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Sample records for histamine releasing factor

  1. Comparative effect of recombinant IL-1, -2, -3, -4, and -6, IFN-gamma, granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and histamine-releasing factors on the secretion of histamine from basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, R.; Welter, J.B.; Forsythe, P.A.; Lett-Brown, M.A.; Grant, J.A. )

    1989-05-15

    Most cytokines possess multiple biologic activities. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of rIL-1 beta, -2, -3, -4 and -6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF on basophils from 16 donors and the amount of histamine released was compared with that by partially purified mononuclear cell-derived histamine-releasing factor (HRF) and anti-IgE. We found that only IL-3 and GM-CSF at relatively high doses (50 to 500 ng/ml) released small amounts of histamine (3 to 14%) from two allergic donors. In contrast, both HRF and anti-IgE released significant amounts of histamine from all donors. Other cytokines did not release any measurable quantity of histamine. Simultaneous addition of several cytokines to the basophils also failed to release histamine. IL-3, GM-CSF, and IL-1 can also release histamine at lower concentrations (less than 5 ng/ml) when incubated with basophils in the presence of D{sub 2}O. Basophils from 6 out of 13 allergic donors released histamine in response to IL-3, whereas three donors responded to IL-1 beta and two responded to GM-CSF. The results of this study demonstrated that although IL-3 and GM-CSF release small amounts of histamine only from a select group of allergic patients, mononuclear cell-derived HRF is more potent in their action and release histamine from normals as well as allergic patients.

  2. Exercise-induced release of histamine and neutrophil chemotactic factor in atopic asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Brown, M J; Nagy, L; Causon, R; Walport, M J; Kay, A B

    1982-08-01

    Concentrations of plasma histamine and serum neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) were measured in seven atopic asthmatics who developed exercise-induced asthma (EIA) after a treadmill task. The results were compared with those obtained after inhalation of specific antigen or methacholine. Plasma histamine concentrations were measured with a novel double-isotope radiometric assay, and NCF was identified by its elution in the void volume fractions of Sephadex G-200 and as a single peak of activity at approximately 0.20 molar NaCl after anion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel (pH 7.8). After exercise or antigen challenge, the time courses of appearance of both mediators were virtually identical and accompanied the increase in airways obstruction. There was a statistically significant correlation between the concentrations of histamine or NCF and the magnitude of airflow obstruction after exercise and antigen challenge. This suggested that there may be a direct association between mediator release and EIA or antigen-induced bronchoconstriction. In contrast, there were no significant elevations in circulating histamine and NCF after inhalation of methacholine, at concentrations giving a fall in FEV1 comparable to that induced by exercise or antigen. The prior administration of cromolyn to three asthmatics inhibited both their EIA and the release of histamine and NCF. When four asthmatics were exercised for periods of 1, 3, and 6 min, the release of NCF and fall in peak expiratory flow rate were directly related to the duration of the exercise. The rise of NCF activity in subjects with EIA was fivefold greater than that observed in asthmatics who did not experience airways obstruction when subjected to the same exercise task. These results provide further evidence that mediators of hypersensitivity are released during EIA.

  3. Acute stress modulates the histamine content of mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract through interleukin-1 and corticotropin-releasing factor release in rats.

    PubMed

    Eutamene, Helene; Theodorou, Vassilia; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2003-12-15

    Stress results in activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and affects illnesses such as neuroinflammatory syndrome. In vivo acute stress (restraint stress) induces gastrointestinal function disturbances through colonic mast cell activation. This study investigated the effect of acute stress in histamine content of colonic mast cells, and the central role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in this effect. After a restraint stress session colonic segments were isolated and submitted to three protocols: (i) determination of histamine levels by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after incubation with 48/80 compound, (ii) evaluation by histology of mucosal mast cell (MMC) number and (iii) determination of histamine immunoreactivity of MMC. These procedures were conducted (1) in sham or stressed rats, (2) in stressed rats previously treated with intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41, (3) in naive rats pretreated with I.C.V. rhIL-1beta or CRF and (4) in rats treated with central IL-1beta and CRF plus alpha-helical CRF and IL-1ra, respectively (cross-antagonism reaction). Acute stress increases histamine content in colonic mast cells, without degranulation. I.C.V. pretreatment with IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41 blocked stress-induced mast cell histamine content increase. Both I.C.V. rhIL-1beta and CRF injections reproduced the stress-linked changes. I.C.V. treatment with CRF antagonist blocked I.C.V. rhIL-1beta-induced mast cell histamine content increase, whereas central IL-1ra did not affect stress events induced by I.C.V. CRF administration. These results suggest that in rats acute stress increases colonic mast cell histamine content. This effect is mediated by the release in cascade in the brain first of IL-1 and secondly of CRF.

  4. The molecular and biological analysis of ixodid ticks histamine release factors.

    PubMed

    Mulenga, Albert; Azad, Abdu F

    2005-01-01

    We previously described a Dermacentor varibialis (DV) cDNA that encodes a ubiquitously expressed and tick saliva-secreted functional histamine release factor (HRF) homolog. In this study gene specific primers based on DVHRF open reading frame nucleotide sequence were utilized to amplify three orthologs, from the wood tick, D. andersoni (DA), the black legged tick, the southern cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (BM) and the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (AA). At nucleotide level, sequence comparisons revealed 98 89 and 84% similarity to DVHRF for DAHRF, AAHRF and BMHRF, respectively, while predicted polypeptide comparisons revealed 98, 96 and 91% similarity for DAHRF, AAHRF and BMHRF respectively. Phylogenetically, the tick HRF clade, while distinct (100% bootstrap value), is closely related to other arthropods, but distantly related to vertebrate and protozoan clades. Consistent with sequence similarity analysis, a DVHRF-specific northern blotting probe hybridized a approximately 900 base pair (bp) mRNA band on all RNA blots. Likewise a mouse polyclonal antibody to E. coli-expressed recombinant (r) DVHRF, cross-reacted baculovirus-expressed non-fusion rAAHRF, rDAHRF, and rBMHRF. As revealed by northern blotting analysis of larvae and nymph RNA, DVHRF mRNA is expressed in both immature and mature ticks indicating that its transcription is not developmentally regulated. Unlike rHRF/TCTP proteins of other organisms, the calcium-binding function may not be conserved for tick HRF homologs as revealed by the 45CaCl2+ overlay assay. Apparent global expression of DVHRF and its orthologs make this protein family an ideal target antigen for development of novel tick control strategies targeting multiple tick species.

  5. Tick Histamine Release Factor Is Critical for Ixodes scapularis Engorgement and Transmission of the Lyme Disease Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jianfeng; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Lei; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are distributed worldwide and affect human and animal health by transmitting diverse infectious agents. Effective vaccines against most tick-borne pathogens are not currently available. In this study, we characterized a tick histamine release factor (tHRF) from Ixodes scapularis and addressed the vaccine potential of this antigen in the context of tick engorgement and B. burgdorferi transmission. Results from western blotting and quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR showed that tHRF is secreted in tick saliva, and upregulated in Borrelia burgdorferi-infected ticks. Further, the expression of tHRF was coincident with the rapid feeding phase of the tick, suggesting a role for tHRF in tick engorgement and concomitantly, for efficient B. burgdorferi transmission. Silencing tHRF by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly impaired tick feeding and decreased B. burgdorferi burden in mice. Interfering with tHRF by actively immunizing mice with recombinant tHRF, or passively transferring tHRF antiserum, also markedly reduced the efficiency of tick feeding and B. burgdorferi burden in mice. Recombinant tHRF was able to bind to host basophils and stimulate histamine release. Therefore, we speculate that tHRF might function in vivo to modulate vascular permeability and increase blood flow to the tick bite-site, facilitating tick engorgement. These findings suggest that blocking tHRF might offer a viable strategy to complement ongoing efforts to develop vaccines to block tick feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:21124826

  6. Histamine release factor from Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer): characterization and in vitro assessment as a protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kathryn; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Offer, Jill E; Sparks, Nicholas H C; Wright, Harry W; Huntley, John F

    2009-03-01

    A cDNA encoding a 174-amino-acid orthologue of a tick histamine release factor (HRF) was identified from the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. The predicted D. gallinae HRF protein (Dg-HRF-1) sequence is highly conserved with the tick HRFs (identity 52-54%) and to a lesser degree with translationally controlled tumour proteins (TCTP) from mammals and other invertebrates (range 38-47%). Phylogenetically, Dg-HRF-1 partitions with the tick HRF clade suggesting a shared linage and potentially similar function(s). A recombinant Dg-HRF-1 protein (rDg-HRF-1) was produced and shown to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, confirming conservation of the histamine-releasing function in D. gallinae. Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits and hens to rDg-HRF-1. Western blotting demonstrated that native Dg-HRF is a soluble protein and immunohistochemical staining of mite sections revealed that the distribution of Dg-HRF, although ubiquitous, is more common in mite reproductive, digestive and synganglion tissues. A survey of hens housed continuously in a mite-infested commercial poultry unit failed to identify IgY specific for recombinant or native Dg-HRF, indicating that Dg-HRF is not exposed to the host during infestation/feeding and may therefore have potential as a vaccine using the concealed antigen approach. To test the protective capability of rDg-HRF-1, fresh heparinised chicken blood was enriched with yolk-derived anti-Dg-HRF IgY antibodies and fed to semi-starved mites using an in vitro feeding system. A statistically significant increase in mortality was shown (P=0.004) in mites fed with anti-Dg-HRF IgY after just one blood meal. The work presented here demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, the feasibility of vaccinating hens with recombinant D. gallinae antigens to control mite infestation and the potential of rDg-HRF-1 as a vaccine antigen.

  7. Ammonium and sulfate ion release of histamine from lung fragments.

    PubMed

    Charles, J M; Menzel, D B

    1975-06-01

    In vitro studies with guinea pig lung fragments incubated with 10- to 200-mM concentrations of ammonium ion demonstrated the release of substanial quantities of histamine. Of the anions tested with ammonium ion, sulfate was the most potent, while nitrate and acetate ions were of intermediate potency and chloride was less potent. An osmotic effect is unlikely since equal concentrations of sodium chloride failed to release histamine. Isoproterenol, known to decrease anaphylactic histamine release, and acetycholine, known to increase histamine release, had no effect on the ammonium sulfate-mediated release of histamine. N-6 2'-O-Dibutyryladenosine 3',5' monophosphate (dibutyryl c-AMP) was also ineffective. These studies suggest that the inhalation irritation associated with certain sulfate and other salts, may be a function of their ability to release histamine in the presence of amonium ion.

  8. Modafinil increases histamine release in the anterior hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Toshimi; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2003-03-20

    Modafinil, (RS)-2-(Diphenylmethylsulfinyl)acetamide, is a well known wake promoting drug used for the treatment of narcolepsy. We investigated the effect of modafinil on the hypothalamic histamine release in the anesthetized rat using in vivo microdialysis. Modafinil (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased histamine release by 150% of the basal release. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of modafinil (1 nmol) also increased histamine release, however, when modafinil (1 nmol) was injected directly into the tuberomammillary nucleus, a limited region where cell bodies of the histaminergic neurons are located, histamine release was not altered. These observations suggest that modafinil may promote waking via the activation of the histaminergic system, although it does not appear to be a direct pharmacological target of modafinil.

  9. Infralimbic cortex activation and motivated arousal induce histamine release.

    PubMed

    Riveros, María Eugenia; Forray, María Inés; Torrealba, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Appetitive behaviours occur in a state of behavioural and physiological activation that allows the optimal performance of these goal-directed behaviours. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histamine neurons under the command of the infralimbic cortex are important to provide behavioural activation. Extracellular histamine and serotonin were measured by microdialysis of the medial prefrontal cortex in behaving rats in parallel with a picrotoxin microinjection into the infralimbic cortex. The injection aroused the rats behaviourally, increased histamine release and decreased serotonin levels. Inhibition of the infralimbic cortex with muscimol produced the opposite effects on neurotransmitter release. The behavioural activation induced by motivating hungry rats with caged food was paralleled by an immediate histamine release, whereas awakening induced by tapping their microdialysis bowl increased serotonin, but not histamine levels. In conclusion, picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex produces behavioural activation together with histamine release; in a similar manner, induction of an appetitive state produced histamine release, likely related to increased behavioural activation characteristic of an appetitive behaviour.

  10. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.; Evans, Elizabeth; Valić, F.; Žuškin, Eugenija

    1973-01-01

    Nicholls, P. J., Evans, E., Valić, F., and Žuškin, E. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 142-145. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal. Extracts of dry and oiled sisal released histamine from pig and human but not from rat lung tissue. A suspension in Tyrode solution of the oil used for softening the sisal fibres had a pH of 8·1 and also released histamine from pig and human lung. The releasing activity was abolished when the pH of this suspension was adjusted to pH 7·4. As all the sisal extracts were adjusted to pH 7·4 for incubation with lung tissue, the histamine-releasing activity of sisal in vitro is unrelated to the presence of the oil. Significant (P < 0·01) mean reductions over the work shift of ventilatory capacity (PEF and FEV1·0) were recorded in all the workers exposed to airborne sisal dust. These reductions were greater in combers than in drawers and spinners. Sisal collected from combing machines possessed more histamine-releasing activity than material from drawing and spinning machines. These results indicate that histamine release by sisal may be the cause of acute ventilatory capacity changes in sisal exposure. PMID:4122162

  11. Histamine release by Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) from lung tissue in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Nicholls, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Evans, Elizabeth and Nicholls, P. J. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 28-30. Histamine release by Western red cedar(Thuja plicata)from lung tissue in vitro. Various respiratory symptoms have previously been observed in workers exposed to dust from Western red cedar (Thuja plicata). Although an allergic basis for these effects has been proposed, the possibility that the dust may contain a pharmacologically active agent was investigated. Aqueous extracts of two samples of red cedar released significant amounts of histamine from pig and human lung in vitro. For one of these samples, using pig lung, a dose-response relation was found over a narrow range of concentrations. These dusts possessed the same order of histamine-releasing activity as a sample of cotton dust. Potassium cyanide reduced the release of histamine caused by low concentrations of Western red cedar. Similar effects of cyanide on the histamine-releasing activity of cotton dust and compound 48/80 were observed. It is possible that release of histamine in the lungs and upper respiratory tract occurs on inhalation of dust from Western red cedar and this may be a contributory factor to the development of respiratory symptoms in workers exposed to the dust of this wood. PMID:4132384

  12. Protection against malaria in mice is induced by blood stage–arresting histamine-releasing factor (HRF)–deficient parasites

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leanna; Peronet, Roger; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Apetoh, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Although most vaccines against blood stage malaria in development today use subunit preparations, live attenuated parasites confer significantly broader and more lasting protection. In recent years, Plasmodium genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) have been generated in rodent models that cause self-resolving blood stage infections and induce strong protection. All such GAPs generated so far bear mutations in housekeeping genes important for parasite development in red blood cells. In this study, using a Plasmodium berghei model compatible with tracking anti–blood stage immune responses over time, we report a novel blood stage GAP that lacks a secreted factor related to histamine-releasing factor (HRF). Lack of HRF causes an IL-6 increase, which boosts T and B cell responses to resolve infection and leave a cross-stage, cross-species, and lasting immunity. Mutant-induced protection involves a combination of antiparasite IgG2c antibodies and FcγR+ CD11b+ cell phagocytes, especially neutrophils, which are sufficient to confer protection. This immune-boosting GAP highlights an important role of opsonized parasite-mediated phagocytosis, which may be central to protection induced by all self-resolving blood stage GAP infections. PMID:27432939

  13. Histamine-releasing factor/translationally controlled tumor protein plays a role in induced cell adhesion, apoptosis resistance and chemoresistance in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    He, Song; Huang, Yuejiao; Wang, Yuchan; Tang, Jie; Song, Yan; Yu, Xiafei; Ma, Jing; Wang, Shitao; Yin, Haibing; Li, Qiuyue; Ji, Lili; Xu, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence has proved that cellular adhesion confers resistance to chemotherapy in multiple lymphomas. The molecular mechanism underlying cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) is, however, poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of histamine-releasing factor (HRF) in non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by immunohistochemistry analysis we observed obvious up-regulation of HRF in NHLs including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma. Functionally, overexpression and knockdown of HRF demonstrated the antiapoptotic effect of HRF in NHL cells, which may be associated with activation of the p-CREB/BCL-2 signaling pathway. Moreover, cell adhesion assay demonstrated that adhesion to fibronectin (FN) or HS-5 up-regulated HRF expression, while knockdown of HRF resulted in decreased cell adhesion, which led to reversed CAM-DR. Our finding supports the role of HRF in NHL cell apoptosis, adhesion and drug resistance, and may provide a clinical therapeutic target for CAM-DR in NHL.

  14. Time- and dose-dependent responses of brain histamine to intracerebroventricular and intraperitoneal administrations of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF1-44).

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A; Fukui, H; Niigawa, H; Miyake, A; Watanabe, T; Nishimura, T; Wada, H

    1987-04-01

    Changes in the level of histamine (HA) in rat brain induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administrations of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF1-44) were studied. HA was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the anterior hypothalamic region, posterior hypothalamic region, median eminence, adenohypophysis, neurohypophysis, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. GRF1-44 (1-10 micrograms, i.c.v.) induced significant time- and dose-dependent increases in the concentration of HA in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system and time-dependent decrease of HA in the hippocampus. In contrast, after i.p. administration of GRF1-44 (10 micrograms) the level of HA in the hypothalamus tended to decrease but the total amount of H-1 receptors in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system did not change. Circadian variations in the GRF-induced HA and growth hormone responses were also observed, responses being lower in the evening than in the morning. It is concluded that GRF interacts with HA at the central level to optimize the function of the somatotropinergic system.

  15. Blood histamine release: A new allergy blood test

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Gottlieb, G.R.; Camp, V.M.; Lollies, P.

    1985-05-01

    Allergen-mediated histamine release from human leukocytes represents an important model for in vitro studies of allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the measurement of histamine released in allergic patients (pts) by radioenzymatic assay following mixing of their blood with common allergens represents a reliable index for diagnosis of atopic allergy. Three categories of allergies were used: (1) housedust and mite; (2) cat and dog dander; (3) trees and grasses and ragweed mixture. The presence of allergy was established by intradermal skin testing in the study group of 82 pts. Significant atopy was defined as greater than or equal to 3+ (overall range 0-4 +, negative to maximum) on skin testing. The test was carried out in tubes with 0.5 ml heparinized blood, 0.5 ml tris albumin buffer, and one of the allergens (60-100 PNU/ml). In 20 controls without allergy, there always was less than or equal to 4% histamine release (normal response). A significant allergen-mediated histamine release, ranging from 12 to 30% of the total blood histamine content, was observed in 96% of the pts with skin test sensitivity of greater than or equal to 3+. There was good agreement between skin testing and histamine release in terms of the allergen causing the response. Thus, measurement of histamine release in blood in response to allergen challenge represents a clinically useful in vitro test for the diagnosis of atopic allergy. Because data can be obtained from a single sample and are highly quantitative, this new method should have application to the longitudinal study of allergic pts and to the assessment of interventions.

  16. Histamine release from human buffy coat-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian Song; Lau, Hang Yung Alaster

    2007-04-01

    Mast cells are unique immune cells that release a spectrum of chemical mediators contributing to the inflammatory symptoms of allergic disorders. Although mast cell biology has been extensively studied in the rodents, research on human mast cells is hampered by the lack of a convenient preparation source. This problem has now been addressed by culturing human mast cells from CD34(+) progenitors. We have recently discovered that human buffy coat preparations from local blood banks are an abundant and convenient source of progenitors for culturing mature mast cells which express functional high affinity IgE receptors and contain histamine and tryptase in their granules. In the current study, we further characterize these buffy coat-derived mast cells by studying their responses to common mast cell secretagogues and stabilizers. Mature human mast cells were obtained by culturing isolated progenitors in methylcellulose containing stem cell factor (SCF), IL-3 and IL-6 for 6 weeks and subsequently in liquid medium containing SCF and IL-6 for another 6 to 8 weeks. Following sensitisation with human IgE, these cells released histamine dose-dependently upon activation by anti-IgE and calcium ionophores while compound 48/80 and substance P were relatively ineffective. When the effects of anti-asthmatic agents on anti-IgE-induced mediator release from these cells were compared, only the beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors produced dose-dependent inhibition but not cromolyn or nedocromil. In total, mast cells cultured from human buffy coat progenitors shared similar functional properties of MC(T) subtype of mast cells found predominantly in human lung parenchyma and intestinal mucosa.

  17. The fate of released histamine: reception, response and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Rangachari, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Histamine released from ECL cells elicits responses from a variety of cellular targets in the vicinity. Three sets of receptors are involved (H1, H2 and H3). Receptor occupation is promptly transduced into cellular responses. The responses, in turn, are terminated by diverse mechanisms: enzymatic inactivation, cellular uptake and desensitization at the receptor level. Under specific pathological conditions, histamine effects could be exaggerated by the presence of derivatives that may be of marginal relevance under physiological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:10461350

  18. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    John, Joshi; Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M

    2014-09-15

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness.

  19. Release of histamine from mast cells by a synthetic ionophore

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, T.P.; Smith, T.F.; Hunter, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Polyphore 27:10 is a copolymer composed of blocks of polyoxyethylene and polyoxypropylene. Subcutaneous injection of this copolymer in mice causes significant inflammation as determined by footpad swelling and increased vascular permeability as measured by extravasation of Evan's blue dye. Micromolar concentrations trigger release of histamine from purified mouse mast cells and human peripheral blood basophils in vitro. Histamine release from murine mast cells required physiologic temperature, metabolic energy, and calcium ions in the surrounding medium. Replacement of sodium ions in the medium with either potassium or lithium markedly inhibited release. Since Polyphore 27:10 has structural homology with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the crown polyethers, both of which chelate metal ions, The authors investigated whether Polyphore 27:10 could act as an ionophore. The Polyphore transported cations across artificial lipid membranes and made erythrocytes highly permeable to sodium ions, but not calcium at physiologic concentrations. They propose that the potent inflammatory and histamine-releasing activities of this copolymer are in part due to its ability to depolarize and degranulate mast cells.

  20. Histamine-releasing and allergenic properties of opioid analgesic drugs: resolving the two.

    PubMed

    Baldo, B A; Pham, N H

    2012-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are amongst the most commonly administered drugs in hospitals. Whether natural or synthetic, they show some common structural features, morphine-like pharmacological action and binding specificity for complementary opioid receptors. Tramadol differs from the other opioid analgesics in possessing monoaminergic activity in addition to its affinity for the µ opioid receptor. Many opioids are potent histamine releasers producing a variety of haemodynamic changes and anaphylactoid reactions, but the relationship of the appearance of these effects to the histamine plasma concentration is complex and there is no direct and invariable relationship between the two. Studies of the histamine-releasing effects, chiefly centred on morphine, reveal variable findings and conclusions often due to a range of factors including differences in technical measurements, dose, mode of administration, site of injection, the anatomical distribution of histamine receptors and heterogeneity of patient responses. Morphine itself has multiple direct effects on the vasculature and other haemodynamically-active mediators released along with histamine contribute to the variable responses to opioid drug administration. Despite their heavy use and occasional apparent anaphylactic-like side-effects, immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions to the drugs are not often encountered. Uncertainties associated with skin testing with these known histamine-releasers, and the general unavailability of opioid drug-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests contribute to the frequent failure to adequately investigate and establish underlying mechanisms of reactions by distinguishing anaphylactoid from true anaphylactic reactions. Clinical implications for diagnosis of reactions and some speculations on the rarity of true Type 1 allergies to these drugs are presented.

  1. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, E.; Coruzzi, G.; Bertaccini, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with ({sup 3}H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors.

  2. Histamine release inhibitory activity of Piper nigrum leaf.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Noriko; Naruto, Shunsuke; Inaba, Kazunori; Itoh, Kimihisa; Tokunaga, Masashi; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2008-10-01

    Oral administration of a methanolic extract of Piper nigrum leaf (PN-ext, 50, 200 and 500 mg/kg) showed a potent dose-dependent inhibition of dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced cutaneous reaction at 1 h [immediate phase response (IPR)] after and 24 h [late phase response (LPR)] after DNFB challenge in mice which were passively sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. Ear swelling inhibitory effect of PN-ext (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)) on very late phase response (vLPR) in the model mice was significant but weaker than that on IPR. Oral administration of PN-ext (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg for 7 d) inhibited picryl chloride (PC)-induced ear swelling in PC sensitized mice. PN-ext exhibited in vitro inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Two lignans of PN-ext, (-)-cubebin (1) and (-)-3,4-dimethoxy-3,4-desmethylenedioxycubebin (2), were identified as major active principles having histamine release inhibitory activity.

  3. The effect of orexin-A and -B on the histamine release in the anterior hypothalamus in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2002-04-26

    The neuropeptides orexin-A and -B have been reported to be appetite-stimulating peptides, but they are also known as important factors that control arousal state. We studied the effects of orexin-A and -B on the hypothalamic histamine release using in vivo microdialysis. A significant and sustained increase in histamine release was observed by intracerebroventricular injection of 1 nmol of orexin-A, but not by the same dose of orexin-B. An increased dose of orexin-B to 5 nmol facilitated histamine release, although this effect was much less potent than orexin-A. These findings suggest that both of the orexins play important roles in the regulation of waking through the activation of histaminergic system.

  4. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  5. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  6. Agarwood Inhibits Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells and Reduces Scratching Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Eiji; Shimizu, Yasuharu; Masui, Ryo; Tsubonoya, Tomoe; Hayakawa, Tomomi; Sudoh, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to clarify the effects of agarwood on histamine release from mast cells in rats and on the scratching behaviors in mice. Methods: Histamine release from rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 or concanavalin A (Con A) and compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice were examined to investigate the effects of agarwood. The hyaluronidase activity and the 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in mast cells were examined to investigate the mechanisms for the inhibition of histamine release. The correlation between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the content of its typical ingredients, a 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives, was analyzed using thin-layer chromatography. Results: Agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on mast-cell histamine release induced by compound 48/80 or Con A without any effect on hyaluronidase activity; this effect involves an increase in the cAMP levels in mast cells. Oral administration of agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice. The inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release were quite different, depending on the area where the agarwood was produced, its quality, and its market price. No correlation was found between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the typical ingredients of agarwood, which are 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives. Conclusion: These results show that agarwood inhibits histamine release from mast cells partially through an increase in the cAMP levels in cells. We suggest that some active ingredients of agarwood must be effective on oral intake and that agarwood can be used to treat patients with a number of conditions, including urticaria, atopic dermatitis, and bronchial asthma, in which an increase in histamine release occurs. Differences in the pharmacological effects of this crude drug among markets may provide important information for the quality

  7. The contribution of histamine release to bronchoconstriction provoked by inhaled benzalkonium chloride in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Miszkiel, K A; Beasley, R; Rafferty, P; Holgate, S T

    1988-01-01

    1. To investigate the possibility that benzalkonium chloride-induced bronchoconstriction results from the endogenous release of histamine, we examined the effect of the selective histamine antagonists terfenadine and astemizole, on the airways response to inhaled benzalkonium chloride and histamine in 12 asthmatic subjects. 2. Double-blind concentration- and time-course studies were undertaken, 3 h after treatment with terfenadine or matched placebo. 3. Benzalkonium chloride and histamine caused concentration-related falls in FEV1 in all subjects with benzalkonium chloride being 7.4 times less potent as a bronchoconstrictor agonist than histamine. Terfenadine displaced to the right the benzalkonium chloride and histamine concentration-response curves by 3.7 and 111 fold respectively. Terfenadine attenuated the initial (5 min) bronchoconstrictor response to benzalkonium chloride by 40%. However, over the whole 45 min period, the response was reduced by only 13% compared with 86% inhibition of the response to histamine. 4. In an open study, eight of the 12 subjects undertook a time course study with inhaled benzalkonium chloride after pretreatment with the chemically unrelated histamine antagonist astemizole. Astemizole inhibited benzalkonium chloride-induced bronchoconstriction to an almost identical degree as that achieved with terfenadine. 5. We conclude that the initial bronchoconstrictor effect of benzalkonium chloride is due, in part, to histamine release. However, the majority of the adverse effect relates to other, as yet unrecognised effects of this bacteriocidal substance. PMID:2451929

  8. Acute central administration of immepip, a histamine H3 receptor agonist, suppresses hypothalamic histamine release and elicits feeding behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2009-04-06

    Histamine suppresses feeding behavior via histamine H1 receptors in the hypothalamus. This study was performed to examine whether the acute reduction of histamine release in the hypothalamus caused by immepip, a histamine H3 agonist, modulates the feeding behavior of rats. Rats had a catheter implanted in the third cerebral ventricle (i3v) and were given central injections of phosphate-buffered-saline or immepip (100-300 pmol/rat). Following the i3v administration of immepip, the rats developed dose-dependent hypokinesia within 10 min of administration. Next to hypokinesia, the rats showed significant dose-dependent feeding behavior. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) confirmed the reduction in histamine release in the hypothalamus of rats following i3v administration of immepip. These results suggest that i3v administration of immepip, an H3 receptor agonist, suppresses hypothalamic histamine release and elicits feeding behavior in rats.

  9. Deuterium-oxide-induced histamine release from basophils of allergic subjects. I. Responsiveness to deuterium oxide requires an activation step

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimierczak, W.; Plaut, M.; Knauer, K.A.; Meier, H.L.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1984-04-01

    Basophils from many atopic persons, and especially asthmatic patients, have been shown to release histamine in response to 44% deuterium oxide (D2O), whereas basophils from nonatopic persons do not release histamine. The present experiments analyzed the mechanisms by which D/sub 2/O mediated release. It was found that although D/sub 2/O induced release from washed leukocytes, it failed to induce release from whole blood or from leukocytes that had sedimented but had not been washed. The kinetics of release after washing were rapid and were equivalent regardless of the temperature at which cells were sedimented (O degrees or 37 degrees C). Washed cells became desensitized to the action of D/sub 2/O within 30 to 60 min at 37 degrees C, whereas unwashed leukocytes did not become desensitized. Serum or plasma inhibited D/sub 2/O-induced release, although high concentrations (1/5) were less inhibitory than lower ones (1/10 to 1/100). Basophils from D/sub 2/O responders also released histamine in response to a ''platelet enhancing factor'' (PEF), whereas those from D/sub 2/O nonresponders did not. As with D/sub 2/O-mediated release, PEF-mediated release occurred only with washed leukocytes, desensitized within 30 to 60 min at 37 degrees C, and was inhibited by serum. These results suggest that D/sub 2/O induces histamine release by augmenting the effects of an endogenous activation mechanism, and that PEF acts on the same (D/sub 2/O-responsive) donors to augment this activation mechanism. Cell activation, as well as desensitization of this activation mechanism, occurs rapidly when basophils are washed free of plasma inhibitors and placed at 37 degrees C.

  10. Enhanced histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs exposed to sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Katayama, Noboru; Wakamori, Kazuo )

    1992-06-01

    To clarify the relationship between air pollution and mast cell response, the effects of sulfuric acid aerosols on histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs were investigated. Guinea pigs were exposed to 0.3, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) aerosols or 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) for 2 and 4 weeks. After the exposure, lung mast cell suspensions were isolated by collagenase treatment and antigen- or A23187-induced histamine release was measured. Antigen-induced histamine release from mast cells was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 2 weeks, but exposure to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 4 weeks did not show the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine release. A23187-induced histamine release was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks, but suppression of histamine release from lung mast cells stimulated with A23187 was observed by the exposure to 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} for 4 weeks. The exposure to 0.3 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} showed no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. The combination of 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} with 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks resulted in no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. These results suggested that functional properties of lung mast cells may be altered by a low concentration of H{sub 2}So{sub 4} aerosol exposure.

  11. Modulation of histamine release from human basophils in vitro by physiological concentrations of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Marone, G.; Findlay, S.R.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-05-01

    Zinc, at physiologic concentrations, inhibits in vitro histamine release from human basophils induced by several immunologic (i.e., antigen and anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) and nonimmunologic (Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187 and formylated tripeptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-met peptide)) stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition begins at about 10(-6) (ionophore A23187, anti-IgE and antigen) or 10(-5) M (f-met peptide) and is maximum at 10(-4) M (80--100% inhibition of histamine release). The activity of zinc is about 25-fold greater with respect to ionophore A23187 (ID50 . 1.1 x 10(-6) M) than to f-met peptide-induced (ID50 . 4 x 10(-5) M) histamine release. Its activity on IgE-mediated histamine release is intermediate between these two extremes (ID50 . 9.7 x 10(-6) M). Zinc does not affect the first stage of histamine release but acts on the calcium-dependent second stage. It is a competitive antagonist of the action of Ca/sup + +/ in histamine secretion induced by antigen, anti-IgE and f-met peptide (but not by A23187) with a dissociation constant of about 1.2 x 10(-5) M. The addition of colchicine with zinc fails to increase the inhibition caused by the ion alone, suggesting the two compounds work via a common mechanism of action. Deuterium oxide reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, the inhibition of histamine release caused by zinc. These results suggest that the effect of zinc on histamine release from human basophils may be related to its influence on the microtubule system, directly or via its interaction with calcium.

  12. Histamine release in the basal forebrain mediates cortical activation through cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zant, Janneke C; Rozov, Stanislav; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Panula, Pertti; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2012-09-19

    The basal forebrain (BF) is a key structure in regulating both cortical activity and sleep homeostasis. It receives input from all ascending arousal systems and is particularly highly innervated by histaminergic neurons. Previous studies clearly point to a role for histamine as a wake-promoting substance in the BF. We used in vivo microdialysis and pharmacological treatments in rats to study which electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral properties are associated with histamine-induced wakefulness and whether this wakefulness is followed by increased sleep and increased EEG delta power during sleep. We also investigated which BF neurons mediate histamine-induced cortical activation. Extracellular BF histamine levels rose immediately and remained constant throughout a 6 h period of sleep deprivation, returning to baseline levels immediately afterward. During the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle, we observed a strong correlation between wakefulness and extracellular histamine concentrations in the BF, which was unaffected by the time of day. The perfusion of histamine into the BF increased wakefulness and cortical activity without inducing recovery sleep. The perfusion of a histamine receptor 1 antagonist into the BF decreased both wakefulness and cortical activity. Lesioning the BF cholinergic neurons abolished these effects. Together, these results show that activation of the cholinergic BF by histamine is important in sustaining a high level of cortical activation, and that a lack of activation of the cholinergic BF by histamine may be important in initiating and maintaining nonrapid eye movement sleep. The level of histamine release is tightly connected to behavioral state, but conveys no information about sleep pressure.

  13. Modulation of neurotransmitter release via histamine H3 heteroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Malinowska, B; Kathmann, M; Göthert, M

    1994-01-01

    Presynaptic H3 receptors occur on histaminergic neurones of the CNS (autoreceptors) and on non-histaminergic neurones of the central and autonomic nervous system (heteroreceptors). H3 heteroreceptors, most probably located on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres innervating the resistance vessels and the heart, have been identified in the model of the pithed rat. Furthermore, we could show in superfusion experiments that H3 heteroreceptors also occur on the sympathetic neurones supplying the human saphenous vein and the vasculature of the pig retina and on the serotoninergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurones in the brain of various mammalian species, including man. The effects of three recently described H3 receptor ligands were studied in superfused mouse brain cortex slices. The potency of the novel H3 receptor agonist imetit exceeded that of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (the reference H3 receptor agonist) by one log unit and that of histamine by almost two log units. Clobenpropit was shown to be a competitive H3 receptor antagonist, exhibiting a pA2 as high as 9.6 (exceeding the pA2 of the reference H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide by one log unit). The irreversible antagonism of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) was also studied. Interactions of the H3 heteroreceptor with the dopamine autoreceptor in mouse striatal slices and the alpha 2-autoreceptor in mouse brain cortex slices could be demonstrated. Activation of alpha 2-autoreceptors decreases the H3 receptor-mediated effect. Blockade of alpha 2-autoreceptors increases the H3 receptor-mediated effect only if the alpha 2-autoreceptors are simultaneously activated by endogenous noradrenaline. The H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices was attenuated by the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium but this attenuation was abolished by reduction of the Ca2+ concentration in the medium (to compensate for the facilitatory effect of

  14. Model of cell activation and desensitization by surface immunoglobin: the case of histamine release from human basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Dembo, M.; Goldstein, B.

    1980-11-01

    We present a model for the control of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated histamine release from human basophils. We suggest that there is a calcium gating factor which interacts with crosslinked IgE to form a short-lived open calcium channel. After formation of the channel the activated gating factor rapidly decays to an inactive form. It is the loss of the active gating factor which causes the basophil to desensitize nonspecifically. We propose that the crosslinked IgE molecules are deactivated by a mechanism, such as endocytosis or shedding, which is independent of the mechanism which inactivates the calcium gating factor. This loss of functional IgE leads to specific desensitization. The mathematical formulation of the model explains the relationship of specific and nonspecific desensitization to the amount of specific IgE on the basophil surface; explains why there are two types of antigen excess inhibition; explains the relationship between antigen excess inhibition and desensitization; explains why, for a fixed antigen concentration, increasing the concentration of cell surface IgE increases histamine release until an optimal concentration is reached, then decreases histamine release; predicts the effects that changing the external calcium will have on the dose response curve; and predicts that increasing the amount of specific IgE on the cell surface will cause the dose response curve to undergo a transition from a curve with a single maximum to a curve with two maxima.

  15. Cyclic AMP agonist inhibition increases at low levels of histamine release from human basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, R.S.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between the intensity of the signal for antigen-induced immunoglobulin E-mediated histamine release from human basophils and the concentration of agonist needed to inhibit release has been determined. The agonists, prostaglandin E1, dimaprit, fenoterol, isobutylmethylxanthine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, all act by increasing the cyclic AMP level. Each agonist was 10- to 1000-fold more potent (relative ID50) at low levels of histamine release (5-10% of total histamine) than at high levels (50-80%). Thus, the inhibitory potential of a drug is a function of the concentration of antigen used to initiate the response. Our results are now more in accord with the inhibitory profile of these drugs in human lung tissue. It is suggested that in vivo release is likely to be low and that this is the level at which to evaluate drugs in vitro.

  16. The effect of hardness of food on amygdalar histamine release in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Sako, Noritaka; Murotani, Tomotaka; Morimoto, Aya; Yamatodani, Atsushi; Ohura, Kiyoshi

    2010-02-08

    When animals eat food, the oral cavity receives a variety of sensory information from food. The hardness of food, which elicits somatic sensation, is thought to affect feeding behavior, however, the details of neuronal mechanism are unclear. The histaminergic system is known to be involved in feeding behavior, and our previous studies indicated that gustatory information activates the histaminergic system, and that palatability of tastants influences its activity. From these findings, we hypothesized that the hardness of food may affect the histaminergic system. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of the hardness of food on histamine release in the central nucleus of amygdala when rats consumed either of two types of pellets composed of similar ingredients but having different degrees of hardness: hard and soft pellets. Histamine release was significantly increased in the rat fed with hard pellets. By contrast, histamine release was not enhanced in soft pellets-fed rats. There were no significant differences between the hard and soft pellet intakes during the experimental period. When rats acquired a conditioned aversion to soft pellets, histamine release was increased during feeding, in sharp contrast to no change of histamine release pattern seen during unconditioned soft pellet intake. These observations indicate that the amygdalar histaminergic system is modulated by oral somatic sensation from food, and by palatability of food texture.

  17. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of histamine release from rat cerebral cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Hill, S J; Straw, R M

    1988-12-01

    1. Depolarization of rat cerebral cortical slices, prelabelled with [3H]-histidine, in high potassium (40 mM KCl) medium stimulated the release of [3H]-histamine. The K+-evoked release of [3H]-histamine was attenuated by incubation in calcium-free medium and prevented by prior incubation of brain slices with the selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor S-(alpha)-fluoromethylhistidine. 2. The K+-evoked release of [3H]-histamine was significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced following stimulation of histamine H3-receptors with R-(alpha)-methylhistamine (1 microM) and this effect was antagonized by the H3-antagonist thioperamide (1 microM). 3. Noradrenaline and the alpha 2-selective adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and UK-14,304 inhibited the K+-evoked release of [3H]-histamine in a concentration-dependent manner yielding EC50 values of 2.5, 0.8 and 1.2 microM, respectively. However, the maximum response to clonidine was only 52 +/- 8% of that obtained with noradrenaline. 4. The inhibitory effect of noradrenaline was antagonized by the non-selective alpha-antagonist phentolamine and by the selective alpha 2-antagonists yohimbine and idazoxan. However, the response to noradrenaline was not inhibited by the alpha 1-antagonist prazosin at concentrations up to 1 microM. 5. These results suggest that both histamine H3-receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors are present on histamine-containing nerve terminals in rat cerebral cortex and can exert an inhibitory influence on neurotransmitter release.

  18. A histamine release assay to identify sensitization to Culicoides allergens in horses with skin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bettina; Childs, Bronwen A; Erb, Hollis N

    2008-12-15

    Skin hypersensitivity is an allergic disease induced in horses by allergens of Culicoides midges. The condition is typically diagnosed by clinical signs and in some horses in combination with allergy testing such as intradermal skin testing or serological allergen-specific IgE determination. Here, we describe an alternative method for allergy testing: a histamine release assay (HRA) that combines the functional aspects of skin testing with the convenience of submitting a blood sample. The assay is based on the principle that crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE bound via high-affinity IgE receptors to the surfaces of mast cells and basophils induces the release of inflammatory mediators. One of these mediators is histamine. The histamine was then detected by a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histamine assay was used to test 33 horses with skin hypersensitivity and 20 clinically healthy control animals for histamine release from their peripheral blood basophils after stimulation with Culicoides allergen extract or monoclonal anti-IgE antibody. An increased histamine release was observed in the horses with skin hypersensitivity compared to the control group after allergen-specific stimulation with Culicoides extract (p=0.023). In contrast, stimulation with anti-IgE induced similar amounts of released histamine in both groups (p=0.46). For further evaluation of the HRA, we prepared a receiver operating-characteristic (ROC) curve and performed a likelihood-ratio analysis for assay interpretation. Our results suggested that the assay is a valuable diagnostic tool to identify sensitization to Culicoides allergens in horses. Because some of the clinically healthy horses also showed sensitization to Culicoides extract, the assay cannot be used to distinguish allergic from non-allergic animals. The observation that sensitization is sometimes detectable in non-affected animals suggested that clinically healthy horses use immune mechanisms to control the

  19. Effects of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine and related compounds on corticosterone release in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, S; Okumura, Y; Kamei, C; Tasaka, K

    1993-07-01

    1. The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine and related compounds on plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone concentrations were studied in conscious rats. 2. Histamine at doses of 5-20 micrograms kg-1 rapidly increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations almost simultaneously, and subsequent courses were also similar to each other. However, in the case of CRF-41 (i.v.), the plasma ACTH concentration first increased followed by an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. Even in hypophysectomized rats, a significant increase in plasma corticosterone concentration was induced by histamine at doses of 20 and 50 micrograms kg-1. 3. Histamine at doses of 10 and 20 micrograms kg-1 elicited an increase in the amplitude of adrenal nerve activity, and electrical stimulation to the adrenal nerves resulted in an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. 4. Both H1-agonist (2-methylhistamine) and H2-agonists (4-methylhistamine and impromidine) also induced similar effects to those of histamine. Pretreatment with pyrilamine caused an inhibition of histamine-induced increase in plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations, while both cimetidine and ranitidine failed to inhibit this effect. However, both H2-blockers were effective in inhibiting the 4-methylhistamine-induced elevation of plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations. 5. Neither (R)-alpha-methylhistamine nor thioperamide had a significant effect, indicating that the H3-receptor is not involved in the histamine-induced increase in plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations. 6. From these findings, it was concluded that (1) electrical signals transmitted from the brain to the adrenal gland through the neurones may be involved in the rapid corticosterone release induced by histamine, and (2) not only H1- but also H2-receptors are implicated in histamine-induced hormone secretions in rats, though the contribution of the H2-receptor is

  20. Analysis of histamine release assays using the Bootstrap.

    PubMed

    Coberly, William A; Price, Joseph A

    2005-01-01

    The data from several types of bioassays is usually presented as a quotient as an intuitive parameter and a means of comparing results between experiments. For the example we considered here, we look at experiments with an experiment-wide negative control used to generate percent activity quotients from each experimental group. We asked if there was a valid means to statistically evaluate the transformed rather than the raw data. The experimental system chosen was a dose response of the agonist compound 48/80, which causes release of histamine from mast cells, thus providing test data from replicates of n=24. Descriptive statistics, the Ryan-Joiner test for normality of distribution of data, and normal probability plots confirm the normality of the distribution of data at each dose level. In parametric analysis, when the control group was treated as an errorless constant, there was a distinct consistent bias in the standard error of the data of 10% or less, which was not present if the control group's mean was treated as a variable with experimental error. This would be of minor interest in qualitative studies and might be safely ignored, but might be of considerable importance in quantitative assessments of activity using confidence intervals. When using Bootstrap estimates of standard error and probability plots of the bootstrap samples, the transformed data does not deviate significantly from normality. The standard, bias-corrected percentile limits (BCa), and empirical percentile methods gave very similar results when using resampling statistics to generate the transformed data from groups of n=6. Sample size can be as low as n=4 and still provide useful results. Thus, we have shown that resampling (i.e., bootstrap, Monte Carlo method, computer-intensive methods) can produce the data transform as well as provide confidence intervals using this type of raw data in small groups (n=4 to 6), giving improved statistical analysis of the transformed data (ratio

  1. Human in vivo cutaneous microdialysis: estimation of histamine release in cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Andersson, T; Wårdell, K; Anderson, C

    1995-09-01

    A novel bioanalytical in vivo sampling technique, cutaneous microdialysis, was used to follow the chronology of skin histamine release in 3 patients with cold urticaria and in 2 healthy volunteers. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging was used simultaneously to monitor the skin circulatory response. Microdialysis samples were collected at 10-min intervals and analysed by radioimmunoassay technique. Fifty minutes after probe insertion, the ventral forearm skin in the area of the dialysis membrane was provoked for 5-15 min with a 25 x 40 mm ice cube covered with plastic foil. In the cold urticaria patients, an up to 80-fold increase of histamine was observed, with peak levels 20-30 min after challenge. Histamine levels then fell to reach "baseline" levels within 50 min. In the healthy subjects, the histamine increase was earlier, less pronounced and of shorter duration. Cutaneous microdialysis and laser Doppler imaging offer new possibilities for the chronological multiparameter assessment of inflammatory skin disorders in vivo.

  2. Anaesthetic agents inhibit gastrin-stimulated but not basal histamine release from rat stomach ECL cells.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Kitano, M; Lindström, E; Håkanson, R

    2000-06-01

    By mobilizing histamine in response to gastrin, the ECL cells in the oxyntic mucosa play a key role in the control of the parietal cells and hence of gastric acid secretion. General anaesthesia suppresses basal and gastrin- and histamine-stimulated acid secretion. The present study examines if the effect of anaesthesia on basal and gastrin-stimulated acid secretion is associated with suppressed ECL-cell histamine secretion. A microdialysis probe was implanted in the submucosa of the ventral aspect of the acid-producing part of the stomach (32 rats). Three days later, ECL-cell histamine mobilization was monitored 2 h before and 4 h after the start of intravenous infusion of gastrin (5 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)). The rats were either conscious or anaesthetized. Four commonly used anaesthetic agents were given 1 h before the start of the experiments by intraperitoneal injection: chloral hydrate (300 mg kg(-1)), pentobarbitone (40 mg kg(-1)), urethane (1.5 g kg(-1)) and a mixture of fluanisone/fentanyl/midazolam (15/0.5/7.5 mg kg(-1)). In a parallel series of experiments, basal- and gastrin-induced acid secretion was monitored in six conscious and 25 anaesthetized (see above) chronic gastric fistula rats. All anaesthetic agents lowered gastrin-stimulated acid secretion; also the basal acid output was reduced (fluanisone/fentanyl/midazolam was an exception). Anaesthesia reduced gastrin-stimulated but not basal histamine release by 55 - 80%. The reduction in gastrin-induced acid response (70 - 95%) was strongly correlated to the reduction in gastrin-induced histamine mobilization. The correlation is in line with the view that the reduced acid response to gastrin reflects impaired histamine mobilization. Rat stomach ECL cells were purified by counter-flow elutriation. Gastrin-evoked histamine mobilization from the isolated ECL cells was determined in the absence or presence of anaesthetic agents in the medium. With the exception of urethane, they inhibited gastrin

  3. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats.

  4. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment.

  5. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  6. Optogenetic-Mediated Release of Histamine Reveals Distal and Autoregulatory Mechanisms for Controlling Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rhîannan H.; Chee, Melissa J.S.; Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) are an important component of the ascending arousal system and may form part of a “flip–flop switch” hypothesized to regulate sleep and wakefulness. Anatomical studies have shown that the wake-active TMN and sleep-active ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) are reciprocally connected, suggesting that each region can inhibit its counterpart when active. In this study, we determined how histamine affects the two branches of this circuit. We selectively expressed channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in TMN neurons and used patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices to examine the effects of photo-evoked histamine release in the ventrolateral TMN and VLPO. Photostimulation decreased inhibitory GABAergic inputs to the ventrolateral TMN neurons but produced a membrane hyperpolarization and increased inhibitory synaptic input to the VLPO neurons. We found that in VLPO the response to histamine was indirect, most likely via a GABAergic interneuron. Our experiments demonstrate that release of histamine from TMN neurons can disinhibit the TMN and suppresses the activity of sleep-active VLPO neurons to promote TMN neuronal firing. This further supports the sleep–wake “flip–flop switch” hypothesis and a role for histamine in stabilizing the switch to favor wake states. PMID:24760861

  7. PURIFICATION OF HISTAMINE SENSITIZING FACTOR OF BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Histamine Sensitizing Factor ( HSF ) of Bordetella pertussis was studied. To improve the cultivation method for HSF preparation, growth conditions of...maintenance and surface bulk culture was devised. Intracellular localization of HSF and lethal toxin were studied. HSF was mainly localized in the cell...wall prepared by Mickle disintegration, and toxin was found in protoplasm Ribosomes prepared from sonicate contained considerable amount of HSF and

  8. Qualitative characteristics of histamine release from human basophils by covalently cross-linked LgE

    SciTech Connect

    Kagey-Sobotka, A.; Dembo, M.; Goldstein, B.; Metzger, H.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of permanent oligomers of human lgE produced was studied using the cross-linking reagent, dimethyl suberimidate, on histamine release from human basophils. lgE dimers were found to be sufficient stimuli for both release and desensitization of these cells; monomeric lgE had no effect. Histamine release was augmented by deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) in the media, but D/sub 2/O was not an absolute requirement to observe release. Desensitization by the dimeric lgE was specific in that the response to anti-lgE was not affected by preincubation of the leukocytes with the lgE dimer under suboptimal releasing conditions. lgE trimers and higher oligomers of lgE also caused both release and desensitization. lgE also trimers were 3- to 4-fold more effective than lgE dimers with regard to the amount required for 50% histamine release. Dilution studies with monomeric lgE suggested that the difference was due to the presence of more ''active'' dimers in the trimeric lgE fractions. We conclude that dimeric lgE, by juxtaposing 2 receptors on the basophil membrane, is the ''unit signal'' for both release and desensitization of these cells.

  9. Histamine H4 Receptor mediates interleukin-8 and TNF-α release in human mast cells via multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-F; Zhang, Z; Dou, X; Li, J-J; Zhang, W; Yu, Y-Y; Yu, B; Yu, B

    2016-01-27

    Histamine, mainly produced by mast cells, is an important inflammatory mediator in immune response. Recently Histamine H4 Receptor (H4R) was also identified in mast cells, from which pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines are released. However, the mechanism of how H4R mediates these cytokines and chemokines release in mast cells was still unclear. To further explore the role of H4R in the immune inflammatory response in mast cells, we tested the release of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the relevant signaling pathways activated by H4R on LAD2 cells (a human mast cell line). We found that the release of IL-8 and TNF-α were blocked by inhibitors of PI3K, ERK and Ca2+-Calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathways, while the release of these cytokines and chemokines were enhanced by the inhibitor of P38 signaling pathway. However, inhibitors of the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways had little effect on the expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators. Moreover, activation of the H4R could induce phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and AKT in mast cells. In conclusion, we found that H4R mediates the release of inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and chemokine IL-8 in human mast cells via PI3K, Ca2+-Calcineurin-NFAT and MAPKs signaling pathways.

  10. IMMUNOLOGICAL RELEASE OF HISTAMINE AND SLOW REACTING SUBSTANCE OF ANAPHYLAXIS FROM HUMAN LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Kaliner, Michael; Orange, Robert P.; Austen, K. Frank

    1972-01-01

    The immunologic release of histamine and slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from human lung tissue can be enhanced by stimulation with either alpha adrenergic agents (phenylephrine or norepinephrine in the presence of propranolol) or cholinergic agents (acetylcholine or Carbachol). The finding that atropine prevents cholinergic but not comparable alpha adrenergic enhancement is consistent with the view that cholinergic and alpha adrenergic agonists interact with separate receptor sites on the target cells involved in the immunologic release of chemical mediators. The consistent qualitative relationship between the antigen-induced release of mediators and the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) as measured by the isolation of 14C-labeled cyclic AMP after incorporation of adenine-14C into the tissues or by the cyclic AMP binding protein assay suggests that changes in the level of this cyclic nucleotide mediate adrenergic modulation of the release of histamine and SRS-A. The addition of 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP) produces an enhancement of the immunologic release of mediators while dibutyryl cyclic AMP is inhibitory. As cholinergic-induced enhancement was not associated with a measurable change in the levels of cyclic AMP, the possibility is suggested that cyclic GMP may be the intracellular mediator of cholinergic-induced enhancement of the immunologic release of histamine and SRS-A. PMID:4115132

  11. [Surfactant-induced itching and the involvement of histamine released from keratinocytes].

    PubMed

    Inami, Yoshihiro; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Sasaki, Atsushi; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of surfactants is to remove dirt, exfoliated corneum cells, and microorganisms from the skin. However, the use of toiletries such as soaps and shampoos containing surfactants may cause adverse effects such as cutaneous irritation, dryness, and itching. Recently, skin pathologies, including dry skin, rough skin, and sensitive skin, have increased because of changes in living conditions and lifestyle. Although many people with skin pathologies complain of itching during and/or after skin washing using detergents, the mechanisms of detergent-induced itch are yet to be elucidated. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying surfactant-induced itching. We found that topical application of an anionic surfactant sodium laurate at an alkaline pH, but not N-lauroylsarcosine sodium salt at neutral pH, to mouse skin induced scratching, an itch-related response. Additionally, we found that the sodium laurate-induced scratching was inhibited by H(1) histamine receptor antagonist, but not mast cell deficiency. Sodium laurate application increased histamine content and the level of the active form (53 kDa) of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in the mouse epidermis, but not the dermis. Furthermore, addition of sodium laurate to a human epidermal cell culture increased histamine release and HDC levels, without affecting cell viability. These results suggest that surfactants with alkaline properties are pruritogenic and that the pruritus is induced by the histamine released from epidermal keratinocytes. The increase in histamine release may be attributable to the activation of HDC in epidermal keratinocytes.

  12. The effects of histamine and prostaglandin D2 on rat mast-cell cyclic AMP and mediator release

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, S.; Kaliner, M.

    1981-11-01

    The possibility that histamine may play a functional role in modulating mast-cell secretion, as has been suggested for basophil degranulation, has both physiologic and pharmacologic implications. Therefore the capacity of histamine to influence rat peritoneal mast-cell (RPMC) cyclic AMP levels and reversed anaphylatic degranulation as reflected in the release of 3H-serotonin (5-HT) was examined. To ascertain that RPMC were functionally responsive to exogenous hormonal stimulation, assessment of prostaglandin (PG) D2 effects on cyclic AMP and 5-HT release were determined in parallel. Although PGD2 (100 microM) increased cyclic AMP and inhibited 5-HT release in the presence of 50 microM aminophylline, histamine (up to 1000 microM) was ineffective was ineffective in both. However, 1000 microM histamine in the presence of 500 microM aminophylline was capable of transiently increasing RPMC cyclic AMP (for 15 to 30 sec) and under these conditions of suppressing 5-HT release. The receptor subtype involved in the suppressive actions of histamine appeared to be of the H-1 type as reflected in the capacity of specific H-1 agonists to reproduce the inhibition of 5-HT release, whereas neither H-2 agonists nor H-2 antagonists had any influence. Thus, under conditions in which phosphodiesterase enzymatic action is impaired, histamine in extremely high concentrations is able to modulate mast-cell secretion. However, it seems very unlikely that this action of histamine has any physiologic significance.

  13. Inhibition of noradrenaline release from the sympathetic nerves of the human saphenous vein by presynaptic histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Weissenborn, G; Schlicker, E; Likungu, J; Göthert, M

    1992-07-01

    The human saphenous vein was used to examine whether presynaptic histamine receptors can modulate noradrenaline release and, if so, to determine their pharmacological characteristics. Strips of this blood vessel were incubated with [3H]noradrenaline and subsequently superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine and corticosterone. Electrically (2 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was inhibited by histamine and the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine. Histamine-induced inhibition of electrically evoked tritium overflow was not affected by alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade by rauwolscine. S-(+)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) as well as the histamine H1 and H2 receptor agonists 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine (up to 3 mumol/l) and dimaprit (up to 30 mumol/l), respectively, were ineffective. The selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide abolished the inhibitory effect of histamine. The histamine H2 and H1 receptor antagonists ranitidine and pheniramine, respectively, did not affect the histamine-induced inhibition of evoked tritium overflow. The present results are compatible with the suggestion that the sympathetic nerves of the human saphenous vein are endowed with inhibitory presynaptic histamine receptors of the H3 class.

  14. Activation of basophil and mast cell histamine release by eosinophil granule major basic protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Major basic protein (MBP) is a primary constituent of eosinophil granules. In this report, we demonstrate that MBP from human eosinophil granules initiates a nonlytic histamine release from human leukocytes. A direct effect of MBP on basophils was confirmed using purified human basophils. The kinetics of release were similar to those reported for poly-L-arginine, although MBP was less potent than poly-L-arginine of similar molecular weight. Reduction and alkylation of MBP diminished both the potency and efficacy of the molecule. Native MBP also stimulated histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells in a manner characteristic of other polycations. These results emphasize the bidirectional nature of the basophil/mast cell-eosinophil regulatory axis. PMID:6854212

  15. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  16. Possible participation of histamine H3 receptors in the modulation of noradrenaline release from rat spinal cord slices.

