the first few minutes, making little or no effort to breathe. A fourth group appears normal or fairly normal at birth, and while breathing strenuously develops signs of asphyxia. The pre- and postnatal signs, causes and differential diagnosis of the four types of neonatal depression are described, and guidelines for resuscitation are provided. PMID:21274148

  7. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  8. Management of neonatal sepsis in term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Du Pont-Thibodeau, Geneviève; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a common and deadly disease. It is broadly defined as a systemic inflammatory response, occurring in the first four weeks of life, as a result of a suspected or proven infection. Yet, more reliable and consistently applied diagnostic criteria would help improve our knowledge of the disease epidemiology. Several therapeutic attempts to control systemic inflammation in sepsis were unsuccessful. Immediate empirical administration of broad-spectrum anti-microbials, aggressive fluid resuscitation, and vaso-active or inotropic support (or both) are the mainstays of the therapeutic management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:25165566

  9. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hammer, S G; Lewan, R B

    1988-01-01

    We report an infant with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency. The initial approach involved rapid evaluation, phototherapy, and close monitoring of serum bilirubin levels. Follow-up included maintenance on folic acid, monitoring blood counts, and educating the parents about the course of pyruvate kinase deficiency, especially aplastic crisis. We suggest that the informed family practitioner can manage neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and pyruvate kinase deficiency with referrals at critical times to pediatric or surgical specialists. The practitioner must be able to recognize quickly the need for exchange transfusion for severe jaundice and for blood transfusions or splenectomy when significant anemia or aplastic crisis occurs.

  10. Neonatal nurse practitioners: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Honeyfield, Mary Ellen

    2009-06-01

    The advanced practice nursing role in neonatal intensive care enjoys an almost 40-year history. The 1970s and the 1980s were fraught with growing pains, including what to call these providers, and role clarity that was defined in most settings by community need. With the birth of NANN, 25 years ago, the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role began to receive support and advocacy that led to the development of educational standards and definition of the role. This article reviews the role's history and identifies current and future issues that will require attention by the national NNP leadership. PMID:19542775

  11. Neonatal death dwarfism. (A further report).

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, K; Masel, J; Morris, L; Kunze, D

    1978-11-01

    Seven cases of rare "Neonatal Death Dwarfism" observed recently in three major Children's Hospitals in Australia are reported. These include Diastrophic Dwarfism, Achondrogenesis II, Lethal Form of Hypophosphatasia, Homozygous Achondroplasia, Minor Form of Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy, Achondrogenesis II (?) and Unclassified Lethal Bone Dysplasia. In all the patients the clinical diagnosis was uncertain or incorrect, whereas a conclusive radiographic diagnosis could be made after X-ray examination in all but one of the cases. Skeletal survey should be performed in each case of neonatal death dwarfism. PMID:152275

  12. Neonatal Marfan Syndrome: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ghandi, Yazdan; S.Zanjani, Keyhan; Mazhari-Mousavi, Seyed-Eshagh; Parvaneh, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Background Neonatal Marfan syndrome is a rare and severe phenotype of this disease. A poor prognosis is anticipated due to the high probability of congestive heart failure, and mitral and tricuspid regurgitations with suboptimal response to medical therapy and difficulties in surgical management at an early age. Case Presentation We present two consecutive patients with this disease who are the first reported cases from Iran to the best of our knowledge. Unfortunately both of them died shortly after diagnosis. Conclusion Neonatal Marfan syndrome is reported from Iran and has a poor prognosis like the patients reported from elsewhere. PMID:23549323

  13. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates.

  14. Volumetric diffusive respirator use in neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P J; Chilton, H W; Garvey, P A; Gupta, J M

    1991-02-01

    Six very low birthweight neonates with terminal respiratory failure due to severe hyaline membrane disease who failed to respond to conventional ventilation were offered a trial of high frequency jet ventilation using the volumetric diffusive respirator (VDR). All neonates showed improvement in pulmonary function. Two neonates were weaned successfully from high frequency ventilation. The results of this initial trial suggest that the volumetric diffusive respirator is a safe and effective method of ventilation in neonates with respiratory failure and that the survival rate in such neonates might be enhanced if treatment is introduced earlier in the disease.

  15. Early Onset Neonatal Septicaemia Caused by Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Mallika; Das, Niloy Kumar; Guchhait, Partha; Misra, Saheli

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an opportunistic pathogen causing infection in the immunocompromised patients. It is a plant pathogen and a rare human pathogen causing neonatal sepsis, joint infection, urinary tract infection and bloodstream infections. Neonatal Gram negative septicaemia may have an unusual presentation of subtle generalised neonatal seizures without any other cardinal features of sepsis. An appropriate diagnosis is therefore the key to proper management. P. agglomerans being an unusual cause of neonatal sepsis should be diagnosed early with proper antibiogram for clinical cure. Here, we report a case of neonatal sepsis caused by P. agglomerans in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India. PMID:27437219

  16. Intracranial complications of Serratia marcescens infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Madide, Ayanda; Smith, Johan

    2016-03-15

    Even though Serratia marcescens is not one of the most common causes of infection in neonates, it is associated with grave morbidity and mortality. We describe the evolution of brain parenchymal affectation observed in association with S. marcescens infection in neonates. This retrospective case series details brain ultrasound findings of five neonates with hospital-acquired S. marcescens infection. Neonatal S. marcescens infection with or without associated meningitis can be complicated by brain parenchymal affectation, leading to cerebral abscess formation. It is recommended that all neonates with this infection should undergo neuro-imaging more than once before discharge from hospital; this can be achieved using bedside ultrasonography.

  17. Neonatal Atlas Construction Using Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Atlas construction generally includes first an image registration step to normalize all images into a common space and then an atlas building step to fuse the information from all the aligned images. Although numerous atlas construction studies have been performed to improve the accuracy of the image registration step, unweighted or simply weighted average is often used in the atlas building step. In this article, we propose a novel patch-based sparse representation method for atlas construction after all images have been registered into the common space. By taking advantage of local sparse representation, more anatomical details can be recovered in the built atlas. To make the anatomical structures spatially smooth in the atlas, the anatomical feature constraints on group structure of representations and also the overlapping of neighboring patches are imposed to ensure the anatomical consistency between neighboring patches. The proposed method has been applied to 73 neonatal MR images with poor spatial resolution and low tissue contrast, for constructing a neonatal brain atlas with sharp anatomical details. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly enhance the quality of the constructed atlas by discovering more anatomical details especially in the highly convoluted cortical regions. The resulting atlas demonstrates superior performance of our atlas when applied to spatially normalizing three different neonatal datasets, compared with other start-of-the-art neonatal brain atlases. PMID:24638883

  18. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  19. Hansenula anomala infection in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Wong, A R; Ibrahim, H; Van Rostenberghe, H; Ishak, Z; Radzi, M J

    2000-12-01

    We present an unusual neonatal fungal infection, Hansenula anomala in a very low birthweight infant who underwent abdominal surgery for an omphalocele. Despite treatment with adequate doses of amphotericin B, the yeast continued to grow from the blood culture, and was only eradicated with the use of oral ketoconazole. PMID:11115044

  20. Gender-Related Differences in Neonatal Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese; Kompagne, Hajnalka; Orvos, Hajnalka; Pal, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Socio-emotional behaviour is in part sex-related in humans, although the contribution of the biological and socio-cultural factors is not yet known. This study explores sex-related differences during the earliest communicative exchange, the neonatal imitation in 43 newborn infants (3-96 hours old) using an index finger extension imitative gesture.…

  1. [Advances in the management of neonatal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos; Becker, Michele M; Ranzan, Josiane; Winckler, Maria Isabel B; Ohlweiler, Lygia

    2013-09-01

    Introduccion. Durante el nacimiento, ocurren cambios fisiologicos en practicamente todos los organos del niño, incluyendo el sistema nervioso central. En esta fase de transicion, es posible un cierto grado de hipoxemia, en general bien tolerado por el neonato. Sin embargo, si la hipoxia neonatal es muy intensa y continuada, puede instalarse una encefalopatia neonatal, lo que caracteriza una situacion critica para el recien nacido. Su abordaje adecuado es imprescindible para garantizar un buen pronostico a largo plazo. Desarrollo. Se actualizan las informaciones acerca de la hipoxia neonatal y se revisan publicaciones recientes acerca de los avances en su abordaje a traves de la medicina basada en evidencias. Conclusiones. La encefalopatia neonatal se puede clasificar desde el punto de vista clinico en tres niveles de intensidad. Usualmente, los casos leves tienen un buen pronostico, los casos de intensidad moderada tienen un 30% de posibilidad de secuelas y los de intensidad grave tienen mas del 70% de mortalidad, pero practicamente todos los supervivientes tendran secuelas. Los avances ocurrieron en dos areas: en el diagnostico, con nuevas tecnicas de EEG y RM, y en el tratamiento, con la aparicion de la hipotermia terapeutica. Existe la posibilidad de un uso futuro para la terapia con celulas madre. El pronostico depende de la clasificacion clinica, de los datos de neuroimagen y del EEG.

  2. Torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Justice, Denise; Vanaman, Monique M; Nelson, Virginia S; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the incidence of torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, whether the severity of brachial plexus palsy affects outcomes and the rate of recovery. We performed a retrospective review of 128 consecutive neonatal brachial plexus palsy patients evaluated at the University of Michigan from 2005-2009. Patients were followed for at least 3 months, with regular physical examinations and imaging. Forty-three percent presented concurrently with torticollis. Significant differences were evident in mean age at first brachial plexus examination, suggesting that patients with concurrent torticollis present earlier for clinical examination. Recovery from torticollis was evident in 62% of patients by 23 ± 12 weeks with conservative management. No statistically significant differences were evident between torticollis and nontorticollis groups after reviewing their severity of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (Narakas score), recovery from neonatal brachial plexus palsy (biceps function at 6 months), need for nerve repair or reconstructive procedures, or infant, maternal, or other factors associated with labor. Results suggest that although torticollis occurs with increased frequency in children with brachial plexus palsy, its presence is not related to severity and does not affect the probability of recovery from brachial plexus palsy. Conservative management for torticollis yields reasonable recovery.

  3. Parental and Perinatal Correlates of Neonatal Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Kay

    This paper discusses the analyses of antecedent correlates of the behavior of 60 infants as measured by the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale on the third day after birth. The data include two sets of antecedent variables: maternal adaptation to pregnancy as reported in prenatal interviews and measured describing the conditions of labor and…

  4. [Forensic approach of infanticide and neonatal death].

    PubMed

    Beauthier, J P

    2007-01-01

    The foetal of neonatal death brings up many questions as well on the physiopathological level as on the medico-legal one. We consider here the various natural and violent origins which allow understanding this difficult forensic activity. The approach of forensic anthropology and recent medical techniques (X-rays and echography) are also studied in order to be helpful to the medical examiner.

  5. Neonate Orientation Behaviour towards Human Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alegria, J.; Noirot, E.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the effect of a recorded male human voice on neonate head, eye, mouth and crying behaviors. Vocal Stimulation enhanced head movement, eye opening, mouthing and crying and influenced hand sucking. Differences between breast fed and bottle fed babies were found for mouth orientation, hand sucking and crying. (RH)

  6. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-11

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  7. Neurodevelopmental outcome of transient neonatal intracerebral echodensities.

    PubMed

    Appleton, R E; Lee, R E; Hey, E N

    1990-01-01

    The later neurodevelopmental progress of 15 babies who had neonatal periventricular echodensities or flares in the absence of any intraventricular bleeding or subsequent cystic degeneration was studied. At follow up four infants had neurological abnormalities, including spastic diplegia (n = 2). These findings suggest that transient flares may represent mild periventricular leucomalacia with consequent mild neurological dysfunction. PMID:2407199

  8. Minimally invasive surgery in neonates and infants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tiffany; Pimpalwar, Ashwin

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has significantly improved the field of surgery, with benefits including shorter operating time, improved recovery time, minimizing stress and pain due to smaller incisions, and even improving mortality. MIS procedures, including their indications, impact, limitations, and possible future evolution in neonates and infants, are discussed in this article. PMID:21180496

  9. Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress

    MedlinePlus

    ... individual comparison. Addiction 106(7):1355–1362, 2011. Full Text Jones, H.E., et al. Neonatal abstinence syndrome ... Journal of Medicine 363(24):2320–2331, 2010. Full Text MOTHER Collaborators Following is a list of collaborators ...

  10. Neonatal listeriosis: Uncommon or misdiagnosed?

    PubMed

    Kylat, R I; Bartholomew, A; Cramer, N; Bader, M Y

    2016-09-16

    The incidence of perinatal and neonatal Listeriosis is underestimated due undiagnosed stillbirths, misdiagnosis of NL and underreporting of single case reports. Recent outbreaks reinforce the need for better surveillance and targeted health education in certain population groups especially during pregnancy. PMID:27589546

  11. Manganese Neurotoxicity: A Focus on the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Keith M.; Thompson, Khristy; Aschner, Judy; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal found in all tissues, and it is required for normal amino acid, lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism. While Mn deficiency is extremely rare in humans, toxicity due to overexposure of Mn is more prevalent. The brain appears to be especially vulnerable. Mn neurotoxicity is most commonly associated with occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (> 1-5 mg Mn/m3) of Mn, consumption of contaminated well water, or parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with liver disease or immature hepatic functioning such as the neonate. This review will focus primarily on the neurotoxicity of Mn in the neonate. We will discuss putative transporters of the metal in the neonatal brain and then focus on the implications of high Mn exposure to the neonate focusing on typical exposure modes (e.g., dietary and parenteral). Although Mn exposure via parenteral nutrition is uncommon in adults, in premature infants, it is more prevalent, so this mode of exposure becomes salient in this population. We will briefly review some of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity and conclude with a discussion of ripe areas for research in this underreported area of neurotoxicity. PMID:17084903

  12. Humidity control tool for neonatal incubator.

    PubMed

    Abdiche, M; Farges, G; Delanaud, S; Bach, V; Villon, P; Libert, J P

    1998-03-01

    In the first days of life, the daily evaporative loss from premature neonates can reach up to 20% of body mass. Such loss can be reduced by increasing the air humidity inside the incubator. Neither passive humidification nor open loop systems allow high humidity rates to be maintained or easily controlled: at 34 degrees C, the maximum levels vary with the system from 40% to 77% of relative humidity. The skin evaporative exchanges between the neonate and the environment are directly proportional to the water vapour partial pressure difference between the neonate's skin and the air. An active closed loop system has been designed, which permits reliable and accurate control of humidity according to the water vapour partial pressure set, between 1 and 6 kPa, in an air temperature range of 28-39 degrees C. It is characterised by variations of about 0.05 kPa around the set value and a maximum humidification speed of 0.25 kPa min-1. The algorithm is based on optimal control and the dynamic programming principles. Test results place this active system above usual systems for its power, precision and adaptability. It is an exploitable tool in fundamental and clinical research, to precisely study the humidity effects on neonatal comfort and thermo-regulation evolution.

  13. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    PubMed Central

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  14. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. PMID:26177232

  15. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  16. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Frank, Matthew W; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O; Gonzalez, Frank J; Schuetz, John D

    2015-09-29

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition.

  17. Reduced nephron endowment in the neonates of Indigenous Australian peoples.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Y; Smith, R; Wright, I M R; Lumbers, E R

    2014-02-01

    Rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among Indigenous groups in Australia exceed non-Indigenous rates eight-fold. Using kidney volume as a surrogate for nephron number, we carried out a study to determine if Indigenous neonates have a smaller kidney volume (and thus a reduced nephron number) from birth compared with non-Indigenous neonates. We recruited term and preterm neonates (<32 weeks) at a tertiary care neonatal unit over a 12 months period. Preterm neonates were assessed (renal sonography and renal function measurement) at 32 weeks corrected age (CA) and again at 38 weeks CA when blood pressure was also measured. All term neonates were assessed in the first post-natal week, including renal sonography, renal function and blood pressure measurement. The primary outcome measured was total kidney volume (TKV) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was a secondary outcome. Data was available for 44 preterm (11 Indigenous) and 39 term (13 Indigenous) neonates. TKV of Indigenous neonates was significantly lower at 32 weeks [12.0 (2.0) v. 15.4 (5.1) ml; P=0.03] and 38 weeks CA [18.6 (4.0) v. 22.6 (5.9) ml; P=0.04] respectively. Term Indigenous neonates also had smaller kidney volumes compared with non-Indigenous neonates. Despite a smaller kidney volume (and reduced nephron number), Indigenous neonates did not have a significantly lower eGFR. Indigenous neonates achieve similar eGFRs to Non-Indigenous neonates, presumably through a higher single nephron filtration rate. This places Indigenous neonates at a greater risk of long-term kidney damage later in life.

  18. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers. PMID:25278279

  19. Strategies to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Paul, V K

    1988-06-01

    The perinatal mortality rate in India averages 66.3/1000 live births. 60% of all infant deaths occur during the 1st month, making the neonatal mortality rate 76/1000 in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. These rates have remained static since 1974. Over 90% of all deliveries occur at home and are conducted by untrained birth attendants. The major causes of perinatal deaths are immaturity/low birth weight, birth asphyxia/trauma, neonatal infections, and congenital malformations. Neonatal tetanus alone is responsible for 230,000-280,000 deaths a year. Hypoxia, low birth weight, and tetanus are preventable, if primary perinatal care is provided and high-risk pregnancies are recognized and referred to facilities where fetal monitoring and neonatal care are available. It is proposed to train all of the country's 5 million traditional birth attendants by 1990 to deliver primary perinatal care. By 1990 also there will be 1 village health guide for every 1000 people. All traditional birth attendants must know how to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and the infrastructure for an adequate referral system must be established. In order to reduce the incidence of low birth weight, the Integrated Child Development Service Scheme proposes that all pregnant women receive a dietary supplement of 500 calories and 25 gm protein, and that pregnant women be given a 2-hour midday rest period. The control of malaria and intestinal infections with chloroquine and antibiotics would do much to reduce low birth weight. Simple technologies for measuring birth weight indicators, such as chest circumference or mid-arm circumference, require only a tape measure. Finally, technics of mass communication must be utilized to spread knowledge of perinatal and neonatal care. PMID:3069742

  20. Neonatal neuropsychology: emerging relations of neonatal sensory-motor responses to white matter integrity.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Maya; Marom, Ronella; Berger, Irit; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Ben-Sira, Liat; Artzi, Moran; Uliel, Shimrit; Leitner, Yael; Geva, Ronny

    2014-09-01

    The neonatal period is considered to be essential for neurodevelopment and wellbeing throughout the life span, yet little is known about brain-behavior relationships in the neonatal period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between neonatal sensory-motor regulation and white-matter (WM) integrity of major fiber tracts in the neonatal period. We hypothesized that WM integrity of sensory-motor systems would predict neurobehavioral maturation during the first month of life. Forty-nine premature neonates underwent magnetic-resonance-imaging at term. Diffusion-tensor-imaging analysis was performed in major WM tracts along with repeated neonatal neurobehavioral evaluations assessing sensory reactivity and motor regulation. Difficulties in one or more behavioral sub-category, mostly in auditory and visual attention, hypotonicity and jitteriness, were documented in 78.3% infants at term. Sixty-six percent of infants experienced difficulties, mostly in auditory attention, head-neck control, hypotonicity and motor asymmetry, at 44 weeks. Attention difficulties were associated with reduced integrity of cerebral and superior cerebellar peduncles; while tonicity was associated with reduced integrity of the corpus-callosum and inferior-posterior tracts. Overall, results showed that early maturing tracts were related with the degree of typicality of sensory reactivity status while late maturing tracts were related with the degree of typicality of tonic regulation. WM integrity and maturation factors explained 40.2% of the variance in neurobehavior at 44 weeks. This study suggests that in preterm neonates, deviant sensory-motor reactivity can be detected very early in development in manners that are related to lower integrity/maturational level of early and late maturing fiber tracts. PMID:25090927

  1. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management.

  2. Emerging Piglet Models of Neonatal Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, David W; Turner, Justine M; Wales, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a growing problem in the human neonatal population. In infants, SBS is the leading cause of intestinal failure, the state of being unable to absorb sufficient nutrients for growth and development. Neonates with SBS are dependent on long-term parenteral nutrition therapy, but many succumb to the complications of sepsis and liver disease. Research in neonatal SBS is challenged by the ethical limits of studying sick human neonates and the heterogeneous nature of the disease process. Outcomes in SBS vary depending on residual intestinal anatomy, intestinal length, patient age, and exposure to nutrition therapies. The neonatal piglet serves as an appropriate translational model of the human neonate because of similarities in gastrointestinal ontogeny, physiological maturity, and adaptive processes. Re-creating the disease process in a piglet model presents a unique opportunity for researchers to discover novel insights and therapies in SBS. Emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS now represent the entire spectrum of disease seen in human infants. This review aims to contextualize these emerging piglet models within the context of SBS as a heterogeneous disease. We first explore the factors that account for SBS heterogeneity and then explore the suitability of the neonatal piglet as an appropriate translational animal model. We then examine differences between the emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS and how these differences affect their translational potential to human neonates with SBS.

  3. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management. PMID:26867561

  4. Strategies to sustain a quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    van Heerden, Carlien; Janse van Rensburg, Elsie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many neonatal deaths can be prevented globally through effective resuscitation. South Africa (SA) committed towards attaining the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) set by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, SA’s district hospitals have the highest early neonatal mortality rates. Modifiable and avoidable causes associated with patient-related, administrative and health care provider factors contribute to neonatal mortality. A quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation could contribute towards decreasing neonatal mortality, thereby contributing towards the attainment of the MDG4. Aim The aim of this study was, (1) to explore and describe the existing situation regarding neonatal resuscitation in a district hospital, (2) to develop strategies to sustain a neonatal resuscitation quality improvement initiative and (3) to decrease neonatal mortality. Changes that occurred and the sustainability of strategies were evaluated. Setting A maternity section of a district hospital in South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Sustainability Model formed the theoretical framework for the study. The Problem Resolving Action Research model was applied and the study was conducted in three cycles. Purposive sampling was used for the quantitative and qualitative aspects of data collection. Data was analysed accordingly. Results The findings indicated that the strategies formulated and implemented to address factors related to neonatal resuscitation (training, equipment and stock, staff shortages, staff attitude, neonatal transport and protocols) had probable sustainability and contributed towards a reduction in neonatal mortality in the setting. Conclusion These strategies had the probability of sustainability and could potentially improve neonatal outcomes and reduce neonatal mortality to contribute toward South Africa’s’ drive to attain the MDG4. PMID:27380840

  5. Neonatal Duodenal Obstruction: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Kamal Nain; Singh, Jasbir; Dalal, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital duodenal obstruction is one of the commonest causes of neonatal intestinal obstruction. We are presenting our 15-year experience by analyzing clinical spectrum and outcome in neonates with duodenal obstruction admitted at our center. Material and Methods: The hospital records of all neonates admitted with duodenal obstruction from June 2000 to June 2015 were reviewed. The patient records were analyzed for antenatal diagnosis, age, sex, clinical presentation, diagnosis, associated anomalies, surgical procedures performed; postoperative morbidity and mortality. We excluded from our study malrotation of gut associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and abdominal wall defects. Results: A total of 81 patients were admitted, out of which 56 were males and 25 were females. Polyhydramnios was detected in 24 (30%) pregnancies. Average birth weight was 2.1±1.0Kg and average gestational age was 38 (SD±1) weeks with 17 (21%) preterm neonates. Presenting features were vomiting in 81(100%) which was bilious in 81% and non-bilious in 19%, epigastric fullness in 56 (69%) and dehydration in 18 (22%) and failure to thrive in 16 (19%). Most common cause of obstruction was duodenal atresia in 38 (46.9%), followed by malrotation of gut in 33 (40.7%), and annular pancreas in 4 cases. Depending upon site of location, infra-ampullary obstruction was the most common in 64 (79%), supra-ampullary in 9 (7.4%) and ampullary 8 neonates. Both duodenal atresia and malrotation of gut was present in 4 cases. X-ray abdomen was most commonly used investigation to confirm the diagnosis. All cases were managed surgically by open laparotomy. Eleven (13.5%) patients died due to sepsis and associated congenital anomalies. Conclusion: Congenital duodenal obstruction most commonly presents in early neonatal period with features of upper GIT obstruction like vomiting and epigastrium fullness as in our series. Early antenatal diagnosis and surgical interventions hold the key in

  6. Early opioid infusion and neonatal outcomes in preterm neonates ≤28 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prakesh S; Dunn, Michael; Lee, Shoo K; Allen, Alexander C; Singhal, Nalini

    2011-05-01

    We sought to assess risk-adjusted neonatal outcomes of extremely preterm infants who received opioid infusion during early postnatal period. A retrospective analysis of preterm infants ≤28 weeks' gestational age (GA) admitted to neonatal intensive care units in the Canadian Neonatal Network was conducted comparing infants on the basis of receipt of opioid infusion during day 1 and day 3 after birth. Rates of mortality, severe neurological injury, severe retinopathy of prematurity, and chronic lung disease were compared. A total 362 infants received opioid infusion on day 1 and day 3, whereas 4419 infants did not receive opioid infusion. Baseline comparison revealed higher number of males, infants of GA <26 weeks, low Apgar score, and higher Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology scores among those who received opioid infusion. Neonates who received opioid infusion had higher risk for mortality (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13, 2.18), severe neurological injury (AOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.30, 2.04), severe retinopathy of prematurity (AOR 1. 39, 95% CI 1.08, 1.79), and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (AOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03, 1.79). Early exposure to opioid infusion in the first 3 days was associated with higher risk of adverse outcomes in extremely preterm infants.

  7. Hypotension and shock in the preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Chris

    2009-08-01

    While the methods of establishing and maintaining organ perfusion differ from one clinician to the next, the underlying physiological rationale remains constant. The gestalt for correcting circulatory compromise is generally performed in a stepwise manner; first ensuring that the vasculature is filled, then administering medications to tighten the vasculature, and lastly, compensating for an immature vasculature. This stepwise approach is reflected in the pharmacological interventions of providing fluid boluses (filling the pump), giving catecholamines (tightening the pump), and starting hydrocortisone (compensating for an immature pump). While the stepwise management approach may be familiar to some nurses, it is important to understand the evidence-based rationale that supports clinical decisions. This article will outline physiology unique to the neonate, clarify terminology that surrounds hypotension and shock, and explore various methods for the treatment of circulatory compromise in the preterm neonate. PMID:19696569

  8. Cholestasis beyond the Neonatal and Infancy Periods.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Racha; Phen, Claudia; Karjoo, Sara; Wilsey, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Cholestasis results from impairment in the excretion of bile, which may be due to mechanical obstruction of bile flow or impairment of excretion of bile components into the bile canaliculus. When present, cholestasis warrants prompt diagnosis and treatment. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis beyond the neonatal period is broad and includes congenital and acquired etiologies. It is imperative that the clinician differentiates between intrahepatic and extrahepatic origin of cholestasis. Treatment may be supportive or curative and depends on the etiology. Recent literature shows that optimal nutritional and medical support also plays an integral role in the management of pediatric patients with chronic cholestasis. This review will provide a broad overview of the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management of cholestasis beyond the neonatal and infancy periods. PMID:27066444

  9. Teaching antenatal counseling skills to neonatal providers.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Theophil A; Watson, Katie L; Boss, Renee D

    2014-02-01

    Counseling a family confronted with the birth of a periviable neonate is one of the most difficult tasks that a neonatologist must perform. The neonatologist's goal is to facilitate an informed, collaborative decision about whether life-sustaining therapies are in the best interest of this baby. Neonatologists are trained to provide families with a detailed account of the morbidity and mortality data they believe are necessary to facilitate a truly informed decision. Yet these complicated and intensely emotional conversations require advanced communication and counseling skills that our current fellowship-training strategies are not adequately providing. We review educational models for training neonatology fellows to provide antenatal counseling at the threshold of viability. We believe that training aimed at teaching these skills should be incorporated into the neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship. The optimal approaches for teaching these skills remain uncertain, and there is a need for continued innovation and outcomes-based research.

  10. Hypotension and shock in the preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Chris

    2009-08-01

    While the methods of establishing and maintaining organ perfusion differ from one clinician to the next, the underlying physiological rationale remains constant. The gestalt for correcting circulatory compromise is generally performed in a stepwise manner; first ensuring that the vasculature is filled, then administering medications to tighten the vasculature, and lastly, compensating for an immature vasculature. This stepwise approach is reflected in the pharmacological interventions of providing fluid boluses (filling the pump), giving catecholamines (tightening the pump), and starting hydrocortisone (compensating for an immature pump). While the stepwise management approach may be familiar to some nurses, it is important to understand the evidence-based rationale that supports clinical decisions. This article will outline physiology unique to the neonate, clarify terminology that surrounds hypotension and shock, and explore various methods for the treatment of circulatory compromise in the preterm neonate.

  11. Job satisfaction and dissatisfaction amongst neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Williamson, S

    1993-06-01

    This study was conducted against the background of the concerns expressed in the press about the difficulties in recruiting and retaining nurses and midwives who were trained and experienced in the field of neonatal nursing. A small study (N = 50) was undertaken in one regional unit using semi-structured interviews. The interview schedule covered a broad range of topics which were identified in the literature as exerting an influence on job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. A relationship between job satisfaction/dissatisfaction, staff turnover, and recruitment was demonstrated. Unfortunately the clinical regrading exercise had a complex effect, which could not be fully assessed within the narrow terms of reference of this study. Interestingly the majority of the respondents found their work stimulating and rewarding. However, the overriding factor which was said to exert a negative influence at work was the way their individual contribution to neonatal care was valued by senior medical and nursing/midwifery colleagues. PMID:8332096

  12. Hair growth in neonatally undernourished rats.

    PubMed

    Salas, M; Pulido, S; Torrero, C; Regalado, M; Loranca, A

    1995-01-01

    Interaction between neonatal undernutrition and the increased self-grooming activity upon hair growth of several body areas was analyzed in rats of 10, 20 and 30 days of age. Light microscopic observations on methylene blue impregnated hairs showed that these perinatal influences delayed the growth of hair follicles and thickness and length of hair measurements of the head and thoracic areas. The hair growth of lateral abdominal regions was less affected. Data suggest that hair alterations are primarily related to food deprivation since hair follicle measures of all skin areas were more affected than the distal hair measurements. Moreover, the distribution of impaired hair growth on different body areas correlates well with the increased self-grooming components associated to neonatal undernourishment. PMID:8914627

  13. Cholestasis beyond the Neonatal and Infancy Periods

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Racha; Phen, Claudia; Karjoo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis results from impairment in the excretion of bile, which may be due to mechanical obstruction of bile flow or impairment of excretion of bile components into the bile canaliculus. When present, cholestasis warrants prompt diagnosis and treatment. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis beyond the neonatal period is broad and includes congenital and acquired etiologies. It is imperative that the clinician differentiates between intrahepatic and extrahepatic origin of cholestasis. Treatment may be supportive or curative and depends on the etiology. Recent literature shows that optimal nutritional and medical support also plays an integral role in the management of pediatric patients with chronic cholestasis. This review will provide a broad overview of the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management of cholestasis beyond the neonatal and infancy periods. PMID:27066444

  14. Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nip, Siu Ying Angel; Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Wing Kwan Alex; Leung, Alexander K. C.; Choi, Paul C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments. PMID:27110421

  15. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  16. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced.

  17. Pain in the neonate: focus on nonpharmacologic interventions.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Brandy; Giebe, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    The assessment and treatment of pain in the neonate, especially preterm neonates, has been a challenge in the NICU for many years. Nurses caring for these vulnerable patients are in a key position to not only recognize when the neonate is experiencing pain but to also work collaboratively with other health care providers in determining the best method to treat and help prevent pain associated with procedures and routine caregiving activities. The American Academy of Pediatrics along with parent groups has recognized the importance of pain-prevention programs in treating pain in the neonate. Nurses, by anticipating and reducing both painful procedures and bedside interruptions, along with innovative nonpharmacologic interventions, can dramatically decrease the neonate's exposure to pain and the potential for long-term effects. An overview of nonpharmacologic interventions in the treatment of neonatal pain is provided for NICU nurses to help them effectively reduce their patient's pain and discomfort.

  18. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: pathogenesis, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julie A.; McFarland, Janice G.; Curtis, Brian R.; Aster, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, (NAIT) is caused by maternal antibodies raised against alloantigens carried on fetal platelets. Although many cases are mild, NAIT is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in newborns and is the most common cause of intracranial haemorrhage in full-term infants. In this report, we review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis and prenatal and post-natal management of NAIT and highlight areas of controversy that deserve the attention of clinical and laboratory investigators. PMID:23384054

  19. Functional Intestinal Obstruction in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Howat, J. M.; Wilkinson, A. W.

    1970-01-01

    Fifty-one neonates with functional intestinal obstruction are described. The commonest causes of functional obstruction were sticky meconium, sepsis, respiratory distress, and the prolonged infusion of fluid through a PVC catheter in the umbilical vein. Functional obstruction was diagnosed on routine investigation in 34 patients and in the remainder Hirschsprung's disease was the most commonly suspected cause of organic obstruction. ImagesFIG. PMID:5491884

  20. Intravenous adrenaline for shock in neonates.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ruchi; Singh, D K

    2010-09-01

    Dopamine and dobutamine have been widely used to treat shock with variable success in newborns. In this retrospective data analysis, we report on the use of adrenaline in 20 neonates with birth asphyxia and shock that was refractory to dopamine and dobutamine. We concluded that adrenaline is a safe and effective drug that can be used as an add-on therapy to dopamine and/or dobutamine in newborns with shock secondary to birth asphyxia.

  1. Advances in management of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Mathur, Amit M

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants, continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  2. Recurrent congenital heart block in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Maria C; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Albert, Dimpna; Ferrer, Queralt; Girona, Josep

    2007-07-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is the main complication of neonatal lupus (NL) and is strongly associated with the presence of anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The recurrence of CHB in subsequent pregnancies in mothers with these antibodies is uncommon, occurring in approximately 15% of cases. We describe here a case of recurrent CHB in a previously asymptomatic mother with Sjögren syndrome and discuss the current strategies for the prevention and treatment of CHB in NL.

  3. Neonatal tuberculosis and cardiac inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.

    PubMed

    Banque, Maria Niña F; Ribu, Ramon O; Policarpio, Maria Theresa T

    2013-04-01

    A 1-month-old neonate was admitted in respiratory distress. Two-dimensional echocardiography and computed tomography scan showed a mass anterior to the left ventricle and right ventricular outflow tract. A biopsy revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. A tuberculin test showed an 18-mm diameter induration. Three of the 6 household contacts were also positive for pulmonary tuberculosis. Antituberculosis medication was started. After 1 year, echocardiography and computed tomography scan showed complete resolution of the mass. PMID:24532627

  4. Congenital lobar emphysema in neonates: Anaesthetic challenges.

    PubMed

    Nath, Mridu Paban; Gupta, Sachin; Kumar, Ashish; Chakrabarty, Anulekha

    2011-05-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) is a potentially reversible, though possibly life-threatening, cause of respiratory distress in the neonate. It poses dilemma in diagnosis and management. We are presenting a 6-week-old baby who presented with a sudden onset of respiratory distress related to CLE affecting the left upper lobe. Lobectomy was performed under general anaesthesia with one lung ventilation. The details of anaesthetic challenges and management are described here. PMID:21808403

  5. Nasal obstruction in neonates and infants.

    PubMed

    Chirico, G; Beccagutti, F

    2010-10-01

    The main functions of the nasal airway are respiration and olfaction. The nose and sinuses condition air before reaching the lower respiratory tract by providing almost 100% humidification, warming, filtering and trapping of foreign particles. The airway epithelium contributes to the host defense system. Any alteration of this clearance system may produce significant problems, particularly in neonates, who are obligate nasal breathers until they are at least two months old. Nasal obstruction, and the inability to remove nasal secretion by nose blowing, may have serious consequences, such as respiratory distress or discomfort, altered sleep cycle, increased risk of obstructive apnoea and feeding difficulties. Most cases of nasal obstruction in neonates and infants are due to generalized nasal airway obstruction associated with neonatal rhinitis, viral upper respiratory tract infections, and possibly milk/soy allergies. Saline nasal lavage is recommended as an adjunct therapy for rhinosinusitis and allergic rhinitis, and in most cases of nasal congestion or obstruction in newborns, infants and children. In two recent experiences, was deemed to be the Narhinel method safe and effective for treatment of nasal congestion in babies with viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, or for the prevention of acute otitis media (AOM) and acute rhinosinusitis (AR) in children. Due to the efficacy, ease of use, tolerability and the lack of alternative medications in children younger than 12 years of age, nasal irrigation with physiological saline solution, followed by gentle aspiration, represent an effective method for the prevention and control of nasal congestion or obstruction in term or preterm neonates, infants and children.

  6. Antithrombotic Therapy in Neonates and Children

    PubMed Central

    Monagle, Paul; Chan, Anthony K. C.; Goldenberg, Neil A.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Journeycake, Janna M.; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neonates and children differ from adults in physiology, pharmacologic responses to drugs, epidemiology, and long-term consequences of thrombosis. This guideline addresses optimal strategies for the management of thrombosis in neonates and children. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Results: We suggest that where possible, pediatric hematologists with experience in thromboembolism manage pediatric patients with thromboembolism (Grade 2C). When this is not possible, we suggest a combination of a neonatologist/pediatrician and adult hematologist supported by consultation with an experienced pediatric hematologist (Grade 2C). We suggest that therapeutic unfractionated heparin in children is titrated to achieve a target anti-Xa range of 0.35 to 0.7 units/mL or an activated partial thromboplastin time range that correlates to this anti-Xa range or to a protamine titration range of 0.2 to 0.4 units/mL (Grade 2C). For neonates and children receiving either daily or bid therapeutic low-molecular-weight heparin, we suggest that the drug be monitored to a target range of 0.5 to 1.0 units/mL in a sample taken 4 to 6 h after subcutaneous injection or, alternatively, 0.5 to 0.8 units/mL in a sample taken 2 to 6 h after subcutaneous injection (Grade 2C). Conclusions: The evidence supporting most recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in neonates and children remains weak. Studies addressing appropriate drug target ranges and monitoring requirements are urgently required in addition to site- and clinical situation-specific thrombosis management strategies. PMID:22315277

  7. Neonatal tetanus--long-term residual handicaps.

    PubMed Central

    Teknetzi, P; Manios, S; Katsouyanopoulos, V

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-eight survivors of neonatal tetanus were assessed, 5 to 12 years after recovery, for neurological sequelae, physical growth, and maturation. Apart from appreciable handicaps (cerebral palsy, mental deficit, behavioural disturbances) in 4 cases, no harmful effect on physical growth or development was found. The fact that affected patients had frequent and prolonged bouts of spasms and apnoea suggests that anoxia was the main cause of brain damage. PMID:6187289

  8. Neonatal sepsis in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Koutouby, A; Habibullah, J

    1995-06-01

    The case records of all neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of Al Wasl Hospital (Dubai) in a period of 60 months (May 1987-April 1992) were analysed. One-hundred-and-six neonates had confirmed sepsis. The most common causative organisms were Group B Streptococci (23 per cent), E. coli (17 per cent), Staph. epidermidis (17 per cent), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16 per cent). Group B Streptococcus presented as the most common organism in very early (< or = 24 hours) and early onset (2-6 days) of sepsis (34 per cent, 21/61), Klebsiella pneumoniae (24 per cent), Staphylococcal epidermidis (18 per cent) and Candida (13 per cent) were most common organisms causing late onset of sepsis (7-30 days). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae had highest mortality (71 per cent, 5/7; and 59 per cent, 10/17, respectively). Lowest mortality (4 per cent, 1/25) was observed in Group B Streptococcus sepsis. Prematurity, low birth weight, and nosocomial sepsis were high risk factors associated with fatal outcome.

  9. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  10. Neonatal seizures: soothing a burning topic.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Matthew D; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L

    2013-10-01

    Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia and present the case of a 6-day-old male infant who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis.

  11. Neonatal tetanus in Zaria, Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Osuhor, P C

    1983-01-01

    This discussion describes the problem of neonatal tetanus as seen in the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH) Zaria, Northern Nigeria over the January 1975 to December 1977 period. Appropriate health actions to be taken regarding prevention and management of neonatal tetanus are described. The pediatric ward of ABUTH, Zaria, admitted 4600 during the study period. Of these, 54 (1.2%) were neonatal tetanus cases. For these tetanus babies, information was available as to the age, sex, apparent portal of entry of the organisms, and the outcome of the infection. Analysis of their mothers included antenatal clinic attendance, residence, and place of delivery. More perinatal babies were infected and died than the other age groups. By the end of the 2nd week of life, over 90% of all the infected babies died. Home delivered babies were more infected than other babies delivered in hospitals. Only 7.4% of the mothers had any form of antenatal care. Zaria City, the traditional residence of the indigenous, had the highest number of cases and deaths. 44 (81.5%) of the babies had septic umbilical cord stumps with 35 deaths among them. The best treatment for an established case of tetanus is total muscle relaxation with anesthetic agents and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. This requires a specialized intensive care unit and a highly skilled personnel that are not yet available in Zaria. Simple sedation and expert and dedicated nursing and medical supervision can go far in reducing the mortality rate. PMID:6654472

  12. Management of pain in the postoperative neonate.

    PubMed

    Truog, R; Anand, K J

    1989-03-01

    Only recently has the use of anesthesia and analgesia become widely accepted in the newborn infant. This is largely a result of the overwhelming evidence that neonates have the neurologic substrate for the perception of pain and display characteristic behavioral, physiologic, metabolic, and hormonal responses to noxious stimuli. The management of postoperative pain in the surgical neonate begins in the operating room, where techniques can be chosen that will ease the transition into the postoperative period. For postoperative analgesia, the most widely used and effective agents are the narcotics morphine and fentanyl. They may be administered either intermittently or continuously, and with proper precautions may be given to both intubated and nonintubated newborns. Other medications for analgesia and sedation are not as well studied in the newborn, but chloral hydrate and the benzodiazepines are useful for sedation, and acetaminophen may be used for analgesia alone or for potentiating the effect of narcotics. In addition, a number of creative nonpharmacologic techniques are being developed and promise to further decrease the discomfort experienced by postoperative neonates.

  13. Neonatal life support during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Groenendaal, F; Leusink, C; Nijenhuis, M; Janssen, M J H

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques are required frequently for the assessment of the brain of ill neonates. In the present study, the effects of a 1.5 T MR scanner on devices for life support were assessed. A ventilator (Dräger Babylog 2000) was tested in the 1.5 T magnet, using a neonatal ventilation tester and 1.5-5 m tubes. In a special MR incubator, temperature and humidity were measured at 1-min intervals. Infusion was tested with the pump outside the magnet room: infusion rates and time to alarm were tested with 7-m tubes. The ventilator performed normally at a magnetic field line of 2 mT, although the alarms failed. The incubator created a temperature of 35.9 degrees C and humidity of 40.7%, which was acceptable for examinations of 45 min. The alarm limits of the infusion pump placed outside the magnet at 7 m were within company limits. The study indicates that magnetic resonance examinations can be performed safely in ill preterm neonates who require life-support devices.

  14. [Genetic syndromes recognizable in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a neonatal neurological lesion associated or not with dysmorphism or with a particular phenotype can be caused by a) prenatal infections (Group TORCH) toxic or teratotoxic agents (alcohol, cocain, antiepileptics, inhalants such as toluene, etc.), vascular defects or genetic anomalies; b) perinatal isquemic hypoxic lesions, infectious or metabolic disorders, etc. In this paper we analyze all entities of genetic origin neonatally recognizable by their phenotype which must be included in the differential diagnosis of all children neurologically compromised. In order to simplify the diagnosis, these entities will be divided according to the prevalence of the phenotype present at birth, dividing them into two large groups: 1) Genic alterations which include: Syndromes with characteristic facies and member malformations, Supra growth syndrome, Syndrome with neonatal growth deficit, Neuro-ectodermic syndromes, Syndromes with characteristic facies and ocular compromise, Syndromes with characteristic facies including those that bear MIM number, and 2) Chromosomal alterations (autosomal in number, mosaic, deletion, and sex chromosomes). The detection of these anomalies through phenotype studies involving congenital encephalopathies of genetic origin is of major importance because it will permit the orientation of specific diagnostic studies, the prevention of difficult and expensive maneuvers, and furthermore, it will offer adequate family counseling and control eventual complications.

  15. Congenital Malaria due to Plasmodium Vivax Infection in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Ravi; Rajwaniya, Dinesh; Agrawal, Priti

    2016-01-01

    Although malaria is endemic in India, congenital malaria is not very common. Congenital malaria is a very rare condition in both endemic and nonendemic areas. We report a case of congenital malaria in a six-day-old neonate with fever and splenomegaly. The diagnosis was picked up accidentally on a peripheral smear examination. Congenital malaria should be kept as differential diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Timely detection of this condition could lead to early diagnosis and treatment, thereby preventing neonatal mortality. PMID:27651968

  16. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Rich, Mark A.; Swana, Hubert S.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates. PMID:27747129

  17. Congenital mesenteric hernia in neonates: Still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Alshahwani, Noora; Al-Balushi, Zainab; Arain, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction with devastating outcomes and still remains a challenge to diagnose pre-operatively. Patients are often managed with emergency surgical exploration and may need bowel resection. We present 2 neonates with small bowel obstruction secondary to strangulated transmesenteric hernia through a congenital defect in the small bowel mesentery, which were managed successfully. We have also reviewed the literature about congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates. PMID:26612129

  18. Congenital Malaria due to Plasmodium Vivax Infection in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Rajwaniya, Dinesh; Agrawal, Priti

    2016-01-01

    Although malaria is endemic in India, congenital malaria is not very common. Congenital malaria is a very rare condition in both endemic and nonendemic areas. We report a case of congenital malaria in a six-day-old neonate with fever and splenomegaly. The diagnosis was picked up accidentally on a peripheral smear examination. Congenital malaria should be kept as differential diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Timely detection of this condition could lead to early diagnosis and treatment, thereby preventing neonatal mortality.

  19. Metabolism and nutritional support in the surgical neonate.

    PubMed

    Pierro, Agostino

    2002-06-01

    Various factors can influence the metabolism of surgical neonates. These include prematurity, operative stress, critical illness, and sepsis. The nutritional management of surgical infants with congenital or acquired intestinal abnormalities has improved after the introduction of parenteral nutrition. This article is focused on the energy and protein metabolism of surgical neonates with particular reference to the metabolic response to operative trauma and sepsis. The metabolic utilization of intravenous nutrients also is discussed. The metabolic response to operative trauma is different between neonates and adults. Infants have high rates of protein turnover and are avid retainers of nitrogen. Energy expenditure increases only transiently (4 to 6 hours) after major surgery in neonates. Protein turnover and catabolism seems not to be affected by major operative procedures in neonates. In neonates on parenteral nutrition, carbohydrate and fat have an equivalent effect on protein metabolism. The main determinants of fat utilization are carbohydrate intake and resting energy expenditure. Parenteral nutrition in surgical neonates is associated with increased production of oxygen-free radicals. This seems to be related to intravenous fat administration. Promoting fat utilization by reducing the carbohydrate to fat ratio in the intravenous diet reduces free radical activity to a similar extent as fat exclusion. Glutamine appears to be safe for use in neonates and infants and is "conditionally essential" in very-low birth weight infants and in septic neonates. Enteral glutamine supplementation in very-low birth weight infants reduces the risk of sepsis. The metabolism of surgical neonates is affected by operative trauma, critical illness, and sepsis. Nutritional support in surgical neonates has a profound impact on outcome. Exogenous glutamine can modulate immune, metabolic, and inflammatory responses. Further investigations are needed to clarify the clinical benefit of

  20. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. A cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, R I; Wood, B P

    1980-07-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is a form of primary short dwarfism, that is manifest at birth generally has not been regarded as a cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism. Seven neonates with severe dwarfism are presented. The first survived the newborn period, but the other six were early neonatal deaths. All displayed the clinical and radiologic features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. The striking similarities between spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita and achondrogenesis type 2 are discussed. PMID:6773018

  1. Neonatal Drug Therapy: The First Frontier of Therapeutics for Children

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, K; van den Anker, J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the safe and effective use of medicines in neonates has increased substantially but has resulted in few label changes. Drugs developed for use in adults are reshaped and tailored to specific neonatal indications. However, the use of drugs in neonates should not only mirror adult pharmacotherapy, but should be driven by their own specific needs. Therefore, building collaborative networks may assist to develop a newborn-driven research agenda addressing their clinical needs and diseases. PMID:26095519

  2. Congenital Malaria due to Plasmodium Vivax Infection in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Rajwaniya, Dinesh; Agrawal, Priti

    2016-01-01

    Although malaria is endemic in India, congenital malaria is not very common. Congenital malaria is a very rare condition in both endemic and nonendemic areas. We report a case of congenital malaria in a six-day-old neonate with fever and splenomegaly. The diagnosis was picked up accidentally on a peripheral smear examination. Congenital malaria should be kept as differential diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Timely detection of this condition could lead to early diagnosis and treatment, thereby preventing neonatal mortality. PMID:27651968

  3. Epilepsy Following Neonatal Seizures Secondary to Hemorrhagic Stroke in Term Neonates.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Charu; Millichap, John J; Krueger, Jena M; Nangia, Srishti; Ritacco, David G; Stack, Cynthia; Nordli, Douglas R

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage accounts for about 50% of all pediatric stroke. Studies of term infants with intracranial hemorrhage have shown favorable motor and cognitive outcome. The goal of this study was to examine the risk of developing epilepsy in full-term infants with intracranial hemorrhage. A retrospective study was performed of term neonates (greater than or equal to 37 weeks gestation) with intracranial hemorrhage and confirmed seizures. Fifteen patients with intracranial hemorrhage and neonatal seizures were identified. Four patients did not have follow-up information beyond the neonatal period (1 death, 3 lost to follow-up after initial clinic visit). The average follow-up period for the remaining 11 patients was approximately 22 months. Ten out of the 11 patients (91%) who were followed were seizure-free and off antiepileptic medications. One patient required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and subsequently developed infantile spasms. The authors found that overall outcome was favorable with respect to development of epilepsy. PMID:26303411

  4. Barriers to provision of developmental care in the neonatal intensive care unit: neonatal nursing perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Prendergast, Carol C

    2007-02-01

    The role of the neonatal nurse is vital for the successful implementation of developmental care and the provision of an optimal neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment. The goal was to identify nurses' perceived barriers to implementation or improving developmental care in their NICUs. Nursing perceptions related to barriers for implementing developmental care were assessed using a 12-point questionnaire during two New York City Neonatal Nursing regional conferences. One hundred forty-six (86%) of 170 nurses representing 24 regional hospitals returned the survey. Developmental care was viewed as essential by 136 nurses (93%), yet 125 nurses (86%) believed that their NICU was not providing optimal developmental care. Light and sound standards were viewed as important to providing care by 71% and 91% of respondents, respectively, yet only four NICUs (3%) had light and sound meters to identify or standardize this environmental source of pain. As a group, the perceived barriers to provision of optimal developmental care in order of decreasing importance were staff nurses and staff physicians (53%) > NICU funds (42%) > physician leadership (37%) > facility limitations (31%) > registered nurse leadership (25%). In contrast, 90% of nurses whose NICU did not use developmental multidisciplinary team meetings or developmental care champions or advocates were significantly more likely to identify nursing or physician colleagues as barriers to implementing or improving developmental care, compared with 38% of nurses whose NICU used such activities ( P < 0.001). Developmental care is perceived by the neonatal nurse as a vital component to the care provided in the NICU. Use of simple light and sound measures may enhance perception of providing an optimal NICU environment. Neonatal nurses perceived barriers to care are often attributed to neonatal staff nursing and physician colleagues. This perception is decreased considerably in those NICUs in which multidisciplinary

  5. Factors Affecting the Weaning from Nasal CPAP in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Shantanu; Rajasekhar, Hariprem; Gupta, Anju; Bhutada, Alok; Rastogi, Deepa; Wung, Jen-Tien

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Identification of the weight and postmenstrual age (PMA) at successful weaning of NCPAP in preterm neonates and the factors influencing the successful wean. Study Design. Retrospective review of 454 neonates ≤32 weeks of gestational age (GA) who were placed on NCPAP and successfully weaned to room air was performed. Results. Neonates had a mean birth weight (BW) of 1357 ± 392 grams with a mean GA of 29.3 ± 2.2 weeks. Neonates were weaned off NCPAP at mean weight of 1611 ± 432 grams and mean PMA of 32.9 ± 2.4 weeks. Univariate analysis showed that chorioamnionitis, intubation, surfactant use, PDA, sepsis/NEC, anemia, apnea, GER and IVH were significantly associated with the time to NCPAP wean. On multivariate analysis, among neonates that were intubated, BW was the only significant factor (P < 0.001) that was inversely related to time to successful NCPAP wean. Amongst non-intubated neonates, along with BW (P < 0.01), chorioamnionitis (P < 0.01), anemia (P < 0.0001), and GER (P < 0.02) played a significant role in weaning from NCPAP. Conclusion. Neonates were weaned off NCPAP at mean weight of 1611 ± 432 grams and mean PMA of 32.9 ± 2.4 weeks. BW significantly affects weaning among intubated and non-intubated neonates, though in neonates who were never intubated chorioamnionitis, anemia and GER also significantly affected the duration on NCPAP. PMID:22187570

  6. Delayed emergency myelopoiesis following polymicrobial sepsis in neonates.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Alex G; Cuenca, Angela L; Gentile, Lori F; Efron, Philip A; Islam, Saleem; Moldawer, Lyle L; Kays, David W; Larson, Shawn D

    2015-05-01

    Neonates have increased susceptibility to infection, which leads to increased mortality. Whether or not this as a result of implicit deficits in neonatal innate immune function or recapitulation of innate immune effector cell populations following infection is unknown. Here, we examine the process of emergency myelopoiesis whereby the host repopulates peripheral myeloid cells lost following the initial infectious insult. As early inflammatory responses are often dependent upon NF-κB and type I IFN signaling, we also examined whether the absence of MyD88, TRIF or MyD88 and TRIF signaling altered the myelopoietic response in neonates to polymicrobial sepsis. Following neonatal polymicrobial septic challenge, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion in bone marrow and the spleen were both attenuated and delayed in neonates compared with adults. Similar reductions in other precursors were observed in neonates. Similar to adult studies, the expansion of progenitor stem cell populations was also seen in the absence of MyD88 and/or TRIF signaling. Overall, neonates have impaired emergency myelopoiesis in response to sepsis compared with young adults. Despite reports that this expansion may be related to TLR signaling, our data suggest that other factors may be important, as TRIF(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) neonatal HSCs are still able to expand in response to polymicrobial neonatal sepsis.

  7. Elucidating the role of genomics in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kirpalani, Haresh; Cotten, Charles Michael

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable preterm populations. Immature immune defenses, and environmental and maternal factors contribute to this risk, with as many as a third of very preterm infants experiencing sepsis during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Epidemiologic and twin studies have suggested that there is a genetic contribution to sepsis predilection. Several investigators have conducted candidate gene association studies on variants of specific interest and potential functional significance in neonatal sepsis. In this review, we describe details of studies that have evaluated genetic susceptibility in neonatal sepsis, and summarize findings from a review of candidate gene association studies.

  8. Neonatal Encephalopathy: Update on Therapeutic Hypothermia and Other Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment for newborns at 36 weeks of gestation or greater with intrapartum hypoxia-related NE. Term and late preterm infants with moderate to severe encephalopathy show improved survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of age after TH. TH can increase survival without increasing major disability, rates of an IQ less than 70, or cerebral palsy. Neonates with severe NE remain at risk of death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment. This review discusses the evidence supporting TH for term or near term neonates with NE. PMID:27524449

  9. The Role of the Neurointensive Care Nursery for Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Rowitch, David H

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy due to intrapartum events is estimated at 1 to 2 per 1000 live births in high-income countries. Outcomes have improved over the past decade due to implementation of therapeutic hypothermia, the only clinically available neuroprotective strategy for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Neonatal encephalopathy is the most common condition treated within a neonatal neurocritical care unit. Neonates with encephalopathy benefit from a neurocritical care approach due to prevention of secondary brain injury through attention to basic physiology, earlier recognition and treatment of neurologic complications, consistent management using guidelines and protocols, and use of optimized teams at dedicated referral centers. PMID:27524453

  10. Analgesic Effect of Oral Glucose in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Jatana, S K; Dalal, S S; Wilson, C G

    2003-04-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain, has defined pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience connected with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage". It was thought that the newborn baby does not experience pain because of incompletely developed nervous system. However, it has been shown that neurological system known to be associated with pain transmission and modulation, is intact and functional. A study was conducted in our center to study the analgesic effect of administration of oral glucose in various concentrations, in neonates undergoing heel punctures, for collection of blood for investigations. This was compared with the analgesic effects of breast milk (which contains lactose). 125 full term normal neonates with no history of birth asphyxia or underlying neurological abnormality, requiring heel punctures for collection of blood for various investigations were selected for the study. They were matched for gestational age, birth weight and sex distribution and divided into 5 groups of 25 each. One group comprised control subjects and was administered sterile water. 3 groups were administered 1 ml of varying strengths of glucose solutions i.e. 10%, 25% and 50% respectively. The last group was given 1 ml of expressed breast milk (EBM). Prior to heel pricks, state of arousal, baseline heart rate (HR) and transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded by pulse oximeter in each neonate. Autolet, a mechanical device for capillary sampling, was used for heel pricks to give equal strength of painful stimulus in each procedure. Audio tape recorder was used to record the cry. The oral solution was administered slowly over 30 seconds by means of a syringe placed in the mouth. Heel puncture was done after 2 minutes, taking all aseptic precautions. HR and SpO2 were monitored using pulse oximeter. Pain response was assessed, by recording duration of crying, change in HR, change in SpO2 and facial action

  11. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock. PMID:27171076

  12. Preventability of neonatal cold injury and its contribution to neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R; Arbeli, Y; Stone, D

    1991-08-01

    When the body temperature of a small neonate falls below 35 degrees C, lassitude can be noted; severe derangements of cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, immunological, and hematological systems may also occur depending in part on the duration and severity of hypothermia. Diagnosis requires a low-reading thermometer, lacking which the diagnosis can be suspected, but most often is missed. Fatal cases of diagnosed cold injury commonly have terminal pneumonia or sepsis. Prevention involves identification and home visits to high-risk infants; intensive care of those with the diagnosis at Soroka Hospital Medical Center has reduced the case-fatality rate from 30% in 1971 to 3% in 1988-1989. During the same period in our region, the proportion of neonatal deaths occurring in winter months of December, January, and February has dropped from 55 to 27%. The expected proportion is 25%. We hypothesize that excess neonatal mortality during winter months, especially due to pneumonia and sepsis or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is an indicator of missed cold injury syndrome. A preliminary evaluation was made form U.S. data by state, provided by the National Center for Health Statistics, which records no fatalities from cold injury during 1986. Contrasted with this are 26 cold injury deaths in Israel for 1977-1980. In the U.S., though, excess winter neonatal deaths in 1986 from SIDS, pneumonia, and sepsis are reported.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1954941

  13. Blood concentrations of pancreatitis associated protein in neonates: relevance to neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarles, J.; Barthellemy, S.; Ferec, C.; Iovanna, J.; Roussey, M.; Farriaux, J.; Toutain, A.; Berthelot, J.; Maurin, N.; Codet, J.; Berthezene, P.; Dagorn, J.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) is a marker for cystic fibrosis which could be used in neonatal screening for the disease.
METHODS—PAP was assayed on screening cards from 202 807 neonates. Babies with PAP ⩾ 15 ng/ml, or ⩾ 11.5 ng/ml and immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) ⩾ 700 ng/ml were recalled for clinical examination, sweat testing, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene analysis.
RESULTS—Median PAP value was 2.8 ng/ml. Forty four cases of cystic fibrosis were recorded. Recalled neonates (n=398) included only 11 carriers. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that PAP above 8.0 ng/ml would select 0.76% of babies, including all those with cystic fibrosis, except for one with meconium ileus and two with mild CFTR mutations. Screening 27146 babies with both PAP and IRT showed that only 0.12% had PAP> 8.0 ng/ml and IRT > 700 ng/ml, including all cases of cystic fibrosis.
CONCLUSION—PAP is increased in most neonates with cystic fibrosis and could be used for CF screening. Its combination with IRT looks promising.

 PMID:10325788

  14. Change in neonatal care pattern and neonatal mortality in a rural medical college.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Potdar, S

    1988-02-01

    Due to the nonavailability of separate nursing staff for a special care neonatal unit in a rural medical college, the strategy for neonatal care of high risk babies was changed from January 1, 1985 onwards. These babies were managed mainly in postnatal wards with emphasis on maternal involvement reinforced by day-to-day orientation of mothers, nurses, and doctors to neonatal care. The incidence of fullterm (FT), preterm (PT), and low birthweight (LBW) babies were comparable in 1984 and 1985. The overall neonatal mortality (NM) was 8.3% in 1984 and 4.3% in 1985, NM in PT was 50.8% in 1984 and 30.0% in 1985, and NM in LBW was 17.0% in 1984 and 9.3% in 1985. These rates were reduced by approximately 40-50% of that recorded in 1984. The difference in all groups was statistically significant. However, the NM in the VLBW (1500 g) did not change substantially. Deaths due to severe asphyxia and intraventricular hemorrhage were reduced from 4.03% of all livebirths in 1984 to 2.2%, the difference being statistically significant. The most significant reeducation was seen in deaths due to infection which dropped from 2.45% of total livebirths in 1984 to 0.88% of the total in 1985. With this experience, the authors recommend the measures adopted by them to reduce the NM, especially in small centers and rural areas where nursing and other facilities are not optimal. PMID:3246397

  15. Neonatal Klebsiella Septicaemia in Ibadan: Implications for Neonatal Care in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omokhodion, S. I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The antecedent events, clinical features, prevalence, and complications of neonatal Klebsiella septicaemia in 73 infants admitted to a special care baby unit in Nigeria are retrospectively reviewed and compared with those of 72 infants who had no risk factors for sepsis admitted to the same unit during the same period. A nosocomial acquisition of…

  16. What neonatal intensive care nurses need to know about neonatal palliative care.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize topics for a professional development program in neonatal palliative care. A total of 276 nurses and midwives who work in an Australian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 26 international healthcare professionals working in NICU and palliative care served as participants. A Delphi technique was used, consisting of a series of rounds of data collection via interview and questionnaire, to identify and consolidate opinions of nurses and other healthcare professionals who work in neonatal intensive care units. The main outcome measures were: (1) Topics to be included in a professional development program for nurses working in neonatal intensive care units and (2) the preferred format of the program. Twenty-three high-priority topics were identified, which included preparing families when death is imminent, how to provide emotional support to grieving parents, advocating for a dying baby, and assessing and managing pain in a dying baby. Care of a dying infant requires the same skill set as caring for older terminally ill children internationally. A combination of face-to-face lectures and interactive workshops using case studies and audiovisual examples is the preferred format.