    PubMed

    Celuch, S M

    1995-12-12

    Rat spinal cord slices prelabelled with [3H]noradrenaline were superfused with a medium containing 1 mu M desipramine plus 0.3 mu M phentolamine. Histamine (0.01-10 mu M) and the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (0.001-10 mu M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the release of radioactivity evoked by electrical field stimulation (0.8 Hz, 20 mA, 2 min). The inhibitory effect of histamine was not modified by either pyrilamine (1 mu M) or ranitidine (10 mu M), but it was antagonized by burimamide (1 mu M). The inhibitory action of histamine (1 mu M) was attenuated by pertussis toxin (3 mu g/ml) and was abolished by N-ethylmaleimide (30 mu M). Neither forskolin (10 mu M) nor rolipram (100 mu M), nor the combination of both drugs, modified the inhibitory effect of histamine. Histamine (1 mu M) did not modify the overflow of tritium induced by electrical stimulation in the absence of phentolamine. The present results suggest that in the rat spinal cord the release of noradrenaline elicited by electrical stimulation is negatively modulated by histamine, probably through the activation of histamine H3 receptors. This modulatory mechanism is likely to involve the participation of regulatory Go/Gi proteins.

  17. Histamine H3A receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Behling, A; Lümmen, G; Göthert, M

    1992-04-01

    Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine plus a drug with alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist properties, and the effects of histamine receptor ligands on the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow were studied. The evoked overflow (from slices superfused with phentolamine) was inhibited by histamine (pIC35 6.53), the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.47) and its S-(+)-enantiomer (5.82) but not influenced by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)-ethylamine 3.2 mumol/l and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit 10 mumol/l. The inhibitory effect of histamine was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene 1 mumol/l and the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine 10 mumol/l. The concentration-response curve of histamine (determined in the presence of rauwolscine) was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.67), impromidine (7.30) and burimamide (6.82) as well as by dimaprit (6.16). The pA2 values of the four drugs were compared with their affinities for H3A and H3B binding sites in rat brain membranes (West et al. 1990 Mol Pharmacol 38:610); a significant correlation was obtained for the H3A, but not for the H3B sites. The results suggest that noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex is inhibited by histamine via H3A receptors and that dimaprit is an H3 receptor antagonist of moderate potency.

  18. Histamine-releasing effect of a corticotrophin derivative. II. Mechanism of action of histamine release by C 44 680-Ba, compared with that of Cpd. 48/80, dextran and triton.

    PubMed

    Rüegg, M

    1979-06-01

    The mechanism of the histamine-liberating action of the synthetic polypeptide C 44 680-Ba, an alkyl-prolyl derivative of beta 1-19 corticotrophin, was investigated and compared with those of Compound 48/80, dextran, Melittin and Triton X-100. It was found that the release of histamine from rat peritoneal cells induced by the polypeptide is dependent on temperature, pH, calcium ions and energy-providing processes. In regard to these criteria, the mode of action of this histamine liberator resembles that of Compound 48/80 but is quite distinct from that of the unspecific substance Triton X-100.

  19. Effects of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) on Ca2+ concentration and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukugasako, Sanae; Ito, Shinichi; Ikemoto, Yoshimi

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) action in allergic reactions were investigated by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). In the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, methyl paraben (0.1–10 mM) increased [Ca2+]i, in a concentration-dependent manner. Under both the conditions, methyl paraben alone did not evoke histamine release. In RPMCs pretreated with a protein kinase C (PKC) activator (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) 3 and 10 nM), methyl paraben (0.3–3 mM) induced histamine release. However, a high concentration (10 mM) of the agent did not increase the histamine release. U73122 (0.1 and 0.5 μM), an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), significantly inhibited the methyl paraben-induced histamine release in PMA-pretreated RPMCs. U73343 (0.5 μM), an inactive analogue of U73122, did not inhibit the histamine release caused by methyl paraben. In Ca2+-free solution, PLC inhibitors (U73122 0.1 and 0.5 μM, D609 1–10 μM) inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas U73343 (0.5 μM) did not. Xestospongin C (2–20 μM) and 2 aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (30 and 100 μM), blockers of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in Ca2+-free solution. In conclusion, methyl paraben causes an increase in [Ca2+]i, which may be due to release of Ca2+ from storage sites by IP3 via activation of PLC in RPMCs. In addition, methyl paraben possibly has some inhibitory effects on histamine release via unknown mechanisms. PMID:12770943

  20. Characteristics of histamine release from rat mast cells in relation to the valency of the stimulating ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Healicon, R M; Foreman, J C

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the valency of a ligand and the subsequent characteristics of histamine release was investigated in rat peritoneal mast cells. The cells were passively sensitized to the DNP hapten and a series of DNP-human serum albumin conjugates of known valency were used to induce histamine release. The rate of release of histamine induced by these conjugates was independent of the DNP/HSA ratio when the ratio was between 71.3 and 7.2. Marked slowing of the release occurred as the ratio was reduced below 7.2. The rate of desensitization of the cells slowed as a continuous function as the DNP/HSA ratio was reduced. 45Calcium uptake measurements showed that the changes in histamine release were paralleled by changes in the membrane permeability to calcium. The rate of release of histamine from mast cells and the rate of desensitization of the cells are discussed in terms of the size of IgE receptor complexes on the cell membrane. PMID:2420710

  1. Histamine Induces ATP Release from Human Subcutaneous Fibroblasts, via Pannexin-1 Hemichannels, Leading to Ca2+ Mobilization and Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Rita; Paramos-de-Carvalho, Diogo; Certal, Mariana; Costa, Maria Adelina; Costa, Cristina; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Sévigny, Jean; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the regulation of connective tissue ATP-mediated mechano-transduction and remodeling may be an important link to the pathogenesis of chronic pain. It has been demonstrated that mast cell-derived histamine plays an important role in painful fibrotic diseases. Here we analyzed the involvement of ATP in the response of human subcutaneous fibroblasts to histamine. Acute histamine application caused a rise in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via H1 receptor activation. Histamine-induced [Ca2+]i rise was partially attenuated by apyrase, an enzyme that inactivates extracellular ATP, and by blocking P2 purinoceptors with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt and reactive blue 2. [Ca2+]i accumulation caused by histamine was also reduced upon blocking pannexin-1 hemichannels with 10Panx, probenecid, or carbenoxolone but not when connexin hemichannels were inhibited with mefloquine or 2-octanol. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, also did not block histamine-induced [Ca2+]i mobilization. Prolonged exposure of human subcutaneous fibroblast cultures to histamine favored cell growth and type I collagen synthesis via the activation of H1 receptor. This effect was mimicked by ATP and its metabolite, ADP, whereas the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, partially attenuated histamine-induced cell growth and type I collagen production. Expression of pannexin-1 and ADP-sensitive P2Y1 receptor on human subcutaneous fibroblasts was confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In conclusion, histamine induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts, via pannexin-1 hemichannels, leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization and cell growth through the cooperation of H1 and P2 (probably P2Y1) receptors. PMID:23918924

  2. Differential effect of cannabinoid agonists and endocannabinoids on histamine release from distinct regions of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Gabriele; Blandina, Patrizio; Mackie, Ken; Nosi, Daniele; Formigli, Lucia; Giannoni, Patrizia; Ballini, Chiara; Corte, Laura Della; Mannaioni, Pier Francesco; Passani, M. Beatrice

    2006-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert complex actions on neurotransmitter systems involved in cognition, locomotion, appetite, but no information was available so far on the interactions between the endocannabinoid system and histaminergic neurons that command several, similar behavioural states and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of cannabimimetic compounds on histamine release using the microdialysis technique in the brain of freely moving rats. We found that systemic administration of the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1-r) agonist arachidonyl-2′chloroethylamide/N-(2chloroethyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (ACEA; 3 mg/kg) increased histamine release from the posterior hypothalamus, where the histaminergic tuberomamillary nuclei (TMN) are located. Local infusions of ACEA (150 nM) or R(+)-methanandamide (mAEA; 1μM), another CB1-r agonist, in the TMN augmented histamine release from the TMN, as well as from two histaminergic projection areas, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis and the dorsal striatum. When the endocannabinoid uptake inhibitor AM404 was infused into the TMN, however, increased histamine release was observed only in the TMN. The cannabinoid-induced effects on histamine release were blocked by co-administrations with the CB1-r antagonist AM251. Using double-immunofluorescence labelling and confocal laser-scanning microscopy, CB1-r immunostaining was found in the hypothalamus, but was not localized onto histaminergic cells. The modulatory effect of cannabimimetic compounds on histamine release apparently did not involve inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission, which provides the main inhibitory input to the histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamus, as local infusions of ACEA did not modify GABA release from the TMN. These profound effects of cannabinoids on histaminergic neurotransmission may partially underlie some of the behavioural changes observed following exposure to cannabinoid-based drugs. PMID:17004927

  3. Dual effects of protoporphyrin and long wave ultraviolet light on histamine release from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, A.; Gigli, I.; Barrett, K.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of long wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and various doses of protoporphyrin (PP) on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells. We also correlated these results with morphologic characteristics and viability of the cells. PP at a dose of 30 ng/ml plus UVA-induced negligible histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), but was able to suppress the ability of the cells to release histamine in response to subsequent exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, or the combination of Ag and IgE. This functional change was associated with an increase in cell size, and cell lysis that gradually occurred during 24 h in culture. PP at a dose of 3 ng/ml plus UVA also significantly inhibited secretogogue-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, but this dose was not associated with significant changes in morphology or viability. These various effects of PP plus UVA were also observed with mast cell preparations obtained by the enzymatic dispersion of rat skin. The suppression of secretogogue-induced histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells treated with PP (3 ng/ml) and UVA could not be reversed by culturing the cells in the dark for 24 h in the absence of PP. Unlike the direct cytotoxic histamine releasing action of high doses of PP plus UVA, the suppressive effect of low PP doses could not be inhibited by catalase, but could be reduced by the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that PP plus UVA has dual effects on mast cells, apparently involving distinct mechanisms. This implies the possibility that PP and UVA at appropriate doses could be used in photochemotherapy of mast cell-mediated skin diseases.

  4. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

  5. Porcine mast cells infected with H1N1 influenza virus release histamine and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2017-04-01

    Mast cells reside in many tissues, including the lungs, and might play a role in enhancing influenza virus infections in animals. In this study, we cultured porcine mast cells from porcine bone marrow cells with IL-3 and stem cell factor to study the infectivity and activation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin. Porcine mast cells were infected with H1N1 influenza virus, without the subsequent production of infectious viruses but were activated, as indicated by the release of histamines. Inflammatory cytokine- and chemokine-encoding genes, including IL-1α, IL-6, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, were upregulated in the infected porcine mast cells. Our results suggest that mast cells could be involved in enhancing influenza-virus-mediated disease in infected animals.

  6. Modulation of histamine-induced Ca2+ release by protein kinase C. Effects on cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca2+] peaks.

    PubMed

    Montero, Mayte; Lobatón, Carmen D; Gutierrez-Fernández, Silvia; Moreno, Alfredo; Alvarez, Javier

    2003-12-12

    In HeLa cells, histamine induces production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) and release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Ca2+ release is typically biphasic, with a fast and brief initial phase, followed by a much slower and prolonged one. In the presence of inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), including staurosporine and the specific inhibitors GF109203X and Ro-31-8220, the fast phase continued until the ER became fully empty. On the contrary, treatment with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate inhibited Ca2+ release. Staurosporine had no effect on InsP3-induced Ca2+ release in permeabilized cells and did not modify either histamine-induced InsP3 production. These data suggest that histamine induces Ca2+ release and with a short lag activates PKC to down-regulate it. Consistently, Ca2+ oscillations induced by histamine were increased in amplitude and decreased in frequency in the presence of PKC inhibitors. We show also that mitochondrial [Ca2+] was much more sensitive to changes in ER-Ca2+ release induced by PKC modulation than cytosolic [Ca2+]. PKC inhibitors increased the histamine-induced mitochondrial [Ca2+] peak by 4-fold but increased the cytosolic [Ca2+] peak only by 20%. On the contrary, PKC activation inhibited the mitochondrial [Ca2+] peak by 90% and the cytosolic one by only 50%. Similarly, the combination of PKC inhibitors with the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter activator SB202190 led to dramatic increases in mitochondrial [Ca2+] peaks, with little effect on cytosolic ones. This suggests that activation of ER-Ca2+ release by PKC inhibitors could be involved in apoptosis induced by staurosporine. In addition, these mechanisms allow flexible and independent regulation of cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca2+] during cell stimulation.

  7. Simultaneous detection of histamine release and lactate production in rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 using sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizaki, Kazuo; Arizono, Naoki )

    1991-04-01

    {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate histamine release and lactate production in intact mast cells isolated from rats. The resonance lines of the aromatic histamine protons in mast cells, detected by the selective spin-excitation technique, were broader and located in a lower magnetic field than those in free histamine solution. When exocytosis of mast-cell granules was induced by compound 48/80, free histamine appeared, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of histamine in the mast cells; the lactate signal was also detected in the spectrum. On the addition of compound 48/ 80, there was a further release of histamine from mast cells, accompanied by further production of lactate. This result indicates that the mechanisms which induce the exocytosis of granules, and/or the events following exocytosis, activate glycolysis.

  8. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  9. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p < 0.001) and neuronal damage in dentate gyrus, CA1 and CA3. In contrast to SS-SE group, rats from the CG-SE group showed increased latency to the establishment of the status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment.

  10. Histamine released from epidermal keratinocytes plays a role in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced itching in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2015-11-01

    Sunburn, wound repair, and chronic renal failure with hemodialysis are usually accompanied by both pigmentation and itching. Proopiomelanocortin-derived α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is produced in response to external stimuli, such as UV irradiation, and is involved in cutaneous pigmentation. However, it is unclear whether α-MSH is also involved in the itching. We therefore investigated whether α-MSH elicited itch-related responses in mice. We found that an intradermal injection of α-MSH induced hind-paw scratching, an itch-related response, in mice. The α-MSH-induced scratching was inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. In mast cell-deficient mice, α-MSH also elicited scratching, which was inhibited by terfenadine. The immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, a key enzyme required for the production of histamine, histamine, and the melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors were shown in not only mast cells but also keratinocytes in murine skin. In addition to the expression of l-histidine decarboxylase and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors, the mouse keratinocyte cell lines (Pam212) also showed immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, histamine, and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors. The application of α-MSH induced the release of histamine from Pam212 cells. These findings indicate that α-MSH may play an important role in the itching associated with pigmented cutaneous lesions and that the histamine released from keratinocytes is involved in this α-MSH-induced itching.

  11. Role of histamine release in nonspecific vasodilatation during anodal and cathodal iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yoshihito; Droog, Erik J; Henricson, Joakim; Wikström, Thore; Lennquist, Sten; Sjöberg, Folke

    2004-03-01

    Nonspecific vasodilatation during iontophoresis is an important confounding factor in experimental pharmacology. In this investigation, we studied the involvement of sensory nerves and histamine-related reactions in causing nonspecific vasodilatation in a model of anodal and cathodal iontophoresis of sodium chloride. Firstly, we applied a mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) cream to confirm its suppressive effect on nonspecific vasodilatation and to measure its efficacy in three different dosages (duration: 1, 2, and 3 h). We then investigated the role of histamine in nonspecific vasodilatation by giving an oral antihistamine drug (cetirizine) to subjects who had and had not been given EMLA. We found substantial suppression of the nonspecific vasodilatation in all EMLA-treated groups (all dosages) compared with untreated controls (with suppression rates of 60-65%). Dosage had no significant effect. A further suppression of nonspecific vasodilatation was seen after oral cetirizine during anodal and cathodal iontophoresis in both EMLA-treated and untreated groups. The antihistamine effect was most pronounced during anodal iontophoresis. These results suggest a histaminergic increase in perfusion that may be independent of neurogenic mechanisms and depend on polarity (anode or cathode). Local nerve blocks (EMLA) together with cetirizine may therefore be used to reduce nonspecific vasodilatation in both anodal and cathodal iontophoresis.

  12. Histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan released by cultured human colonic mucosa: indication for possible presence of E mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eliakim, R.; Gilead, L.; Ligumsky, M; Okon, E.; Rachmilewitz, D.; Razin, E.

    1986-01-01

    An association between the release of histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan (PG) was demonstrates in human colonic mucosa (HCM). Colonic biopsy samples incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate into PG, which was partially released into the culture medium during the incubation period. Ascending thin-layer chromatography of the released /sup 35/S-labeled PG after its digestion by chondroitin ABC lyase (chondroitinase, EC 4.2.2.4) followed by autoradiography yielded three products that migrated in the position of monosulfated disaccharides of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate and N-acetylgalactosoamine 6-sulfate and of an oversulfated disaccharide possessing N-acetylgalatosamine 4,6-disulfate. Cultured colonic mucosa released 23.6 +/- 3.7ng of histamine per mg of wet tissue without any special trigger. Comparison by linear regression analysis of the release of histamine and chondroitin (/sup 35/S)sulfate E PG revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.7. Histological examination of the colonic biopsies revealed the presence of many mast cells in various degrees of degranulation in the mucosa and submucosa. The above correlation, the observation that most of the mast cells showed various degrees of degranulation, and the lack of heparin synthesis as opposed to the synthesis and immunological release of chondroitin sulfate E strongly suggest that the E mast cell exists in the human colon.

  13. Histamine receptors in isolated bovine oviductal arteries.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A C; Novella, S; Raposo, R; Recio, P; Labadía, A; Costa, G; Garcia-Sacristán, A; Benedito, S

    1997-05-20

    dilatation was practically abolished by mepyramine and also by indomethacin. The L-arginine analogue, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) inhibited the effect of histamine and basal production of nitric oxide. L-Arginine, which on its own induced significant endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, reversed the effect of L-NAME on histamine relaxation. Indomethacin only caused a slight modification of the sensitivity of the vessels to histamine, suggesting that prostacyclin or other cyclo-oxygenase products did not make a significant contribution to the model. The absence of the endothelium did not modify the contractile effect of histamine. The results suggest that the relaxant response of isolated oviductal arteries to histamine is dependent on the functional integrity of the endothelium and is mainly mediated by histamine H1 receptors. These receptors may mask a minority presence of histamine H3 contractile receptors located on smooth muscle. The main relaxing factor released from the endothelium by mediation of histamine is nitric oxide, which may also exert an effect on vascular tone.

  14. The characteristics of inhibition of histamine release from human lung fragments by sodium cromoglycate, salbutamol and chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Church, Martin K.; Young, Kevin D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Three drugs have been tested for activity against antigen-induced histamine release from passively sensitized human lung fragments after increasing periods of pre-incubation before challenge. 2 After 30 s pre-incubation, sodium cromoglycate inhibited histamine release in the concentration range 0.2-200 μM, producing a maximum inhibition of 33.0%. As the pretreatment period was extended, tolerance developed in a dose-related manner, resulting in a 48.3% and 82.8% loss of activity of the 200 μM dose after 60 min and 19 h pre-incubation, respectively. Tolerance was independent of extracellular calcium and was poorly reversible. Lung tissue desensitized to cromoglycate was cross-tolerant to the related drug, bufrolin, but not to salbutamol or chlorpromazine. 3 In acute studies, salbutamol (0.03-3.0 μM) produced dose-related inhibition of histamine release, with a maximum inhibition of 72.2%. The effect was blocked stereoselectively by 1 μM propranolol, suggesting that it occurred through an interaction with lung β-adrenoceptors. Increasing the pre-incubation time with salbutamol from 30 s to 19 h did not produce tolerance. Inhibition produced by incubation with salbutamol for 19 h was totally prevented when propranolol was added at the beginning of the pre-incubation period, indicating that it resulted from stimulation of β-receptors and not from a non-specific or toxic effect. However, studies of reversibility of effect through washing or late addition of propranolol did indicate some change in the nature of salbutamol inhibition with time. 4 Chlorpromazine was a weak inhibitor of immunological histamine release. A 100 μM concentration was ineffective after 30 s pre-incubation but its activity increased with time. Pre-incubation of lung fragments with this concentration for 1 h or longer, or with a 1 mM dose for a shorter period, provoked histamine release in the absence of antigen. Effects of chlorpromazine were not reversed by washing. 5 The different

  15. The Effects of Electrical Stimuli on Calcium Change and Histamine Release in Rat Basophilic Leukemia Mast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Zu-Hui; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2013-06-01

    We apply electric fields at different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 kHz to the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells in calcium-containing or calcium-free buffers. The stimuli cause changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i as well as the histamine. The [Ca2+]i increases when the frequency of the external electric field increases from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, and then decreases when the frequency further increases from 10 kHz to 100 kHz, showing a peak at 100 kHz. A similar frequency dependence of the histamine release is also found. The [Ca2+]i and the histamine releases at 100 Hz are about the same as the values of the control group with no electrical stimulation. The ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor to the TRPV (transient receptor potential (TRP) family V) channels across the cell membrane, is used in the experiment to check whether the electric field stimuli act on the TRPV channels. Under an electric field of 10 kHz, the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-concentration buffer is about 3.5 times as much as that of the control group with no electric stimulation, while the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-free buffer is only about 2.2 times. Similar behavior is also found for the histamine release. RR blockage effect on the [Ca2+]i decrease is statistically significant (~75%) when mast cells in the buffer with calcium are stimulated with a 10 kHz electric field in comparison with the result without the RR treatment. This proves that TRPVs are the channels that calcium ions inflow through from the extracellular environment under electrical stimuli. Under this condition, the histamine is also released following a similar way. We suggest that, as far as an electric stimulation is concerned, an application of ac electric field of 10 kHz is better than other frequencies to open TRPV channels in mast cells, and this would cause a significant calcium influx resulting in a significant histamine release, which could be one of the mechanisms for electric therapy.

  16. Effect of various GABA-receptor agonists and antagonists on anaphylactic histamine release in the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Luzzi, S; Franchi-Micheli, S; Ciuffi, M; Rosi, E; Zilletti, L

    1987-04-01

    In this paper we confirm the previously reported inhibition by GABA of anaphylactic histamine release from isolated guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle. Moreover we report that: GABA-inhibition of anaphylactic histamine release is mimicked both by GABA-A and GABA-B agonists; both GABA-A and GABA-B antagonists are effective in reversing GABA's inhibitory effect; the effect is exerted specifically by GABA-ergic drugs: taurine and beta-alanine are ineffective; the GABA-ergic effect seems not to involve cholinergic and adrenergic transmission. It is concluded that it might be interesting to assess the clinical value of GABA-ergic drugs in allergic gut disorders.

  17. Histamine release-neutralization assay for sera of patients with atopic dermatitis and/or cholinergic urticaria is useful to screen type I hypersensitivity against sweat antigens.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Hajime; Ishii, Kaori; Yanase, Yuhki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hide, Michihiro

    2012-10-01

    We previously reported that about 80 % of patients with atopic dermatitis and 60 % with cholinergic urticaria revealed type I allergy against sweat, by means of skin test against autologous sweat and/or histamine-release test for peripheral blood basophils with semi-purified sweat antigen. In this study, we developed an assay for sera to neutralize histamine-releasing activity of semi-purified sweat antigen. The semi-purified sweat antigen was pre-incubated with serially diluted sera for 30 min at 37 °C and was subjected to histamine-release activity. Histamine release-neutralization (HRN) activities were calculated by measuring the amount of histamine release from basophils in the presence or absence of semi-purified sweat antigen. Of 62 subjects, 39 showed positive histamine release (≥5 %) from their basophils in response to semi-purified sweat antigen, and sera of 34 out of 39 subjects (87.2 %) were also positive in HRN activity (≥10 %). The specificity of the HRN assay was 0.522. Moreover, HRN activities in sera were largely correlated with degrees of histamine release from peripheral blood basophils of the same donors in response to sweat antigen. To identify the substance that neutralizes histamine-release activity, we removed IgE and IgG from the sera of HRN (+) subjects by column chromatography. The HRN activities in 30 out of 42 sera were largely reduced by the removal of IgG. On the other hand, sera of four subjects lost HRN activity by the removal of IgE, suggesting that the majority of HRN (+) subjects have serum IgG against the sweat antigen as well as IgE bound to peripheral basophils. Thus, the HRN assay maybe useful for the screening of type I allergy against sweat antigen.

  18. Simultaneous detection of gastric acid and histamine release to unravel the regulation of acid secretion from the guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Bitziou, Eleni; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-08-01

    Gastric acid secretion is regulated by three primary components that activate the parietal cell: histamine, gastrin, and acetylcholine (ACh). Although much is known about these regulatory components individually, little is known on the interplay of these multiple activators and the degree of regulation they pose on the gastric acid secretion mechanism. We utilized a novel dual-sensing approach, where an iridium oxide sensor was used to monitor pH and a boron-doped diamond electrode was used for the detection of histamine from in vitro guinea pig stomach mucosal sections. Under basal conditions, gastrin was shown to be the main regulatory component of the total acid secretion and directly activated the parietal cell rather than by mediating gastric acid secretion through the release of histamine from the enterochromaffin-like cell, although both pathways were active. Under stimulated conditions with ACh, the gastrin and histamine components of the total acid secretion were not altered compared with levels observed under basal conditions, suggestive that ACh had no direct effect on the enterochromaffin-like cell and G cell. These data identify a new unique approach to investigate the regulation pathways active during acid secretion and the degree that they are utilized to drive total gastric acid secretion. The findings of this study will enhance our understanding on how these signaling mechanisms vary under pathophysiology or therapeutic management.

  19. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms.

  20. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  1. Effects of C18 Fatty Acids on Intracellular Ca(2+) Mobilization and Histamine Release in RBL-2H3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Chul; Kim, Min Gyu; Jo, Young Soo; Song, Ho Sun; Eom, Tae In; Sim, Sang Soo

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of C18 fatty acids (stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) on mast cells, we measured the effect of C18 fatty acids on intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and histamine release in RBL-2H3 mast cells. Stearic acid rapidly increased initial peak of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid gradually increased this mobilization. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), stearic acid (100 µM) did not cause any increase of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid increased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, but the increase was smaller than that in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+). These results suggest that C18 fatty acid-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization is mainly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Verapamil dose-dependently inhibited stearic acid-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, but did not affect both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. These data suggest that the underlying mechanism of stearic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid on intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization may differ. Linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid significantly increased histamine release. Linoleic acid (C18:2: ω-6)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and histamine release were more prominent than α-linolenic acid (C18:3: ω-3). These data support the view that the intake of more α-linolenic acid than linoleic acid is useful in preventing inflammation.

  2. Effects of C18 Fatty Acids on Intracellular Ca2+ Mobilization and Histamine Release in RBL-2H3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Chul; Kim, Min Gyu; Jo, Young Soo; Song, Ho Sun; Eom, Tae In

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of C18 fatty acids (stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) on mast cells, we measured the effect of C18 fatty acids on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and histamine release in RBL-2H3 mast cells. Stearic acid rapidly increased initial peak of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid gradually increased this mobilization. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, stearic acid (100 µM) did not cause any increase of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid increased intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, but the increase was smaller than that in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These results suggest that C18 fatty acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization is mainly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Verapamil dose-dependently inhibited stearic acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, but did not affect both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. These data suggest that the underlying mechanism of stearic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization may differ. Linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid significantly increased histamine release. Linoleic acid (C18:2: ω-6)-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and histamine release were more prominent than α-linolenic acid (C18:3: ω-3). These data support the view that the intake of more α-linolenic acid than linoleic acid is useful in preventing inflammation. PMID:24976764

  3. Comparative study of the membrane-permeabilizing activities of mastoparans and related histamine-releasing agents in bacteria, erythrocytes, and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Satoshi; Komagoe, Keiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Katsu, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The membrane-permeabilizing activities of mastoparans and related histamine-releasing agents were compared through measurements of K(+) efflux from bacteria, erythrocytes, and mast cells. Changes in bacterial cell viability, hemolysis, and histamine release, as well as in the shape of erythrocytes were also investigated. The compounds tested were mastoparans (HR1, a mastoparan from Polistes jadwagae, and a mastoparan from Vespula lewisii), granuliberin R, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and compound 48/80, as well as antimicrobial peptides, such as magainin I, magainin II, gramicidin S, and melittin. We used a K(+)-selective electrode to determine changes in the permeability to K(+) of the cytoplasmic membranes of cells. Consistent with the surface of mast cells becoming negatively charged during histamine release, due to the translocation of phosphatidylserine to the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, histamine-releasing agents induced K(+) efflux from mast cells, dependent on their ability to increase the permeability of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes rich in negatively charged phospholipids. The present results demonstrated that amphiphilic peptides, possessing both histamine-releasing and antimicrobial capabilities, induced the permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membranes of not only bacteria but mast cells. Mastoparans increased the permeability of membranes in human erythrocytes at higher concentrations, and changed the normal discoid shape to a crenated form. The structural requirement for making the crenated form was determined using compound 48/80 and its constituents (monomer, dimer, and trimer), changing systematically the number of cationic charges of the molecules.

  4. Plasma histamine concentration and histamine detection in peripheral blood eosinophils in cats.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Michiyo; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2006-10-01

    Plasma histamine levels were measured in 11 clinically healthy cats and 15 cats with allergic dermatitis. Histamine levels were markedly elevated in 5/15 allergic cats. A calcium ionophore, A23187, stimulates histamine release from feline peripheral blood cells. Immunostaining of blood smears from clinically healthy cats revealed that approximately 10% of eosinophils possessed histamine-containing granules. These results indicate that some peripheral eosinophils in cats contain histamine and can release histamine by appropriate stimulation.

  5. [Cerebral ischemia and histamine].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoto

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces excess release of glutamate and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which provoke catastrophic enzymatic processes leading to irreversible neuronal injury. Histamine plays the role of neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and histaminergic fibers are widely distributed in the brain. In cerebral ischemia, release of histamine from nerve endings has been shown to be enhanced by facilitation of its activity. An inhibition of the histaminergic activity in ischemia aggravates the histologic outcome. In contrast, intracerebroventricular administration of histamine improves the aggravation, whereas blockade of histamine H2 receptors aggravates ischemic injury. Furthermore, H2 blockade enhances ischemic release of glutamate and dopamine. These findings suggest that central histamine provides beneficial effects against ischemic neuronal damage by suppressing release of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, histaminergic H2 action facilitates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and shows deleterious effects on cerebral edema.

  6. Preliminary characterization of diacylglycerol generation in human basophils: temporal relationship to histamine release and resolution of degranulation.

    PubMed

    Oriente, A; Hundley, T; Hubbard, W C; MacGlashan, D W

    1997-05-01

    Purified human basophils were examined for changes in diacylglycerol levels to determine whether the transient nature of a N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) -stimulated elevation in membrane protein kinase C (PKC) activity could be explained by the transient production of diacylglycerol (DAG). In preliminary experiments total DAG levels were measured by the DAG kinase assay. Although elevations followed stimulation with 1 microM fMLP (basal levels of 15 pmol/10(6) basophils vs. 45 pmol/10(6) basophils at the 3-min time point), there were no detectable changes in the first 60 s of the reaction. Histamine release is typically complete by 30-45 s. Measurement of inositol trisphosphate indicated a rapid increase by 5 s of 2.5 pmol/10(6) basophils. If DAG were produced at similar levels, the DAG kinase assay would not have detected the elevation. Consequently, fMLP-stimulated basophils were examined for changes in 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoyl, 3-sn-glycerol (SA-DAG) and 1-oleoyl, 2-arachidonoyl, 3-sn-glycerol by GC-NICIMS (negative ion chemical ionization mass spectroscopy). A 5-s elevation in these two species averaged 2 pmol/10(6) basophils, consistent with the inositol trisphosphate levels and occurring during the period of histamine release. However, a much more pronounced second phase to the SA-DAG response also occurred, mirroring the total DAG levels. This second phase of the DAG response, either total or SA-DAG, was transient on a time scale temporally coincident with the appearance and resolution of degranulation sacs as measured by fluorescence microscopy. These data suggest that there is selective generation of DAG species in the early reaction and the later appearance of DAG may be related to the formation and resolution of granule structures that follow the secretion of histamine.

  7. Development and validation of a liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to determine in vitro and in vivo histamine release.

    PubMed

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Pang, Eric; Weaver, James L; Howard, Kristina E; Patel, Vikram; Boyne, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is an important biogenic amine involved in regulating numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes in humans and animals. To date, there have been very few studies focused on developing and validating sensitive liquid-chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assays capable of quantitative trace level histamine analysis in biological matrices. In the present study, a rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS assay, amenable to high throughput analysis was developed and validated to characterize in vitro and in vivo histamine release. The LC-MS/MS procedure incorporating deuterium labeled internal standards provides rapid resolution of histamine with excellent sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Histamine eluted at 1.5 min and was well separated from endogenous plasma peaks. The total run time of the assay was 8.0 min. A linear (r(2) ≥ 0.99) instrument response over the entire concentration range of 1.0-1000 ng/mL was observed. Excellent accuracy (error ± 3.4%) and precision (CV ± 10%) of the assay was demonstrated, with the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) at 15.6 ng/mL. The validated LC-MS/MS assay was applied to determine histamine release in both in vitro and in vivo models. Peritoneal mast cells treated with prototypical degranulating agents (Compound 48/80 and Teicoplanin) showed that the two chemicals caused approximately 40% histamine release. In rats, using this assay, basal histamine plasma levels were typically under 100 ng/mL. Treatment with an agent suspected of causing anaphylactic type reactions resulted in plasma histamine levels to increase above 3000 ng/mL. The LC-MS/MS assay presented in this study can be applied to further characterize the physiological and pathophysiological role of histamine release in complex in vitro and in vivo models. Importantly, the LC-MS/MS assay may be useful in assessing active pharmaceutical ingredient-mediated degranulation and anaphylaxis as part of either a pre-market or a post

  8. Radiation-Released Histamine in the Rhesus Monkey as Modified by Mast Cell Depletion and Antihistamine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    radiation of two untreated monkeys, four monkeys given chlorpheniramine 30 minutes before irradiation and four monkeys treated with 48/80 for four...antagonist, chlorpheniramine ’ (3 mg/kg), 30 minutes before irradiation. Experiment 3. Seven monkeys were given aminoguanidine and 30 minutes later the...4000-rad dose of ionizing radiation in animals receiving no treatment. When the animals were pretreated with chlorpheniramine , the histamine

  9. Histamine H3-receptor stimulation is unable to modulate noradrenaline release by the isolated rat heart during ischaemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Mazenot, C; Durand, A; Ribuot, C; Demenge, P; Godin-Ribuot, D

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of H3-histaminergic prejunctional receptors to modulate the noradrenaline release induced by myocardial ischaemia in the rat, and the effects of an eventual modulation on haemodynamic, biochemical and electrophysiological parameters. Isolated rat hearts were perfused according to the Langendorff technique. Control hearts (n = 13) were not treated; two groups were treated with the H3-agonist R-alpha-methyl-histamine at 0.3 microM (n = 14) and 1 microM (n = 11) and one group, used as positive control, was treated with the selective alpha 2-agonist Mivazerol at 0.5 microM (n = 14) added to the perfusion medium. Noradrenaline, lactate and transaminase output in the coronary effluent, as well as various haemodynamic and electrophysiological parameters, were measured during global and total ischaemia (30 min) and reperfusion (30 min). alpha 2-receptor stimulation increased ischaemia-induced noradrenaline release during reperfusion (195 +/- 13 vs. 145 +/- 12 pmol.g-1 in control group, P < 0.05). In contrast, R-alpha-methyl-histamine, at both doses, did not significantly modify these parameters. Both treatments did not affect ischaemia- and reperfusion-induced haemodynamic (decrease in heart rate or in left ventricular developed pressure), biochemical (lactate and GOT release) and electrophysiological (arrhythmias or increase in action potential duration) alterations. Unlike other species, the rat appears to be insensitive to H3-histaminergic receptor modulation of ischaemia-induced noradrenaline release, although a modulation can be seen with other prejunctional receptor agonists.

  10. Comparison of the effect of an H(3)-inverse agonist on energy intake and hypothalamic histamine release in normal mice and leptin resistant mice with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Hatano, Kouta; Murotani, Tomotaka; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2008-04-09

    Leptin is a key signal linking peripheral adiposity levels to the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. The injection of leptin decreases body weight and food intake in lean rodents; however, in a rodent model of high fat diet-induced obesity (DIO), the exogenous leptin cannot improve adiposity. This ineffectiveness is known as leptin resistance, and the factors downstream of leptin signaling have received attention as viable targets in the treatment of obesity. We previously reported that the histaminergic system is one of the targets of leptin. In the present study, the effect of an H(3)-receptor inverse agonist on hypothalamic histamine release and energy intake was investigated in normal and DIO mice. Leptin (1.3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased hypothalamic histamine release and reduced 12 h-energy intake in normal mice, but had no such effects in DIO mice. In contrast, clobenpropit (5 mg/kg, i.p.), an H(3)-inverse agonist, elicited a significant increase in histamine release in both types of mice. Clobenpropit did not reduce 12 h-energy intake; however, it decreased 3 h-energy intake in both types of mice. These results suggest that lack of the activation of the histaminergic system partly contributes to obesity in DIO mice and direct activation of the histaminergic system circumvents leptin resistance.

  11. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in pig retina discs.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Schunack, W; Göthert, M

    1990-11-01

    Discs of pig retina were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, 3H-dopamine or 3H-serotonin and then superfused. Electrical field stimulation increased the outflow of tritium from discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline or 3H-dopamine, but no from discs preincubated with 3H-serotonin. The tritium content at the end of superfusion was similar in discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline or 3H-dopamine but about tenfold lower in discs preincubated with 3H-serotonin. The tritium content in discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline was markedly reduced when desipramine was present during preincubation but was not affected by selective inhibitors of dopamine and serotonin uptake. The tritium content in discs preincubated with 3H-dopamine and 3H-serotonin, in contrast, was reduced or tended to be reduced by a selective dopamine and serotonin uptake inhibitor, respectively. The electrically evoked overflow of tritium from discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline was abolished by tetrodotoxin or omission of Ca2+. In discs superfused with desipramine, the electrically evoked overflow was enhanced by phentolamine but not affected by histamine. When both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium, histamine inhibited the evoked overflow (pIC15 6.85). This effect was mimicked by the histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine as well as by its S-(+)-enantiomer (pIC15 7.85 and 5.30, respectively) but not by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (each 10 mumol/l).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Studies on the release of leukotrienes and histamine by human lung parenchymal and bronchial fragments upon immunologic and nonimmunologic stimulation. Effects of nordihydroguaiaretic acid, aspirin, and sodium cromoglycate

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Fragments of human lung parenchyma or bronchi were studied by high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and bioassay for the biosynthesis of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, and by radioenzymatic assay for the release of histamine, upon immunologic and nonimmunologic stimulation. Human lung parenchyma were passively sensitized with serum from timothy- positive allergic patients (radioallergosorbent test, 30-40%) and challenged with 0.5 microgram/ml of timothy allergen. Analysis of the incubation media showed the presence of LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, LTE4, and histamine. Maximum release of LTB4 and LTD4 was observed after 15 min of challenge (92.8 +/- 21, and 67.8 +/- 14 pmol/g tissue wet weight, respectively; mean +/- SEM) whereas maximum release of LTC4 was observed after 5 min of challenge (25 +/- 7.1 pmol). In parallel to leukotriene formation, histamine was released rapidly and reached a maximum after approximately 15 min of challenge (2.85 +/- 0.76 nmol/g tissue). When fragments of human lung parenchyma were stimulated with ionophore A23187 (4 microM), we observed a profile of leukotriene and histamine release similar to that seen in response to the allergen. Ionophore A23187 stimulated the release of two- to fivefold greater amounts of leukotrienes and histamine than did the allergen. Release of LTC4 and histamine was maximal after 5 min of stimulation (83 +/- 22.2 and 5.2 +/- 0.95 nmol/g tissue, respectively), whereas LTB4 and LTD4 release reached a maximum after 15 min (438 +/- 66.6 and 205 +/- 68 nmol/g tissue, respectively). In addition, human lung parenchyma metabolized LTB4 into omega-OH-LTB4 and omega-COOH-LTB4. This tissue also released 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-Hete), 12-Hete, and 15- Hete. Fragments of human lung bronchi also released a similar profile of leukotrienes (except LTC4) and histamine when challenged with the allergen or ionophore A23187. Maximum release of LTB4 and LTD4 by allergen or

  13. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits dopamine synthesis but not release or uptake in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Miranda, Guillermo; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effect of activating histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) on rat nucleus accumbens (rNAcc) dopaminergic transmission by analyzing [(3)H]-dopamine uptake by synaptosomes, and dopamine synthesis and depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release in slices. The uptake of [(3)H]-dopamine by rNAcc synaptosomes was not affected by the H3R agonist RAMH (10(-10)-10(-6) M). In rNAcc slices perfusion with RAMH (1 μM) had no significant effect on [(3)H]-dopamine release evoked by depolarization with 30 mM K(+) (91.4 ± 4.5% of controls). The blockade of dopamine D2 autoreceptors with sulpiride (1 μM) enhanced K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release (168.8 ± 15.5% of controls), but under this condition RAMH (1 μM) also failed to affect [(3)H]-dopamine release. Dopamine synthesis was evaluated in rNAcc slices incubated with the l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) decarboxylase inhibitor NSD-1015 (1 mM). Forskolin-induced DOPA accumulation (220.1 ± 10.4% of controls) was significantly reduced by RAMH (41.1 ± 6.5% and 43.5 ± 9.1% inhibition at 100 nM and 1 μM, respectively), and this effect was prevented by the H3R antagonist ciproxifan (10 μM). DOPA accumulation induced by preventing cAMP degradation with IBMX (iso-butyl-methylxantine, 1 mM) or by activating receptors for the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) with PACAP-27 (1 μM) was reduced (IBMX) or prevented (PACAP-27) by RAMH (100 nM). In contrast, DOPA accumulation induced by 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 mM) was not affected by RAMH (100 nM). These results indicate that in rNAcc H3Rs do not modulate dopamine uptake or release, but regulate dopamine synthesis by inhibiting cAMP formation and thus PKA activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  14. [In vitro comparative study of the protective effect of different theophyllines on the leucocytes' histamine-release induced by antigen (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Biot, N; Grosclaude, M; Kofman, J; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1980-01-01

    The recent discovery of the protective action of xanthic bases towards histamine-release consecutive to the antigen-antibody reaction led the authors to study the importance of this protection induced by various theophylline derivatives. The technique used was that described by LICHTENSTEIN and OSLER: isolation of leucocytes, measurement of histamine liberated in the presence of antigen, same measurement done in the presence of antigen and theophylline. The antigens used were: house dust, Dermatophagoides pteronyssimus (DP), graminaceae pollens. The tested theophyllines were: the theophylline base, aminophylline, bamiphylline, diprophylline, thio theo, piperazine acefilinate. All these substances studied brought a reduction of the histamine-release but according to a variable frequency and intensity: the thio theo, the diprophylline and the piperazine acefilinate gave the best results. Besides the latters are clearer when the antigen was dust or DP. This study enables the confirmation of the inhibiting action of theophyllines on histamine-release induced by antigen, but complementary studies on a larger number of cases seem necessary in order to determine precisely the most efficient derivatives.

  15. Controlled-release formulation of antihistamine based on cetirizine zinc-layered hydroxide nanocomposites and its effect on histamine release from basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samer; Ali, Hussein Al; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    A controlled-release formulation of an antihistamine, cetirizine, was synthesized using zinc-layered hydroxide as the host and cetirizine as the guest. The resulting well-ordered nanolayered structure, a cetirizine nanocomposite “CETN,” had a basal spacing of 33.9 Å, averaged from six harmonics observed from X-ray diffraction. The guest, cetirizine, was arranged in a horizontal bilayer between the zinc-layered hydroxide (ZLH) inorganic interlayers. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies indicated that the intercalation takes place without major change in the structure of the guest and that the thermal stability of the guest in the nanocomposites is markedly enhanced. The loading of the guest in the nanocomposites was estimated to be about 49.4% (w/w). The release study showed that about 96% of the guest could be released in 80 hours by phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 compared with about 97% in 73 hours at pH 4.8. It was found that release was governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. Release of histamine from rat basophilic leukemia cells was found to be more sensitive to the intercalated cetirizine in the CETN compared with its free counterpart, with inhibition of 56% and 29%, respectively, at 62.5 ng/mL. The cytotoxicity assay toward Chang liver cells line show the IC50 for CETN and ZLH are 617 and 670 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:22848164

  16. Controlled-release formulation of antihistamine based on cetirizine zinc-layered hydroxide nanocomposites and its effect on histamine release from basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Samer; Al Ali, Hussein; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Zobir Hussein, Mohd; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Nazrul Hakim, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    A controlled-release formulation of an antihistamine, cetirizine, was synthesized using zinc-layered hydroxide as the host and cetirizine as the guest. The resulting well-ordered nanolayered structure, a cetirizine nanocomposite "CETN," had a basal spacing of 33.9 Å, averaged from six harmonics observed from X-ray diffraction. The guest, cetirizine, was arranged in a horizontal bilayer between the zinc-layered hydroxide (ZLH) inorganic interlayers. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies indicated that the intercalation takes place without major change in the structure of the guest and that the thermal stability of the guest in the nanocomposites is markedly enhanced. The loading of the guest in the nanocomposites was estimated to be about 49.4% (w/w). The release study showed that about 96% of the guest could be released in 80 hours by phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 compared with about 97% in 73 hours at pH 4.8. It was found that release was governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. Release of histamine from rat basophilic leukemia cells was found to be more sensitive to the intercalated cetirizine in the CETN compared with its free counterpart, with inhibition of 56% and 29%, respectively, at 62.5 ng/mL. The cytotoxicity assay toward Chang liver cells line show the IC₅₀ for CETN and ZLH are 617 and 670 μg/mL, respectively.

  17. H1-histamine receptors may mediate the contractile response of guinea-pig ileum to 'histamine-free' splenic extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Ainz, L. F.; Casis, E.; de Gandarias, J. M.; Gil-Rodrigo, C. E.; Goiriena de Gandarias, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A water-soluble splenic factor, which produces a contractile response of the guinea-pig ileum, that is resistant to cholinoceptor and adrenoceptor antagonists is described. The ileal contractions elicited by the splenic extract showed some significant differences from those elicited by 5-hydroxytryptamine. The responses to splenic extract were not affected by the D-tryptamine-receptor antagonist, methysergide. The effect of the splenic extract on the guinea-pig ileum was similar to that of histamine. The H1-histamine antagonists, (+)-chloropheniramine and diphenhydramine, caused a parallel shift to the right of the splenic extract dose-response curve without suppression of the maximum response. A pA2 value of 8.97 +/- 0.03 for (+)-chloropheniramine and 7.55 +/- 0.1 for diphenhydramine was calculated. Significant histamine levels, as determined by fluorometric methods, could not be detected in the splenic extract. Likewise, the splenic factor did not release histamine from the intestinal preparation. These results support the view that: (i) the splenic factor acts through H1-histamine receptors; (ii) it is not histamine; (iii) it does not have any histamine releasing effect on the ileal smooth muscle. PMID:6652334

  18. In vitro histamine release from basophils of asthmatic and atopic individuals in D/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, R.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1982-05-01

    It was found that spontaneous histamine release from human basophils in H/sub 2/O-based buffers is negligible; in D/sub 2/O-based buffers, however, release is observed with the cells of some donors. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed release from the basophils of 1 of 22 control individuals (5%), 15 of 47 patients with allergic rhinitis (32%), and 14 of 20 asthmatic patients (70%). The difference between both patient groups and controls and between atopics and asthmatics was highly significant. That D/sub 2/O release was not cytotoxic is suggested by the finding that 37/sup 0/ was optimal, with inhibition at 4/sup 0/C or 46/sup 0/C as well as by EDTA, 2-deoxyglucose, and dibromoacetophenone, an inhibitor of phospholipase A/sub 2/. The release mechanism was unusual in that dibutyryl cAMP and agonists that cause an increase in cAMP lead to no inhibition. No correlation was noted between the total serum IgE level (and thus the number of IgE receptors on the basophil surface) and the magnitude of D/sub 2/O release. No increase in D/sub 2/O release was observed in 17 ragweed-sensitive patients through a ragweed season. A unique property of D/sub 2/O release was the loss of reactivity by preincubating cells at 37/sup 0/C for 30 min before adding D/sub 2/O. Non-D/sub 2/O-reactive cells could be ''converted'' to D/sub 2/O-reactive cells by incubation with antigen in the whole blood phase during leukocyte isolation; these cells showed the same loss of releaseability at 37/sup 0/C and an inhibitor profile similar to D/sub 2/O-responsive cells from ragweed allergic or asthmatic patients. We suggest that D/sub 2/O-based buffers reveal, in atopic and asthmatic patients, in vivo basophil activation; whether this is due to IgE cross-links, to C split products, or to other stimuli is not yet clear.

  19. Recommended for release on recognizance: factors affecting pretrial release recommendations.

    PubMed

    Petee, T A

    1994-06-01

    Researchers have acknowledged the influence of pretrial release agencies in judicial decision making regarding bail; however, few researchers have focused on the process used by the pretrial release agencies to make bail-bond recommendations. In this study I sought to establish which factors were most salient in making the decision to recommend a defendant for release on recognizance. I found that both officially sanctioned release criteria and "extralegal" variables were predictive of this decision.

  20. Plasma histamine and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis at various stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Hagel, A F; de Rossi, T; Konturek, P C; Albrecht, H; Walker, S; Hahn, E G; Raithel, M

    2015-08-01

    Mast cells secrete numerous mediators and this study investigated plasma levels of histamine, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Plasma levels of histamine were determined in 68 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 22 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 13 controls. TNF-α levels were assessed in 29 CD patients, 11 UC patients, and in 11 controls. Plasma histamine levels in the control group were 0.25 ng (0.14 - 0.33) and showed no difference to CD (0.19 ng, 0.09 - 0.35) or UC (0.23 ng, 0.11 - 0.60). Significantly lower histamine levels were only found in CD patients on 5-aminosalicylic acid treatment (P ≤ 0.04). Plasma TNF-α levels in the control group were significantly lower 0.44 ml/m(2) (0 - 1.15) than in CD patients (4.62 ml/m(2), 1.82 - 9.22, P = 0.005) or UC (3.14 ml/m(2); 0.08 - 11.34, P = 0.01). In CD disease activity, fistula, and extraintestinal manifestations (EM) were associated with significantly higher plasma TNF-α values, but not the type of treatment. We concluded that in contrast to TNF-α, histamine levels were normal in CD and UC. There is no correlation with histamine and thus the proportion of TNF-α secreted from mast cells in the plasma in patients with IBD is less important.

  1. Stimulation by thimerosal of histamine-induced Ca(2+) release in intact HeLa cells seen with aequorin targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Montero, M; Barrero, M J; Torrecilla, F; Lobatón, C D; Moreno, A; Alvarez, J

    2001-09-01

    The oxidizing thiol reagent, thimerosal, has been shown to activate reversibly the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptor in several cell types. We have studied here the effects of thimerosal by monitoring the [Ca(2+)] inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of intact HeLa cells with targeted aequorin. We show that thimerosal produced little effects on the ER-Ca(2+)-pump and only slightly increased the ER-Ca(2+)-leak in intact cells. Instead, thimerosal increased the sensitivity to histamine of ER-Ca(2+)-release by about two orders of magnitude, made the response much more prolonged at saturating histamine concentrations and enhanced both cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] responses to histamine. Moreover, inhibition of ER-Ca(2+)release by cytosolic [Ca(2+)] microdomains was fully preserved and sensitive to BAPTA-loading, and histamine-induced Ca(2+) release remained quantal in the presence of both thimerosal and intracellular BAPTA. The effects of thimerosal were reversible in the presence of dithiotreitol, suggesting the possible presence of a physiological redox regulatory mechanism. However, in permeabilized cells thimerosal potentiated InsP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release but oxidized glutathione had no effect. In addition, thimerosal increased the [Ca(2+)](ER) steady-state level in permeabilized cells. Thimerosal partially inhibited also plasma membrane Ca(2+)extrusion and increased Ca(2+)(Mn(2+)) entry through the plasma membrane, both phenomena contributing to increase the steady-state cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Thimerosal-induced Ca(2+) entry was additive to that induced by emptying of the ER, suggesting that store-operated Ca(2+) channels may not be involved. These results provide new insights on the mechanisms of activation and inactivation of InsP(3) receptors.

  2. Structure-activity relationship of a series of 17 parabens and related compounds for histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells and skin allergic reaction in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Uramaru, Naoto; Inoue, Toshio; Watanabe, Yoko; Shigematsu, Hidenari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Parabens, which are a homologous series of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, have been used as preservatives in cosmetics, medicines and foods because of their antimicrobial activity. However, parabens in cosmetics have been suspected to cause allergic contact dermatitis. In this study, we examined paraben-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and skin reaction in guinea pigs using a series of 17 parabens with different alcohol side chains, ranging from methylparaben to dodecylparaben. Octylparaben showed the greatest histamine release-inducing activity from mast cells, and the activity was decreased in shorter- and longer-side-chain parabens. Octyl benzoate, octyl o-hydroxybenzoate and phenyloctane caused no significant degranulation of mast cells, whereas octyl m-hydroxybenzoate, octyl p-hydroxybenzoate and octyl phenol induced concentration-related degranulation. Metabolites of these parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) did not show histamine release-inducing activity. In the guinea pig skin reaction test, heptylparaben induced a typical strong skin reaction, while butylparaben induced a typical weak skin reaction, and methylparaben and dodecylparaben were inactive. Metabolites of parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) were also inactive. These results indicate that interaction of parabens with rat mast cells requires a minimum length and adequate lipophilicity of the alkyl side chain. Since metabolites of parabens were inactive, parabens appear to be direct-acting allergens.

  3. Suppressive effects of Hochu-ekki-to, a traditional Chinese medicine, on IgE production and histamine release in mice immunized with ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Takano, I; Nagai, F; Fujitani, T; Ushiyama, K; Okubo, T; Seto, T; Ikeda, S; Kano, I

    1999-11-01

    We examined the effects of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (Japanese name: Hochu-ekki-to, HET), a traditional Chinese medicine, on IgE production and histamine release in mice immunized intraperitoneally with a mixture of ovalbumin (OA) and aluminum hydroxide (alum adjuvant). Three groups of mice were orally administered 0, 1.7 or 17 mg of HET on day 13 after the first immunization with a mixture of 1 microg OA and 1 mg alum adjuvant. They were again immunized with the same dose of OA plus alum adjuvant on day 14. The immunological changes in mice treated with OA alone or OA plus HET were examined, and the following findings were obtained. In the HET-treated mice, the elevation of anti-OA IgE in serum, and histamine release from basophils in blood, were significantly suppressed. A significant suppression of interleukin-4 (IL-4) secretion and proliferation of splenic lymphocytes in primary culture was also observed. A tendency to suppress the elevation of anti-OA IgG1 in serum and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion from splenic lymphocytes was observed in the HET-treated mice. These findings suggest that oral administration of HET suppresses IgE antibody production and histamine release in type I allergic reaction in mice immunized with OA plus alum adjuvant; this shows the efficacy of HET in treating type I allergic diseases, such as asthma.

  4. Activation of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells following histamine release: a possible role in cell recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Ferjan, I.; Johansen, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. The activity of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells was measured at various time intervals after induction of cellular histamine release by compound 48/80 or by the antigen-antibody reaction. The Na+/K(+)-pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive potassium uptake of the cells using 86Rb+ as a tracer for potassium (K+(86Rb+)-uptake). 2. Stimulation of the cells with compound 48/80 induced a time and concentration dependent increase of the Na+/K(+)-pump activity. The pump activity was maximal 2 min after stimulation of the cells. Then, the activity gradually decreased and reached a level not significantly different from the controls after 2 h of incubation. 3. When the cells were stimulated by the antigen-antibody reaction, there was also a rapid (within 5 min) stimulation of the Na+/K(+)-pump. In contrast to the stimulation with compound 48/80, the pump activity returned to the control level after 60 min of incubation with antigen. 4. The ouabain-resistant potassium uptake of the cells was increased after stimulation of the cells, regardless of the secretagogue used. This probably reflects the increased surface area of the cells present after the histamine release. 5. On the basis of the present results, we suggest a role for the Na+/K(+)-pump in the recovery process of the mast cell following histamine release. PMID:7679025

  5. Effect of progesterone on the release of arachidonic acid from human endometrial cells stimulated by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Liggins, G.C.; Aimer, G.P.; Watkins, E.J.

    1986-02-01

    Progesterone at concentrations of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M inhibits release of (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid from stimulated, perfused, endometrial cells. The effect is independent of the mechanism of stimulation. Cortisol (10(-5)M but not 10(-7)M) has a similar effect in this system but estradiol (10(-7)M) is without effect. There was a positive correlation (p less than 0.05) between the magnitude of inhibition by progesterone and the day of cycle. The inhibitory action of progesterone on the release of arachidonic acid was greater in endometrial cells than in decidual cells and was apparent after fifteen minutes. The activities of commercial and endometrial cell-free preparations of phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C were unaffected by the presence of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone modulates release of (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid from endometrial cells by a rapid, indirect action on phospholipase activity.

  6. Involvement of histamine or tumor necrosis factor in early-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lei, H Y; Shun, C Y; Wang, J Y; Hsiue, T R; Leir, S H

    1995-03-01

    A novel early-type hypersensitivity (ETH) reaction, manifested as capillary congestion, increase of vasopermeability, and plasma protein leakage, can be induced within 1 h after challenge of antigen-sensitized mice. The mediators involved in ETH varied among different strains of mice. The poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10) (GAT)-induced ETH in BALB/c mice was blocked by diphenhydramine (histamine H1 antagonist) and ketanserine (serotonin antagonist), but not by cimetidine (histamine H2 antagonist). These results indicate that both histamine and serotonin are involved, and that the histamine effect is mediated through a H1 receptor. Meanwhile, GAT-induced ETH in B6 mice was inhibited by anti-TNF alpha antibody suggesting that TNF alpha is involved. The mice can be classified into either histamine or TNF alpha type based on the pattern of mediator involved in ETH. A/J and CBA strains as well as BALB/c mice were classified as histamine type while A. TL, B10.BR, and C3H/He in addition to B6 mice were TNF alpha type. The observation that GAT-induced ETH in (BALB/c x B6)F1 mice was inhibited by both diphenhydramine and anti-TNF alpha suggests that the mediation of the actions of histamine or TNF alpha by GAT was genetically controlled and inherited as the dominant trait in (BALB/c x B6)F1 mice. ETH could be passively transferred by heat (56 degrees C, 4 h)-treated anti-GAT sera. Sera derived from the histamine type transferred ETH across the type barrier and histamine was the mediator, irrespective of the type of the recipient. However, sera derived from TNF alpha type only transferred ETH to the mice of the same TNF alpha type and TNF alpha was the mediator.

  7. A COMPARISON OF THE SPECIFICITY OF INHIBITION BY PHOSPHONATE ESTERS OF THE FIRST COMPONENT OF COMPLEMENT AND THE ANTIGEN-INDUCED RELEASE OF HISTAMINE FROM GUINEA PIG LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elmer L.; Austen, K. Frank

    1964-01-01

    The ability of a number p-nitrophenylethyl alkyl, phenyl alkyl, chloroalkyl, and aminoalkyl phosphonates to inhibit the activated first component (C'1a) of guinea pig complement, and the antigen-induced release of histamine from sliced, perfused guinea pig lung has been compared. C'1a in its reactivity with these phosphonates is distinctly more similar to trypsin than to any of the other enzymes studied previously. It is suggested that both trypsin and C'1a possess an anionic group in the active center of the respective enzyme, but the distance between the anionic and esteratic site in C'1a might be less than in trypsin. The pattern of inhibition of histamine relase by the alkyl, phenyl alkyl, and chloroalkyl phosphonates is similar to the inhibition of C'1a by these compounds, although distinct differences are apparent. The aminoalkyl phosphonates are distinctly less active inhibitors of histamine release than the corresponding alkyl phosphonates, whereas the reverse is true of the inhibition of C'1a. On the basis of these differences, it is tentatively concluded that the organophosphorus-inhibitable enzymes in the guinea pig systems studied here are similar but not identical. PMID:14212115

  8. Histamine H2-receptors on guinea-pig ileum myenteric plexus neurons mediate the release of contractile agents

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.A.; Ebersole, B.J.