  17. Neonatal Narcotic Dependence. Report Series 29, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    This brief report suggests that it is evident that many uncertainties still remain with regard to neonatal narcotic dependence. Discussion centers on the precise causes and symptoms of neonatal narcotic dependence, the most efficacious treatment procedures, the relative severity of heroin dependence as compared with methadone dependence in the…

  18. Clinical pharmacology in neonates: small size, huge variability.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N

    2014-01-01

    Drug therapy is a powerful tool for improving neonatal outcome. Despite this, neonatologists still routinely prescribe off-label compounds developed for adults and extrapolate doses from those used for children or adults. Knowledge integration through pharmacokinetic modeling is a method that could improve the current situation. Such predictive models may convert neonatal pharmacotherapy from explorative to confirmatory. This can be illustrated by research projects related to the prediction of neonatal renal clearance and neonatal glucuronidation. This type of model will also improve the current knowledge of neonatal (patho)physiology. In the meanwhile, the fields of clinical pharmacology (e.g. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and pharmacogenetics) and neonatology (e.g. whole-body cooling and the lower limit of viability) have both matured, resulting in new research topics. However, in order for the modeling and the newly emerging topics to become effective tools, they need to be tailored to the specific characteristics of neonates. Consequently, the field of neonatal pharmacotherapy needs dedicated neonatologists who continue to raise the awareness that off-label practices, eminence-based dosing regimens and the absence of neonatal drug formulations all reflect suboptimal care.

  19. [A neonate with blisters on his upper legs].

    PubMed

    Molenaar-Hoogendijk, Marina; Boute, Frans J; Loots, Myriam A M

    2016-01-01

    A 10-days-old male neonate presented with multiple bullae, mostly in the diaper region, without signs of illness. We diagnosed this condition as neonatal bullous impetigo and treated the patient orally with flucloxacillin. Bullous impetigo is caused by Staphylococcus aureus toxins that break down intercellular proteins. PMID:26860750

  20. [A child with neonatal allo-immune neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Markhorst, D G; Hack, W W; de Waal, F C; Kuypers, R

    1990-10-01

    A newborn child with neonatal neutropenia as a result of the presence of maternal IgG isoantibodies against neutrophil granulocyte blood group antigens is reported. Mechanism, diagnostics and therapy of the disease are discussed. The diagnosis not only has consequences for the child, but also for the mother and following pregnancies. A review of the most important causes of neonatal neutropenia is given.

  1. Predictive values for procalcitonin in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Abdel Hakeem Abdel; Kamel, Bothina Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis followed by appropriate treatment decreases mortality and morbidity in infants. The aim of this study is to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Methods: We present a cross sectional study where 35 neonates with early onset sepsis (admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Units at El-Minia Children University Hospital from August 2012 to August 2013) were included in the study. Another 35 healthy neonates with no clinical or biological data of infection were included as a control group. Subjects were subjected to a thorough history taking and routine laboratory investigations. Serum PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Mean levels of PCT and CRP in neonates with sepsis were significantly higher than in the control group (p=0.0001). There was a moderate, but significant, positive correlation between PCT and C-reactive protein (p=0.001, r=0.55) and an insignificant correlation between procalcitonin and total leukocytic count among the neonates with sepsis (p=0.2, r=0.2). In addition, procalcitonin had high sensitivity, specificity, a high positive predictive value, and a high negative predictive value (80%, 85.7%, 84.8%, and 81.1% respectively). Procalcitonin showed higher sensitivity when compared to CRP. Conclusion: Procalcitonin is a sensitive, independent, and useful biomarker in comparison to CRP in early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. PMID:26396733

  2. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care. PMID:26944066

  3. Relationships Between Neonatal Characteristics and Mother-Infant Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Danzger, Barbara

    A total of 51 mothers and their newborn infants were studied in order to evaluate the relationship between neonatal style and the early mother-infant relationship. The procedure included an infant assessment with the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale, a mother-infant interaction observation during feeding, and an interview concerning maternal…

  4. Neonatal Characteristics and Directional Effects in Mother-Infant Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.

    This study of 134 mothers and their newborn infants evaluated the relationships between neonatal style and mother-infant interaction. The procedure included a newborn assessment with the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale and two mother-infant interaction observations, one carried out during feeding and the other during a semi-structured…

  5. Gender Differences in Mother-Neonate Twin Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riese, Marilyn L.

    To investigate differences in mothers' interaction patterns with their neonate twins based on birth order, relative size at birth, or gender, 37 neonate twins and their mothers were observed during the first 10 minutes of a feeding in a hospital nursery. Time-sampling recordings were made of maternal behaviors related to proximal stimulation,…

  6. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices.

  7. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices. PMID:27424006

  8. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care.

  9. 45 CFR 46.205 - Research involving neonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Research involving neonates. 46.205 Section 46.205 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Pregnant Women, Human Fetuses and Neonates Involved in Research §...

  10. 45 CFR 46.205 - Research involving neonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Research involving neonates. 46.205 Section 46.205 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Pregnant Women, Human Fetuses and Neonates Involved in Research §...

  11. 45 CFR 46.205 - Research involving neonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Research involving neonates. 46.205 Section 46.205 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Pregnant Women, Human Fetuses and Neonates Involved in Research §...

  12. Neonatal Tetanus in Vietnam: Comprehensive Intensive Care Support Improves Mortality.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Huynh T; Lubis, Inke N; Qui, Phan T; Yen, Lam M; Wills, Bridget; Thwaites, C Louise; Sabanathan, Saraswathy

    2016-06-01

    We report a 66% reduction in neonatal tetanus mortality after introducing a new management bundle integrating antibiotic therapy, muscle relaxation and invasive monitoring. The latter allowed rapid detection of autonomic instability which was treated with magnesium sulphate. This is the first report of its use in neonatal tetanus. PMID:26407289

  13. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries.

  14. Neonatal intensive care: satisfaction measured from a parent's perspective.

    PubMed

    Conner, J M; Nelson, E C

    1999-01-01

    Health care systems today are complex, technically proficient, competitive, and market-driven. One outcome of this environment is the recent phenomenon in the health care field of "consumerism." Strong emphasis is placed on customer service, with organized efforts to understand, measure, and meet the needs of customers served. The purpose of this article is to describe the current understanding and measurement of parent needs and expectations with neonatal intensive care services from the time the expectant parents enter the health care system for the birth through the discharge process and follow-up care. Through literature review, 11 dimensions of care were identified as important to parents whose infants received neonatal intensive care: assurance, caring, communication, consistent information, education, environment, follow-up care, pain management, participation, proximity, and support. Five parent satisfaction questionnaires-the Parent Feedback Questionnaire, Neonatal Index of Parent Satisfaction, Inpatient Parent Satisfaction-Children's Hospital Minneapolis, Picker Institute-Inpatient Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survey, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit-Parent Satisfaction Form-are critically reviewed for their ability to measure parent satisfaction within the framework of the neonatal care delivery process. An immense gap was found in our understanding about what matters most and when to parents going through the neonatal intensive care experience. Additional research is required to develop comprehensive parent satisfaction surveys that measure parent perceptions of neonatal care within the framework of the care delivery process. PMID:9917476

  15. Bacteremia caused by Rhizobium radiobacter in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Seema; Al-Sweih, Noura; Othman, Abdul Hafez; Dhar, Rita

    2014-02-01

    The authors report a case of bacteremia due to Rhizobium radiobacter in a preterm neonate. Although the baby recovered from the septic episode following therapy with appropriate antibiotics he succumbed to complications, mainly associated with prematurity. This case highlights a rare manifestation of R.radiobacter infection in a neonate in whom the source of the organism remained undiscovered.

  16. Prediction of Nine Month Performance from Neonatal and Developmental Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John F., Jr.; And Others

    This study investigated the ability of the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS), in combination with neonatal histories and developmental assessments, to predict mental and motor performance of 9-month-old infants on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID). Fourteen normal, full-term infants and 10 average-for-gestational-age,…

  17. Inspired gas temperature in ventilated neonates.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark William; Dunster, Kimble Robert; Cartwright, David William

    2004-07-01

    The warming and humidification of inspired gases for ventilated neonates are routine. There are no data on the temperature of the gas at the airway opening in ventilated neonates. Is the inspired gas temperature at the airway opening, as expected and set on the humidifier, around 37 degrees C? We aimed to measure temperature at the airway opening and compare this with the circuit temperature. This was an observational study in a neonatal intensive care unit. Twenty-five mechanically ventilated infants were studied. All had humidifiers with chamber temperature set at 36 degrees C and the circuit temperature set at 37 degrees C. Two temperature probes were inserted and rested at the circuit-exit and at the airway opening, and temperatures were measured for 2 min in each infant. At this time, the circuit temperature was also noted. The mean (SD) temperature at the airway opening in infants nursed in incubators was 34.9 (1.2) degrees C, compared with radiant warmers where the mean (SD) was 33.1 (0.5) degrees C. The mean (SD) difference in temperature from the circuit temperature probe to the airway opening was greater under radiant warmers, with a mean (SD) drop of 3.9 (0.6) degrees C compared with a mean (SD) drop of 2.0 (1.3) degrees C in the incubators. In conclusion, the temperature at the circuit temperature probe does not reflect the temperature at the airway opening. Inspired gas temperatures are lower than the expected 37 degrees C with the normal circuits and usual humidifier settings. PMID:15170873

  18. Bed bug outbreak in a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, T; Kumar, A; Saili, A

    2015-10-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in bed bug infestations over the last 10-15 years. A major stigma is placed upon the institutions found to be infested. We report our experience with an outbreak of the tropical bed bug, Cimex hemipterus, in a neonatal unit. The outbreak not only affected the admitted newborns and mothers by causing a wide variety of rashes and inducing sleeplessness, but also impinged upon the health professionals and their families by producing similar symptomology. It is important for healthcare providers to be aware of, and for each healthcare facility to have, bed bug prevention and control policies. PMID:25591490

  19. Neonatal intensive care in the home.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, T M

    1998-12-01

    As the trend toward early discharge and home care of medically fragile neonates continues, parents find themselves thrust into a lifestyle for which they are unprepared. They must quickly adjust to a new daily routine and new home environment. They watch as part of their home is transformed into a mini intensive care unit with the kind of high-tech equipment and supplies once exclusively reserved for hospital settings. Parents also must learn to live with limited privacy because home care nurses and other providers become a visible presence and a daily reminder that their lives have been forever altered. PMID:10030204

  20. Neonatal candidiasis: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Rachel G; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2014-11-01

    Infection with Candida species is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in infants. The incidence of Candida infection varies widely across centers, likely due to differences in practice related to modifiable risk factors such as exposure to empiric antibiotics and length of parenteral nutrition. Early diagnosis of Candida and prompt treatment with appropriate antifungal agents, such as fluconazole, amphotericin B deoxycholate, and micafungin, are critical for improved outcomes. This paper reviews the current literature relating to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of Candida infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  1. Neonatal opaque right lung: delayed fluid resorption

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, K.; Richardson, J.

    1981-12-01

    Eight newborn infants with opaque right lungs were examined. Clinically, the main problem associated with the opaque right lung is mild respiratory distress, and radiographyically, the findings consist of (a) a totally opaque right lung, (b) a semiopaque right lung, or (c) an opaque right upper lobe only. These findings are usually interpreted as representing pneumonia, empyema, or hydrochlothorax, but the fact that they clear within 24 to 48 hours indicates that none of these diseases is the cause. It is thought that neonatal opaque right lung results from the transient retention of normal fetal fluid in the right lung.

  2. Neurosonography of the pre-term neonate

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a description of our present understanding of the premature brain as seen through the eyes of the sonogram. Neurosonography of the Pre-Term Neonate ties the pathophysiology, anatomy and the all important clinical follow-up data to the sonogram. The book is divided into five sections: Scanning Techniques and Normal Anatomy, Pathophysiology of Germinal Matrix Related Hemorrhage and Ischemia, Neurosonography - Germinal Matrix Related Hemorrhage - Periventricular Leukomalacia, Incidence and Outcome - Germinal Matrix Related Hemorrhage - Periventricular Leukomalacia and Comparison of Two Modalities: Ultrasound versus Computed Tomography.

  3. Selenium supplementation for the preterm Indian neonate.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, Geeta; Aggarwal, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Deficient antioxidant defenses in preterm infants have been implicated in diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia, and intraventricular hemorrhage. The antioxidant properties of selenium make it important in the nutrition of very low-birth weight (VLBW) infants. Selenium is a component of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), an enzyme that prevents the production of free radicals. Preterm infants have low selenium stores and require supplementation by parenteral and enteral routes. This communiquι reviews the beneficial role that selenium supplementation might play in improving neonatal outcomes. PMID:27350709

  4. Cerebral ultrasound findings in neonatal lupus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, A A; Gallini, F; De Luca, D; Luciano, R; Frezza, S; de Turris, P L; Tortorolo, G

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study was performed enrolling 11 newborns with neonatal lupus syndrome (NLS) and 22 control newborns to investigate cerebral ultrasound (US) anomalies and their relationship with clinical neurological signs and laboratory findings. Cerebral US detected a significantly higher incidence in the study group of both subependymal pseudocysts (SEPC) and subependymal hemorrhage (SEH), neither of which correlated to autoantibody levels. All infants had completely normal neurological examinations both at birth and follow-up. The etiopathogenesis of central nervous system findings in NLS is discussed. US evaluation identified minimal anomalies compatible with favorable outcome: further studies are necessary to investigate the possible long-term sequelae, pathogenesis and spectrum of cerebral US findings.

  5. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development.

  6. Milk bolus obstruction in the neonate.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C T; Dickson, J A; Swain, V A

    1977-01-01

    Seventeen cases of neonatal intestinal obstruction due to inspissated milk curds were seen at this hospital in the 9 years 1964-1972. The obstruction started on the 2nd to 10th day of life. Half the babies passed blood from the rectum and in most the x-rays were diagnostic. All survived, 14 after operation and 3 after medical treatment with a Gastrografin enema. Incomplete absorption of solids, particularly the fat from cows' milk feeds, is suggested as the cause. PMID:576378

  7. Developmental and maladaptive plasticity in neonatal SCI.

    PubMed

    Pape, Karen E

    2012-06-01

    Babies and young children with early spinal cord injury (SCI) have evidence of an improved level of recovery over an extended time period. Enhanced neuroplasticity is well recognized in neonatal animal models. In the young human, developmental apraxia and learned early habitual movements mask expression of residual or recovered motor function. Techniques providing sensorimotor stimulation with threshold electrical stimulation (TES) and EMG triggered stimulation (ETS) act to increase awareness and useful function. Small cohort size and prolonged developmental maturation argue for the use of single subject research designs in this population. PMID:22306423

  8. Neonatal Thrombocytopenia as a Consequence of Maternal Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kalagiri, Ram R; Choudhury, Saiara; Carder, Timothy; Govande, Vinayak; Beeram, Madhava R; Uddin, M Nasir

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (preE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension affecting a significant proportion of pregnant women worldwide and can cause detrimental effects in the mother and newborn. Some of the effects in the newborn include neonatal thrombocytopenia. Pertaining specifically to neonatal thrombocytopenia, several questions remain unanswered. Discussion According to the current literature, neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal preE is highly prevalent in the general population and the incidence is reported to be around 30% worldwide. This review gives an insight into the syndrome and summarizes the possible pathological mechanisms, the diagnostic approach, complications, and therapeutic interventions of neonatal thrombocytopenia. It also identifies the involvement of other cell lines, apart from platelets in the newborns. Furthermore, we suggest a future prospective study to investigate the pathogenesis of preE and plan a study involving animal models to come up with a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent preE and its various consequences in neonates. PMID:26929869

  9. Neonatal Thrombocytopenia as a Consequence of Maternal Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kalagiri, Ram R.; Choudhury, Saiara; Carder, Timothy; Govande, Vinayak; Beeram, Madhava R.; Uddin, M Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (preE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension affecting a significant proportion of pregnant women worldwide and can cause detrimental effects in the mother and newborn. Some of the effects in the newborn include neonatal thrombocytopenia. Pertaining specifically to neonatal thrombocytopenia, several questions remain unanswered. Discussion According to the current literature, neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal preE is highly prevalent in the general population and the incidence is reported to be around 30% worldwide. This review gives an insight into the syndrome and summarizes the possible pathological mechanisms, the diagnostic approach, complications, and therapeutic interventions of neonatal thrombocytopenia. It also identifies the involvement of other cell lines, apart from platelets in the newborns. Furthermore, we suggest a future prospective study to investigate the pathogenesis of preE and plan a study involving animal models to come up with a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent preE and its various consequences in neonates. PMID:26929869

  10. How Can the Microbiologist Help in Diagnosing Neonatal Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Paolucci, Michela; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon whether the onset of symptoms is before 72 hours of life (early-onset neonatal sepsis—EONS) or later (late-onset neonatal sepsis—LONS). These definitions have contributed greatly to diagnosis and treatment by identifying which microorganisms are likely to be responsible for sepsis during these periods and the expected outcomes of infection. This paper focuses on the tools that microbiologist can offer to diagnose and eventually prevent neonatal sepsis. Here, we discuss the advantages and limitation of the blood culture, the actual gold standard for sepsis diagnosis. In addition, we examine the utility of molecular techniques in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:22319539

  11. Differential Regenerative Capacity of Neonatal Mouse Hearts after Cryoinjury

    PubMed Central

    Darehzereshki, Ali; Rubin, Nicole; Gamba, Laurent; Kim, Jieun; Fraser, James; Huang, Ying; Billings, Joshua; Mohammadzadeh, Robabeh; Wood, John; Warburton, David; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mouse hearts fully regenerate after ventricular resection similar to adult zebrafish. We established cryoinjury models to determine if different types and varying degrees of severity in cardiac injuries trigger different responses in neonatal mouse hearts. In contrast to ventricular resection, neonatal mouse hearts fail to regenerate and show severe impairment of cardiac function post transmural cryoinjury. However, neonatal hearts fully recover after non-transmural cryoinjury. Interestingly, cardiomyocyte proliferation does not significantly increase in neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjuries. Epicardial activation and new coronary vessel formation occur after cryoinjury. The profibrotic marker PAI-1 is highly expressed after transmural but not non-transmural cryoinjuries, which may contribute to the differential scarring. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for heart injuries should vary depending on the nature of the injury. PMID:25555840

  12. Differential regenerative capacity of neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjury.

    PubMed

    Darehzereshki, Ali; Rubin, Nicole; Gamba, Laurent; Kim, Jieun; Fraser, James; Huang, Ying; Billings, Joshua; Mohammadzadeh, Robabeh; Wood, John; Warburton, David; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal mouse hearts fully regenerate after ventricular resection similar to adult zebrafish. We established cryoinjury models to determine if different types and varying degrees of severity in cardiac injuries trigger different responses in neonatal mouse hearts. In contrast to ventricular resection, neonatal mouse hearts fail to regenerate and show severe impairment of cardiac function post transmural cryoinjury. However, neonatal hearts fully recover after non-transmural cryoinjury. Interestingly, cardiomyocyte proliferation does not significantly increase in neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjuries. Epicardial activation and new coronary vessel formation occur after cryoinjury. The profibrotic marker PAI-1 is highly expressed after transmural but not non-transmural cryoinjuries, which may contribute to the differential scarring. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for heart injuries should vary depending on the nature of the injury.

  13. Neonatal Sepsis due to Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Boyce, Guilaine K.; Sadarangani, Manish; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, especially those born prematurely, are at high risk of morbidity and mortality from sepsis. Multiple factors, including prematurity, invasive life-saving medical interventions, and immaturity of the innate immune system, put these infants at greater risk of developing infection. Although advanced neonatal care enables us to save even the most preterm neonates, the very interventions sustaining those who are hospitalized concurrently expose them to serious infections due to common nosocomial pathogens, particularly coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteria (CoNS). Moreover, the health burden from infection in these infants remains unacceptably high despite continuing efforts. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, immunological risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and outcomes of neonatal infection due to the predominant neonatal pathogen CoNS. PMID:23762094

  14. Immune response to intrapharyngeal LPS in neonatal and juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A; Lee, Seakwoo; Gibbs, Kevin; Lopez, Armando; Collaco, Joseph M; Neptune, Enid; Soloski, Mark J; Scott, Alan; D'Alessio, Franco

    2015-03-01

    Neonates and infants have a higher morbidity and mortality associated with lower respiratory tract illnesses compared with older children. To identify age-related and longitudinal differences in the cellular immune response to acute lung injury (ALI), neonatal and juvenile mice were given Escherichia coli LPS using a novel, minimally invasive aspiration technique. Neonatal and juvenile mice received between 3.75 and 7.5 mg/kg LPS by intrapharyngeal aspiration. Airway and lung cells were isolated and characterized by flow cytometry, cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression from lung homogenates was quantified, and lung morphometry and injury scores were performed. LPS-treated neonatal mice underwent adoptive transfer with adult T regulatory cells (Tregs). After LPS aspiration, lung monocytes isolated from neonatal mice had a predominant M2 phenotype, whereas lung monocytes from juvenile mice displayed a mixed M1/M2 phenotype. At 72 hours after LPS exposure, neonatal lungs were slower to resolve inflammation and expressed lower mRNA levels of CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, and IL-10. Juvenile, but not neonatal, mice demonstrated a significant increase in airway Tregs after LPS exposure. Adoptive transfer of adult Tregs into LPS-challenged neonatal mice resulted in reduced lung inflammation and improved weight gain. These findings underscore several vulnerabilities in the neonatal immune response to LPS-induced ALI. Most striking was the deficiency in airway Tregs after LPS aspiration. Adoptive transfer of adult Tregs mitigated LPS-induced ALI in neonatal mice, highlighting the importance of age-related differences in Tregs and their response to ALI during early postnatal development.

  15. Maternal Super Obesity and Neonatal Morbidity after Term Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Smid, Marcela C; Vladutiu, Catherine J; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Manuck, Tracy A; Boggess, Kim A; Stamilio, David M

    2016-10-01

    Objective To estimate the association between maternal super obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 50 kg/m(2)) and neonatal morbidity among neonates born via cesarean delivery (CD). Methods Retrospective cohort of singleton neonates delivered via CD ≥ 37 weeks in the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit Cesarean Registry. Maternal BMI at delivery was stratified as 18.5 to 29.9 kg/m(2), 30 to 39.9 kg/m(2), 40 to 49.9 kg/m(2), and ≥ 50 kg/m(2). Primary outcomes included acute (5-minute Apgar score < 5, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and ventilator support < 24 hours, neonatal injury, and/or transient tachypnea of the newborn) and severe (grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, seizure, respiratory distress syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, meconium aspiration, ventilator support ≥ 2 days, sepsis and/or neonatal death) neonatal morbidity. Odds of neonatal morbidity were estimated for each BMI category adjusting for clinical and operative characteristics. Results Of 41,262 maternal-neonatal dyads, 36% of women were nonobese, 49% had BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m(2), 12% had BMI of 40 to 49.9 kg/m(2), and 3% were super obese. Compared with nonobese women, super obese women had twofold odds of acute (5 vs. 10%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.59-2.73) and severe (3 vs. 6%; aOR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.59-2.73) neonatal morbidity. Conclusion Among term infants delivered via CD, maternal super obesity is associated with increased risk of neonatal morbidity.

  16. Maternal Super Obesity and Neonatal Morbidity after Term Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Smid, Marcela C; Vladutiu, Catherine J; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Manuck, Tracy A; Boggess, Kim A; Stamilio, David M

    2016-10-01

    Objective To estimate the association between maternal super obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 50 kg/m(2)) and neonatal morbidity among neonates born via cesarean delivery (CD). Methods Retrospective cohort of singleton neonates delivered via CD ≥ 37 weeks in the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit Cesarean Registry. Maternal BMI at delivery was stratified as 18.5 to 29.9 kg/m(2), 30 to 39.9 kg/m(2), 40 to 49.9 kg/m(2), and ≥ 50 kg/m(2). Primary outcomes included acute (5-minute Apgar score < 5, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and ventilator support < 24 hours, neonatal injury, and/or transient tachypnea of the newborn) and severe (grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, seizure, respiratory distress syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, meconium aspiration, ventilator support ≥ 2 days, sepsis and/or neonatal death) neonatal morbidity. Odds of neonatal morbidity were estimated for each BMI category adjusting for clinical and operative characteristics. Results Of 41,262 maternal-neonatal dyads, 36% of women were nonobese, 49% had BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m(2), 12% had BMI of 40 to 49.9 kg/m(2), and 3% were super obese. Compared with nonobese women, super obese women had twofold odds of acute (5 vs. 10%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.59-2.73) and severe (3 vs. 6%; aOR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.59-2.73) neonatal morbidity. Conclusion Among term infants delivered via CD, maternal super obesity is associated with increased risk of neonatal morbidity. PMID:27464019

  17. External Otitis: An Unusual Presentation in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Taheri, Peymaneh; Rostami, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis externa (AOE) is an infection of the external auditory canal, the auricle, and the outer surface of the tympanic membrane. Although AOE is one of the most common otologic conditions encountered in pediatric population, it is known to primarily affect children older than 2 years. We report a case of AOE caused by Staphylococcus aureus in a 23-day-old neonate. A 23-day-old female infant presented to our neonatology clinic with irritability and discharge from the right ear. There were yellow otorrhea, mild erythema, and edema of right external ear canal. There was no sign of otitis media on otoscopy. The results of laboratory tests were insignificant. The discharge culture grew colonies of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. After 48 hours of treatment with intravenous cloxacillin, significant improvement was observed. The present case highlights an unusual presentation of staphylococcal infection in a neonate. This is the first case of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus otitis externa in an immunocompetent newborn. PMID:27703821

  18. Error reduction when prescribing neonatal parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia L; Garrison, Nancy A; Hutchison, Alastair A

    2007-08-01

    A neonatal intensive care unit audit of 204 parenteral nutrition (PN) orders revealed a 27.9% PN prescribing error rate, with errors by pediatric residents exceeding those by neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) (39% versus 16%; P < 0.001). Our objective was to reduce the PN prescribing error rate by implementing an ordering improvement process. An interactive computerized PN worksheet, used voluntarily, was introduced and its impact analyzed in a retrospective cross-sectional study. A time management study was performed. Analysis of 480 PN orders revealed that the PN prescribing error rate was 11.7%, with no difference in error rates between pediatric residents and NNPs (12.3% versus 10.5%). Use of the interactive computerized PN worksheet was associated with a reduction in the prescribing error rate from 14.5 to 6.8% for all PN orders ( P = 0.016) and from 29.3 to 9.6% for peripheral PN orders ( P = 0.002). All 12 errors that occurred in the 177 PN prescriptions completed using the computerized PN worksheet were due to avoidable data entry or transcription mistakes. The time management study led to system improvements in PN ordering. We recommend that an interactive computerized PN worksheet be used to prescribe peripheral PN and thus reduce errors.

  19. Could Neonatal Hypernatremia Dehydration Influence Hearing Status?

    PubMed Central

    Boskabadi, Hassan; Anvarifar, Farnaz; Nourizadeh, Navid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neonatal hypernatremia dehydration (NHD) is a dangerous condition in neonates, which is accompanied by acute complications (renal failure, cerebral edema, and cerebral hemorrhage) and chronic complications (developmental delay). Children begin learning language from birth, and hearing impairment interferes with this process. We assessed the hearing status of infants with hypernatremia dehydration. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study in 110 infants presenting at the Ghaem Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) between 2007 and 2011, we examined the incidence of hearing impairment in infants suffering from hypernatremia dehydration (serum sodium >150 mEq/L) in comparison with infants with normal sodium level (serum sodium ≤150 mEq/L). Results: Three of 110 cases examined in the study group showed a transient hearing impairment. A mean serum sodium level of 173mg/dl was reported among hearing-impaired infants. Conclusion: Transient hearing impairment was higher in infants with hypernatremia; although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Hearing impairment was observed in cases of severe hypernatremia. PMID:24505569

  20. FIVE YEAR NEURODEVELOPMENTAL OUTCOME OF NEONATAL DEHYDRATION

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Gabriel J.; Liljestrand, Petra; Hudes, Esther S.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Jeremy, Rita J.; Newman, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the long-term outcome of neonatal dehydration. Study design We identified 182 newborns rehospitalized with dehydration (weight loss ≥12% of birth weight and/or serum sodium ≥150 mEq/L) and 419 randomly selected controls from a cohort of 106,627 term and near-term infants ≥2000 g born from 1995 through 1998 in Northern California Kaiser Permanente hospitals. Outcomes data were obtained from electronic records, interviews, questionnaire responses, and neurodevelopmental evaluations performed in a masked fashion. Results Follow-up data to the age of at least two years were available for 173/182 children with a history of dehydration (95%) and 372/419 controls (89%) and included formal evaluation at a mean (±SD) age of 5.1±0.12 years for 106 children (58%) and 168 children (40%) respectively. None of the cases developed shock, gangrene, or respiratory failure. Neither crude nor adjusted scores on cognitive tests differed significantly between groups. There was no significant difference between groups in the proportion of children with abnormal neurologic examinations or neurologic diagnoses. Frequencies of parental concerns and reported behavior problems also were not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusions Neonatal dehydration in this managed care setting was not associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants born at or near term. PMID:17643761

  1. Common adipokine features of neonates and centenarians.

    PubMed

    Meazza, Cristina; Vitale, Giovanni; Pagani, Sara; Castaldi, Davide; Ogliari, Giulia; Mari, Daniela; Laarej, Kamilia; Tinelli, Carmine; Bozzola, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Adipose tissue seems to be a pivotal organ in the aging process. We investigated whether healthy aging could have its roots in a sound metabolic condition from the first year of life by evaluating leptin and adiponectin levels in neonates [33 adequate for gestational age (AGA) and 29 small for gestational age (SGA)], 48 centenarians, and 50 healthy elderly subjects. At birth, SGA neonates showed lower leptin levels (SGA 0.88 +/- 0.28; AGA 2.22 +/- 0.91 ng/mL; p < 0.05) and comparable adiponectin levels with respect to AGA. At 1 year, SGA showed increased leptin (SGA 1.74 +/- 0.28; AGA 1.31 +/- 0.19 ng/mL) and slightly reduced adiponectin concentrations (SGA 35.51 +/- 2.53; AGA 38.56 +/- 3.18 microg/mL) than AGA. Centenarians showed lower leptin (centenarians 18.71 +/- 3.78; elderly 34.81 +/- 7.27 ng/mL; p < 0.05) and higher adiponectin levels (centenarians 55.63 +/- 7.7; elderly 33.51 +/- 4.1 microg/mL; p < 0.05) than elderly subjects. Centenarians, like AGA infants during the first year of life, show a favorable adipokine profile, suggesting that the metabolic condition at early age could affect the longevity of an individual.

  2. Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography in neonates.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, Mohamed; Chang, Taeun; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Clancy, Robert R

    2009-11-01

    Conventional electroencephalography (EEG) has been used for decades in the neonatal intensive care unit for formulating neurologic prognoses, demonstrating brain functional state and degree of maturation, revealing cerebral lesions, and identifying the presence and number of electrographic seizures. However, both the immediate availability of conventional EEG and the expertise with which it is interpreted are variable. Amplitude-integrated EEG provides simplified monitoring of cerebral function, and is rapidly gaining popularity among neonatologists, with growing use in bedside decision making and inclusion criteria for randomized clinical studies. Nonetheless, child neurologists and neurophysiologists remain cautious about relying solely on this tool and prefer interpreting conventional EEG. The present review examines the technical aspects of generating, recording, and interpreting amplitude-integrated EEG and contrasts this approach with conventional EEG. Finally, several proposed amplitude-integrated EEG classification schemes are reviewed. A clear understanding of this emerging technology of measuring brain health in the premature or sick neonate is critical in modern care of the newborn infant. PMID:19818932

  3. [Neonatal Dengue. Presentation of clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Romero-Santacruz, Edith; Lira-Canul, Janeth Jaqueline; Pacheco-Tugores, Fredy; Palma-Chan, Adolfo Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a flavivirus, with four serotypes, transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In Mexico it is a public health problem, especially in the region of central and southeast of the country. The disease can be asymptomatic or present serious forms and even death. It is confirmed by detection of the NS1 Antigen; IgM antibodies, polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation. The vertical transmission to de newborn has been little studied. 7 cases in neonates from November to December 2011 are reported. All patients were male, obtained by caesarean section between 34 and 40 weeks of gestation, whose mothers were enrolled with fever and symptoms associated with dengue disease and serology positive for dengue. Six with positive AgNS1 and one positive IgM; one mother died. All the newborns had positive serology for dengue, 4 with positive AgNS1 and 3 positive IgM. The clinical features of the newborn ranged from asymptomatic to one serious dengue fever, shock and hemorrhage. The symptomatic 6 attended with thrombocytopenia, changes in temperature and unspecific disturbance. The severity of mothers conditioned disrepair product at birth, but not with subsequent gravity of the new born. Vertical trasmission of dengue should be suspected in risk areas, to maintain vigilance and to give early treatment. Also is neccesary promote the realization of specific diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines to the neonatal period.