    1982-04-01

    Dimaprit, a highly selective H2-agonist, caused a multiphasic contraction of guinea-pig ileal segments and ileal myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparations. The initial phase was characterized by a twitch which reached a maximum in 15 to 30 sec and was followed by a partial relaxation. The later phase was variable and consisted of a series of twitch responses or of a slowly developing contracture which sometimes was accompanied by oscillatory changes in tension. dose-response curves were generated for the initial response; for isolated ileal segments the EC50 was 5.1 +/- 1.8 micrometers (mean +/- S.D., N . 7) and the Hill coefficient was 1.1 +/- 0.2 and for longitudinal muscle strips the EC50 was 5.8 +/- 1.2 micrometer and the Hill coefficient was 1.2 +/- 0.1 (N . 7). Both the initial and secondary components of the contractile responses to dimaprit were prevented by 0.2 micron tetrodotoxin or 10 microns mefenamic acid and by the production of tachphylaxis to either substance P or serotonin. Scopolamine, 0.001 to 0.1 micron, insurmountably antagonized only the initial component of the response. Mepyramine (1.0 micrometer), hexamethonium (100 microns), bromolysergic acid (0.25 microns) and p-(imidazol-1-yl)phenyl (10 microns) were without effect on the response to dimaprit. The histamine H2-receptor antagonist, tiotidine, produced parallel dextral shifts in the dose-response curve for dimaprit. The apparent pA2 value for tiotidine was 7.65. The results suggest that dimaprit acts on H2-receptors located on myenteric plexus neurons to cause the release of contractile substances. The mediators of the contractile response are tentatively identified as acetylcholine, substance P, serotonin and a product(s) of the arachadonic acid cascade.

  9. Histamine and substance P in synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Long, X; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Fang, W

    2015-05-01

    Although psychosocial factors and malocclusion are regarded as potential causes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that substance P (SP), which has been associated with both psychosocial factors and malocclusion, and histamine, whose release can be induced by SP, may be implicated in the pathogenetic process. This study was designed to measure the concentration of histamine and SP in synovial fluid (SF) of both 38 patients with TMD and 11 healthy controls, and analyse the correlation between histamine and SP. Patients with TMD were divided into three subgroups: displaced disc with reduction (DDR), displaced disc without reduction (DDNR) and osteoarthritis (OA), with 10, 13, 15 subjects in every subgroup, respectively. After collecting SF samples, histamine and SP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA) and calibrated by bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-quantified protein level in the samples. The results suggest that OA group presented a significantly higher level of both histamine and SP than DDNR, DDR and healthy control groups. Histamine or SP in DDR and DDNR groups tend to be higher than control group, but no significance was found. Painful TMJs show higher histamine and SP than painless TMJs. Correlation analysis reveals a significant correlation between histamine and SP concentrations. Collectively, this study showed the changes of histamine and SP in the SF from different stages of TMD and found a significant correlation between the two substances, suggesting their potential implication in the pathogenesis of TMD.

  10. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha release during systemic reaction in cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Gosset, P; Janin, A; Dalenne, R; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1994-02-01

    Primary cold urticaria (PCU) characterized by the association of urticaria, angioedema, and sometimes a shock-like reaction after cold exposure, is usually considered to be linked with histamine and prostaglandin D2 release by mast cells. To determine the involvement of cytokines, we studied the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the blood of the efferent vein after immersion of the hand in chilled water. Five patients with PCU were compared with a control population (three patients with nonphysical urticaria and three healthy subjects). Among patients with PCU who underwent the cold immersion test, two exhibited a shock-like reaction with a large urticarial plaque (patients 1 and 2), one had only a mild cutaneous reaction, and two had no reaction. Patient 1 was reevaluated after 6 months of treatment with H1 and H2 antihistamines: he did not respond to this challenge. All controls were strictly negative. Histamine was released within the first minute after the challenge in the three patients with PCU, but at a higher level for the two patients who had a systemic reaction. TNF-alpha was undetectable in the blood of the patient with only a mild cutaneous reaction, whereas TNF-alpha release was observed for the two patients with a systemic reaction, 2 and 6 minutes after the end of the cold immersion test. The two other patients and the control subjects released neither histamine nor TNF-alpha. In parallel, pathologic and immunohistochemical (with a rabbit anti-TNF-alpha antibody) studies were performed on skin biopsy specimens collected 10 minutes after ice-cube test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Histamine H4-Receptors Inhibit Mast Cell Renin Release in Ischemia/Reperfusion via Protein Kinase Cε-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Type-2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Aldi, Silvia; Takano, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Koda, Kenichiro; Chan, Noel Y.-K.; Marino, Alice; Salazar-Rodriguez, Mariselis; Thurmond, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Renin released by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) from cardiac mast cells (MCs) activates a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causing arrhythmic dysfunction. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) inhibits MC renin release and consequent activation of this local RAS. We postulated that MC histamine H4-receptors (H4Rs), being Gαi/o-coupled, might activate a protein kinase C isotype–ε (PKCε)–aldehyde dehydrogenase type-2 (ALDH2) cascade, ultimately eliminating MC-degranulating and renin-releasing effects of aldehydes formed in I/R and associated arrhythmias. We tested this hypothesis in ex vivo hearts, human mastocytoma cells, and bone marrow–derived MCs from wild-type and H4R knockout mice. We found that activation of MC H4Rs mimics the cardioprotective anti-RAS effects of IPC and that protection depends on the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in MCs, reducing aldehyde-induced MC degranulation and renin release and alleviating reperfusion arrhythmias. These cardioprotective effects are mimicked by selective H4R agonists and disappear when H4Rs are pharmacologically blocked or genetically deleted. Our results uncover a novel cardioprotective pathway in I/R, whereby activation of H4Rs on the MC membrane, possibly by MC-derived histamine, leads sequentially to PKCε and ALDH2 activation, reduction of toxic aldehyde-induced MC renin release, prevention of RAS activation, reduction of norepinephrine release, and ultimately to alleviation of reperfusion arrhythmias. This newly discovered protective pathway suggests that MC H4Rs may represent a new pharmacologic and therapeutic target for the direct alleviation of RAS-induced cardiac dysfunctions, including ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. PMID:24696042

  13. Histamine and histamine receptor regulation of gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Lindsey; Hodges, Kyle; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-10-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter released throughout the body that regulates multiple physiological responses. Primarily histamine is acknowledged for its role in inflammatory reactions to foreign pathogens that enter the body. Aside from inflammatory responses, histamine expression and synthesis has been detected in various cancer cell lines and multiple malignancies. Through experimentation histamine has demonstrated its ability to manage proliferation and angiogenesis in these cancerous cells, in either a positive or inhibitory manner. Regulation of angiogenesis and proliferation have been proven to be carried out by the stimulation or inhibition of numerous pathways and secondary response elements, such as VEGFA/C, IP3/Ca(2+), G-proteins, cAMP, and many more. The activation of these different response pathways is linked to the binding of ligands to the histamine receptors H1-H4HR. These receptors exhibit various effects dependent on whether it binds an agonist, antagonist, or its specific ligand, histamine. In cancer cell lines and different tumor cells the binding of these different compounds has shown to be one of the main components in exerting proliferative or antiproliferative changes in the microenvironment. It is also known that the histamine receptors have varying degrees of expression in different forms of cancer, and this expression can impact the tumor in various ways. This clearly indicates the significance of histamine receptors in cancer formation, and one of the aims of this review is to cover this topic concisely and in depth. Histamine is produced from numerous cells such as basophils and mast cells and is synthesized from the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). In this review we will prominently discuss the function of mast cells and HDC in histamine expression in various gastrointestinal carcinomas. We also briefly discuss current studies to support these claims. In this review we hope to give the reader a clear and comprehensible overview

  14. Histamine H3 Receptor Activation Counteracts Adenosine A2A Receptor-Mediated Enhancement of Depolarization-Evoked [3H]-GABA Release from Rat Globus Pallidus Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [3H]-GABA release induced by high K+ (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-3H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K+-evoked [3H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K+-induced [3H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections. PMID:24884070

  15. Limited influence of aspirin intake on mast cell activation in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: comparison using skin prick and histamine release tests.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hideki; Tanaka, Mami; Kikuzawa, Ayuko; Tsujimoto, Mariko; Sekimukai, Akiko; Yamashita, Junji; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Nishigori, Chikako

    2012-09-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is a severe systemic syndrome induced by physical exercise after ingesting causative food. Aspirin is a well-known trigger for anaphylaxis in patients with FDEIA. Possible mechanisms by which symptoms are aggravated by aspirin include enhanced antigen absorption and mast cell activation. The aim of this study was to determine whether aspirin intake has an influence on mast cell/basophil activation in patients with FDEIA. Provocation tests revealed that adding aspirin to the causative food challenge in 7 of 9 (77.8%) patients with FDEIA provoked symptoms. In most cases, pretreatment with aspirin did not enhance skin tests (71.4%) or histamine release tests (88.9%) with food allergen challenges. The study confirms that histamine release and skin prick tests can be adjunctive tools for diagnosing FDEIA. In addition, our results suggest that exacerbation of FDEIA symptoms by aspirin is not mediated by direct effects of aspirin on mast cell/basophil activation.

  16. IgE and IgGa antibody-mediated release of histamine from rat peritoneal cells. II. Interaction of IgGa and IgE at the targe cell.

    PubMed

    Bach, M K; Block, K J; Austen, K F

    1971-04-01

    IgGa, in contrast to IgE, antibodies mediated the antigen-induced release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells without a requirement for a latent period and without the capacity to bind firmly to the target cell. Nonetheless, IgGa anti-DNP antibody interfered with the capacity of rat anti-N. brasiliensis antiserum rich in IgE antibodies to prepare the target cells for histamine release by worm antigen. Further, interaction of IgE antibody-prepared cells with IgGa anti-DNP antibody and DNP-BSA at 0 degrees C so as to achieve sterile activation, or at 30 degrees C to permit histamine release, inactivated such cells as determined by the subsequent failure to release histamine upon challenge with worm antigen. Thus, although IgE and IgGa antibodies are immunochemically distinct homologous immunoglobulins and exhibit different functional characteristics, their interaction at the target cell involves a common receptor and at least one common point in the pathway to the release of pharmacologic agents from the cell.

  17. In Vitro Inhibition of Histamine Release Behavior of Cetirizine Intercalated into Zn/Al- and Mg/Al-Layered Double Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    The intercalation of cetirizine into two types of layered double hydroxides, Zn/Al and Mg/Al, has been investigated by the ion exchange method to form CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites, respectively. The basal spacing of the nanocomposites were expanded to 31.9 Å for CTZAN and 31.2 Å for CTMAN, suggesting that cetirizine anion was intercalated into Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and arranged in a tilted bilayer fashion. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study supported the formation of both the nanocomposites, and the intercalated cetirizine is thermally more stable than its counterpart in free state. The loading of cetirizine in the nanocomposite was estimated to be about 57.2% for CTZAN and 60.7% CTMAN. The cetirizine release from the nanocomposites show sustained release manner and the release rate of cetirizine from CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8, presumably due to the different release mechanism. The inhibition of histamine release from RBL2H3 cells by the free cetirizine is higher than the intercalated cetirizine both in CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites. The viability in human Chang liver cells at 1000 μg/mL for CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites are 74.5 and 91.9%, respectively. PMID:22754339

  18. In vitro inhibition of histamine release behavior of cetirizine intercalated into Zn/Al- and Mg/Al-layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    The intercalation of cetirizine into two types of layered double hydroxides, Zn/Al and Mg/Al, has been investigated by the ion exchange method to form CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites, respectively. The basal spacing of the nanocomposites were expanded to 31.9 Å for CTZAN and 31.2 Å for CTMAN, suggesting that cetirizine anion was intercalated into Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and arranged in a tilted bilayer fashion. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study supported the formation of both the nanocomposites, and the intercalated cetirizine is thermally more stable than its counterpart in free state. The loading of cetirizine in the nanocomposite was estimated to be about 57.2% for CTZAN and 60.7% CTMAN. The cetirizine release from the nanocomposites show sustained release manner and the release rate of cetirizine from CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8, presumably due to the different release mechanism. The inhibition of histamine release from RBL2H3 cells by the free cetirizine is higher than the intercalated cetirizine both in CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites. The viability in human Chang liver cells at 1000 μg/mL for CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites are 74.5 and 91.9%, respectively.

  19. Histamine H3 receptor activation prevents dopamine D1 receptor-mediated inhibition of dopamine release in the rat striatum: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Rodriguez, Alfonso; Alonso-Spilsbury, María; Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Gonzalez-Pina, Rigoberto; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio; Bueno-Nava, Antonio

    2013-09-27

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) co-localize with dopamine (DA) D1 receptors (D1Rs) on striatal medium spiny neurons and functionally antagonize D1R-mediated responses. The intra-striatal administration of D1R agonists reduces DA release whereas D1R antagonists have the opposite effect. In this work, a microdialysis method was used to study the effect of co-activating D1 and H3 receptors on the release of DA from the rat dorsal striatum. Infusion of the D1R agonist SKF-38393 (0.5 and 1 μM) significantly reduced DA release (26-58%), and this effect was prevented by co-administration of the H3R agonist immepip (10 μM). In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist thioperamide (10 μM). Our results indicate that co-stimulation of post-synaptic D1 and H3 receptors may indirectly regulate basal DA release in the rat striatum and provide in vivo evidence for a functional interaction between D1 and H3 receptors in the basal ganglia.

  20. Activation of histamine H3-receptors inhibits carrier-mediated norepinephrine release during protracted myocardial ischemia. Comparison with adenosine A1-receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Imamura, M; Lander, H M; Levi, R

    1996-03-01

    We previously showed that prejunctional histamine H3-receptors downregulate norepinephrine exocytosis, which is markedly enhanced in early myocardial ischemia. In the present study, we investigated whether H3-receptors modulate nonexocytotic norepinephrine release during protracted myocardial ischemia. In this setting, decreased pH(i) in sympathetic nerve endings sequentially leads to a compensatory activation of the Na+-H+ antiporter (NHE), accumulation of intracellular Na+, reversal of the neuronal uptake of norepinephrine, and thus carrier-mediated release of norepinephrine. Accordingly, norepinephrine overflow from isolated guinea pig hearts undergoing 20-minute global ischemia and 45-minute reperfusion was attenuated approximately 80% by desipramine (10 nmol/L) and 70% by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA, 10 micromol/L), inhibitors of norepinephrine uptake and NHE, respectively. The H3-receptor agonist imetit (0.1 micromol/L) decreased carrier-mediated norepinephrine release by approximately 50%. This effect was blocked by the H3-receptor antagonist thioperamide (0.3 micromol/L), indicating that H-receptor activation inhibits carrier-mediated norepinephrine release. At lower concentrations, imetit (10 nmol/L) or EIPA (3 micromol/L) did not inhibit carrier-mediated norepinephrine release. However, a 25% inhibition occurred with imetit (10 nmol/L) and EIPA (3 micromol/L) combined. This synergism suggests an association between H-receptors and NHE. Conceivably, activation of H-receptors may lead to inhibition of NHE. In fact, alpha2-adrenoceptor activation, which is known to stimulate NHE, enhanced norepinephrine release, whereas alpha2-adrenoceptor blockade attenuated it. Furthermore, activation of adenosine A1-receptors markedly attenuated norepinephrine release, whereas their inhibition potentiated it. Because norepinephrine directly correlated with the severity of reperfusion arrhythmia and imetit reduced the incidence of ventricular fibrillation by 50

  1. Inhibition of granulation tissue growth by histamine.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Yokoyama, J; Wake, K

    1975-06-01

    Granulomas were induced in rats by subcutaneous implantation of formalin-soaked filter-paper disks. Daily subcutaneous injection of histamine at doses of two times 0.05 mg/kg and above inhibited the growth of granulation tissue as measured by a marked decrease in the dry-defatted granuloma weight and of the hydroxyproline and hexosamine content. Histological observations of granulation tissue indicated that histamine inhibited the proliferation of fibroblasts and the formation of capillaries. Inhibitory effects were also observed with the histamine releaser, sinomenine, and the histaminase inhibitor, aminoguanidine. These histamine effects seem not to be mediated by glucocorticoid release, since an effective dose level of histamine produced no change in growth or thymus weight. Prednisolone was less potent than histamine in inhibiting Prednisolone was ineffective at the dose tested. Subcutaneous injection of the H2-receptor antagonist, burimamide, blocked these histamine effects and also of sinomeinine and aminoguanidine. The H1-receptor antagonist, mepyramine, did not block these histamine effects. Burimamide alone enhanced the growth of granuloma. These results indicate that granulation-tissue growth in inflammation is affected by the inhibitory effect of endogenous histamine acting through H2-receptors.

  2. Co-axial bioassay of a smooth muscle relaxant factor released from guinea-pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L B; Paterson, J W; Goldie, R G

    1989-01-01

    1. The ability of guinea-pig trachea to release an epithelium-derived relaxant factor (EpDRF) was assessed in a co-axial bioassay system. 2. Histamine (100 microM) and methacholine (25 microM) caused endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat isolated aorta, presumably via the release of endothelium-derived relaxant factor (EDRF). In contrast, endothelium-denuded rat aorta did not relax in response to these agents. 3. EDRF release was detected in response to methacholine in a co-axial bioassay system, consisting of intact rabbit aorta tube (EDRF donor) and endothelium-denuded rat aorta strip (assay preparation). These results indicated the transfer of EDRF from a donor to an assay preparation, thereby validating the co-axial bioassay method. 4. Substitution of endothelium-intact rabbit aorta tube by epithelium-intact guinea-pig tracheal tube tissue in co-axial assemblies, still allowed the assay preparation to relax in response to histamine or methacholine. Removal of the intact tracheal tube from the system, or removal of the epithelium from the donor tracheal tube in co-axial preparations, abolished such relaxant responses. These observations are consistent with histamine- or methacholine-induced release of an epithelium-derived relaxant factor (EpDRF) from the trachea. 5. In the co-axial assembly comprising intact guinea-pig trachea and endothelium-denuded rat aorta, histamine and methacholine produced concentration-dependent, EpDRF-induced aortic relaxation. Mean concentrations of histamine and methacholine producing 50% of the maximum relaxation (EC50) were 39.8 microM and 2.7 microM respectively. Histamine-induced relaxation was inhibited in the presence of mepyramine (2 microM) and responses to methacholine were inhibited by atropine (0.1 microM). 6. Methylene blue (50 microM) had no effect on such relaxant responses, indicating that EpDRF does not activate guanylate cyclase. Furthermore, the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 microM), the cyclo

  3. Rabbit IgG directed to a synthetic C-terminal peptide of the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I inhibits human basophil histamine release induced by natural Lol p I.

    PubMed

    van Ree, R; Aalberse, R C

    1995-03-01

    The potential role of allergen-specific IgG antibodies as 'blocking' antibodies in allergen-induced human basophil histamine release was investigated. This was studied in a model with the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I and polyclonal rabbit antisera directed against this allergen and against a synthetic peptide of its C terminus. When allergen and antibodies were allowed to preincubate, Lol p I induced histamine release was inhibited up to 85% by the antiserum against Lol p I. By omitting preincubation, and thereby more closely mimicking an in vivo situation, up to 55% inhibition was realized. This indicates that allergen-specific IgG can act as 'blocking' antibody without preincubation. Immunization of rabbits with a synthetic C-terminal peptide of Lol p I resulted in antibodies reactive with natural Lol p I. Despite their 100-fold lower avidity for Lol p I (as compared with antinatural Lol p I), these antibodies had the capacity to inhibit Lol p I induced histamine release for > 90% (up to 50% without preincubation). This indicates that it is possible to block histamine release induced by a major allergen with low-avidity IgG antibodies directed against a minor proportion of the allergen (25 amino acids). IgE antibodies from the donors studied were unreactive with this synthetic peptide, indicating that for blocking activity identical epitope specificity of IgE and IgG is not essential. This opens interesting perspectives for application of synthetic peptides in immunotherapy, distinct from their effects on T cell reactivity.

  4. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  5. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, presynaptically inhibits glutamate release in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ying; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2017-03-15

    Ciproxifan is an H3 receptor antagonist and inverse agonist with antipsychotic effects in several preclinical models; its effect on glutamate release has been investigated in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, ciproxifan reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked Ca(2+)-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration elevation but did not affect the membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin and Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was not affected by the intracellular Ca(2+)-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor OBAA, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), PGE2 subtype 2 (EP2) receptor antagonist PF04418948, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor FR180204 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on glutamate release. Ciproxifan reduced the 4-AP-evoked phosphorylation of ERK and synapsin I, a presynaptic target of ERK. The ciproxifan-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented in synaptosomes from synapsin I-deficient mice. Moreover, ciproxifan reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that ciproxifan, acting through the blockade of Gi/Go protein-coupled H3 receptors present on hippocampal nerve terminals, reduces voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry by diminishing PLA2/PGE2/EP2 receptor pathway, which subsequently suppresses the ERK/synapsin I cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release.

  6. Central corticotropin releasing factor and social stress

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Tobias; Winberg, Svante

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are a main source of stress in vertebrates. Social stressors, as well as other stressors, activate the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in glucocorticoid release. One of the main components of the HPA axis is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). The neuropeptide CRF is part of a peptide family including CRF, urocortin 1–3, urotensin 1–3, and sauvagine. The actions of the CRF family are mediated by at least two different receptors with different anatomical distribution and affinities for the peptides. The CRF peptides affect several behavioral and physiological responses to stress including aggression, feeding, and locomotor activity. This review will summarize recent research in vertebrates concerning how social stress interacts with components of the CRF system. Consideration will be taken to the different models used for social stress ranging from social isolation, dyadic interactions, to group dominance hierarchies. Further, the temporal effect of social stressor from acute, intermittent, to chronic will be considered. Finally, strains selected for specific behavior or physiology linked to social stress will also be discussed. PMID:23847465

  7. Histamine regulates the inflammatory response of the tunicate Styela plicata.

    PubMed

    García-García, Erick; Gómez-González, Nuria E; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Mulero, Victoriano

    2014-10-01

    Histamine is stored inside hemocytes of the tunicate Styela plicata (Chordata, Tunicata, Ascidiacea), but no evidence on its role in the regulation of the immune response of this species has been reported. We examined whether histamine participated in the regulation of inflammation and host defense in S. plicata. The presence of histamine inside S. plicata hemocytes was confirmed by flow cytometry, and histamine release was detected by ELISA, after in vitro hemocyte stimulation with different PAMPs. In vitro hemocyte treatment with histamine, or specific histamine-receptor agonists, reduced their phagocytic ability. Injection of histamine into the tunic recruited hemocytes to the site of injection. Systemic injection of histamine, or the histamine-releasing agent compound 48/80, decreased the phagocytic ability of hemocytes. Histamine promoted the constriction of tunic hemolymph vessels in vivo, having a direct effect on vasoconstriction in tunic explants. These results provide for the first time clear evidence for the involvement of histamine in the regulation of inflammation and host defense in tunicates.

  8. Neuronal histamine and expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasopressin and oxytocin in the hypothalamus: relative importance of H1 and H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, A; Larsen, P J; Knigge, U; Jørgensen, H; Warberg, J

    1998-08-01

    Centrally administered histamine (HA) stimulates the secretion of the pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides ACTH and beta-endorphin as well as prolactin. The effect of HA on secretion of these adenohypophysial hormones is indirect and may involve activation of hypothalamic neurons containing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), arginine-vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OT). We studied the effect of activating central HA receptors by central infusion of HA, HA agonists or antagonists on expression of CRH, AVP and OT mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Intracerebroventricular infusion of HA (270 nmol), the H1-receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine or the H2-receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine increased the level of CRH mRNA in the PVN, and OT mRNA in the SON. In contrast, none of these compounds had any effect on expression of AVP mRNA in the PVN or SON. Administration of the H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine or the H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine had no effect on basal expression of CRH, AVP or OT mRNA in the PVN and/or SON except for a slight inhibitory effect of cimetidine on CRH mRNA expression in the PVN. Pretreatment with mepyramine or cimetidine before HA administration inhibited the HA-induced increase in OT mRNA levels but had no effect on the HA-induced increase in CRH mRNA levels in the PVN. We conclude that HA stimulates hypothalamic CRH and OT neurons by increasing mRNA levels, and this effect seems to be mediated via activation of both HA H1 and H2 receptors.

  9. Fusion of Na-ASP-2 with human immunoglobulin Fcγ abrogates histamine release from basophils sensitized with anti-Na-ASP-2 IgE.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Bin; Santiago, H; Keegan, B; Gillespie, P; Xue, J; Bethony, J; de Oliveira, L M; Jiang, D; Diemert, D; Xiao, S-H; Jones, K; Feng, X; Hotez, P J; Bottazzi, M E

    2012-01-01

    Na-ASP-2 is a major protein secreted by infective third-stage larvae (L3) of the human hookworm Necator americanus upon host entry. It was chosen as a lead vaccine candidate for its ability to elicit protective immune responses. However, clinical development of this antigen as a recombinant vaccine was halted because it caused allergic reactions among some of human volunteers previously infected with N. americanus. To prevent IgE-mediated allergic reactions induced by Na-ASP-2 but keep its immunogenicity as a vaccine antigen, we designed and tested a genetically engineered fusion protein, Fcγ/Na-ASP-2, composed of full-length Na-ASP-2 and truncated human IgG Fcγ1 that targets the negative signalling receptor FcγRIIb expressed on pro-allergic cells. The chimeric recombinant Fcγ/Na-ASP-2 protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris and shared the similar antigenicity as native Na-ASP-2. Compared to Na-ASP-2, the chimeric fusion protein efficiently reduced the release of histamine in human basophils sensitized with anti-Na-ASP-2 IgE obtained from individuals living in a hookworm-endemic area. In dogs infected with canine hookworm, Fcγ/Na-ASP-2 resulted in significantly reduced immediate-type skin reactivity when injected intradermally compared with Na-ASP-2. Hamsters vaccinated with Fcγ/Na-ASP-2 formulated with Alhydrogel(®) produced specific IgG that recognized Na-ASP-2 and elicited similar protection level against N. americanus L3 challenge as native Na-ASP-2.

  10. Inhibition of histamine release by local and intracerebroventricular infusion of galanin in hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of awake rat: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Shimako; Ijiri, Soichiro; Kehr, Jan; Yoshitake, Takashi

    2013-02-08

    The neuropeptide galanin is co-localized with histamine in subpopulations of neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus suggesting its involvement in modulating histaminergic neurotransmission. The purpose of the present study was to investigate, by use of microdialysis, the effects of local intraparenchymal (combined infusion and microdialysis probe), and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions of galanin on extracellular levels of histamine in its major projecting areas, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus ventrolateral part (VMHVL), CA3 area of ventral hippocampus (vHipp) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in separate groups (n=5 rats/each) of freely moving rats. Galanin (0.5nmol and 1.5nmol) dose-dependently decreased the basal histamine levels in the VMHVL to 77.1% (i.c.v.) at 40min and to 82.1% (intra-VMHVL infusion) already at 20min, of the control group (32.6±3.5fmol/10μl), whereas only 1.5nmol i.c.v. galanin and not the local infusions deceased the histamine levels in the vHipp (8.4±0.6fmol/10μl) to 82.8% and in mPFC (9.8±0.9fmol/10μl) to 87.5%. It is concluded that central administration of galanin decreased the basal extracellular histamine levels in major histamine projecting areas, however, these effects were less prominent than those observed for 5-HT (Kehr et al., 2002 [12]) and ACh (Yoshitake et al., 2011 [38]) in the ventral hippocampus following i.c.v. and/or local galanin infusions.

  11. Factors controlling gastric-glucagon release.

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, P J; Luyckx, A S

    1977-01-01

    A system consisting of an isolated dog stomach perfused with whole blood has been designed to study gastric glucagon secretion. Under basal conditions, gastric glucagon release was 0.0-3.1 ng glucagon/100g of stomach per min. Arginine, at an arterial plasma concentration averaging 10 mM, elicited a rapid glucagon release. This gastric glucagon release was almost completely abolished by somatostatin (100 ng/ml). The release of gastric glucagon was not affected by hyperglycemia alone but was reduced by about 40% when hyperglycemia was concomitant with an hyperinsulinemia within the physiological range. These observations support the concept that adequate concentrations of insulin are necessary in order for hyperglycemia to inhibit gastric glucagon secretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that the isolated perfused dog stomach might provide a unique tool permitting investigation of alpha-cell function in the absence of endogenously released insulin. PMID:845258

  12. Mental illness, criminal risk factors and parole release decisions.

    PubMed

    Matejkowski, Jason; Draine, Jeffrey; Solomon, Phyllis; Salzer, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    Research has not examined whether higher rates of parole denial among inmates with mental illness (MI) are the result of the increased presence of criminal risk factors among this population. Employing a representative sample of inmates with (n  =  219) and without (n  =  184) MI receiving parole release decisions in 2007, this study tested whether the central eight risk factors for recidivism considered in parole release decisions intervened in the relationship between MI and parole release. MI was associated with possession of a substance use disorder, antisocial personality disorder and violent charges while incarcerated; however, these factors were not related to release decisions. MI was found to have neither a direct nor an indirect effect on release decisions. While results indicate that release decisions appear, to some extent, to be evidence-based, they also suggest considerable discretion is being implemented by parole board members in release decisions above and beyond consideration of criminal risk factors.

  13. Modulatory effects of histamine on cat carotid body chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Moya, Esteban A; Koenig, Cecilia S; Fujiwara, Kunio; Alcayaga, Julio; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2008-12-31

    Histamine has been proposed to be an excitatory transmitter between the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor (glomus) cells and petrosal ganglion (PG) neurons. The histamine biosynthetic pathway, its storage and release, as well as the presence of histamine H1, H2 and H3 receptors have been found in the CB. However, there is only indirect evidence showing the presence of histamine in glomus cells, or weather its application produces chemosensory excitation. Thus, we studied the histamine immunocytochemical localization in the cat CB, and the effects of histamine, and H1, H2 and H3 receptor blockers on carotid sinus nerve (CSN) discharge, using CB and PG preparations in vitro. We found histamine immunoreactivity in dense-cored vesicles of glomus cells. Histamine induced dose-dependent increases in CSN discharge in the CB, but not in the PG. The H1-antagonist pyrilamine reduced the CB responses induced by histamine, the H2-antagonists cimetidine and ranitidine had no effect, while the H3-antagonist thioperamide enhanced histamine-induced responses. Present data suggests that histamine plays an excitatory modulatory role in the generation of cat CB chemosensory activity.

  14. Evidence of NK1 and NK2 Tachykinin Receptors and their Involvement in Histamine Release in a Murine Mast Cell Line

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    bacitracin . variations it response remain inexplicable. bestatimt. compouind 48/80 andl histamine diphos- In thtis report. tlte actiont of netirokinlins...Actions 26, 11-). deries iias cel lut aid isthe irs to huiwtha lOe.tiluer 11- Iwprapuii Z-, Reniun. N. aniid Regoli. I). derives~~~~~~ ~ ~ matcl i adi

  15. The protein kinase MEK1/2 mediate vascular endothelial growth factor- and histamine-induced hyperpermeability in porcine coronary venules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mack H; Yuan, Sarah Y; Granger, Harris J

    2005-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been implicated in the signal transduction of the endothelial response to growth factors and inflammatory stimuli. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the p42/44 MAPK pathway plays a common role in mediating the microvascular hyperpermeability response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and histamine. The apparent permeability coefficient of albumin was measured in isolated and perfused coronary venules. Application of VEGF induced a rapid increase in venular permeability, and the effect was blocked by PD98059 and UO126, selective inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase MEK1/2, in a dose-dependent pattern. The same MEK1/2 inhibitors dose-dependently attenuated the increase in venular permeability caused by histamine. In addition, the increases in venular permeability caused by agents that are known to activate the nitric oxide pathway, including the calcium ionophore ionomycin, the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and the protein kinase G activator 8-bromo-cGMP, were significantly attenuated in venules pretreated with the MEK1/2 inhibitors. Furthermore, transfection of venules with active MEK1 increased baseline permeability. In contrast, transfection of active ERK1, a downstream target of MEK1/2, did not significantly alter the basal permeability of venules. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 with a specific inhibiting peptide did not prevent the hyperpermeability response to VEGF or histamine. The results suggest that activation of MEK1/2 may play a central role in the signal transduction of microvascular hyperpermeability in response to growth factors and inflammatory mediators. PMID:15539400

  16. High-dose anti-histamine use and risk factors in children with urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Pınar; Avcil, Sibelnur; Erge, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Aim The drugs of choice in the treatment of urticaria in children are H1-antihistamines. The aim of the study was to evaluate children with urticaria and define risk factors for requirement of high-dose H1-antihistamines in children with urticaria. Material and Methods The medical data of children who were diagnosed as having urticaria admitted to our outpatient clinic between January 2014 and January 2016 were searched. The medical histories, concomitant atopic diseases, parental atopy histories, medications, treatment responses, blood eosinophil and basophil counts, and serum total IgE levels were recorded. In addition, the urticaria activity score for seven days, autoimmune antibody tests, and skin prick test results were evaluated in children with chronic urticaria. Results The numbers of the children with acute and chronic urticaria were 138 and 92, respectively. The age of the children with chronic urticaria was higher than that of those with acute urticaria (p<0.0001). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of blood eosinophil and basophil counts, and serum total IgE levels (p>0.05). There was a negative correlation between blood eosinophil count and the UAS7 score in children with chronic urticaria (r=−0.276, p=0.011). Chronic urticaria and requirement of high dose H1-antihistamines were significant in children aged ≥10 years (p<0.001, p=0.015). High UAS7 score (OR: 1.09; CI 95%: [1.03–1.15]) and basopenia (OR: 6.77; CI 95%: [2.01–22.75]) were associated with the requirement of high-dose H1-AH in children with chronic urticaria. Conclusion The requirement of high-dose H1-antihistamines was higher with children’s increasing age. Disease severity and basopenia were risk factors for the requirement of high-dose H1-antihistamines. PMID:28123332

  17. Adrenergic and cromolyn sodium modulation of ECL cell histamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Lawton, G P; Tang, L H; Miu, K; Gilligan, C J; Absood, A; Modlin, I M

    1995-01-01

    The histamine secreting enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell is now recognized as the principal regulator of gastric acid secretion. Histamine is not only a primary modulator of acid secretion, but may be of relevance in gastritis and as a mitogen in gastric neoplasia. Study of the ECL cell has been limited since no pure preparation was available. We therefore developed a pure isolated ECL cell preparation with a purity of 90-95% as determined by total histamine content and chromogranin immunofluorescence. Trypan blue exclusion demonstrated > 95% viability. While gastrin and acetylcholine are known modulators of acid secretion, the role of adrenergic neurotransmitters has not been clearly delineated. The purpose of this study was to examine adrenergic modulation of ECL cell histamine release. To further define the inhibitory mechanisms of histamine secretion, we evaluated the mast cell histamine inhibitor sodium cromoglycate. Histamine secretion was determined by radioimmunoassay. Basal secretion was 0.6 +/- 0.2 nmol/10(3) cells. Gastrin stimulated histamine secretion with an EC50 of 3 x 10(-10) M. Octopamine (alpha-adrenergic agonist) (10(-11)-10(-4) M) failed to stimulate histamine secretion. Isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic agonist) stimulated histamine secretion (EC50, 6 x 10(-8) M) and was inhibited by propranolol (IC50 5 x 10(-10) M).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Role of Histamine and Its Receptors in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is recognized as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain, and it plays a major role in the pathogenic progression after cerebral ischemia. Extracellular histamine increases gradually after ischemia, and this may come from histaminergic neurons or mast cells. Histamine alleviates neuronal damage and infarct volume, and it promotes recovery of neurological function after ischemia; the H1, H2, and H3 receptors are all involved. Further studies suggest that histamine alleviates excitotoxicity, suppresses the release of glutamate and dopamine, and inhibits inflammation and glial scar formation. Histamine may also affect cerebral blood flow by targeting to vascular smooth muscle cells, and promote neurogenesis. Moreover, endogenous histamine is an essential mediator in the cerebral ischemic tolerance. Due to its multiple actions, affecting neurons, glia, vascular cells, and inflammatory cells, histamine is likely to be an important target in cerebral ischemia. But due to its low penetration of the blood-brain barrier and its wide actions in the periphery, histamine-related agents, like H3 antagonists and carnosine, show potential for cerebral ischemia therapy. However, important questions about the molecular aspects and pathophysiology of histamine and related agents in cerebral ischemia remain to be answered to form a solid scientific basis for therapeutic application. PMID:22860191

  19. Lipolytic responses induced by intracerebroventricular administration of histamine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bugajski, J; Janusz, Z

    1981-04-01

    Histamine (10-50 microgram) administered intraventricularly in conscious rats induced an increase in serum-free fatty acids. The maximum, significant increase appeared 30-60 min after administration. Histamine H1-receptor antagonists, mepyramine and chloropyramine, when injected 2 h prior to histamine, abolished considerably hyperlipaemic responses to histamine. H2-Receptor antagonists, metiamide and cimetidine, given i.c.v. only moderately diminished histamine-induced hyperlipaemia. Histamine injected i.c.v. also increased serum corticosterone levels considerably. This elevation was prevented significantly by the H1-receptor antagonist, mepyramine, but not by the H2-receptor blocker, cimetidine. It seems likely that histamine given i.c.v. induces lipolysis through the release of ACTH, one of the known lipid-mobilizing hormones. The central lipid-mobilizing mechanism after histamine depends more on activation of H1- than H2-receptors.

  20. Is the analysis of histamine and/or interleukin-4 release after isocyanate challenge useful in the identification of patients with IgE-mediated isocyanate asthma?

    PubMed

    Blindow, Silke; Preisser, Alexandra M; Baur, Xaver; Budnik, Lygia T

    2015-07-01

    Isocyanates are a well-known and frequent cause of occupational asthma. The implementation of specific inhalation challenges (SICs) is the gold standard in asthma diagnosis supporting occupational case history, lung function testing, specific skin prick tests and the detection of specific IgE. However, the diagnosis is not always definitive. An interesting new approach, analyses of individual genetic susceptibilities, requires discrimination between a positive SIC reaction arising from IgE-mediated immune responses and one from other pathophysiological mechanisms. Hence, additional refinement tools would be helpful in defining sub-classes of occupational asthma and diagnosis. We used total IgE levels, specific IgE and SIC results for sub-classification of 27 symptomatic isocyanate workers studied. Some mutations in glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are suspected either to enhance or to decrease the individual risk in the development of isocyanate asthma. Our patient groups were assessed for the point mutations GSTP1*I105V and GSTP1*A114V as well as deletions (null mutations) of GSTM1 and GSTT1. There seems to be a higher risk in developing IgE-mediated reactions when GSTM1 is deleted, while GSTT1 deletions were found more frequently in the SIC positive group. Blood samples taken before SIC, 30-60 min and 24h after SIC, were analyzed for histamine and IL-4, classical markers for the IgE-mediated antigen-specific activation of basophils or mast cells. We suggest that the utility of histamine measurements might provide an additional useful marker reflecting isocyanate-induced cellular reactions (although the sampling times require optimization). The promising measurement of IL-4 is not feasible at present due to the lack of a reliable, validated assay.

  1. The release of a non-prostanoid inhibitory factor from rabbit bronchus detected by co-axial bioassay.

    PubMed

    Spina, D; Page, C P

    1991-04-01

    1. Methacholine relaxed phenylephrine-contracted aorta of the rat with the endothelium intact. This effect was inhibited by haemoglobin, methylene blue, gossypol, phenidone and L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Rat aorta denuded of endothelium failed to relax in response to methacholine, histamine and the peptidoleukotrienes C4, D4 and E4. 2. Methacholine and histamine but not leukotrienes C4, D4 and E4 relaxed phenylephrine-contracted rat aorta without endothelium when surrounded by rabbit epithelium-intact bronchus. The muscarinic antagonist atropine antagonized the methacholine-induced relaxation. 3. Removal of the epithelium either mechanically or chemically, abolished methacholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. These data indicate that the epithelium is responsible for the observed relaxant effect to methacholine and histamine. 4. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, the phospholipase A2 inhibitor, mepacrine and the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), failed to inhibit methacholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. This indicates that the epithelium-derived inhibitory factor (EpDIF) is not a product of the cyclo-oxygenase or lipoxygenase pathway or a product derived from activation of phospholipase A2. 5. Haemoglobin, methylene blue, phenidone, gossypol and L-NAME failed to inhibit the relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. These results demonstrate that EpDIF detected in the co-axial bioassay is not endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) or nitric oxide. Similarly, catalase was without effect. 6. EpDIF is unlikely to be a peptide since papain and alpha-chymotrypsin failed to alter the methacholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. Furthermore, thiorphan, captopril and aprotinin were also without effect, suggesting that EpDIF is not a substrate for airway peptidases. 7. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the release of a

  2. Histamine and Nt-methylhistamine in the circulation during intravenous infusion of histamine in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Wylie, G; Davies, R J

    1988-12-01

    Plasma levels of histamine and Nt-methylhistamine were measured simultaneously by high performance liquid chromatography during the intravenous infusion of histamine acid phosphate in six normal volunteers. Progressive, dose-related increases in plasma histamine were noted, reaching a maximum value of 3.1 +/- 0.14 ng ml-1 corresponding to a maximum infusion rate of 180 ng kg-1 min-1 (means +/- SEM). Increases in plasma histamine were accompanied by a significant dose-related fall in mean diastolic blood pressure (baseline 74.0 +/- 4.4 mm Hg falling to 60.0 +/- 3.3 mm Hg at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.001) and an increase in pulse rate (baseline 76.3 +/- 2.8 beats min-1 rising to 89.24 beats min-1 at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.05). All subjects exhibited facial flushing, the threshold plasma histamine level for this effect being 1.3 +/- 0.15 ng ml-1 corresponding to an infusion rate of 60 ng kg-1 min-1. Elevation of plasma Nt-methylhistamine was seen in only one subject, who exhibited a level of 0.5 ng ml-1 at the highest infusion rate. These results suggest that measurements of plasma Nt-methylhistamine are unlikely to provide a useful index of histamine release into the circulation.

  3. A novel double-isotope technique for the enzymatic assay of plasma histamine: application to estimation of mast cell activation assessed by antigen challenge in asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.J.; Ind, P.W.; Causon, R.; Lee, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration of plasma histamine may provide an index of mast cell activation (degranulation) and can be measured by a sensitive radioenzymatic assay based on its specific conversion to (/sup 3/H)-methylhistamine in the presence of histamine-N-methyltransferase and (/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine. In this assay, the separation of excess (/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine from (/sup 3/H)-methylhistamine requires several steps, for which a correction factors is necessary to maintain precision. In the present modification, duplicate 50-microliters aliquots of each plasma sample were incubated with histamine-N-methyltransferase and (/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine. A further aliquot, with an added standard of 200 ng/ml histamine, was incubated with histamine-N-methyl-transferase and (/sup 14/C)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine. This standard was converted to (/sup 14/C)-methylhistamine, and its recovery at the end of the assay corrected both for varying efficiency of methylation among plasma samples and for losses during the subsequent extraction and separation stages. The sensitivity of the assay was 25 pg/ml. The intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were 7.2% and 11.6%, respectively. In five asthmatics, antigen challenge caused a 28% fall in FEV1, and this was associated with a twofold to threefold rise in plasma histamine concentration. This assay may thus prove a useful method for assessing the role of mast cell release of mediators in vivo.

  4. A novel double-isotope technique for the enzymatic assay of plasma histamine: application to estimation of mast cell activation assessed by antigen challenge in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Brown, M J; Ind, P W; Causon, R; Lee, T H

    1982-01-01

    The concentration of plasma histamine may provide an index of mast cell activation (degranulation) and can be measured by a sensitive radioenzymatic assay based on its specific conversion to (3H)-methylhistamine in the presence of histamine-N-methyltransferase and (3H)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine. In this assay, the separation of excess (3H)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine from (3H)-methylhistamine requires several steps, for which a correction factors is necessary to maintain precision. In the present modification, duplicate 50-microliters aliquots of each plasma sample were incubated with histamine-N-methyltransferase and (3H)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine. A further aliquot, with an added standard of 200 ng/ml histamine, was incubated with histamine-N-methyl-transferase and (14C)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine. This standard was converted to (14C)-methylhistamine, and its recovery at the end of the assay corrected both for varying efficiency of methylation among plasma samples and for losses during the subsequent extraction and separation stages. The sensitivity of the assay was 25 pg/ml. The intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were 7.2% and 11.6%, respectively. In five asthmatics, antigen challenge caused a 28% fall in FEV1, and this was associated with a twofold to threefold rise in plasma histamine concentration. This assay may thus prove a useful method for assessing the role of mast cell release of mediators in vivo.

  5. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians.

  6. Histamine and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Torrealba, Fernando; Riveros, Maria E.; Contreras, Marco; Valdes, Jose L.

    2012-01-01

    Brain histamine may affect a variety of different behavioral and physiological functions; however, its role in promoting wakefulness has overshadowed its other important functions. Here, we review evidence indicating that brain histamine plays a central role in motivation and emphasize its differential involvement in the appetitive and consummatory phases of motivated behaviors. We discuss the inputs that control histaminergic neurons of the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus, which determine the distinct role of these neurons in appetitive behavior, sleep/wake cycles, and food anticipatory responses. Moreover, we review evidence supporting the dysfunction of histaminergic neurons and the cortical input of histamine in regulating specific forms of decreased motivation (apathy). In addition, we discuss the relationship between the histamine system and drug addiction in the context of motivation. PMID:22783171

  7. New kid on the block: does histamine get along with inflammation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Volonté, Cinzia; Parisi, Chiara; Apolloni, Savina

    2015-01-01

    Results from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and pre-clinical studies strongly suggest that systemic and CNS-intrinsic immune activation plays a central role in ALS pathogenesis. Microglial cells are emerging in this context as master regulators with a bi-functional role in the progression of the pathological response. They foster a pro-inflammatory setting through the production of cytotoxic cytokines and chemokines (M1 phenotype), after an aborted effort to sustain an anti-inflammatory environment for motor neurons through the release of beneficial cytokines and growth factors (M2 phenotype). In this review, we gather information meant to propose that histamine and ATP, which are released from mast cells, microglia and damaged neurons at sites of injury where they function as transmitters, have to be considered as new players in the ALS neuroinflammatory arena. After all, abnormal histamine and ATP signalling in the brain are already documented in neurodegenerative/neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease and, at present, histamine- as well as ATP-related compounds are in clinical trial for these same pathologies. Concerning ALS, while emerging data are now available about purinergic mechanisms, the involvement of histamine is basically unexplored. The circumstantial evidence that we present here thus constitutes a solid background for formulating novel hypotheses, stimulating a scientific debate and, most of all, inspiring future research. We deem that a new potential role of histamine in the setting of ALS neuroinflammation might find a fertile ground where to thrive. ALS is still a disease without a cure: why not to play with a new kid on the block?

  8. Measurement of urinary histamine: comparison of fluorometric and radioisotopic-enzymatic assay procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, K.; Dyer, J.; Merlin, S.; Kaliner, M.

    1982-02-01

    Assessment of urinary histamine may prove useful in determining the role of histamine in human health and disease. Urinary histamine may be accurately estimated by a modified fluorometric assay employing diamine oxidase (DAO) digestion and cation-exchange chromatography. However, the radioisotopic-enzymatic assay is less expensive, easier to perform, and possibly more sensitive. Therefore the two procedures were compared. The radioenzyme assay was found to be affected by factors in urine (possibly salt concentrations) requiring extraction of histamine from urine by butanol-heptane. Moreover, it was found to be necessary to compare DAO-digested samples with undigested samples to accurately estimate histamine levels and to run the standard curve of histamine in DAO-digested urine. Even with these modifications, the radioenzyme assay was not as accurate as the fluorometric assay for urine samples having histamine values about 60 ng/ml. Therefore we recommend utilization of the modified fluorometric assay for the measurement of urinary histamine levels.

  9. Effects of histamine on atrial and ventricular contractility in the canine isovolumic heart.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Priola, D V

    1990-03-01

    The effects of intracoronary administration of histamine on atrial and ventricular contractility were determined in a paced canine isovolumic heart preparation. Contractility was assessed by recording the pressure developed in saline-filled balloons placed in each of the four cardiac chambers. At doses above 0.1 mg and up to 100 mg histamine produced dose-related positive inotropic responses in all chambers. These were preceded by transient negative effects. The positive responses were not affected by a combination of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists antazoline and cimetidine but were almost completely abolished by the beta adrenoceptor blocker timolol. The negative responses were uninfluenced by either treatment. It was concluded that, in the canine isovolumic heart not subjected to complicating chronotropic and extracardiac factors, moderate doses of histamine are devoid of inotropic effects. Higher doses do produce myocardial stimulation, not mediated by histamine receptors, but probably due to norepinephrine release. These responses are preceded by transient non-specific depressant effects.

  10. Effects of histamine on light responses of amacrine cells in tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongchun; Satoh, Hiromasa; Vila, Alejandro; Wu, Samuel M; Marshak, David W

    2011-04-01

    Using immunofluorescence, we showed that histamine receptor 1 is expressed by horizontal cell axons and a subset of amacrine cells in the tiger salamander retina. The effects of histamine on light responses of amacrine cells were studied in slice preparations. Histamine modulated the light responses of many salamander amacrine cells, depending upon the morphological type. The most pronounced effects of histamine were decreases in the light responses of broadly stratified amacrine cells, particularly those having medium-sized dendritic field diameters. To determine whether the effects of histamine were direct, Co(++) was substituted for Ca(++) in the extracellular medium to block synaptic transmission. Histamine still affected broadly stratified amacrine cells, but not narrowly stratified amacrine cells under these conditions. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibitory interactions between strata of the IPL and within the classical receptive fields of the ganglion cells would be particularly sensitive to histamine released from retinopetal axons.

  11. Release characteristics of encapsulated formulations incorporating plant growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Slawomir; Schwartz, Liliana; Wiesman, Zeev; Markus, Arie; Wolf, David

    2002-05-01

    The release characteristics of encapsulated formulations containing a combination of plant growth factors (PGF)--plant hormones (IBA, paclobutrazol), nutrients (fertilizers, microelements), and fungicide (prochloraz)--were studied. The formulations were prepared by encapsulating the active ingredients in a polyethylene matrix and, in some cases, subsequently coating the product with polyurethane. Dissolution experiments were carried out with both coated and non-coated formulations to determine the sustained release patterns of the active ingredients. The PGF controlled-release systems obtained have been shown to promote development of root systems, vegetative growth, and reproductive development in cuttings, potted plants, or garden plants of various plant species. These beneficial effects are attributable to the lasting and balanced PGF availability provided by these systems.

  12. Sulodexide induces hepatocyte growth factor release in humans.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Dubowski, Miroslaw; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2007-03-08

    Heparin influences numerous pleiotropic growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), partially by their release from endothelial and extracellular matrix stores. The effects of sulodexide, a heparin-like glycosaminoglycan medication of growing importance in medicine, on HGF liberation are not known. We performed a 2-week open-label sulodexide trial in healthy male volunteers. The drug was initially administered intravenously (i.v.) in a single dose of 1200 Lipoprotein Lipase Releasing Units (LRU), then -- orally for 12 days (500 LRU twice a day), and -- again by i.v. route (1200 LRU) on day 14. Intravenous sulodexide injections were repeatedly found to induce marked and reproducible increases in immunoreactive plasma HGF levels (more than 3500% vs baseline after 10 min, and more than 1200% after 120 min), and remained unchanged when measured 120 min following oral sulodexide administration. The percentage increments in plasma HGF evoked by i.v. sulodexide at both time points and on both days inversely correlated with baseline levels of the growth factor. On day 14, the HGF levels after 120 min and their percentage increase vs baseline were strongly and directly dependent on i.v. sulodexide dose per kg of body weight. This study shows that sulodexide has a novel, remarkable and plausibly biologically important stimulating effect on the release of pleiotropic hepatocyte growth factor in humans.

  13. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  14. Intracerebroventricular histamine, but not 48/80, causes posttraining memory facilitation in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M A; Izquierdo, I

    1988-01-01

    The immediate posttraining intracerebroventricular injection of histamine (1 or 10 ng/rat) facilitated memory both of a stepdown inhibitory avoidance task, and of the habituation of rearing responses to an open field. As previously shown for the avoidance task, the combination of cimetidine (1,000 ng/rat) plus prometazine (1,000 ng/rat), but not each drug on its own, blocked the effect of histamine in the habituation task. The effect of histamine was not shared by the intracerebroventricular administration of the mast cell histamine releaser, 48/80 (0.1 to 100 micrograms/rat). The present findings indicate that the memory facilitatory action of histamine might be general across tasks, and that 48/80-releasable, presumably mast cell, endogenous histamine is probably not involved in memory regulation.

  15. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2.

  16. Gelatin methacrylate microspheres for controlled growth factor release.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles (MPs) formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15-90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor than conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite the GA MPs having an order of magnitude greater gelatin content. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery.

  17. Gelatin Methacrylate Microspheres for Growth Factor Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15–90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor over conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite an order of magnitude greater gelatin content of GA MPs. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery. PMID:25463489

  18. Distribution and release of epidermal growth factor in man.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Bielanski, W; Konturek, S J; Bogdal, J; Oleksy, J

    1989-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is localised in man to salivary and Brunner's glands. It is present in large concentrations in saliva and duodenal contents but the mechanisms of its release have been little studied. This study carried out on four groups of healthy subjects was designed to determine the distribution and the release of immunoreactive EGF (IR-EGF) in salivary, gastric, duodenal, and pancreatic secretions. Under basal conditions, the concentrations of IR-EGF in salivary, gastric, duodenal and pancreatic secretions were; 2.7 (0.4), 0.42 (0.12), 21 (5) and 8.5 (1.2) ng/ml, respectively. Chewing of Parafilm* significantly increased salivary but not gastric or duodenal EGF output while atropinisation led to the reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output without affecting the increment in EGF release induced by chewing. Cigarette smoking caused a marked reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output. Infusion of pentagastrin increased salivary and duodenal EGF output and this was blocked by the addition of somatostatin. Injection of secretin lead to an increase in pancreatic output of EGF. We conclude that in man the major sources of EGF are salivary glands, duodenum, and pancreas and that the release of EGF remains under neurohormonal control. PMID:2806986

  19. Polyelectrolyte complexes stabilize and controllably release vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Vitharana, Samadhi N; Peek, Laura J; Coop, Tina; Berkland, Cory

    2007-05-01

    Angiogenesis has long been a desired therapeutic approach to improve clinical outcomes of conditions typified by ischemia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has demonstrated the ability to generate new blood vessels in vivo, but trials using intravenous delivery have not yet produced clinical success. Localized, sustained delivery of VEGF has been proven necessary to generate blood vessels as demonstrated by implantable, controlled release devices. Ultimately, nanoparticles delivered by intravenous injection may be designed to accumulate in target tissues and sustain the local VEGF concentration; however, injectable nanosuspensions that control the release of stabilized VEGF must first be developed. In this study, we utilize the heparin binding domain of VEGF to bind the polyanion dextran sulfate, resulting in an enhanced thermal stability of VEGF. Coacervation of the VEGF-bound dextran sulfate with selected polycations (chitosan, polyethylenimine, or poly-L-lysine) produced nanoparticles approximately 250 nm in diameter with high VEGF encapsulation efficiency (50-85%). Release of VEGF from these formulations persisted for >10 days and maintained high VEGF activity as determined by ELISA and a mitogenic bioassay. Chitosan-dextran sulfate complexes were preferred because of their biodegradability, desirable particle size ( approximately 250 nm), entrapment efficiency ( approximately 85%), controlled release (near linear for 10 days), and mitogenic activity.

  20. In vivo histamine voltammetry in the mouse premammillary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2015-06-07

    Histamine plays a major role in the mediation of allergic reactions such as peripheral inflammation. This classical monoamine is also a neurotransmitter involved in the central nervous system but its role in this context is poorly understood. Studying histamine neurotransmission is important due to its implications in many neurological disorders. The sensitivity, selectivity and high temporal resolution of fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offer many advantages for studying electroactive neurotransmitters. Histamine has previously been studied with FSCV; however, the lack of a robust Faradaic electrochemical signal makes it difficult to selectively identify histamine in complex media, as found in vivo. In this work, we optimize an electrochemical waveform that provides a stimulation-locked and unique electrochemical signal towards histamine. We describe in vitro waveform optimization and a novel in vivo physiological model for stimulating histamine release in the mouse premammillary nucleus via stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. We demonstrate that a robust signal can be used to effectively identify histamine and characterize its in vivo kinetics.

  1. Drosophila factor 2, an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor, has DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D

    1997-12-12

    Drosophila factor 2 has been identified as a component of negative transcription elongation factor (N-TEF) that causes the release of RNA polymerase II transcripts in an ATP-dependent manner (Xie, Z. and Price D. H. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 11043-11046). We show here that the transcript release activity of factor 2 requires ATP or dATP and that adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS), adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP), or other NTPs do not support the activity. Factor 2 demonstrated a strong DNA-dependent ATPase activity that correlated with its transcript release activity. At 20 microg/ml DNA, the ATPase activity of factor 2 had an apparent Km(ATP) of 28 microM and an estimated Kcat of 140 min-1. Factor 2 caused the release of nascent transcripts associated with elongation complexes generated by RNA polymerase II on a dC-tailed template. Therefore, no other protein cofactors are required for the transcript release activity of factor 2. Using the dC-tailed template assay, it was found that renaturation of the template was required for factor 2 function.