  4. Improving cranial ultrasound scanning strategy in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound scans are undertaken in this tertiary neonatal intensive care unit by the doctors within the department. A quality improvement project was undertaken by means of two PDSA cycles to determine adherence to neonatal cranial ultrasound scanning schedule, assess the quality of scan reporting, and formulate a comprehensive guideline outlining best practice. The baseline measurements assessed 93 scans of preterm infants and 9 of term infants. The results of this prompted intradepartmental education (PDSA cycle 1) then creation and implementation of a documentation template, a local guideline, and education via presentations, posters, and email (PDSA cycle 2). These encompassed 77 preterm and 5 term scans. In our baseline measurements, 52% of preterm infant scans and 44% of term infant scans were performed to schedule. Of premature baby scan reports, 75% had the time documented and 92% the name of the scanning doctor. After implementing changes PDSA cycle 2 data showed that 74% of preterm infant scans and all term infant scans were performed according to schedule, with 100% having the doctor's name and time of scan documented. We successfully introduced a guideline and documentation template, improving performance to schedule and documentation in most areas. It remains an ongoing challenge to adhere to basic standards of documentation; a template can assist in achieving this. Rotating trainees may offer insight into areas that could benefit from quality improvement. This enthusiasm can be successfully harnessed to implement changes to improve quality of patient care. PMID:27096095

  5. Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas as Neonatal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Katz, Brenda; Schelonka, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mycoplasmas represent a complex and unique group of microorganisms that have been associated with a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and infants. The lack of conclusive knowledge regarding the pathogenic potential of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. in many conditions is due to a general unfamiliarity of physicians and microbiology laboratories with their fastidious growth requirements, leading to difficulty in their detection; their high prevalence in healthy persons; the poor design of research studies attempting to base association with disease on the mere presence of the organisms in the lower urogenital tract; the failure to consider multifactorial aspects of diseases; and considering these genital mycoplasmas only as a last resort. The situation is now changing because of a greater appreciation of the genital mycoplasmas as perinatal pathogens and improvements in laboratory detection, particularly with regard to the development of powerful molecular nucleic acid amplification tests. This review summarizes the epidemiology of genital mycoplasmas as causes of neonatal infections and premature birth; evidence linking ureaplasmas with bronchopulmonary dysplasia; recent changes in the taxonomy of the genus Ureaplasma; the neonatal host response to mycoplasma and ureaplasma infections; advances in laboratory detection, including molecular methods; and therapeutic considerations for treatment of systemic diseases. PMID:16223956

  6. Long-Term Consequences of Neonatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The maturation of the central nervous system’s (CNS’s) sensory connectivity is driven by modality-specific sensory input in early life. For the somatosensory system, this input is the physical, tactile interaction with the environment. Nociceptive circuitry is functioning at the time of birth; however, there is still considerable organization and refinement of this circuitry that occurs postnatally, before full discrimination of tactile and noxious input is possible. This fine-tuning involves separation of tactile and nociceptive afferent input to the spinal cord’s dorsal horn and the maturation of local and descending inhibitory circuitry. Disruption of that input in early postnatal life (for example, by tissue injury or other noxious stimulus), can have a profound influence on subsequent development, and consequently the mature functioning of pain systems. In this review, the impact of neonatal surgical incision on nociceptive circuitry is discussed in terms of the underlying developmental neurobiology. The changes are complex, occurring at multiple anatomical sites within the CNS, and including both neuronal and glial cell populations. The altered sensory input from neonatal injury selectively modulates neuronal excitability within the spinal cord, disrupts inhibitory control, and primes the immune system, all of which contribute to the adverse long-term consequences of early pain exposure. PMID:26174217

  7. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  8. [Neonatal Dengue. Presentation of clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Romero-Santacruz, Edith; Lira-Canul, Janeth Jaqueline; Pacheco-Tugores, Fredy; Palma-Chan, Adolfo Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a flavivirus, with four serotypes, transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In Mexico it is a public health problem, especially in the region of central and southeast of the country. The disease can be asymptomatic or present serious forms and even death. It is confirmed by detection of the NS1 Antigen; IgM antibodies, polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation. The vertical transmission to de newborn has been little studied. 7 cases in neonates from November to December 2011 are reported. All patients were male, obtained by caesarean section between 34 and 40 weeks of gestation, whose mothers were enrolled with fever and symptoms associated with dengue disease and serology positive for dengue. Six with positive AgNS1 and one positive IgM; one mother died. All the newborns had positive serology for dengue, 4 with positive AgNS1 and 3 positive IgM. The clinical features of the newborn ranged from asymptomatic to one serious dengue fever, shock and hemorrhage. The symptomatic 6 attended with thrombocytopenia, changes in temperature and unspecific disturbance. The severity of mothers conditioned disrepair product at birth, but not with subsequent gravity of the new born. Vertical trasmission of dengue should be suspected in risk areas, to maintain vigilance and to give early treatment. Also is neccesary promote the realization of specific diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines to the neonatal period. PMID:26233977

  9. Biological specimen banks in neonatal screening.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Simonsen, H

    1999-12-01

    The Danish neonatal screening program analyses dried blood spot samples (DBSS) from close to 70,000 newborns annually from Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Since 1982, all DBSS have been stored in a biological specimen bank at -20 degrees C as a routine procedure after analysis. Before sampling, parents are given written information about the screening tests, the biobank and its use, and can choose to opt out. Since 1993 the biobank has been regulated by specific legislation, and thus assumes a unique position among biological specimen banks. Its purposes are: (i) diagnosis and treatment of diseases screened for, including repeat testing, quality assurance and group statistics; (ii) other diagnostic uses during infancy; and (iii) research projects. The stored samples have been used successfully to diagnose a range of genetic diseases using biochemical and molecular genetic assays, and to diagnose congenital CMV and toxoplasmosis infections using assays for specific IgM antibodies and pathogen nucleic acids. The unbiased nature and comprehensive coverage of the samples in the biobank make them attractive for research purposes. Our studies have focused on the epidemiology of genetic disease alleles and other molecular disease markers and on retrospective screening projects, which have allowed rapid appraisal of the performance of novel screening modalities, saving years of prospective screening trials. Storage of neonatal screening samples is thus beneficial not only to the individual testees, but also to future generations of newborns.

  10. Infection control in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chudleigh, J; Fletcher, M; Gould, D

    2005-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a major problem in acute hospital settings. Hand decontamination is considered to be the most effective means of preventing healthcare-associated infection, but is poorly performed. Few studies have examined technique, which may be important in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) where clinical procedures are intricate and could result in contamination of many areas of the hand, resulting in cross-infection. This study examined technique in six NICUs. Eighty-eight nurses were observed. A scoring system was developed so that technique could be quantified and subjected to statistical testing. The mean score was 6.29 out of 11 when hands were washed and 3.87 out of 7 when alcohol hand rub was used, indicating that performance was not optimal. Scores for technique were not significantly different in each NICU. Senior nurses achieved higher scores for handwashing (P<0.01), as did nurses holding positive feelings about the atmosphere in their NICU (P=0.04). Junior nurses scored less well on a knowledge questionnaire than senior nurses (P<0.01). Nurses who had been employed in the neonatal unit for less than one year also scored less well (P<0.01). Differences in technique were noted when comparing the beginning and end of long shifts. These differences were not noted at the beginning and end of standard shifts.

  11. Neonatal carrier: An easy to make alternative device to costly transport chambers

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Milind; Singh, Sangram; Negi, Anupama; Vyas, Tanmay; Chourishi, Vigya; Jain, Anvesh

    2010-01-01

    The transport of sick neonates to the surgical centers or transportation within the center is an essential requirement of neonatal surgery. Neonatal transport incubators are costly, space occupying, and are not available at many places in the developing countries. We report here a cheap yet effective and easy to make, alternate neonatal carrier device. PMID:21170195

  12. Hydrofluoroalkane-beclomethasone versus chlorofluorocarbon-beclomethasone delivery in neonatal models.

    PubMed

    Cole, C H; Mitchell, J P; Foley, M P; Nagel, M W

    2004-09-01

    Dose delivery of hydrofluoroalkane-beclomethasone and chlorofluorocarbon-beclomethasone was compared during in vitro neonatal simulations: mechanical ventilation with 40% and 100% relative humidity + Neonatal Chamber-Ventilator System/endotracheal tube; manual ventilation + Neonatal Chamber/endotracheal tube; "spontaneous breathing" + Neonatal Chamber/face mask without/with manual assistance. The delivery of hydrofluoroalkane-beclomethasone was significantly greater in each simulation.

  13. Neonatal near miss in the Birth in Brazil survey.

    PubMed

    Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura da; Leite, Alvaro Jorge Madeiro; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Cunha, Antonio José Ledo Alves da; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2014-08-01

    This study used data from the Birth in Brazil survey, a nationwide hospital-based study of 24,197 postpartum women and their newborns, collected between February 2011 and July 2012. A three-stage cluster sampling design (hospitals, days, women) was used consisting of stratification by geographic region, type of municipality (capital or non-capital), and type of hospital financing. Logistic regression was used to identify variables that were potential predictors of neonatal mortality and neonatal near miss indicators. After testing nineteen variables, five were chosen to compose a set of neonatal near miss indicators (birth weight of less than 1,500 g, Apgar score of less than 7 in the 5th minute of life, use of mechanical ventilation, gestational age of less than 32 weeks and congenital malformations). The neonatal near miss rate in the Birth in Brazil survey was 39.2 per thousand live births, three and a half times higher than the neonatal mortality rate (11.1 per thousand). These neonatal near miss indicators were able to identify situations with a high risk of neonatal death.

  14. Predicting neonatal pharmacokinetics from prior data using population pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Edginton, Andrea N; Avant, Debbie; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2015-10-01

    Selection of the first dose for neonates in clinical trials is very challenging. The objective of this analysis was to assess if a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model developed with data from infants to adults is predictive of neonatal clearance and to evaluate what age range of prior PK data is needed for informative modeling to predict neonate exposure. Two sources of pharmacokinetic data from 8 drugs were used to develop population models: (1) data from all patients > 2 years of age, and (2) data from all nonneonatal patients aged > 28 days. The prediction error based on the models using data from subjects > 2 years of age showed bias toward overprediction, with median average fold error (AFE) for CL predicted/CLobserved greater than 1.5. The bias for predicting neonatal PK was improved when using all prior PK data including infants as opposed to an assessment without infant PK data, with the median AFE 0.91. As an increased number of pediatric trials are conducted in neonates under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, dose selection should be based on the best estimates of neonatal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics prior to conducting efficacy and safety studies in neonates. PMID:25907280

  15. Lower Incidence of Seizure among Neonates Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Orbach, Sharon A; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Kuzniewicz, Michael; Glass, Hannah C

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that hypothermia decreases seizure burden, while limited human data are inconclusive. This retrospective cohort study examines the relationship between therapeutic hypothermia and seizure in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Our center admitted 224 neonates from July 2004 to December 2011 who met institutional cooling criteria. Seventy-three neonates were born during the pre-cooling era, prior to November 2007, and 151 were born during the cooling era. Among neonates with moderate encephalopathy, the incidence of seizure in cooled infants was less than half the incidence in those not cooled (26% cooling versus 61% pre-cooling era; RR=0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61). Among neonates with severe encephalopathy, there was no difference in the incidence (83% versus 87%; RR=1.05, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.39). These results support animal data and suggest a mechanism by which neonates with moderate encephalopathy may benefit more from cooling than neonates with severe encephalopathy. PMID:24334344

  16. Neonatal Marfan Syndrome: Report of a Case with an Inherited Splicing Mutation outside the Neonatal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Le Gloan, Laurianne; Hauet, Quentin; David, Albert; Hanna, Nadine; Arfeuille, Chloé; Arnaud, Pauline; Boileau, Catherine; Romefort, Bénédicte; Benbrik, Nadir; Gournay, Véronique; Joram, Nicolas; Baron, Olivier; Isidor, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    We report a child and her mother affected by Marfan syndrome. The child presented with a phenotype of neonatal Marfan syndrome, revealed by acute and refractory heart failure, finally leading to death within the first 4 months of life. Her mother had a common clinical presentation. Genetic analysis revealed an inherited FBN1 mutation. This intronic mutation (c.6163+3_6163+6del), undescribed to date, leads to exon 49 skipping, corresponding to in-frame deletion of 42 amino acids (p.Ile2014_Asp2055del). FBN1 next-generation sequencing did not show any argument for mosaicism. Association in the same family of severe neonatal and classical Marfan syndrome illustrates the intrafamilial phenotype variability. PMID:27022329

  17. Empedobacter brevis Meningitis in a Neonate: A Very Rare Case of Neonatal Meningitis and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankur; Soni, Priyanka; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, Basudev

    2016-01-01

    Empedobacter brevis is gram-negative bacilli that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family. It was previously known with name of Flavobacterium breve. The reservoir of these bacteria is soil, plants, water, food, hospital water sources, including incubators, sinks, faucets, tap water, hemodialysis systems, saline solutions, and other pharmaceutical solutions. We report a case of term female newborn, admitted with complaint of respiratory distress developing soon after birth and developed clinical features of sepsis at age of 92 hours of postnatal life. The sepsis screen was positive and blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid showed growth of Empedobacter brevis that was resistant to multiple antibiotics. The neonate was treated with appropriate antibiotics and was discharged successfully. The novelty of the case report is that this is the first case report of neonatal sepsis caused by Empedobacter brevis. PMID:27648334

  18. Empedobacter brevis Meningitis in a Neonate: A Very Rare Case of Neonatal Meningitis and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankur; Soni, Priyanka; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, Basudev

    2016-01-01

    Empedobacter brevis is gram-negative bacilli that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family. It was previously known with name of Flavobacterium breve. The reservoir of these bacteria is soil, plants, water, food, hospital water sources, including incubators, sinks, faucets, tap water, hemodialysis systems, saline solutions, and other pharmaceutical solutions. We report a case of term female newborn, admitted with complaint of respiratory distress developing soon after birth and developed clinical features of sepsis at age of 92 hours of postnatal life. The sepsis screen was positive and blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid showed growth of Empedobacter brevis that was resistant to multiple antibiotics. The neonate was treated with appropriate antibiotics and was discharged successfully. The novelty of the case report is that this is the first case report of neonatal sepsis caused by Empedobacter brevis.

  19. Empedobacter brevis Meningitis in a Neonate: A Very Rare Case of Neonatal Meningitis and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Patel, Ankur; Soni, Priyanka; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, Basudev

    2016-01-01

    Empedobacter brevis is gram-negative bacilli that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family. It was previously known with name of Flavobacterium breve. The reservoir of these bacteria is soil, plants, water, food, hospital water sources, including incubators, sinks, faucets, tap water, hemodialysis systems, saline solutions, and other pharmaceutical solutions. We report a case of term female newborn, admitted with complaint of respiratory distress developing soon after birth and developed clinical features of sepsis at age of 92 hours of postnatal life. The sepsis screen was positive and blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid showed growth of Empedobacter brevis that was resistant to multiple antibiotics. The neonate was treated with appropriate antibiotics and was discharged successfully. The novelty of the case report is that this is the first case report of neonatal sepsis caused by Empedobacter brevis. PMID:27648334

  20. Hospitalised neonates in Estonia commonly receive potentially harmful excipients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on the neonatal exposure to excipients is limited. Our aim was to describe the extent of excipient intake by Estonian neonates; to classify the excipients according to potential neonatal toxicity and thereby to measure the extent of exposure of neonates to potentially harmful excipients. Methods A prospective cohort study that recorded all medicines prescribed to patients aged below 28 days admitted to Tartu University Hospital from 01.02-01.08 2008 and to Tallinn Children’s Hospital from 01.02- 01.08 2009 was conducted. Excipients were identified from Summaries of Product Characteristics and classified according to toxicity following a literature review. Results 1961 prescriptions comprising 107 medicines were written for 348/490 neonates admitted. A total of 123 excipients were found in 1620 (83%) prescriptions and 93 (87%) medicines. 47 (38%) of these excipients were classified as potentially or known to be harmful to neonates. Most neonates (97%) received at least one medicine (median number 2) with potentially or known to be harmful excipient. Parabens were the most commonly used known to be harmful excipients and sodium metabisulphite the most commonly used potentially harmful excipient, received by 343 (99%) and 297 (85%) of treated neonates, respectively. Conclusions Hospitalised neonates in Estonia are commonly receiving a wide range of excipients with their medication. Quantitative information about excipients should be made available to pharmacists and neonatologists helping them to take into account excipient issues when selecting medicines and to monitor for adverse effects if administration of medicines containing excipients is unavoidable. PMID:22931304

  1. Functional characteristics of neonatal rat β cells with distinct markers.

    PubMed

    Martens, G A; Motté, E; Kramer, G; Stangé, G; Gaarn, L W; Hellemans, K; Nielsen, J H; Aerts, J M; Ling, Z; Pipeleers, D

    2014-02-01

    Neonatal β cells are considered developmentally immature and hence less glucose responsive. To study the acquisition of mature glucose responsiveness, we compared glucose-regulated redox state, insulin synthesis, and secretion of β cells purified from neonatal or 10-week-old rats with their transcriptomes and proteomes measured by oligonucleotide and LC-MS/MS profiling. Lower glucose responsiveness of neonatal β cells was explained by two distinct properties: higher activity at low glucose and lower activity at high glucose. Basal hyperactivity was associated with higher NAD(P)H, a higher fraction of neonatal β cells actively incorporating (3)H-tyrosine, and persistently increased insulin secretion below 5 mM glucose. Neonatal β cells lacked the steep glucose-responsive NAD(P)H rise between 5 and 10 mM glucose characteristic for adult β cells and accumulated less NAD(P)H at high glucose. They had twofold lower expression of malate/aspartate-NADH shuttle and most glycolytic enzymes. Genome-wide profiling situated neonatal β cells at a developmental crossroad: they showed advanced endocrine differentiation when specifically analyzed for their mRNA/protein level of classical neuroendocrine markers. On the other hand, discrete neonatal β cell subpopulations still expressed mRNAs/proteins typical for developing/proliferating tissues. One example, delta-like 1 homolog (DLK1) was used to investigate whether neonatal β cells with basal hyperactivity corresponded to a more immature subset with high DLK1, but no association was found. In conclusion, the current study supports the importance of glycolytic NADH-shuttling in stimulus function coupling, presents basal hyperactivity as novel property of neonatal β cells, and provides potential markers to recognize intercellular developmental differences in the endocrine pancreas. PMID:24049066

  2. Clinical Pharmacology of Paracetamol in Neonates: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Gian Maria; Allegaert, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol is commonly used to control mild-to-moderate pain or to reduce opioid exposure as part of multimodal analgesia, and is the only compound recommended to treat fever in neonates. Paracetamol clearance is lower in neonates than in children and adults. After metabolic conversion, paracetamol is subsequently eliminated by the renal route. The main metabolic conversions are conjugation with glucuronic acid and with sulphate. In the urine of neonates sulphated paracetamol concentration is higher than the glucuronidated paracetamol level, suggesting that sulfation prevails over glucuronidation in neonates. A loading dose of 20 mg/kg followed by 10 mg/kg every 6 hours of intravenous paracetamol is suggested to achieve a compartment concentration of 11 mg/L in late preterm and term neonates. Aiming for the same target concentration, oral doses are similar with rectal administration of 25 to 30 mg/kg/d in preterm neonates of 30 weeks’ gestation, 45 mg/kg/d in preterm infants of 34 weeks’ gestation, and 60 mg/kg/d in term neonates are suggested. The above-mentioned paracetamol doses for these indications (pain, fever) are well tolerated in neonates, but do not result in a significant increase in liver enzymes, and do not affect blood pressure and have limited effects on heart rate. In contrast, the higher doses suggested in extreme preterm neonates to induce closure of the patent ductus arteriosus have not yet been sufficiently evaluated regarding efficacy or safety. Moreover, focussed pharmacovigilance to explore the potential causal association between paracetamol exposure during perinatal life and infancy and subsequent atopy is warranted. PMID:25709719

  3. Neonatal isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD): a potentially life-threatening but treatable cause of neonatal cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleem, Mahdi; Saadeh, Lina; Misra, Amrit; Madani, Shailender

    2016-01-01

    Isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) is a rare cause of neonatal cholestasis and hypoglycaemia. This diagnosis has a 20% mortality potential if unrecognised. We describe a case of an infant presenting with cholestatic jaundice and hypoglycaemia. The patient had laboratory findings suggestive of IAD, which was later confirmed with molecular genetic testing. One of the mutations this patient had is a new finding. The patient was started on glucocorticoid replacement therapy after which his bilirubin and glucose levels normalised. PMID:27535729

  4. The "Bermuda triangle" of neonatal neurology: cerebral palsy, neonatal encephalopathy, and intrapartum asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael I

    2004-03-01

    The terms "cerebral palsy," "neonatal encephalopathy," and "intrapartum asphyxia" are frequently used in pediatric neurology. This article presents concise, verifiable definitions for each of these entities based on our current understanding and formulates the nature of the interrelationships between them. The aim is to provide a level of clarity that will enhance diagnostic and pathogenetic precision and minimize conceptual misunderstanding. This should aid future therapeutic and research efforts in this important area. PMID:15132251

  5. The "Bermuda triangle" of neonatal neurology: cerebral palsy, neonatal encephalopathy, and intrapartum asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael I

    2004-03-01

    The terms "cerebral palsy," "neonatal encephalopathy," and "intrapartum asphyxia" are frequently used in pediatric neurology. This article presents concise, verifiable definitions for each of these entities based on our current understanding and formulates the nature of the interrelationships between them. The aim is to provide a level of clarity that will enhance diagnostic and pathogenetic precision and minimize conceptual misunderstanding. This should aid future therapeutic and research efforts in this important area.

  6. Translational research and biomarkers in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-12-01

    As neonatal sepsis is a severe condition, there is a call for reliable biomarkers to differentiate between infected and noninfected newborns. Although blood culture has been considered as the gold standard, this analysis is still too slow and limited by false negative results. Use of CRP is hampered by a physiological 3-day increase, resulting in a low sensitivity to detect sepsis at an early stage. A moderate diagnostic accuracy of other acute phase proteins has been demonstrated (serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, mannose binding lectin and hepcidin). In neonatal sepsis, changed chemokine/cytokine levels are observed before those of acute phase reactants. High IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α concentrations are detected in infected infants. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor has been used to identify bacteremia, whereas low plasma RANTES concentrations are characteristic for septicemia. Several cell adhesion molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. As an upregulated CD64 expression on granulocytes is found within 1-6h after bacterial invasion, serial CD64 measurements could guide antibiotic therapy. An increased CD11b/CD18 density can improve the diagnosis, and a positive correlation between CD11b and the severity of systemic inflammation has been reported. An early increase in sCD14-ST presepsin is also observed during sepsis, whereas high sTREM-1 values in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) have been associated with mortality. Biomarkers resulting from proteomics are also promising. A 4-biomarker 'mass restricted' score has been validated as diagnostic for intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation. S100A8 in amniotic fluid is a strong predictor of an increased incidence of EOS. Proteomic analysis of cord blood has revealed altered protein expression patterns. The ApoSAA score is useful for identifying sepsis and could guide prescription of antibiotics. (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics allow to diagnose septic shock, which is

  7. The Future of Neonatal Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Practice: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Staebler, Suzanne; Meier, Susan R; Bagwell, Gail; Conway-Orgel, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the National Association of Neonatal Nurses and the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners have been monitoring aspects of neonatal advanced practice nursing and providing leadership and advocacy to address concerns related to workforce, education, competency, fatigue, safety, and scope of practice. This white paper discusses current barriers within neonatal advanced practice registered nurse practice as well as strategies to promote the longevity of the neonatal advanced practice registered nurse roles. PMID:26742097

  8. Fatal Neonatal Peritoneal Candidiasis Mimicking Mucormycosis-A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Bineeta; Kusumakar, Kanupriya; Kumar Sarin, Yogesh

    2016-10-01

    Candida species have been implicated as significant contributors to morbidity in the neonatal period and are associated with 25-50% of mortality in invasive neonatal candidiasis. Peritoneal candidiasis, being paucisymptomatic, cannot often be correctly identified in a preterm neonate. The correct approach to diagnosis of neonatal peritoneal candidiasis is taking into account the epidemiology along with a strong clinical suspicion and appropriate timely diagnostic interventions. We report a case of fatal neonatal peritoneal candidiasis which was misdiagnosed as mucormycosis.

  9. Microanalysis of amoxicillin, flucloxacillin, and rifampicin in neonatal plasma.

    PubMed

    Pullen, J; Stolk, L M L; Neef, C; Zimmermann, L J I

    2007-12-01

    Simple and rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic assays with ultraviolet detection have been developed and validated for the determination of amoxicillin, flucloxacillin and rifampicin in neonatal plasma. Plasma samples were either precipitated with perchloric acid (amoxicillin) or methanol (rifampicin) or extracted with methylene chloride (flucloxacillin). Precision coefficients of variation and inaccuracy were less than 15% for all three assays. Only small sample volumes (20-40 microL) were required, making the assays suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies in preterm and term neonates. The assays have successfully been applied to analysis of amoxicillin, flucloxacillin and rifampicin in previously published pharmacokinetic studies in neonates.

  10. Pediatric and neonatal interfacility transport medicine after mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Calvin G

    2009-08-01

    Pediatric and neonatal interfacility transport medicine is a relatively young but a rapidly evolving specialty. Transport teams are essential for the safe interfacility movement of critically ill patients. A mass casualty incident (MCI) can present major challenges for a critical care transport team. This article will examine the capabilities and limitations of pediatric and neonatal critical care transport teams. The predicaments brought about by Hurricane Katrina that hindered the evacuation of pediatric and neonatal patients out of ravaged hospitals are also reviewed. From these experiences, recommendations to improve the efficiency and efficacy of interfacility transport of pediatric patients will be presented.

  11. Neonatal pattern vision: a predictor of future mental performance?

    PubMed

    Miranda, S B; Hack, M; Fantz, R L; Fanaroff, A A; Klaus, M H

    1977-10-01

    The visual fixation responses of 33 high-risk neonates to patterned stimuli were rated as normal, suspect, or abnormal in an attempt to predict future intellectual performance. For comparison purposes, a neurologic examination was aslo administered. Follow-up studies based on autopsies and neurologic and psychological testing agreed with the neonatal visual preference ratings in 27 cases, but with the neurologic examination ratings in only 22 cases. This preliminary study suggests that neonatal visual testing is a promising technique for evaluating brain integrity in the newborn period.

  12. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  13. History of neonatal resuscitation. Part 2: oxygen and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen was used in neonatal resuscitation from 1780, within 5 years of its detection. It rapidly gained general acceptance and infiltrated delivery rooms and, a century later, neonatal special care units. After 217 years without scientific evidence, the use of oxygen for neonatal resuscitation has recently been questioned. Continuous distending airway pressure for oxygen administration was available at the beginning of the 20th century, but was not widely accepted. Alkali and analeptic drugs gained widespread but short-lived use after the Second World War.

  14. Neonatal endocrine emergencies: a primer for the emergency physician.

    PubMed

    Park, Elizabeth; Pearson, Nadia M; Pillow, M Tyson; Toledo, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The resuscitation principles of securing the airway and stabilizing hemodynamics remain the same in any neonatal emergency. However, stabilizing endocrine disorders may prove especially challenging. Several organ systems are affected simultaneously and the clinical presentation can be subtle. Although not all-inclusive, the implementation of newborn screening tests has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality in neonates. Implementing routine screening tests worldwide and improving the accuracy of present tests remains the challenge for healthcare providers. With further study of these disorders and best treatment practices we can provide neonates presenting to the emergency department with the best possible outcomes.

  15. Meconium aspiration syndrome and neonatal outcome in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Malik, A S; Hillman, D

    1994-01-01

    The outcome in 148 inborn meconium-stained neonates was studied prospectively over a 5-month period. Fifty-three infants (38.5%) developed meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). There was a significantly higher rate of MAS (p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation (p < 0.016) and hospital stay (p < 0.016) in neonates with meconium in the trachea than in neonates with no meconium in the oropharynx. The incidence of MAS was significantly higher and the duration of hospital stay longer in outborn than in inborn infants (p < 0.022).

  16. Neonatal Cholestasis Caused by Undiagnosed Maternal Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M. Kyle; Adams, Christa J.; Book, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis results from a variety of etiologies, including anatomic, infectious, and metabolic abnormalities. Hyperthyroidism, in contrast to hypothyroidism, is infrequently associated with neonatal cholestasis. Newborn screening is an important tool to detect newborn metabolic disorders, including thyroid dysfunction. However, one must exercise caution when interpreting these reports; typically only high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are flagged as abnormal, while low or undetectable levels may not be. We present a unique case of cholestasis in a hyperthyroid neonate of an untreated, undiagnosed mother with Graves' disease; the infant's metabolic screen was not flagged as abnormal. PMID:26157908

  17. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients.