  2. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Gastrointestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Vicario, María; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the intestinal lumen and the mucosa is the location where the majority of ingested immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the vast gastrointestinal immune system. Upon regular physiological conditions, the intestinal micro-flora and the epithelial barrier are well prepared to process daily a huge amount of food-derived antigens and non-immunogenic particles. Similarly, they are ready to prevent environmental toxins and microbial antigens to penetrate further and interact with the mucosal-associated immune system. These functions promote the development of proper immune responses and oral tolerance and prevent disease and inflammation. Brain-gut axis structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal stimuli. The brain-gut axis integrates local and distant regulatory networks and super-systems that serve key housekeeping physiological functions including the balanced functioning of the intestinal barrier. Disturbance of the brain-gut axis may induce intestinal barrier dysfunction, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions, which may indeed trigger transient mucosal inflammation and gut disease. There is a large body of evidence indicating that stress, through the brain-gut axis, may cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, mainly via the systemic and peripheral release of corticotropin-releasing factor. In this review, we describe the role of stress and corticotropin-releasing factor in the regulation of gastrointestinal permeability, and discuss the link to both health and pathological conditions. PMID:25537677

  3. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  4. Neuropeptide W stimulates adrenocorticotrophic hormone release via corticotrophin-releasing factor but not via arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Yogo, Kosuke; Oki, Yutaka; Iino, Kazumi; Yamashita, Miho; Shibata, Shoko; Hayashi, Chiga; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Suenaga, Toshiko; Nakahara, Daiichiro; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) was isolated as an endogenous ligand for NPBWR1, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor localized in the rat brain, including the paraventricular nucleus. It has been reported that central administration of NPW stimulates corticosterone secretion in rats. We hypothesized that NPW activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis via corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and/or arginine vasopressin (AVP). NPW at 1 pM to 10 nM did not affect basal or ACTH-induced corticosterone release from dispersed rat adrenocortical cells, or basal and CRF-induced ACTH release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells. In conscious and unrestrained male rats, intravenous administration of 2.5 and 25 nmol NPW did not affect plasma ACTH levels. However, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of 2.5 and 5.0 nmol NPW increased plasma ACTH levels in a dose-dependent manner at 15 min after stimulation (5.0 vs. 2.5 nmol NPW vs. vehicle: 1802 ± 349 vs. 1170 ± 204 vs. 151 ± 28 pg/mL, respectively, mean ± SEM). Pretreatment with astressin, a CRF receptor antagonist, inhibited the increase in plasma ACTH levels induced by icv administration of 2.5 nmol NPW at 15 min (453 ± 176 vs. 1532 ± 343 pg/mL, p<0.05) and at 30 min (564 ± 147 vs. 1214 ± 139 pg/mL, p<0.05) versus pretreatment with vehicle alone. However, pretreatment with [1-(β-mercapto-β, β-cyclopentamethylenepropionic acid), 2-(Ο-methyl)tyrosine]-arg-vasopressin, a V1a/V1b receptor antagonist, did not affect icv NPW-induced ACTH release at any time (p>0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that central NPW activates the HPA axis by activating hypothalamic CRF but not AVP.

  5. [Presynaptic histamine H3-receptors exist on cardiac sympathetic terminals of guinea pig].

    PubMed

    Luo, X X

    1995-07-01

    This is the first time to report the existence of new presynaptic inhibitory autoreceptors--histamine H3-receptors in guinea pig myocardium. We found that (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (alpha-MeHA), a selective histamine H3-receptor agonist, attenuates the sympathetic inotropic response of isolated guinea pig atria elicited by electrical field stimulation. This inhibition was associated with a marked reduction in endogenous norepinephrine release. The above phenomenon was antagonised by selective histamine H3-receptor antagonists, and inhibited by pretreatment with N ethylmeleimide. The cardiac sympathetic response could be attenuated or facilitated by increase or decrease of endogenous histamine. Our findings indicate that the endogenous histamine might be involved in the modulation of cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission by interacting with histamine H3-receptors and the receptors are probably coupled to a G(o)/Gi protein.

  6. Platelet activating factor: release from colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis and its effect on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1996-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis. They may stimulate intestinal secretion and contribute to the production of diarrhoea. Platelet activating factor (PAF) may be responsible for a high proportion of this secretory response. Biopsy specimens from inflamed and quiescent mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis and normal human colonic mucosa were cultured or co-cultured. The release of PAF, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene D4 into the culture medium was measured and the ability of this culture medium, from inflamed and normal tissues, to influence secretion in rat colonic mucosa was assessed. PAF was liberated by inflamed tissue. Its release from quiescent but not normal tissue was stimulated by medium in which inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues had been cultured and by exogenous bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, but not by histamine. PAF stimulated eicosanoid production. The rise in short circuit current produced in vitro by inflamed tissue culture medium was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist (CV 6209) (46%) (32.4 (2.9) v 17.5 (1.19) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005) and further by combined cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) (58%) (32.4 (2.9) v 13.6 (1.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005). Mepacrine and hydrocortisone attenuated considerably the electrical response evoked by medium from inflamed mucosa to a similar extent (32.4 (2.9) v 6.3 (1.2) v 5.1 (0.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.001). These data suggest that PAF accounted for 46% of the culture medium secretory effect. Thus, any attempt to block its release in patients with ulcerative colitis may have only a partial effect on their symptoms. PMID:8675086

  7. Activation of histamine H3 receptors in human nasal mucosa inhibits sympathetic vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Varty, LoriAnn M; Gustafson, Eric; Laverty, Maureen; Hey, John A

    2004-01-19

    The peripheral histamine H3 receptor is a presynaptic heterologous receptor located on postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers innervating sympathetic effector systems such as blood vessels and the heart. An extensive body of evidence shows that activation of the histamine H3 receptor attenuates sympathetic tone by presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release. It is proposed that this sympathoinhibitory action, in vivo, leads to reduced vasoconstriction, thereby eliciting a vasodilatory effect. In humans, the peripheral histamine H3 receptor has also been shown to exert a sympathoinhibitory function on specific peripheral autonomic effector systems. For example, human saphenous vein and heart possess functional presynaptic histamine H3 receptors on the sympathetic nerve terminals that upon activation decrease the sympathetic tone to these respective organs. The present studies were conducted to define the role of histamine H3 receptors on neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses in human nasal turbinate mucosa. Contractility studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of histamine H3 receptor activation on sympathetic vasoconstriction in surgically isolated human nasal turbinate mucosa. We found that the histamine H3 receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (30 and 300 nM), inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced (neurogenic) sympathetic vasoconstriction in a concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with the selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (100 nM), blocked the sympathoinhibitory effect of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstriction. In addition, analysis of Taqman mRNA expression studies showed a specific, high level of distribution of the histamine H3 receptor localized in the human nasal mucosa. Taken together, these studies indicate that histamine H3 receptors modulate vascular contractile responses in human nasal mucosa most likely by inhibiting noradrenaline release from

  8. Conserved motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic polypeptide release factors: tRNA-protein mimicry hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Ebihara, K; Uno, M; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    Translation termination requires two codon-specific polypeptide release factors in prokaryotes and one omnipotent factor in eukaryotes. Sequences of 17 different polypeptide release factors from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were compared. The prokaryotic release factors share residues split into seven motifs. Conservation of many discrete, perhaps critical, amino acids is observed in eukaryotic release factors, as well as in the C-terminal portion of elongation factor (EF) G. Given that the C-terminal domains of EF-G interacts with ribosomes by mimicry of a tRNA structure, the pattern of conservation of residues in release factors may reflect requirements for a tRNA-mimicry for binding to the A site of the ribosome. This mimicry would explain why release factors recognize stop codons and suggests that all prokaryotic and eukaryotic release factors evolved from the progenitor of EF-G. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8643594

  9. Histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Bruno; Nicolau-Galmés, Francesca; Jangi, Shawkat M; Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Alonso-Tejerina, Erika; Burgos-Bretones, Juan; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2010-07-01

    Histamine has been demonstrated to be involved in cell proliferation, embryonic development, and tumour growth. These various biological effects are mediated through the activation of specific histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4) that differ in their tissue expression patterns and functions. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies of the modulatory roles of histamine in tumour development and metastasis have been reported, the effect of histamine in the progression of some types of tumours remains controversial; however, recent findings on the role of histamine in the immune system have shed new light on this question. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding the roles of histamine and its receptors in tumour biology. We report our recent observations of the anti-tumoural effect of H1 histamine antagonists on experimental and human melanomas. We have found that in spite of exogenous histamine stimulated human melanoma cell proliferation, clonogenic ability and migration activity in a dose-dependent manner, the melanoma tumour growth was not modulated by in vivo histamine treatment. On the contrary, terfenadine-treatment in vitro induced melanoma cell death by apoptosis and in vivo terfenadine treatment significantly inhibited tumour growth in murine models. These observations increase our understanding of cancer biology and may inspire novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

  10. Intrahypothalamic neuroendocrine actions of corticotropin-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Almeida, O F; Hassan, A H; Holsboer, F

    1993-01-01

    Most studies of the neuroendocrine effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) have focused on its role in the regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis; activation of this axis follows release of the peptide from CRF-containing terminals in the median eminence. However, a sizeable proportion of CRF fibres terminate within the hypothalamus itself, where synaptic contacts with other hypothalamic neuropeptidergic neurons (e.g. gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing and opioidergic neurons) have been identified. Here, we summarize physiological and pharmacological data which provide insights into the nature and significance of these intrahypothalamic connections. It is now clear that CRF is a potent secretagogue of the three major endogenous opioid peptides (beta-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin) and that it stimulates opioidergic neurons tonically. In the case of beta-endorphin, another hypothalamic peptide, arginine vasopressin, appears to be an essential mediator of CRF's effect, suggesting the occurrence of CRF synapses on, or in the vicinity of, vasopressin neurons; morphological support for this assumption is still wanting. Evidence for direct and indirect inhibitory effects of CRF on sexual behaviour and secretion of reproductive hormones is also presented; the indirect pathways include opioidergic neurons. An important conclusion from all these studies is that, in addition to its better known functions in producing adaptive responses during stressful situations, CRF might also contribute to the coordinated functioning of various components of the neuroendocrine system under basal conditions. Although feedback regulation of hypothalamic neuronal activity by peripheral steroids is a well-established tenet of endocrinology, data on modulation of the intrahypothalamic actions of CRF by adrenal and sex steroids are just emerging. Some of these newer findings may be useful in framing questions related to the mechanisms underlying disease states (such as

  11. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE PAGES

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; ...

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  12. Progress in corticotropin-releasing factor-1 antagonist development

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2010-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonists have been sought since the stress-secreted peptide was isolated in 1981. Although evidence suggests the limited efficacy of CRF1 antagonists as antidepressants, CRF1 antagonists might be novel pharmacotherapies for anxiety and addiction. Progress in understanding the two-domain model of ligand–receptor interactions for CRF family receptors might yield chemically novel CRF1 receptor antagonists, including peptide CRF1 antagonists, antagonists with signal transduction selectivity and nonpeptide CRF1 antagonists that act via the extracellular (rather than transmembrane) domains. Novel ligands that conform to prevalent pharmacophore and exhibit drug-like pharmacokinetic properties have been identified. The therapeutic utility of CRF1 antagonists should soon be clearer: several small molecules are currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for depression, anxiety and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:20206287

  13. IgE enhances Fc epsilon receptor I expression and IgE-dependent release of histamine and lipid mediators from human umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells: synergistic effect of IL-4 and IgE on human mast cell Fc epsilon receptor I expression and mediator release.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Sayama, K; Yano, K; Lantz, C S; Noben-Trauth, N; Ra, C; Costa, J J; Galli, S J

    1999-05-01

    We investigated the effects of IgE versus IL-4 on Fc epsilon RI surface expression in differentiated human mast cells derived in vitro from umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. We found that IgE (at 5 micrograms/ml) much more strikingly enhanced surface expression of Fc epsilon RI than did IL-4 (at 0.1-100 ng/ml); similar results were also obtained with differentiated mouse mast cells. However, IL-4 acted synergistically with IgE to enhance Fc epsilon RI expression in these umbilical cord blood-derived human mast cells, as well as in mouse peritoneal mast cells derived from IL-4-/- or IL-4+/+ mice. We also found that: 1) IgE-dependent enhancement of Fc epsilon RI expression was associated with a significantly enhanced ability of these human mast cells to secrete histamine, PGD2, and leukotriene C4 upon subsequent passive sensitization with IgE and challenge with anti-IgE; 2) preincubation with IL-4 enhanced IgE-dependent mediator secretion in these cells even in the absence of significant effects on Fc epsilon RI surface expression; 3) when used together with IgE, IL-4 enhanced IgE-dependent mediator secretion in human mast cells to levels greater than those observed in cells that had been preincubated with IgE alone; and 4) batches of human mast cells generated in vitro from umbilical cord blood cells derived from different donors exhibited differences in the magnitude and pattern of histamine and lipid mediator release in response to anti-IgE challenge, both under baseline conditions and after preincubation with IgE and/or IL-4.

  14. Submucosal microinfusion of endothelin and adrenaline mobilizes ECL-cell histamine in rat stomach, and causes mucosal damage: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Bernsand, M; Ericsson, P; Bjorkqvist, M; Zhao, C-M; Hakanson, R; Norlen, P

    2003-10-01

    Rat stomach ECL cells release histamine in response to gastrin. Submucosal microinfusion of endothelin or adrenaline, known to cause vasoconstriction and gastric lesions, mobilized striking amounts of histamine. While the histamine response to gastrin is sustainable for hours, that to endothelin and adrenaline was characteristically short-lasting (1-2 h). The aims of this study were to identify the cellular source of histamine mobilized by endothelin and adrenaline, and examine the differences between the histamine-mobilizing effects of gastrin, and of endothelin and adrenaline. Endothelin, adrenaline or gastrin were administered by submucosal microinfusion. Gastric histamine mobilization was monitored by microdialysis. Local pretreatment with the H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine and the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine did not prevent endothelin- or adrenaline-induced mucosal damage. Submucosal microinfusion of histamine did not cause damage. Acid blockade by ranitidine or omeprazole prevented the damage, suggesting that acid back diffusion contributes. Gastrin raised histidine decarboxylase (HDC) activity close to the probe, without affecting the histamine concentration. Endothelin and adrenaline lowered histamine by 50-70%, without activating HDC. Histamine mobilization declined upon repeated administration. Endothelin reduced the number of histamine-immunoreactive ECL cells locally, and reduced the number of secretory vesicles. Thus, unlike gastrin, endothelin (and adrenaline) is capable of exhausting ECL-cell histamine. Microinfusion of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (known to deplete ECL cells but not mast cells of histamine) reduced the histamine-mobilizing effect of endothelin by 80%, while 1-week pretreatment with omeprazole enhanced it, supporting the involvement of ECL cells. Somatostatin or the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-, but not endothelin-stimulated histamine release, suggesting that endothelin and gastrin mobilize histamine via

  15. Histamine H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis with cell shape change and adhesion molecule upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ping; Ngo, Karen; Nguyen, Steven; Thurmond, Robin L; Edwards, James P; Karlsson, Lars; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping

    2004-01-01

    During mast cell degranulation, histamine is released in large quantities. Human eosinophils were found to express histamine H4 but not H3 receptors. The possible effects of histamine on eosinophils and the receptor mediating these effects were investigated in our studies. Histamine (0.01–30 μM) induced a rapid and transient cell shape change in human eosinophils, but had no effects on neutrophils. The maximal shape change was at 0.3 μM histamine with EC50 at 19 nM. After 60 min incubation with 1 μM histamine, eosinophils were desensitized and were refractory to shape change response upon histamine restimulation. Histamine (0.01–1 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. Histamine-induced eosinophil shape change was mediated by the H4 receptor. This effect was completely inhibited by H4 receptor-specific antagonist JNJ 7777120 (IC50 0.3 μM) and H3/H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (IC50 1.4 μM), but not by selective H1, H2 or H3 receptor antagonists. H4 receptor agonists imetit (EC50 25 nM) and clobenpropit (EC50 72 nM) could mimic histamine effect in inducing eosinophil shape change. Histamine (0.01–100 μM) induced upregulation of adhesion molecules CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) on eosinophils. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 and thioperamide. Histamine (0.01–10 μM) induced eosinophil chemotaxis with an EC50 of 83 nM. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 (IC50 86 nM) and thioperamide (IC50 519 nM). Histamine (0.5 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. In conclusion, we have demonstrated a new mechanism of eosinophil recruitment driven by mast cells via the release of histamine. Using specific histamine receptor ligands, we have provided a definitive proof that the H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis, cell shape change and

  16. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    SciTech Connect

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plant height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.

  17. Histamine stimulates neurogenesis in the rodent subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Liliana; Eiriz, Maria Francisca; Santos, Tiago; Xapelli, Sara; Grade, Sofia; Rosa, Alexandra Isabel; Cortes, Luísa; Ferreira, Raquel; Bragança, José; Agasse, Fabienne; Ferreira, Lino; Malva, João O

    2012-04-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells present in the subventricular zone (SVZ) are a potential source of repairing cells after injury. Therefore, the identification of novel players that modulate neural stem cells differentiation can have a huge impact in stem cell-based therapies. Herein, we describe a unique role of histamine in inducing functional neuronal differentiation from cultured mouse SVZ stem/progenitor cells. This proneurogenic effect depends on histamine 1 receptor activation and involves epigenetic modifications and increased expression of Mash1, Dlx2, and Ngn1 genes. Biocompatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles, engineered to release histamine in a controlled and prolonged manner, also triggered robust neuronal differentiation in vitro. Preconditioning with histamine-loaded microparticles facilitated neuronal differentiation of SVZ-GFP cells grafted in hippocampal slices and in in vivo rodent brain. We propose that neuronal commitment triggered by histamine per se or released from biomaterial-derived vehicles may represent a new tool for brain repair strategies.

  18. Histamine, but not leukotriene C4, is an essential mediator in cold urticaria wheals.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Pauliina; Harvima, Ilkka T; Ackermann, Leena

    2007-01-01

    In addition to histamine, leukotriene C4 (LTC4) might also play a role in mediating cold urticaria wheals. To study the significance of LTC4 vs. histamine, 6 patients with cold urticaria were challenged with the ice cube test before and after ingestion of 10 mg cetirizine (antihistamine), 10 mg montelukast (leukotriene antagonist) or a combination of both drugs. Cetirizine diminished the cold-induced wheal by 50+/- 42%. Montelukast had no significant effect, and the combination of both drugs diminished the wheal by 37+/- 33%. Furthermore, a skin microdialysis technique detected the release of histamine in the cold-induced wheal, whereas no LTC4 release was detected. In conclusion, the antihistamine is effective and histamine is released, whereas the leukotriene antagonist is not effective and LTC4 is not released in the cold urticaria wheal.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of histamine in biological samples: the cerebrospinal fluid challenge--a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaopin; Wu, Juanli; Wu, Shihua; Bao, Aimin

    2013-04-24

    Histamine, a neurotransmitter crucially involved in a number of basic physiological functions, undergoes changes in neuropsychiatric disorders. Detection of histamine in biological samples such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is thus of clinical importance. The most commonly used method for measuring histamine levels is high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, factors such as very low levels of histamine, the even lower CSF-histamine and CSF-histamine metabolite levels, especially in certain neuropsychiatric diseases, rapid formation of histamine metabolites, and other confounding elements during sample collection, make analysis of CSF-histamine and CSF-histamine metabolites a challenging task. Nonetheless, this challenge can be met, not only with respect to HPLC separation column, derivative reagent, and detector, but also in terms of optimizing the CSF sample collection. This review aims to provide a general insight into the quantitative analyses of histamine in biological samples, with an emphasis on HPLC instruments, methods, and hyphenated techniques, with the aim of promoting the development of an optimal and practical protocol for the determination of CSF-histamine and/or CSF-histamine metabolites.

  20. Histamine H1 receptor cell membrane chromatography online high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method reveals houttuyfonate as an activator of the histamine H1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Han, Shengli; Cao, Jingjing; Zhang, Tao; He, Langchong

    2014-11-01

    Allergy is an abnormal reaction of the body to an allergen. Histamine is responsible for many of the acute symptoms of allergic diseases. Many of the allergic and inflammatory actions of histamine are mediated by the histamine H1 receptor. In the present study, we established a two-dimensional histamine H1 receptor/cell membrane chromatography with online high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry method for screening potential histamine-activating components in a traditional Chinese medicine injection. The specification of the method was validated by screening, separating, and identifying a mixed standard solution of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, gefitinib, tamsulosin, and nitrendipine. The Yujin injection, an example of traditional Chinese medicine injection, was screened and potential allergic components acting on the histamine H1 receptor were identified. A Ca(2+) flux assay showed that houttuyfonate and Yujin injection induced calcium release in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that houttuyfonate is an activator of the histamine H1 receptor. The mechanism of houttuyfonate activation involves phosphorylation of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor. In conclusion, this two-dimensional method can rapidly detect and enrich target components isolated from the Yujin injection. This indicates that individuals with an overexpression of the histamine H1 receptor should be aware of possible allergic reactions when receiving the Yujin injection.

  1. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated suppression of inhibitory synaptic transmission in the submucous plexus of guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Xia, Y; Hu, H z; Ren, J; Gao, C; Wood, J D

    2000-05-26

    Conventional intracellular microelectrodes and marker injection techniques were used to study the actions of histamine on inhibitory synaptic transmission in the submucous plexus of guinea-pig small intestine. Bath application of histamine (1-300 microM) reversibly suppressed both noradrenergic and non-adrenergic slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of histamine were mimicked by the selective histamine H(3) receptor agonist R(-)-alpha-methylhistamine but not the selective histamine H(1) receptor agonist, 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl) heptanecarboxamide (HTMT dimaleate), or the selective histamine H(2) receptor agonist, dimaprit. The histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, thioperamide, blocked the effects of histamine. Histamine H(1) and H(2) receptor antagonists did not change the action of histamine. Hyperpolarizing responses to focal application of norepinephrine or somatostatin by pressure ejection from micropipettes were unaffected by histamine and R(-)-alpha-methylhistamine. The results suggest that histamine acts at presynaptic histamine H(3) receptors on the terminals of sympathetic postganglionic fibers and intrinsic somatostatinergic nerves in the small intestine to suppress the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitters, norepinephrine and somatostatin.

  2. Therapeutic potential of histamine H3 receptor agonist for the treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Ryo; Miyamoto, Yasuhisa; Shimamura, Ken; Ishihara, Akane; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Hidehito; Chen, Airu S; Chen, Howard Y; Macneil, Douglas J; Kanatani, Akio; Tokita, Shigeru

    2006-09-12

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are located on the presynaptic membranes and cell soma of histamine neurons, where they negatively regulate the synthesis and release of histamine. In addition, H3Rs are also located on nonhistaminergic neurons, acting as heteroreceptors to regulate the releases of other amines such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. The present study investigated the effects of H3R ligands on appetite and body-weight regulation by using WT and H3R-deficient mice (H3RKO), because brain histamine plays a pivotal role in energy homeostasis. The results showed that thioperamide, an H3R inverse agonist, increases, whereas imetit, an H3R agonist, decreases appetite and body weight in diet-induced obese (DiO) WT mice. Moreover, in DiO WT mice, but not in DiO H3RKO mice, imetit reduced fat mass, plasma concentrations of leptin and insulin, and hepatic triglyceride content. The anorexigenic effects of imetit were associated with a reduction in histamine release, but a comparable reduction in histamine release with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, an inhibitor of histamine synthesis, increased appetite. Moreover, the anorexigenic effects of imetit were independent of the melanocortin system, because imetit comparably reduced appetite in melanocortin 3 and 4 receptor-deficient mice. The results provide roles of H3Rs in energy homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic potential for H3R agonists in the treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  3. Development of a sensitive radioassay of histamine for in vitro allergy testing

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Gottieb, G.R.; Camp, V.M.; Kutner, M.; Lolies, P.

    1984-01-01

    A radioenzymatic assay for the measurement of histamine is described, based on the incubation of histamine in the presence of histamine-N-methyl-transferase from rat kidney and (/sup 3/H-methyl)-S-adenosyl-L-methionine (sp act 15 Ci/mmol) in phosphate buffer, 0.05 mole/l, pH 7.9, at 37/sup 0/C for 60 min. The N-(/sup 3/H-methyl)histamine generated was selectively extracted into toluene/isoamyl alcohol (3:2) and the quantity of the tritium in the sample was determined by liquid-scintillation counting. As little as 1 nmol/l of histamine can be detected. The assay is specific, with no cross-reactivity noted for several compounds closely related to histamine. The assay was used to measure the released histamine of a group of allergic subjects following the incubation of their blood with various allergens. A good correlation was found between histamine release from whole blood and the response of skin mast cells to intradermal antigen administration.

  4. Histamine H3 antagonists as wake-promoting and pro-cognitive agents.

    PubMed

    Stocking, Emily M; Letavic, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The histamine H3 receptor is a pre-synaptic auto- and hetero-receptor that controls the release of histamine and a variety of other neurotransmitters in the brain. As such, modulation of the histamine H(3) receptor is expected to affect wake via control of the release of histamine and to affect cognition via regulation of several other neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Over the last several years numerous pre-clinical studies have shown that histamine H3 antagonists promote wakefulness, improve cognition, and in some cases affect food intake. Based on the interest level generated from these early pharmacology studies, and following the cloning and expression of the human histamine H3 receptor, many pharmaceutical companies began drug discovery programs aimed at the identification of histamine H3 antagonists suitable for human clinical trials. These efforts have led to many new chemotypes, and several promising compounds have recently entered the clinic for a variety of conditions, including ADHD, Narcolepsy, EDS associated with Narcolepsy, Cognitive disorders and Schizophrenia. Recent efforts towards the identification and pharmacological characterization of novel histamine H3 antagonists will be discussed.

  5. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  6. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  7. 76 FR 68183 - Highlights of the Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Update Release of Final Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Update Release of Final Report AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA's Office of Research and Development. The parent Exposure Factors... in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals. The Highlights of the Exposure Factors...

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated release of platelet-derived growth factor from cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a 30,000-Mr glycoprotein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). It is also a potent vasoconstrictor. In the present study, we found that the macrophage-derived polypeptide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), releases a factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) that is mitogenic for SMC. Postculture medium from TNF-stimulated EC induced a 90% increase in mitogenesis is compared with controls. This effect was half-maximal at a TNF dose of 114 pM, reflected a 2.5-fold increase in PDGF-specific mRNA synthesis, and peaked at 15 h of TNF stimulation. Mitogenic activity was completely abrogated by preincubation of postculture medium with antibody to platelet PDGF. Stimulation of EC with IL-1 (60-240 pM) led to the release of similar mitogenic activity. Thus, in addition to its effects on the hemostatic and adhesive properties of EC, TNF also promotes release of PDGF, which may serve to modulate proliferation of vascular SMC during wound healing, inflammation, and atherogenesis. PMID:3598461

  9. Stress-Derived Corticotropin Releasing Factor Breaches Epithelial Endotoxin Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Loss of the endotoxin tolerance of intestinal epithelium contributes to a number of intestinal diseases. The etiology is not clear. Psychological stress is proposed to compromise the intestinal barrier function. The present study aims to elucidate the role of the stress-derived corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in breaching the established intestinal epithelial endotoxin tolerance. Methods Epithelial cells of HT-29, T84 and MDCK were exposed to lipopolysaccharide to induce the endotoxin tolerance; the cells were then stimulated with CRF. The epithelial barrier function was determined using as indicators of the endotoxin tolerant status. A water-avoid stress mouse model was employed to test the role of CRF in breaching the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestine. Results The established endotoxin tolerance in the epithelial cell monolayers was broken down by a sequent exposure to CRF and LPS manifesting a marked drop of the transepithelial resistance (TER) and an increase in the permeability to a macromolecular tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The exposure to CRF also increased the expression of Cldn2 in the epithelial cells, which could be mimicked by over expression of TLR4 in epithelial cells. Over expression of Cldn2 resulted in low TER in epithelial monolayers and high permeability to HRP. After treating mice with the 10-day chronic stress, the intestinal epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised, which could be prevented by blocking either CRF, or TLR4, or Cldn2. Conclusions Psychological stress-derived CRF can breach the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23840363

  10. Modulation of ConA-induced inflammatory ascites by histamine - short communication.

    PubMed

    Baintner, Károly

    2015-03-01

    The early phase of the ConA-induced inflammatory ascites was studied, with special reference to histamine. Concanavalin A (ConA), a cell-surface binding lectin was injected i.p. (25 mg/kg bw) to mice. After 1 h the animals were killed, the ascitic fluid collected and measured. Other agents were injected s.c., 10 min before the ConA-challenge. Exogenous histamine markedly inhibited the ConA-induced ascites. Release of endogenous vasoactive agents from the mast cells by Compound 48/80 had a similar, but slight effect. Cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizing agent, and chloropyramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist was ineffective. Although histamine increases endothelial permeability, it did not enhance the formation of ascitic fluid, on the contrary, it inhibited the ConA-induced ascites, presumably due to its known hypotonic effect. It is concluded that ConA-induced ascites is not mediated by mast cell histamine.

  11. Histamine H3 activation depresses cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Eschun, G; Bose, D; Jacobs, H; Yang, J J; Light, R B; Mink, S N

    1998-11-01

    In the heart, histamine (H3) receptors may function as inhibitory presynaptic receptors that decrease adrenergic norepinephrine release in conditions of enhanced sympathetic neural activity. We hypothesized that H3-receptor blockade might improve cardiovascular function in sepsis. In a canine model of Escherichia coli sepsis, we found that H3-receptor blockade increased cardiac output (3.6 to 5.3 l/min, P < 0.05), systemic blood pressure (mean 76 to 96 mmHg, P < 0.05), and left ventricular contractility compared with pretreatment values. Plasma histamine concentrations increased modestly in the H3-blocker-sepsis group compared with values obtained in a nonsepsis-time-control group. In an in vitro preparation, histamine H3 activation could be identified under conditions of septic plasma. We conclude that activation of H3 receptors may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  12. Histamine in the locus coeruleus promotes descending noradrenergic inhibition of neuropathic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Jin, Cong-Yu; Viisanen, Hanna; You, Hao-Jun; Pertovaara, Antti

    2014-12-01

    Among brain structures receiving efferent projections from the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus is the pontine locus coeruleus (LC) involved in descending noradrenergic control of pain. Here we studied whether histamine in the LC is involved in descending regulation of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Peripheral neuropathy was induced by unilateral spinal nerve ligation in the rat with a chronic intracerebral and intrathecal catheter for drug administrations. Mechanical hypersensitivity in the injured limb was assessed by monofilaments. Heat nociception was assessed by determining radiant heat-induced paw flick. Histamine in the LC produced a dose-related (1-10μg) mechanical antihypersensitivity effect (maximum effect at 15min and duration of effect 30min), without influence on heat nociception. Pretreatment of LC with zolantidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist), but not with pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), and spinal administration of atipamezole (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), prazosine (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) or bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist) attenuated the antihypersensitivity effect of histamine. The histamine-induced antihypersensitivity effect was also reduced by pretreatment of LC with fadolmidine, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist inducing autoinhibition of noradrenergic cell bodies. Zolantidine or pyrilamine alone in the LC failed to influence pain behavior, while A-960656 (histamine H3 receptor antagonist) suppressed hypersensitivity. A plausible explanation for these findings is that histamine, due to excitatory action mediated by the histamine H2 receptor on noradrenergic cell bodies, promotes descending spinal α1/2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Blocking the autoinhibitory histamine H3 receptor on histaminergic nerve terminals in the LC facilitates release of histamine and thereby, increases descending noradrenergic pain inhibition.

  13. Blood histamine concentrations are not elevated in humans with septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.; Kaliner, M.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Histamine has been suggested as an important mediator of the cardiovascular abnormalities during septic shock. To determine if blood histamine levels were increased during human sepsis and septic shock, plasma histamine was measured using a very sensitive radioenzyme assay employing histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) in the following patient groups: normal controls (n = 76), nonseptic critically ill (n = 12), nonseptic shock (n = 2), sepsis without shock (n = 28), and septic shock (n = 41). Using this enzyme binding assay, all these groups had similar, normal plasma histamine concentrations, except those patients with septic shock whose mean histamine measurements were significantly reduced (p less than .002). This decrease was found to be due to an artifact of the assay: plasma contained a circulating inhibitor that falsely lowered the measured histamine level. Fractionation of septic shock plasma using molecular exclusion membranes and gel filtration revealed a 5000 MW inhibitory factor. After removal of this inhibitor from plasma, septic shock plasma histamine levels were normal. Thus, septic shock patients may have a circulating inhibitor of the HNMT enzyme, but plasma histamine concentrations are normal. Histaminemia is unlikely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock in humans.

  14. Measurement of urinary histamine: comparison of fluorometric and radioisotopic-enzymatic assay procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, K.; Dyer, J.; Merlin, S.; Kaliner, M.

    1982-02-01

    Assessment of urinary histamine may prove useful in determining the role of histamine in human health and disease. Urinary histamine may be accurately estimated by a modified fluorometric assay employing diamine oxidase (DAO) digestion and cation-exchange chromatography. Normal urine histamine values obtained by this assay are: arithmetic means (+/- SEM), 8.6 +/- 0.6 ng/ml and 10.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/24 hr; geometric means (+/- SEM), 6.2 +/- 1.1 ng/ml and 10.0 +/- 1.3 micrograms/24 hr. However, the radioisotopic-enzymatic assay is less expensive, easier to perform, and possibly more sensitive. Therefore the two procedures were compared. The radioenzyme assay was found to be affected by factors in urine (possibly salt concentrations) requiring extraction of histamine from urine by butanol-heptane. Moreover, it was found to be necessary to compare DAO-digested samples with undigested samples to accurately estimate histamine levels and to run the standard curve of histamine in DAO-digested urine. Even with these modifications, the radioenzyme assay was not as accurate as the fluorometric assay for urine samples having histamine values about 60 ng/ml. Therefore we recommend utilization of the modified fluorometric assay for the measurement of urinary histamine levels.

  15. Histamine-HisCl1 Receptor Axis Regulates Wake-Promoting Signals in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Sonn, Jun Young; Choe, Joonho

    2013-01-01

    Histamine and its two receptors, histamine-gated chloride channel subunit 1 (HisCl1) and ora transientless (Ort), are known to control photoreception and temperature sensing in Drosophila. However, histamine signaling in the context of neural circuitry for sleep-wake behaviors has not yet been examined in detail. Here, we obtained mutant flies with compromised or enhanced histamine signaling and tested their baseline sleep. Hypomorphic mutations in histidine decarboxylase (HDC), an enzyme catalyzing the conversion from histidine to histamine, caused an increase in sleep duration. Interestingly, hisCl1 mutants but not ort mutants showed long-sleep phenotypes similar to those in hdc mutants. Increased sleep duration in hisCl1 mutants was rescued by overexpressing hisCl1 in circadian pacemaker neurons expressing a neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF). Consistently, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of hisCl1 in PDF neurons was sufficient to mimic hisCl1 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that PDF neurons are crucial for sleep regulation by the histamine-HisCl1 signaling. Finally, either hisCl1 mutation or genetic ablation of PDF neurons dampened wake-promoting effects of elevated histamine signaling via direct histamine administration. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrate that the histamine-HisCl1 receptor axis can activate and maintain the wake state in Drosophila and that wake-activating signals may travel via the PDF neurons. PMID:23844178

  16. Regulation of plasma histamine levels by the mast cell clock and its modulation by stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuki; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2017-01-01

    At steady state, plasma histamine levels exhibit circadian variations with nocturnal peaks, which is implicated in the nighttime exacerbation of allergic symptoms. However, the regulatory mechanisms are largely unexplored. This study determined how steady-state plasma histamine levels are regulated and affected by environmental factors. We found that plasma histamine levels decreased in mast cell–deficient mice and their circadian variations were lost in mast cell–deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow–derived mast cells (BMMCs) harboring a mutation in the circadian gene Clock. Clock temporally regulates expression of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), which is involved in histamine transport, in mast cells; OCT inhibition abolished circadian variations in plasma histamine levels. Mice housed under aberrant light/dark conditions or suffering from restraint stress exhibited de-synchronization of the mast cell clockwork, concomitant with the loss of circadian variations in OCT3 expression and plasma histamine levels. The degree of compound 48/80–induced plasma extravasation in mice was correlated with plasma histamine levels. Collectively, the mast cell clock mediates circadian regulation of plasma histamine levels at steady state, in part by controlling OCT3 expression, which can be modulated by stress. Additionally, we propose that plasma histamine levels potentiate mast cell–mediated allergic reactions. PMID:28074918

  17. Improgan antinociception does not require neuronal histamine or histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal; Nalwalk, Julia W; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sakurada, Shinobu; Hoffman, Marcel; Leurs, Rob; Timmerman, Henk; Silos-Santiago, Immaculada; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Hough, Lindsay B

    2003-06-06

    Improgan, a chemical congener of the H(2) antagonist cimetidine, induces antinociception following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration in rodents, but the mechanism of action of this compound remains unknown. Because the chemical structure of improgan closely resembles those of histamine and certain histamine blockers, and because neuronal histamine is known to participate in pain-relieving responses, the antinociceptive actions of improgan were evaluated in mice containing null mutations in the genes for three histamine receptors (H(1), H(2), and H(3)) and also in the gene for histidine decarboxylase (the histamine biosynthetic enzyme). Similar to earlier findings in Swiss-Webster mice, improgan induced maximal, reversible, dose-related reductions in thermal nociceptive responses in ICR mice, but neither pre-improgan (baseline) nor post-improgan nociceptive latencies were changed in any of the mutant mice as compared with wild-type controls. Improgan also had weak inhibitory activity in vitro (pK(i)=4.7-4.9) on specific binding to three recently-discovered, recombinant isoforms of the rat H(3) receptor (H(3A), H(3B), and H(3C)). The present findings strongly support the hypothesis that neuronal histamine and its receptors fail to play a role in improgan-induced antinociception.

  18. Fluorescence-based retention assays reveals sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor from bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonmo; Yun, Ye-Rang; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    The sustained release of growth factors following their implantation in vivo is essential for successful outcomes in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we evaluated the release kinetics and delivery efficacies of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic growth factor, incorporated into calcium phosphate bone grafts (BGs). We evaluated the release profile of VEGF from BGs using a novel fluorescence-based retention assay, which revealed that VEGF loaded on BGs can be released in a sustained manner without an initial burst (near zero-order cumulative release) with a controlled release rate of 13.6% per week for up to 7 weeks. In contrast, an ELISA-based release assay showed VEGF to have an early burst-release profile for the first week. However, the biological activity of VEGF released from the BGs was preserved over the 7-week release period, which is consistent with the sustained-release profile observed in the fluorescence-based retention assay. Furthermore, the in vivo bone-forming action of the VEGF-loaded BGs was well demonstrated in a rat subcutaneous model. Taken together, the sustained release of VEGF loaded onto BGs was effective in stimulating proliferation, angiogenesis and osteogenesis, suggesting the ultimate value of VEGF-engineered BGs for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstriction in porcine nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Varty, LoriAnn M; Hey, John A

    2002-10-11

    Histamine release from mast cells is a primary mediator of rhinorrhea, nasal mucosal swelling, increased secretion, sneezing, pruritus and congestion that occur in allergic rhinitis. It is well known that histamine H(1) receptor antagonists inhibit the itch and rhinorhea, but do not block the allergic nasal congestion. A growing body of evidence shows that in addition to histamine H(1) receptors, activation of H(3) receptors may contribute to the procongestant nasal actions of histamine. Activation of the prejunctional histamine H(3) receptor modulates sympathetic control of nasal vascular tone and resistance. The present study was conducted to further characterize the role of histamine H(3) receptors on neurogenic sympathetic vascular contractile responses in isolated porcine nasal turbinate mucosa. We presently found that the histamine H(3) receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (10-1000 nM), inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced sympathetic vasomotor contractions in a concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with either of the selective histamine H(3) receptor antagonists, thioperamide and clobenpropit, blocked the sympathoinhibitory effect of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine in porcine turbinate mucosa. The effect of compound 48/80, an agent that elicits the release of endogenous histamine from mast cells on nasal sympathetic contractile responses, was also tested. The action of compound 48/80 to release mast cell-derived histamine in the nose mimics many of the nasal responses associated with allergic rhinitis, extravascular leakage and decreased nasal patency. We presently found that compound 48/80 also inhibited the electrical field stimulation-induced sympathetic response. Pretreatment with the H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit blocked the sympathoinhibitory action of compound 48/80 on sympathetic contractile responses in nasal mucosa. Taken together, these studies indicate that histamine H(3) receptors modulate vascular contractile

  20. Epidermal growth factor acts as a corticotropin-releasing factor in chronically catheterized fetal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Polk, D H; Ervin, M G; Padbury, J F; Lam, R W; Reviczky, A L; Fisher, D A

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been reported to stimulate adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), growth hormone and prolactin secretion from pituitary tissue in vitro, and in large doses evokes ACTH secretion in adult sheep in vivo. In order to assess a possible role for EGF in the pituitary hyperfunction characteristic of the in utero fetus, we measured changes in plasma immunoreactive ACTH concentrations after acute administration of saline, purified mouse EGF or synthetic ovine corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) to chronically catheterized fetal sheep. Both CRF and EGF were associated with increases in plasma immunoreactive ACTH concentrations. Peak values 60 min after 10-micrograms injections of either EGF or CRF increased from baseline ACTH values of 61 +/- 11 pg/ml to 191 +/- 37 and 178 +/- 25 pg/ml, respectively. Dose-response studies indicate that at low doses (less than 20 micrograms) EGF is as potent a stimulus for ACTH release as CRF. EGF infusion was not associated with detectable changes in circulating CRF, catecholamines, arginine vasopressin levels, or plasma growth hormone concentrations. We speculate that EGF may be important in the regulation of pituitary function in the developing mammalian fetus. PMID:3029180

  1. Satiety factor oleoylethanolamide recruits the brain histaminergic system to inhibit food intake

    PubMed Central

    Provensi, Gustavo; Coccurello, Roberto; Umehara, Hayato; Munari, Leonardo; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Nosi, Daniele; Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Moles, Anna; Blandina, Patrizio; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Key factors driving eating behavior are hunger and satiety, which are controlled by a complex interplay of central neurotransmitter systems and peripheral stimuli. The lipid-derived messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is released by enterocytes in response to fat intake and indirectly signals satiety to hypothalamic nuclei. Brain histamine is released during the appetitive phase to provide a high level of arousal in anticipation of feeding, and mediates satiety. However, despite the possible functional overlap of satiety signals, it is not known whether histamine participates in OEA-induced hypophagia. Using different experimental settings and diets, we report that the anorexiant effect of OEA is significantly attenuated in mice deficient in the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC-KO) or acutely depleted of histamine via interocerebroventricular infusion of the HDC blocker α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH). α-FMH abolished OEA-induced early occurrence of satiety onset while increasing histamine release in the CNS with an H3 receptor antagonist-increased hypophagia. OEA augmented histamine release in the cortex of fasted mice within a time window compatible to its anorexic effects. OEA also increased c-Fos expression in the oxytocin neurons of the paraventricular nuclei of WT but not HDC-KO mice. The density of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in other brain regions that receive histaminergic innervation and participate in the expression of feeding behavior was comparable in OEA-treated WT and HDC-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that OEA requires the integrity of the brain histamine system to fully exert its hypophagic effect and that the oxytocin neuron-rich nuclei are the likely hypothalamic area where brain histamine influences the central effects of OEA. PMID:25049422

  2. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+), which took place via activation of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1Rs via PLC and IP3, increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  3. Research Advances in Tissue Engineering Materials for Sustained Release of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-yang; Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Jing-jing; Xiao, Ze-cong; He, Chao-chao; Shi, Hong-xue; Li, Xiao-kun; Yang, Shu-lin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of cytokines that stimulate cell growth and are widely used in clinical practice, such as wound healing, revascularization, bone repair, and nervous system disease. However, free growth factors have a short half-life and are instable in vivo. Therefore, the search of excellent carriers to enhance sustained release of growth factors in vivo has become an area of intense research interest. The development of controlled-release systems that protect the recombinant growth factors from enzymatic degradation and provide sustained delivery at the injury site during healing should enhance the growth factor's application in tissue regeneration. Thus, this study reviews current research on commonly used carriers for sustained release of growth factors and their sustained release effects for preservation of their bioactivity and their accomplishment in tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26347885

  4. Research Advances in Tissue Engineering Materials for Sustained Release of Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-yang; Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Jing-jing; Xiao, Ze-cong; He, Chao-chao; Shi, Hong-xue; Li, Xiao-kun; Yang, Shu-lin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of cytokines that stimulate cell growth and are widely used in clinical practice, such as wound healing, revascularization, bone repair, and nervous system disease. However, free growth factors have a short half-life and are instable in vivo. Therefore, the search of excellent carriers to enhance sustained release of growth factors in vivo has become an area of intense research interest. The development of controlled-release systems that protect the recombinant growth factors from enzymatic degradation and provide sustained delivery at the injury site during healing should enhance the growth factor's application in tissue regeneration. Thus, this study reviews current research on commonly used carriers for sustained release of growth factors and their sustained release effects for preservation of their bioactivity and their accomplishment in tissue engineering approaches.

  5. Inhibition of mast cell-derived histamine secretion by cromolyn sodium treatment decreases biliary hyperplasia in cholestatic rodents.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Lindsey L; Hargrove, Laura A; Graf, Allyson B; Francis, Taylor C; Hodges, Kyle M; Nguyen, Quy P; Ueno, Yoshi; Greene, John F; Meng, Fanyin; Huynh, Victoria D; Francis, Heather L

    2014-12-01

    Cholangiopathies are characterized by dysregulation of the balance between biliary growth and loss. We have shown that histamine (HA) stimulates biliary growth via autocrine mechanisms. To evaluate the paracrine effects of mast cell (MC) stabilization on biliary proliferation, sham or BDL rats were treated by IP-implanted osmotic pumps filled with saline or cromolyn sodium (24 mg/kg BW/day (inhibits MC histamine release)) for 1 week. Serum, liver blocks and cholangiocytes were collected. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression was measured using real-time PCR in cholangiocytes. Intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) was evaluated by IHC for CK-19. MC number was determined using toluidine blue staining and correlated to IBDM. Proliferation was evaluated by PCNA expression in liver sections and purified cholangiocytes. We assessed apoptosis using real-time PCR and IHC for BAX. Expression of MC stem factor receptor, c-kit, and the proteases chymase and tryptase were measured by real-time PCR. HA levels were measured in serum by EIA. In vitro, MCs and cholangiocytes were treated with 0.1% BSA (basal) or cromolyn (25 μM) for up to 48 h prior to assessing HDC expression, HA levels and chymase and tryptase expression. Supernatants from MCs treated with or without cromolyn were added to cholangiocytes before measuring (i) proliferation by MTT assays, (ii) HDC gene expression by real-time PCR and (iii) HA release by EIA. In vivo, cromolyn treatment decreased BDL-induced: (i) IBDM, MC number, and biliary proliferation; (ii) HDC and MC marker expression; and (iii) HA levels. Cromolyn treatment increased cholangiocyte apoptosis. In vitro, cromolyn decreased HA release and chymase and tryptase expression in MCs but not in cholangiocytes. Cromolyn-treated MC supernatants decreased biliary proliferation and HA release. These studies provide evidence that MC histamine is key to biliary proliferation and may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cholangiopathies.

  6. Histamine Reduces Flash Sensitivity of ON Ganglion Cells in the Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Akimov, Nikolay P.; Marshak, David W.; Frishman, Laura J.; Yusupov, Rafail G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. In Old World primates, the retina receives input from histaminergic neurons in the posterior hypothalamus. They are a subset of the neurons that project throughout the central nervous system and fire maximally during the day. The contribution of these neurons to vision, was examined by applying histamine to a dark-adapted, superfused baboon eye cup preparation while making extracellular recordings from peripheral retinal ganglion cells. Methods. The stimuli were 5-ms, 560-nm, weak, full-field flashes in the low scotopic range. Ganglion cells with sustained and transient ON responses and two cell types with OFF responses were distinguished; their responses were recorded with a 16-channel microelectrode array. Results. Low micromolar doses of histamine decreased the rate of maintained firing and the light sensitivity of ON ganglion cells. Both sustained and transient ON cells responded similarly to histamine. There were no statistically significant effects of histamine in a more limited study of OFF ganglion cells. The response latencies of ON cells were approximately 5 ms slower, on average, when histamine was present. Histamine also reduced the signal-to-noise ratio of ON cells, particularly in those cells with a histamine-induced increase in maintained activity. Conclusions. A major action of histamine released from retinopetal axons under dark-adapted conditions, when rod signals dominate the response, is to reduce the sensitivity of ON ganglion cells to light flashes. These findings may relate to reports that humans are less sensitive to light stimuli in the scotopic range during the day, when histamine release in the retina is expected to be at its maximum. PMID:20207974

  7. Histamine reduces flash sensitivity of on ganglion cells in the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Nikolay P; Marshak, David W; Frishman, Laura J; Glickman, Randolph D; Yusupov, Rafail G

    2010-07-01

    PURPOSE. In Old World primates, the retina receives input from histaminergic neurons in the posterior hypothalamus. They are a subset of the neurons that project throughout the central nervous system and fire maximally during the day. The contribution of these neurons to vision, was examined by applying histamine to a dark-adapted, superfused baboon eye cup preparation while making extracellular recordings from peripheral retinal ganglion cells. METHODS. The stimuli were 5-ms, 560-nm, weak, full-field flashes in the low scotopic range. Ganglion cells with sustained and transient ON responses and two cell types with OFF responses were distinguished; their responses were recorded with a 16-channel microelectrode array. RESULTS. Low micromolar doses of histamine decreased the rate of maintained firing and the light sensitivity of ON ganglion cells. Both sustained and transient ON cells responded similarly to histamine. There were no statistically significant effects of histamine in a more limited study of OFF ganglion cells. The response latencies of ON cells were approximately 5 ms slower, on average, when histamine was present. Histamine also reduced the signal-to-noise ratio of ON cells, particularly in those cells with a histamine-induced increase in maintained activity. CONCLUSIONS. A major action of histamine released from retinopetal axons under dark-adapted conditions, when rod signals dominate the response, is to reduce the sensitivity of ON ganglion cells to light flashes. These findings may relate to reports that humans are less sensitive to light stimuli in the scotopic range during the day, when histamine release in the retina is expected to be at its maximum.

  8. Risk factors for hazardous substance releases that result in injuries and evacuations: data from 9 states.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H I; Haugh, G S; Price-Green, P A; Dhara, V R; Kaye, W E

    1996-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine risk factors associated with hazardous substance releases (at fixed facilities or during transport) that have public health consequences. Data from nine states with surveillance systems for such releases and their consequences were analyzed. Risk factors were determined for releases resulting in (1) injuries or (2) evacuations. Both outcomes were more likely to occur as a result of facility releases (odds ratio [OR] = 1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44, 2.47, for injuries; OR = 3.29, 95% CI = 2.28, 4.74, for evacuations). Releases of ammonia, chlorine, and acids resulted in injuries and evacuations more frequently than releases of other substances. PMID:8659662

  9. Platelet-aggregating activity of released factor(s) from Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Nwagwu, M; Inyang, A L; Molokwu, R I; Essien, E M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of factors derived from Trypanosoma brucei brucei on rat platelets was studied. T. brucei at a concentration of 4 X 10(9) trypanosomes/ml phosphate saline glucose (PSG) was stored at -20 degrees C for 18 h, thawed, and a supernatant fraction, trypanosome-derived supernatant (TDS) was obtained by spinning the sample at 3000 g for 10 min at 20 degrees C. Normal rat platelets, prepared as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), were then incubated with TDS in the absence or presence of ADP (0.05-0.1 microM). The results showed that approximately 83% platelet aggregation was induced by addition of TDS (50 microliters; 113 micrograms protein) to 100 microliters PRP with a platelet count of 10(6). simultaneous addition of ADP and TDS to PRP produced a synergistic effect. It was also shown that a supernatant fraction, obtained by incubating live T. brucei (4 X 10(9)/microliters PSG) at 0 degrees C 1 h and spinning down the trypanosomes (3000 g for 10 min), also induced platelet aggregation. The nature of the factor(s) derived from, or released by, T. brucei inducing platelet aggregation is being investigated but it has been shown not to be ADP.

  10. Histamine and mast cell activator compound 48/80 are safe but inefficient systemic adjuvants for gilthead seabream vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gómez González, N E; Cabas, I; Montero, J; García Alcázar, A; Mulero, V; García Ayala, A

    2017-07-01

    Histamine has a key role in the regulation of inflammatory and innate immune responses in vertebrates. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), a marine hermaphrodite teleost of great commercial value, was the first fish species shown to possess histamine-containing mast cells (MCs) at mucosal tissues. MCs are highly abundant in the peritoneal exudate of gilthead seabream and compound 48/80 (Co 48/80), often used to promote MC activation and histamine release, is able to promote histamine release from gilthead seabream MCs in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of histamine and Co 48/80 on the immune responses of gilthead seabream. For this purpose, histamine and Co 48/80 were intraperitoneally injected alone or combined with 10(9) heat-killed Vibrio anguillarum cells and their effects on head kidney and peritoneal exudate were analyzed. The results indicated that although histamine and Co 48/80 were both able to alter the percentage of peritoneal exudate and head kidney immune cell types, only Co 48/80 increased reactive oxygen species production by peritoneal leukocytes. In addition, histamine, but not Co 48/80, was able to slightly impair the humoral adaptive immune response, i.e. production of specific IgM to V. anguillarum. Notably, both histamine and Co 48/80 reduced the expression of the gene encoding histamine receptor H2 in peritoneal exudate leukocytes. These results show for the first time in fish that although systemic administration of histamine and Co 48/80 is safe, neither compound can be regarded as an efficient adjuvant for gilthead seabream vaccination.

  11. Growth factor delivery: How surface interactions modulate release in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    King, William J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively used to deliver growth factors to induce new bone formation. The pharmacokinetics of growth factor delivery has been a critical regulator of their clinical success. This review will focus on the surface interactions that control the non-covalent incorporation of growth factors into scaffolds and the mechanisms that control growth factor release from clinically relevant biomaterials. We will focus on the delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 from materials currently used in the clinical practice, but also suggest how general mechanisms that control growth factor incorporation and release delineated with this growth factor could extend to other systems. A better understanding of the changing mechanisms that control growth factor release during the different stages of preclinical development could instruct the development of future scaffolds for currently untreatable injuries and diseases. PMID:22433783

  12. FACTORS RELATING TO THE RELEASE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORES FROM CONTAMINATED SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes preliminary results of a research project to determine the factors that control the release of S. chartarum spores from a contaminated source and test ways to reduce spore release and thus exposure. As anticipated, S. chartarum spore emissions from gypsum boar...

  13. Functional characteristics of histamine receptor-bearing mononuclear cells. I. Selective production of lymphocyte chemoattractant lymphokines with histamine used as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Center, D M; Cruikshank, W W; Berman, J S; Beer, D J

    1983-10-01

    Mitogens and antigens have been the traditional ligands for activating lymphocytes in vitro for the elaboration of lymphokines. Recently, histamine, by interaction with histamine-type 2 receptors on T lymphocytes, has been found to induce the production of one lymphokine, histamine-induced suppressor factor (HSF), that inhibits lymphocyte proliferation and lymphokine production in vitro. Because the biologic effects of HSF appear to be confined to alterations in lymphocyte function, we assessed the ability of soluble products of histamine-stimulated human blood mononuclear cells to affect another lymphocyte function, motility. Utilizing a modified Boyden chamber assay to assess lymphocyte migration, we identified chemoattractant activity for human blood and rat splenic T lymphocytes in histamine-induced mononuclear cell supernatants. No neutrophil or monocyte chemoattractant activity was present. Sephadex G-100 gel filtration of histamine-induced supernatants showed the lymphotactic activity eluted with a 56,000 m.w. This activity was cationic as determined by its elution pattern from a Sephadex QAE anion exchange matrix with a single pl of 9.0 to 9.4 determined by isoelectric focusing in sucrose. Its biologic activity is predominantly chemokinetic in nature, is stable to heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min, but is sensitive to the effects of trypsin and neuraminidase. These physicochemical and functional characteristics establish it as identical to a recently described concanavalin A-induced (Con A) lymphotactic lymphokine (LCF). Mononuclear cells that did not adhere to a histamine affinity matrix were unable to produce LCF when subsequently stimulated with histamine or Con A. Mononuclear cells incubated with histamine and diphenhydramine produced LCF; the addition of cimetidine eliminated LCF production. In fact, supernatants from cells incubated with histamine and cimetidine significantly inhibited lymphocyte migration, a phenomenon explainable by the two regions

  14. Brain-derived mast cells could mediate histamine-induced inhibition of food intake in neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, S; Bungo, T; Ohgushi, A; Ando, R; Shimojo, M; Masuda, Y; Denbow, D M; Furuse, M

    2000-02-28

    In the present study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine on food intake of neonatal chicks was examined over 2 h. Histamine (100, 200 or 400 nmol, respectively) was injected in the lateral ventricle of 2-day-old chicks, and cumulative food intakes were measured. i.c.v. injection of histamine significantly inhibited food intake in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, compound 48/80, which causes degranulation of mast cells and release of histamine, or thioperamide, which is an antagonist of the histamine H3 autoreceptor and increases histamine release from histaminergic nerve terminals, was injected i.c.v. to clarify whether mast cell- or neuron-derived histamine in the central nervous system of chicks is essential to the feeding inhibition. Central administration of compound 48/80 inhibited food intake with a dose-dependent manner, but thioperamide had no effect on feeding. An inhibitor of mast cell degranulation, sodium cromoglycate, somewhat attenuated food intake inhibited by compound 48/80. These results suggest that brain-derived mast cells could be a major source of histamine in the inhibition of food intake of neonatal chicks.

  15. Enhancement of RNA Polymerase Activity by a Factor Released by Auxin from Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, James W.; Cherry, Joe H.; Morré, D. James; Lembi, Carole A.

    1972-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques for solubilization of RNA polymerase from soybean chromatin and isolation of plasma membrane fractions from plants we can show the presence of a transcriptional factor specifically released from the membranes by auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The nonauxin, 3,5-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, does not release the factor, but subsequent exposure of the membranes to auxin results in its release. Factor activity could not be demonstrated in fractions devoid of plasma membranes. The presence of a regulatory factor for RNA polymerase associated with plant plasma membrane and specifically released by auxin provides a mechanism whereby both rapid growth responses and delayed nuclear changes could be derived from a common auxin receptor site associated with plasma membrane. Images PMID:4508307

  16. Protective Factors for Violence among Released Prisoners--Effects over Time and Interactions with Static Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is a substantial body of research on risk factors for violent behavior in adulthood but little empirical study of protective factors and desistance. Method: This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of factors hypothesized to reduce violent reoffending among a sample of 800 male prisoners following release into the…

  17. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  18. Stimulation of 14-3-3 protein and its isoform on histamine secretion from permeabilized rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Ueeda, Takayuki

    2002-12-01

    The effect of the 14-3-3 protein, an adaptor protein of intracellular signal pathways, on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells was investigated. The exogenous 14-3-3 protein from bovine brain increased the Ca(2+)-dependent histamine release from permeabilized mast cells, but only slightly affected the non-permeabilized cells. Partial amino acid sequences showed that the bovine brain 14-3-3 protein contained 14-3-3beta, gamma and zeta isoforms, and that these recombinant isoforms were prepared. Among them, 14-3-3zeta was an active species while the 14-3-3beta and gamma were inactive for histamine release from the permeabilized mast cells. Approximately 15% of the histamine release was stimulated by 14-3-3zeta at 2.5 microM, and half-maximal stimulation occurred at 1 microM. Treatment of the mast cells with wortmannin or staurosporine completely inhibited the stimulatory effect on histamine release caused by Ca(2+) or Ca(2+)/14-3-3zeta, and genistein partially inhibited both stimulatory effects. PD 98059, however, had little effect on the histamine release. These results suggest the possibility that 14-3-3zeta is associated with signal transduction for degranulation of the mast cells.