  18. Determinants of neonatal mortality in rural India, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kumar, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite the growing share of neonatal mortality in under-5 mortality in the recent decades in India, most studies have focused on infant and child mortality putting neonatal mortality on the back seat. The development of focused and evidence-based health interventions to reduce neonatal mortality warrants an examination of factors affecting it. Therefore, this study attempt to examine individual, household, and community level factors affecting neonatal mortality in rural India. Data and methods. We analysed information on 171,529 singleton live births using the data from the most recent round of the District Level Household Survey conducted in 2007–08. Principal component analysis was used to create an asset index. Two-level logistic regression was performed to analyse the factors associated with neonatal deaths in rural India. Results. The odds of neonatal death were lower for neonates born to mothers with secondary level education (O R = 0.60, p = 0.01) compared to those born to illiterate mothers. A progressive reduction in the odds occurred as the level of fathers’ education increased. The odds of neonatal death were lower for infants born to unemployed mothers (O R = 0.89, p = 0.00) compared to those who worked as agricultural worker/farmer/laborer. The odds decreased if neonates belonged to Scheduled Tribes (O R = 0.72, p = 0.00) or ‘Others’ caste group (O R = 0.87, p = 0.04) and to the households with access to improved sanitation (O R = 0.87, p = 0.02), pucca house (O R = 0.87, p = 0.03) and electricity (O R = 0.84, p = 0.00). The odds were higher for male infants (O R = 1.21, p = 0.00) and whose mother experienced delivery complications (O R = 1.20, p = 0.00). Infants whose mothers received two tetanus toxoid injections (O R = 0.65, p = 0.00) were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Children of higher birth order were less likely to die compared to first birth order. Conclusion. Ensuring the consumption of an adequate quantity

  19. Sialic acid level in maternal and neonatal lymphocytes and sera correlated to birth order and sex of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Komlos, L; Landmann, J; Notmann, J; Dulitzky, F; Kyzer, S; Hart, J; Halbrecht, I; Levinsky, H

    1992-01-01

    Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) was determined 1 h after normal term deliveries on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 42 mother-neonate pairs and in 29 maternal and neonatal sera. Results were evaluated according to maternal parity and sex of the neonate. The cases were divided into two groups: primiparae, and secundi- and multiparae. In primiparae the sialic acid level on lymphocytes from male neonates and from their mothers was by 23-30% decreased as compared to female neonatal and maternal cells. In the higher parity group, a significantly increased sialic acid level was found on lymphocytes from male as compared to female neonates, and maternal serum sialic acid concentration, unrelated to the newborns' sex, was by 17-20% increased as compared to primiparae. The results suggest that with increasing parity higher levels of sialic acid on male neonatal cells may possibly contribute to mask fetal male-specific histocompatibility antigens. Increased sialic acid levels in maternal sera from secundi- and multiparae suggest its possible contribution to an increased serum blocking effect. PMID:1472580

  20. The Unique Neonatal NK Cells: A Critical Component Required for Neonatal Autoimmune Disease Induction by Maternal Autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Rival, Claudia; Setiady, Yulius; Samy, Eileen T.; Harakal, Jessica; Tung, Kenneth S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Human maternal autoantibodies can trigger autoimmune diseases such as congenital heart block (CHB) in the progeny of women with lupus or Sjogren’s disease. The pathogenic effect of early autoantibody (autoAb) exposure has been investigated in a murine neonatal autoimmune ovarian disease (nAOD) model triggered by a unique ZP3 antibody. Although immune complexes (IC) are formed in adult and neonatal ovaries, ZP3 antibody triggers severe nAOD only in <7-day-old neonatal mice. Propensity to nAOD is due to the uniquely hyper-responsive neonatal natural killer (NK) cells that lack the inhibitory Ly49C/I receptors. In nAOD, the neonatal NK cells directly mediate ovarian inflammation and oocyte depletion while simultaneously promoting de novo pathogenic ovarian-specific T cell responses. Resistance to nAOD in older mice results from the emergence of the Ly49C/I+ NK cells that regulate effector NK cells and from CD25+ regulatory T cell control. In preliminary studies, FcγRIII+ NK cells as well as the ovarian resident FcγRIII+ macrophages and/or dendritic cells were found to be as indispensable players. Activated by ovarian IC, they migrate to lymphoid organs where NK cell priming occurs. Remarkably, the findings in nAOD are very similar to those reported for neonatal responses to a retrovirus and its cognate antibody that lead to long-lasting immunity. Studies on nAOD therefore provide insights into maternal autoAb-mediated neonatal autoimmunity, including CHB, while simultaneously uncovering new properties of the neonatal innate and adaptive responses, lethality of premature infant infection, and novel neonatal antiviral vaccine design. PMID:24904590

  1. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis. PMID:27319779

  2. [Chlamydia infection in neonates and infants].

    PubMed

    Sarlangue, J; Castella, C

    2005-04-01

    Incidence of chlamydial infection depends on maternal colonization during pregnancy, which is different in each population. The transmission is not obligatory but when present, it occurs at birth through the genital tractus. Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the first cause of neonatal conjunctivitis, with no influence of eye lotion application at birth. C. trachomatis is also responsible for interstitial pneumonia with possible consequences on the lung function. The laboratory diagnosis relies on the identification of intracellular bacteria in patient samples by the mean of culture or PCR. Systemic antibiotherapy by macrolides is always necessary, with local application in the case of conjunctivitis. The key point is the detection of colonization of pregnant women with identified risk factors. In positive case, oral treatment of both parents is recommended.

  3. Role of innate immunity in neonatal infection.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Alex G; Wynn, James L; Moldawer, Lyle L; Levy, Ofer

    2013-02-01

    Newborns are at increased risk of infection due to genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Herein we examine the roles of the neonatal innate immune system in host defense against bacterial and viral infections. Full-term newborns express a distinct innate immune system biased toward T(H)2-/T(H)17-polarizing and anti-inflammatory cytokine production with relative impairment in T(H)1-polarizing cytokine production that leaves them particularly vulnerable to infection with intracellular pathogens. In addition to these distinct features, preterm newborns also have fragile skin, impaired T(H)17-polarizing cytokine production, and deficient expression of complement and of antimicrobial proteins and peptides (APPs) that likely contribute to susceptibility to pyogenic bacteria. Ongoing research is identifying APPs, including bacterial/permeability-increasing protein and lactoferrin, as well as pattern recognition receptor agonists that may serve to enhance protective newborn and infant immune responses as stand-alone immune response modifiers or vaccine adjuvants.

  4. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Essentials for the Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has increased dramatically during the past 15 years, likely due to an increase in antepartum maternal opiate use. Optimal care of these patients is still controversial because of the available published literature lacking sufficient sample size, placebo control, and comparative pharmacologic trials. Primary treatment for NAS consists of opioid replacement therapy with either morphine or methadone. Paregoric and tincture of opium have been abandoned because of relative safety concerns. Buprenorphine is emerging as a treatment option with promising initial experience. Adjunctive agents should be considered for infants failing treatment with opioid monotherapy. Traditionally, phenobarbital has been used as adjunctive therapy; however, results of clonidine as adjunctive therapy for NAS appear to be beneficial. Future directions for research in NAS should include validating a simplified scoring tool, conducting comparative studies, exploring home management options, and optimizing management through pharmacogenomics. PMID:25309144

  5. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children

    PubMed Central

    JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; ICHIM, GABRIELA; GHEBAN, DAN

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison’s disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  6. Transitional neonatal hydronephrosis: fact or fantasy

    SciTech Connect

    Homsy, Y.L.; Williot, P.; Danais, S.

    1986-07-01

    Hydronephrosis secondary to an anomalous ureteropelvic junction was detected antenatally in more than 60 neonatal renal units Those 21 units that exhibited partial obstruction or dilatation without obstruction were selected for this study. They were assessed and followed by serial diuretic isotope renography (99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid augmented with furosemide) and ultrasonography. Excretory urography was used selectively. Of the 17 renal units that could be assessed 88 per cent demonstrated labile ureteropelvic junctions. Indeed, in 3 to 6 months, when the definitive status seemed to be attained, 41 per cent (7 units) had deteriorated, 12 per cent (2 units) remained stable and 47 per cent (8 units) underwent spontaneous improvement. We recommend a 3 to 6-month observation period for patients with hydronephrosis secondary to ureteropelvic junction anomalies when definite obstruction cannot be confirmed by isotope renography.

  7. Pregnancy and neonatal outcome after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kent; Lieberman, Nicky; Sheiner, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic is changing the face of maternal-fetal medicine. One in five women is obese at time of conception, and increasing numbers of parturients have undergone bariatric surgery. Recent publication of large, population-based studies and comparison studies of preoperative and post-operative pregnancies have highlighted new risks and benefits to the mother and child. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to effectively reduce the risk of complications such as fetal macrosomia, gestational diabetes mellitus, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; however, women who become pregnant after bariatric surgery may constitute a unique obstetric population with an increased risk for preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants. In this article, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the impact of maternal bariatric surgery on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes.

  8. Neonatal euthanasia: lessons from the Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Eduard Verhagen, A A

    2014-10-01

    Decisions about neonatal end-of-life care have been studied intensely over the last 20 years in The Netherlands. Nationwide surveys were done to quantify these decisions, provide details and monitor the effect of guidelines, new regulations and other interventions. One of those interventions was the Groningen Protocol for newborn euthanasia in severely ill newborns, published in 2005. Before publication, an estimated 20 cases of euthanasia per year were performed. After publication, only two cases in five years were reported. Studies suggested that this might be partly caused by the lack of consensus about the dividing line between euthanasia and palliative care. New recommendations about paralytic medication use in dying newborns were issued to increase transparency and to improve reporting of euthanasia. New surveys will be needed to measure the effects of these interventions. This cycle of interventions and measurements seems useful for continuous improvement of end-of-life care in newborns.

  9. Meropenem-Induced Neutropenia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Aubrey N.; Johnson, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    Postmarketing surveillance has associated meropenem with the development of hematologic abnormalities, including agranulocytosis, neutropenia, and leukopenia, but the exact incidence in children is unknown. The case describes a full-term, 26-day-old neonate admitted for a sepsis workup. She was found to have a blood culture positive for Enterobacter cloacae and suspected meningitis and was initiated on meropenem 40 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours. On day 14 of antibiotic treatment, the patient developed an isolated neutropenia with an absolute neutrophil count of 288 cells/mm3. Meropenem was discontinued on hospital day 20, and a follow-up complete blood cell count 2 months later confirmed resolution of the hematologic abnormality. Clinicians should monitor complete blood cell counts diligently in children who receive large doses and prolonged courses of meropenem. PMID:27713676

  10. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  11. Shared Decision Making in Neonatal Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jamie B; Wiggins, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Since the Institute of Medicine published Crossing the Quality Chasm in 2001, healthcare systems have become more focused on improving the quality of healthcare delivery. At Oregon Health & Science University and Doernbecher Children's Hospital, we recognize the need to take an interprofessional, team-based approach to improving the care we provide to our current and future patients. We describe here an ongoing quality improvement project in the Doernbecher Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), with specific attention to the factors we believe have contributed to the implementation and early success of the project. These factors include the history of quality improvement work in our NICU and in the field of neonatology, the "dyad leadership" structure under which we operate in our NICU, and our developing understanding of the concept of "team intelligence." These elements have led to the formation of a team that can practice shared decision making and work as one to realize a shared goal. PMID:27465457

  12. [A Rare Case of Neonatal Teeth].

    PubMed

    Martins, Andreia A; Ferraz, Cláudia; Vaz, Rute

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal teeth is a rare disorder of tooth eruption, arising in the oral cavity, usually in the anterior mandible, in the first month of life. Its etiology is unknown. This condition can cause breastfeeding difficulties, besides aspiration or swallowing of the teeth. We describe the case of a premature infant in the second day of life presented with gingival edema, redness and discrete swelling in the region of the mandibular central incisors. Ten days later, two small teeth with hypermobility were detected. Extraction of those teeth was performed. With this clinical case we intend to show the rarity of this entity, especially in premature infants, the possible association with various syndromes and the need for a multifactorial approach to the treatment decision (extraction / conservative treatment).

  13. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: essentials for the practitioner.

    PubMed

    Siu, Anita; Robinson, Christine A

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has increased dramatically during the past 15 years, likely due to an increase in antepartum maternal opiate use. Optimal care of these patients is still controversial because of the available published literature lacking sufficient sample size, placebo control, and comparative pharmacologic trials. Primary treatment for NAS consists of opioid replacement therapy with either morphine or methadone. Paregoric and tincture of opium have been abandoned because of relative safety concerns. Buprenorphine is emerging as a treatment option with promising initial experience. Adjunctive agents should be considered for infants failing treatment with opioid monotherapy. Traditionally, phenobarbital has been used as adjunctive therapy; however, results of clonidine as adjunctive therapy for NAS appear to be beneficial. Future directions for research in NAS should include validating a simplified scoring tool, conducting comparative studies, exploring home management options, and optimizing management through pharmacogenomics. PMID:25309144

  14. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis.

  15. Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A; Mauriat, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Critical ultrasound is a new tool for first-line physicians, including neonate intensivists. The consideration of the lung as one major target allows to redefine the priorities. Simple machines work better than up-to-date ones. We use a microconvex probe. Ten standardized signs allow a majority of uses: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding and the A-line (normal lung surface), the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion regardless its echogenicity, the tissue-like sign and fractal sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line artifact and lung rockets (indicating interstitial syndrome), abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign, suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point, indicating pneumothorax. Other signs are used for more sophisticated applications (distinguishing atelectasis from pneumonia for instance...). All these disorders were assessed in the adult using CT as gold standard with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90 to 100%, allowing to consider ultrasound as a reasonable bedside gold standard in the critically ill. The same signs are found, with no difference in the critically ill neonate. Fast protocols such as the BLUE-protocol are available, allowing immediate diagnosis of acute respiratory failure using seven standardized profiles. Pulmonary edema e.g. yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the B-profile. The FALLS-protocol, inserted in a Limited Investigation including a simple model of heart and vessels, assesses acute circulatory failure using lung artifacts. Interventional ultrasound (mainly, thoracocenthesis) provides maximal safety. Referrals to CT can be postponed. CEURF proposes personnalized bedside trainings since 1990. Lung ultrasound opens physicians to a visual medicine. PMID:23255876

  16. Ultrasonography of Extravaginal Testicular Torsion in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Majkowska, Zofia; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Żerańska, Maria; Panek, Małgorzata; Drop, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Extravaginal testicular torsion (ETT), also called prenatal or perinatal, occurs prenatally and is present at birth or appears within the first month of life. It has different etiology than intravaginal torsion, which appears later in life. Testicular torsion must be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of acute scrotum and should be confirmed or ruled out at first diagnostic step. Ultrasonography is a basic imaging modality, however diagnostic pitfalls are still possible. There is still wide discussion concerning management of ETT, which varies from immediate orchiectomy to conservative treatment resulting in testicle atrophy. Material/Methods In this article we present ultrasonographic spectrum of ETT in neonates, which were diagnosed and treated in our hospital during the last 8 years (2008–2015), in correlation with clinical and intraoperative findings. Results Thirteen neonates with ETT were enrolled in the study – 11 patients with a single testicle affected and 2 patients with bilateral testicular torsion. Most common signs on clinical examination were: hardened and enlarged testicle and discoloration of the scrotum. Most common ultrasonographic signs were: abnormal size or echostructure of the affected testicle and absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography. In 3 patients ultrasound elastography was performed, which appeared very useful in testicle structure assessment. Conclusions Testicular torsion may concern boys even in the perinatal period. Ultrasonographic picture of acute scrotum in young boys may be confused. Coexistence of the abnormal size or echostructure of the torsed testicle with absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography appear as very specific but late ultrasonographic sings. Ultrasound elastography may be a very useful tool for visualisation of a very common clinical sign – hardening of the necrotic testicle. PMID:27757176

  17. A neonate with critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jarrett; Dawson, Emily; Williams, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is defined as a ductal-dependent congenital heart defect requiring surgical or percutaneous intervention via cardiac catheterization before 1 year of age. Most cases of CCHD can be diagnosed with prenatal ultrasound or fetal echocardiogram. If not prenatally diagnosed, CCHD can be stable in the newborn nursery due to persistent ductal patency, and the patient may only be diagnosed after ductal closure and development of cardiac symptoms at home. In this case, a 6-day-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) floppy with agonal respirations, poor capillary refill, and absent femoral pulses. On the day of presentation, the patient became increasingly fussy, refused feeding, and began to gasp. The patient was transported to the ED for evaluation, where a bedside echocardiogram revealed interrupted aortic arch (IAA), ventricular septal defect, minimal flow through a thread-like ductus arteriosus, and severely depressed cardiac function. IAA is very rare, with an incidence of three cases per 1 million live births. Patients require neonatal supportive care, continuous prostaglandin E1 infusion, and urgent referral for neonatal surgical repair in the first days to weeks of life. To reduce the volume of undiagnosed CCHD in the immediate newborn period, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Diseases in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) recommended that CCHD screening via pulse oximetry be added to the recommended uniform screening panel. A positive screen results in an immediate referral for an echocardiogram. Fetal diagnosis, newborn screening, and/or careful clinical examination may have resulted in detection of IAA in our patient prior to ductal closure. PMID:24877491

  18. Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill Neonate.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A; Mauriat, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Critical ultrasound is a new tool for first-line physicians, including neonate intensivists. The consideration of the lung as one major target allows to redefine the priorities. Simple machines work better than up-to-date ones. We use a microconvex probe. Ten standardized signs allow a majority of uses: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding and the A-line (normal lung surface), the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion regardless its echogenicity, the tissue-like sign and fractal sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line artifact and lung rockets (indicating interstitial syndrome), abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign, suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point, indicating pneumothorax. Other signs are used for more sophisticated applications (distinguishing atelectasis from pneumonia for instance...). All these disorders were assessed in the adult using CT as gold standard with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90 to 100%, allowing to consider ultrasound as a reasonable bedside gold standard in the critically ill. The same signs are found, with no difference in the critically ill neonate. Fast protocols such as the BLUE-protocol are available, allowing immediate diagnosis of acute respiratory failure using seven standardized profiles. Pulmonary edema e.g. yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the B-profile. The FALLS-protocol, inserted in a Limited Investigation including a simple model of heart and vessels, assesses acute circulatory failure using lung artifacts. Interventional ultrasound (mainly, thoracocenthesis) provides maximal safety. Referrals to CT can be postponed. CEURF proposes personnalized bedside trainings since 1990. Lung ultrasound opens physicians to a visual medicine. PMID:23255876

  19. Bedside Guide for Neonatal Care Petty Julia Bedside Guide for Neonatal Care 352pp £21.99 Palgrave/Macmillan Education 9781137398468 1137398469 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    THE CHALLENGES and complexities of neonatal care are presented in an interactive way in this pocket-size teaching and learning tool. It would suit novice neonatal nurses and those qualified who want to refresh their skills.

  20. 45 CFR 46.205 - Research involving neonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be obtained if the pregnancy resulted from rape or incest. (c) Nonviable neonates. After delivery... rape or incest. The consent of a legally authorized representative of either or both of the parents...

  1. 45 CFR 46.205 - Research involving neonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be obtained if the pregnancy resulted from rape or incest. (c) Nonviable neonates. After delivery... rape or incest. The consent of a legally authorized representative of either or both of the parents...

  2. School-Aged Outcomes After Neonatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Czech, Theresa; Pardo, Andrea C

    2016-02-01

    Investigators from the Accident Vasculaire Cérébral de nouveau-né (AVCnn) Study Group, a multicenter registry in France, examined outcomes at 7 years of age in children previously identified with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS).

  3. Clinically silent seizures in a neonate with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Mitsuru; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although seizures during infancy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are common, seizures in neonates are infrequent. Here, we report the clinical course and electroencephalography (EEG) findings of a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex associated with clinically silent seizures. The patient was a girl in whom cardiac tumors were detected on fetal ultrasonography. Brain magnetic resonance imaging during the neonatal period showed subependymal and cortical tubers. Routine EEG indicated unexpected ictal changes with no noticeable clinical symptoms. Ictal EEG was associated with a subtle increase in heart rate and a brief increase in chin electromyogram. These changes were difficult to identify clinically. The patient later developed focal seizures and epileptic spasms and had severe psychomotor delay. The present case suggests the occurrence of clinically silent seizures before the appearance of epileptic spasms in infants with tuberous sclerosis, and that EEG is an option for neonates with a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26712128

  4. Effect of antenatal dexamethasone on neonatal leukocyte count.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Bauer, C R; Boehm, J; Korones, S B; Rigatto, H; Rao, A V

    1988-01-01

    The leukocyte count and differential white blood cell count during the first hour of life was determined in 164 neonates born of mothers receiving antenatal steroids and compared to 171 neonates of mothers randomly assigned to a placebo group. A leukemoid reaction (greater than 40,000 WBC/mm3) was seen only once each in the neonates born of placebo or steroid treated mothers. In addition, maternal steroid treatment had no general effect, except in a small subgroup of neonates born 3 to 7 days after the mother had been treated with 20 mg dexamethasone, where the total leukocyte and the absolute neutrophil counts were higher than the placebo group and other subgroups. PMID:3057139

  5. Two-dimensional finite element modelling of the neonatal head.

    PubMed

    Gibson, A; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2000-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) could allow the early diagnosis of infant brain injury following birth asphyxia. The purpose of this work was to determine the effect of variations in skull, scalp or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistivity, as these vary in clinical conditions and could degrade image quality. These factors were investigated using finite element models of the adult and neonatal head. The results suggest that there is a wide range over which the resistivity of the neonatal skull has little effect on the sensitivity to a central impedance change. The scalp and CSF appear to shunt current away from the brain; when their resistivity was decreased from normal values, this shunting effect increased and caused a decrease in sensitivity to a central resistance change. The resistivity of neonatal skull has not, to our knowledge, been directly measured and will anyway vary within and between individuals; this work suggests that EIT will be relatively insensitive to variations in neonatal skull impedance.

  6. RESEARCH ON NEONATAL MICROBIOMES: WHAT NEONATOLOGISTS NEED TO KNOW

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael P.; Minnerly, John; Curtiss, William; Rangwala, Shaukat; Kelley, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to educate neonatal caregivers about metagenomics. This scientific field uses novel and ever changing molecular methods to identify how infants become colonized with microbes after birth. Publications using metagenomics appear infrequently in the neonatal literature because clinicians are unaccustomed with the analytical techniques, data interpretation, and illustration of the results. This review covers those areas. After a brief introduction of neonatal citations forthcoming from metagenomic studies, the following topics are covered: 1) the history of metagenomics, 2) a description of current and emerging instruments used to define microbial populations in human organs, and 3) how extensive databases generated by genome analyzers are examined and presented to readers. Clinicians may feel like they are learning a new language; however, they will appreciate this task is essential to understanding and practicing neonatal medicine in the future. PMID:24193200

  7. Neonatal and longer term management following substance misuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mactier, Helen

    2013-11-01

    Substance misuse in pregnancy is not a new problem, but although impaired foetal growth and the risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome are widely appreciated, relatively little attention has been paid to longer term consequences for the infant. Available evidence indicates that prenatal exposure to opioids and other drugs of misuse is detrimental to the developing foetal brain; consistent with this, poor in utero head growth, delayed infant visual maturation and impaired general neurodevelopmental progress independent of social confounders are increasingly being recognised. This review considers current evidence and discusses best practice in the neonatal management and follow-up of affected babies. More studies are required to explore alternatives to methadone maintenance in pregnancy and to define optimal treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. All infants born to drug-misusing mothers must be considered vulnerable, even if they have not required treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis causing neonatal conjunctivitis in a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Kakar, S; Bhalla, P; Maria, A; Rana, M; Chawla, R; Mathur, N B

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is considered a major aetiological agent of conjunctivitis in newborns. The objective of the present study was to determine the aetiology of neonatal conjunctivitis and clinico-epidemiological correlates of chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum. Fifty-eight newborns with signs and symptoms of conjunctivitis were studied. Conjunctival specimens were subjected to Gram staining, routine bacteriological culture, culture for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining for diagnosis of C. trachomatis infection. C. trachomatis was detected in 18 (31%) neonates. Findings suggest that since C. trachomatis is the most common cause of neonatal conjunctivitis, routine screening and treatment of genital C. trachomatis infection in pregnant women and early diagnosis and treatment of neonatal Chlamydial conjunctivitis may be considered for its prevention and control.

  9. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants.

  10. Long term neurological dysfunction and neonatal hypoglycaemia after diabetic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Stenninger, E; Flink, R; Eriksson, B; Sahlen, C

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine if children born to mothers with diabetes mellitus during pregnancy, who subsequently developed neonatal hypoglycaemia, experienced long term neurological dysfunction.
METHODS—Thirteen children with, and 15 without, neonatal hypoglycaemia (blood glucose < 1.5 mmol/l) were randomly selected from a larger cohort and investigated at the age of 8 years. They were also compared with 28 age matched healthy controls.
RESULTS—Children with neonatal hypoglycaemia had significantly more difficulties in a validated screening test for minimal brain dysfunction than controls and were also more often reported to be hyperactive, impulsive, and easily distracted. On psychological assessment, they had a lower total development score than normoglycaemic children born to diabetic mothers, and control children. 
CONCLUSIONS—Neonatal hypoglycaemia in diabetic pregnancy was associated with long term neurological dysfunction related to minimal brain dysfunction/deficits in attention, motor control, and perception.

 PMID:10194986

  11. Approaches to management and care of the neonatal nondomestic ruminant.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Barbara A; Lamberski, Nadine

    2012-05-01

    Management and care of the nondomestic ruminant neonate are similar in principle to domestic animal practice. Housing of the dam, conditions for birth, preparation for intervention, and plans for treatment and hand-rearing of sick neonates must all be considered carefully before undertaking nondomestic ruminant breeding. Unfortunately, neonatal losses tend to be much higher in nondomestic calves before weaning than in domestic cattle, sheep, and goat herds.1 With continued habitat and population declines in wild species, successful captive breeding of nondomestic herds becomes more important to species sustainability and potential reintroduction programs. The primary challenges contributing to neonatal losses in nondomestic ruminants are often animal temperament and adaptation to captivity. Only through experience can some of these challenges be overcome. However, by understanding some species-specific behavioral tendencies and the fractious nature of nondomestic ruminants in general, we can improve our success in managing and maintaining healthy populations of nondomestic ruminants in captivity. PMID:22640541

  12. Long-term consequences of neonatal exposure to chlordecone.

    PubMed

    Sierra, V; Uphouse, L

    1986-01-01

    Neonate, female rats pups were injected with varying doses of chlordecone in cotton seed oil or with 1 mg chlordecone in dimethylsulfoxide. The effects of these neonatal treatments on vaginal opening, persistent vaginal estrus and adult sexual behavior were examined. Females treated with chlordecone showed earlier onset of vaginal opening and developed persistent vaginal estrus in adulthood. Sexual behavior of intact adult females was irregular but after ovariectomy and estrogen plus progesterone hormonal priming, chlordecone treated females showed normal lordosis responding. Females did not appear to have been defeminized by the neonatal chlordecone. After treatment with testosterone in adulthood, chlordecone treated females exhibited high levels of mounting behavior indicating that the neonatal treatments may have masculinized the developing hypothalamus. No significant effects of the vehicle were detected.

  13. Considerations in the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Chris; Spigarelli, Michael G; Campbell, Sarah C; Constance, Jonathan E; Courter, Joshua D; Thorell, Emily A; Olson, Jared; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2014-02-01

    The management of neonatal sepsis is challenging owing to complex developmental and environmental factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many antimicrobial agents. In this review, we describe (i) the changing epidemiology of early- and late-onset neonatal sepsis; (ii) the pharmacologic considerations that influence the safety and efficacy of antibacterials, antifungals, and immunomodulatory adjuvants; and (iii) the recommended dosing regimens for pharmacologic agents commonly used in the treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis. Neonatal sepsis is marked by high morbidity and mortality, such that prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential following culture collection. Before culture results are available, combination therapy with ampicillin and an aminoglycoside is recommended. When meningitis is suspected, ampicillin and cefotaxime may be considered. Following identification of the causative organism and in vitro susceptibility testing, antimicrobial therapy may be narrowed to provide targeted coverage. Therapeutic drug monitoring should be considered for neonates receiving vancomycin or aminoglycoside therapies. For neonates with invasive fungal infections, the development of new antifungal agents has significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in recent years. Liposomal amphotericin B has been found to be safe and efficacious in patients with renal impairment or toxicity caused by conventional amphotericin B. Antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole has also been reported to dramatically reduce rates of neonatal invasive fungal infections and to improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes among treated children. Additionally, several large multicenter studies are currently investigating the safety and efficacy of oral lactoferrin as an immunoprophylactic agent for the prevention of neonatal sepsis. PMID:24218112

  14. The development of a neonatal communication intervention tool.

    PubMed

    Strasheim, Esedra; Kritzinger, Alta; Louw, Brenda

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal communication intervention is important in South Africa, which has an increased prevalence of infants born with risks for disabilities and where the majority of infants live in poverty. Local literature showed a dearth of information on the current service delivery and roles of speech-language therapists (SLTs) and audiologists in neonatal nurseries in the South African context. SLTs have the opportunity to provide the earliest intervention, provided that intervention is well-timed in the neonatal nursery context. The aim of the research was to compile a locally relevant neonatal communication intervention instrument/tool for use by SLTs in neonatal nurseries of public hospitals. The study entailed descriptive, exploratory research. During phase 1, a survey was received from 39 SLTs and 2 audiologists in six provinces. The data revealed that participants performed different roles in neonatal nurseries, which depended on the environment, tools, materials and instrumentation available to them. Many participants were inexperienced, but resourceful in their attempts to adapt tools/materials. Participants expressed needs for culturally appropriate and user-friendly instruments for parent guidance and staff/team training on the topic of developmental care. During phase 2, a tool for parent guidance titled Neonatal communication intervention programme for parents was compiled in English and isiZulu. The programme was piloted by three participants. Suggestions for enhancements of the programme were made, such as providing a glossary of terms, adapting the programme's language and terminology, and providing more illustrations. SLTs and audiologists must contribute to neonatal care of high-risk infants to facilitate development and to support families.

  15. Prevention of Early-onset Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marió, M. J. Soto; Valenzuela, I; Vásquez, A. E; Illanes, S. E

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of up to 50% of healthy adults and newborns; it is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Early detection can be used to establish the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to significantly reduce neonatal sepsis. This article reviews methods of detection and prevention of GBS infection in the neonate. PMID:24358406

  16. Torsion of the Appendix Testis in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Arvind; Rich, Mark A.; Swana, Hubert S.

    2016-01-01

    Torsion of the appendix testis is a rare cause of scrotal swelling in the neonatal period. We present a case of torsion of the appendix testis in a one-day-old male. We discuss the physical examination and radiologic studies used to make the diagnosis. Nonoperative therapy was recommended and the patient has done well. Recognition of this condition in the neonatal period can prevent surgical intervention and its associated risks. PMID:27379193

  17. [Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: pathogenesis and neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B

    2014-01-01

    The perinatal period represents a clinical setting of potential risk for injury to developing brain secondary to many causes, with the chance for long-lasting, profound neurocognitive deficits. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury leads to serious long-term morbidities. The leading pathogenetic mechanisms are hypoxia and/or ischemia, as a result of perinatal asphyxia. Understanding of the underlying pathophysiology will help the physicians in the general supportive management and neuroprotection of the neonatal brain.

  18. Infant, neonatal and perinatal mortality rates in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, K L

    1982-07-01

    Infant, neonatal and perinatal mortality rates are reliable indices of the health status and delivery of health care in a country. These rates have been declining in Singapore since World War II, and presently have become comparable to those of many developing countries. The pattern has also changed; postneonatal mortality has fallen markedly, resulting in neonatal mortality accounting for 75% of infant mortality, and first week mortality for 85% of neonatal mortality. Perinatal mortality rates have also declined over the years, due mainly to a decline in the first week mortality rates though a slight fall in stillbirth rates has also occurred. Further improvements can be expected in the perinatal and neonatal mortality rates. As neonatal intensive care improves, the prognosis of the very small and feeble infants will be brighter even though the efforts required might be very much greater. Such a challenge will prove to be very exciting and stimulating, and be an impetus to the raising of neonatal intensive care to a much higher level.

  19. Pharmacotherapy for Neonatal Seizures: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Maria D; Griffin, Brendan T; Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Cryan, John F; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-04-01

    Seizures are the most common neurological emergencies in the neonatal period and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Seizures affect up to five per 1000 term births and population-based studies suggest that they occur even more frequently in premature infants. Seizures are a sign of an underlying cerebral pathology, the most common of which is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in term infants. Due to a growing body of evidence that seizures exacerbate cerebral injury, effective diagnosis and treatment of neonatal seizures is of paramount importance to reduce long-term adverse outcomes. Electroencephalography is essential for the diagnosis of seizures in neonates due to their subtle clinical expression, non-specific neurological presentation and a high frequency of electro-clinical uncoupling in the neonatal period. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy may require neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia, accompanying sedation with opioids, anticonvulsant drugs or a combination of all of these. The efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of seven anticonvulsant drugs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, levetiracetam, lidocaine, midazolam, topiramate and bumetanide) are reviewed. This review is focused only on studies reporting electrographically confirmed seizures and highlights the knowledge gaps that exist in optimal treatment regimens for neonatal seizures. Randomised controlled trials are needed to establish a safe and effective treatment protocol for neonatal seizures. PMID:26943929

  20. Neonatal pain management: still in search for the Holy Grail.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed.