  19. Factors affecting ferulic acid release from Brewer's spent grain by Fusarium oxysporum enzymatic system.

    PubMed

    Xiros, Charilaos; Moukouli, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the factors affecting ferulic acid (FA) release from Brewer's spent grain (BSG), by the crude enzyme extract of Fusarium oxysporum were investigated. In order to evaluate the importance of the multienzyme preparation on FA release, the synergistic action of feruloyl esterase (FAE, FoFaeC-12213) and xylanase (Trichoderma longibrachiatum M3) monoenzymes was studied. More than double amount of FA release (1 mg g(-1) dry BSG) was observed during hydrolytic reactions by the crude enzyme extract compared to hydrolysis by the monoenzymes (0.37 mg g(-1) dry BSG). The protease content of the crude extract and the inhibitory effect of FA as an end-product were also evaluated concerning their effect on FA release. The protease treatment prior to hydrolysis by monoenzymes enhanced FA release about 100%, while, for the first time in literature, FA in solution found to have a significant inhibitory effect on FAE activity and on total FA release.

  20. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on the Release of Transforming Growth Factor-β.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Rika; Mizumoto, Naoko; Kanno, Nana; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is released by activated platelets and induces the differentiation of T-helper 17 from naïve T cells. Contact between blood and cellulose acetate (CA) beads induces cytokine release, although their inflammatory effects on TGF-β release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on the release of TGF-β in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured platelets and TGF-β. Compared with blood samples incubated without beads, the platelet count and amount of TGF-β significantly decreased in blood samples incubated with CA beads. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited the release of TGF-β from adsorbed platelets. The biological effects of this reduction of TGF-β release during platelet adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  1. Characteristics of histamine-induced leukocyte rolling in the undisturbed microcirculation of the rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Kohji; Thorlacius, Henrik; Xie, Xun; Lindbom, Lennart; Hedqvist, Per; Raud, Johan

    1998-01-01

    histamine by 52%, while both H2-receptor antagonists were completely inactive. However, the combination of cimetidine and diphenhydramine reduced the histamine-induced PMNL rolling by 82%. Furthermore, in contrast to an H3-receptor agonist, challenge with either the H1-receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine or two different H2-receptor agonists (impromidine, dimaprit) was sufficient to provoke significant venular PMNL accumulation. Treatment with the nitric oxide-synthase inhibitor L-NAME did not affect the histamine-induced PMNL rolling. On the other hand, 3 h pretreatment with dexamethasone reduced the PMNL response to histamine by 73%, and flow cytometric analysis showed that the dexamethasone treatment almost completely inhibited binding of soluble P-selectin to rat isolated PMNLs. We conclude that initial leukocyte recruitment after mast cell activation in the rat mesentery is critically dependent on histamine release. The cellular response to histamine was specifically due to PMNL rolling, involved activation of both H1- and H2-receptors, and lasted for 2–3 h. Moreover, the histamine-induced PMNL rolling was not dependent on nitric oxide synthesis, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, possibly via inhibition of expression or function of leukocytic P-selectin ligand(s). PMID:9504378

  2. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  3. The effect of indomethacin on the kinetics of histamine, 48/80 and antigen wealing.

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, F; Shuster, S

    1990-01-01

    1. The kinetics of weal formation and disappearance following intradermal injection of histamine, compound 48/80 and antigen were measured in indomethacin and inert geltreated human forearm skin. 2. Rates of formation went in descending order for histamine, 48/80 and antigen; rate constants of disappearance for equal sized weals were the same for histamine and 48/80 but were much less for antigen. The corresponding half-lives were 77, 73 and 160 min for histamine, 48/80 and antigen weal disappearance respectively. 3. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibition by topical indomethacin had no effect either on the immediate weal and flare responses or on the rates of formation and disappearance of the weals. 4. These findings together with previous studies using H1-receptor antagonists indicate that 48/80 acts by histamine release but that antigen releases both histamine and an additional material or materials which are not related to cyclo-oxygenase activity. 5. Exacerbation of chronic idiopathic urticaria by cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors is therefore likely to be part of the urticarial disease process. PMID:2106336

  4. Histamine 50-Skin-Prick Test: A Tool to Diagnose Histamine Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Lukas; Ulmer, Hanno; Kofler, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Background. Histamine intolerance results from an imbalance between histamine intake and degradation. In healthy persons, dietary histamine can be sufficiently metabolized by amine oxidases, whereas persons with low amine oxidase activity are at risk of histamine toxicity. Diamine oxidase (DAO) is the key enzyme in degradation. Histamine elicits a wide range of effects. Histamine intolerance displays symptoms, such as rhinitis, headache, gastrointestinal symptoms, palpitations, urticaria and pruritus. Objective. Diagnosis of histamine intolerance until now is based on case history; neither a validated questionnaire nor a routine test is available. It was the aim of this trial to evaluate the usefullness of a prick-test for the diagnosis of histamine intolerance. Methods. Prick-testing with 1% histamine solution and wheal size-measurement to assess the relation between the wheal in prick-test, read after 20 to 50 minutes, as sign of slowed histamine degradation as well as history and symptoms of histamine intolerance. Results. Besides a pretest with 17 patients with HIT we investigated 156 persons (81 with HIT, 75 controls): 64 out of 81 with histamine intolerance(HIT), but only 14 out of 75 persons from the control-group presented with a histamine wheal ≥3 mm after 50 minutes (P < .0001). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance. Histamine-50 skin-prickt-test offers a simple tool with relevance. PMID:23724226

  5. Histamine Enhances Voltage-Gated Potassium Currents of ON Bipolar Cells in Macaque Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Chun; Satoh, Hiromasa; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The goal was to understand the functions of retinopetal axons containing histamine. In prior work, type 3 histamine receptors (HR3) have been localized to the tips of ON bipolar cell dendrites in macaque retinas. Voltage-gated potassium channels have also been localized to bipolar cell dendrites, and the hypothesis tested in the present study was that these are modulated by histamine. Methods Whole-cell recordings of potassium currents were made from bipolar cells in slice preparations of macaque retina. In voltage-clamp mode, the cells were held at −60 mV and stepped to values from −60 to 80 mV. Recordings of the membrane potential were also made in current-clamp mode. Histamine, the HR3 agonist (R) α-methylhistamine (RAMH), tetraethyl ammonium (TEA), and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied in the superfusate. Results Histamine produced a dose-dependent increase in potassium currents in a subset of bipolar cells. At 5 μM, histamine increased the currents by 15% or more in the ON bipolar cells but not in the OFF bipolar cells. RAMH at 5 μM increased the amplitude of the potassium currents in the ON bipolar cells. In 10 mM TEA, potassium currents were reduced in all the bipolar cells, and there was no effect of histamine. Histamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of the ON bipolar cells by 5 mV. Conclusions By enhancing potassium currents in the ON bipolar cells, histamine is expected to reduce the amplitude of the light responses and limit their duration. The hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential would also reduce neurotransmitter release at their output synapses. PMID:18836167

  6. Effect of inhaled ozone on lung histamine in conscious guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, R.L.; Gold, W.M.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of short-term ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure on pulmonary mast cell function was examined. Guinea pigs were continuously exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2, 4, and 8 hr. O/sub 3/ exposure produced a significant decrease in lung histamine concentration. Two-hour exposure to O/sub 3/ caused a 22.4 +/- 7.0% decrease in lung histamine concentration compared with controls. Ozone exposures of 4 and 8 hr caused lung histamine concentrations to decrease by 43.7 +/- 7.7 and 49.0 +/- 7.5%, respectively, without significant changes in lung water or protein, or evidence of cytotoxicity. These results suggest that O/sub 3/ or its metabolites affect pulmonary mast cell function by stimulating the release of histamine from the lung.

  7. Time course of the effects of histamine, thioperamide and EEDQ on H3 receptors in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Detzner, M; Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E

    1994-06-01

    The effects of histamine, thioperamide and EEDQ (N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline) at the noradrenaline release-modulating H3 receptor in the mouse brain were examined. In superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, the inhibitory effect of histamine on the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow was virtually identical when the time of exposure was 30, 80 or 130 min; after withdrawal of histamine, the evoked overflow recovered within 80 min. The attenuation of the effect of histamine by thioperamide was reversible within 50 min after withdrawal of the antagonist, whereas the attenuation produced by EEDQ remained constant for at least 80 min. In conclusion, the effects of histamine and thioperamide at the H3 receptor are readily reversible, whereas EEDQ appears to be an irreversible antagonist; desensitization of the H3 receptor does not occur.

  8. Pharmacological Evidence that Histamine H3 Receptors Mediate Histamine-Induced Inhibition of the Vagal Bradycardic Out-flow in Pithed Rats.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica; García-Pedraza, José Ángel; Villalón, Carlos M; Morán, Asunción

    2016-02-01

    In vivo stimulation of cardiac vagal neurons induces bradycardia by acetylcholine (ACh) release. As vagal release of ACh may be modulated by autoreceptors (muscarinic M2 ) and heteroreceptors (including serotonin 5-HT1 ), this study has analysed the pharmacological profile of the receptors involved in histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats. For this purpose, 180 male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated and pre-treated (i.v.) with 1 mg/kg atenolol, followed by i.v. administration of physiological saline (1 ml/kg), histamine (10, 50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) or the selective histamine H1 (2-pyridylethylamine), H2 (dimaprit), H3 (methimepip) and H4 (VUF 8430) receptor agonists (1, 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg each). Under these conditions, electrical stimulation (3, 6 and 9 Hz; 15 ± 3 V and 1 ms) of the vagus nerve resulted in frequency-dependent bradycardic responses, which were (i) unchanged during the infusions of saline, 2-pyridylethylamine, dimaprit or VUF 8430; and (ii) dose-dependently inhibited by histamine or methimepip. Moreover, the inhibition of the bradycardia caused by 50 μg/kg of either histamine or methimepip (which failed to inhibit the bradycardic responses to i.v. bolus injections of acetylcholine; 1-10 μg/kg) was abolished by the H3 receptor antagonist JNJ 10181457 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). In conclusion, our results suggest that histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats is mainly mediated by pre-junctional activation of histamine H3 receptors, as previously demonstrated for the vasopressor sympathetic out-flow and the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide) out-flow.

  9. Polymethylmethacrylate-induced release of bone-resorbing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.H.; Sowder, W.G.; Anderson, D.; Appel, A.M.; Hopson, C.N. )

    1989-12-01

    A pseudomembranous structure that has the histological characteristics of a foreign-body-like reaction invariably develops at the bone-cement interface in the proximity of resorption of bone around aseptically loosened cemented prostheses. This study was an attempt to implicate polymethylmethacrylate in this resorptive process. Unfractionated peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (consisting of lymphocytes and monocytes) and surface-adherent cells (monocyte-enriched) were prepared from control subjects who did and did not have clinical evidence of osteoarthrosis and from patients who had osteoarthrosis and were having a revision for failure of a cemented hip or knee implant. Cells were cultured for varying periods in the presence and absence of nonpolymerized methacrylate (one to two-micrometer spherules), pulverized polymerized material, or culture chambers that were pre-coated with polymerized cement. Conditioned media that were derived from both methacrylate-stimulated cell populations were shown to contain specific bone-resorbing mediators (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, or prostaglandin E2) and to directly affect bone resorption in 45Ca-labeled murine limb-bone assays.

  10. Effects of histamine on monocyte complement production. I. Inhibition of C2 production mediated by its action on H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lappin, D; Whaley, K

    1980-09-01

    Histamine produced dose-dependent inhibition of the production of the second complement component (C2) by monocytes in tissue culture. The effect was not associated with either cell death, as ascertained by trypan blue exclusion, or loss of cells from the monolayer, as determined by measuring their DNA content. The specificity of the response was shown by the failure of histidine or histamine metabolites to inhibit C2 production. Preincubation of histamine with histaminase also abrogated the histamine effect. The kinetics of the effect were extremely rapid and irreversible, most of the reduction being achieved during a 5-min exposure to histamine. The H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine was able to prevent the histamine response, whereas chlorpheniramine, the H1 receptor antagonist, had no effect. Dimaprit and 4-methyl histamine, H2 receptor agonists, simulated the effect of histamine whereas the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-aminoethylthiazole) was ineffective, confirming that the effect of histamine on C2 production by monocytes is mediated by the H2 receptors. Thus histamine, released from basophils or mast cells by the C3 and C5 cleavage products C3a and C5a respectively, may exert a negative feedback on further C3 and C5 cleavage by limiting the formation of the C3 (C42) and C5 (C423b) convertases.

  11. Psycho-Social Factors as Predictors of Success in a Work-Release Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahen, Leonard S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the significance of social and environmental factors as predictors of the rehabilitative potential of an inmate. Work history must be used as a whole. The more recent a good history, the more successful an inmate's jail record. Work factors may aid in selecting narcotics-addicted inmates for work-release programs. (Author/BEF)

  12. Peptide Chain Termination: Effect of Protein S on Ribosomal Binding of Release Factors

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J. L.; Caskey, C. T.

    1970-01-01

    The protein factor S, previously shown to stimulate polypeptide chain termination in bacterial extracts, has two effects upon the complex formed between ribosomes, release factor, and terminator (trinucleotide) codon: (1) in the absence of GTP or GDP, S stimulates formation of an [R·UAA·ribosome] intermediate, and (2) in the presence of GTP or GDP, S participates in dissociation of this intermediate. Factor S can stimulate fMet release from [fMet-tRNAf·AUG·ribosome] intermediates in either the presence or absence of GTP or GDP. A model is proposed which relates the in vitro effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on fMet release to the effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on the binding and dissociation of R factor from ribosomes. PMID:5289007

  13. Effects of multivalent histamine supported on gold nanoparticles: activation of histamine receptors by derivatized histamine at subnanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gasiorek, Friederike; Pouokam, Ervice; Diener, Martin; Schlecht, Sabine; Wickleder, Mathias S

    2015-10-21

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles with a functionalized ligand shell were synthesized and used as new histamine receptor agonists. Mercaptoundecanoic acid moieties were attached to the surface of the nanoparticles and derivatized with native histamine. The multivalent presentation of the immobilized ligands carried by the gold nanoparticles resulted in extremely low activation concentrations for histamine receptors on rat colonic epithelium. As a functional read-out system, chloride secretion resulting from stimulation of neuronal and epithelial histamine H1 and H2 receptors was measured in Ussing chamber experiments. These responses were strictly attributed to the histamine entities as histamine-free particles Au-MUDOLS or the monovalent ligand AcS-MUDA-HA proved to be ineffective. The vitality of the tissues used was not impaired by the nanoparticles.

  14. Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor Mediates Bradykinin Stimulated Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Ayaz M.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ozkor, Muhiddin A.; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W. Craig; Manatunga, Amita; Hayek, Salim; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Bradykinin stimulates tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) release from human endothelium. Although bradykinin stimulates both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) release, the role of EDHF in t-PA release remains unexplored. This study sought to determine the mechanisms of bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release in the forearm vasculature of healthy human subjects. Methods In 33 healthy subjects (age 40.3±1.9 years) forearm blood flow (FBF) and t-PA release were measured at rest, and after intra-arterial infusions of bradykinin (400ng/min) and sodium nitroprusside (3.2 mg/min). Measurements were repeated after intra-arterial infusion of TEA (1 μmol/min), fluconazole (0.4 μmol.min-1.L-1), and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 8 μmol/min) to block nitric oxide, and their combination in separate studies. Results Bradykinin significantly increased net t-PA release across the forearm (P<0.0001). Fluconazole attenuated both bradykinin-mediated vasodilation (-23.3±2.7% FBF, P<0.0001) and t-PA release (from 50.9±9.0 to 21.3±8.9 ng/min/100ml, P=0.02). TEA attenuated FBF (-14.7±3.2%, P=0.002) and abolished bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release (from 22.9+5.7 to - 0.8±3.6 ng/min/100ml, P=0.0002). L-NMMA attenuated FBF (P<0.0001), but did not inhibit bradykinin-induced t-PA release (P=NS). Conclusion Bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release is partly due to cytochrome P450-derived epoxides, and is inhibited by K+ca channel blockade. Thus, bradykinin stimulates both EDHF-dependent vasodilation and t-PA release. PMID:24925526

  15. Effect of c-kit ligand, stem cell factor, on mediator release by human intestinal mast cells isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, S C; Schwengberg, S; Wordelmann, K; Weimann, A; Raab, R; Manns, M P

    1996-01-01

    The regulation of mediator release in human intestinal mast cells is largely unknown. Apart from IgE receptor crosslinking no secretagogues have been described so far. This study examined the effect of two cytokines (c-kit ligand and interleukin 3) and other agonists on human intestinal mast cell function. Cells were isolated from surgery specimens of 47 patients undergoing intestinal resection because of tumours or inflammatory bowel disease. Cell suspensions contained 3.6% mast cells (mean of 50 experiments). After preincubation without or with c-kit ligand or interleukin 3, cells were stimulated by IgE receptor crosslinking, C5a or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Histamine and sulphidoleukotriene release was measured in supernatants. The sequential stimulation of the cells with c-kit ligand and IgE receptor crosslinking induced the release of high amounts of histamine and leukotrienes, whereas each agonist by itself induced only marginal mediator release. Interleukin 3 induced no release by itself, but enhanced the IgE receptor dependent release, possibly by an indirect mechanism. No significant mediator release was seen in response to C5a and fMLP, even if the cells were pretreated with c-kit ligand. The mediator release, particularly that of leukotrienes, was higher in cells isolated from actively inflamed tissue from patients with inflammatory bowel disease compared with controls. In conclusion, it was found that, apart from IgE receptor crosslinking, c-kit ligand and interleukin 3 regulate mediator release in human intestinal mast cells. The enhancement of mediator release by cytokines may be of particular relevance in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and food intolerance reactions. PMID:8566835

  16. The other side of the histamine H3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Bart A; Ghiabi, Bibinaz

    2014-04-01

    Although histamine H3 receptors are predominantly known as presynaptic receptors, regulating the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, and histamine, in the striatal complex the vast majority of these receptors are actually located on the other side, in other words postsynaptically. Given their strategic location, they can crucially affect signaling throughout the basal ganglia. We describe the anatomy and function of H3 receptors within the basal ganglia with a specific focus on their colocalization with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Because the basal ganglia are centrally involved in several major neurological and psychiatric disorders, we also discuss the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting H3 receptors in the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD), schizophrenia, and addiction.

  17. Effect of central and peripheral actions of histamine and its metabolite N-alpha methyl histamine on gastric secretion and acute gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, S; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, M; Pajdo, R; Drozdowicz, D; Ptak, A; Hahn, E G

    2001-12-01

    N alpha-methylhistamine (N alpha-MH) is one of unusual metabolite of histamine that was found in Helicobacter pylori-infected stomach and is believed to interact with specific histamine H1, H2 and H3-receptors to stimulate gastric acid secretion and gastrin release from isolated G-cells but the effects of N alpha-MH on gastric mucosal integrity have been little studied. This study was designed; 1) to compare the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p.), intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and gastric topical (intragastric i.g.) application of exogenous N alpha-MH with that of standard histamine on gastric secretion in rats equipped with gastric fistula (series A) and 2) to compare the effect of i.c.v. administration of histamine and N alpha-MH with that of peripheral (i.p. and i.g.) application of these amines on gastric lesions induced by 100% ethanol (series B) in rats with or without capsaicin-induced deactivation of sensory nerves. The area of gastric lesions was determined planimetrically, gastric blood flow (GBF) was assessed by H2-gas clearance method and venous blood was collected for determination of plasma gastrin levels by RIA. N alpha-MH and histamine (0.1-10 mg/kg i.p. or i.g.) dose-dependently increased gastric acid output (series A); whereas i.c.v. administration of histamine or N alpha-MH inhibited dose-dependently this secretion; the dose attenuating gastric acid output by 50% (ED50) being 4 and 6 microg/kg i.c.v. Both, N alpha-MH and histamine (2 mg/kg i.p. and i.g.) attenuated significantly the area of gastric lesions induced by 100% ethanol (series B) while producing significant rise in the GBF and plasma immunoreactive gastrin increments. Central application of N alpha-MH and histamine (0.01-5 microg/kg i.c.v.) inhibited ethanol-induced gastric damage whereas higher doses ranging from 10-100 microg/kg of histamine and N alpha-MH were significantly less effective. Capsaicin-induced deactivation of sensory nerves by itself augmented significantly ethanol

  18. Histamine Recycling Is Mediated by CarT, a Carcinine Transporter in Drosophila Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; An, Futing; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Borycz, Janusz; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is an important chemical messenger that regulates multiple physiological processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Even so, how glial cells and neurons recycle histamine remains to be elucidated. Drosophila photoreceptor neurons use histamine as a neurotransmitter, and the released histamine is recycled through neighboring glia, where it is conjugated to β-alanine to form carcinine. However, how carcinine is then returned to the photoreceptor remains unclear. In an mRNA-seq screen for photoreceptor cell-enriched transporters, we identified CG9317, an SLC22 transporter family protein, and named it CarT (Carcinine Transporter). S2 cells that express CarT are able to take up carcinine in vitro. In the compound eye, CarT is exclusively localized to photoreceptor terminals. Null mutations of cart alter the content of histamine and its metabolites. Moreover, null cart mutants are defective in photoreceptor synaptic transmission and lack phototaxis. These findings reveal that CarT is required for histamine recycling at histaminergic photoreceptors and provide evidence for a CarT-dependent neurotransmitter trafficking pathway between glial cells and photoreceptor terminals. PMID:26713872

  19. Histamine Recycling Is Mediated by CarT, a Carcinine Transporter in Drosophila Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; An, Futing; Borycz, Jolanta A; Borycz, Janusz; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Wang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Histamine is an important chemical messenger that regulates multiple physiological processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Even so, how glial cells and neurons recycle histamine remains to be elucidated. Drosophila photoreceptor neurons use histamine as a neurotransmitter, and the released histamine is recycled through neighboring glia, where it is conjugated to β-alanine to form carcinine. However, how carcinine is then returned to the photoreceptor remains unclear. In an mRNA-seq screen for photoreceptor cell-enriched transporters, we identified CG9317, an SLC22 transporter family protein, and named it CarT (Carcinine Transporter). S2 cells that express CarT are able to take up carcinine in vitro. In the compound eye, CarT is exclusively localized to photoreceptor terminals. Null mutations of cart alter the content of histamine and its metabolites. Moreover, null cart mutants are defective in photoreceptor synaptic transmission and lack phototaxis. These findings reveal that CarT is required for histamine recycling at histaminergic photoreceptors and provide evidence for a CarT-dependent neurotransmitter trafficking pathway between glial cells and photoreceptor terminals.

  20. Prejunctional inhibition of sympathetically evoked pupillary dilation in cats by activation of histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1993-08-01

    Frequency-dependent pupillary dilations were evoked by electrical stimulation of the pre- or post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic nerve (sympatho-excitation) or the hypothalamus (parasympatho-inhibition) in sympathectomized anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-dependent depression of mydriasis due to direct neural sympathetic activation but had no effect on responses elicited by parasympathetic withdrawal. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, was inactive. R alpha MeHA was much more effective in depressing sympathetic responses obtained at lower frequencies when compared to higher frequencies of stimulation. Responses evoked both pre- and postganglionically were inhibited by R alpha MeHA. This peripheral sympatho-inhibitory action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by the histamine H3 receptor blocker thioperamide but not by intravenous pretreatment with the histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine. Histamine H2 receptor blockers cimetidine and ranitidine were also without effect. R alpha MeHA did not depress pupillary responses elicited by i.v. (-)-adrenaline. The results demonstrate that histamine H3 receptors modulate sympathetic activation of the iris at a site proximal to the iris dilator muscle. The predominant mechanism of action appears to the prejunctional inhibition of noradrenaline release from postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. However, a concomitant ganglionic inhibitory action cannot be excluded.

  1. Histamine and betahistine in the treatment of vertigo: elucidation of mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lacour, M; Sterkers, O

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a picture of the mechanisms by which: histamine and histaminergic agonists act on the vestibular system both peripherally and centrally; and histaminergic agonists and antagonists interfere with the recovery process after peripheral vestibular lesion. We have focused on betahistine, a structural analogue of histamine with weak histamine H(1) receptor agonist and more potent H(3) receptor antagonist properties, to review the currently available data on the role of the histaminergic system in the recovery process after peripheral vestibular deficits and the effects of histamine analogues in the clinical treatment of vertigo. This review provides new insights into the basic mechanisms by which betahistine improves vestibular compensation in animal models of unilateral vestibular dysfunction, and elucidates particularly the mechanisms of action of this substance at the level of the CNS. It is proposed that betahistine may reduce peripherally the asymmetric functioning of the sensory vestibular organs in addition to increasing vestibulocochlear blood flow by antagonising local H(3) heteroreceptors. Betahistine acts centrally by enhancing histamine synthesis within tuberomammillary nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus and histamine release within vestibular nuclei through antagonism of H(3) autoreceptors. This mechanism, together with less specific effects of betahistine on alertness regulation through cerebral H(1) receptors, should promote and facilitate central vestibular compensation. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action of betahistine is of particular interest for the treatment of vestibular and cochlear disorders and vertigo.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Histamine- and Non-Histamine-Producing Photobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Leon, Maria; Dunlap, Paul V.; Benner, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-producing bacteria (HPBs) have recently been identified from the marine environment. The identification and characterization of HPBs is important to developing effective mitigation strategies for scombrotoxin fish poisoning. We report here the draft genomes of seven histamine-producing and two non-histamine-producing marine Photobacterium strains. PMID:27660786

  3. The behavioral and biochemical effects of thioperamide, a histamine H3-receptor antagonist, in a light/dark test measuring anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, M; Onodera, K

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the effects of thioperamide, a histamine H3-receptor antagonist, in a light/dark test measuring anxiety in mice. Thioperamide (20 mg/kg) slightly affected the locomotion and time spent in a light zone, and shuttle crossing. However, the decreases of these parameters were significant only when the animals were pretreated with zolantidine, a histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Moreover, the decreased parameters induced by the combination of thioperamide and zolantidine were reversed by pretreatment with pyrilamine, a histamine H1-receptor antagonist. These data suggest that thioperamide induces the release of neuronal histamine, which in turn stimulates both H1- and H2-receptors to produce the anxiogenic effect. The stimulation of histamine H1-receptors may mediate the anxiety, while H2-receptors may play a role in masking the anxiogenic effect. Thus, the present study suggests the involvement of endogenous neuronal brain histamine in anxiety. In the biochemical study, a previous report showed that thioperamide accelerated the release of neuronal histamine in the brains of mice [Sakai et al., Life Sciences, 48, 2397-2404(1991)]. This study also demonstrated that thioperamide did not affect the turnover rate of noradrenaline, dopamine, or serotonin in the brains of mice, which indicates that thioperamide is a good pharmacological tool for accelerating the release of neuronal histamine in the brain.

  4. Histamine chloramine reactivity with thiol compounds, ascorbate, and methionine and with intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Peskin, Alexander V; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2003-11-15

    Histamine is stored in granules of mast cells and basophils and released by inflammatory mediators. It has the potential to intercept some of the HOCl generated by the neutrophil enzyme, myeloperoxidase, to produce histamine chloramine. We have measured rate constants for reactions of histamine chloramine with methionine, ascorbate, and GSH at pH 7.4, of 91 M(-1)s(-1), 195 M(-1)s(-1), and 721 M(-1)s(-1), respectively. With low molecular weight thiols, the reaction was with the thiolate and rates increased exponentially with decreasing thiol group pK(a). Comparing rate constants for different chloramines reacting with ascorbate or a particular thiol anion, these were higher when there was less negative charge in the vicinity of the chloramine group. Histamine chloramine was the most reactive among biologically relevant chloramines. Consumption of histamine chloramine and oxidation of intracellular GSH were examined for human fibroblasts. At nontoxic doses, GSH loss over 10 min was slightly greater than that with HOCl, but the cellular uptake of histamine chloramine was 5-10-fold less. With histamine chloramine, GSSG was a minor product and most of the GSH was converted to mixed disulfides with proteins. HOCl gave a different profile of GSH oxidation products, with significantly less GSSG and mixed disulfide formation. There was irreversible oxidation and losses to the medium, as observed with HOCl and other cell types. Thus, histamine chloramine shows high preference for thiols both in isolation and in cells, and in this respect is more selective than HOCl.

  5. Gelatin-based hydrogel for vascular endothelial growth factor release in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, S; di Blasio, L; Tonda-Turo, C; Mancardi, A; Primo, L; Ciardelli, G; Gambarotta, G; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials in regenerative medicine applications, due to their hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and capacity to release drugs and growth factors in a controlled manner. In this study, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on blends of natural polymers were used in in vitro and ex vivo experiments as a tool for VEGF-controlled release to accelerate the nerve regeneration process. Among different candidates, the angiogenic factor VEGF was selected, since angiogenesis has been long recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Recent studies have pointed out that VEGF has a beneficial effect on motor neuron survival and Schwann cell vitality and proliferation. Moreover, VEGF administration can sustain and enhance the growth of regenerating peripheral nerve fibres. The hydrogel preparation process was optimized to allow functional incorporation of VEGF, while preventing its degradation and denaturation. VEGF release was quantified through ELISA assay, whereas released VEGF bioactivity was validated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a Schwann cell line (RT4-D6P2T) by assessing VEGFR-2 and downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia explants cultured on VEGF-releasing hydrogels displayed increased neurite outgrowth, providing confirmation that released VEGF maintained its effect, as also confirmed in a tubulogenesis assay. In conclusion, a gelatin-based hydrogel system for bioactive VEGF delivery was developed and characterized for its applicability in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Histamine and Tyramine in Food.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    F. Niven, and G. D. Wilson. 1961. Microbiology of Meat Curing. III. Some microbiological and related technological aspects in the manufacture of...and 0.42 ug/g (1). In yogurt the tyramine concentration was less than 0.2 ug/ml (2). Since the concentrations of tyramine and histamine in these...and not by lactobacilli, added for cheese manufacture , which are anaerobes or facultative anaerobes. The tyramine content of cheese is known to be

  7. Study of the biological effectiveness of a nanosilver-epidermal growth factor sustained-release carrier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-DA; Wang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Chun-Jiao; Cao, Ke; Liu, Jin-Yan; Chen, Yao; Chen, Feng-Hua

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the biological effectiveness and character of a nanosilver-epidermal growth factor (EGF) sustained-release carrier. This was synthesized using the self-assembly method and then characterized by transmission electron microscopy and UV spectrophotometry. The biological activity of the sustained release carrier was determined through cytological, bacteriological and wound-healing experiments. The results showed that the nanosilver-EGF sustained-release carrier was well dispersed with uniform particle size and that it had good antibacterial properties similar to those of nanosilver. The nanosilver-EGF sustained-release carrier is superior to EGFs in effectively promoting cell division and proliferation. The results of the wound-healing experiments provide evidence of its curative effects.

  8. Modulation of colony stimulating factor release and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, S; Warner, T D; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of the immune response against tumour cells is emerging as a valuable approach for cancer treatment. Some experimental studies have shown that secretion of colony stimulating factors by cancer cells reduces their tumorigenicity and increases their immunogenicity probably by promoting the cytolitic and antigen presenting activities of leukocytes. We have observed that human colon cancer cells (HT-29) are able to secrete granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor when stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). In this study we assessed, for the first time, the effects of several anticancer drugs on colony stimulating factor release or apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Cytokine-induced release of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor was significantly increased by cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine. Taxol only increased macrophage-colony stimulating factor release while reduced that of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. No changes in colony stimulating factor secretion were observed after treatment with methotrexate. Only cisplatin and taxol induced apoptosis in these cells. Secretion of colony stimulating factors by colon cancer cells may contribute to the immune host response against them. Anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine increase colony stimulating factor secretion by cytokine stimulated cancer cells probably through mechanisms different to those leading to cell apoptosis, an effect that may contribute to their anti-neoplasic action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1316–1321. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600240 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953891

  9. A primary role for release factor 3 in quality control during translation elongation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Hani S; Green, Rachel

    2011-10-14

    Release factor 3 (RF3) is a GTPase found in a broad range of bacteria where it is thought to play a critical "recycling" role in translation by facilitating the removal of class 1 release factors (RF1 and RF2) from the ribosome following peptide release. More recently, RF3 was shown in vitro to stimulate a retrospective editing reaction on the bacterial ribosome wherein peptides carrying mistakes are prematurely terminated during protein synthesis. Here, we examine the role of RF3 in the bacterial cell and show that the deletion of this gene sensitizes cells to other perturbations that reduce the overall fidelity of protein synthesis. We further document substantial effects on mRNA stability and protein expression using reporter systems, native mRNAs and proteins. We conclude that RF3 plays a primary role in vivo in specifying the fidelity of protein synthesis thus impacting overall protein quantity and quality.

  10. Mast cells and histamine are triggering the NF-κB-mediated reactions of adult and aged perilymphatic mesenteric tissues to acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Dusio, Giuseppina F.; Gasheva, Olga Yu.; Skoog, Hunter; Tobin, Richard; Peddaboina, Chander; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Zawieja, David C.; Newell-Rogers, M. Karen; Gashev, Anatoliy A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish mechanistic links between the aging-associated changes in the functional status of mast cells and the altered responses of mesenteric tissue and mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) to acute inflammation. We used an in vivo model of acute peritoneal inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide treatment of adult (9-month) and aged (24-month) F-344 rats. We analyzed contractility of isolated MLVs, mast cell activation, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) without and with stabilization of mast cells by cromolyn or blockade of all types of histamine receptors and production of 27 major pro-inflammatory cytokines in adult and aged perilymphatic mesenteric tissues and blood. We found that the reactivity of aged contracting lymphatic vessels to LPS-induced acute inflammation was abolished and that activated mast cells trigger NF-κB signaling in the mesentery through release of histamine. The aging-associated basal activation of mesenteric mast cells limits acute inflammatory NF-κB activation in aged mesentery. We conclude that proper functioning of the mast cell/histamine/NF-κB axis is necessary for reactions of the lymphatic vessels to acute inflammatory stimuli as well as for interaction and trafficking of immune cells near and within the collecting lymphatics. PMID:27875806

  11. Recombinant gamma interferon causes neutrophil migration mediated by the release of a macrophage neutrophil chemotactic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, R. A.; Cunha, F. Q.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    A dose-dependent neutrophil migration was observed following the injection of purified (Hu IFN-gamma) or recombinant (rIFN-gamma) human gamma interferon into rat peritoneal cavities. This finding contrasts with their inability to cause chemotaxis in vitro in the Boyden chamber. Neutrophil migration into peritoneal cavities and subcutaneous air pouches induced by both preparations of interferon was abolished by pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone. IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration was enhanced when the macrophage population of the peritoneal cavities was increased by previous injection of thioglycollate and reduced by peritoneal lavage. Macrophage monolayers pretreated either with rIFN-gamma or with lipopolysaccharide from E. coli release into the supernatant a factor that stimulates neutrophil recruitment in animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone blocked this release but did not affect the neutrophil recruitment induced by this factor. These results suggest that IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration in vivo may be mediated by the release from resident macrophages of a neutrophil chemotactic factor and that dexamethasone blockade of neutrophil recruitment by IFN-gamma is due to inhibition of the release of this factor. PMID:2119790

  12. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 522 Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New... gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate injectable solution. DATES: This rule is...: PART 522--IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS 0 1. The authority citation for...

  13. Ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor receptor modulation of central amygdala neurocircuitry: An update and future directions.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2015-05-01

    The central amygdala is a critical brain region for many aspects of alcohol dependence. Much of the work examining the mechanisms by which the central amygdala mediates the development of alcohol dependence has focused on the interaction of acute and chronic ethanol with central amygdala corticotropin releasing factor signaling. This work has led to a great deal of success in furthering the general understanding of central amygdala neurocircuitry and its role in alcohol dependence. Much of this work has primarily focused on the hypothesis that ethanol utilizes endogenous corticotropin releasing factor signaling to upregulate inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala. Work that is more recent suggests that corticotropin releasing factor also plays an important role in mediating anxiety-like behaviors via the enhancement of central amygdala glutamatergic transmission, implying that ethanol/corticotropin releasing factor interactions may modulate excitatory neurotransmission in this brain region. In addition, a number of studies utilizing optogenetic strategies or transgenic mouse lines have begun to examine specific central amygdala neurocircuit dynamics and neuronal subpopulations to better understand overall central amygdala neurocircuitry and the role of neuronal subtypes in mediating anxiety-like behaviors. This review will provide a brief update on this literature and describe some potential future directions that may be important for the development of better treatments for alcohol addiction.

  14. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  15. Studies on the role of central histamine in the acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1982-06-01

    The experiments described in this report were designed to test two hypotheses about how exposure to low-level radiation can affect the behavior of an organism: first, tht radiation effects on behavior are mediated by a radiation-induced release of histamine; and second, that this radiation-induced histamine release can exert relatively direct effects on the central nervous system. The results of the first experiment showed that microinjection of histamine directly into the fourth ventricle of rats produced a taste aversion to a novel sucrose solution. Pretreating rats with intraventricular H/sub 1/ or H/sub 2/ blockers was not effective in preventing the acquisition of the radiation-induced aversion, although the H/sub 1/ blocker did prevent the acquisition of a histamine-induced taste aversion. It also was not possible to establish a cross-tolerance between centrally administered histamine and radiation. The results are interpreted as not supporting the hypothesis that a radiation-induced release of central histamine mediates the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following exposure to low-level radiation.

  16. Diets High in Heat-Treated Soybean Meal Reduce the Histamine-Induced Epithelial Response in the Colon of Weaned Piglets and Increase Epithelial Catabolism of Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Susan; Pieper, Robert; Schwelberger, Hubert G.; Wang, Jing; Villodre Tudela, Carmen; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Van Kessel, Andrew G.; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of dietary fermentable protein (fCP) and fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) on the colonic epithelial response to histamine in pigs. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 × 2 factorial design with low fCP/low fCHO, low fCP/high fCHO, high fCP/low fCHO and high fCP/high fCHO. After 21-23 days, the pigs were killed and tissue from the proximal colon was stimulated with carbachol, histamine, PGE2 or sodium hydrogen sulphide in Ussing chambers. Changes in short-circuit current and tissue conductance were measured. Diamine oxidase, histamine N-methyltransferase, stem cell growth factor receptor, Fc-epsilon receptor I and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene expression was determined. Activities of diamine oxidase and histamine N-methyltransferase and numbers of colonic mast cells were measured. The change in the short-circuit current in response to histamine was lower (P = 0.002) and tended to be lower for PGE2 (P = 0.053) in high fCP groups compared to low fCP groups, irrespective of fCHO. Additionally, the change in tissue conductance after the application of histamine was lower (P = 0.005) in the high fCP groups. The expression of histamine N-methyltransferase mRNA (P = 0.033) and the activities of diamine oxidase (P = 0.001) and histamine N-methyltransferase (P = 0.006) were higher with high fCP in comparison with low fCP. The expression of mast cell markers, stem cell growth factor receptor (P = 0.005) and Fc-epsilon receptor I (P = 0.049) was higher with high fCP diets compared to diets low in fCP, whereas the mast cell count did not differ between groups. The expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was reduced (P = 0.001) with high fCP diets compared to low fCP diets. The lower epithelial response to histamine and PGE2 and elevated epithelial histamine inactivation suggests an adaptation to high fCP diets. PMID:24260435

  17. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  18. Mineral coatings modulate β-TCP stability and enable growth factor binding and release.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Lee, Jae Sung; Lan Levengood, Sheeny K; Vanderby, Ray; Murphy, William L

    2012-03-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an attractive ceramic for bone tissue repair because of its similar composition to bone mineral and its osteoconductivity. However, compared with other ceramics β-TCP has a rapid and uncontrolled rate of degradation. In the current study β-TCP granules were mineral coated with the aim of influencing the dissolution rate of β-TCP, and also to use the coating as a carrier for controlled release of the growth factors recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF), modular VEGF peptide (mVEGF), and modular bone morphogenetic protein 2 peptide (mBMP2). The biomineral coatings were formed by heterogeneous nucleation in aqueous solution using simulated body fluid solutions with varying concentrations of bicarbonate (HCO(3)). Our results demonstrate that we could coat β-TCP granules with mineral layers possessing different dissolution properties. The presence of a biomineral coating delays the dissolution rate of the β-TCP granules. As the carbonate (CO(3)(2-)) content in the coating was increased the dissolution rate of the coated β-TCP also increased, but remained slower than the dissolution of uncoated β-TCP. In addition, we showed sustained release of multiple growth factors, with release kinetics that were controllable by varying the identity of the growth factor or the CO(3)(2-) content in the mineral coating. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, and mVEGF enhanced migration of mouse embryonic endothelial cells in a scratch wound healing assay, indicating that each released growth factor was biologically active.

  19. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  20. Physiological factors of atrial natriuretic polypeptide release and its neural regulation in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Y; Miyata, A; Morita, H; Hosomi, H

    1988-12-01

    We have examined physiological factors in atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) release and whether or not the cardiac nerves control release of ANP. Two possible factors were tested, an increase in plasma sodium level (PNa) and an increase in atrial pressure. Injection of 1.0 or 2.0 mEq/kg of sodium ions elevated PNa by 5.3 +/- 0.3 or 7.3 +/- 0.4 mEq/L, respectively, but plasma ANP level (PANP) did not change. Infusion of 18 ml/kg of 3% Dextran-40 over 5 min increased mean left atrial pressure (MLAP) by 7.6 +/- 0.9 mmHg. PANP increased from 206 +/- 17 pg/ml to 260 +/- 25 pg/ml, which was not significant. PANP, corrected for hemodilution, significantly increased to 348 +/- 34 pg/ml. These results suggest that PNa increase does not promote ANP release, but that an atrial pressure increase does. This transient volume load did not induce full response of the ANP releasing system. A prolonged volume load for 45 min increased corrected PANP to 435 +/- 73 pg/ml. A close linear correlation was found between the increases in MLAP and PANP. These facts indicate that prolonged volume expansion is necessary to induce full response of the ANP releasing system. Complete cardiac denervation did not affect the tonic level of plasma ANP, volume expansion-induced increase in PANP, or the sensitivity of the ANP releasing system. Thus we conclude that the cardiac nerves do not control ANP release caused by volume expansion.

  1. Silk fibroin matrices for the controlled release of nerve growth factor (NGF).

    PubMed

    Uebersax, Lorenz; Mattotti, Marta; Papaloïzos, Michaël; Merkle, Hans P; Gander, Bruno; Meinel, Lorenz

    2007-10-01

    Nerve conduits (NC) for peripheral nerve repair should guide the sprouting axons and physically protect the axonal cone from any damage. The NC should also degrade after completion of its function to obviate the need of subsequent explanation and should optionally be suitable for controlled drug release of embedded growth factors to enhance nerve regeneration. Silk fibroin (SF) is a biocompatible and slowly biodegradable biomaterial with excellent mechanical properties that could meet the above stated requirements. SF material (films) supported the adherence and metabolic activity of PC12 cells, and, in combination with nerve growth factor (NGF), supported neurite outgrowth during PC12 cell differentiation. NGF-loaded SF-NC were prepared from aqueous solutions of NGF and SF (20%, w/w), which were air-dried or freeze-dried (freezing at -20 or -196 degrees C) in suitable molds. NGF release from the three differently prepared SF-NC was prolonged over at least 3 weeks, but the total amount released depended on the drying procedure of the NC. The potency of released NGF was retained within all formulations. Control experiments with differently dried NGF-lactose solutions did not evidence marked protein aggregation (SEC, HPLC), loss of ELISA-reactivity or PC12 cell bioactivity. This study encourages the further exploitation of SF-NC for growth factor delivery and evaluation in peripheral nerve repair.

  2. Histamine influences body temperature by acting at H1 and H3 receptors on distinct populations of preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Ghochani, Yasmin; Klaus, Joseph; Tabarean, Iustin V

    2010-03-24

    The preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus, a region that contains neurons that control thermoregulation, is the main locus at which histamine affects body temperature. Here we report that histamine reduced the spontaneous firing rate of GABAergic preoptic neurons by activating H3 subtype histamine receptors. This effect involved a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and was not dependent on synaptic activity. Furthermore, a population of non-GABAergic neurons was depolarized, and their firing rate was enhanced by histamine acting at H1 subtype receptors. In our experiments, activation of the H1R receptors was linked to the PLC pathway and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. This depolarization persisted in TTX or when fast synaptic potentials were blocked, indicating that it represents a postsynaptic effect. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of H3 receptors in a population of GABAergic neurons, while H1 receptors were expressed in non-GABAergic cells. Histamine applied in the median preoptic nucleus induced a robust, long-lasting hyperthermia effect that was mimicked by either H1 or H3 histamine receptor subtype-specific agonists. Our data indicate that histamine modulates the core body temperature by acting at two distinct populations of preoptic neurons that express H1 and H3 receptor subtypes, respectively.

  3. Functional characteristics of histamine receptor-bearing mononuclear cells. II. Identification and characterization of two histamine-induced human lymphokines that inhibit lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Berman, J S; McFadden, R G; Cruikshank, W W; Center, D M; Beer, D J

    1984-09-01

    Although functional histamine receptors have generally been restricted to those human T lymphocytes expressing suppressor cell functions, more recent evidence suggests that histamine receptor-bearing human T lymphocytes are functionally heterogeneous and capable of other immunomodulatory activities. Lymphocyte chemoattractant factor (LCF) is a cationic sialoprotein with an apparent m.w. of 56,000, whose production is limited to histamine-type 2 receptor-bearing human T cells. LCF is selectively chemokinetic for T lymphocytes, and presumably contributes to the recruitment of unsensitized effector lymphocytes at inflammatory sites. In addition to LCF, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration of histamine-induced lymphocyte supernatants revealed two regions of migration inhibitory activity for human blood T and rat splenic lymphocytes. These regions corresponded to m.w. of 70,000 to 80,000 (LyMIF75K) and 30,000 to 40,000 (LyMIF35K). LyMIF75K had a single pI of 7.5 to 8.0, and its biologic activity was sensitive to trypsin but not to neuraminidase or heat (56 degrees C). LyMIF35K had a single pI of 8.5 to 8.8, and its biologic activity was sensitive to neuraminidase and heat but not to trypsin. These LyMIFs therefore appeared to be distinct from one another and physicochemically different from other migration inhibitory lymphokines. All three lymphokine activities appeared within 4 hr of incubation. The minimum concentration of histamine required to stimulate production of the LyMIF was 10(-6) M. Lymphocytes that did not adhere to a histamine affinity matrix were unable to produce either LyMIF upon subsequent stimulation with histamine or concanavalin A (Con A). Lymphocytes incubated with histamine and diphenhydramine produced LCF but neither LyMIF, whereas cells incubated with histamine in the presence of cimetidine produced both LyMIF but not LCF. These data suggest that a subset of lymphocytes defined by the presence of histamine-type 1 receptors are capable of producing two

  4. Purification of an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D H

    1996-05-10

    Factor 2 was previously identified in Drosophila Kc cell nuclear extract (KcN) as an activity suppressing the appearance of long transcripts (Price, D. H., Sluder, A. E., and Greenleaf, A. L. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 3244-3255). A 154-kDa protein with factor 2 activity was purified to apparent homogeneity from KcN. An immobilized template assay indicated that factor 2 caused the release of transcripts by RNA polymerase II in an ATP-dependent manner. Some early elongation complexes were resistant to factor 2 action but became sensitive after treatment with 1 M KCl. In the absence of factor 2, transcription complexes still exhibited a low degree of processivity suggesting that factor 2 was only partially responsible for abortive elongation.

  5. Isolation and characterization of lipid-protein particles containing platelet factor 3 released from human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, H; Andersson, L O; Höglund, S

    1982-01-01

    Lipid-protein particles with platelet factor 3 measured by the Stypven clotting-time test [Hardisty & Hutton (1966) Br. J. Haematol. 12, 764-776] have been isolated from platelet-release supernatant. Starting material was washed platelets, which were released by treatment with collagen. Purification of the particles from other components in the release material was accomplished by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B followed by affinity chromatography on poly-L-lysine-Sepharose CL-4B gel. Chemical characterization showed that the particles were composed of 40% protein, 42% phospholipids, 13% cholesterol and 5% triacylglycerols. The phospholipid composition was 38% phosphatidylcholine, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 9% phosphatidylserine, 2% phosphatidic acid and 26% sphingomyelin. No carbohydrate was detected. Electron-microscopic studies revealed the presence of membranous particles with diameters between 70 and 170 nm. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 3. PMID:7103943

  6. Brain derived neurotrophic factor release from layer-by-layer coated agarose nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Daniel A; Shahriari, Dena; Wolf, Kayla J; Angart, Phillip A; Koffler, Jacob; Tuszynski, Mark H; Chan, Christina; Walton, Patrick; Sakamoto, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Agarose nerve guidance scaffolds (NGS) seeded with cells expressing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have demonstrated robust nerve regeneration in the rat central nervous system. The purpose of this work was to explore whether agarose NGS coated with hydrogen-bonded layer-by-layer (HLbL) could provide an acellular method of delivering prolonged and consistent dosages of active BDNF. Our results show that HLbL-coated agarose NGS could release BDNF over 10days in consistent dosages averaging 80.5±12.5(SD)ng/mL. Moreover, the BDNF released from HLbL was confirmed active by in vitro cell proliferation assays. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that HLbL assembled onto a hydrogel can provide consistent, prolonged release of active BDNF in clinically relevant dosages.

  7. Histamine H3-receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bakker, R A

    2004-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for HA as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in various brain functions, including emotion, cognition, and feeding. The recent cloning of the histamine H3 receptor allowed for the subsequent cloning of a variety of H3 receptor isoforms from different species as well as the H4 receptor. As a result a wide variety of H3-receptor isoforms are now known that display differential brain expression patterns and signalling properties. These recent discoveries are discussed in view of the growing interest of the H3 receptor as a target for the development of potential therapeutics.

  8. Sprouty 2 binds ESCRT-II factor Eap20 and facilitates HIV-1 gag release.

    PubMed

    Medina, G N; Ehrlich, L S; Chen, M H; Khan, M B; Powell, M D; Carter, C A

    2011-07-01

    The four ESCRT (endocytic sorting complexes required for transport) complexes (ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III) normally operate sequentially in the trafficking of cellular cargo. HIV-1 Gag trafficking and release as virus-like particles (VLPs) require the participation of ESCRTs; however, its use of ESCRTs is selective and nonsequential. Specifically, Gag trafficking to release sites on the plasma membrane does not require ESCRT-0 or -II. It is known that a bypass of ESCRT-0 is achieved by the direct linkage of the ESCRT-I component, Tsg101, to the primary L domain motif (PTAP) in Gag and that bypass of ESCRT-II is achieved by the linkage of Gag to ESCRT-III through the adaptor protein Alix. However, the mechanism by which Gag suppresses the interaction of bound ESCRT-I with ESCRT-II is unknown. Here we show (i) that VLP release requires the steady-state level of Sprouty 2 (Spry2) in COS-1 cells, (ii) that Spry2 binds the ESCRT-II component Eap20, (iii) that binding Eap20 permits Spry2 to disrupt ESCRT-I interaction with ESCRT-II, and (iv) that coexpression of Gag with a Spry2 fragment that binds Eap20 increases VLP release. Spry2 also facilitated release of P7L-Gag (i.e., release in the absence of Tsg101 binding). In this case, rescue required the secondary L domain (YPX(n)L) in HIV-1 Gag that binds Alix and the region in Spry2 that binds Eap20. The results identify Spry2 as a novel cellular factor that facilitates release driven by the primary and secondary HIV-1 Gag L domains.

  9. Elongation factor 1-alpha is released into the culture medium during growth of Giardia intestinalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Skarin, Hanna; Ringqvist, Emma; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G

    2011-04-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis is still not fully understood but excretory-secretory products have been suggested to be important during host-parasite interactions. Here we used SDS-PAGE gels and MALDI-TOF analysis to identify proteins released by Giardia trophozoites during in vitro growth. Serum proteins (mainly bovine serum albumin) in the growth medium, bind to the parasite surface and they are continuously released, which interfere with parasite secretome characterization. However, we identified two released Giardia proteins: elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) and a 58 kDa protein, identified as arginine deiminase (ADI). This is the first description of EF-1α as a released/secreted Giardia protein, whereas ADI has been identified in an earlier secretome study. Two genes encoding EF-1α were detected in the Giardia WB genome 35 kbp apart with almost identical coding sequences but with different promoter and 3' regions. Promoter luciferase-fusions showed that both genes are transcribed in trophozoites. The EF-1α protein localizes to the nuclear region in trophozoites but it relocalizes to the cytoplasm during host-cell interaction. Recombinant EF-1α is recognized by serum from giardiasis patients. Our results suggest that released EF-1α protein can be important during Giardia infections.

  10. Seed release by invasive thistles: the impact of plant and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Jongejans, Eelke; Pedatella, Nicholas M; Shea, Katriona; Skarpaas, Olav; Auhl, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Dispersal is a key process in biological studies of spatial dynamics, but the initiation of dispersal has often been neglected, despite strong indications that differential timing of dispersal can significantly affect dispersal distances. To investigate which plant and environmental factors determine the release of plumed seeds by the invasive thistles Carduus acanthoides and Carduus nutans, we exposed 192 flower heads of each species to increasing wind speeds in a full-factorial wind tunnel experiment with four air flow turbulence, three flower head wetness and two flower head temperature levels. The number of seed releases was highest under dry and turbulent conditions and from heads that had already lost a considerable number of seeds, but was not affected by flower head size, head angle or temperature. Inspection of the trials on video showed that higher wind speeds were needed to meet the seed release threshold in laminar flows and for C. acanthoides heads that had been wet for a longer time. Species differences were minimal, although seed release was more sensitive to lower levels of turbulence in the larger-headed and more open C. nutans heads. Knowledge of seed release biases towards weather conditions favourable for long-distance dispersal improves our understanding of the spread of invaders and allows managers to increase the efficiency of their containment strategies by applying them at crucial times. PMID:17666379

  11. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  12. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  13. The Effect of Vitamin D Treatment On Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Release From Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    GEZEN-AK, Duygu; DURSUN, Erdinç; YILMAZER, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D, the main function of which is thought to be the maintenance of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and bone structure, has been shown in recent studies to have important roles in brain development as well. A certain vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene haplotype was reported, for the first time by our group, to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our studies also showed that vitamin D prevents beta amyloid-induced calcium elevation and toxicity that target nerve growth factor (NGF) release in cortical neurons; beta amyloid suppresses VDR expression and the disruption of vitamin D-VDR pathway mimics beta amyloid-induced neurodegeneration. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of vitamin D on the NGF release from hippocampal neurons. Method Primary hippocampal neuron cultures that were prepared from 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat embryos were treated with vitamin D for 48 hours. The alteration in the NGF release was determined with ELISA. Cytotoxicity tests were also performed for all groups. Results The NGF release in vitamin D-treated group was significantly higher than in untreated control group. The protective effect of vitamin D against cytotoxicity was also observed. Conclusion Our results indicated that vitamin D regulates the release of NGF, a very important molecule for neuronal survival of hippocampal neurons as well as cortical neurons.

  14. Material-mediated proangiogenic factor release pattern modulates quality of regenerated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Baek, Kwanghyun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Millet, Larry J; Bashir, Rashid; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogels designed to sustainably release bioactive molecules are extensively used to enhance tissue repair and regenerative therapies. Along this line, numerous efforts are made to control the molecular release rate and amount. In contrast, few efforts are made to control the molecular release pattern, and, subsequently, modulate the spatial organization of newly forming tissues, including blood vessels. Therefore, using a hydrogel printed to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a pre-defined pattern, this study demonstrates that spatial distribution of VEGF is important in guiding growth direction of new blood vessels, and also in retaining the structural integrity of pre-existing vasculature. Guided by a computational model, we fabricated a patch composed of micro-sized VEGF-releasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel cylinders using an ink-jet printer. Interestingly, hydrogel printed with computationally optimized spacing created anisotropically aligned vasculature exclusively when the printed gel pattern was placed parallel to pre-existing blood vessels. In contrast, vascular sprouting from placing the printed gel pattern perpendicular to pre-existing vessels resulted in deformation and structural disintegration of the original vasculature. We envision that this study will be useful to better understand angiogenesis-modulated neovascularization and further improve the treatment quality for various wounds and tissue defects.

  15. Influence of Formulation Factors and Compression Force on Release Profile of Sustained Release Metoprolol Tablets using Compritol® 888ATO as Lipid Excipient

    PubMed Central

    Patere, Shilpa N.; Kapadia, Chhanda J.; Nagarsenker, Mangal S.

    2015-01-01

    Tablets containing metoprolol succinate and Compritol® 888ATO in the ratio of 1:2 yielded the desired sustained release profile in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 when evaluated using USP type II paddle apparatus and was selected as the optimized formulation. Robustness of optimized formulation was assessed by studying the effect of factors like varying source of metoprolol succinate and Compritol® 888ATO, compression force and hydroalcoholic dissolution medium on the release profile. No significant difference (P>0.05) in release profile was observed when metoprolol succinate from three different sources and Compritol® 888ATO from two different batches were used. Release profile of sustained release tablets of metoprolol succinate in media containing various concentrations of ethanol was comparable with media devoid of ethanol as evaluated by f2 test. This indicated that release profile of sustained release tablets of metoprolol succinate was reliable with no significant change due to variation in source of active pharmaceutical ingredient, particularly due to particle size distribution. Sustained release tablets of metoprolol succinate yielded release pattern within specifications irrespective of presence or absence of ethanol in the medium indicating that release properties of Compritol® 888ATO matrix are not affected by ethanol. Tablets compressed at compression force of <100 kg/cm2 exhibited low hardness with total porosity of 15.39% and significantly increased (P<0.05) metoprolol succinate release as compared to tablets compressed at 2000 kg/cm2 with 6.90% of total porosity revealing influence of compression force. Compritol® 888ATO holds great potential in providing reliable and controlled release profile of highly water soluble metoprolol succinate. PMID:26798179

  16. Inhaled histamine increases the rate of absorption of sodium cromoglycate from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R; Fowler, C; Simpson, S; Renwick, A G; Holgate, S T

    1992-01-01

    Since many factors may alter lung epithelial permeability (LEP) to water soluble molecules, the effect of histamine on the absorption and clearance of inhaled sodium cromoglycate was examined in seven mildly asthmatic patients with hyperresponsive airways and eight normal subjects. The subjects underwent histamine challenge to determine the provocative concentration of histamine required to reduce the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) by 20% (PC20) from baseline. On two further visits they inhaled either saline placebo or histamine and 5 min later inhaled an aerosol containing sodium cromoglycate. Measurements of FEV1 were made and blood samples taken for analysis of plasma sodium cromoglycate concentration at intervals for 3 h. In the asthmatic group histamine inhalation led to a 24 +/- 4% reduction in FEV1 but had no effect on the normal subjects. When compared with inhaled saline, histamine increased the initial pulmonary absorption of SCG without influencing the total amount of drug absorbed in both asthmatics and normals. These observations suggest that the pharmacokinetics of inhaled sodium cromoglycate may be altered significantly by inflammatory mediators present at the site of drug absorption from the airways. PMID:1576060

  17. Gas chromatographic analysis of histamine in mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus).

    PubMed

    Antoine, Francis R; Wei, Cheng-I; Otwell, W Steve; Sims, Charlie A; Littell, Ramon C; Hogle, Amanda D; Marshall, Maurice R

    2002-08-14

    Several authors have studied histamine using gas chromatography (GC) as a tool for quantitation, but the methods used were not always suitable depending on the kind of food. Problems frequently cited include incomplete histamine elution from the columns and peak tailing. Histamine is of interest because it is the factor common to all cases of scombroid poisoning, it has physiological and biological activity, and it is a chemical indicator of fish quality. In this study a modified GC method was used to quantify histamine in mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). Mean recovery was 67% for the GC method, compared with 90% for the AOAC fluorometric method. There was a 0.96 correlation of the GC histamine values with those of the AOAC fluorometric method. A temperature program, splitless/split injection, and analyte cleanup were essential for GC properties. Histamine retention time was 8.2 min. The method allowed peak height to be used for quantitation and simultaneous analysis of cadaverine and putrescine.

  18. Novel systems for tailored neurotrophic factor release based on hydrogel and resorbable glass hollow fibers.

    PubMed

    Novajra, G; Tonda-Turo, C; Vitale-Brovarone, C; Ciardelli, G; Geuna, S; Raimondo, S

    2014-03-01

    A novel system for the release of neurotrophic factor into a nerve guidance channel (NGC) based on resorbable phosphate glass hollow fibers (50P2O5-30CaO-9Na2O-3SiO2-3MgO-2.5K2O-2.5TiO2 mol%) in combination with a genipin-crosslinked agar/gelatin hydrogel (A/G_GP) is proposed. No negative effect on the growth of neonatal olfactory bulb ensheathing cell line (NOBEC) as well as on the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins was measured in vitro in the presence of fiber dissolution products in the culture medium. For the release studies, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-20), taken as growth factor model molecule, was solubilized in different media and introduced into the fiber lumen exploiting the capillary action. The fibers were filled with i) FD-20/phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, ii) FD-20/hydrogel solution before gelation and iii) hydrogel before gelation, subsequently lyophilized and then filled with the FD-20/PBS solution. The different strategies used for the loading of the FD-20 into the fibers resulted in different release kinetics. A slower release was observed with the use of A/G_GP hydrogel. At last, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nerve guides containing the hollow fibers and the hydrogel have been fabricated.

  19. Effects of sodium cromoglycate and nedocromil sodium on histamine secretion from human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, K B; Flint, K C; Brostoff, J; Hudspith, B N; Johnson, N M; Lau, H Y; Liu, W L; Pearce, F L

    1988-01-01

    Sodium cromoglycate and nedocromil sodium produced a dose dependent inhibition of histamine secretion from human pulmonary mast cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and by enzymatic dissociation of lung parenchyma. Both compounds were significantly more active against the lavage cells than against the dispersed lung cells, and nedocromil sodium was an order of magnitude more effective than sodium cromoglycate against both cell types. Tachyphylaxis was observed with the parenchymal cells but not with the lavage cells. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate also inhibited histamine release from the lavage cells of patients with sarcoidosis and extrinsic asthma. PMID:2462755

  20. Nitric Oxide and Histamine Signal Attempts to Swallow: A Component of Learning that Food Is Inedible in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzoff, Ayelet; Miller, Nimrod; Susswein, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Memory that food is inedible in "Aplysia" arises from training requiring three contingent events. Nitric oxide (NO) and histamine are released by a neuron responding to one of these events, attempts to swallow food. Since NO release during training is necessary for subsequent memory and NO substitutes for attempts to swallow, it was suggested that…

  1. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  2. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT).

  3. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  4. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  5. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  6. Platelets modulate gastric ulcer healing: role of endostatin and vascular endothelial growth factor release.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Elliott, S N; Cirino, G; Buret, A; Ignarro, L J; Wallace, J L

    2001-05-22

    Bleeding and delayed healing of ulcers are well recognized clinical problems associated with the use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, which have been attributed to their antiaggregatory effects on platelets. We hypothesized that antiplatelet drugs might interfere with gastric ulcer healing by suppressing the release of growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), from platelets. Gastric ulcers were induced in rats by serosal application of acetic acid. Daily oral treatment with vehicle, aspirin, or ticlopidine (an ADP receptor antagonist) was started 3 days later and continued for 1 week. Ulcer induction resulted in a significant increase in serum levels of VEGF and a significant decrease in serum levels of endostatin (an antiangiogenic factor). Although both aspirin and ticlopidine markedly suppressed platelet aggregation, only ticlopidine impaired gastric ulcer healing and angiogenesis as well as reversing the ulcer-associated changes in serum levels of VEGF and endostatin. The effects of ticlopidine on ulcer healing and angiogenesis were mimicked by immunodepletion of circulating platelets, and ticlopidine did not influence ulcer healing when given to thrombocytopenic rats. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with serum from ticlopidine-treated rats significantly reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis, effects reversed by an antibody directed against endostatin. Ticlopidine treatment resulted in increased platelet endostatin content and release. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized contribution of platelets to the regulation of gastric ulcer healing. Such effects likely are mediated through the release from platelets of endostatin and possibly VEGF. As shown with ticlopidine, drugs that influence gastric ulcer healing may do so in part through altering the ability of platelets to release growth factors.

  7. In situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol)–heparin hydrogels for mild encapsulation and prolonged release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Justine J; Farrugia, Brooke L; Green, Rylie A; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Martens, Penny J

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-based hydrogels are attractive for controlled growth factor delivery, due to the native ability of heparin to bind and stabilize growth factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are heparin-binding growth factors that synergistically enhance angiogenesis. Mild, in situ encapsulation of both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor and subsequent bioactive dual release has not been demonstrated from heparin-crosslinked hydrogels, and the combined long-term delivery of both growth factors from biomaterials is still a major challenge. Both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were encapsulated in poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels and demonstrated controlled release. A model cell line, BaF32, was used to show bioactivity of heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor released from the gels over multiple days. Released basic fibroblast growth factor promoted higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth over 24 h and proliferation for 3 days than the poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels alone. The release of vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth but not significant proliferation. Dual-growth factor release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels resulted in a synergistic effect with significantly higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth compared to basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels allowed bioactive growth factor encapsulation and provided controlled release of multiple growth factors which is beneficial toward tissue regeneration applications. PMID:27895888

  8. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  9. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Rucha

    2016-01-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5. Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5. PMID:27221617

  10. Inflammation and activity augment brain-derived neurotrophic factor peripheral release.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L Y; Shen, S; Liu, M; Xia, C; Kay, J C; Zhang, Q L

    2016-03-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release to nerve terminals in the central nervous system is crucial in synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity. However, BDNF release peripherally from primary afferent neurons has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that BDNF is synthesized by primary afferent neurons located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rat, and releases to spinal nerve terminals in response to depolarization or visceral inflammation. In two-compartmented culture that separates DRG neuronal cell bodies and spinal nerve terminals, application of 50mM K(+) to either the nerve terminal or the cell body evokes BDNF release to the terminal compartment. Inflammatory stimulation of the visceral organ (e.g. the urinary bladder) also facilitates an increase in spontaneous BDNF release from the primary afferent neurons to the axonal terminals. In the inflamed viscera, we show that BDNF immunoreactivity is increased in nerve fibers that are immuno-positive to the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Both BDNF and pro-BDNF levels are increased, however, pro-BDNF immunoreactivity is not expressed in PGP9.5-positive nerve-fiber-like structures. Determination of receptor profiles in the inflamed bladder demonstrates that BDNF high affinity receptor TrkB and general receptor p75 expression levels are elevated, with an increased level of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation/activity. These results suggest a possibility of pro-proliferative effect in the inflamed bladder. Consistently we show that the proliferation marker Ki67 expression levels are enhanced in the inflamed organ. Our results imply that in vivo BDNF release to the peripheral organ is an important event in neurogenic inflammatory state.

  11. Response to histamine allows the functional identification of neuronal progenitors, neurons, astrocytes, and immature cells in subventricular zone cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Silva, Bruno; Ferreira, Raquel; Grade, Sofia; Malva, João O

    2008-02-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) cell cultures contain mixed populations of immature cells, neurons, astrocytes, and progenitors in different stages of development. In the present work, we examined whether cell types of the SVZ could be functionally discriminated on the basis of intracellular free calcium level ([Ca(2+)](i)) variations following KCl and histamine stimulation. For this purpose, [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in SVZ cell cultures from neonatal P1-3 C57Bl/6 donor mice, in single cells, after stimulation with 100 microM histamine or 50 mM KCl. MAP-2-positive neurons and doublecortin-positive neuroblasts were distinguished on the basis of their selective ratio of response to KCl and/or histamine stimulation. Moreover, we could distinguish immature cells on the basis of the selective response to histamine via the histamine 1 receptor activation. Exposure of SVZ cultures to the pro-neurogenic stem cell factor (SCF) induced an increase in the number of cells responding to KCl and a decrease in the number of cells responding to histamine, consistent with neuronal differentiation. The selective response to KCl/histamine in single cell calcium imaging analysis offers a rapid and efficient way for the functional discrimination of neuronal differentiation in SVZ cell cultures, opening new perspectives for the search of potential pro-neurogenic factors.

  12. Histamine H3 receptors--general characterization and their function in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, B; Godlewski, G; Schlicker, E

    1998-06-01

    The histamine H3 receptor was initially identified as a presynaptic autoreceptor controlling histamine release and synthesis in the brain. It belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of the H3 receptor which has not yet been cloned was definitely established by the design of highly potent and selective agonists (R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine, imetit) and antagonists (thioperamide, clobenpropit). These receptors also occur as heteroreceptors both in the central nervous system and on peripheral neurons of the gastrointestinal and bronchial tract, where they regulate the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. In the cardiovascular system, histamine H3 receptors are mainly located presynaptically on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the blood vessels and the heart. Their activation leads to the inhibition of noradrenaline release and consequently to the reduction of the neurogenic vasopressor and cardiostimulatory responses. The presence of such receptors has been shown both in vitro (human, pig, guinea-pig, rabbit, rat isolated tissues) and in vivo (rat, guinea-pig). The vascular and cardiac presynaptic H3 receptors may be activated by endogenous histamine. The vascular H3 receptors appear to be operative in hypertension and interact with presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors. Postsynaptic vasodilatatory H3 receptors have been detected in several vascular beds as well. H3 receptor ligands affect basal cardiovascular parameters in conscious and anesthetized guinea-pigs but not rats. Presynaptic H3 receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of headache and cardiac ischemia.

  13. Outrage Factors in Government Press Releases of Food Risk and Their Influence on News Media Coverage.

    PubMed

    Ju, Youngkee; Lim, Jeongsub; Shim, Minsun; You, Myoungsoon

    2015-08-01

    An appropriate level of risk perception should be a critical issue in modern "risk society." There have been many studies on the influences on risk perception. This study investigates whether risk communication scholar Dr. Peter Sandman's outrage factors intensify journalistic attention to health risks from food consumption. A content analysis of a health institution's press releases was conducted to examine 15 outrage factors of food risks conveyed in the governmental risk communication. In addition, the news stories covering the food risks informed by the press releases were calculated to evaluate the relation between outrage factors of a risk and the number of news stories covering the risk. Results showed that controllability was the most salient outrage factor, followed by trust, voluntariness, familiarity, and human origin; the greater the outrage score of a risk, the more news stories of the risk. For individual outrage factors, a risk with an implication of catastrophic potential was associated with an increase of news stories. Food providers' distrustful behaviors also influenced journalistic attention to the food risks. The implication of the findings to health message designers is discussed.

  14. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  15. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  16. New concepts of histamine receptors and actions.

    PubMed

    Repka-Ramirez, Maria Susana

    2003-05-01

    Histamine and antihistamines are so deeply woven into the fabric of allergic diseases that it is sometimes difficult to see how this field could advance beyond our current, potent histamine H1-receptor drugs. Investigations of other actions of histamine and the identification of H2, H3, and now H4 receptors have suddenly reignited the search for new mono- and multi-receptor-specific agonists and antagonists. There is great excitement due to preliminary findings that H3 receptors act as neural inhibitory autoreceptors, and H4 receptors might modulate immune cell functions.

  17. Synthesis of histamine by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Davies, R J; Crook, S J; Tabaqchali, S

    1986-03-29

    Recent findings suggest that bacteria might contribute to histamine concentrations in the sputum of patients with infective lung disease. Ten isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, together with two reference strains, were incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. Serial estimations of histamine concentrations by high pressure liquid chromatography showed significant increases at 24 and 48 hours; no increases were evident in the control samples. These findings suggest that H influenzae might contribute to inflammation and limited airflow in infective lung disease by producing histamine.

  18. Synthesis of histamine by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Davies, R J; Crook, S J; Tabaqchali, S

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that bacteria might contribute to histamine concentrations in the sputum of patients with infective lung disease. Ten isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, together with two reference strains, were incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. Serial estimations of histamine concentrations by high pressure liquid chromatography showed significant increases at 24 and 48 hours; no increases were evident in the control samples. These findings suggest that H influenzae might contribute to inflammation and limited airflow in infective lung disease by producing histamine. PMID:3083910

  19. Analytical Methods for the Quantification of Histamine and Histamine Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard

    2017-03-21

    The endogenous metabolite histamine (HA) is synthesized in various mammalian cells but can also be ingested from exogenous sources. It is involved in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological processes. So far, four different HA receptors (H1R-H4R) have been described and numerous HAR antagonists have been developed. Contemporary investigations regarding the various roles of HA and its main metabolites have been hampered by the lack of highly specific and sensitive analytic methods for all of these analytes. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is the method of choice for identification and sensitive quantification of many low-molecular weight endogenous metabolites. In this chapter, different methodological aspects of HA quantification as well as recommendations for LC-MS/MS methods suitable for analysis of HA and its main metabolites are summarized.

  20. Corticotropin releasing factor and catecholamines enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission in the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-07-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays an important role in many behaviors including anxiety, memory consolidation and cardiovascular responses. While these behaviors can be modulated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and catecholamine signaling, the mechanism(s) by which these signals modify CeA glutamatergic neurotransmission remains unclear. Utilizing whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology recordings from neurons in the lateral subdivision of the CeA (CeAL), we show that CRF, dopamine (DA) and the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) all enhance the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) without altering sEPSC kinetics, suggesting they increase presynaptic glutamate release. The effect of CRF on sEPSCs was mediated by a combination of CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors. While previous work from our lab suggests that CRFRs mediate the effect of catecholamines on excitatory transmission in other subregions of the extended amygdala, blockade of CRFRs in the CeAL failed to significantly alter effects of DA and ISO on glutamatergic transmission. These findings suggest that catecholamine and CRF enhancement of glutamatergic transmission onto CeAL neurons occurs via distinct mechanisms. While CRF increased spontaneous glutamate release in the CeAL, CRF caused no significant changes to optogenetically evoked glutamate release in this region. The dissociable effects of CRF on different types of glutamatergic neurotransmission suggest that CRF may specifically regulate spontaneous excitatory transmission.

  1. Evaluation of the tablet core factors influencing the release kinetics and the loadability of push-pull osmotic systems.

    PubMed

    Malaterre, Vincent; Ogorka, Joerg; Loggia, Nicoletta; Gurny, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Push-pull osmotic systems have been developed to deliver poorly soluble drugs in a modified-release fashion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the tablet core factors on the drug release kinetics and loadability. The release kinetics was efficiently modulated by varying either the proportion of osmotic agent or the drug layer polymer grade as an alternative to change the membrane characteristics. High osmotic agent proportions and viscous-grade polymers were recommended to formulate high drug loads up to 20% without losing both the release completeness and the zero-order drug release kinetics.

  2. Diamine Oxidase from White Pea (Lathyrus sativus) Combined with Catalase Protects the Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Line from Histamine Damage.

    PubMed

    Jumarie, Catherine; Séïde, Marilyne; Marcocci, Lucia; Pietrangeli, Paola; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2017-01-20

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) administration has been proposed to treat certain gastrointestinal dysfunctions induced by histamine, an immunomodulator, signaling, and pro-inflammatory factor. However, H2O2 resulting from the oxidative deamination of histamine by DAO may be toxic. The purpose of this study was to investigate to which extent DAO from white pea (Lathyrus sativus), alone or in combination with catalase, may modulate histamine toxicity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. The results show that histamine at concentrations higher than 1 mM is toxic to the Caco-2 cells, independently of the cell differentiation status, with a LC50 of ≅ 10 mM following a 24-h exposure. Depending on its concentration, DAO increased histamine toxicity to a greater extent in differentiated cells compared to undifferentiated cultures. In the presence of catalase, the DAO-induced increase in histamine toxicity was completely abolished in the undifferentiated cells and only partially decreased in differentiated cells, showing differences in the sensitivity of Caco-2 cells to the products resulting from histamine degradation by DAO (H2O2, NH3, or imidazole aldehyde). It appears that treatment of food histaminosis using a combination of vegetal DAO and catalase would protect against histamine toxicity and prevent H2O2-induced damage that may occur during histamine oxidative deamination.

  3. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  5. Structure of the human histamine H1 receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, M D; Loonen, I; Verhasselt, P; Neefs, J M; Luyten, W H

    1998-01-01

    Histamine H1 receptor expression has been reported to change in disorders such as allergic rhinitis, autoimmune myocarditis, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Here we report the isolation and characterization of genomic clones containing the 5' flanking (regulatory) region of the human histamine H1 receptor gene. An intron of approx. 5.8 kb was identified in the 5' untranslated region, which suggests that an entire subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors may contain an intron immediately upstream of the start codon. The transcription initiation site was mapped by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to a region 6.2 kb upstream of the start codon. Immediately upstream of the transcription start site a fragment of 1.85 kb was identified that showed promoter activity when placed upstream of a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into cells expressing the histamine H1 receptor. The promoter sequence shares a number of characteristics with the promoter sequences of other G-protein-coupled receptor encoding genes, including binding sites for several transcription factors, and the absence of TATA and CAAT sequences at the appropriate locations. The promoter sequence described here differs from that reported previously [Fukui, Fujimoto, Mizuguchi, Sakamoto, Horio, Takai, Yamada and Ito (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 894-901] because the reported genomic clone was chimaeric. Furthermore our study provides evidence that the 3' untranslated region of the H1 receptor mRNA is much longer than previously accepted. Together, these findings provide a complete view of the structure of the human histamine H1 receptor gene. Both the coding region of the H1 receptor gene and its promoter region were independently mapped to chromosome 3p25. PMID:9794809

  6. Histamine derived from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri suppresses TNF via modulation of PKA and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Carissa M; Hong, Teresa; van Pijkeren, Jan Peter; Hemarajata, Peera; Trinh, Dan V; Hu, Weidong; Britton, Robert A; Kalkum, Markus; Versalovic, James

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial microbes and probiotic species, such as Lactobacillus reuteri, produce biologically active compounds that can modulate host mucosal immunity. Previously, immunomodulatory factors secreted by L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 were unknown. A combined metabolomics and bacterial genetics strategy was utilized to identify small compound(s) produced by L. reuteri that were TNF-inhibitory. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) separation isolated TNF-inhibitory compounds, and HILIC-HPLC fraction composition was determined by NMR and mass spectrometry analyses. Histamine was identified and quantified in TNF-inhibitory HILIC-HPLC fractions. Histamine is produced from L-histidine via histidine decarboxylase by some fermentative bacteria including lactobacilli. Targeted mutagenesis of each gene present in the histidine decarboxylase gene cluster in L. reuteri 6475 demonstrated the involvement of histidine decarboxylase pyruvoyl type A (hdcA), histidine/histamine antiporter (hdcP), and hdcB in production of the TNF-inhibitory factor. The mechanism of TNF inhibition by L. reuteri-derived histamine was investigated using Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-activated human monocytoid cells. Bacterial histamine suppressed TNF production via activation of the H(2) receptor. Histamine from L. reuteri 6475 stimulated increased levels of cAMP, which inhibited downstream MEK/ERK MAPK signaling via protein kinase A (PKA) and resulted in suppression of TNF production by transcriptional regulation. In summary, a component of the gut microbiome, L. reuteri, is able to convert a dietary component, L-histidine, into an immunoregulatory signal, histamine, which suppresses pro-inflammatory TNF production. The identification of bacterial bioactive metabolites and their corresponding mechanisms of action with respect to immunomodulation may lead to improved anti-inflammatory strategies for chronic immune-mediated diseases.

  7. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatic crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was increased by 2.4-fold compared with that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed compared to

  8. Histamine receptors in the gastric microcirculation.

    PubMed Central

    Guth, P H; Smith, E

    1978-01-01

    The types and functions of histamine receptors in the submucosal arterioles of the corpus and antrum of the cat and rat stomach were studied using an in vivo microscopy technique. Change in arteriolar diameter in response to superfusion of histamine with and without antagonists was measured by an image-splitting technique. H1 and H2 histamine receptors subserving vasodilatation were demonstrated in both the antral and corpus submucosal arterioles of the cat and rat. However, the H1 effect was predominant in the antrum (the H2 antagonist inhibited histamine dilatation only in the presence of the H1 antagonist), while H1 and H2 effects were approximately equal and independent in the corpus. PMID:32123

  9. A novel collagen/platelet-rich plasma (COL/PRP) scaffold: preparation and growth factor release analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wang, Jingwei; Ren, Mingguang; Li, Lifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used in clinical practice for more than 20 years because it causes the release of many growth factors. However, the burst release pattern and short release period of PRP have become obstacles to its application. An optimal controllable release system is an urgent need for researchers. This study investigated whether collagen/PRP (COL/PRP) scaffolds can serve as a vehicle for the controllable release of growth factors. We fabricated a novel scaffold that integrates PRP activated by thrombin or collagen into type I collagen. The mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the COL/PRP scaffolds were not cytotoxic to L-929 fibroblasts. The PDGF and FGF content in the thrombin group was at a higher level and lasted for a long period of time. Collagen and thrombin played the same role in the release of TGF-β1 and VEGF. These data suggest that the novel COL/PRP scaffolds provide a carrier for the controllable release of growth factors and may be used in tissue- regenerative therapies.

  10. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  11. Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mussatto, D.J.; Garrard, C.S.; Trumbull, J.J.; Bowers, M.W.; Sanders, C.J.; Yeates, D.B.; Lourenco, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine, a mediator of airways constriction, alters ciliary beat frequency, bronchial mucus production, and epithelial ion transport; and in dogs, increases mucociliary transport. To evaluate the effect of inhaled histamine on human tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance, the authors measured lung mucociliary clearance (LMC) and tracheal mucociliary transport rate (TMTR) in 5 healthy, nonsmoking subjects in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. The concentration of inhaled histamine which produced a 20% fall in FEV/sub 1/ was established for each subject. On a separate day the subjects inhaled a 9 ..mu..m MMAD /sup 99m/Tc-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol. LMC and TMTR were then measured for 2.5h using a gamma camera and a tracheal multidetector probe. Simultaneously, the subjects were challenged every 26 +/- 4 min with either PBS or histamine in PBS. The Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ retained after 24h for histamine (14.4 +/- 7.6%) and PBS studies (13.1 +/- 8.6%) indicated no difference in deposition of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (ANOVA). Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ clearance at 30 min was increased in the histamine studies (61 +/- 21% compared to the PBS studies (44 +/- 29%; p < 0.02, ANOVA)). TMTR was also increased with histamine (7.6 +/- 3.4 mm/min) compared to PBS (4.6 +/- 1.7 mm/min; p < 0.001, ANOVA). Results indicate an acute stimulatory effect of inhaled histamine on mucous transport in humans.

  12. Determination of histamine in microdialysis samples from rat brain by microbore column liquid chromatography following intramolecular excimer-forming derivatization with pyrene-labeling reagent.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Fumio; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Shimako; Fuxe, Kjell; Kehr, Jan

    2003-07-15

    This paper describes a sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection for determination of histamine in brain microdialysis samples from awake rats. Samples containing histamine (10 microl) were derivatized with 20 microl of the reagent consisting of 3 mM 4-(1-pyrene)butyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (PSE), 3 mM potassium carbonate and acetonitrile (1:1:18, v/v), thereafter 20 microl volume was injected onto the microbore column packed with C18 silica gel. The histamine derivative contained two pyrene moieties, which generated intramolecular excimer fluorescence (450-540 nm) and allowed clear discrimination from the monomer fluorescence (360-420 nm) emitted by PSE itself. The separation of histamine-pyrene derivative was achieved within 25 min, the detection limit (S/N=3) was 0.3 fmol histamine in 20 microl injected. The basal extracellular levels of histamine collected in 10-min fractions (fmol per 10 microl, mean+/-S.D., not corrected for recovery, n=10 rats) were 35.45+/-4.56 (hypothalamus), 9.05+/-1.56 (prefrontal cortex), 7.83+/-0.86 (hippocampus) and 6.54+/-0.66 (striatum). The voltage-sensitive release of histamine was evaluated by perfusing the probes with high (100 mM) concentration of potassium ions or with sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 microM), and the calcium-dependent release was tested by perfusion with calcium-free Ringer solution. These data, together with physiologically induced increase of extracellular histamine in four examined brain regions during forced swimming demonstrate that this method is suitable for high-sensitive determination of neuronally released histamine under various pharmacological and physiological conditions.

  13. Impaired drinking response in histamine H3 receptor knockout mice following dehydration or angiotensin-II challenge.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Ryo; Miyamoto, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Hidehito; Kanatani, Akio; Tokita, Shigeru

    2006-07-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are presynaptic receptors that negatively regulate the release of histamine. The present study examined the physiological role of H3Rs in drinking behavior. In water-replete rats, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of R-alpha-methylhistamine (RalphaMeHA), an H3R agonist, elicited drinking behavior. In contrast, i.c.v. administration of thioperamide, an H3R inverse agonist, significantly attenuated the drinking behavior elicited by either overnight dehydration or i.c.v. administration of angiotensin-II (AT-II). Inhibition of histamine release with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, an inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, did not elicit drinking behavior. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of thioperamide on drinking behavior in water-depleted rats were not mimicked by i.c.v. administration of histamine. These results suggest that the predominant effects of H3Rs on drinking behavior are not mediated by the modulation of histamine release. In H3R-deficient (H3RKO) mice, drinking behavior induced by overnight dehydration or i.c.v. administration of AT-II was significantly impaired compared to wild type mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that brain H3Rs play a pivotal role in drinking behavior in response to dehydration and AT-II, and these effects may be largely independent of the modulation of histaminergic tone.

  14. Evolution of the eukaryotic translation termination system: origins of release factors.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Y; Ford Doolittle, W

    2000-06-01

    Accurate translation termination is essential for cell viability. In eukaryotes, this process is strictly maintained by two proteins, eukaryotic release factor 1 (eRF1), which recognizes all stop codons and hydrolyzes peptidyl-tRNA, and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3), which is an elongation factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) homolog stimulating eRF1 activity. To retrace the evolution of this core system, we cloned and sequenced the eRF3 genes from Trichomonas vaginalis (Parabasalia) and Giardia lamblia (Diplomonada), which are generally thought to be "early-diverging eukaryotes," as well as those from two ciliates (Oxytricha trifallax and Euplotes aediculatus). We also determined the sequence of the eRF1 gene for G. lamblia. Surprisingly, the G. lamblia eRF3 appears to have only one domain, corresponding to EF-1alpha, while other eRF3s (including the T. vaginalis protein) have an additional N-terminal domain, of 66-411 amino acids. Considering this novel eRF3 structure and our extensive phylogenetic analyses, we suggest that (1) the current translation termination system in eukaryotes evolved from the archaea-like version, (2) eRF3 was introduced into the system prior to the divergence of extant eukaryotes, including G. lamblia, and (3) G. lamblia might be the first eukaryotic branch among the organisms considered.

  15. Effect of trehalose coating on basic fibroblast growth factor release from tailor-made bone implants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungjin; Lee, Jongil; Igawa, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-il; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    Artificial bone implants are often incorporated with osteoinductive factors to facilitate early bone regeneration. Calcium phosphate, the main component in artificial bone implants, strongly binds these factors, and in a few cases, the incorporated proteins are not released from the implant under conditions of physiological pH, thereby leading to reduction in their osteoinductivity. In this study, we coated tailor-made bone implants with trehalose to facilitate the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In an in vitro study, mouse osteoblastic cells were separately cultured for 48 hr in a medium with a untreated implant (T-), trehalose-coated implant (T+), bFGF-incorporated implant (FT-), and bFGF-incorporated implant with trehalose coating (FT+). In the FT+ group, cell viability was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that trehalose effectively covered the surface of the artificial bone implant without affecting the crystallinity or the mechanical strength of the artificial bone implant. These results suggest that coating artificial bone implants with trehalose could limit the binding of bFGF to calcium phosphate.

  16. Dual growth factor releasing multi-functional nanofibers for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiwei; Paras, Christian B; Weng, Hong; Punnakitikashem, Primana; Su, Lee-Chun; Vu, Khanh; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a dual growth factor-releasing nanoparticle-in-nanofiber system for wound healing applications. In order to mimic and promote the natural healing procedure, chitosan and poly(ethylene oxide) were electrospun into nanofibrous meshes as mimics of extracellular matrix. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was loaded within nanofibers to promote angiogenesis in the short term. In addition, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles were embedded inside nanofibers to generate a sustained release of PDGF-BB for accelerated tissue regeneration and remodeling. In vitro studies revealed that our nanofibrous composites delivered VEGF quickly and PDGF-BB in a relayed manner, supported fibroblast growth and exhibited anti-bacterial activities. A preliminary in vivo study performed on normal full thickness rat skin wound models demonstrated that nanofiber/nanoparticle scaffolds significantly accelerated the wound healing process by promoting angiogenesis, increasing re-epithelialization and controlling granulation tissue formation. For later stages of healing, evidence also showed quicker collagen deposition and earlier remodeling of the injured site to achieve a faster full regeneration of skin compared to the commercial Hydrofera Blue® wound dressing. These results suggest that our nanoparticle-in-nanofiber system could provide a promising treatment for normal and chronic wound healing.

  17. Development of realistic environmental release factors based on measured data: approach and lessons from the EU metal industry.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, Frederik A M; Van Assche, Frank; Hicks, Keegan; Mertens, Jelle; Voigt, Astrid; Verougstraete, Violaine

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of environmental exposure and risks associated with the production or use of a substance on an industrial site includes the estimation of the releases to the environment. In the absence of measured release data on the specific substance, a risk assessor would rely on default release factors to the environmental compartments as developed in international, national, or regional context. Because a wide variety of substances, processes, and uses has to be covered, default release factors are as a rule conservative, usually leading to significant overprediction of releases and hence to overpredicted environmental exposure concentrations and risks. In practice, unrealistic and worst-case predictions do not support a more efficient management of releases and risk. The objective of this article is to propose a more realistic approach to characterize the environmental releases from manufacture, processing, and downstream uses of the metals and their compounds. Although developed in the European Union (EU), this approach can also be used in other regions and in other chemical management systems addressing metals. A database consisting of more than 1300 recent (1993-2010), site-specific measured release factors to air and water of 18 different metals from various EU Member States was compiled and used to calculate average and reasonable worst-case release factors for multiple metal manufacture and industrial use processes. The parameters influencing releases to water were found to depend predominantly on life cycle step (manufacture and/or use), the sector and/or the solid-water partition coefficient (K(d)). The release factors can be used as advanced tier instrument in environmental safety assessments, increasing the realism of the estimates while still keeping a sufficient level of conservatism.

  18. Effect of carnosine on the immunosuppressive effect of histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpan, Yu. V.

    1985-04-01

    This paper studies the ability of carnosine (beta-imidazole-lactate) to affect histamine-induced immunosuppression of proliferative activity of various lymphocyte subpopulations and the realization of this effect through surface histamine receptors of the cells. The experiments were carried out on mice; lymphocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled thymidine for 4 h, after which their radioactivity was determined on a scintillation counter. The results show that histamine has an inhibitory action on antigen-induced proliferation of T suppressor lymphocytes through H-2 histamine receptors, for this effect was considerably inhibited by the H-2 histamine blockers metiamide, but not by the H-1 histamine blocker mepyramine.

  19. Corticotropin releasing factor stimulates cAMP formation in pituitary corticotropic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, M.; Cantalamessa, L.; Catania, A.; Reschini, E.; Mueller, E.E.

    1984-01-23

    Addition of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) to membranes from two ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors strikingly increased in a dose-dependent fashion adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Stimulation of AC activity by CRF in membranes from non-tumoral tissue adjacent to tumoral corticotrophs was considerably lower, and was lacking in membranes from a growth hormone secreting tumor. These data correlated well with in vivo pre-surgery and post-surgery ACTH responsiveness to CRF of the tumor bearing patients. Basal AC activity was higher in pituitary adenomas than in non-tumoral adjacent tissue.

  20. Performance of optimized noncanonical amino acid mutagenesis systems in the absence of release factor 1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunan; Lajoie, Marc J; Italia, James S; Chin, Melissa A; Church, George M; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-05-24

    Site-specific incorporation of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins expressed in E. coli using UAG-suppression competes with termination mediated by release factor 1 (RF1). Recently, unconditional deletion of RF1 was achieved in a genomically recoded E. coli (C321), devoid of all endogenous UAG stop codons. Here we evaluate the efficiency of ncAA incorporation in this strain using optimized suppression vectors. Even though the absence of RF1 does not benefit the suppression efficiency of a single UAG codon, multi-site incorporation of a series of chemically distinct ncAAs was significantly improved.

  1. Dual-stage growth factor release within 3D protein-engineered hydrogel niches promotes adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Goodwin, Midori; Teasley, Eric S.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered biomimetic microenvironments from hydrogels are an emerging strategy to achieve lineage-specific differentiation in vitro. In addition to recapitulating critical matrix cues found in the native three-dimensional (3D) niche, the hydrogel can also be designed to deliver soluble factors that are present within the native inductive microenvironment. We demonstrate a versatile materials approach for the dual-stage delivery of multiple soluble factors within a 3D hydrogel to induce adipogenesis. We use a Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH) embedded with alginate microgels to deliver two pro-adipogenic soluble factors, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) with two distinct delivery profiles. We show that dual-stage delivery of FGF-1 and BMP-4 to human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) significantly increases lipid accumulation compared with the simultaneous delivery of both growth factors together. Furthermore, dual-stage growth factor delivery within a 3D hydrogel resulted in substantially more lipid accumulation compared to identical delivery profiles in 2D cultures. Gene expression analysis shows upregulation of key adipogenic markers indicative of brown-like adipocytes. These data suggest that dual-stage release of FGF-1 and BMP-4 within 3D microenvironments can promote the in vitro development of mature adipocytes. PMID:25309741

  2. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  3. Orexin-corticotropin-releasing factor receptor heteromers in the ventral tegmental area as targets for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi; McCormick, Peter J

    2015-04-29

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R-OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R-OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R-CRF1R-OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A-CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking.

  4. Inhibition of ACTH Release by Peptide Hormones: Molecular Mechanisms and Possible Role as Anti-Stress Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-16

    somatostatin (SRIF) may be a non- steriod inhibitor of Ar.TH release. The goals of the proposal were to examine the structure of the SRIF receptor and determine...major objective of the research proposal was the identification of non- steriodal factors which inhibit ACTH release and may be useful in the treatment

  5. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v)) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/W(v) mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v) mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v) mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v) mice. W/W(v) mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  6. Basic fibroblast growth factor priming increases the responsiveness of immortalized hypothalamic luteinizing hormone releasing hormone neurones to neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Gallo, F; Morale, M C; Tirolo, C; Testa, N; Farinella, Z; Avola, R; Beaudet, A; Marchetti, B

    2000-10-01

    The participation of growth factors (GFs) in the regulation of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) neuronal function has recently been proposed, but little is known about the role played by GFs during early LHRH neurone differentiation. In the present study, we have used combined biochemical and morphological approaches to study the ability of a number of GFs normally expressed during brain development, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to induce survival, differentiation, proliferation, and phenotypic expression of immortalized (GT1-1) LHRH neurones in vitro, at early (3-days in vitro, 3-DIV) and late (8-DIV) stages of neuronal differentiation. Comparison of GF-treated vs untreated neurones grown in serum-deprived (SD) medium demonstrated bFGF to be the most potent, and insulin the least active in promoting neuronal differentiation. Thus, at both 3-DIV and 8-DIV, but especially at 8-DIV, bFGF induced the greatest increase in the total length and number of LHRH processes/cell and in growth cone surface area. bFGF was also the most active at 3-DIV, and IGF-I at 8-DIV, in counteracting SD-induced cell death, whereas EGF was the most potent in increasing [3H]thymidine incorporation. All GFs studied decreased the spontaneous release of LHRH from GT1-1 cells when applied at 3-DIV or 8-DIV, except for insulin which was inactive at both time-points and bFGF which was inactive at 8-DIV. Pre-treatment of GT1-1 cells with a suboptimal ('priming') dose of bFGF for 12 h followed by application of the different GFs induced a sharp potentiation of the neurotrophic and proliferative effects of the latter and particularly of those of IGF-I. Moreover, bFGF priming counteracted EGF-induced decrease in LHRH release and significantly stimulated LHRH secretion following IGF-I or insulin application, suggesting that bFGF may sensitize LHRH neurones to differentiating effects of

  7. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  8. Oligoubiquitination of tissue factor on Lys255 promotes Ser253-dephosphorylation and terminates TF release.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary E W; Featherby, Sophie; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2016-11-01

    Restriction of tissue factor (TF) activity at the cell surface and TF release are critical for prevention of excessive coagulation. This study examined the regulation of TF dephosphorylation and its release through ubiquitination. A plasmid containing the sequence to express the tandem protein TF-tGFP was mutated to include an arginine-substitution at Lys255 within TF. MDA-MB-231 cell line, and HCAEC endothelial cells were transfected and subsequently activated with PAR2-agonist peptide. The wild-type and mutant TF-tGFP were immunoprecipitated from the cell lysates and the ubiquitination and phosphorylation state of TF examined. Analysis of the proteins showed that arginine-substitution of Lys255 within TF prevented its ubiquitination while the wild-type TF-tGFP was oligoubiquitinated. The TF-associated oligoubiquitin chain was estimated to contain up to 4 ubiquitin units, with the linkage formed between Lys63 of one ubiquitin unit, and the C-terminus of the next unit. The Lys255→Arg substitution of TF-tGFP prolonged the phosphorylation of Ser253 within TF, compared to the wild-type TF-tGFP, lengthened the presence of TF-tGFP at the cell surface and extended the duration of TF-tGFP release from cells following PAR2 activation. A biotinylated 19-mer peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of TF (TFc) was used as substrate to show that the ubiquitination of TF was mediated by the Ube2D family of E2-enzymes and involved Mdm2. Moreover, double-phosphorylation of TFc was prerequisite for ubiquitination, with subsequent dephosphorylation of Ser253 by phosphatase PP2A. In conclusion, oligoubiquitination of Lys255 within TF permits PP2A to bind and dephosphorylate Ser253 and occurs to terminate TF release and contain its activity.

  9. Corticotropin releasing factor dose-dependently modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Eric W; Waterhouse, Barry D; Chandler, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is critically involved in the stress response and receives afferent input from a number of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) containing structures. Several in vivo and in vitro studies in rat have shown that CRF robustly increases the firing rate of LC neurons in a dose-dependent manner. While it is known that these increases are dependent on CRF receptor subtype 1 and mediated by effects of cAMP intracellular signaling cascades on potassium conductance, the impact of CRF on synaptic transmission within LC has not been clarified. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to assess how varying concentrations of bath-applied CRF affect AMPA-receptor dependent spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs). Compared to vehicle, 10, 25, and 100 nm CRF had no significant effects on any sEPSC parameters. Fifty nanomolar CRF, however, significantly increased sEPSC amplitude, half-width, and charge transfer, while these measures were significantly decreased by 200 nm CRF. These observations suggest that stress may differentially affect ongoing excitatory synaptic transmission in LC depending on how much CRF is released from presynaptic terminals. Combined with the well-documented effects of CRF on membrane properties and spontaneous LC discharge, these observations may help explain how stress and CRF release are able to modulate the signal to noise ratio of LC neurons. These findings have implications for how stress affects the fidelity of signal transmission and information flow through LC and how it might impact norepinephrine release in the CNS.

  10. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  11. Purification of a high-molecular-weight somatoliberin (growth-hormone-releasing factor) from pig hypothalami.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, J E; Lowry, P J

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary observations [Sykes & Lowry (1980) J. Endocrinol. 85, 42P-43P] had suggested that the major hypothalamic somatoliberin (growth-hormone-releasing factor) was a larger peptide than the other characterized hypothalamic factors, with an elution position on Sephadex G-50 between those of neurophysin and corticotropin. The present paper reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of pig hypothalamic somatoliberin. Acid extracts of pig stalk median eminence were purified by gel filtration and preparative and analytical high-pressure liquid chromatography to yield a preparation that was specific in the release of somatotropin (growth hormone) in vitro, giving a steep dose--response curve at doses in the range 0.20-3.0 ng. Amino acid analysis revealed a non-cysteine-containing peptide with a high number of glutamate (or glutamine) and aspartate (or asparagine) residues. The peptide had about 56-57 amino acid residues and an apparent molecular weight of 6400, in keeping with its elution position on a column of Sephadex G-50. PMID:6409074

  12. In Situ Loading of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Within Porous Silica Nanoparticles for a Prolonged Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Wang, Dashan; Gardiner, Richard B.; Harris, Richard; Abdul, Mumin Md; Thomas, Anu Alice

    2009-11-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a protein, plays a key role in wound healing and blood vessel regeneration. However, bFGF is easily degraded in biologic systems. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with well-tailored porous structure have been used for hosting guest molecules for drug delivery. Here, we report an in situ route to load bFGF in MSNs for a prolonged release. The average diameter ( d) of bFGF-loaded MSNs is 57 ± 8 nm produced by a water-in-oil microemulsion method. The in vitro releasing profile of bFGF from MSNs in phosphate buffer saline has been monitored for 20 days through a colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The loading efficiency of bFGF in MSNs is estimated at 72.5 ± 3%. In addition, the cytotoxicity test indicates that the MSNs are not toxic, even at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. It is expected that the in situ loading method makes the MSNs a new delivery system to deliver protein drugs, e.g. growth factors, to help blood vessel regeneration and potentiate greater angiogenesis.

  13. Epidermal growth factor released in human dental pulp following orthodontic force.

    PubMed

    Derringer, Kathryn; Linden, Roger

    2007-02-01

    This study investigated the role of human epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the angiogenic response of the dental pulp to orthodontic force. The release of angiogenic growth factor EGF in human dental pulp following orthodontic force application was examined using neutralizing antibody anti-human (anti-h) EGF to block its effects. The dental pulps from 10 premolar teeth from 10 patients (equal numbers of males and females aged 11-14 years), treated with a straightwire fixed appliance for 2 weeks and extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided vertically, and sections from each half-pulp were individually co-cultured with a section of rat aorta in collagen surrounded by growth media. Anti-h EGF was added to the media of the co-cultures from one-half of each pulp from each tooth from each patient; the remaining co-cultures from the other half of each pulp without anti-h EGF were used as the controls. Cultures were examined daily by light microscopy for angiogenic growth and number of microvessels. The addition of anti-h EGF to the growth media in the co-cultures resulted in a significant reduction (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank test) in pulpal and rat aorta microvessel numbers, compared with the control co-cultures. The results indicate that EGF released following orthodontic force application plays a part in the angiogenic response of the pulp.

  14. Crystal Structure of a Translation Termination Complex Formed With Release Factor RF2

    SciTech Connect

    Korostelev, A.; Asahara, H.; Lancaster, L.; Laurberg, M.; Hirschi, A.; Zhu, J.; Trakhanov, S.; Scott, W.G.; Noller, H.F.

    2009-05-20

    We report the crystal structure of a translation termination complex formed by the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome bound with release factor RF2, in response to a UAA stop codon, solved at 3 {angstrom} resolution. The backbone of helix -5 and the side chain of serine of the conserved SPF motif of RF2 recognize U1 and A2 of the stop codon, respectively. A3 is unstacked from the first 2 bases, contacting Thr-216 and Val-203 of RF2 and stacking on G530 of 16S rRNA. The structure of the RF2 complex supports our previous proposal that conformational changes in the ribosome in response to recognition of the stop codon stabilize rearrangement of the switch loop of the release factor, resulting in docking of the universally conserved GGQ motif in the PTC of the 50S subunit. As seen for the RF1 complex, the main-chain amide nitrogen of glutamine in the GGQ motif is positioned to contribute directly to catalysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis, consistent with mutational studies, which show that most side-chain substitutions of the conserved glutamine have little effect. We show that when the H-bonding capability of the main-chain N-H of the conserved glutamine is eliminated by substitution with proline, peptidyl-tRNA esterase activity is abolished, consistent with its proposed role in catalysis.

  15. Recognition of the amber UAG stop codon by release factor RF1

    SciTech Connect

    Korostelev, Andrei; Zhu, Jianyu; Asahara, Haruichi; Noller, Harry F.

    2010-08-23

    We report the crystal structure of a termination complex containing release factor RF1 bound to the 70S ribosome in response to an amber (UAG) codon at 3.6-{angstrom} resolution. The amber codon is recognized in the 30S subunit-decoding centre directly by conserved elements of domain 2 of RF1, including T186 of the PVT motif. Together with earlier structures, the mechanisms of recognition of all three stop codons by release factors RF1 and RF2 can now be described. Our structure confirms that the backbone amide of Q230 of the universally conserved GGQ motif is positioned to contribute directly to the catalysis of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis reaction through stabilization of the leaving group and/or transition state. We also observe synthetic-negative interactions between mutations in the switch loop of RF1 and in helix 69 of 23S rRNA, revealing that these structural features interact functionally in the termination process. These findings are consistent with our proposal that structural rearrangements of RF1 and RF2 are critical to accurate translation termination.

  16. New insights into the role of histamine in subventricular zone-olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Eiriz, Maria F.; Valero, Jorge; Malva, João O.; Bernardino, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life. Many brain diseases stimulate NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and homing of these newborns cells into damaged regions. However, complete cell replacement has never been fully achieved. Hence, the identification of proneurogenic factors crucial for stem cell-based therapies will have an impact in brain repair. Histamine, a neurotransmitter and immune mediator, has been recently described to modulate proliferation and commitment of NSCs. Histamine levels are increased in the brain parenchyma and at the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) upon inflammation and brain injury, thus being able to modulate neurogenesis. Herein, we add new data showing that in vivo administration of histamine in the lateral ventricles has a potent proneurogenic effect, increasing the production of new neuroblasts in the SVZ that ultimately reach the olfactory bulb (OB). This report emphasizes the multidimensional effects of histamine in the modulation of NSCs dynamics and sheds light into the promising therapeutic role of histamine for brain regenerative medicine. PMID:24982610

  17. Mast cell release of superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dileepan, K.N.; Simpson, K.M.; Stechschulte, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of rat serosal mast cells (MC) to release superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) upon activation by immunologic and nonimmunologic stimuli was investigated. Purified MC (90-95%) were either sensitized with monoclonal IgE reactive against dinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) and challenged with DNP-BSA, or naive MC were treated with compound 48/80 or ionophore A23187. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was measured by O/sub 2//sup -/ dismutase (SOD)-sensitive reduction of cytochrome C and MC activation was assessed by the release of histamine or (/sup 14/C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT). The results reveal that activation of MC by 48/80 or immunologic challenge does not release O/sub 2//sup -/, although these stimuli induce substantial release of histamine and 5HT (40-70%). In contrast, A23187 released O/sub 2//sup -/ (3-6 nMols/10/sup 6/ MC) and histamine (40-80%). In mixed cell preparations containing MC and macrophages (M0), activation of MC with 48/80 resulted in inhibition of M0 O/sub 2//sup -/ release. The MC-mediated inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ production was not due to histamine or 5HT, but was due to MC-granule SOD. MC contain abundant quantities of SOD and, therefore, release O/sub 2//sup -/ only when its production exceeds the intracellular SOD threshold following activation with selective stimuli. In addition, the apparent differences in the mode and site of action of various stimuli on MC may contribute to the discriminative release of O/sub 2//sup -/.

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is released from pituitary folliculo-stellate-like cells by endotoxin and dexamethasone and attenuates the steroid-induced inhibition of interleukin 6 release.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Tanya; Patel, Reshma; Stead, Caroline A S; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Buckingham, Julia C

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine produced by peripheral immune cells and also by endocrine cells in the anterior pituitary gland. MIF exerts its proinflammatory actions in the host-defense system by blocking the inhibitory effects of glucocorticoids on the release of other proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-6, TNFalpha). Reports that pituitary folliculo-stellate (FS) cells share many characteristics with immune cells led us to propose that these cells may serve as an additional source of MIF in the pituitary and that pituitary-derived MIF may act in an autocrine or paracrine manner to modulate endotoxin-induced cytokine release from FS cells. In the present study we addressed this hypothesis by using 1) immunohistochemistry to localize MIF in primary pituitary tissue and 2) well-characterized FS (TtT/GF), corticotroph (AtT20), and macrophage/monocyte (RAW 264.7) cell lines to explore the effects of CRH, endotoxin, and dexamethasone on MIF release and to examine the effects of MIF on IL-6 release. Our immunohistochemical study showed that MIF is expressed in abundance in S100-positive FS cells and also in other pituitary cell types. All three cell lines expressed MIF protein and responded to endotoxin (10-1000 ng/ml, 24 h) and dexamethasone (100 pM to 10 nM, 24 h) with concentration-dependent increases in MIF release. CRH (10-100 nM) also stimulated MIF release from AtT20 cells but, unlike endotoxin and dexamethasone, it had no effect on MIF release from TtT/GF or RAW cells. Recombinant MIF did not affect the basal release of IL-6 from TtT/GF cells; however, it effectively reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone (1 nM) on the endotoxin-induced release of IL-6 from these cells. The results suggest that the FS cells are both a source of and a target for MIF and raise the possibility that MIF serves as a paracrine/autocrine factor in the pituitary gland that contributes to the protective neuroendocrine response

  19. Effects of malathion metabolites on degranulation of and mediator release by human and rat basophilic cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, S; Rodgers, K

    1997-06-06

    In the present study, the effects of malathion and malathion derivatives on histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release by RBL-1 cells, rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), and human peripheral blood basophils (HPBB) and cutaneous mast calls were examined. One hour of incubation of RBL-1 cells with all organophosphate compounds tested, except for malathion and malathion monoacid, led to an increase in histamine release. beta-Hexosaminidase, an enzyme released by basophilic cells and a biochemical marker of degranulation, was not released from RBL-1 cells after 1 h of exposure to organophosphate compounds. Within 4 h, all compounds tested increased the release of histamine and beta-hexosaminidase. Longer exposures led to a decrease in the concentration of the compound that was required to cause mediator release. Exposure of RPMC to organophosphate compounds, with the exception of malathion monoacid and malathion (30 min) or malathion monoacid (1 h), led to the release of histamine, but not beta-hexosaminidase. Incubation of HPBB with malaoxon (51.4 +/- 2.8% total histamine released), malathion diacid (25.7 +/- 2.9%), beta-malathion monoacid (31.4 +/- 2.8%), and isomalathion (57.1 +/- 17.1%) for 1 h led to the release of histamine. Only malaoxon and isomalathion caused beta-hexosaminidase release from HPBB after a 1-h incubation. Incubation of cutaneous mast cells with malaoxon and beta-monoacid for 4 h led to increased release of histamine and beta-hexosaminidase at levels comparable to compound 48/80. These data suggest that malathion metabolites can cause rapid release of histamine from basophilic cells from a variety of origins and species. With prolonged incubation, malathion itself caused the release of mast-cell mediators, suggesting that the cells may be capable of metabolizing malathion. These data also indicate a disparity between the release kinetics of two different mast-cell mediators contained in granules by organophosphates, and that there are different

  20. High antagonist potency of GT-2227 and GT-2331, new histamine H3 receptor antagonists, in two functional models.

    PubMed

    Tedford, C E; Hoffmann, M; Seyedi, N; Maruyama, R; Levi, R; Yates, S L; Ali, S M; Phillips, J G

    1998-06-26

    GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and GT-2331 ((1R,2R)-4-(2-(5,5-dimethylhex-1-ynyl)cyclopropyl)imidazole) were developed as new potent histamine H3 receptor antagonists. The functional activity of these ligands on the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of neurogenic contraction of the guinea-pig jejunum and histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of norepinephrine release from guinea-pig heart synaptosomes were investigated. GT-2227 and GT-2331 both antagonized the inhibitory effects of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the contraction induced by electrical field stimulation in the guinea-pig jejunum with pA2 values of 7.9+/-0.1 and 8.5+/-0.03, respectively. In addition, GT-2227 and GT-2331 antagonized the inhibition of norepinephrine release in cardiac synaptosomes by GT-2203 ((1R,2R)-trans-2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopropylamine), a histamine H3 receptor agonist. The current results demonstrate the antagonist activity for both GT-2227 and GT-2331 in two functional assays for histamine H3 receptors.

  1. Structure of the human histamine H3 receptor gene (HRH3) and identification of naturally occurring variations.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, P; Bönisch, H; Oerters, F; Brüss, M

    2002-04-01

    Neurotransmitter release is modulated by presynaptic histamine H(3) receptors located on histaminergic, noradrenergic and other nonhistaminergic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we report the determination of the structure of the human histamine H(3) receptor gene (HRH3) and the identification of a missense mutation (Ala280Val) in a patient with Shy-Drager syndrome. The coding region of the gene consists of three exons interrupted by two introns of approximately 1 kb in size. Exon boundaries only partly correspond to transmembrane domain organization. The homozygous Ala280Val variation in the third intracellular loop of the histamine H(3) receptor of a patient with Shy-Drager syndrome may be related to the etiology of the illness due to altered norepinephrine release. Furthermore, knowledge of the gene structure allows the verification of alternative splicing of the receptor. The corresponding histamine H(3) receptor isoforms as reported for the guinea pig and rat histamine H(3) receptor in different brain regions are not found in the human brain.

  2. In vitro characterization of hepatocyte growth factor release from PHBV/PLGA microsphere scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin Hao; Wang, Chi-Hwa; Tong, Yen Wah

    2009-05-01

    Polymer scaffolds which can support cells to grow as well as deliver growth factors to the cells simultaneously have great potential for the successful regeneration of failed tissues. As popularly used vehicles to deliver anti-cancer drugs and growth factors, microspheres also show many advantages as substrates to guide the growth of cells. Therefore, we aimed to examine the feasibility of using microspheres as ideal scaffolds for liver tissue engineering. To determine the capabilities of previously used microsphere scaffold to deliver growth factors simultaneously, this work investigated a long-term (about three months) release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from microsphere scaffolds fabricated by using two different polymers, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV, 8% PHV), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA, 5050) and a blend of PLGA and PHBV. BSA served as a model for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) since both proteins have similar molecular weights and hydrophilicity. Furthermore, HGF was encapsulated into the PLGA/PHBV composite microsphere with a core-shell structure, and sustained delivery of HGF with maintained bioactivity was achieved for at least 40 days. The moderate degradation rate (about 55% loss of the initial mass) and well-preserved structure after three months of incubation indicated that the PLGA/PHBV composite microspheres would therefore be more suitable than the pure PHBV or PLGA microspheres as a scaffold for engineering liver tissue.

  3. Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) regulates adipocyte differentiation and determines adipose tissue expandability

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Diaz, Sergio; Johnson, Lance A.; DeKroon, Robert M.; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose M.; Alzate, Oscar; Fernandez-Real, Jose M.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Arbones-Mainar, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired adipogenesis renders an adipose tissue unable to expand, leading to lipotoxicity and conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While factors important for adipogenesis have been studied extensively, those that set the limits of adipose tissue expansion remain undetermined. Feeding a Western-type diet to apolipoprotein E2 knock-in mice, a model of metabolic syndrome, produced 3 groups of equally obese mice: mice with normal glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemic yet glucose-tolerant mice, and prediabetic mice with impaired glucose tolerance and reduced circulating insulin. Using proteomics, we compared subcutaneous adipose tissues from mice in these groups and found that the expression of PTRF (polymerase I and transcript release factor) associated selectively with their glucose tolerance status. Lentiviral and pharmacologically overexpressed PTRF, whose function is critical for caveola formation, compromised adipocyte differentiation of cultured 3T3-L1cells. In human adipose tissue, PTRF mRNA levels positively correlated with markers of lipolysis and cellular senescence. Furthermore, a negative relationship between telomere length and PTRF mRNA levels was observed in human subcutaneous fat. PTRF is associated with limited adipose tissue expansion underpinning the key role of caveolae in adipocyte regulation. Furthermore, PTRF may be a suitable adipocyte marker for predicting pathological obesity and inform clinical management.—Perez-Diaz, S., Johnson, L. A., DeKroon, R. M., Moreno-Navarrete, J. M., Alzate, O., Fernandez-Real, J. M., Maeda, N., Arbones-Mainar, J. M. Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) regulates adipocyte differentiation and determines adipose tissue expandability. PMID:24812087

  4. Insulin antagonizes the phagocytosis stimulating action of histamine in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1992-02-01

    Histamine increased specifically the phagocytic activity of the unicellular Tetrahymena, whereas insulin had no influence on it. Insulin antagonized the phagocytosis stimulating action of histamine after simultaneous exposure and after preexposure two days earlier as well, although in the latter case to a lesser degree. Double exposure to a combination of histamine+insulin didn't influence the phagocytic activity at all, demonstrating the histamine antagonizing effect of insulin in this model.

  5. Promoted growth of murine hair follicles through controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether or not the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is effective in promoting the hair follicle growth of mice in second anagen of hair cycle. VEGF was incorporated into a biodegradable collagen hydrogel for its controlled release. Following implantation of the collagen hydrogel incorporating 0 or 2 microg of VEGF and injection of 0 or 2 microg of VEGF in the solution form into the back subcutis of mice, the hair follicle growth was evaluated photometrically and histologically in terms of the skin color of reverse side of the implanted or injected site, the skin thickness, and the area occupied by hair follicle tissue. Ten days later, the skin color of mice implanted with the collagen hydrogel incorporating 2 microg of VEGF was significantly darker than that injected with 2 pg of VEGF. The collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF increased the hair follicle area at the implanted site to a significantly greater extent than other agents while significant angiogenetic effect in the skin tissue was observed. VEGF-free, empty collagen hydrogels did not affect the skin darkness, hair follicle growth, and the angiogenesis. Moreover, the hair shaft length was significantly elongated by the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF, in marked contrast to other agents. Immunohistolchemicalstaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF promoted the proliferation of cells around the hair follicle more frequently than free VEGF. We concluded that the controlled release of VEGF more positively acted on the hair growth cycle of mice for hair growth than the injection of free VEGF.