  1. Diagnosis, treatment and follow up of neonatal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Türker, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study aimed to evaluate the aetiology, spectrum, course and outcomes of neonates with arrhythmias observed in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit from 2007 to 2012. Methods Neonates with rhythm problems were included. The results of electrocardiography (ECG), Holter ECG, echocardiography and biochemical analysis were evaluated. The long-term results of follow up were reviewed. Results Forty-five patients were male (68%) and 21 (32%) were female. Fifty-five patients (83.3%) were term, 11 (16.6%) were preterm, and 34% were diagnosed in the prenatal period. Twenty cases (30.3%) had congenital heart disease. Twenty-three patients (34.8%) were diagnosed during the foetal period. The most common arrhythmias were supraventricular ectopic beats and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) at 39.3 and 22.7%, respectively. SVT recurred in five patients after the neonatal period. Conclusion Supraventricular ectopic beats and SVT were the most common arrhythmias during the neonatal period. Although the prognosis of arrhythmias in the neonatal period is relatively good, regular monitoring is required. PMID:24844549

  2. Mode of Delivery in Premature Neonates: Does It Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Racusin, Diana A.; Antony, Kathleen M.; Haase, Jennifer; Bondy, Melissa; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite the current prevalence of preterm births, no clear guidelines exist on the optimal mode of delivery. Our objective was to investigate the effects of mode of delivery on neonatal outcomes among premature infants in a large cohort. Study Design We applied a retrospective cohort study design to a database of 6,408 births. Neonates were stratified by birth weight and a composite score was calculated to assess neonatal outcomes. The results were then further stratified by fetal exposure to antenatal steroids, birth weight, and mode of delivery. Results No improvement in neonatal outcome with cesarean delivery (CD) was noted when subjects were stratified by mode of delivery, both in the presence or absence of antenatal corticosteroid administration. In the 1,500 to 1,999 g subgroup, there appears to be an increased risk of respiratory distress syndromes in neonates born by CD. Conclusion In our all-comers cohort, replicative of everyday obstetric practice, CD did not improve neonatal outcomes in preterm infants. PMID:27468363

  3. Opioid neonatal abstinence syndrome: controversies and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Kim; Perez-Montejano, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The Opioid Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) is a term used to describe a cluster of signs and symptoms seen in infants experiencing withdrawal from opioid drugs. Despite a substantial literature the relationship between maternal methadone dose, NAS and the method of assessment of NAS symptoms has not been agreed. The following review will address current and historical controversies surrounding these issues and will examine the evidence concerned with the evaluation of neonates exposed to methadone in utero. The key findings are as follows: A variety of NAS scales are used to assess the severity of neonatal withdrawal symptoms including locally adapted validated tools. Inconsistencies in the use of NAS scales have included the timing, duration and frequency of administration; the degree to which observers were trained to reliability; the use of NAS scales designed for term neonates to assess pre-term neonates who may have a qualitatively different expression of abstinence symptoms and; the research setting in which the tool was administered. There is a lack of research investigating the observant bias' effect upon scoring NAS, the basis for treatment decisions and the influence of concomitant maternal use of non-opioid drugs late in pregnancy. We also discuss the implications of the lack of recognition of NAS symptoms leading to possible under reporting and inappropriate, early neonatal discharge from hospital. In addition, this paper also discusses the merits and problems of conducting research in this area and highlights gaps in our knowledge and areas for further research.

  4. Is exchange transfusion a possible treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis?

    PubMed

    Timpani, Giuseppina; Foti, Francesca; Nicolò, Antonino; Nicotina, Pier Antonio; Nicastro, Emanuele; Iorio, Raffaele

    2007-11-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare congenital disorder of the liver associated to a poor prognosis. Liver transplantation is often required, since no effective medical treatment has been found. Despite mounting evidence of an alloimmune etiology of this condition, exchange transfusion has never been proposed as a specific treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis. Here we describe two siblings affected by neonatal hemochromatosis. The first, a female, died at 18 days of severe coagulopathy and acute renal failure, diagnosed as affected by neonatal hemochromatosis only when the second sibling was suspected as being affected by the same disease. The second child showed a rapidly worsening coagulopathy which was treated with two exchange transfusions, followed by rapid clinical and laboratory improvement, before reaching a definite diagnosis of neonatal hemochromatosis. He is healthy at present after a follow-up of 12 months. Although exchange transfusion has never been considered as treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis, this case suggests that it could be a feasible treatment option for children affected by this disease, as for other alloimmune conditions.

  5. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics. PMID:24246520

  6. Neonatal pain management: still in search of the Holy Grail

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed. PMID:27087155

  7. Long-term Behavioral Consequences of Brief, Repeated Neonatal Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Knuth, Emily D.; Etgen, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    Rats subjected to stressful stimuli during the stress hyporesponsive period exhibit varied neuroendocrine and behavioral changes as neonates, adolescents and adults. The current work examined the effects of neonatal isolation stress, using a within-litter design, on adult anxiety-related behavior and endocrine stress reactivity. Neonatal rats were isolated daily for 1 hr from postnatal day (P) 4-9, a manipulation previously shown to induce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses on P9 (Knuth and Etgen, 2005). Control animals were either handled briefly or left undisturbed (with-dam). Adult rats were tested for anxiety-related behavior using the elevated plus maze and open field, and for endocrine responses following restraint stress. Neonatal isolation decreased center exploration of the open field following 1 hr restraint, including decreased time in the center compared to with-dam or handled controls, and decreased center entries and distance traveled in the center compared to with-dam controls. It also decreased time in and entries into the open arms of the elevated plus maze compared to handled controls, suggesting enhanced anxiety-related behavior. Neonatal isolation had no effect on basal or restraint-induced levels of ACTH or corticosterone. These findings indicate that neonatal isolation may enhance anxiety-related behaviors, especially in response to stress, without altering HPA function. Section: Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience PMID:17125746

  8. [Specificities of neonatal hemostasis and implications in pathologic situations].

    PubMed

    Gruel, Y

    2010-09-01

    The haemostasis of healthy newborn differs from those of normal adult but remains well balanced without bleeding or thrombosis. However, this equilibrium is unstable, and the neonate is exposed to acquired or inherited haemostasis disorders that necessitate to be early diagnosed in order to be appropriately treated. Several studies provided reference ranges for haemostatic components in the foetus, the newborn and throughout childhood. The particularities of neonatal haemostasis are therefore better defined and contribute to further understand the pathophysiology and characteristics of hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur in newborns. Some examples of the impact of age on haemostasis are: the risk of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is high in the first newborn of a woman at risk since the involved antigens are fully expressed by foetal platelets; the newborn is at risk for vitamin K deficiency with bleeding due to poor transport of vitamin K across the placenta and low levels of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, X; the diagnosis of some inherited coagulation deficiencies can be difficult in the newborn due to physiologically low levels of coagulation factors; thrombotic events are rare in the healthy neonate, despite physiologically very low levels of several coagulation inhibitors; the pharmacokinetic and effects of antithrombotic agents are influenced by the specificities of haemostasis in neonates. This review will discuss about the foetal development of haemostasis until birth, and some implications regarding the pathophysiology, the diagnosis and the treatment of bleeding disorders in the human neonate.

  9. Use of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography and Focused Cardiac Sonography in Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Time to Embrace It?

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Amit; Diambomba, Yenge; Lee, Shoo K; Jain, Amish

    2016-07-01

    Focused cardiac sonography and targeted neonatal echocardiography refer to goal-directed cardiac imaging using ultrasound, typically by noncardiologic specialists. Although the former consists of a rapid qualitative assessment of cardiac function, which is usually performed by acute care practitioners, the latter refers to detailed functional echocardiography to obtain quantitative and qualitative indexes of pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics in sick neonates and is typically performed by neonatologists. Although the use of these modalities is increasing, they still remain unavailable in most North American centers providing acute care to neonates, partly because of limited data regarding their direct impact on patient care. Here we present a series of 5 cases from a large perinatal unit in which immediate availability of relevant expertise led to important and arguably life-saving clinical interventions. In 4 of these cases, focused cardiac sonography was sufficient to make the diagnosis, whereas in 1 case, clinical integration of detailed systemic hemodynamics measured on target neonatal echocardiography was required.

  10. Current status of neonatal care and alternate strategies for reduction of neonatal mortality in the decade of nineties.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S K; Ramji, S; Sachdev, H P

    1991-12-01

    Improvement in neonatal care in India is needed in order to fulfill the National Health Policy to reduce infant and perinatal mortality and low birth weight babies. 50-60% of perinatal and infant mortality is due to neonatal mortality, specifically low birth weight. There have been no declines in any of the states even though there are literacy, fertility, poverty and health personnel differences between states. The health delivery system is described. Basic facilities are lacking in subcenters and primary health centers: weighing scales, blood pressure recorder, urine analysis, and blood transfusion capability; pregnancy registration is 40%. 40% of women believe that the female multipurpose worker (ANM) is a maternal and child health worker; Dais made postnatal visits to 25% of the women and infants, while physicians and ANM's visited 10%. The most frequent method of delivery is home delivery with a Dai or relative in attendance. Information on temperature control at birth, hand washing, feeding, and identification of high risk infants by health personnel is inadequate. There are no neonatal units in the entire country even though there are 8 million low birth weight babies/year and 1 million neonatal deaths/year. Neonatal causes are primarily birth injuries, aspiration syndrome, and neonatal infections (tetanus, pneumonia, and diarrhea). Studies have identified health service improvements to reduce neonatal mortality. In India, the priority should be to 1) establish delivery of neonatal and perinatal care at all 3 levels of care, 2) train and educate all health personnel in perinatal and neonatal care, and 3) improve community participation by involving the community in decision making on kind of care, perinatal care, and health education and by monitoring such services. Infant care must extend from prenatal through postnatal care, which is currently fragmented, through a 3-tiered system. 80-85% of all infants need care at Level I; 15-20% require Level II care

  11. Renal insufficiency in neonates after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Asfour, B; Bruker, B; Kehl, H G; Fründ, S; Scheld, H H

    1996-07-01

    Renal failure after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is well understood for infants, children and adults. The perioperative risk factors after CPB for immature kidneys in newborns are not well known. This retrospective study investigates perioperative risk factors for renal insufficiency in neonates. I) Preoperative: Age; weight, performed angiography, amount of dye used in angiography, renal disease and creatinine. II) Intraoperative: Duration of operation, duration of MAP < 40 mmHg, use of deep hypothermia, in-out fluid balance, duration of CPB, duration of circulatory arrest and cross-clamp time. III) Postoperative: Creatinine, use of catecholamines, use of nitroglycerine (NG) or phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDI) and additional antibiotics. From Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1994 50 neonates underwent cardiac surgery using CPB (n = 23 transposition of the great arteries; n = 4 pulmonary atresia; n = 6 critical pulmonary stenosis; n = 5 hypoplastic left heart syndrome; n = 3 Ebstein's anomaly; n = 2 interrupted arch with hypoplastic left ventricle; n = 2 single ventricle; n = 1 each: double outlet right ventricle, tricuspid atresia, critical aortic stenosis, rhabdo-myosarkoma, corrected transposition of the great arteries.) Thirty-one patients entered the study. Depending on the postoperative creatinine level two groups (group I: creatinine <1 mg/dl and group II: >1 mg/dl) were created. The diureses between the two groups did not differ. Comparing the patients of group I vs. group II, patients of group I were younger (mean age: 7.7 d. vs. 11.4 d), lighter (mean weight: 3260 g vs. 3430 g), less had angiography (44% vs. 77%), received more dye (mean amount: 14 ml vs. 7 ml), the duration of MAP < 40 mmHg while on CPB was longer (mean duration 3 min vs. 21 min), more patients were operated on using deep hypothermia (55% vs. 27%), the postoperative in-out-fluid balance was more positive (mean balance +413 ml vs. +221 ml), received postop. more frequently high

  12. Predictors of neonatal encephalopathy in full-term infants.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, S. J.; Alessandri, L. M.; Badawi, N.; Burton, P. R.; Pemberton, P. J.; Stanley, F.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Preliminary investigation of the contribution of adverse antepartum and intrapartum factors to neonatal encephalopathy in singleton neonates born full term. DESIGN--Matched case-control study based on incidence density sampling of controls. SETTING--Two major teaching hospitals (one paediatric and one obstetric) and three peripheral maternity hospitals in Perth, Western Australia (population 1.2 million). SUBJECTS--89 cases, all the full term singleton neonates born during an eight month period in 1992 who fulfilled one or more of six criteria during the first week of life (seizures, abnormal conscious state, persistent hypertonia or hypotonia, and feeding or respiratory difficulties of central origin). One full term control infant without neonatal encephalopathy was matched to each case by sex, hospital of delivery, time of day and day of the week of birth, and maternal health insurance status. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratio estimates of relative risk of neonatal encephalopathy associated with antepartum and intrapartum factors. RESULTS--Estimated incidence of moderate or severe encephalopathy in first week of life was 3.75 per 1000 full term live births. Thirteen cases and no controls had evidence suggestive of important intrapartum hypoxia, and in only five of these cases was the neurological condition at birth attributed to events during the intrapartum period. Univariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified significant differences between cases and controls for maternal vaginal bleeding in pregnancy, maternal thyroxine treatment, congenital abnormalities, induction of labour, interval from membrane rupture to delivery, maternal pyrexia in labour, augmentation of labour, abnormal intrapartum cardiotocograms, and meconium in labour. Family history of convulsions also approached significance. CONCLUSIONS--Our preliminary results suggest that intrapartum hypoxia, according to currently used criteria, was not the cause of neonatal

  13. The in-vitro anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban in neonates.

    PubMed

    Attard, Chantal; Monagle, Paul; Kubitza, Dagmar; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2014-04-01

    The use of anticoagulants in neonates is increasing because of the medical advances improving the long-term survival of very sick infants who are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current anticoagulation therapy in neonates is less than ideal, because of the physiological differences compared to children and adults regarding the pathophysiology of thrombosis and pharmacology of the drug. Limitations associated with conventional anticoagulants have prompted the development of novel drugs that specifically target the key proteins in the coagulation system. Rivaroxaban is the first oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor available for the prevention of VTE in adults. Its predictable pharmacokinetic profile, high oral bioavailability and once-daily dosing make rivaroxaban an optimal anticoagulant that warrants investigation in neonates. This study was designed to determine whether there are age-related differences in the pharmacodynamic effects of rivaroxaban in vitro amongst neonates. Neonatal and adult plasma pools were created and spiked with increasing concentrations of rivaroxaban (0-500 ng/ml). Commercially available prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and anti-Factor Xa assays as well as a sub-sampling thrombin generation assay were used to measure the rivaroxaban effect. A dose-dependent response was observed for PT, aPTT and lag time in both the age groups. Rivaroxaban caused a significant increase in the clotting time for PT and aPTT as well as an increase in lag time (as measured by thrombin generation) in neonates when compared with adults. In-vivo studies are required to confirm the consistency of dose-response in neonates. PMID:24418940

  14. Malaria Prevention with IPTp during Pregnancy Reduces Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Clara; Bardají, Azucena; Sigauque, Betuel; Sanz, Sergi; Aponte, John J.; Mabunda, Samuel; Alonso, Pedro L.

    2010-01-01

    Background In the global context of a reduction of under-five mortality, neonatal mortality is an increasingly relevant component of this mortality. Malaria in pregnancy may affect neonatal survival, though no strong evidence exists to support this association. Methods In the context of a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in 1030 Mozambican pregnant women, 997 newborns were followed up until 12 months of age. There were 500 live borns to women who received placebo and 497 to those who received SP. Findings There were 58 infant deaths; 60.4% occurred in children born to women who received placebo and 39.6% to women who received IPTp (p = 0.136). There were 25 neonatal deaths; 72% occurred in the placebo group and 28% in the IPTp group (p = 0.041). Of the 20 deaths that occurred in the first week of life, 75% were babies born to women in the placebo group and 25% to those in the IPTp group (p = 0.039). IPTp reduced neonatal mortality by 61.3% (95% CI 7.4%, 83.8%); p = 0.024]. Conclusions Malaria prevention with SP in pregnancy can reduce neonatal mortality. Mechanisms associated with increased malaria infection at the end of pregnancy may explain the excess mortality in the malaria less protected group. Alternatively, SP may have reduced the risk of neonatal infections. These findings are of relevance to promote the implementation of IPTp with SP, and provide insights into the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms through which maternal malaria affects fetal and neonatal health. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00209781 PMID:20195472

  15. Mathematical model of the neonatal mouse ventricular action potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linda J.; Sobie, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Therapies for heart disease are based largely on our understanding of the adult myocardium. The dramatic differences in action potential (AP) shape between neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes, however, indicate that a different set of molecular interactions in neonatal myocytes necessitates different treatment for newborns. Computational modeling is useful for synthesizing data to determine how interactions between components lead to systems-level behavior, but this technique has not been used extensively to study neonatal heart cell function. We created a mathematical model of the neonatal (day 1) mouse myocyte by modifying, based on experimental data, the densities and/or formulations of ion transport mechanisms in an adult cell model. The new model reproduces the characteristic AP shape of neonatal cells, with a brief plateau phase and longer duration than the adult (APD80=60.1 vs. 12.6 ms). The simulation results are consistent with experimental data, including: 1) decreased density, and altered inactivation, of transient outward K+ currents, 2) increased delayed rectifier K+ currents, 3) Ca2+ entry through T-type as well as L-type Ca2+ channels, 4) increased Ca2+ influx through Na+-Ca2+ exchange, and 5) Ca2+ transients resulting from transmembrane Ca2+ entry rather than release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Simulations performed with the model generated novel predictions, including increased SR Ca2+ leak and elevated intracellular [Na+] in neonatal compared with adult myocytes. This new model can therefore be used for testing hypotheses and obtaining a better quantitative understanding of differences between neonatal and adult physiology. PMID:18408122

  16. Natal and Neonatal Teeth: A Retrospective Study of 15 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Basavanthappa, Nagaveni N; Kagathur, Umashankara; Basavanthappa, Radhika N; Suryaprakash, Satisha T

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To present 17 natal/neonatal teeth in 15 patients and describe their clinical characteristics, associated disorders, complications and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of neonates who visited the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, India, between 2003 and 2006 was carried out. It was a study of clinical data, such as the age and gender of the patients, the history and chief complaints of mothers, the clinical appearance and location of natal/neonatal teeth, and associated complications and treatments. Results: A total of 17 teeth (6 natal, 11 neonatal) were found in 15 patients. No significant gender predilection (8 male, 7 female) was found. Sixteen natal/neonatal teeth were placed in mandibular incisor area (10 on the right side and 6 on the left side) and one tooth in the maxillary incisor area. In 13 patients, the occurrence of natal/neonatal teeth was unilateral, and in 2 patients, it was bilateral. Three cases were associated with enamel hypoplasia, 3 cases with Riga-Fede disease, and 1 case with gingival hyperplasia. One case involved a patient with cleft lip and palate. Radiographic examination confirmed these teeth to be supernumerary, and all teeth exhibited hypermobility. Extraction had been done in all the cases. Eleven of the extracted teeth exhibited only rudimentary roots, and six teeth showed no roots. Conclusions: The occurrence of a natal/neonatal tooth is a rare phenomenon. When it occurs, the teeth have a variety of clinical characteristics and lead to different complications. Knowledge of the management of these structures is essential for the overall well being of a child. PMID:21494384

  17. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Sze, Gordon; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal and early-life stress results in alterations in neural connectivity and an increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, alterations in amygdala connectivity have emerged as a common effect across several recent studies. However, the impact of prenatal stress exposure on the functional organization of the amygdala has yet to be explored in the prematurely-born, a population at high risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. We test the hypothesis that preterm birth and prenatal exposure to maternal stress alter functional connectivity of the amygdala using two independent cohorts. The first cohort is used to establish the effects of preterm birth and consists of 12 very preterm neonates and 25 term controls, all without prenatal stress exposure. The second is analyzed to establish the effects of prenatal stress exposure and consists of 16 extremely preterm neonates with prenatal stress exposure and 10 extremely preterm neonates with no known prenatal stress exposure. Standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed connectivity methods are used. When compared to term controls, very preterm neonates show significantly reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the insula (p < 0.05). Similarly, when compared to extremely preterm neonates without exposure to prenatal stress, extremely preterm neonates with exposure to prenatal stress show significantly less connectivity between the left amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, and the peristriate cortex (p < 0.05). Exploratory analysis of the combined cohorts suggests additive effects of prenatal stress on alterations in amygdala connectivity associated with preterm birth. Functional connectivity from the amygdala to other subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these

  18. Developmental pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol in preterm and term neonates

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Roosmarijn F W; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Kulo, Aida; de Hoon, Jan; Verbesselt, Rene; Danhof, Meindert; Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    AIM Propylene glycol (PG) is often applied as an excipient in drug formulations. As these formulations may also be used in neonates, the aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol, co-administered intravenously with paracetamol (800 mg PG/1000 mg paracetamol) or phenobarbital (700 mg PG/200 mg phenobarbital) in preterm and term neonates. METHODS A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed based on 372 PG plasma concentrations from 62 (pre)term neonates (birth weight (bBW) 630–3980 g, postnatal age (PNA) 1–30 days) using NONMEM 6.2. The model was subsequently used to simulate PG exposure upon administration of paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates (gestational age 24–40 weeks). RESULTS In a one compartment model, birth weight and PNA were both identified as covariates for PG clearance using an allometric function (CLi= 0.0849 × {(bBW/2720)1.69× (PNA/3)0.201}). Volume of distribution scaled allometrically with current bodyweight (Vi= 0.967 × {(BW/2720)1.45}) and was estimated 1.77 times higher when co-administered with phenobarbital compared with paracetamol. By introducing these covariates a large part of the interindividual variability on clearance (65%) as well as on volume of distribution (53%) was explained. The final model shows that for commonly used dosing regimens, the population mean PG peak and trough concentrations range between 33–144 and 28–218 mg l−1 (peak) and 19–109 and 6–112 mg l−1 (trough) for paracetamol and phenobarbital formulations, respectively, depending on birth weight and age of the neonates. CONCLUSION A pharmacokinetic model was developed for PG co-administered with paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates. As such, large variability in PG exposure may be expected in neonates which is dependent on birth weight and PNA. PMID:22536830

  19. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Sze, Gordon; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal and early-life stress results in alterations in neural connectivity and an increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, alterations in amygdala connectivity have emerged as a common effect across several recent studies. However, the impact of prenatal stress exposure on the functional organization of the amygdala has yet to be explored in the prematurely-born, a population at high risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. We test the hypothesis that preterm birth and prenatal exposure to maternal stress alter functional connectivity of the amygdala using two independent cohorts. The first cohort is used to establish the effects of preterm birth and consists of 12 very preterm neonates and 25 term controls, all without prenatal stress exposure. The second is analyzed to establish the effects of prenatal stress exposure and consists of 16 extremely preterm neonates with prenatal stress exposure and 10 extremely preterm neonates with no known prenatal stress exposure. Standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed connectivity methods are used. When compared to term controls, very preterm neonates show significantly reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the insula (p < 0.05). Similarly, when compared to extremely preterm neonates without exposure to prenatal stress, extremely preterm neonates with exposure to prenatal stress show significantly less connectivity between the left amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, and the peristriate cortex (p < 0.05). Exploratory analysis of the combined cohorts suggests additive effects of prenatal stress on alterations in amygdala connectivity associated with preterm birth. Functional connectivity from the amygdala to other subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these

  20. Severe intracranial haemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Morais, Sofia; Sevivas, Teresa; Veiga, Ricardo; Salvado, Ramon; Taborda, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a rare (1/1000–5000 births) life-threatening disorder, caused by fetomaternal incompatibility for a fetal human platelet alloantigen inherited from the father, with production of maternal alloantibodies against fetal platelets, leading to severe thrombocytopenia and potential bleeding. Intracranial haemorrhage is the most feared complication. This report presents the case of a term newborn infant, born from caesarean section after a normal pregnancy, presenting signs of skin bleeding with different ages. Obstetric history included a previous spontaneous abortion after amniocentesis. Severe thrombocytopenia (4×109/l platelets) was found and brain ultrasound showed multiple intracranial haemorrhages. Human platelet antigen (HPA) phenotyping showed maternal negative HPA-1a and paternal positive HPA-1a platelets. Strongly positive anti-HPA-1a and weakly positive anti-human leukocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Multiple platelet transfusions, intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid were given but favourable response was accomplished only after a compatible platelet transfusion. Brain MRI showed multiple subacute and chronic haemorrhages. PMID:22679192

  1. Prediction of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia using PCR.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L R; Jones, C; Munro, T E

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is a potentially fatal condition and in the majority of cases is associated with maternal antibodies to the HPA-1a (PLA1) haplotype. Early diagnosis in utero can enhance survival rates. The application of DNA genomic analysis and PCR technology for the determination of the HPA-1a/HPA-1b (PLA1/PLA2) locus is described and applied in a family study where the fetus was diagnosed to have NAIT. This rapid technique differentiated between the 3 haplotypes HPA-1a/HPA-1a, HPA-1b/HPA-1b and HPA-1a/HPA-1b using the polymorphism at base 196 of the GPIIIa gene. This is the first Australian report on the establishment of this technology for platelet genotype typing and the application in the diagnosis of NAIT. This technique can be performed on DNA extracted from any nucleated cells and avoids the difficulty of requiring fetal platelets for serological typing when NAIT is suspected. The PCR technique of genomic DNA analysis has an important application in the prediction and management of this potentially severe condition.

  2. The neonate brain detects speech structure.

    PubMed

    Gervain, Judit; Macagno, Francesco; Cogoi, Silvia; Peña, Marcela; Mehler, Jacques

    2008-09-16

    What are the origins of the efficient language learning abilities that allow humans to acquire their mother tongue in just a few years very early in life? Although previous studies have identified different mechanisms underlying the acquisition of auditory and speech patterns in older infants and adults, the earliest sensitivities remain unexplored. To address this issue, we investigated the ability of newborns to learn simple repetition-based structures in two optical brain-imaging experiments. In the first experiment, 22 neonates listened to syllable sequences containing immediate repetitions (ABB; e.g., "mubaba," "penana"), intermixed with random control sequences (ABC; e.g., "mubage," "penaku"). We found increased responses to the repetition sequences in the temporal and left frontal areas, indicating that the newborn brain differentiated the two patterns. The repetition sequences evoked greater activation than the random sequences during the first few trials, suggesting the presence of an automatic perceptual mechanism to detect repetitions. In addition, over the subsequent trials, activation increased further in response to the repetition sequences but not in response to the random sequences, indicating that recognition of the ABB pattern was enhanced by repeated exposure. In the second experiment, in which nonadjacent repetitions (ABA; e.g., "bamuba," "napena") were contrasted with the same random controls, no discrimination was observed. These findings suggest that newborns are sensitive to certain input configurations in the auditory domain, a perceptual ability that might facilitate later language development. PMID:18768785

  3. Prenatal Methamphetamine Use and Neonatal Neurobehavioral Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lynne M.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Derauf, Chris; Grant, Penny; Shah, Rizwan; Arria, Amelia; Huestis, Marilyn; Haning, William; Strauss, Arthur; Grotta, Sheri Della; Fallone, Melissa; LiuPhD, Jing; Lester, Barry M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use among pregnant women is an increasing problem in the United States. How prenatal MA exposure affects neonatal neurobehavior is unknown. Objective To examine the neurobehavioral effects of prenatal MA exposure. Design The Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study screened 13,808 subjects and 1632 were eligible and consented. 166 (n=74 exposed) were enrolled in a longitudinal follow up. Exposure was determined by meconium assay and self-report with alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco present in both groups. The NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) was administered within the first 5 days of life. Analyses conducted on NNNS summary scores included exposure group effects, heavy MA use effects, association with frequency of use by trimester, and dose-response relationships with amphetamine metabolites. Results After adjusting for covariates, exposure to MA was associated with increased physiological stress. Heavy MA use was related to lower arousal, more lethargy, and increased physiological stress. First trimester MA use was related to elevated physiological stress. Third trimester use was related to poorer quality of movement. Higher level of amphetamine metabolites in meconium was associated with increased CNS stress. Conclusions Prenatal MA exposure was associated with neurobehavioral patterns of decreased arousal, increased stress, and poor quality of movement. The dose response relationships may represent neurotoxic effects from MA. PMID:18031987

  4. [Brain signaling mechanisms during neonatal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Rizzotti, Alina; Aguero, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    The brain and the immune system are the two major adaptive systems of the body. During an immune response the developing neonatal brain and the immune system "cross-talk" and this course of action is essential for maintaining homeostasis. Two pathway are involved in this intercommunication: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This overview focuses on the role of SNS in neuroimmune interactions, an area that has received much less attention than the role of HPA axis. Evidence suggests that norepinephrine (NE) is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in different organs and tissues. Under stimulation, NE is released from the sympathetic nerve terminals in these organs and tissues .Through stimulation of specific receptors, locally released NE, or circulating catecholamines such as epinephrine, affect lymphocyte traffic, circulation, and proliferation, and modulate cytokine production and the functional activity of different lymphoid cells. In addition, recent evidence is discussed that NE and epinephrine, through stimulation of the beta(2)-adrenoreceptor-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, inhibit the production of type 1/proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma by antigen-presenting cells and T helper (Th) 1 cells, whereas they stimulate the production of type 2/anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Thus, the activation of SNS during an immune response might be aimed to localize the inflammatory response.

  5. Intestinal amino acid metabolism in neonates.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; van der Schoor, Sophie R D; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G; Wattimena, Darcos; Schierbeek, Henk; Schaart, Maaike W; Riedijk, Maaike A; van der Lugt, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    The portal-drained viscera (stomach, intestine, pancreas and spleen) have a much higher rate of both energy expenditure and protein synthesis than can be estimated on the basis of their weight. A high utilization rate of dietary nutrients by the portal-drained viscera might result in a low systemic availability which determines whole-body growth. From studies in our multiple catheterized piglet model, we conclude that more than half of the dietary protein intake is utilized within the portal-drained viscera and that amino acids are a major fuel source for the visceral organs. Specific stable isotope studies reveal that there are large differences in the utilization rate amongst the different amino acids. The majority of the results obtained from the piglet studies can be extrapolated to the human (preterm) infant. First-pass, splanchnic uptake of lysine and threonine differ substantially, while non-essential amino acids are oxidized to a great extend in the human gut. Overall, these studies indicate that gut amino acid metabolism has a great impact on systemic availability and hence growth in the neonate.

  6. Colorful story of phototherapy for neonatal jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agati, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Pratesi, Riccardo; Pratesi, Simone; Donzelli, Gian Paolo

    1996-12-01

    Colors have always attracted our fantasy and imagination. Medicine, like many other human activities, did not escape their attraction, sometimes with fatal consequences. The scientific literature, magazines, etc. are full of reports on the beneficial, miraculous effects of colors. Even nowadays, where photobiology and photomedicine have been put on very firm bases, chromopaths are still at work. The evolution of light therapy from chromotherapy to photomedicine is presented in brief, with the aim of contributing to the action against the unscientific behavior of researchers and clinicians who support biological and/or clinical results without serious and well documented work. Colors have played an important role in the phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. It is an interesting example of how even a rigorous scientific search for the optimal color has progressed in part by change, due to the lack of an action spectrum, too hurried extrapolations of animal results to man, unsuspected dynamical behavior of bilirubin molecules, etc. The story of its evolution up to present knowledge is reported in this paper.