  6. Corticotropin-releasing factor family peptide signaling in feline bladder urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Roppolo, James R; Buffington, Tony C A; Birder, Lori A

    2014-07-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a central role in the orchestration of behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress. The family of CRF-related peptides (CRF and paralogs: urocortin (Ucn)-I, -II, and -III) and associated receptors (CRFR1 and CRFR2) are also expressed in peripheral tissues such as the skin and gastrointestinal tract. Local signaling may exert multiple effects of stress-induced exacerbation of many complex syndromes, including psoriasis and visceral hypersensitivity. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), a chronic visceral pain syndrome characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain, is reported to be exacerbated by stress. Functional changes in the epithelial lining of the bladder, a vital blood-urine barrier called the urothelium, may play a role in IC/PBS. This study investigated the expression and functional activity of CRF-related peptides in the urothelium of normal cats and cats with feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), a chronic idiopathic cystitis exhibiting similarities to humans diagnosed with IC/PBS. Western blots analysis showed urothelial (UT) expression of CRFR1 and CRFR2. Enzyme immunoassay revealed release of endogenous ligands (CRF and Ucn) by UT cells in culture. Evidence of functional activation of CRFR1 and CRFR2 by receptor-selective agonists (CRF and UCN3 respectively) was shown by i) the measurement of ATP release using the luciferin-luciferase assay and ii) the use of membrane-impermeant fluorescent dyes (FM dyes) for fluorescence microscopy to assess membrane exocytotic responses in real time. Our findings show evidence of CRF-related peptide signaling in the urothelium. Differences in functional responses between FIC and normal UT indicate that this system is altered in IC/PBS.

  7. Clonidine stimulates atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) release in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, B; Tremblay, J; Gutkowska, J

    1988-01-01

    To determine the effect of clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, on atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) release during water deprivation, plasma immunoreactive ANF (IR-ANF) arginine vasopressin, diuresis and natriuresis were measured in rats which had been deprived of water for 24 and 48 hr after intravenous (IV) administration of 50 micrograms clonidine. In normally-hydrated rats clonidine produced a marked elevation of plasma IR-ANF from 40.5 +/- 4.6 pg/ml to 1064 +/- 22 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) and sodium excretion from 73.3 +/- 6.8 microEq to 723.4 +/- 62.3 microEq. Clonidine evoked an increase in plasma IR-ANF from 16.6 +/- 5.9 pg/ml to 229.5 +/- 60 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) after 24 hr water deprivation and from 13.6 +/- 7.4 pg/ml to 104.8 +/- 21 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) after 48 hr water deprivation. Clonidine did not induce any significant changes in vasopressin levels. During 24 hr and 48 hr water deprivation vasopressin rose from 3.1 +/- 0.3 pg/ml to 7.3 +/- 1.3 pg/ml and 8.4 +/- 0.6 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM), respectively. In normally-hydrated rats clonidine produced a marked diuresis and natriuresis. These effects and urinary cGMP excretion were significantly inhibited by anti-ANF antibodies. Clonidine caused a significant increase in urine output in 24 hr water-deprived rats but the response was markedly lower than that seen in normally-hydrated rats. In conclusion, clonidine stimulates ANF release both in normally-hydrated and water-deprived rats. The diuretic effect of clonidine appears to be related to ANF release but not to inhibition of vasopressin.

  8. Hemoglobin stimulates mononuclear leukocytes to release interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    McFaul, S J; Bowman, P D; Villa, V M; Gutierrez-Ibanez, M J; Johnson, M; Smith, D

    1994-11-01

    Incubation of human mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) with human stroma-free hemolysate (SFH), purified adult hemoglobin Ao (HbAo), and oxidized HbAo (METHb) caused MNL to release compounds into the supernate that mediated neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) chemotaxis and PMN adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Chemotaxis and PMN adherence to HUVEC were reduced significantly when supernates were preincubated with neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), respectively, suggesting that IL-8 and TNF-alpha played significant roles in mediating these activities. Greatest chemotactic activity was observed in supernates of MNL treated with HbAo; while greatest PMN/endothelial cell (EC) adherence activity was observed in supernates of MNL treated with METHb. Furthermore, PMN/EC adherence activity was a function of METHb content in each hemoglobin solution. PMN chemotaxis, PMN adherence to HUVEC, and cytokine release increased as a function of increasing incubation time. Chemotactic activity was detected in HbAo-treated and METHb-treated MNL supernates after incubation for 6 hours and was maximal by 10 hours. IL-8 was detected in both HbAo and METHb-MNL supernates by 4 hours. PMN/EC adherence activity was detected in HbAo-MNL supernates at 10 hours and in METHb-MNL supernates at 4 hours. TNF-alpha was detected in METHb and HbAo-MNL supernates at 4 and 12 hours, respectively. These results suggest that hemoglobin solutions stimulate MNL to release IL-8 and TNF-alpha in quantities sufficient to induce PMN chemotaxis and PMN adherence to HUVEC. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  9. Mesocosm experiments to assess factors affecting phosphorus retention and release in an extended Wisconsin wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, J.F.; Manion, B.J.; Goddard, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphorus retention by wetland sediments and vegetation was investigated in Jackson Creek wetland, an extension of an existing prairie marsh in southeastern Wisconsin. The extended wetland construction was undertaken in 1992-93 to help reduce the phosphorus loading to a downstream eutrophic lake. Two approaches were used to study potential and actual phosphorus retention in the system. Mesocosm experiments of 20-40 days duration indicated that retention of total and dissolved reactive phosphorus in mesocosm cells containing macrophytes and/or sediments was reduced by factors of 2-20 relative to cells containing only water or a copper algicide to suppress metabolic activity. In contrast to the nutrient trapping function, these results show a potential for net phosphorus release that can be associated with increased biological richness. Measurements of water flow and nutrient loads at the wetland's inflow and outflow points demonstrated 9-39% net uptake of phosphorus on an annual scale but frequent occurrences of net phosphorus release over shorter (one-month) time scales. These episodes of release are most likely during the summer months. Thus, the wetland role in phosphorus cycling is not one of a true source or sink, although the annual budget data alone suggest substantial net retention. Effective management of the wetland for its nutrient trapping potential can be hindered by this oversimplification. The system is instead subject to relatively short-term alternation between net import and export. The periodic phosphorus export, although representing a small fraction of net annual import, could be critical for growth of macrophyte and algal communities downstream.

  10. Control of Histamine-Producing Bacteria and Histamine Formation in Fish Muscle by Trisodium Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Green, David P; Bolton, Greg E; McClellan-Green, Patricia D

    2015-06-01

    Scombrotoxin fish poisoning remains the primary cause of seafood poisoning outbreaks despite preventive guidelines. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of pH for the control of growth and histamine formation by histamine-producing bacteria in fish muscle. We examined pH effects on growth and histamine formation in tuna fish infusion broth and in inoculated tuna and mahi-mahi fish muscle. Histamine production was significantly less for all bacterial strains at pH 8.5 compared to pH 5.5 in tuna fish infusion broth with no significant difference in growth. Elevated pH due to phosphate treatment of fish muscle tissues significantly reduced histamine formation with no effect on the growth of histamine-producing bacteria. This study revealed that phosphate treatment of mahi-mahi and tuna fish muscle resulted in significantly lower histamine production over 4 d of storage at 10 °C. Phosphate treatment of fish muscle may serve as a secondary barrier in addition to FDA recommended time and temperature controls for reducing public health concerns of scombrotoxin fish poisoning.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Histamine-Producing Morganella psychrotolerans Strains

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Maria Sanchez; Benner, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-producing bacteria are responsible for scombrotoxin (histamine) fish poisoning, a leading cause of fish poisoning in the United States. We report here the first draft genomes of three histamine-producing Morganella psychrotolerans strains, isolated from tuna and mahi-mahi. PMID:27635011

  12. Beyond static and dynamic risk factors: the incremental validity of release planning for predicting sex offender recidivism.

    PubMed

    Scoones, Carwyn D; Willis, Gwenda M; Grace, Randolph C

    2012-01-01

    Both desistance research and strengths-based approaches to offender rehabilitation suggest that attempts to reduce sex offender recidivism should attend to an offender's release environment. Recent research has demonstrated that better quality release planning is associated with reduced recidivism; however, whether release planning contributes significant incremental validity in predicting recidivism over and above static and dynamic risk factors is unclear. In the present study, release planning was retrospectively assessed for a sample of child molesters (n = 196) who had been released into the community following completion of a prison-based treatment program and its relative contribution to recidivism risk prediction was investigated. The average follow-up period was 11.08 years, during which 13.3% of the sample were convicted of a new sexual offence. Hierarchical Cox regression analyses showed that release planning contributed additional predictive validity for sexual recidivism after controlling for static and dynamic risk factors. Findings suggest that assessment of release planning might improve accuracy of sex offender risk assessments and that improved release planning should contribute to reductions in recidivism.

  13. In situ injury-induced release of basic-fibroblast growth factor from corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Adamis, A. P.; Meklir, B.; Joyce, N. C.

    1991-01-01

    Basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycan in Bowman's layer of the cornea. The mechanism by which the molecule is deposited in Bowman's layer is the subject of controversy since b-FGF lacks a signal peptide sequence for extracellular secretion. Using immunofluorescence, the authors studied the presence and distribution of b-FGF in the bovine cornea and the conditions under which it could be released and bound to Bowman's layer. The results indicate that corneal epithelium contains b-FGF but that uninjured corneas do not contain detectable levels of b-FGF in Bowman's layer. Injury to the corneal epithelium results in the binding of b-FGF to Bowman's layer. Removal of the intact corneal epithelium without cell injury does not result in the binding of b-FGF to Bowman's layer. These findings suggest that one mechanism for the release of b-FGF from corneal epithelial cells is passive leakage after cell injury with secondary binding to Bowman's layer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1951634

  14. Vasopressin responses to corticotropin-releasing factor and hypertonicity after truncal vagotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Raff, H; Papanek, P E; Cowles, V E

    1996-01-01

    Infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) augments the plasma vasopressin response to infusion of hypertonic saline in conscious dogs. Furthermore, afferent vagal nerve input from the abdomen is involved in the control of vasopressin release and may be altered by CRF. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effect of CRF on the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline and to determine if it is mediated by afferent input carried from the abdominal vagus. Conscious male dogs (n = 5) underwent infusion of isotonic saline (vehicle), CRF (10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1), hypertonic saline (0.2 mmol.kg-1.min-1), or the combination of CRF and hypertonic saline. Hypertonic saline increased plasma sodium from 147 +/- 1 to 153 +/- 1 meq/1 and plasma vasopressin from 2.5 +/- 0.1 to 5.8 +/- 0.4 pg/ml. CRF infusion alone had no effect on plasma vasopressin. The addition of 10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1 CRF augmented the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline to 7.7 +/- 1.7 and 6.9 +/- 0.3 pg/ml, respectively. Truncal vagotomy did not attenuate the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline with or without CRF infusion. We conclude that CRF augments the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline and that this effect is not mediated via afferents from the abdominal vagus.

  15. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  16. A pre-formed Pyrogenic Factor Released by Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zampronio, A. R.; Melo, M. C. C.; Silva, C. A. A.; Pelá, I. R.; Hopkins, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pyrogenic activity of factor(s) released by rat peritoneal macrophages following a brief stimulation with LPS. The effect of this factor on the number of circulating leukocytes and serum Fe, Cu and Zn levels, was also evaluated. The possibility that the content of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in the supernatant could explain the observations was investigated. Supernatant produced over a period of 1 h by peritoneal macrophages, following a 30 min incubation with LPS at 37°C, was ultrafiltered through a 10 000 MW cut-off Amicon membrane, sterilized, and concentrated 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 times. The intravenous (i.v.) injection of this supernatant induced a concentration-dependent fever in rats with a maximal response at 2 h. The pyrogenic activity was produced by macrophages elicited with thioglycollate and by resident cells. The supernatants also induced neutrophilia and reduction in Fe and Zn 6 h after the injection. Absence of activity in boiled supernatants, or supernatants from macrophages incubated at 4°C with LPS, indicates that LPS was not responsible for the activity. In vitro treatment with indomethacin (Indo), dexamethasone (Dex), or cycloheximide (Chx) did not modify the release of pyrogenic activity into the supernatant or its effects on the reduction in serum metal levels. Although Chx abolished the production of mediator(s) inducing neutrophilia, and Dex reduced the induction of IL-1β, TNF and IL-6, injection of the highest concentration of these cytokines detected in the supernatants did not induce fever. In vivo treatment with Dex, but not Indo, abolished the fever induced by the supernatant. These results suggest that macrophages contain pre-formed pyrogenic mediator(s), not related to IL-1β, IL-6 or TNF, that acts indirectly and independently of prostaglandtn. It also seems likely that the pyrogenic activity is related to the factor responsible for the reduction of serum Fe

  17. Extracellular Ca(2+) entry and mobilization of inositol trisphosphate-dependent Ca(2+) stores modulate histamine and electrical field stimulation induced contractions of the guinea-pig prostate.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michelle; Kerr, Karen; Ventura, Sabatino; Exintaris, Betty

    2011-09-01

    This investigation aimed to examine the source of Ca(2+) mobilization that leads to the contractile response to either exogenously added histamine (1 μM-1mM) or electrical field stimulation (10Hz, 0.5ms, 60V). Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) by removal of Ca(2+) from the bathing medium reduced histamine (1mM) induced responses by 34% and responses induced by electrical field stimulation by 94%. Similarly, blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels by nifedipine (1 μM) reduced histamine (1mM) induced responses by 43% and responses induced by electrical field stimulation by 77%. Application of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) (10 μM) to inhibit Ca(2+) reuptake to the sarcoplasmic reticulum enhanced both histamine-induced and electrical field stimulation induced responses to a small degree, while the addition of the inosotol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonist, 2-aminophenoxyethane borane (2-APB) (100 μM) inhibited histamine induced responses by 70% and electrical field stimulation induced responses by 57%. Ryanodine (1 μM) did not affect contractile responses to either histamine or electrical field stimulation, either in the absence or presence of 2-APB (100 μM). During both histamine and electrical field stimulation induced contractions, prostate smooth muscle generates IP(3) receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in conjunction with Ca(2+) entry from the extracellular environment. Ryanodine receptors on the other hand, appear not to play a role in this physiological mechanism.

  18. Histamine promotes the expression of receptors TLR2 and TLR4 and amplifies sensitivity to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid treatment in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Cruz-Arrieta, Sandra; Villeda-Navarro, Mónica; Méndez-Mejía, José Antonio

    2011-10-01

    The vasoactive hydrophilic amine histamine is the most important molecule released by mast cells. However, histamine's role in activating intracellular responses in HGFs (human gingival fibroblasts) has not been evaluated to date. In the present study, we investigated the effect of histamine and of Gram-negative [LPS (lipopolysaccharide)] and Gram-positive [LTA (lipoteichoic acid)] bacterial components on the modulation of the inflammatory response of HGFs. We incubated HGFs with histamine to determine whether this hydrophilic amine regulates overexpression of TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2) and TLR4, which recognize LTA and LPS respectively. Our experiments demonstrated that histamine increases transcription and translation of TLR2 and TLR4. Incubation with LTA or LPS in the presence of histamine markedly increased expression of COX2 (cyclo-oxygenase 2) and synthesis of prostaglandin E2. These results suggest that histamine plays an important role in modulating the innate immune response, and likewise, that LTA and LPS regulate the adaptive immune response. The present study provides information about the regulation and expression of molecules that promote chronic inflammatory processes leading to the emergence of periodontitis and the consequent loss of the dental organ.

  19. Cognitive Disruptions in Stress-Related Psychiatric Disorders: A Role for Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF)

    PubMed Central

    Bangasser, Debra A.; Kawasumi, Yushi

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a potential etiology contributor to both post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and major depression. One stress-related neuropeptide that is hypersecreted in these disorders is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Dysregulation of CRF has long been linked to the emotion and mood symptoms that characterize PTSD and depression. However, the idea that CRF also mediates the cognitive disruptions observed in patients with these disorders has received less attention. Here we review literature indicating that CRF can alter cognitive functions. Detailed are anatomical studies revealing that CRF is poised to modulate regions required for learning and memory. We also describe preclinical behavioral studies that demonstrate CRF’s ability to alter fear conditioning, impair memory consolidation, and alter a number of executive functions, including attention and cognitive flexibility. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of the cognitive impairments observed in stress-related psychiatric disorders are described. PMID:25888454

  20. Applications of human factors engineering to LNG release prevention and control

    SciTech Connect

    Shikiar, R.; Rankin, W.L.; Rideout, T.B.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an investigation of human factors engineering and human reliability applications to LNG release prevention and control are reported. The report includes a discussion of possible human error contributions to previous LNG accidents and incidents, and a discussion of generic HF considerations for peakshaving plants. More specific recommendations for improving HF practices at peakshaving plants are offered based on visits to six facilities. The HF aspects of the recently promulgated DOT regulations are reviewed, and recommendations are made concerning how these regulations can be implemented utilizing standard HF practices. Finally, the integration of HF considerations into overall system safety is illustrated by a presentation of human error probabilities applicable to LNG operations and by an expanded fault tree analysis which explicitly recognizes man-machine interfaces.

  1. Emerging role of polymerase-1 and transcript release factor (PTRF/ Cavin-1) in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Low, Jin-Yih; Nicholson, Helen D

    2014-09-01

    Polymerase-1 and release transcript factor (PTRF) was initially reported to be involved in the termination of the transcription process. More recently, it has been implicated in the formation of caveolae, cave-like structures in the plasma membrane. The effects of PTRF related to caveolae suggest that this protein may play important roles in health and disease. PTRF is highly expressed in various cells, including adipocytes, osteoblasts and muscle (cardiac, skeletal and smooth) cells. The role of PTRF in prostate cancer has been recently reviewed but there is growing evidence that PTRF is involved in other physiological processes such as cell repair and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism and, furthermore, altered expression of PTRF may be associated with disease. This review discusses the emerging role of PTRF in health and disease.

  2. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R.; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H.; Madrid, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1G93A) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PCNa), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1G93A. These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1G93A on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  3. Stress, sex, and addiction: potential roles of corticotropin-releasing factor, oxytocin, and arginine-vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Bisagno, Verónica; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2014-09-01

    Stress sensitivity and sex are predictive factors for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Life stresses are not only risk factors for the development of addiction but also are triggers for relapse to drug use. Therefore, it is imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between stress and drug abuse, as an understanding of this may help in the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches to block the clinical manifestations of drug addiction. The development and clinical course of addiction-related disorders do appear to involve neuroadaptations within neurocircuitries that modulate stress responses and are influenced by several neuropeptides. These include corticotropin-releasing factor, the prototypic member of this class, as well as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin that play important roles in affiliative behaviors. Interestingly, these peptides function to balance emotional behavior, with sexual dimorphism in the oxytocin/arginine-vasopressin systems, a fact that might play an important role in the differential responses of women and men to stressful stimuli and the specific sex-based prevalence of certain addictive disorders. Thus, this review aims to summarize (i) the contribution of sex differences to the function of dopamine systems, and (ii) the behavioral, neurochemical, and anatomical changes in brain stress systems.

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor neurogenesis during midlife development in salmon: genetic, environmental and thyroid hormone regulation.

    PubMed

    Ebbesson, L O E; Nilsen, T O; Helvik, J V; Tronci, V; Stefansson, S O

    2011-08-01

    Salmon parr-smolt transformation (smoltification) is a mid-life transitional stage between life in freshwater and seawater that entails a wide range of neural, endocrine and physiological modifications. In salmon, the neuroendocrine corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system regulates pituitary adrenocorticotrophic hormone and thyrotrophin release. Four experimental groups of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, were used to investigated CRF neurogenesis and its regulation during smoltification. We compared: (i) developmental stages (parr and early-smolt) in anadromous controls; (ii) a developmentally arrested model: anadromous reared under continuous light (LL) with anadromous controls; (iii) a natural hypoendocrine/incomplete smolt development salmon model (landlocked) with anadromous controls; and (iv) landlocked treated with thyroxine to anadromous control smolt levels. CRF neurogenesis between groups was studied with bromodeoxyuradine (BrdU) incorporation followed by double-labelling CRF and BrdU immunhistochemistry. The rate of CRF neurogenesis in the preoptic area (POA) increased from parr to early-smolts in anadromous salmon. By contrast, neurogenesis was inhibited in the LL group and reduced in the landlocked salmon. The administration of thyroxine in landlocked salmon to match anadromous levels increased the rate of CRF neurogenesis to anadromous levels. In conclusion, newly-formed CRF cells in the POA during smoltification are associated with increased retinal innervation to the POA and endocrine responsiveness to increased photoperiod. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the degree of salmon brain development. Thyroid hormones increase CRF neurogenesis during this critical period of development in salmon. We hypothesise that a positive-feedback of thyroid hormones on CRF neurogenesis may be an important event in reaching the developmental climax during critical periods.

  5. Prostaglandins inhibit secretion of histamine and pancreastatin from isolated rat stomach ECL cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Erik; Håkanson, Rolf

    1998-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of naturally occurring prostanoids and prostaglandin (PG) congeners on gastrin- and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP)-evoked histamine and pancreastatin secretion from isolated rat stomach ECL cells. ECL cells (75–85% purity) were isolated from rat stomach using pronase digestion followed by repeated counter-flow elutriation and cultured for 48 h before secretion experiments. The release of histamine and pancreastatin was determined by radioimmunoassay. None of the PGs tested stimulated the release of either histamine or pancreastatin. PGE1 and PGE2 inhibited both gastrin- and PACAP-evoked histamine and pancreastatin secretion (IC50=1–2×10−10 M). Most other naturally occuring prostanoids and PG congeners had no or little inhibitory effect. The PGE analogues misoprostol and sulprostone were more potent (IC50=0.9×10−11 M and 2×10−11 M respectively) than PGE1 and PGE2. The rank order of potency was misoprostol>sulprostone>PGE1=PGE2, suggesting the involvement of the so-called EP3 receptor. The effects of PGs on the stomach ECL cells may be direct or indirect, for instance through the stimulated release of somatostatin from contaminating D cells (2–3%). However, the amount of somatostatin in the cell culture after 48 h was below the limit of detection, and somatostatin immunoneutralization did not prevent misoprostol from inhibiting secretion from the ECL cells. The misoprostol-induced inhibition was reversed by pertussis toxin suggesting the involvement of G-protein subunits Gα0 and/or Gαi. In view of the potency by which PGE1, PGE2, misoprostol and sulprostone inhibited the stimulated release of histamine and pancreastatin, we suggest that the ECL cells represent a primary target for prostaglandins acting via an EP3 receptor in the oxyntic mucosa. The results suggest that the clinically useful effect of misoprostol as an anti-ulcer drug reflects its ability to inhibit stomach ECL

  6. Direct effects of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and GH-releasing factor (GRF) on GH secretion from cultured porcine somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hormigo, A; Castaño, J P; Torronteras, R; Malagón, M M; Ramírez, J L; Gracia-Navarro, F

    1998-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) belongs to the expanding family of synthetic GH secretagogues (GHSs). Previous studies have shown that non-peptidyl GHRP-6 analogues stimulate GH release in vivo in pigs, and interact synergistically with GH-releasing factor (GRF), but its direct effects on porcine somatotropes have not been addressed hitherto. In the present study, we have evaluated the response of cultured porcine pituitary cells to GHRP-6, and its interaction with GRF and somatostatin (SRIF). Secretory response of somatotropes was assessed by using two distinct techniques. GH released by monolayer cell cultures was evaluated by enzyme immunoassay, whereas that secreted by individual somatotropes was measured by immunodensitometry using a cell blotting assay. Our results demonstrate that both GHRP-6 and GRF stimulated GH release from monolayer cultures at doses equal to or above 10(-9) M. Use of cell immunoblot assay demonstrated that, like GRF, the hexapeptide acts directly upon porcine somatotropes to exert its action. Moreover, regardless of the technique applied, combined administration of GHRP-6 (10(-6) or 10(-9) M) and GRF (10(-8) M) resulted in an additive, but not synergistic, stimulatory GH response. Finally, SRIF (10(-7) M) inhibited the stimulatory effect of GHRP-6 alone or in combination with GRF. These results indicate that GHRP-6 directly and effectively stimulates GH secretion from porcine somatotropes in vitro, and acts additively when coadministered with GRF. Therefore, the synergistic stimulatory effect of GHSs and GRF reported in vivo in this species might require additional factors that are lacking in the in vitro situation.

  7. Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

  8. The portal-drained viscera release fibroblast growth factor 19 in humans.

    PubMed

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Bloemen, Johanne G; Jansen, Peter L M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Schaap, Frank G; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is an ileum-derived endrocrine factor that is produced in response to transepithelial bile salt flux. FGF19 represses bile salt synthesis in the liver. Despite the general assumption that FGF19 signals to the liver via portal blood, no human data are available to support this notion. The aim was to study portal FGF19 levels, and determined bile salt and FGF19 fluxes across visceral organs in humans. Bile salt and FGF19 levels were assessed in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood collected from fasted patients who underwent partial liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (n = 30). Fluxes across the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver, and splanchnic area were calculated. Portal bile salt levels (7.8 [5.0-12.4] μmol/L) were higher than levels in arterial (2.7 [1.7-5.5] μmol/L, P < 0.0001) and hepatic venous blood (3.4 [2.5-6.5] μmol/L, P < 0.0001). Bile salts released by the PDV (+1.2 [+0.7-+2.0] mmol kg(-1) h(-1), P < 0.0001) were largely taken up by the liver (-1.0 [-1.8 to -0.4] mmol kg(-1) h(-1), P < 0.0001). Portal levels of FGF19 (161 ± 78 pg/mL) were higher than arterial levels (135 ± 65 pg/mL, P = 0.046). A net release of FGF19 by the PDV (+4.0 [+2.1 to +9.9] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P < 0.0001) was calculated. There was no significant flux of FGF19 across the liver (-0.2 [-3.7 to +7.4] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P = 0.93). In conclusion, FGF19 levels in human portal blood are higher than in arterial blood. FGF19 is released by the portal-drained viscera under fasted steady state conditions.

  9. Novel function of histamine signaling in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis: Histamine H1 receptors protect and H2 receptors accelerate atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Histamine is not only essential for acute inflammatory reactions, but it also participates in a chronic inflammatory disorder. We generated apolipoprotein E (apoE) and histamine receptors (HHRs), including the major H1 and H2 receptors (HH1R, HH2R) double knockout mice (DKO) to clarify the role of HHRs in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, in which apoE-KO and DKO mice were fed a high cholesterol diet. We found that pronounced hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerotic progression occurred in HH1R/apoE-DKO mice, but in HH2R/apoE-DKO mice less atherosclerosis, despite pro-atherogenic serum cholesterol levels compared with apoE-KO mice. Furthermore, the increased expressions of scavenger receptors (SRs), such as SR-A, CD36 and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, were consistent with the pro-atherogenic phenotype of HH2R/apoE-DKO mice. We hypothesize that histamine/HH1R and HH2R signaling has conflicting innate functions, inflammatory/atherogenic and anti-inflammatory/anti-atherogenic actions, and that there are innate links between histamine signaling and hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, independently of serum cholesterol metabolism. Specific histamine signaling blockers, in particular, HH2R blockers, are a possible novel therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis.

  10. Development of an LC-ESI-MS/MS method for the determination of histamine: application to the quantitative measurement of histamine degranulation by KU812 cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Junko; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Tode, Chisato; Shimizu, Maki; Morita, Izumi; Nobukawa, Machiko; Nobukawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Norihiro

    2009-01-15

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for the identification and quantification of histamine without a previous derivatization step or the addition of general ion-pairing reagents to the mobile phase. This method was used to measure histamine release following degranulation of KU812 human basophilic cells, using pyrazol as an internal standard. Analyses were performed on an LC system employing a Cosmosil 5C(18) PAQ column and an isocratic elution with methanol-0.005% trifluoroacetic acid (1:1) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. A triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, equipped with an electrospray ionization interface was employed, operating in the positive ion mode. The retention time of histamine and the internal standard were 4.0 and 5.0 min, respectively. The relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) of the retention time and peak area were between 0.47% and 2.03%. Micropipette tip solid-phase extraction (SPE) using LooseTip C(18) allowed for not only rapid sample preparation, but also decreased suppression effects, improving peak shape. This method was used to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of compounds contained in Taxus yunnanensis extracts. Four constituents that were isolated from the wood extracts of T. yunnanensis and sodium cromoglicate, which is used as a first line anti-allergic drug, were tested in an in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. Of these compounds, taxiresinol and isotaxiresinol were more inhibitory than sodium cromoglicate.

  11. Insulin/IGF signaling in Drosophila and other insects: factors that regulate production, release and post-release action of the insulin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nässel, Dick R; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs) are important regulators of metabolism, growth, reproduction and lifespan, and mechanisms of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) have been well conserved over evolution. In insects, between one and 38 ILPs have been identified in each species. Relatively few insect species have been investigated in depth with respect to ILP functions, and therefore we focus mainly on the well-studied fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila eight ILPs (DILP1-8), but only two receptors (dInR and Lgr3) are known. DILP2, 3 and 5 are produced by a set of neurosecretory cells (IPCs) in the brain and their biosynthesis and release are controlled by a number of mechanisms differing between larvae and adults. Adult IPCs display cell-autonomous sensing of circulating glucose, coupled to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for DILP release. The glucose-mediated DILP secretion is modulated by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, as well as by factors released from the intestine and adipocytes. Larval IPCs, however, are indirectly regulated by glucose-sensing endocrine cells producing adipokinetic hormone, or by circulating factors from the intestine and fat body. Furthermore, IIS is situated within a complex physiological regulatory network that also encompasses the lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. After release from IPCs, the ILP action can be modulated by circulating proteins that act either as protective carriers (binding proteins), or competitive inhibitors. Some of these proteins appear to have additional functions that are independent of ILPs. Taken together, the signaling with multiple ILPs is under complex control, ensuring tightly regulated IIS in the organism.

  12. Factors influencing immediate post-release survival of spectacled eiders following surgical implantation of transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexson, Matthew G.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Spriggs, Maria; Myers, Gwen E.

    2014-01-01

    Surgically implanted transmitters are a common method for tracking animal movements. Immediately following surgical implantation, animals pass through a critical recovery phase when behaviors may deviate from normal and the likelihood of individual survival may be reduced. Therefore, data collected during this period may be censored to minimize bias introduced by surgery-related behaviors or mortality. However, immediate post-release mortalities negate a sampling effort and reduce the amount of data potentially collected after the censoring period. Wildlife biologists should employ methods to support an animal’s survival through this period, but factors contributing to immediate post-release survival have not been formally assessed. We evaluated factors that potentially influenced the immediate post-release survival of 56 spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) marked with coelomically implanted satellite transmitters with percutaneous antennae in northern Alaska in 2010 and 2011. We modeled survival through the first 14 days following release and assessed the relative importance and effect of 15 covariates hypothesized to influence survival during this immediate post-release period. Estimated daily survival rate increased over the duration of the immediate post-release period; the probability of mortality was greatest within the first 5 days following release. Our top-ranking model included the effect of 2 blood analytes, pH and hematocrit, measured prior to surgical implantation of a transmitter. We found a positive response to pH; eiders exhibiting acidemia (low pH) prior to surgery were less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. We found a curvilinear response to hematocrit; eiders exhibiting extremely low or high pre-surgery hematocrit were also less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. In the interest of maximizing the survival of marked birds following release, hematological data obtained prior to surgical implantation of

  13. Endogenous central histamine-induced reversal of critical hemorrhagic hypotension in rats: studies with L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Jochem, Jerzy

    2003-10-01

    Activation of the histaminergic system is characteristic of response to the action of adverse or potentially dangerous stimuli that disturb circulatory homeostasis, such as dehydration and changes in blood pressure. Previous study demonstrates that inhibition of histamine N-methyltransferase, which catabolizes histamine released from neurons, leads to the increase in endogenous central histamine concentrations and to the reversal of critical hemorrhagic hypotension. In the present study, the influence of intraperitoneal loading with histamine precursor L-histidine on central cardiovascular regulation was studied in a model of irreversible pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock. Experiments were carried out in male Wistar rats anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine subjected to critical hemorrhagic hypotension of 20 to 25 mmHg, which resulted in the death of all control saline-treated animals within 30 min. L-histidine administered in 5 min of critical hypotension produced dose-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and heart rate (100-500 mg/kg), and a 100% survival rate of 2 h (500 mg/kg), whereas in normotensive animals, it did not influence cardiovascular parameters. The resuscitating effect of L-histidine (500 mg/kg) was associated with increases in histamine concentrations in the cerebral cortex (0.97 +/- 0.11 nmol/g of wet tissue vs. 0.67 +/- 0.22 nmol/g of wet tissue; P<0.05), hypothalamus (4.78 +/- 0.58 nmol/g of wet tissue vs. 4.08 +/- 0.43 nmol/g of wet tissue; P<0.01), and medulla oblongata (0.55 +/- 0.18 nmol/g of wet tissue vs. 0.34 +/- 0.09 nmol/g of wet tissue; P<0.05), as well as with no changes in plasma histamine concentrations in comparison with the saline-treated group 20 min after injection. Pretreatment with (S)-alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 0.5 mg intracerebroventricularly), an irreversible inhibitor of L-histidine decarboxylase, produced a decrease in central histamine concentrations and diminished volumes of blood required to

  14. Early Outgrowth Cells Release Soluble Endocrine Antifibrotic Factors That Reduce Progressive Organ Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Darren A.; Connelly, Kim A.; Zhang, Yanling; Advani, Suzanne L.; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, Golam; Kepecs, David; Spring, Christopher; Smith, Christopher; Batruch, Ihor; Kosanam, Hari; Advani, Andrew; Diamandis, Eleftherios; Marsden, Philip A.; Gilbert, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived cells can improve organ function in chronic disease models, ostensibly by the release of paracrine factors. It has, however, been difficult to reconcile this prevailing paradigm with the lack of cell retention within injured organs and their rapid migration to the reticuloendothelial system. Here, we provide evidence that the salutary antifibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived early outgrowth cells (EOCs) are more consistent with an endocrine mode of action, demonstrating not only the presence of antifibrotic factors in the plasma of EOC-treated rats but also that EOC conditioned medium (EOC-CM) potently attenuates both TGF-β- and angiotensin II-induced fibroblast collagen production in vitro. To examine the therapeutic relevance of these findings in vivo, 5/6 subtotally nephrectomized rats, a model of chronic kidney and heart failure characterized by progressive fibrosis of both organs, were randomized to receive i.v. injections of EOC-CM, unconditioned medium, or 106 EOCs. Rats that received unconditioned medium developed severe kidney injury with cardiac diastolic dysfunction. In comparison, EOC-CM-treated rats demonstrated substantially improved renal and cardiac function and structure, mimicking the changes found in EOC-treated animals. Mass spectrometric analysis of EOC-CM identified proteins that regulate cellular functions implicated in fibrosis. These results indicate that EOCs secrete soluble factor(s) with highly potent antifibrotic activity, that when injected intravenously replicate the salutary effects of the cells themselves. Together, these findings suggest that an endocrine mode of action may underlie the effectiveness of cell therapy in certain settings and portend the possibility for systemic delivery of cell-free therapy. PMID:23922321

  15. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  16. Gender-Based Correlation Profiles Among the Release Factors and Distance Thrown in Paralympic Seated Shot Put.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Davis, Ronald; Judge, Lawrence W; Kwon, Young-Hoo; Han, Kihoon; Kim, Jemin; Kim, Jaewoong; Kim, Jaehwa

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among release factors (speed, height, and angle) and distance thrown in Paralympic seated shot put. Forty-eight trials performed by 11 men and 5 women during the 2012 US Paralympic trials in track and field were analyzed. With both genders combined, release speed (r = .95, p < .01) and angle (r = .51, p < .01) showed significant correlations to distance thrown. Release speed (r = .94, p < .01) in men and all release factors (r = .60-.98, p < .02) in women showed significant correlations to distance. Release speed and angle were identified as important predictors of the distance, explaining over 89-96% of the variance in distance thrown. Unlike athletes without disability, seated shot-putters exhibited significant positive speed-angle correlations (combined: r = .37, p < .01; women: r = .57, p = .03). Application of these results should address a focus in training on generating speed through the release point with a consistent release angle.

  17. Mechanism of renal effects of intracerebroventricular histamine in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kook, Y J; Kim, K K; Yang, D K; Ahn, D S; Choi, B K

    1988-01-01

    Histamine, when given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), has been reported to produce antidiuresis in the rabbit. In this study it was attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in the effect. Histamine (H), 100 micrograms/kg i.c.v., produced antidiuresis with decreases in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate in urethane-anesthetized rabbits. With larger doses, a tendency towards increased electrolyte excretion was noted in spite of decreased filtration. In the denervated kidney, marked diuresis and natriuresis were observed following i.c.v. H, whereas the contralateral innervated kidney responded with typical antidiuresis. Reserpinized rabbits also responded with marked natriuresis to i.c.v. H. Diphenhydramine (D), 250 micrograms/kg i.c.v., increased urine flow rate, sodium and potassium excretion, along with increase in renal perfusion. With 750 micrograms/kg i.c.v., marked natriuresis was observed in spite of decreased filtration. When H was given after D (250 micrograms/kg) the antidiuresis was completely abolished, and diuresis became more prominent. Cimetidine, 250 micrograms/kg i.c.v., elicited antidiuresis with decreases in renal hemodynamics, the pretreatment with cimetidine did not influence the antidiuresis by H and no natriuresis was noted. The present study suggests that histamine, given i.c.v., influences renal function in dual ways, i.e., antidiuresis by increasing the sympathetic tone to the kidney and diuresis due to some humoral natriuretic factor, the latter becoming apparent only when the former influence has been removed, and further suggests that H1-receptors might be involved in the nerve-mediated antidiuresis, whereas H2-receptors might mediate the humorally induced natriuresis and diuresis.

  18. Corticotropin releasing factor impairs sustained attention in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Cole, Robert D; Kawasumi, Yushi; Parikh, Vinay; Bangasser, Debra A

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events and stress-related psychiatric disorders impair sustained attention, the ability to monitor rare and unpredictable stimulus events over prolonged periods of time. Despite the link between stress and attentional disruptions, the neurobiological basis for stress regulation of attention systems remains underexplored. Here we examined whether corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), which orchestrates stress responses and is hypersecreted in patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders, impairs sustained attention. To this end, male and female rats received central infusions of CRF prior to testing on an operant sustained attention task (SAT), where rats were trained to discriminate signaled from non-signaled events. CRF caused a dose-dependent decrease in SAT performance in both male and female rats. Females were more impaired than males following a moderate dose of CRF, particularly during the middle part of the session. This sex difference was moderated by ovarian hormones. Females in the estrous cycle stage characterized by lower ovarian hormones had a greater CRF-induced attentional impairment than males and females in other cycle stages. Collectively, these studies highlight CRF as a critical stress-related factor that can regulate attentional performance. As sustained attention subserves other cognitive processes, these studies suggest that mitigating high levels of CRF in patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders may ameliorate their cognitive deficits.

  19. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries

    PubMed Central

    Grasman, Jonathan M.; Do, Duc M.; Page, Raymond L.; Pins, George D.

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues. PMID:26344363

  20. Acetylcholine releases endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and EDRF from rat blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G.; Suzuki, H.; Weston, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of haemoglobin and methylene blue on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced electrical and mechanical responses of smooth muscle cells were investigated in rat aorta and rat main pulmonary artery. 2. When the endothelium was intact, ACh induced a transient hyperpolarization and sustained relaxation of tissues precontracted with noradrenaline. Both hyperpolarization and relaxation were absent in preparations without endothelium. 3. Haemoglobin and methylene blue inhibited the ACh-induced relaxation, but not the transient hyperpolarization. 4. In aorta with an intact endothelium, ACh produced an increase in both the rate of 86Rb efflux and tissue cyclic GMP levels. The changes in ion flux were unaffected by either haemoglobin or methylene blue in concentrations which almost abolished the increase in cyclic GMP concentrations. 5. In arteries with an intact endothelium, indomethacin had no effect on the ACh-induced electrical and mechanical responses or on the increase in 86Rb efflux and tissue cyclic GMP levels. 6. It is concluded that in the rat aorta and rat main pulmonary artery, ACh releases two different substances, an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and a hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), from the endothelial cells. Neither substance appears to be derived from a pathway dependent on cyclo-oxygenase. EDHF seems to play a minor role in the relaxation of noradrenaline-induced contractions. PMID:2851359

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor in the dorsal raphe nucleus: Linking stress coping and addiction.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Rita J; Lucki, Irwin; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2010-02-16

    Addiction and stress are linked at multiple levels. Drug abuse is often initiated as a maladaptive mechanism for coping with stress. It is maintained in part by negative reinforcement to prevent the aversive consequences of stress associated with abstinence. Finally, stress is a major factor leading to relapse in subjects in which drug seeking behavior has extinguished. These associations imply overlapping or converging neural circuits and substrates that underlie the processes of addiction and the expression of the stress response. Here we discuss the major brain serotonin (5-HT) system, the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system as a point of convergence that links these processes and how the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) directs this by a bimodal regulation of DRN neuronal activity. The review begins by describing a structural basis for CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system. This is followed by a review of the effects of CRF and stress on DRN function based on electrophysiological and microdialysis studies. The concept that multiple CRF receptor subtypes in the DRN facilitate distinct coping behaviors is reviewed with recent evidence for a unique cellular mechanism by which stress history can determine the type of coping behavior. Finally, work on CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system is integrated with literature on the role of 5-HT-dopamine interactions in addiction.

  2. Determination of trans- and cis-urocanic acid in relation to histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine contents in tuna (Auxis Thazard) at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zare, Davood; Muhammad, Kharidah; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ghazali, H M

    2015-02-01

    Scombroid fish poisoning is usually associated with consumption of fish containing high levels of histamine. However, reports indicate that some cases have responded to antihistamine therapy while ingested histamine levels in these cases were low. Potentiation of histamine toxicity by some biogenic amines, and release of endogenous histamine by other compounds such as cis-urocanic acid (UCA) are some hypotheses that have been put forth to explain this anomaly. Very little is known about the effects of storage conditions on the production of both UCA isomers and biogenic amines in tuna. Thus, the production of trans- and cis-UCA, histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine in tuna during 15 d of storage at 0, 3, and 10 °C and 2 d storage at ambient temperature were monitored. The initial trans- and cis-UCA contents in fresh tuna were 2.90 and 1.47 mg/kg, respectively, whereas the levels of putrescine and cadaverine were less than 2 mg/kg, and histamine was not detected. The highest levels of trans- and cis-UCA were obtained during 15 d storage at 3 °C (23.74 and 21.79 mg/kg, respectively) while the highest concentrations of histamine (2796 mg/kg), putrescine (220.32 mg/kg) and cadaverine (1045.20 mg/kg) were obtained during storage at room temperature, 10 and 10 °C, respectively. Histamine content increased considerably during storage at 10 °C whereas trans- and cis-UCA contents changed slightly. The initial trans-UCA content decreased during storage at ambient temperature. Thus, unlike histamine, concentrations of trans- and cis-UCA did not result in elevated levels during storage of tuna.

  3. Functional identification of histamine H3-receptors in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Imamura, M; Seyedi, N; Lander, H M; Levi, R

    1995-07-01

    Norepinephrine release contributes to ischemic cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmias. Because activation of histamine H3-receptors inhibits norepinephrine release, we searched for the presence of H3-receptors directly in sympathetic nerve endings (cardiac synaptosomes) isolated from surgical specimens of human atria. Norepinephrine was released by depolarization with K+. The presence of H3-receptors was ascertained because the selective H3-receptor agonists (R) alpha-methylhistamine and imetit reduced norepinephrine release, and the specific H3-receptor antagonist thioperamide blocked this effect. Norepinephrine release was exocytotic, since it was inhibited by the N-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker omega-conotoxin and the protein kinase C inhibitor Ro31-8220. Functional relevance of these H3-receptors was obtained by showing that transmural electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerve endings in human atrial tissue increased contractility, an effect blocked by propranolol and attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by (R) alpha-methylhistamine. Also, thioperamide antagonized the effect of (R) alpha-methylhistamine. Our findings are the first demonstration that H3-receptors are present in sympathetic nerve endings in the human heart, where they modulate adrenergic responses by inhibiting norepinephrine release. Since myocardial ischemia causes intracardiac histamine release, H3-receptor-induced attenuation of sympathetic neurotransmission may be clinically relevant.

  4. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-11-15

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca(2+) release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD.

  5. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca2+ release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD. PMID:27845775

  6. Expression of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Na; Wang, Xiyu; Fang, Xiucai; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Guo-Du; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2005-01-17

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiological recording, and intraneuronal injection of the neuronal tracer biocytin were integrated in a study of the functional expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. RT-PCR revealed expression of CRF1 receptor mRNA, but not CRF2, in both myenteric and submucosal plexuses. Immunoreactivity for the CRF1 receptor was distributed widely in the myenteric plexus of the stomach and small and large intestine and in the submucosal plexus of the small and large intestine. CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was coexpressed with calbindin, choline acetyltransferase, and substance P in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was found in neurons that expressed calbindin, substance P, choline acetyltransferase, or neuropeptide Y. Application of CRF evoked slowly activating depolarizing responses associated with elevated excitability in both myenteric and submucosal neurons. Histological analysis of biocytin-filled neurons revealed that both uniaxonal neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology responded to CRF. The CRF-evoked depolarizing responses were suppressed by the CRF1/CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin and the selective CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI27914 and were unaffected by the selective CRF2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30. The findings support the hypothesis that the CRF1 receptor mediates the excitatory actions of CRF on neurons in the enteric nervous system. Actions on enteric neurons might underlie the neural mechanisms by which stress-related release of CRF in the periphery alters intestinal propulsive motor function, mucosal secretion, and barrier functions.

  7. Delta opioid receptors colocalize with corticotropin releasing factor in hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, T J; Milner, T A

    2011-04-14

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect, likely playing a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Prior study findings suggest that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR) may localize to similar neuronal populations within HF lamina. Here, hippocampal sections of male and cycling female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for immunolabeling using antisera directed against the DOR and CRF peptide, as well as interneuron subtype markers somatostatin or parvalbumin, and analyzed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Both DOR- and CRF-labeling was observed in interneurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus. Males and normal cycling females displayed a similar number of CRF immunoreactive neurons co-labeled with DOR and a similar average number of CRF-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. In addition, 70% of DOR/CRF dual-labeled neurons in the hilar region co-labeled with somatostatin, suggesting a role for these interneurons in regulating perforant path input to dentate granule cells. Ultrastructural analysis of CRF-labeled axon terminals within the hilar region revealed that proestrus females have a similar number of CRF-labeled axon terminals that contain DORs compared to males but an increased number of CRF-labeled axon terminals without DORs. Taken together, these findings suggest that while DORs are anatomically positioned to modulate CRF immunoreactive interneuron activity and CRF peptide release, their ability to exert such regulatory activity may be compromised in females when estrogen levels are high.

  8. Identification of two H3-histamine receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.E. Jr.; Zweig, A.; Shih, N.Y.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Clark, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The H3-histamine receptor provides feedback inhibition of histamine synthesis and release as well as inhibition of other neurotransmitter release. We have characterized this receptor by radioligand binding studies with the H3 agonist N alpha-(3H)methylhistamine ((3H)NAMHA). The results of (3H)NAMHA saturation binding and NAMHA inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding were consistent with an apparently single class of receptors (KD = 0.37 nM, Bmax = 73 fmol/mg of protein) and competition assays with other agonists and the antagonists impromidine and dimaprit disclosed only a single class of sites. In contrast, inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding by the specific high affinity H3 antagonist thioperamide revealed two classes of sites (KiA = 5 nM, BmaxA = 30 fmol/mg of protein; KiB = 68 nM, BmaxB = 48 fmol/mg of protein). Burimamide, another antagonist that, like thioperamide, contains a thiourea group, likewise discriminated between two classes of sites. In addition to differences between some antagonist potencies for the two receptors, there is a differential guanine nucleotide sensitivity of the two. The affinity of the H3A receptor for (3H) NAMHA was reduced less than 2-fold, whereas (3H)NAMHA binding to the H3B receptor was undetectable in the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). The distinction between H3A and H3B receptor subtypes, the former a high affinity and the latter a low affinity thioperamide site, draws support from published in vitro data.

  9. An in vitro assay system as a potential replacement for the histamine sensitisation test for acellular pertussis based combination vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Chun-Ting; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Cook, Sarah; Douglas-Bardsley, Alexandra; Ochiai, Masaki; Corbel, Michael; Xing, Dorothy

    2010-05-07

    The histamine sensitisation test (HIST) for pertussis toxin is currently an official batch release test for acellular pertussis containing combination vaccines in Europe and North America. However, HIST, being a lethal endpoint assay, often leads to repeated tests due to large variations in test performance. Although a more precise HIST test based on measurement of temperature reduction after the histamine challenge is used in Asian countries, this test still uses animals. An in vitro test system based on a combination of enzyme coupled-HPLC and carbohydrate-binding assays with results analysed by a mathematical formula showed a good agreement with the in vivo HIST results based on measurement of temperature reduction after histamine challenge. The new in vitro test system was shown to be a potential alternative to the current in vivo HIST.

  10. Role of the Histamine H3 Receptor in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Kathmann, Markus

    2016-10-28

    The Gi/o protein-coupled histamine H3 receptor is distributed throughout the central nervous system including areas like cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum with the density being highest in the posterior hypothalamus, i.e. the area in which the histaminergic cell bodies are located. In contrast to the other histamine receptor subtypes (H1, H2 and H4), the H3 receptor is located presynaptically and shows a constitutive activity. In detail, H3 receptors are involved in the inhibition of histamine release (presynaptic autoreceptor), impulse flow along the histaminergic neurones (somadendritic autoreceptor) and histamine synthesis. Moreover, they occur as inhibitory presynaptic heteroreceptors on serotoninergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and perhaps cholinergic neurones. This review shows for four functions of the brain that the H3 receptor represents a brake against the wake-promoting, anticonvulsant and anorectic effect of histamine (via postsynaptic H1 receptors) and its procognitive activity (via postsynaptic H1 and H2 receptors). Indeed, H1 agonists and H3 inverse agonists elicit essentially the same effects, at least in rodents; these effects are opposite in direction to those elicited by brain-penetrating H1 receptor antagonists in humans. Although the benefit for H3 inverse agonists for the symptomatic treatment of dementias is inconclusive, several members of this group have shown a marked potential for the treatment of disorders associated with excessive daytime sleepiness. In March 2016, the European Commission granted a marketing authorisation for pitolisant (Wakix(R)) (as the first representative of the H3 inverse agonists) for the treatment of narcolepsy.

  11. Factors influencing lead and iron release from some Egyptian drinking water pipes.

    PubMed

    Lasheen, M R; Sharaby, C M; El-Kholy, N G; Elsherif, I Y; El-Wakeel, S T

    2008-12-30

    The major objective of this study is to assess the effect of stagnation time, pipe age, pipes material and water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity and chloride to sulfate mass ratio on lead and iron release from different types of water pipes used in Egypt namely polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP) and galvanized iron (GI), by using fill and dump method. Low pH increased lead and iron release from pipes. Lead and iron release decreased as pH and alkalinity increased. Lead and iron release increased with increasing chloride to sulfate mass ratio in all pipes. EDTA was used as an example of natural organic matter which may be influence metals release. It is found that lead and iron release increased then this release decreased with time. In general, GI pipes showed to be the most effected by water quality parameters tested and the highest iron release. PVC pipes are the most lead releasing pipes while PP pipes are the least releasing.

  12. Endothelin-induced contraction and mediator release in human bronchus.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, D. W.; Hubbard, W. C.; Undem, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. To elucidate the role of acetylcholine and various autacoids in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contraction in human bronchus, the effects of various receptor antagonists were examined. In addition, the ability of ET-1 to stimulate the release of histamine, peptidoleukotrienes and prostanoids was determined. 2. ET-1 was a potent and effective contractile agonist in human bronchus, possessing similar potency and efficacy to leukotriene D4 (LTD4); EC50 (-log M): ET-1 = 7.76 +/- 0.09, n = 7; LTD4 = 8.46 +/- 0.53, n = 7; P > 0.2; maximum response (% 10 microM pre-carbachol): ET-1 = 103.8 +/- 17.4, n = 7; LTD4 = 95.5 +/- 9.3, n = 7; P > 0.6. 3. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, sodium meclofenamate (1 microM) or the potent and selective thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548 (1 microM) were without significant effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves. 4. In the presence of sodium meclofenamate (1 microM), the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 microM), the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, WEB 2086 (1 microM) or the combination of the H1-histamine receptor antagonist, mepyramine (10 microM) and the leukotriene receptor antagonist, SK&F 104353 (10 microM), were without marked effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves. In addition, the combination of all four receptor antagonists did not antagonize ET-1-induced contraction. 5. ET-1 (0.3 microM) did not stimulate the release of histamine or immunoreactive leukotrienes from human bronchus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7693285

  13. Studies on the pharmacology of the novel histamine H3 receptor agonist Sch 50971.

    PubMed

    Hey, J A; Aslanian, R; Bolser, D C; Chapman, R W; Egan, R W; Rizzo, C A; Shih, N Y; Fernandez, X; McLeod, R L; West, R; Kreutner, W

    1998-09-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the pharmacology of Sch 50971 ((+)-trans-4-(4(R)-methyl-3(R)-pyrolidinyl)-1H-imidazole dihydrochloride, CAS 167610-28-8), a novel histamine H3 receptor agonist. The activity of Sch 50971 was compared with that of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (CAS 75614-87-8), a potent and moderately selective agonist of histamine H3 receptors, in a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. Sch 50971 is a high affinity, selective H3 receptor agonist in vitro and in vivo. Sch 50971 inhibits [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine (CAS 673-50-7) binding to the histamine H3 receptor in human brain (Ki = 5.0 nmol/l) and guinea pig brain (Ki = 2.5 nmol/l). Sch 50971 also inhibits electric field stimulated guinea pig ileum contractions (pD2 = 7.47) and decreases [3H]-norepinephrine (CAS 51-41-2) release (pD2 = 7.48) from guinea pig pulmonary artery by activation of presynaptic inhibitory H3 receptors. The in vitro effects of Sch 50971 are antagonized by low concentrations of a selective H3 antagonist, thioperamide (CAS 106243-16-7). Sch 50971 has low affinity (IC50's > 10 mumol/l) for histamine H1, dopamine D1 and D2, serotonin 5-HT2 and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. It also does not exhibit histamine H2-antagonist activity. In guinea pigs and cats, Sch 50971 exhibits in vivo H3 agonist activity. Sch 50971 inhibits sympathetic hypertension evoked by stimulation of the medulla oblongata in anesthetized guinea pigs (ED30 = 0.3 mg/kg i.v., ED30 = 1.0 mg/kg i.d.). Sch 50971 also inhibits the effects of sympathetic nerve stimulation on nasal resistance in cats. In these assays, Sch 50971 exhibits an efficacy and potency comparable to H3-agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine. However, under in vivo conditions, Sch 50971 does not exhibit histamine H1-mediated responses that are seen with (R)-alpha-methylhistamine at doses close to those that produce H3 effects. Therefore, Sch 50971 is a novel, potent and selective agonist of histamine H3 receptors with an improved in

  14. Ribosome release factor RF4 and termination factor RF3 are involved in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA from the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Heurgué-Hamard, V; Karimi, R; Mora, L; MacDougall, J; Leboeuf, C; Grentzmann, G; Ehrenberg, M; Buckingham, R H

    1998-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA dissociation from ribosomes is an energetically costly but apparently inevitable process that accompanies normal protein synthesis. The drop-off products of these events are hydrolysed by peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase. Mutant selections have been made to identify genes involved in the drop-off of peptidyl-tRNA, using a thermosensitive peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase mutant in Escherichia coli. Transposon insertions upstream of the frr gene, which encodes RF4 (ribosome release or recycling factor), restored growth to this mutant. The insertions impaired expression of the frr gene. Mutations inactivating prfC, encoding RF3 (release factor 3), displayed a similar phenotype. Conversely, production of RF4 from a plasmid increased the thermosensitivity of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase mutant. In vitro measurements of peptidyl-tRNA release from ribosomes paused at stop signals or sense codons confirmed that RF3 and RF4 were able to stimulate peptidyl-tRNA release from ribosomes, and showed that this action of RF4 required the presence of translocation factor EF2, known to be needed for the function of RF4 in ribosome recycling. When present together, the three factors were able to stimulate release up to 12-fold. It is suggested that RF4 may displace peptidyl-tRNA from the ribosome in a manner related to its proposed function in removing deacylated tRNA during ribosome recycling. PMID:9451005

  15. Ghrelin activates hypophysiotropic corticotropin-releasing factor neurons independently of the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Agustina; Portiansky, Enrique; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Perello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Previous work has established that the hormone ghrelin engages the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal neuroendocrine axis via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The neuronal circuitry that mediates this effect of ghrelin is currently unknown. Here, we show that ghrelin-induced activation of PVN CRF neurons involved inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inputs, likely via ghrelin binding sites that were localized at GABAergic terminals within the PVN. While ghrelin activated PVN CRF neurons in the presence of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor antagonists or in arcuate nucleus (ARC)-ablated mice, it failed to do it so in mice with ghrelin receptor expression limited to ARC agouti gene related protein (AgRP)/NPY neurons. These data support the notion that ghrelin activates PVN CRF neurons via inhibition of local GABAergic tone, in an ARC-independent manner. Furthermore, these data suggest that the neuronal circuits mediating ghrelin's orexigenic action vs. its role as a stress signal are anatomically dissociated.

  16. Detecting transforming growth factorrelease from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-02

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  17. Corticotropin releasing factor: a key role in the neurobiology of addiction.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla, Eric P; Logrip, Marian L; Koob, George F

    2014-04-01

    Drug addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder characterized by loss of control over intake and dysregulation of stress-related brain emotional systems. Since the discovery by Wylie Vale and his colleagues of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the structurally-related urocortins, CRF systems have emerged as mediators of the body's response to stress. Relatedly, CRF systems have a prominent role in driving addiction via actions in the central extended amygdala, producing anxiety-like behavior, reward deficits, excessive, compulsive-like drug self-administration and stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. CRF neuron activation in the medial prefrontal cortex may also contribute to the loss of control. Polymorphisms in CRF system molecules are associated with drug use phenotypes in humans, often in interaction with stress history. Drug discovery efforts have yielded brain-penetrant CRF1 antagonists with activity in preclinical models of addiction. The results support the hypothesis that brain CRF-CRF1 systems contribute to the etiology and maintenance of addiction.

  18. Targeted mutations of the corticotropin-releasing factor system: effects on physiology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Contarino, A; Gold, L H

    2002-01-01

    Genetic modifications of the genes that encode proteins integral to the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system have been employed in the creation of mutant mice that serve as tools for studying the role of this neuropeptide in regulated and dysregulated behaviors and physiology. Overexpression of the CRF peptide and CRF binding protein as well as deletion of the peptide, binding protein, and both known receptors has been achieved and these mouse models have been characterized for anatomical, neuroendocrine, and behavioral sequelae. The profile of results, consistent with current knowledge of CRF function from more traditional assays, indicates that enhancement of CRF function is associated with an activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, an anxious phenotype, alterations in cognitive performance and reductions in feeding. In general, blockade of CRF function produces the opposite effects. Genetic mouse models allow further analysis of specific elements in the CRF circuitry for which more traditional tools have not existed. These animal models are valuable for increasing our understanding of the underlying pathology associated with a variety of psychiatric and neuroendocrine disorders and for the development and testing of novel treatment agents.