  7. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Presentation and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Karol; Jones, Hendree E

    2016-01-01

    The increase in opioid use among the general population is reflected in pregnant women and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) statistics. This increase has produced an unprecedented focus on NAS from both the political-judicial sphere and the medical community. Under the banner of fetal protection, judges and prosecutors have implemented punitive approaches against women who use prescribed and nonprescribed opioids during pregnancy, including arrest, civil commitment, detention, prosecution, and loss of custody or termination of parental rights. Within the medical community, questions have been raised regarding protocols to detect prenatal drug exposure at delivery, NAS treatment protocols, the need for quality-improvement strategies to standardize care and reduce length of stay for mother and infant, and the benefits of engaging the mother in the care of her infant. It is not uncommon for the expression of strong discordant views on these issues both between and among these political-judicial and medical constituencies. Closely examining the issues often reveal a lack of understanding of substance use disorders, their treatment, and the occurrence and treatment of NAS. This study provides an in-depth examination of NAS, including variations in presentation and factors that impact the efficacy of treatment, and also identifying questions that remain unanswered. Finally, 4 key areas on which future research should focus to guide both medical care and public policy are discussed. PMID:26974659

  8. Genetic disorders of neonatal respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cole, F S; Hamvas, A; Nogee, L M

    2001-08-01

    Genetic risk for respiratory distress in infancy has been recognized with increasing frequency in neonatal intensive care units. Reports of family clusters of affected infants and of ethnic- and gender-based respiratory phenotypes point to the contribution of inheritance. Similarly, different outcomes among gestationally matched infants with comparable exposures to oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or nutritional deficiency also suggest a genetic risk for respiratory distress. Examples of inherited deficiency of surfactant protein B in both humans and genetically engineered murine lineages illustrate the importance of identifying markers of genetic risk. In contrast to developmental, inflammatory, or nutritional causes of respiratory distress that may resolve as infants mature, genetic causes result in both acute and chronic (and potentially irreversible) respiratory failure. The availability of clinically useful genetic markers of risk for respiratory distress in infancy will permit development of rational strategies for treatment of genetic lung disorders of infancy and more accurate counseling of families whose infants are at genetic risk for development of respiratory distress at birth or during early childhood. We review examples of genetic variations known to be associated with or cause respiratory distress in infancy. PMID:11477198

  9. Gastrin in fetal and neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, R J; Cranwell, P D

    1991-01-01

    1. The concentration and molecular profile of gastrin were examined in plasma and tissue extracts of fetal and neonatal pigs from 93 days gestation up to 12 weeks of age and also in the fetal gastric contents. 2. Gastrin was present in the gastrointestinal tract and plasma of fetal pigs at 93 days gestation. The concentration in both plasma and antral extracts increased progressively up to birth and continued to rise postnatally, reaching a peak at about 3 weeks of age in plasma and 6 weeks in the antrum. 3. In blood the major molecular form of gastrin was G34 (up to 80%), while in the antrum the major form was G17 (66-91%). The percentage of G34 in the antrum was highest in later gestation (21%), and reached adult proportion by 8 weeks of age (4%). 4. A considerable amount of gastrin, chiefly G17, was detected in the fetal gastric contents. Synthetic human G17 was stable in fetal gastric contents when incubated at 37 degrees C for 60 min, although, when incubated with gastric contents from a sow, it disappeared within 5 min. 5. It is suggested that the presence of gastrin in fetal gastric contents may be important in stimulation of fetal gut development.

  10. Indices of body proportionality in neonates.

    PubMed

    Tsou Yau, K I; Chang, M H

    1993-01-01

    The inadequacy of using body weight alone to evaluate fetal skeletal and soft-tissue growth has long been recognized. Body proportionality indices could identify symptomatic newborn infants better than size-for-date classification. Lack of normative data precludes its being used, practically, in Chinese newborns. Thus body weight, body length, head circumference and mid-arm circumference were measured in 240 neonates appropriate for gestational age, 27-42 weeks, 960-3918 g, to construct reference indices of body proportionality: ponderal index (PI), body mass index (BMI), weight/length ratio (W/L), head circumference/body length ratio (HC/L) and mid-arm circumference/head circumference ratio (MAC/HC). All the five indices of body proportionality but HC/L were statistically correlated with gestational age (GA). For full-term newborns, PI did not correlate with GA. Furthers, the MAC/HC ratio decreased after 40 weeks' gestation. Therefore, when these indices of body proportionality are used to evaluate intrauterine nutritional status of a newborn, the appropriate standard for GA should be considered. PMID:8372678

  11. Congenital Nasopharyngeal Teratoma in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Mirshemirani, Alireza; Khaleghnejad, Ahmad; Mohajerzadeh, Leila; Samsami, Majid; Hasas-yeganeh, Shaghayegh

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital germ cell tumors are uncommon. The most common site of teratoma is in the sacrococcygeal region. Teratoma arising from the head and neck comprises less than 10% of reported cases and of these, nasopharyngeal lesions are rare. Teratomas are generally benign, and have a well recognized clinical and histopathological entity. We present a case of nasopharyngeal teratoma (NPT) associated with a wide cleft palate. Case Presentation A 20 day old female neonate with a teratoma of the nasopharyngeal area, and wide cleft palate was referred to our center. The protruded mass which measured 6×4×3cm, was of soft consistency, blocked the airway, and prevented oral feeding. Preoperative evaluation and imaging was performed and mass was excised 2 days after admission. Pathology revealed a well-differentiated mature solid teratoma (hairy polyp). The patient had no complication in the post-operative period. Cleft palate was surgically repaired when 2 years old. She is now a six year old girl with normal development. Conclusion Congenital nasopharyngeal teratomas are usually benign. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and should be undertaken on an urgent basis, especially in a patient who presents with signs and symptoms of airway obstruction. PMID:23056797

  12. Values influencing neonatal nurses' perceptions and choices.

    PubMed

    Raines, D A

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the values influencing the nurses' perception and choice of behavior in a hypothetical clinical situation. The theoretical framework was Rokeach's theory on the nature of human values and value systems. A descriptive study using a mailed survey was conducted on a random sample of 331 members of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. Data on individual nurse's values, perception of information, and behavioral choices were collected with an investigator-developed questionnaire consisting of a values scale, and an information scale and choice alternatives related to three hypothetical vignettes: a low-birthweight infant, an infant with chromosomal anomalies, and a chronically ill infant. Results of this study indicate that nurses identified a hierarchy of values related to their practice. Information related to infant characteristics was consistently most important; however, in uncertain situations, rules or external protocols had an increased influence on the behavioral choice process. The behavioral choice option with the greatest agreement was different for each situation. A consistently negative correlation between the options within each vignette indicates that nurses have clearly defined choice preferences. Model testing revealed a consistent relationship across the three vignettes between the variable being just and protocol, doing right and infant characteristics, and infant characteristics and the choice options (p < .05).

  13. Alteration of the amniotic fluid and neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Volante, Enrico; Gramellini, Dandolo; Moretti, Sabrina; Kaihura, Christine; Bevilacqua, Giulio

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative alterations of the amniotic fluid complicate 7% of the pregnancies. Polyhydramnios complicates 1-3% while oligohydramnios involves 3-5% of the pregnancies. The most common causes of polyhydramnios are fetal abnormalities, maternal diabetes and twin pregnancies, but are idiopathic in the 60%. Perinatal mortality has been reported to range between 10-30% while the risk of preterm birth reaches up to 22% in pregnancies complicated by polyhydramnios. The neonatal outcome, in cases where polyhydramnios is due to fetal-neonatal abnormalities, depends on the underlying pathology. Polyhydramnios due to defects in intestinal canalisation in particular, has been correlated to good neonatal prognosis. In our experience no early postoperative deaths occurred in a group of 16 newborns consequtively admitted to our unit in the last two years, with abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract with need of surgery within the second week of life. Most cases of oligohydramnios are due to premature rupture of membranes, other causes are fetal abnormalities, such as urinary tract malformations, or chromosomopaties and drugs e.g. NSAID's. Oligohydramnios of mild entities is often associated to preterm birth, fetal growth restriction. In some cases of oligohydramnios, neonatal survival is highly conditioned by pulmonary hypoplasia which develops with rates that range between 13 and 21%. Neonatal prognosis is often disastrous in cases with severe oligohydramnios, which however could be improved by amnioinfusion, which restores an amniotic fluid volume sufficient in reducing the adverse environmental effects and in prolonging, where possible, pregnancy. Beside the quantity also the quality of the amniotic fluid may be related to the neonatal outcome. Finding of some inflammatory factors (interleukines) in the amniotic fluid seems to be significantly correlated to periventricular leucomalacia (PVL), cerebral paralysis and long-term neurological abnormalities

  14. Neonatal respiratory distress in a reference neonatal unit in Cameroon: an analysis of prevalence, predictors, etiologies and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tochie, Joel Noutakdie; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre; Langmia, Regina Ndasi; Barla, Esther; Koki-Ndombo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a main cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Early detection of its risk factors and early treatment of its etiologies are major challenges. However, few studies in developing countries have provided data needed to tackle it. We aimed to determine the prevalence, predictors, etiologies and outcome of NRD in a tertiary health care centre of Cameroon. Methods We analyzed the hospital files of all newborns admitted to the Neonatal unit of Douala General Hospital from 1st January 2011 to 28th February 2013. NRD was diagnosed based on the presence of one or more of the following signs: an abnormal respiratory rate, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring, chest wall recessions and thoraco-abdominal asynchrony with or without cyanosis, in their files. Socio-demographic and clinical variables of newborns and their mothers were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence of NRD was 47.5% out of the 703 newborns studied. Acute fetal distress, elective caesarean delivery, APGAR score < 7 at the 1st minute, prematurity, male gender and macrosomia were independent predictors of NRD. The main etiologies were neonatal infections (31%) and transient tachypnea of the newborn (25%). Its neonatal mortality rate was 24.5%, mainly associated with neonatal sepsis and hyaline membrane disease. Conclusion NRD is a frequent emergency and causes high morbidity and mortality. Most of its risk factors and etiologies are preventable. Adequate follow-up of pregnancy and labor for timely intervention may improve the neonatal outcomes. PMID:27642489

  15. Evaluation of Antenatal to Neonatal Continuum Care Services Affecting Neonatal Health in a Tertiary Health-Care Setup

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Jarina; Ali, Syed Irfan; Tripathy, Radha Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maternal and child mortality and morbidity continue to be high despite existence of various national health programmes in India. Annually 41% of all Under 5 mortality is comprised of neonates, 3/4 of who die within the first week of life. Even though effective programmes are existing, optimum utilization is still a question. So the present study was planned to assess utilisation of maternal and neonatal health services and its influence on neonatal health. Objectives: 1. To assess the utilization of MCH services before admission to SNCU. 2. To analyse the process of implementation of IMNCI before referral and during the admission. 3. To observe the impact on neonatal health and give necessary recommendations. Methodology: The information regarding utilization of MCH services was obtained by conducting in depth interviews with the responsible adults accompanying the sick neonate. The Pre-treatment and referral slips were verified and compared with that of the prescribed guidelines laid down by the IMNCI for young infants (0-2 months) at SNCU. Results and Discussion: Some of the important observations were mentioned here. 100% women had TT immunization whereas 72% had the full ANC, 58.7% had full course of IFA, 76% had utilized JSY benefits and 48.34% had their PNC. 84% neonates had required immunization, 59.01% were on exclusive breast feeding. 38.9% were paid home visits, only 42% had an idea about the danger signs of neonatal period. 23% sick babies were treated under IMNCI guideline. Among them 98% given initial treatment, only 34% given proper diagnosis/classification, 56% were given adequate advice. PMID:27385875

  16. Bleeding issues in neonates and infants - update 2015.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike; Limperger, Verena; Bauer, Alexander; Kowalski, Dorothee; Kenet, Gili

    2015-02-01

    The presentation of a neonate with clinical bleeding symptoms commonly causes considerable anxiety to parents and treating physicians. Since inherited coagulation disorders are rare many children with persistently abnormal coagulation screens will have an underlying bleeding disorder. Apart from emergency cases a family history including a bleeding questionnaire is mandatory asking for the onset and/or severity symptoms of hemorrhage prior to laboratory assessment. The absolute values of reference ranges for coagulation assays in neonates and children vary with analyzer and reagent systems, but confirm the concept of developmental hemostasis, showing that physiologic concentrations of coagulation proteins gradually increase and are lower in premature infants as compared to full-term babies or healthy children. The evaluation should include global screening tests and a full blood cell count to rule out thrombocytopenia. As in adults a prolonged PT in neonates reflects decreased plasma concentrations of vitamin-K-dependent factors, whereas the prolonged PTT stems from decreased plasma levels of contact factors. When initial laboratory test results reveal abnormalities, as compared to age-related values, a stepwise diagnostic approach should be followed. In the bleeding neonate or infant that has no laboratory abnormality, FXIII and alpha2-antiplasmin activity should be assessed, and when primary hemostatic defects are suspected, platelet function should be further evaluated. Treatment options of a bleeding neonate vary according to the underlying medical condition.

  17. Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry (BERA) in Neonates with Hyperbillirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Soni, Annanya; Kanaujia, Surendra Kumar; Kaushik, Sandeep

    2016-09-01

    (1) To study the BERA changes in neonates with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. (2) To compare the BERA changes in the neonates with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia before and after therapy. Thirty consecutive term appropriate for gestational age (AGA) neonates presenting to NICU with total serum bilirubin requiring intervention (using the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines) were included in the study as cases and thirty normal term AGA neonates with uneventful peri-natal period and a maximum measured serum bilirubin <12 mg/dl in case of term baby were included as controls after obtaining informed consent. Initial BERA was done within 3-24 h of hospitalization after obtaining informed consent from parents, at the time of discharge and at 3 month followup. Machine used for recording BERA was intelligent hearing system version 3.3. In our study out of the 30 cases 10 (33.3 %) cases were found to have BERA changes in the form of absent wave forms, raised threshold, prolonged latencies or prolonged inter peak latencies. In our study, it was observed that there was statistically significant correlation (p value < 0.005) between increasing bilirubin level and BERA changes. Correlation of the findings of this study with previous few studies indicates that BERA can be used as a useful non invasive tool to determine auditory functions in the neonate especially changes of early bilirubin toxicity. PMID:27508136

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnant Women and Their Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Maryam; Chaman, Reza; Amiri, Mohammad; Ajami, Mohammad Esmaeil; Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Rohani, Hossein; Taghavi-Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Sadeghi, Erfan; Raei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is a worldwide problem. Studies have reported prevalence ranged 18-84% in pregnant women. Receiving adequate calcium and vitamin D during pregnancy period is necessary for calcium homeostasis, fetal growth and bone mineralization. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and their neonates in Shahroud city in the northeast Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 284 pregnant women and their neonates referred to Fatemiyeh Hospital of Shahroud were included. Blood samples of mothers and umbilical cords were collected during the delivery and were sent to laboratory in order to measure calcium and 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Findings: Amounts of Vitamin D insufficiency (20-30 ng/mL) and deficiency (<20 ng/mL) in (mothers, neonates) were found to be (60.2%, 48.9%) and (1.1%, 2.5%) respectively. Calcium deficiency (<8.5 mg/dL) was present in 33.5% of mothers and 25% of neonates. There was a weak correlation between maternal serum and cord blood 25-hydroxy vitamin D (r=0.12, p=0.053). Conclusion: More than half of the mothers and their neonates had some degrees of vitamin D deficiency. It is recommended to evaluate the nutritional status of vitamin D in pregnant women along with public health interventions to be carried out. PMID:27157170

  19. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:23292914

  20. Serial Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Concenetrations in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Rebecca M.; Fox, Stephen D.; Golden, W. Christopher; Sibinga, Erica; Groopman, John D.; Lees, Peter S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the balance of metabolism of free bisphenol A (BPA) to the inactive conjugate, BPA glucuronide, in neonates. Study design Free BPA and BPA glucuronide concentrations were measured in 78 urine samples collected between December 2012 and August 2013 from a cohort of 44 healthy full term (≥ 37 weeks’ gestation) neonates at two intervals (3 - 6 days and 7 - 27 days of age). A questionnaire was administered at the time of sample collection. Neonates recruited into the study were born in an urban, tertiary care hospital. Results Only BPA glucuronide was detected in the urine samples; concentrations ranged from <0.1 μg/L to 11.21 μg/L (median: 0.27 μg/L). Free BPA concentrations were below the limit of quantification of 0.1 μg/L. Age, but not sex or type of diet was significantly associated with urinary BPA glucuronide concentration (p=0.002). Conclusions Our results illustrate widespread BPA exposure in healthy full-term neonates and efficient conjugation of BPA to its readily excretable and biologically inactive form (BPA glucuronide) as early as 3 days of age. Factors other than type of diet may be important contributors to BPA exposure in neonates. PMID:25921439

  1. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  2. Current Neonatal Resuscitation Practices among Paediatricians in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Satvik C.; Nimbalkar, Archana S.; Patel, Dipen V.; Sethi, Ankur R.; Phatak, Ajay G.; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. We assessed neonatal resuscitation practices among paediatricians in Gujarat. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of 23 questions based on guidelines of Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) and Navjaat Shishu Suraksha Karyakram (NSSK) was conducted using web-based tool. Questionnaire was developed and consensually validated by three neonatologists. Results. Total of 142 (21.2%) of 669 paediatricians of Gujarat, India, whose e-mail addresses were available, attempted the survey and, from them, 126 were eligible. Of these, 74 (58.7%) were trained in neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with mechanical ventilation facilities was available for 54% of respondents. Eighty-eight (69.8%) reported correct knowledge and practice regarding effective bag and mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions. Knowledge and practice about continuous positive airway pressure use in delivery room were reported in 18.3% and 30.2% reported use of room air for BMV during resuscitation. Suctioning oral cavity before delivery in meconium stained liquor was reported by 27.8% and 38.1% cut the cord after a minute of birth. Paediatricians with NRP training used appropriate method of tracheal suction in cases of nonvigorous newborns than those who were not trained. Conclusions. Contemporary knowledge about neonatal resuscitative practices in paediatricians is lacking and requires improvement. Web-based tools provided low response in this survey. PMID:24688549

  3. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  4. Toll-like receptor signaling in neonatal sepsis and inflammation: a matter of orchestration and conditioning.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2013-12-01

    Altered neonatal Toll-like receptor (TLR) function is hypothesized to contribute to the heightened susceptibility to infection and perpetuated inflammation in term and preterm neonates, clinically evident in neonatal sepsis and increased rates of inflammatory disorders. Current data indicate that basal TLR expression in term neonates equals adult expression patterns, while expression in preterm infants seems to increase, depending on gestational age. Regarding TLR signaling, some studies suggest TLR incompetence in neonates associated with impaired pro-inflammatory responses, others describe neonatal TLR function well developed and allude to its hyper-inflammation tendency. We discuss the competing positions and considerable limitations of research approaches and conclude that neonatal innate immunity is not generally less able to respond to TLR stimulation. Moreover, we describe pre-conditioning factors other than immaturity having a comparable impact. In the long term, better understanding of the complex interplay of pre- and postnatal conditions and maturation-dependent neonatal TLR function may provide new therapeutic approaches.

  5. A study of neonatal deaths in the tea gardens of Dibrugarh district of upper Assam.

    PubMed

    Phukan, R K; Mahanta, J

    1998-11-01

    A total of 2432 live births and 46 stillbirths were studied in some of the tea gardens of Dibrugarh district of upper Assam. The neonatal mortality rate was 46.5 per 1000 live births per year. Immaturity (21.2%), fever/sepsis (13.3%), breathing disorder (12.4%), neonatal tetanus (11.5%) and neonatal diarrhoea (8.8%) accounted for most of the neonatal deaths. There were 42.9% low birth weight infants and this was associated with 92.8% of total neonatal deaths and 34.3% of preterm babies were associated with 90.7% of neonatal deaths. The case fatality rate among low birth weight and preterm babies was 9% and 11% respectively. High risk of neonatal deaths had been found among the neonates in case of no maternal immunisation, delivery attended by untrained person and newborn care at home. PMID:10218318

  6. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY The most common forms of ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  7. Claudin immunolocalization in neonatal mouse epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Troy, Tammy-Claire; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Yerlikaya, Seda; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-11-01

    Emerging evidence supports the notion that claudins (Cldns) are dynamically regulated under normal conditions to respond to the selective permeability requirements of various tissues, and that their expression is developmentally controlled. We describe the localization of those Cldns that we have previously demonstrated to be functionally important in epidermal differentiation and the formation of the epidermal permeability barrier, e.g., Cldn1, Cldn6, Cldn11, and Cldn18, and the presence of Cldn3 and Cldn5 in various neonatal mouse epithelia including the epidermis, nail, oral mucosa, tongue, and stomach. Cldn1 is localized in the differentiated and/or undifferentiated compartments of the epidermis and nail and in the dorsal surface of the tongue and glandular compartment of the stomach but is absent from the oral mucosa and the keratinized compartment of the stomach. Cldn3 is present in the basal cells of the nail matrix and both compartments of the murine stomach but not in the epidermis, oral mucosa, or tongue. Cldn5 is found in the glandular compartment of the stomach but not in the epidermis, nail unit, oral mucosa, forestomach, and tongue. Cldn6, Cldn11, and Cldn18 occur in the differentiating suprabasal compartment of the epidermis, nail, and oral mucosa and in the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the tongue and the keratinized squamous epithelium of the stomach. The simple columnar epithelium of the glandular stomach stains for Cldn18 and reveals a non-membranous pattern for Cldn6 and Cldn11 expression. Our results demonstrate differential Cldn protein profiles in various epithelial tissues and their differentiation stages. Although the molecular mechanisms regulating Cldn expression are unknown, elucidation of their differential localization patterns in tissues with diverse permeability requirements should provide a better understanding of the role of tight junctions in tissue function. PMID:17828607

  8. Hyperphagia in neonates withdrawing from methadone

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A.; Kastner, B.; Taeusch, H

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To examine whether hyperphagia is a clinically significant problem in infants born to women receiving methadone maintenance.
METHODS—The volume of feeds, changes in infant body weight, as well as occurrence of adverse clinical effects in infants withdrawing from methadone were studied during the first month of life. A retrospective chart review was conducted for all infants at San Francisco General between 1992 and 1995, born to women receiving methadone maintenance during their pregnancy. Forty four infants were identified and the data obtained from hospital medical records. The daily oral intake of these infants was recorded during the first month of life. The incidence of hyperphagia (oral intake> 190 cc/kg/day) was measured. Associations between infant oral intake and maternal methadone dose were studied using correlation analysis as well as Anova for repeated measures. Adverse clinical symptoms were also recorded. A subset of premature infants was studied separately.
RESULTS—The incidence of hyperphagia was 26% by day 8 and 56% by day 16 of life in the infants. Hyperphagia was not associated with maternal methadone dose or with infant withdrawal scores. Infants who were hyperphagic lost significantly more weight during the first week of life than those who were not. Despite significantly greater intake, the hyperphagic infants did not gain weight more rapidly during the first month of life compared with those infants with lower oral intake. Infants who were hyperphagic (maximum intake of 290 cc/kg/day) did not experience increased vomiting, aspiration, diarrhoea, or abdominal distention.
CONCLUSIONS—Hyperphagia is commonly found in infants withdrawing from methadone and can be persistent in a significant number. Hyperphagia was not associated with either increased neonatal weight gain or with adverse gastrointestinal consequences. Hyperphagia may occur in infants withdrawing from methadone who have high metabolic demands due to clinical

  9. Nutrition and maternal, neonatal, and child health.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul; Mullany, Luke C; Hurley, Kristen M; Katz, Joanne; Black, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    This article reviews the central role of nutrition in advancing the maternal, newborn, and child health agenda with a focus on evidence for effective interventions generated using randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The 1000 days spanning from conception to 2 years of life are a critical period of time when nutritional needs must be ensured; failure to do so can lead to adverse impacts on short-term survival as well as long-term health and development [corrected]. The burden of maternal mortality continues to be high in many under-resourced settings; prenatal calcium supplementation in populations with low intakes can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia morbidity and mortality and is recommended, and antenatal iron-folic acid use in many countries may reduce anemia, a condition that may be an underlying factor in postpartum hemorrhage. Sufficient evidence exists to promote multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy to reduce fetal growth restriction and low birth weight. Early initiation of breastfeeding (within an hour), exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life, and vitamin A supplementation in the first few days of life in Asia (but not in Africa) reduce infant mortality. Biannual large-dose vitamin A supplements to children 6-59 months of age and zinc for treatment of diarrhea continue to be important strategies for improving child health and survival. Early nutrition and micronutrient status can influence child development but should be integrated with early responsive learning interventions. Future research is needed that goes beyond the 1000 days to ensure adequate preconceptional nutrition and health, with special emphasis on adolescents who contribute to a large proportion of first births in many LMIC. Thus, we make the case for integrating proven nutrition interventions with those for health in pregnant women, and with those for health and child development in neonates, infants, and

  10. Nutrition and maternal, neonatal, and child health.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul; Mullany, Luke C; Hurley, Kristen M; Katz, Joanne; Black, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    This article reviews the central role of nutrition in advancing the maternal, newborn, and child health agenda with a focus on evidence for effective interventions generated using randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The 1000 days spanning from conception to 2 years of life are a critical period of time when nutritional needs must be ensured; failure to do so can lead to adverse impacts on short-term survival as well as long-term health and development [corrected]. The burden of maternal mortality continues to be high in many under-resourced settings; prenatal calcium supplementation in populations with low intakes can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia morbidity and mortality and is recommended, and antenatal iron-folic acid use in many countries may reduce anemia, a condition that may be an underlying factor in postpartum hemorrhage. Sufficient evidence exists to promote multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy to reduce fetal growth restriction and low birth weight. Early initiation of breastfeeding (within an hour), exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life, and vitamin A supplementation in the first few days of life in Asia (but not in Africa) reduce infant mortality. Biannual large-dose vitamin A supplements to children 6-59 months of age and zinc for treatment of diarrhea continue to be important strategies for improving child health and survival. Early nutrition and micronutrient status can influence child development but should be integrated with early responsive learning interventions. Future research is needed that goes beyond the 1000 days to ensure adequate preconceptional nutrition and health, with special emphasis on adolescents who contribute to a large proportion of first births in many LMIC. Thus, we make the case for integrating proven nutrition interventions with those for health in pregnant women, and with those for health and child development in neonates, infants, and

  11. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, R L; Campbell, F; Brenbridge, A N

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis. PMID:6462825

  12. [Neonatal risks of drugs exposure at the end of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Cissoko, Hawaré; Jonville-Béra, Annie Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Foetal drugs exposure consequences depend according to the drug involved and to the length of the exposure which in the sum of length of treatment and of drug elimination (5 half life). Decisions are based upon risk evaluation and are a compromise between a risk banalisation and an excess of carefully. We described risks management for drugs used for a disease due to the pregnancy (glucocorticoïdes, antibiotics) then for drugs used for a chronic disease often preceding the pregnancy (non steroidal anti-inflammatory, serotonin recapture inhibitors, benzodiazepines, antiepileptics, conversion enzyme inhibitors/renine angiotensine antagonists, betabloquants). We also present the elements to take in account for the best drug choice at the end of pregnancy and/or for an adapted advice if the drug has been already taken: the drug itself (pharmacological effects, kinetics in neonate, toxicity marker, risk detection tool), drug amount possibly received by the neonate and literature data about neonatal manifestations due to the drug.

  13. Vallecular Cyst in Neonates: Case Series—A Clinicosurgical Insight

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Shweta; Agarwal, Sangeet Kumar; Agarwal, Alok

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the case series is to understand the clinical and surgical aspects of new minimally invasive technique of coblation in cases of vallecular cysts in neonates. Method of Study. Four neonates underwent surgery for vallecular cyst by using Arthrocare ENT coblator system. Results Obtained. All the four cases presented in stridor and difficult intubation was also a concern which necessitated a swift, high precision instrument with almost immediate results. Coblation excision includes direct contact with vallecular cyst, improved targeting of the cyst, and preservation of normal tissue. All the four cases had an uneventful postoperative period and smooth recovery and had an early discharge from the hospital. Conclusions. Early diagnosis and intervention hold the key for an early recovery and for minimizing nutritional disturbances secondary to poor feeding in cases of neonatal vallecular cysts. PMID:25405048

  14. Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography. PMID:27195026

  15. Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography. PMID:27195026

  16. Imaging findings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Leonor; Vial, Yvan; Gengler, Carole; Meuli, Reto

    2016-03-01

    Congenital lung malformations are increasingly detected before birth. However, bronchial atresia is rarely identified in utero and not always recognized in neonates. There are two types of atresia: 1) proximal, located at the level of the mainstem or the proximal lobar bronchi, which is extremely rare and usually lethal during pregnancy, causing a tremendous volume increase of the distal involved lung with secondary hypoplasia of the normal lung, and 2) peripheral, located at the segmental/subsegmental bronchial level, which may present as an isolated lesion or as part of a complex congenital malformation. Prenatal findings are mostly nonspecific. Postnatal exams show overinflated lung areas and focal bronchial dilations. The typical fluid-filled bronchoceles are not always observed in neonates but develop progressively in the first months of life. This pictorial essay describes the spectrum of imaging findings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants. PMID:26646151

  17. Neonatal Cyanosis Due to Hemoglobin Variant: Hb F-Sarajevo.

    PubMed

    Lozar-Krivec, Jana; Stepic, Maja; Hovnik, Tinka; Krsnik, Mladen; Paro-Panjan, Darja

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal cyanosis is rarely due to hemoglobin variants with low oxygen affinity. We describe the clinical course and results of molecular genetic analysis of a boy who presented after birth with severe cyanosis. Arterial blood-gas analysis demonstrated a pronounced shift of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve to the right and molecular genetic analysis revealed a γ-globin variant, Hb F-Sarajevo. The patient presented is the second reported case of neonatal cyanosis due to this mutation, which was first described in 2012 by Zimmermann-Baer and coauthors. With the introduction of universal screening for congenital heart disease, the finding of low oxygen saturation will uncover more neonates with hemoglobinopathies with low oxygen affinity. PMID:27571121

  18. Statistical survey of skin changes in Japanese neonates.

    PubMed

    Hidano, A; Purwoko, R; Jitsukawa, K

    1986-02-01

    We observed 5387 infants over 10 years in weekly visits to a neonatal ward and obtained the following frequency data on these skin changes: erythema toxicum neonatorum, 40.8%; perianal dermatitis, 18.9%; scrotal pigmentation, 15.2%; miliaria, 8.5%; and adnexal polyp of neonatal skin, 4.1%. The frequencies of the types of birthmarks were: mongolian spots, 81.5%; salmon patches, 22.3%; nevocellular nevi, 2.7%; port-wine stains, 2.1%; strawberry marks, 1.7%; café au lait spots, 1.7% (including a case of von Recklinghausen's disease); epidermal and sebaceous nevi, 0.3%; accessory auricles, 0.3%; and smooth muscle hamartomas, 0.2%. A positive relationship was observed between infant maturity and the prevalence of erythema toxicum neonatorum. Apart from candidiasis, neonatal skin infections were extremely rare. PMID:3952030

  19. Early neonatal special care units and their scientific achievements.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of sick neonates originated in maternity and foundling hospitals in the 19th century. Nosocomial infections and difficult logistics of wet-nursing prevented admission of neonates in most children's hospitals well into the 20th century. In this article, 31 hospitals are described, all located in large cities, in which preterm and sick neonates were treated before the Great Depression. Even though mostly initiated by private charity, these institutions performed research right from the start. Topics included warming and feeding preterm infants, collecting and distributing human milk, developing and storing breast milk substitutes, prevention of rickets and nosocomial infections, maternal and public education regarding infection control, pathoanatomic characterisation of diseases and malformations and epidemiologic studies of infant mortality. These pioneering hospitals, their founding dates, researchers and classic publications are presented in a table.

  20. Management and prevention of pertussis infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Berti, Elettra; Venturini, Elisabetta; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Chiappini, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that universal immunization against pertussis led to a dramatic decrease in the incidence and mortality in high-income countries, it has left a window of vulnerability for newborns. Although specific guidelines concerning management of neonatal whooping cough have not yet been developed, the present review summarizes the main available recommendations on diagnostic work-up and treatment of neonatal pertussis. Additionally, new prevention strategies are explored, including the use of an additional booster dose of vaccine to adolescents and adults, vaccination of healthcare workers, immunization of household contacts and caregivers (cocooning strategy), vaccination of pregnant women and, finally, neonatal immunization with novel vaccines. These strategies are analyzed and discussed in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness.

  1. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  2. Need for neonatal screening program in India: A national priority.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Pradhan, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    In India, out of 342 districts surveyed, 286 have been identified as endemic to iodine deficiency (ID). Research studies conducted in school age children (SAC), Adolescent girls, Pregnant Mothers (PMs) and Neonates have documented poor iodine nutritional status. As observed by total goiter rate of more than 5% and median urinary iodine concentration level of <100 μg/l in SAC and <150 μg/l in PMs as prescribed cutoff of World Health Organization. And higher thyroid stimulating hormone levels among neonates. ID leads to compromised mental development and hence which remain hidden and not visible to family, program managers and administrator. The present review describes the current status of ID in different parts of the country. With a view to strongly recommend the implementation of Neonatal screening program for ID so that the optimal mental development of children can be achieved. PMID:25729682

  3. Procedural Pain Management in Neonates, Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Neonates, infants and children all feel pain and require analgesia for painful procedures. Many painful procedures are associated with medical interventions, including immunisation, heel lance, venesection, IV cannulation and dressing change. Untreated pain can have short and long term effects, including sensitisation to pain episodes in later life. A range of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been shown to be effective for procedural pain management in infants and children, and are most effective when used in combination. Developmental changes in pain responses, analgesic response and drug pharmacokinetics need to be taken into account when planning procedural pain management for neonates. Comprehensive evidence based guidelines are available to guide effective procedural pain management in neonates, infants and older children. PMID:26526331

  4. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units.

  5. Neonatal Imitation Predicts How Infants Engage with Faces

    PubMed Central

    Paukner, Annika; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Ferrari, Pier F.; Mrozek, Timothy; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    In human infants, neonatal imitation and preferences for eyes are both associated with later social and communicative skills, yet the relationship between these abilities remains unexplored. Here we investigated whether neonatal imitation predicts facial viewing patterns in infant rhesus macaques. We first assessed infant macaques for lipsmacking (a core affiliative gesture) and tongue protrusion imitation in the first week of life. When infants were 10–28 days old, we presented them with an animated macaque avatar displaying a still face followed by lipsmacking or tongue protrusion movements. Using eye tracking technology, we found that macaque infants generally looked equally at the eyes and mouth during gesture presentation, but only lipsmacking-imitators showed significantly more looking at the eyes of the neutral still face. These results suggest that neonatal imitation performance may be an early measure of social attention biases and might potentially facilitate the identification of infants at risk for atypical social development. PMID:24995706

  6. Neonatal Plasma Transfusion: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Keir, Amy K; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-10-01

    Several clinical scenarios for plasma transfusion are repeatedly identified in audits, including treatment of bleeding in association with laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, correction of disseminated intravascular coagulation, prevention of intraventricular hemorrhage, management of critically ill neonates (eg, during sepsis or as a volume expander), or correction of markers of prolonged coagulation in the absence of bleeding. The findings of at least one national audit of transfusion practice indicated that almost half of plasma transfusions are given to neonates with abnormal coagulation values with no evidence of active bleeding, despite the limited evidence base to support the effectiveness of this practice. Plasma transfusions to neonates should be considered in the clinical context of bleeding (eg, vitamin K dependent), disseminated intravascular coagulation, and very rare inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors. There seems to be no role for prophylactic plasma to prevent intraventricular hemorrhage or for use as a volume expander. PMID:27473518

  7. Colonization and epithelial adhesion in the pathogenesis of neonatal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Catherine M

    2003-10-01

    Candida species are important nosocomial pathogens in the newborn population, particularly among the premature very-low-birth-weight infants in neonatal intensive care units. Candida colonization of the neonatal skin and gastrointestinal tract is an important first step in the pathogenesis of invasive disease. C albicans is the most commonly isolated species in colonized or infected infants. Over the past decade the incidence of both colonization and infection with other Candida species, particularly C parapsilosis, has risen dramatically. Colonization of the infant occurs early in life and is affected by a variety of common practices in neonatal intensive care. Microbial factors also augment colonization, including the ability of Candida to adhere to human epithelium. A better understanding of the complex interactions between host risk factors and virulence traits of colonizing yeast may allow the risk of systemic spread to be reduced in the population of premature infants.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Study of Manikin Simulator Fidelity on Neonatal Resuscitation Program Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; White, Susan; Bessell, Clare; Deshpandey, Akhil; Drover, Anne; Hayward, Mark; Valcour, James

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) has been developed to educate physicians and other health care providers about newborn resuscitation and has been shown to improve neonatal resuscitation skills. Simulation-based training is recommended as an effective modality for instructing neonatal resuscitation and both low and high-fidelity manikin…

  9. Potential Vertical Transmission of Winter Ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) from Moose (Alces americanus) Dams to Neonates.

    PubMed

    Severud, William J; DelGiudice, Glenn D

    2016-01-01

    North American moose (Alces americanus) frequently become infested with winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus). During capture of neonatal moose in northeastern Minnesota, US, in May-June 2013 and 2014, we recovered adult ticks from neonates, presumably vertically transferred from dams, heretofore, not documented. Infestations on neonates may have population-level implications.

  10. Neonatal mortality in dogs: Prognostic value of Doppler ductus venosus waveform evaluation - Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Barella, Gabriele; Faverzani, Stefano; Faustini, Massimo; Groppetti, Debora; Pecile, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To define the prognostic value of Doppler ultrasonographic morphology of ductus venosus (DV) waveform on canine neonatal mortality. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four healthy pregnant bitches underwent fetal ultrasonographic assessment. The DV waveforms were classified as diphasic (dDVw) or triphasic (tDVw) and compared with neonatal mortality. Results: Ninety-three fetuses were evaluated. Twenty fetuses belonged to litters with neonatal mortality, in which tDVw was observed. Seven fetuses belonged to litters without neonatal mortality, in which tDVw was observed. Fifty-eight fetuses belonged to litters without neonatal mortality, in which only dDVw was observed. Eight fetuses belonged to litters with neonatal mortality, in which only dDVw was observed. The correlation between tDVw and neonatal mortality was statistically significant (odds ratio [OR], 20.7; p<0.0001). Considering only pregnancies with one or two fetuses with the same DV waveform: Two fetuses with tDVw belonged to litters with neonatal mortality; 1 foetus with tDVw belonged to litter without neonatal mortality and 26 fetuses showed dDVw without neonatal mortality. The correlation between tDVw and neonatal mortality even in litters up to two pups was statistically significant (OR, 88.3; p=0.01). Conclusion: Echo-Doppler assessment of DV is feasible in canine fetuses, and the presence tDVw seems to be related to neonatal mortality. PMID:27182129

  11. Do antenatal care interventions improve neonatal survival in India?

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ram, Faujdar; Alagarajan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    Although antenatal care (ANC) interventions have been in place for a long time, there is hardly any systematic evidence on the association between ANC interventions and neonatal mortality in India. The present study attempts to investigate the association between ANC interventions and neonatal mortality in India using data from the District Level Household Survey conducted in India during 2007-8. The ANC interventions included in the analysis are at least four antenatal visits, consumption of 90 or more iron-folic acid (IFA) tablets, and uptake of two or more tetanus toxoid (TT) injections. We have used discrete-time logistic regression models to investigate the association between ANC interventions and neonatal mortality. Risk of neonatal mortality was significantly lower for infants of mothers who availed four or more antenatal visits [odds ratio (OR): 0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-0.81], consumed 90 or more IFA tablets (OR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.73-0.99), received two or more TT injections (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.63-0.83). When we analysed different combinations of antenatal visits, IFA supplementation and TT injections, TT injections provided the main protective effect-the risk of neonatal mortality was significantly lower in newborns of women who received two or more TT injections but did not consume 90 or more IFA tablets (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.60-0.78), or who received two or more TT injections but did not avail four or more antenatal visits (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86). In the statistical model, 6% (95% CI: 4-8%) of the neonatal deaths in India could be attributed to a lack of at least two TT injections during pregnancy. Indian public health programmes must ensure that every pregnant woman receives two or more TT injections during antenatal visits.

  12. Neonatal circumcision revisited. Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assist physicians in providing guidance to parents regarding neonatal circumcision. OPTIONS: Whether to recommend the routine circumcision of newborn male infants. OUTCOMES: Costs and complications of neonatal circumcision, the incidence of urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and cancer of the penis in circumcised and uncircumcised males, and of cervical cancer in their partners, and the costs of treating these diseases. EVIDENCE: The literature on circumcision was reviewed by the Fetus and Newborn Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. During extensive discussion at meetings of the committee over a 24-month period, the strength of the evidence was carefully weighed and the perspective of the committee developed. VALUES: The literature was assessed to determine whether neonatal circumcision improves the health of boys and men and is a cost-effective approach to preventing penile problems and associated urinary tract conditions. Religious and personal values were not included in the assessment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The effect of neonatal circumcision on the incidence of urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer of the penis, cervical cancer and penile problems; the complications of circumcision; and estimates of the costs of neonatal circumcision and of the treatment of later penile conditions, urinary tract infections and complications of circumcision. RECOMMENDATION: Circumcision of newborns should not be routinely performed. VALIDATION: This recommendation is in keeping with previous statements on neonatal circumcision by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The statement was reviewed by the Infectious Disease Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. The Board of Directors of the Canadian Paediatric Society has reviewed its content and approved it for publication. SPONSOR: This is an official statement of the Canadian Paediatric Society. No external

  13. Neonatal respiratory distress in Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Selma MA; Nasr, Abdelhaleem

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a common neonatal problem, which is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. There are few published studies in developing countries addressing neonatal respiratory distress. There is no previously published study in Sudan on this problem. The objective of the study is to determine the frequency, different causes, immediate outcome. It was a prospective, descriptive, cross sectional hospital-based study which was carried out in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Omdurman Maternity Hospital, between February-March 2013. The study enrolled all Sudanese newborns from 0-28 days including normal, low and high birth weight of different gestational ages admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and diagnosed as neonatal respiratory distress. The frequency of NRD was calculated, the causes and immediate outcome were determined. Results showed that the frequency rate of NRD was (4.83%) among the total number of hospital (2071) live births during the period of the study. The commonest causes were transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) in 28% of cases, sepsis in 24% of cases and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) in 15% of cases. The outcome of NRD was: cure in 56% of cases, death in 36% of cases, and patients discharged with complications in 8% of cases. In conclusion, the study confirmed the importance of NRD with a frequency rate of 4.83%, morbidity of 8% and mortality of 36% of cases. The causes and immediate outcome were determined and discussed. Some recommendations were suggested in order to reduce its frequency, morbidity and mortality. PMID:27493392

  14. Construction and application of human neonatal DTI atlases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv; Chang, Linda; Oishi, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Atlas-based MRI analysis is one of many analytical methods and is used to investigate typical as well as abnormal neurodevelopment. It has been widely applied to the adult and pediatric populations. Successful applications of atlas-based analysis (ABA) in those cohorts have motivated the creation of a neonatal atlas and parcellation map (PM). The purpose of this review is to discuss the various neonatal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) atlases that are available for use in ABA, examine how such atlases are constructed, review their applications, and discuss future directions in DTI. Neonatal DTI atlases are created from a template, which can be study-specific or standardized, and merged with the corresponding PM. Study-specific templates can retain higher image registration accuracy, but are usually not applicable across different studies. However, standardized templates can be used to make comparisons among various studies, but may not accurately reflect the anatomies of the study population. Methods such as volume-based template estimation are being developed to overcome these limitations. The applications for ABA, including atlas-based image quantification and atlas-based connectivity analysis, vary from quantifying neurodevelopmental progress to analyzing population differences in groups of neonates. ABA can also be applied to detect pathology related to prematurity at birth or exposure to toxic substances. Future directions for this method include research designed to increase the accuracy of the image parcellation. Methods such as multi-atlas label fusion and multi-modal analysis applied to neonatal DTI currently comprise an active field of research. Moreover, ABA can be used in high-throughput analysis to efficiently process medical images and to assess longitudinal brain changes. The overarching goal of neonatal ABA is application to the clinical setting, to assist with diagnoses, monitor disease progression and, ultimately, outcome prediction. PMID:26578899

  15. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of morphine in neonates: A review.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2016-08-01

    Morphine is an agonist of the µ and k receptors, whose activation results in analgesia. Morphine-like agonists act through the µ opioid receptors to cause pain relief, sedation, euphoria and respiratory depression. Morphine is glucuronidated and sulfated at positions 3 and 6; the plasma concentration ratios correlate positively with birth weight, which probably reflects increased liver weight with increasing birth weight. Moreover, morphine clearance correlates positively with gestational age and birth weight. Steady-state morphine plasma concentrations are achieved after 24-48 hours of infusion, but the glucuronide metabolite plasma concentrations do not reach steady state before 60 hours. The morphine-3-glucuronide metabolite has lower clearance, a shorter half-life and a smaller distribution volume compared with the morphine-6 metabolite, which is the most active morphine-like agonist. Ordinary doses cause constipation, urinary retention and respiratory depression. Neonatal pain relief may require a blood level of approximately 120 ng/ml, whereas lower levels (20-40 ng/ml) seem adequate for children. A bibliographic search was performed using the PubMed database and the keywords "morphine metabolism neonate" and "morphine pharmacokinetics neonate". The initial and final cutoff points were January 1990 and September 2015, respectively. The results indicate that morphine is extensively glucuronidated and sulfated at positions 3 and 6, and that the glucuronidation rate is lower in younger neonates compared with older infants. Although much is known about morphine in neonates, further research will be required to ensure that recommended therapeutic doses for analgesia in neonates are evidence based. PMID:27626479

  16. Development of a neonatal skull phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolian, Pantea; Todd, Rhiannon; Kosik, Ivan; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; Vasefi, Fartash; St. Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis and monitoring of disorders in the neonatal brain. However, PAI of the brain through the intact skull is challenging due to reflection and attenuation of photoacoustic pressure waves by the skull bone. The objective of this work was to develop a phantom for testing the potential limits the skull bone places on PAI of the neonatal brain. Our approach was to make acoustic measurements on materials designed to mimic the neonatal skull bone and construct a semi-realistic phantom. A water tank and two ultrasound transducers were utilized to measure the ultrasound insertion loss (100 kHz to 5MHz) of several materials. Cured mixtures of epoxy and titanium dioxide powder provided the closest acoustic match to neonatal skull bone. Specifically, a 1.4-mm thick sample composed of 50% (by mass) titanium dioxide powder and 50% epoxy was closest to neonatal skull bone in terms of acoustic insertion loss. A hemispherical skull phantom (1.4 mm skull thickness) was made by curing the epoxy/titanium dioxide powder mixture inside a mold. The mold was constructed using 3D prototyping techniques and was based on the hairless head of a realistic infant doll. The head was scanned to generate a 3D model, which in turn was used to build a 3D CAD version of the mold. The mold was CNC machined from two solid blocks of Teflon®. The neonatal skull phantom will enable the study of the propagation of photoacoustic pressure waves under a variety of experimental conditions.

  17. Update on the management of neonatal sepsis in horses.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock remain the biggest killers of neonatal foals. Management of this severe syndrome remains difficult, requiring intensive intervention. Key aspects of management include infection control, hemodynamic support, immunomodulatory interventions, and metabolic/endocrine support. Infection control largely consists of early antimicrobial therapy, plasma transfusions, and local therapy for the infected focus. In cases with severe sepsis or septic shock, hemodynamic support with fluids, vasoactive agents, and respiratory support insuring oxygen delivery to vital organs is important. Nutritional support is important, but close monitoring is needed to avoid hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  18. Hypernatraemic dehydration in a neonate: brain MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Musapasaoglu, H; Agildere, A Muhtesem; Teksam, M; Tarcan, A; Gurakan, B

    2008-02-01

    Severe hypernatremic dehydration can cause serious neurological complications in neonates. The most significant problems include brain oedema, intracranial haemorrhage, sinus thrombosis, haemorrhagic infarcts and permanent brain damage. The symptoms of many of these complications are similar. With respect to brain MRI findings in hypernatremic neonates, this is a report that describes linear lesions that represent intracranial haemorrhage at the grey-white matter junction. These MRI findings may be helpful for diagnosing hypernatremic dehydration, and for ruling out differential diagnoses for complications of this disorder.

  19. [Neonatal cerebral venous thrombosis: diagnosis by magnetic resonance angiography].

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Pedraza, S; Méndez, J; Trujillo, A

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal cerebral venous thrombosis (NCVT) is a rare, severe neuropathology of multiple etiology and variable clinical presentation. We describe the case of a 25-day-old infant that presented with a tonic convulsion. Ultrasound examination showed tetraventricular hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the presence of acute thrombosis of the deep and superficial venous systems associated to a hemorrhagic infarct of the left thalamus. Coagulation study revealed a deficit of protein C. Thrombosis of deep cerebral veins must be ruled out as a cause of a neonatal convulsive crisis. The presence of a hemorrhagic thalamic lesion supports the diagnosis of NCVT, which must in turn be confirmed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA).

  20. Congenital neonatal chylothorax with hydrops fetalis treated with octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Dammas, Ali Saed

    2013-01-01

    Congenital idiopathic chylothorax is the most common form of pleural effusion in neonates. It results from collection of lymphatic fluid in the pleural space secondary to leakage from the thoracic duct or one of its main tributaries. Chylothorax complicated by hydrops fetalis in a premature or term infant is an uncommon, serious clinical problem. We report on two cases with congenital chylothorax both treated with octreotide. One of the cases responded well to octreotide treatment, while the other did not. We conclude that octreotide should be considered in the treatment of neonatal chylothorax. PMID:27493357

  1. The nature of neonatal status epilepticus--a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Dlugos, Dennis J

    2015-08-01

    Neonatal status epilepticus occurs within the substrate of the hyperexcitable newborn brain and is usually provoked by acute CNS derangements, although status can also be the presentation of early-life epilepsy. Provoked neonatal status usually resolves within a few days, with or without treatment, but new data suggests that status is associated with adverse outcomes, even after controlling for underlying disease severity and MRI structural brain injury. Novel treatments may be needed to improve seizure control and outcome, given the characteristics of neurotransmission in the newborn brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  2. The Normal and Abnormal Equine Neonatal Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Levine, David G

    2015-12-01

    The first weeks of life are critical in many aspects, and the musculoskeletal system is no exception. Being able to stand and nurse within hours of life is necessary for survival. Laxity, flexural deformities, and skeletal immaturity can all make it difficult for neonates to ambulate. The increased vascularity to bones and cartilage mixed with the newly forming immune system also make neonates susceptible to infections that we rarely see in adult animals. This article concentrates on orthopedic conditions seen in the first 2 weeks of life.

  3. Acute scrotum in a neonate caused by renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Maas, C; Müller-Hansen, I; Flechsig, H; Poets, C F

    2011-03-01

    The authors report on a rare case of neonatal scrotal oedema occurring concurrently with pain upon palpation of the spermatic cord on the first day of life. An ultrasound examination showed poor perfusion of the left testicle and a thrombosis of the left renal vein; intraoperative exploration indicated necrosis of the left testicle without signs of torsion. Gorged vessels with paravasal bleeding were found in the spermatic cord. The authors hypothesise that necrosis of the testicle may result from haemorrhagic infarction caused by renal venous thrombosis. Acute scrotal discolouration with pain upon palpation in neonates is usually attributed to testicular torsion. The authors report a case where these symptoms had a different cause.

  4. Preventing admission hypothermia in very low birth weight neonates.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypothermia, temperature < 36.5°C, is a major contributor to neonatal mortality and morbidity. hypothermia of preterm infants remains a challenge in the NiCU for many reasons. preterm very low birth weight (VlBW) infants, those infants born <1,500 g, are prone to very rapid heat losses through mechanisms of convection, evaporation, conduction, and radiation. this article reviews current research to reduce and prevent mortality and morbidity from hypothermia in preterm VlBW infants by implementing interventions in the delivery room to minimize heat loss and maintain core body temperatures. PMID:24816875

  5. History of neonatal resuscitation - part 3: endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation to resuscitate neonates was used by Scheel in 1798. A century before endotracheal anesthesia was developed, inventive obstetricians constructed devices for endotracheal intubation of infants and mastered their insertion, localization, and airtight sealing. Fell's laryngoscope, Magill's intubation forceps and tissue-friendly materials were significant contributions of the 20th century to endotracheal intubation of the newborn. The striking absence of scientific studies on the most efficient resuscitation techniques for neonates can be explained by the difficulty to adjust for the personal skills of the resuscitator.

  6. The Equine Neonatal Cardiovascular System in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Marr, Celia M

    2015-12-01

    The neonatal foal is in a transitional state from prenatal to postnatal circulation. Healthy newborn foals often have cardiac murmurs and dysrhythmias, which are usually transient and of little clinical significance. The neonatal foal is prone to infection and cardiac trauma. Echocardiography is the main tool used for valuation of the cardiovascular system. With prompt identification and appropriate action, dysrhythmias and other sequel to cardiac trauma can be corrected. With infection, the management and prognosis are driven by concurrent sepsis. Congenital disease represents an interesting diagnostic challenge for the neonatologist, but surgical correction is not appropriate for most equids.

  7. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Victoria; Ellis, Catherine; Strumidlo, Laura

    2016-06-29

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition. Jack's prognosis is poor, and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. The legal and ethical perspectives of withholding life-sustaining treatment in infants and children will be explored through the application of ethical frameworks, as well as statute and case law relevant to children and adolescent nursing. The article also discusses the neonatal nurse's role, with reference to local and national guidelines. PMID:27353936

  8. Overcoming the barriers to using kangaroo care in neonatal settings.

    PubMed

    Penn, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo care (KC), has benefits for babies and parents, improving clinical outcomes, temperature control, breastfeeding rates and child-parent bonding; it reduces morbidity and mortality. Barriers to KC for neonates may include a lack of training for nurses, lack of time, maternal or child physical or mental ill health, and inappropriate settings. With education and helpful management, neonatal nurses can advocate for KC for all babies. Parents may need information and encouragement to begin with. Therefore, nurses can improve the experiences of their patients and, in the long run, free time to perform clinical procedures.

  9. Brachial plexus injuries in neonates: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Mason, David C; Ciervo, Carman A

    2009-02-01

    Neonates and infants with brachial plexus injuries are typically treated using splinting, range-of-motion exercise, and, in more severe cases, nerve reconstruction. However, myofascial release--a common osteopathic manipulative treatment technique that has been used to manage thoracic outlet syndrome in adults--may provide effective, noninvasive management of brachial plexus injuries in neonates and infants. While emphasizing the importance of good communication with parents of affected patients, the authors review brachial plexus anatomy, describe diagnostic examinations, and outline a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:19269939

  10. The importance of timely detection and management in neonatal appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Barrak Hani; Al Omran, Yasser; Hassan, Aziz; Al Hindi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of cute appendicitis is rarely encountered in neonatology. When it does occur, it is thought to be due to prematurity or develops secondary to coexisting diseases. We present a case of appendicitis in a 10-day-old Middle-Eastern girl, who was born at term and who had no underlying conditions that are typically associated with neonatal appendicitis. This case highlights that certain causes and clinical signs are unreliable when coming to a working diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis, and that regardless of the cause, timely detection and management are necessary in achieving surgical success. PMID:24855077

  11. The importance of timely detection and management in neonatal appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Barrak Hani; Al Omran, Yasser; Hassan, Aziz; Al Hindi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of cute appendicitis is rarely encountered in neonatology. When it does occur, it is thought to be due to prematurity or develops secondary to coexisting diseases. We present a case of appendicitis in a 10-day-old Middle-Eastern girl, who was born at term and who had no underlying conditions that are typically associated with neonatal appendicitis. This case highlights that certain causes and clinical signs are unreliable when coming to a working diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis, and that regardless of the cause, timely detection and management are necessary in achieving surgical success. PMID:24855077

  12. Acute otitis media in neonatal life: a review.

    PubMed

    Syggelou, A; Fanos, V; Iacovidou, N

    2011-06-01

    Acute otitis media is frequently encountered by general practitioners and pediatricians. In the neonatal period acute otitis media may present as an isolated local infection or as part of septicemia. Diagnosis of the condition by otoscopy is difficult. Considering the wide spectrum of middle ear disorders (acute otitis media, otitis media with effusion, chronic suppurative otitis media) one can appreciate why opinions on the management of the condition are diverse. This is a review of the literature on clinical presentation, etiology, risk factors, treatment and prevention of acute otitis media in neonatal life.

  13. Neonatal lupus erythematosis: a five-year case review.

    PubMed

    Porcel Chacón, Rocío; Tapia Ceballos, Leopoldo; Díaz Cabrera, Rocío; Gutiérrez Perandones, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an infrequent disease seen in newborns. It is caused by transplacental maternal autoantibody passage. Cutaneous involvement and congenital heart block (CHB) are the most common affections, although it may involve multiple organs like the liver, lungs, blood, nervous or digestive systems. This article present a review of the four cases diagnosed in the past five years in a Neonatal Unit, which shows the different clinical spectrum which can develop around this disease (CHB, multisystemic affection and two cutaneous cases), different autoantibodies (specially anti-SSA) with an early negativization during the first year of life and the possibility of future collagen vascular disease as occurred in one case.

  14. The neurological effects of brevetoxin on neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tapley, S.R.; Ramsdell, J.S.; Xi, D.

    1994-12-31

    We have investigated the neuroexcitatory and neurodegenerative effects of brevetoxin on neonatal rats. Brevetoxin, a marine-biotoxin that has been implicated in several seafood poisoning incidents, is produced by the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium brevis. Four studies were done: dose response, northern analysis, immunohistochemistry and neurodegeneration. We found that neonatal rats are much more sensitive to brevetoxin than adult rats. The effectiveness of c-fos as a biomarker is being investigated, because of the high basal expression in young animals. The neurodegeneration, although not available yet, should provide valuable information.

  15. Bacteriological study of neonatal sepsis and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R K; Rai, S K; Khanal, L K; Manda, P K

    2013-03-01

    Bloodstream infections in neonates are life-threatening emergencies. Identification of the common bacteria causing such infections and their susceptibility patterns will provide necessary information for timely intervention. This study was done to determine the prevalence of neonatal septicaemia, identify the bacterial isolates and study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH), Kathmandu, Nepal. This descriptive-analytical study was conducted in NMCTH from July 2011 to January 2012. Blood culture of all neonates who were suspected for neonatal sepsis was performed. Bacterial isolation, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done by standard microbiological method. Out of 120 neonates suspected of having neonatal sepsis, 30.8% (37/120) were blood culture positive (i.e. prevalence = 30.8%). The most common causative agents of neonatal sepsis was Staphylococcus aureus (56.8%; 21/37) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (21.7%; 8/37), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.4%; 5/37) and others. Neonatal sepsis was more frequent in male neonates (32.5%) while (26.5%) in female neonates in the ratio of 1.2:1 (p > 0.05). Neonatal sepsis was significantly higher (58.3%) in low birth weight (LBW) (< 2.5kg) neonates compared with good birth weight (GBW) (23.9%) (< 0.05). Prevalence was higher in preterm neonates (57.8%; 11/19) as compared with term-babies (25.7%) (P = 0.05). Generally, all of the isolates were sensitive to most of the antibiotics used as the first line drugs like amikacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and ampicillin except Acinetobacter baumannii. This organisms was only sensitive towards cotrimoxazole, azithromicin, cefotaxime and ceftazidime.

  16. Pregnanetriolone in paper-borne urine for neonatal screening for 21-hydroxylase deficiency: The place of urine in neonatal screening.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Fernández, José Ramón

    2016-09-01

    The standard method of primary neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperlasia (CAH), determination of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) in heelprick blood, is the object of recurrent controversy because of its poor diagnostic and economic efficiency. The superior ability of urinary pregnanetriolone levels to discriminate between infants with and without classical CAH has been known for some time, but has not hitherto been exploited for primary screening. Here we propose an economical neonatal CAH-screening system based on fluorimetric determination of the product of reaction between urinary pregnanetriolone and phosphoric acid. PMID:27570738

  17. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  18. Contralateral Suppression of Linear and Nonlinear Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions in Neonates at Risk for Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durante, Alessandra Spada; Carvallo, Renata Mota Mamede

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) contralateral suppression in neonates at risk for hearing loss, 55 neonates at risk for hearing loss (risk group) and 72 full-term neonates not at such risk (control group) were bilaterally tested. In all neonates, the TEOAE were recorded in two stimulation modes (linear and…

  19. Ethical pitfalls in neonatal comparative effectiveness trials.

    PubMed

    Modi, Neena

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine has been embraced wholeheartedly, and rightly so, as the best approach for reducing clinical uncertainty and ensuring that patients receive treatment and care that are efficacious (i.e. they work) and effective (i.e. they work in real life). High-quality evidence comes from high-quality clinical research. It would hence be reasonable to assume that these two would form a closely integrated partnership. Alas, this is not yet the case. So many uncertainties in medical care relate to treatments and practices already widely in use. In neonatal medicine, for example, some of us use protein-carbohydrate fortification of human milk and some of us do not, some of us stop enteral feeds during blood transfusions whereas some of us do not, some of us reach for dopamine when blood pressure falls while some of us use dobutamine. For our patients, these uncertainties represent a lottery, the throw of the dice that determines whether they receive the treatment advocated by Dr. A or Dr. B. They deserve better than this. Randomization is considered the gold standard approach to eliminating the clinician bias that very often dominates the choice of treatments. Randomization reduces the influence on outcomes of confounding by unknown factors, and ensures that every patient has a fair and equal chance of receiving the best possible treatment when this is, in fact, not known. In an ideal world, every medical uncertainty would be addressed in this way. The evaluation of treatments that are in accepted use has been termed 'comparative effectiveness research', i.e. the comparison of existing healthcare interventions to determine which works best, for whom and under which circumstances. Recently a long-standing uncertainty, the optimum saturation target for preterm babies receiving oxygen was put to the test of randomization. The accepted standard-of-care saturation range of 85-95% has been used for a considerable time and its use is intended to avoid both levels of

  20. Assessment of Febrile Neonates According to Low Risk Criteria for Serious Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zarkesh, Marjaneh; Hashemian, Houman; Momtazbakhsh, Mohammad; Rostami, Tahereh

    2011-01-01

    Objective It is propounded that febrile neonates with low risk criteria (LRC) can be carefully observed without parenteral antimicrobial therapy; but yet, reliability of LRC to exclude serious bacterial infection (SBI) is uncertain. Methods The records of all febrile term neonates, seen in the emergency room and admitted in neonatal ward of 17 Shahrivar children's hospital of Rasht, Iran from January 2004 to January 2009 were reviewed. All of them underwent full sepsis workup. The prevalence of SBI in total population and LRC positive and negative neonates were calculated Findings A total of 202 records of previously healthy febrile neonates were evaluated. SBI was shown in 38 (18.8%). The most common type of SBI was urinary tract infection (UTI). Sixty-two (31%) neonates had LRC, and only one (1.6%) had SBI (UTI with E. coli). SBI was significantly more common in neonates without LRC (26.6% versus 1.6%, P<0.001). The negative predictive value (NPV) of LRC to exclude SBI was 98.4% (95%confidence interval: 96.7% to 100%). Conclusion These findings suggest that LRC may be relied upon to exclude SBI in febrile neonates. We propose that all febrile neonates be admitted, ill or LRC negative neonates should undergo a full sepsis work up and be administered systemic antibiotics immediately. LRC positive neonates should be under close observation. PMID:23056828