  19. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  20. The cauliflower Orange gene enhances petiole elongation by suppressing expression of eukaryotic release factor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Sun, Tian-Hu; Wang, Ning; Ling, Hong-Qing; Lu, Shan; Li, Li

    2011-04-01

    The cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) Orange (Or) gene affects plant growth and development in addition to conferring β-carotene accumulation. This study was undertaken to investigate the molecular basis for the effects of the Or gene mutation in on plant growth. The OR protein was found to interact with cauliflower and Arabidopsis eukaryotic release factor 1-2 (eRF1-2), a member of the eRF1 family, by yeast two-hybrid analysis and by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. Concomitantly, the Or mutant showed reduced expression of the BoeRF1 family genes. Transgenic cauliflower plants with suppressed expression of BoeRF1-2 and BoeRF1-3 were generated by RNA interference. Like the Or mutant, the BoeRF1 RNAi lines showed increased elongation of the leaf petiole. This long-petiole phenotype was largely caused by enhanced cell elongation, which resulted from increased cell length and elevated expression of genes involved in cell-wall loosening. These findings demonstrate that the cauliflower Or gene controls petiole elongation by suppressing the expression of eRF1 genes, and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of leaf petiole regulation.

  1. Targeted release of transcription factors for cell reprogramming by a natural micro-syringe.

    PubMed

    Berthoin, Lionel; Toussaint, Bertrand; Garban, Frédéric; Le Gouellec, Audrey; Caulier, Benjamin; Polack, Benoît; Laurin, David

    2016-11-20

    Ectopic expression of defined transcription factors (TFs) for cell fate handling has proven high potential interest in reprogramming differentiated cells, in particular for regenerative medicine, ontogenesis study and cell based modelling. Pluripotency or transdifferentiation induction as TF mediated differentiation is commonly produced by transfer of genetic information with safety concerns. The direct delivery of proteins could represent a safer alternative but still needs significant advances to be efficient. We have successfully developed the direct delivery of proteins by an attenuated bacterium with a type 3 secretion system that does not require challenging and laborious steps for production and purification of recombinant molecules. Here we show that this natural micro-syringe is able to inject TFs to primary human fibroblasts and cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. The signal sequence for vectorization of the TF Oct4 has no effect on DNA binding to its nucleic target. As soon as one hour after injection, vectorized TFs are detectable in the nucleus. The injection process is not associated with toxicity and the bacteria can be completely removed from cell cultures. A three days targeted release of Oct4 or Sox2 embryonic TFs results in the induction of the core pluripotency genes expression in fibroblasts and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. This micro-syringe vectorization represents a new strategy for TF delivery and has potential applications for cell fate reprogramming.

  2. The corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 mediates the motivational effect of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rouibi, Khalil; Contarino, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    Altered motivational processes are key features of drug dependence and withdrawal, yet their neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. The present study shows that genetic disruption of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 (CRF₂-/-) does not impair motivation for palatable food in drug-naïve mice. However, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency effectively reduces the increase in palatable food-driven motivation induced by opiate withdrawal. Indeed, both in male and female wild-type mice, withdrawal from escalating morphine doses (20-100 mg/kg) induces a dramatic and relatively long-lasting (6 days) increase in palatable food-driven operant behavior under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In contrast, either male or female morphine-withdrawn CRF₂-/- mice show smaller and shorter (2 days) increases in motivation than wild-type mice. Nevertheless, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency does not impair the ability to discriminate reinforced behavior prior to, during the partial opiate withdrawal periods occurring between morphine injections and following drug discontinuation, indicating preserved cognitive function. Moreover, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency does not affect the ambulatory or body weight effects of intermittent morphine injections and withdrawal. These results provide initial evidence of a gender-independent and specific role for the CRF₂ receptor in the motivational effects of opiate withdrawal.

  3. Corticotropin-releasing factor acts via a third ventricle site to reduce exploratory behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, F; Berridge, C W; Baldwin, H A; Dunn, A J

    1990-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 20-25 ng) injected into the lateral or fourth ventricles of rats decreased exploratory behavior in the multicompartment testing chamber (MCC), as assessed by decreased mean contact times with novel stimuli. This result extends similar observations made previously in mice. To investigate the site of this action of CRF, cold cream plugs injected into the cerebral ventricles of rats were used to prevent access of the CRF to specific periventricular sites. When the cerebral aqueduct was blocked with cold cream, CRF injected into the lateral ventricle, but not the fourth ventricle, decreased exploratory behavior in the MCC. These results suggest that CRF does not act in the fourth ventricle to alter behavior in the MCC, and most likely acts in the lateral or third ventricles. Cold cream blocks within the third ventricle prevented the effect of lateral ventricle administration of CRF. The clearest effects were obtained when the anteroventral portion of the third ventricle (AV3V) had been coated with cold cream. This region, which contains the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT), was the only region blocked that showed a significant statistical interaction between the cold cream block and the effect of CRF. This result suggests that the OVLT, or regions close to it, is the primary site of the behavioral action of CRF in the MCC. It is possible that the peptide could be taken up in this region and transported to another brain site.

  4. Intrahypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor elevates gastric bicarbonate and inhibits stress ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Gunion, M W; Kauffman, G L; Taché, Y

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrahyopthalamic microinfusions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on gastric bicarbonate, acid, and pepsin content and on cold restraint-induced gastric lesion formation were tested in three experiments. Bilateral microinfusions of CRF into the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (0.86 nmol/rat) significantly increased both gastric bicarbonate concentration and total bicarbonate output. These effects were observed irrespective of whether rats were pretreated with the acid antisecretory drug omeprazole. In nonomeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions also significantly reduced acid secretion and raised pH. The increase in bicarbonate content accounted for half of the observed decrease in acid output, suggesting that CRF microinfusions activated separable bicarbonate-stimulating and acid-inhibiting hypothalamic systems. In non-omeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions significantly increased serum gastrin, whereas pepsin output was unchanged. Gastric mucosal damage produced by 4 h of cold restraint was significantly diminished by CRF microinfusion into the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data demonstrate that ventromedial hypothalamic microinfusions of CRF increase bicarbonate content, decrease gastric acid content, and confer protection against cold restraint-induced gastric mucosal damage. Hypothalamic CRF neuronal terminals and receptors may be involved in the central regulation of gastric bicarbonate secretion as well as acid secretion.

  5. Corticotropin releasing factor excites neurons of posterior hypothalamic nucleus to produce tachycardia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, He-Ren; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Li, Hong-Zhao; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), a peptide hormone involved in the stress response, holds a key position in cardiovascular regulation. Here, we report that the central effect of CRF on cardiovascular activities is mediated by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH), an important structure responsible for stress-induced cardiovascular changes. Our present results demonstrate that CRF directly excites PH neurons via two CRF receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2, and consequently increases heart rate (HR) rather than the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Bilateral vagotomy does not influence the tachycardia response to microinjection of CRF into the PH, while β adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol almost totally abolishes the tachycardia. Furthermore, microinjecting CRF into the PH primarily increases neuronal activity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM), but does not influence that of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV). These findings suggest that the PH is a critical target for central CRF system in regulation of cardiac activity and the PH-RVLM/RVMM-cardiac sympathetic nerve pathways, rather than PH-DMNV-vagus pathway, may contribute to the CRF-induced tachycardia. PMID:26831220

  6. Regulation of interleukin 10 release by tumor necrosis factor in humans and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) has been shown to inhibit endotoxin-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. To assess the role of TNF in the induction of IL-10 in endotoxemia, four healthy men were studied after a bolus intravenous injection of recombinant human TNF (50 micrograms/m2). In addition, 13 healthy chimpanzees were investigated after a bolus intravenous injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg), 6 animals received endotoxin only, 4 animals received a simultaneous intravenous injection of a monoclonal anti-TNF antibody, whereas 3 chimpanzees were treated with an anti-TNF F(ab')2 fragment 30 min after the administration of endotoxin. TNF induced a modest rise in IL-10 concentrations peaking after 45 min (47 +/- 32 pg/ml; p < 0.05). IL-10 peaked 2 h after injection of endotoxin (202 +/- 61 pg/ml; p < 0.005). In both anti-TNF-treated groups, the early endotoxin-induced TNF activity was completely neutralized. Simultaneous anti-TNF treatment attenuated endotoxin-induced IL-10 release (73 +/- 13 pg/ml; p < 0.01 versus endotoxin alone), whereas postponed anti-TNF treatment did not significantly affect this response (p = 0.21). These results indicate that TNF, in part, mediates the induction of IL-10 in endotoxemia, resulting in an autoregulatory feedback loop. PMID:7964475

  7. Corticotropin releasing factor excites neurons of posterior hypothalamic nucleus to produce tachycardia in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, He-Ren; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Li, Hong-Zhao; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning

    2016-02-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), a peptide hormone involved in the stress response, holds a key position in cardiovascular regulation. Here, we report that the central effect of CRF on cardiovascular activities is mediated by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH), an important structure responsible for stress-induced cardiovascular changes. Our present results demonstrate that CRF directly excites PH neurons via two CRF receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2, and consequently increases heart rate (HR) rather than the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Bilateral vagotomy does not influence the tachycardia response to microinjection of CRF into the PH, while β adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol almost totally abolishes the tachycardia. Furthermore, microinjecting CRF into the PH primarily increases neuronal activity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM), but does not influence that of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV). These findings suggest that the PH is a critical target for central CRF system in regulation of cardiac activity and the PH-RVLM/RVMM-cardiac sympathetic nerve pathways, rather than PH-DMNV-vagus pathway, may contribute to the CRF-induced tachycardia.

  8. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  9. Spectroscopic studies on the conformational transitions of a bovine growth hormone releasing factor analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Friedman, Alan R.; Thamann, Thomas J.

    1997-10-01

    The secondary structure of the bovine growth hormone releasing factor analog, [Ile 2, Ser 8,28, Ala 15, Leu 27, Hse 30] bGRF(1-30)-NH-Ethyl, acetate salt (U-90699F) was studied in solution by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Spectroscopic studies revealed that concentrated aqueous solutions of U-90699F (100 mg ml -1) undergo a secondary structure transition from disordered coil/α-helix to intermolecular β-sheet. Disordered coil and α-helical structure were grouped together in the infrared and Raman studies since the amide I vibrations are close in frequency and overlap in assignments was possible. Before the conformational transition, the facile exchange of the peptide's amide hydrogens for deuterium indicated that the majority of amide hydrogens were readily accessible to solvent. The kinetics of the conformational transition coincided with an increase in solution viscosity and turbidity. An initiation phase preceded the conformational transition during which only minor spectral changes were observed by infrared spectroscopy. The initiation phase and reaction kinetics were consistent with a highly cooperative nucleation ultimately leading to a network of intermolecular β-sheet structure and gel formation. Increased temperature accelerated the conformational transition. The conformational transition was thermally irreversible but the β-sheet structure of aggregated or gelled peptide could be disrupted by dilution and agitation.

  10. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs). CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  11. Structural evolution of urotensin-I: reflections of life before corticotropin releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, David A

    2009-10-01

    Peptides have a long evolutionary history that predates the appearance of metazoans. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family of peptides is among the most ancient peptide lineages. The identification and characterization of urotensin-I and related orthologues led the way for the elucidation of the entire CRF peptide family. A comparative analysis of the CRF paralogue sequences suggest that CRF is the most derived of these peptides and has lost many of its ancestral characteristics after it became associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA/I axis). In vertebrates, the urotensin-I group of orthologues, which includes sauvagine and urocortin, possess a number of shared characteristics that may be indicative of the ancestral peptide. Given the early origin of the CRF family peptides, it is likely that other peptide lineages are distantly related to the CRF family. In silico or cDNA library screening using probes based on urotensin-I/urocortin characteristics have been used to identify novel CRF family and related sequences that provide clues the evolutionary origin of the CRF family.

  12. Induction of megakaryocytes to synthesize and store a releasable pool of human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, D A; Shi, Q; Nurden, P; Haberichter, S L; Rosenberg, J B; Johnson, B D; Nurden, A T; White, G C; Montgomery, R R

    2003-12-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a complex plasma glycoprotein that modulates platelet adhesion at the site of a vascular injury, and it also serves as a carrier protein for factor (F)VIII. As megakaryocytes are the only hematopoietic lineage to naturally synthesize and store VWF within alpha-granules, this study was performed to determine if expression of a FVIII transgene in megakaryocytes could lead to trafficking and storage of FVIII with VWF in platelet alpha-granules. Isolex selected CD34+ cells from human G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood cells (PBC) and murine bone marrow were transduced with a retrovirus encoding the B-domain deleted form of human FVIII (BDD-FVIII). Cells were then induced with cytokines to form a population of multiple lineages including megakaryocytes. Chromogenic analysis of culture supernatant from FVIII-transduced human cells demonstrated synthesis of functional FVIII. Treatment of cells with agonists of platelet activation (ADP, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide) resulted in the release of VWF antigen and active FVIII into the supernatant from transduced cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of cultured human and murine megakaryocytes revealed a punctate pattern of staining for FVIII that was consistent with staining for VWF. Electron microscopy of transduced megakaryocytes using immunogold-conjugated antibodies colocalized FVIII and VWF within the alpha-granules. FVIII retained its association with VWF in human platelets isolated from the peripheral blood of NOD/SCID mice at 2-6 weeks post-transplant of transduced human PBC. These results suggest feasibility for the development of a locally inducible secretory pool of FVIII in platelets of patients with hemophilia A.

  13. PABP enhances release factor recruitment and stop codon recognition during translation termination

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexandr; Mikhailova, Tatyana; Eliseev, Boris; Yeramala, Lahari; Sokolova, Elizaveta; Susorov, Denis; Shuvalov, Alexey; Schaffitzel, Christiane; Alkalaeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) is a major component of the messenger RNA–protein complex. PABP is able to bind the poly(A) tail of mRNA, as well as translation initiation factor 4G and eukaryotic release factor 3a (eRF3a). PABP has been found to stimulate translation initiation and to inhibit nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Using a reconstituted mammalian in vitro translation system, we show that PABP directly stimulates translation termination. PABP increases the efficiency of translation termination by recruitment of eRF3a and eRF1 to the ribosome. PABP's function in translation termination depends on its C-terminal domain and its interaction with the N-terminus of eRF3a. Interestingly, we discover that full-length eRF3a exerts a different mode of function compared to its truncated form eRF3c, which lacks the N-terminal domain. Pre-association of eRF3a, but not of eRF3c, with pre-termination complexes (preTCs) significantly increases the efficiency of peptidyl–tRNA hydrolysis by eRF1. This implicates new, additional interactions of full-length eRF3a with the ribosomal preTC. Based on our findings, we suggest that PABP enhances the productive binding of the eRF1–eRF3 complex to the ribosome, via interactions with the N-terminal domain of eRF3a which itself has an active role in translation termination. PMID:27418677

  14. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  15. Factors controlling nitrogen release from two forested catchments with contrasting hydrochemical responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christopher, S.F.; Mitchell, M.J.; McHale, M.R.; Boyer, E.W.; Burns, Douglas A.; Kendall, C.

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen (N) and the associated fluxes to surface waters remains challenging, given the need to deal with spatial and temporal variability and to characterize complex and heterogeneous landscapes. We focused our study on catchments S14 and S15 located in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, USA, which have similar topographic and hydrologic characteristics but contrasting stream nitrate (NO3- ) concentrations. We characterized the mechanisms by which NO3- reaches the streams during hydrological events in these catchments, aiming to reconcile our field data with our conceptual model of factors that regulate nutrient exports from forested catchments. Combined hydrometric, chemical and isotopic (??18O-H2O) data showed that the relative contributions of both soil and ground water sources were similar between the two catchments. Temporal patterns of stream chemistry were markedly different between S14 and S15, however, because the water sources in the two catchments have different solute concentrations. During late summer/fall, the largest source of NO3- in S14 was till groundwater, whereas shallow soil was the largest NO3- source in S15. NO3- concentrations in surface water decreased in S14, whereas they increased in S15 because an increasing proportion of stream flow was derived from shallow soil sources. During snowmelt, the largest sources of NO3- were in the near-surface soil in both catchments. Concentrations of NO3- increased as stream discharge increased and usually peaked before peak discharge, when shallow soil water sources made the largest contribution to stream discharge. The timing of peaks in stream NO3- concentrations was affected by antecedent moisture conditions. By elucidating the factors that affect sources and transport of N, including differences in the soil nutrient cycling and hydrological characteristics of S14 and S15, this study contributes to the overall conceptualization of NO3- release from temperate

  16. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  17. Release of alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor from plasma fibrin clots by activated coagulation factor XIII. Its effect on fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mimuro, J; Kimura, S; Aoki, N

    1986-01-01

    When blood coagulation takes place in the presence of calcium ions, alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor (alpha 2PI) is cross-linked to fibrin by activated coagulation Factor XIII (XIIIa) and thereby contributes to the resistance of fibrin to fibrinolysis. It was previously shown that the cross-linking reaction is a reversible one, since the alpha 2PI-fibrinogen cross-linked complex could be dissociated. In the present study we have shown that the alpha 2PI-fibrin cross-linking reaction is also a reversible reaction and alpha 2PI which had been cross-linked to fibrin can be released from fibrin by disrupting the equilibrium, resulting in a decrease of its resistance to fibrinolysis. When the fibrin clot formed from normal plasma in the presence of calcium ions was suspended in alpha 2PI-deficient plasma of buffered saline, alpha 2PI was gradually released from fibrin on incubation. When alpha 2PI was present in the suspending milieu, the release was decreased inversely to the concentrations of alpha 2PI in the suspending milieu. The release was accelerated by supplementing XIIIa or the presence of a high concentration of the NH2-terminal 12-residue peptide of alpha 2PI (N-peptide) which is cross-linked to fibrin in exchange for the release of alpha 2PI. When the release of alpha 2PI from fibrin was accelerated by XIIIa or N-peptide, the fibrin became less resistant to the fibrinolytic process, resulting in an acceleration of fibrinolysis which was proportional to the degree of the release of alpha 2PI. These results suggest the possibility that alpha 2PI could be released from fibrin in vivo by disrupting the equilibrium of the alpha 2PI-fibrin cross-linking reaction, and that the release would result in accelerated thrombolysis. Images PMID:2419360

  18. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  19. In vitro relaxation of dog cerebral veins in response to histamine is mediated by histamine H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Monge, L; García-Villalón, A L; Fernández, N; García, J L; Gómez, B; Diéguez, G

    1997-11-05

    There is little information on the histamine receptor mechanisms involved in cerebral venodilation, thus the role of histamine present in human cerebrospinal fluid is difficult to assess. In isolated canine pial veins, concentration-response curves to histamine (10[-7]-10[-3] M), the histamine H1 receptor agonist, 2-pyridylethylamine (10[-6]-10[-2] M), the histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit (S-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) isothiourea dihydrochloride, 10[-6]-10[-2] M), and the histamine H3 receptor agonist, imetit (S-[2-(1 midazol-4-yl)ethyl]isothiourea dihydrobromide, 10[-7]-10[-3] M) were isometrically determined. In resting veins, histamine, 2-pyridylethylamine and dimaprit had no significant effect, whereas in endothelin-1-precontracted veins, these drugs produced concentration-dependent relaxation (Emax in % of active tone and pD2 were: for histamine, 72 +/- 6 and 5.36 +/- 0.09; for 2-pyridylethylamine, 59 +/- 5 and 3.28 +/- 0.05; for dimaprit, 65 +/- 7 and 4.81 +/- 0.10, respectively). The relaxations in response to histamine and dimaprit were competitively antagonized by the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine (3 x 10[-6]-10[-4] M) (pA2 = 6.07 +/- 0.03 for histamine, and 6.09 +/- 0.07 for dimaprit), but were not affected by the histamine H1 receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (10[-6] M) or the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, thioperamide (N-cyclohexyl-4-(1-H-imidazol-4-yl)-1-piperidine-carbothioamide maleate, 10[-6] M). The relaxation in response to 2-pyridylethylamine was inhibited by cimetidine (10[-5] M), but not by chlorpheniramine (10[-6] M). Imetit produced a small contraction in resting veins (14 +/- 4 mg) and precontracted veins (20 +/- 3 mg), which was not modified by thioperamide (10[-6] M). The relaxation of veins in response to histamine was not modified by endothelium removal, nor by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10[-4] M), or the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, meclofenamate (10[-5] M

  20. Desloratadine citrate disodium injection, a potent histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, inhibits chemokine production in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis guinea pig model and histamine-induced human nasal epithelial cells via inhibiting the ERK1/2 and NF-kappa B signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiling; Xu, Shuhong; Zhou, Peipei; He, Guangwei; Jie, Qiong; Wu, Yulin

    2015-11-15

    Chemokines have chemotactic properties on leukocyte subsets whose modulation plays a pivotal role in allergic inflammatory processes. Our present study was designed to investigate the anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties of desloratadine citrate disodium injection (DLC) and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-allergic effects of DLC were evaluated based on allergic symptoms, serological marker production and histological changes of the nasal mucosa in guinea pigs model of allergic rhinitis. The anti-inflammatory properties and molecular mechanisms of DLC were explored by studying the regulation of a set of chemokines and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways, after DLC treatment in guinea pigs model of allergic rhinitis in vivo and histamine-activated human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) in vitro. In vivo model in guinea pigs, DLC alleviated the rhinitis symptoms, inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration in nasal lavage fluid (NLF) and histamine, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTEs) and interleukin (IL)-8 release in sera and P-ERK1/2 and NF-κB activation in nasal mucosa. In vitro, DLC markedly inhibited histamine-induced production of MCP-1, RANTEs and IL-8 and suppressed c-Raf, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and ERK1/2 activation in HNECs. These results provide evidence that DLC possesses potent anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties. The mechanism of action underlying DLC in allergic inflammation appears to be inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, in addition to blocking of the NF-κB pathway.

  1. Insufficient intake of L-histidine reduces brain histamine and causes anxiety-like behaviors in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Sugita, Mayu; Naganuma, Fumito; Iida, Tomomitsu; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb; Harada, Ryuichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    L-histidine is one of the essential amino acids for humans, and it plays a critical role as a component of proteins. L-histidine is also important as a precursor of histamine. Brain histamine is synthesized from L-histidine in the presence of histidine decarboxylase, which is expressed in histamine neurons. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the importance of dietary L-histidine as a precursor of brain histamine and the histaminergic nervous system. C57BL/6J male mice at 8 wk of age were assigned to 2 different diets for at least 2 wk: the control (Con) diet (5.08 g L-histidine/kg diet) or the low L-histidine diet (LHD) (1.28 g L-histidine/kg diet). We measured the histamine concentration in the brain areas of Con diet-fed mice (Con group) and LHD-fed mice (LHD group). The histamine concentration was significantly lower in the LHD group [Con group vs. LHD group: histamine in cortex (means ± SEs): 13.9 ± 1.25 vs. 9.36 ± 0.549 ng/g tissue; P = 0.002]. Our in vivo microdialysis assays revealed that histamine release stimulated by high K(+) from the hypothalamus in the LHD group was 60% of that in the Con group (P = 0.012). However, the concentrations of other monoamines and their metabolites were not changed by the LHD. The open-field tests showed that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the central zone (87.6 ± 14.1 vs. 50.0 ± 6.03 s/10 min; P = 0.019), and the light/dark box tests demonstrated that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the light box (198 ± 8.19 vs. 162 ± 14.1 s/10 min; P = 0.048), suggesting that the LHD induced anxiety-like behaviors. However, locomotor activity, memory functions, and social interaction did not differ between the 2 groups. The results of the present study demonstrated that insufficient intake of histidine reduced the brain histamine content, leading to anxiety-like behaviors in the mice.

  2. Tailored design of electrospun composite nanofibers with staged release of multiple angiogenic growth factors for chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huan-Ju; Kuan, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Tsai, Jui-Che; Chen, Tim-Mo; Hsieh, Dar-Jen; Wang, Tzu-Wei

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research study is to develop a collagen (Col) and hyaluronic acid (HA) inter-stacking nanofibrous skin equivalent substitute with the programmable release of multiple angiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and endothelial growth factor (EGF)) either directly embedded in the nanofibers or encapsulated in the gelatin nanoparticles (GNs) by electrospinning technology. The delivery of EGF and bFGF in the early stage is expected to accelerate epithelialization and vasculature sprouting, while the release of PDGF and VEGF in the late stage is with the aim of inducing blood vessels maturation. The physiochemical characterizations indicate that the Col-HA-GN nanofibrous membrane possesses mechanical properties similar to human native skin. The design of a particle-in-fiber structure allows growth factors for slow controlled release up to 1month. Cultured on biodegradable Col-HA membrane with four kinds of growth factors (Col-HA w/4GF), endothelial cells not only increase in growth rate but also form a better network with a thread-like tubular structure. The therapeutic effect of Col-HA w/4GF membrane on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats reveals an accelerated wound closure rate, together with elevated collagen deposition and enhanced maturation of vessels, as revealed by Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. From the above, the electrospun Col-HA-GN composite nanofibrous skin substitute with a stage-wise release pattern of multiple angiogenic factors could be a promising bioengineered construct for chronic wound healing in skin tissue regeneration.

  3. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium.

  4. Radioenzymatic assay for measurement of tissue concentrations of histamine: adaptation to correct for adherence of histamine to mechanical homogenizers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.K.; Frey, M.J.; Reed, B.R.; Leff, A.R.; Shields, R.; Gold, W.M.

    1984-04-01

    Because adherence of histamine to glass is well-known, we tested for its adherence to a mechanical homogenizer commonly used in the extraction of histamine from tissue samples. During 60 sec of homogenization, 15% to 17% of the histamine originally present in the samples ''disappeared,'' and the reason for the disappearance was reversible binding of histamine to the homogenizer. Adding trace amounts of (/sup 14/C)histamine to each sample before homogenization and measuring the disappearance of radioactivity during homogenization permitted correction for binding to the homogenizer. This technique for correction was validated by the measurement of endogenous concentrations of histamine in the tracheal posterior membranes of six dogs (range of mean concentrations: 0.63 to 1.51 ng/mg wet weight) followed by the measurement of known amounts of exogenous histamine added before homogenization to tracheal tissue samples from the same dogs. In the latter samples, 96 +/- 13% (mean +/- SEM) of the histamine added was measured by our technique. We conclude that binding of histamine to mechanical homogenizers may be an important cause of inaccuracy of the enzymatic assay for the measurement of histamine concentrations in tissue but that such binding may but that such binding may be easily corrected for.

  5. Functional specificity of amino acid at position 246 in the tRNA mimicry domain of bacterial release factor 2.

    PubMed

    Uno, M; Ito, K; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    The termination of protein synthesis in bacteria requires codon-specific polypeptide release factors RF-1 (UAG/UAA specific) and RF-2 (UGA/UAA specific). We have proposed that release factors mimic tRNA and recognize the stop codon for polypeptide release (Nakamura et al (1996) Cell 87, 147-150). In contrast to the textbook view, genetic experiments have indicated that Escherichia coli RF-2 terminates translation very weakly at UAA while Salmonella RF-2 decodes this signal efficiently. Moreover, an excess of E coli RF-2 was toxic to cells while an excess of Salmonella RF-2 was not. These two RF-2 proteins are identical except for 16 out of 365 amino acids. Fragment swap experiments and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a residue at position 246 is solely responsible for these two phenotypes. Upon substituting Ala (equivalent to Salmonella RF-2) for Thr-246 of E coli RF-2, the protein acquired increased release activity for UAA as well as for UGA. These results led us to conclude that E coli RF-2 activity is potentially weak and that the amino acid at position 246 plays a crucial role, not for codon discrimination, but for stop codon recognition or polypeptide release, presumably constituting an essential moiety of tRNA mimicry or interacting with peptidyltransferase centers of the ribosome.

  6. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  7. A Transgenic Rat for Investigating the Anatomy and Function of Corticotrophin Releasing Factor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pomrenze, Matthew B.; Millan, E. Zayra; Hopf, F. Woodward; Keiflin, Ronald; Maiya, Rajani; Blasio, Angelo; Dadgar, Jahan; Kharazia, Viktor; De Guglielmo, Giordano; Crawford, Elena; Janak, Patricia H.; George, Olivier; Rice, Kenner C.; Messing, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) is a 41 amino acid neuropeptide that coordinates adaptive responses to stress. CRF projections from neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to the brainstem are of particular interest for their role in motivated behavior. To directly examine the anatomy and function of CRF neurons, we generated a BAC transgenic Crh-Cre rat in which bacterial Cre recombinase is expressed from the Crh promoter. Using Cre-dependent reporters, we found that Cre expressing neurons in these rats are immunoreactive for CRF and are clustered in the lateral CeA (CeL) and the oval nucleus of the BNST. We detected major projections from CeA CRF neurons to parabrachial nuclei and the locus coeruleus, dorsal and ventral BNST, and more minor projections to lateral portions of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and lateral hypothalamus. Optogenetic stimulation of CeA CRF neurons evoked GABA-ergic responses in 11% of non-CRF neurons in the medial CeA (CeM) and 44% of non-CRF neurons in the CeL. Chemogenetic stimulation of CeA CRF neurons induced Fos in a similar proportion of non-CRF CeM neurons but a smaller proportion of non-CRF CeL neurons. The CRF1 receptor antagonist R121919 reduced this Fos induction by two-thirds in these regions. These results indicate that CeL CRF neurons provide both local inhibitory GABA and excitatory CRF signals to other CeA neurons, and demonstrate the value of the Crh-Cre rat as a tool for studying circuit function and physiology of CRF neurons. PMID:26733798

  8. Conformational origin of a difficult coupling in a human growth hormone releasing factor analog.

    PubMed

    Deber, C M; Lutek, M K; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1989-01-01

    During the solid-phase synthesis of the human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) analog [Ala15, Leu27, Asn28] -GRF(1-32)-OH, incorporation of Boc-Gln16 was determined to be incomplete. While aggregation of growing resin-bound peptide chains with concomitant beta-sheet formation and "precipitation" has been proposed to account in general for such "difficult coupling," no feature of sequence in the Gln16 region of this GRF analog provided an immediate rationale for this result. We now report 500 MHz 1H NMR spectra of a series of resin-bound GRF segments surrounding the Gln16 position (19-32 through 14-32), swelled in dimethylsulfoxide-d6 solutions [GRF(14-32) = Leu14-Ala-Gln-Leu-Ser(Bzl)-Ala-Arg(Tos)-Lys(CIZ)-Leu- Leu-Gln-Asp(OcHex)-Ile-Leu-Asn-Arg(Tos)-Gln-Gln-Gly32-PAM resin]. While relatively sharp spectra are observed for GRF(19-32), components with resonances broadened by an order-of-magnitude appear in spectra of the 18-32 and 17-32 peptide-resin, and the entire spectrum of 16-32 is ill-resolved and highly broadened. Subsequent spectra sharpen again (15-32, 14-32). These combined synthesis/spectroscopic experimental results, in conjunction with predictive analyses using standard Chou-Fasman 2 degrees structure parameters, suggest that the completeness of the Gln16 coupling is hindered by formation of a specific, folded beta-sheet/beta-turn structure in GRF(16-32) (with the turn located at 18-21, "upstream" of the difficult coupling site), and accompanying aggregation of peptide chains. This analysis suggests that awareness of such potential beta-sheet/beta-turn sequences can guide analog choices, and/or facilitate pre-programming of synthesis steps in anticipation of problem couplings.

  9. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) Receptor Signaling in the Central Nervous System: New Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hauger, Richard L.; Risbrough, Victoria; Brauns, Olaf; Dautzenberg, Frank M.

    2007-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related urocortin peptides mediate behavioral, cognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine and immunologic responses to aversive stimuli by activating CRF1 or CRF2 receptors in the central nervous system and anterior pituitary. Markers of hyperactive central CRF systems, including CRF hypersecretion and abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, have been identified in subpopulations of patients with anxiety, stress and depressive disorders. Because CRF receptors are rapidly desensitized in the presence of high agonist concentrations, CRF hypersecretion alone may be insufficient to account for the enhanced CRF neurotransmission observed in these patients. Concomitant dysregulation of mechanisms stringently controlling magnitude and duration of CRF receptor signaling also may contribute to this phenomenon. While it is well established that the CRF1 receptor mediates many anxiety- and depression-like behaviors as well as HPA axis stress responses, CRF2 receptor functions are not well understood at present. One hypothesis holds that CRF1 receptor activation initiates fear and anxiety-like responses, while CRF2 receptor activation re-establishes homeostasis by counteracting the aversive effects of CRF1 receptor signaling. An alternative hypothesis posits that CRF1 and CRF2 receptors contribute to opposite defensive modes, with CRF1 receptors mediating active defensive responses triggered by escapable stressors, and CRF2 receptors mediating anxiety- and depression-like responses induced by inescapable, uncontrollable stressors. CRF1 receptor antagonists are being developed as novel treatments for affective and stress disorders. If it is confirmed that the CRF2 receptor contributes importantly to anxiety and depression, the development of small molecule CRF2 receptor antagonists would be therapeutically useful. PMID:16918397

  10. A comparison of the in vivo effects of ketotifen, clemastine, chlorpheniramine and sodium cromoglycate on histamine and allergen induced weals in human skin.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M J; Meyrick Thomas, R H; Moodley, I; Davies, R J

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ketotifen was compared with that of clemastine and chlorpheniramine, known antihistamines, and sodium cromoglycate, a drug considered to have mast cell "stabilizing' properties on histamine and allergen wealing reactions in human skin, in random order, double-blind, placebo controlled studies. Ketotifen was significantly more potent in the inhibition of both histamine (P less than 0.001) and allergen (P less than 0.001) skin wealing reactions than either clemastine or chlorpheniramine. Sodium cromoglycate had no significant effect on either histamine or allergen skin wealing reactions in any of the concentrations tested. However ketotifen, like clemastine, had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on histamine than on allergen induced weals (P less than 0.001) and both drugs were shown to act as competitive antagonists of histamine. Ketotifen has been shown to be a potent anti-histamine but there is no evidence from these in vivo studies to suggest that it has any additional inhibitory activity on release of mediators from mast cells in human skin. PMID:6405771

  11. The systematic investigation and development of the histamine radioenzymatic assay

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    The radioenzymatic assay for histamine is a widely used analytical procedure based on the enzymatic conversion of histamine to ({sup 3}H)tele-methylhistamine utilizing histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) and S-adenosyl-L-({sup 3}H-methyl) methionine (({sup 3}H)SAME). Despite numerous modifications of this method, the assay lacks the sensitivity and specificity required to quantify histamine from many important biologic samples such as human plasma. The objective of this study was to investigate systematically the radioenzymatic assay for histamine and develop a highly sensitive and specific assay for use in basic or clinical studies. HNMT was purified 260-fold from rat kidney and the use of purified HNMT in the histamine radioenzymatic assay improved specificity of this method and also improved sensitivity by eliminating the enzyme-dependent blank and permitting the inclusion of high specific activity ({sup 3}H)SAME. The adsorption of histamine to glass surfaces was characterized and strategies were developed to prevent binding. Finally, optimization of the reaction allowed the development of a simplified product isolation procedure. The histamine radioenzymatic assay developed in this study has a sensitivity of 2.0 pg and is specific for histamine as judged by direct product identification and cross-contamination studies. The assay was utilized to establish reference values for the concentration of histamine in human plasma and the 24-hour urinary excretion of histamine for normal human subjects. In summary, a sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay for histamine was developed as a result of the systematic investigation of this methodology.

  12. Impact of population age structure on Wolbachia transgene driver efficacy: ecologically complex factors and release of genetically modified mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rasgon, Jason L; Scott, Thomas W

    2004-07-01

    Wolbachia symbionts hold theoretical promise as a way to drive transgenes into insect vector populations for disease prevention. For simplicity, current models of Wolbachia dynamics and spread ignore ecologically complex factors such as the age structure of vector populations and overlapping vector generations. We developed a model including these factors to assess their impact on the process of Wolbachia spread into populations of three mosquito species (Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens). Depending on the mosquito species, Wolbachia parameters, released mosquito life stage and initial age structure of the target population, the number of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes that we predict would need to be released ranged from less than the threshold calculated by the simple model to a 10-30-fold increase. Transgenic releases into age-structured populations, which is an expectation for wild mosquitoes, will be difficult and depending on the circumstances may not be economically or logistically feasible due to the large number of infected mosquitoes that must be released. Our results support the perspective that understanding ecological factors is critical for designing transgenic vector-borne disease control strategies.

  13. Histamine resets the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus through the H1R-CaV 1.3-RyR pathway in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Kim, Young-Beom; Kim, Woong Bin; Yoon, Bo-Eun; Shen, Feng-Yan; Lee, Seung Won; Soong, Tuck-Wah; Han, Hee-Chul; Colwell, Christopher S; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Yang In

    2015-10-01

    Histamine, a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator implicated in the control of arousal state, exerts a potent phase-shifting effect on the circadian clock in the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In this study, the mechanisms by which histamine resets the circadian clock in the mouse SCN were investigated. As a first step, Ca(2+) -imaging techniques were used to demonstrate that histamine increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i ) in acutely dissociated SCN neurons and that this increase is blocked by the H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine. The histamine-induced Ca(2+) transient is reduced, but not blocked, by application of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) blocker dantrolene. Immunohistochemical techniques indicated that CaV 1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed mainly in the somata of SCN cells along with the H1R, whereas CaV 1.2 channels are located primarily in the processes. Finally, extracellular single-unit recordings demonstrated that the histamine-elicited phase delay of the circadian neural activity rhythm recorded from SCN slices is blocked by pyrilamine, nimodipine and the knockout of CaV 1.3 channel. Again, application of dantrolene reduced but did not block the histamine-induced phase delays. Collectively, these results indicate that, to reset the circadian clock, histamine increases [Ca(2+) ]i in SCN neurons by activating CaV 1.3 channels through H1R, and secondarily by causing Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) release from RyR-mediated internal stores.

  14. [Machanism of the stimulatory effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on gastatric acid secretion induced by pentagastrin in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, Z L; Lu, G Q

    1997-08-01

    The present experiment was designed to study the mechanism underlying the stimulatory effect of histamine (HA, i.c.v.) on the gastric acid secretion in subdiaphragmatic vagotomized SD rats. Gastric acid was continuously washed out with 37 degrees C saline by a perfusion pump. Drugs were injected into the third ventricle or the vein to examine the effect on gastric acid secretion and the level of plasma corticosterone. The results are as follows: (1) HA (1.0 microgram, i.c.v.) potentiated gastric acid secretion induced by G-5, which could be abolished by preintramuscular injection of diphenhydramine hydrochloride (8.0 micrograms). (2) Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) (0.5 microgram, 1.0 microgram, i.c.v.) augmented gastric acid secretion in a dose dependent manner. (3) HA (1.0 microgram, i.c.v.) increased the plasma corticosterone level. (4) Intravenous injection of corticosterone 21-sulfale (15, 30 micrograms) augmented gastric acid secretion in a dose dependent manner. These results suggested that intracerebroventricular injection of HA could stimulate the release of CRF by specificably binding with H1 receptor in some areas of hypothalamus, which, in turn, increased gastric acid secretion induced by G-5 via increasing the level of plasma corticosterone.

  15. Histamine facilitates consolidation of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Juliana Sartori; Da Silva, Weber Cláudio; Da Silveira, Clarice Kras Borges; Köhler, Cristiano André; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2011-10-01

    Non-reinforced retrieval induces memory extinction, a phenomenon characterized by a decrease in the intensity of the learned response. This attribute has been used to develop extinction-based therapies to treat anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorders. Histamine modulates memory and anxiety but its role on fear extinction has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, using male Wistar rats, we determined the effect of the intra-hippocampal administration of different histaminergic agents on the extinction of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA), a form of aversive learning. We found that intra-CA1 infusion of histamine immediately after non-reinforced retrieval facilitated consolidation of IA extinction in a dose-dependent manner. This facilitation was mimicked by the histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor SKF91488 and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit, reversed by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine, and unaffected by the H1 antagonist pyrilamine, the H3 antagonist thioperamide and the antagonist at the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) polyamine-binding site ifenprodil. Neither the H1 agonist 2-2-pyridylethylamine nor the NMDAR polyamine-binding site agonist spermidine affected the consolidation of extinction while the H3 receptor agonist imetit hampered it. Extinction induced the phosphorylation of ERK1 in dorsal CA1 while intra-CA1 infusion of the MEK inhibitor U0126 blocked extinction of the avoidance response. The extinction-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 was enhanced by histamine and dimaprit and blocked by ranitidine administered to dorsal CA1 after non-reinforced retrieval. Taken together, our data indicate that the hippocampal histaminergic system modulates the consolidation of fear extinction through a mechanism involving the H2-dependent activation of ERK signalling.

  16. [Analysis of influence factors and control methods on iron release phenomenon in drinking water distribution system].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhang-bin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-jian; He, Wen-Jie; Han, Hong-da; Yin, Pei-jun

    2006-02-01

    Variation rule of iron in drinking water distribution systems was studied, and it was found that the iron released from the scale to the bulk water was the primary reason for iron overstep. The main chemical composition of the scale in cast iron pipe and galvanized steel pipe was iron in a northern city in China. In the drinking water distribution systems, when the value of dissolved oxygen or chlorine residual was low, the iron release phenomenon was severe. The reason for that was the passivation layer of the corrosion scale was destroyed in reductive condition and the result was a great amount of iron in ferrous form was released. According to the research results, the control methods for iron release and 'red water' phenomenon were indicated.

  17. Relative reactivities of histamine and indoleamines with acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Takeshi; Niitsu, Masaru

    2003-08-01

    Relative reactivities of histamine and indoleamines such as tryptamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-methoxytryptamine with acetaldehyde (AA) under physiological conditions were investigated. AA was found to have much higher reactivity towards histamine than towards indoleamines. For example, when a reaction mixture of AA (1 mM) and histamine or tryptamine (5 mM) in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) was incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h, AA decreased by 11% in the case of tryptamine, while in the case of histamine, it decreased 88%. In addition, the reaction product of AA with histamine was investigated. Mixtures of a fixed amount of histamine (5 mM) and various amounts of AA (1-20 mM) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) were incubated for 5 h at 37 degrees C. In all cases, only one product, 4-methylspinaceamine (4-MSPA), was observed. The yield of 4-MSPA was in approximate agreement with the losses of histamine and AA, indicating that the loss of histamine caused by the reaction of AA was quantatively converted to 4-MSPA. These results show that the reaction of AA with histamine easily takes place to produce 4-MSPA in an aqueous medium close to physiological conditions.

  18. Pulmonary serotonin and histamine in experimental asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, I.M.; Day, R.; Lemaire, S.

    1986-03-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were treated once with tracheal instillation of 5 mg Crysotile B asbestos fibers in 0.5 ml saline under ketamine/xylaxine anesthesia. Control rats (n = 37) received 0.5 ml saline. Test and control rats were killed at 7 and 14 d., and 1, 3 and 6 mo. post instillation. Serotonin (5-HT) was quantitated in lung tissue homogenate from all rats using HPLC and electrochemical detection. Among rats killed at 1, 3 and 6 mo., lung tissue histamine-o-phthaldialdehyde complex was quantitated using reverse phase HPLC coupled to a fluorometric detector. Furthermore, 5-HT was quantitated in the cytoplasm of grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells and in mast cells using formaldehyde-vapor-induced fluorescence and microspectrofluorometry, and mast cell numbers were determined. Test rats had higher pulmonary 5-HT and histamine levels than controls at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Test rats also had higher cellular 5-HT compared to controls in NEB's at 1 mo., but not in NECs, and tended to have higher 5-HT-levels in mast cells at 6 mo. Mast cell numbers were higher among tests at 1 and 3 mo. The authors results suggest that NEBs may contribute to the early asbestos induced rise in 5-HT, and that the major source of 5-HT and histamine is from the increased numbers of mast cells.

  19. Sustaining neovascularization of a scaffold through staged release of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and platelet-derived growth factor-BB.

    PubMed

    Davies, Neil H; Schmidt, Christian; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Zilla, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration into a three-dimensional scaffold requires the stimulation of blood vessel ingrowth. We have employed a freely interconnecting porous scaffold developed by us to determine the utility of a covalently bound heparin surface coating for the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in vivo. The heparin surface was shown to release VEGF far more rapidly than PDGF-BB in vitro (VEGF: 75 ng/h for 24 h; PDGF-BB: 86 pg/h for >7 days). In rat subcutaneous implants, at 10 days the heparin surface alone increased vessel ingrowth substantially (p<0.05 vs. unmodified scaffold), release of VEGF resulted in a further increase (p<0.05 vs. heparinized scaffold), whereas PDGF-BB had no additional effect. The increase induced by the combination of growth factors was similar to VEGF alone. After 2 months, PDGF-BB, but not VEGF delivery, resulted in a substantial increase in vascularization above that induced by heparin (p<0.05). At the longer time point the combination of growth factors was similar to PDGF-BB. However, only the combination of growth factors significantly elevated the number of ingrowing arterioles (p<0.05 vs. heparinized scaffold). Thus, the covalent modification of a porous scaffold with heparin allows for the differential release of VEGF and PDGF-BB that results in both a rapid and sustained increase in scaffold vascularization.

  20. Regulation of insulin release by factors that also modify glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fahien, L A; MacDonald, M J; Kmiotek, E H; Mertz, R J; Fahien, C M

    1988-09-25

    Leucine and monomethyl succinate initiate insulin release, and glutamine potentiates leucine-induced insulin release. Alanine enhances and malate inhibits leucine plus glutamine-induced insulin release. The insulinotropic effect of leucine is at least in part secondary to its ability to activate glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase (Sener, A., Malaisse-Lagae, F., and Malaisse, W. J. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 78, 5460-5464). The effect of these other amino acids or Krebs cycle intermediates on insulin release also correlates with their effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and their ability to regulate inhibition of this enzyme by alpha-ketoglutarate. For example, glutamine enhances insulin release and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity only in the presence of leucine. This could be because leucine, especially in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, increases the Km of glutamate and converts alpha-ketoglutarate from a noncompetitive to a competitive inhibitor of glutamate. Thus, in the presence of leucine, this enzyme is more responsive to high levels of glutamate and less responsive to inhibition by alpha-ketoglutarate. Malate could decrease and alanine could increase insulin release because malate increases the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in islet mitochondria via the combined malate dehydrogenase-aspartate aminotransferase reaction, and alanine could decrease the level of alpha-ketoglutarate via the alanine transaminase reaction. Monomethyl succinate alone is as stimulatory of insulin release as leucine alone, and glutamine enhances the action of both. Succinyl coenzyme A, leucine, and GTP are all bound in the same region on glutamate dehydrogenase, where GTP is a potent inhibitor and succinyl coenzyme A and leucine are comparable activators. Thus, the insulinotropic properties of monomethyl succinate could result from it increasing the level of succinyl coenzyme A and decreasing the level of GTP via the succinate thiokinase reaction.

  1. Factor-dependent in vitro growth of human normal bone marrow-derived basophil-like cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    A factor(s) present in supernatants from lectin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells promoted the production of basophil-like cells in liquid cultures of normal human bone marrow cells. The cultured basophil-like cells had lobulated or round nuclei, and the cytoplasmic granules stained metachromatically with toluidine blue and azurophilic with Giemsa. 20% of the metachromatically staining cells were peroxidase positive but not positive for nonspecific esterase. The histamine content was 0.5-2 pg/cell. The basophil-like cells released histamine upon challenge with calcium ionophore A23187 but not with compound 48/80. They also released histamine with anti-IgE when passively sensitized with human myeloma IgE. The development of basophil-like cells was promoted in a dose-dependent fashion by a factor(s) in the conditioned medium. Blocking of cell proliferation with hydroxyurea or X irradiation inhibited the development of basophil- like cells. The production of the factor was dependent on the presence of T cells. The factor was different from interleukin 2 and its molecular weight was estimated to be 25,000-40,000 by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-200 column. Thus, human basophil-like cells derived from normal bone marrow cells can grow and differentiate in vitro under the regulation of T cells. PMID:6193237

  2. Histamine H3-receptor inverse agonists as novel antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chihiro

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) that is resistant to treatment with dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists may involve changes other than those in the dopaminergic system. Recently, histamine (HA), which regulates arousal and cognitive functions, has been suggested to act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Four HA receptors-H1, H2, H3, and H4-have been identified. Our recent basic and clinical studies revealed that brain HA improved the symptoms of SZ. The H3 receptor is primarily localized in the central nervous system, and it acts not only as a presynaptic autoreceptor that modulates the HA release but also as a presynaptic heteroreceptor that regulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as monoamines and amino acids. H3-receptor inverse agonists have been considered to improve cognitive functions. Many atypical antipsychotics are H3-receptor antagonists. Imidazole-containing H3-receptor inverse agonists inhibit not only cytochrome P450 but also hERG potassium channels (encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene). Several imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists also have high affinity for H4 receptors, which are expressed at high levels in mast cells and leukocytes. Clozapine is an H4-receptor agonist; this agonist activity may be related to the serious side effect of agranulocytosis caused by clozapine. Therefore, selective non-imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists can be considered as novel antipsychotics that may improve refractory SZ.

  3. The characterization of protein release from sericin film in the presence of an enzyme: towards fibroblast growth factor-2 delivery.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Ayumu; Naganuma, Tsuyoshi; Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Yamada, Masaki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2011-07-29

    Aqueous preparations of silk protein (sericin) films were prepared to evaluate their biodegradation properties. In the absence of trypsin, sericin film swelled rapidly, kept its shape, and remained unaltered for 28 days or longer due to form β-sheet structures. In the presence of trypsin, sericin film gradually degraded; since the rate depended on the concentration of trypsin, the films likely underwent enzymatic hydrolysis. Sericin film incorporating the model protein drug fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin (FA) also gradually degraded in the presence of trypsin and resulted in the sustained release of FA for 2 weeks or longer; in contrast, FA release was quite slow in the absence of trypsin. It is expected that sericin film has potential as a biodegradable and drug-releasing carrier. To evaluate the practical applicability of sericin film for the repair of defective tissues, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was incorporated into sericin films and the films were implanted on skull defects in rats. Whereas FGF-2 release was suppressed in the absence of trypsin in vitro, it appears that FGF-2, immobilized by ionic interactions between sericin and FGF-2, can be sustained-released in vivo from films incorporating 2500 or 250 ng of FGF-2 to support the growth of tissue around wounds.

  4. Polyoxomatelate functionalized tris(2,2-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) as the probe for electrochemiluminescence sensing of histamine.

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Chen, Zhuqiu; Zheng, Jiachun; Chen, Siyuan; Wang, Li; Su, Wenjin

    2016-03-01

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensing system was developed to determine histamine in aquatic food with tris(2,2-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) and Keggin-type polyoxomatelate (H3PMo12O40). A hybrid material was synthesized by mixing Keggin H3PMo12O40 (PMo12) and Ru(bpy)3(2+) and it was applied in capillary electrophoresis-electrochemiluminescence (CE-ECL) as a histamine probe for the first time. Some factors which affected the performances of separation and detection were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, one single quantitative analysis of histamine was achieved at a separation voltage of 16kV, and the limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3) of histamine was 1.0×10(-3)mg/L. The linear concentration range was between 0.01 and 1mg/L and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of peak height was between 0.27% and 1.29%, while the RSD of migration time was between 0.96% and 1.87%. The results indicated that the proposed probe presented good characteristics in terms of higher sensitivity and better reproducibility for histamine detection than those of the Ru(bpy)3(2+) ECL system.

  5. What Factors Are Related to Success on Conditional Release/Discharge? Findings from the New Orleans Forensic Aftercare Clinic: 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Manguno-Mire, Gina M.; Coffman, Kelly L.; DeLand, Sarah M.; Thompson, John W.; Myers, Leann

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the empirically based factors that predicted success on conditional release among a sample of individuals conditionally discharged in Louisiana. Not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees and individuals on conditional release/discharge for incompetency to stand trial were included in the study. Success on conditional release was defined as maintenance of conditional release during the study period. Recidivism (arrest on new charges) and incidents were empirically evaluated. Success on conditional release was maintained in over 70% of individuals. Recidivism was low, with only five arrests on new charges. Success on conditional release was predicted by financial resources, not having a personality disorder, and having fewer total incidents in the program. After controlling for the influence of other variables, having an incident on conditional release was predicted by a substance use diagnosis and being released from jail. Individuals conditionally released from jail showed fewer number of days to first incident (67 vs. 575 days) compared with individuals discharged from the hospital. These data provide support for the successful management of forensic patients in the community via conditional release, although they highlight specific factors that should be considered when developing community-based release programming. Conditional release programs should consider empirical factors in the development of risk assessment and risk management approaches to improve successful maintenance of community-based forensic treatment alternatives. PMID:25328070

  6. What factors are related to success on conditional release/discharge? Findings from the New Orleans forensic aftercare clinic: 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Manguno-Mire, Gina M; Coffman, Kelly L; DeLand, Sarah M; Thompson, John W; Myers, Leann

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the empirically based factors that predicted success on conditional release among a sample of individuals conditionally discharged in Louisiana. Not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees and individuals on conditional release/discharge for incompetency to stand trial were included in the study. Success on conditional release was defined as maintenance of conditional release during the study period. Recidivism (arrest on new charges) and incidents were empirically evaluated. Success on conditional release was maintained in over 70% of individuals. Recidivism was low, with only five arrests on new charges. Success on conditional release was predicted by financial resources, not having a personality disorder, and having fewer total incidents in the program. After controlling for the influence of other variables, having an incident on conditional release was predicted by a substance use diagnosis and being released from jail. Individuals conditionally released from jail showed fewer number of days to first incident (67 vs. 575 days) compared with individuals discharged from the hospital. These data provide support for the successful management of forensic patients in the community via conditional release, although they highlight specific factors that should be considered when developing community-based release programming. Conditional release programs should consider empirical factors in the development of risk assessment and risk management approaches to improve successful maintenance of community-based forensic treatment alternatives.

  7. Glutamatergic regulation of brain histamine neurons: In vivo microdialysis and electrophysiology studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fell, Matthew J; Flik, Gunnar; Dijkman, Ulrike; Folgering, Joost H A; Perry, Kenneth W; Johnson, Bryan J; Westerink, Ben H C; Svensson, Kjell A

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between the glutamatergic and the histaminergic systems in the brain are not fully understood. Here we studied histamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior hypothalamus-tuberomamillary nucleus (PH-TMN) using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiological recordings of histaminergc neurons in the PH-TMN in vivo to further address the mechanistic details of these interactions. We demonstrated that histaminergic activity was regulated by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR 2 and 3) using systemic dosing with mGluR 2/3 agonist and antagonists and an mGluR 2 positive allosteric modulator. These interactions likely occur via direct modulation of glutamate release in the PH-TMN. The importance of circadian rhythm for histamine release was also shown using microdialysis studies with mGluR 2/3 compounds under light and dark conditions. Based on histamine release studies with NMDA and ketamine, we propose the existence of two sub-populations of NMDA receptors where one subtype is located on histaminergic cell bodies in the PH-TMN and the second on GABA-ergic neurons projecting to the PH-TMN. These subpopulations could be distinguished based on function, notably opposing actions were seen on histamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex of the rat. In summary, this paper provides evidence that the histaminergic system is closely regulated by glutamate neurons in multiple ways. In addition, this interaction depends to a great extent on the activity state of the subject.

  8. Clinical risk factors for death after release from prison in Washington State: A nested case control study

    PubMed Central

    Binswanger, Ingrid A.; Stern, Marc F.; Yamashita, Traci E.; Mueller, Shane R.; Baggett, Travis P.; Blatchford, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims While mortality rates after prison release are high, little is known about clinical risk factors for death. We sought to identify risk and protective factors for all-cause and accidental poisoning (overdose) death. Design Nested case control study of people released from prison. Setting Washington State Department of Corrections, Washington, USA. Participants Cases (699 all-cause deaths, of which 88 were among women, and 206 additional overdose deaths, of which 76 were among women) between 1999 and 2009 matched 1:1 to controls on sex, age and year of release using risk set sampling. Measurements Prison medical charts were abstracted for clinical information. Independent associations between clinical characteristics and all-cause and overdose mortality were assessed using conditional logistic regression. Findings Key independent risk factors for all-cause mortality included homelessness (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.06, 2.23), injection drug use (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.15, 2.05), tobacco use (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.06, 2.12), cirrhosis (OR 4.42, 95% CI 1.63, 11.98), and psychiatric medications before release (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.71, 3.29). Independent risk factors for overdose mortality included substance dependence (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.32, 4.11), injection drug use (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.53, 3.86), panic disorder (OR 3.87, 95% CI 1.62, 9.21), psychiatric prescriptions before release (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.55, 3.85), and problems with opiates/sedatives (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.40, 5.63). Substance use disorder treatment during the index incarceration was protective for all-cause (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49, 0.91) and overdose (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35, 0.90) mortality. Conclusions Injection drug use and substance use disorders are risk factors for death after release from prison. In-prison substance use treatment services may reduce the risk. PMID:26476210

  9. Factors Affecting Release of Heat-Labile Enterotoxin by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Steven L.; Robertson, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Various conditions affecting the release of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli have been examined. The pH of a defined medium containing three amino acids, M-9 salts, and 0.5% glucose decreased to less than 7.0 in early log phase of growth, and no extracellular LT was detected. Adjustment of the pH at 8 h from 6.0 to 8.0 resulted in a concomitant increase in LT activity in culture supernatants. The release of cell-associated LT was significantly reduced by preincubation with protease inhibitors and increased by preincubation with trypsin. Cell-associated LT was not released by pH adjustment of cells grown at 21°C; however, polymyxin B treatment released a toxin species active in only the pigeon erythrocyte lysate (PEL) assay system. As the growth temperature was increased, polymyxin B released toxin species which exhibited both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell activity. Polymyxin B extracts of enterotoxigenic E. coli in early log phase grown at 37°C possessed only PEL activity, whereas extracts from cells in late-log and stationary phases had biological activity in both assay systems. Also, LT released by pH adjustment from mid-log to stationary phase was active in both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assays. Gel electrophoresis of polymyxin B extracts revealed at least three molecular weight species active in either the PEL (22,000 daltons and 30,000 daltons) or both the PEL and the Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assay (72,000 daltons), depending on the growth temperature. These observations may help to explain the chemical and biological heterogeneity of most LT preparations and facilitate purification of LT by increasing the yield of enterotoxin. PMID:37162

  10. Effects of environmental factors on the molluscicidal activities of slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane and copper sulfate*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K. Y.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the molluscicidal activities of slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane (TBTO) and copper sulfate under various environmental conditions. Organic materials such as mud and weeds reduced the molluscicidal efficacy of both chemicals. TBTO can be considered a good long-lasting molluscicide but, because of uncertainty as to its general toxic effects, it should not be used in field trials. The molluscicidal activity of slow-release copper sulfate was short-lived in plain lake water and was nil in the presence of mud or weeds at the concentration used. PMID:1088355

  11. Histamine receptors expressed in circulating progenitor cells have reciprocal actions in ligation-induced arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Guo, Xin; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2013-09-01

    Histamine is synthesized as a low-molecular-weight amine from L-histidine by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Recently, we demonstrated that carotid artery-ligated HDC gene-deficient mice (HDC(-/-)) showed less neointimal formation than wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that histamine participates in the process of arteriosclerosis. However, little is known about the roles of histamine-specific receptors (HHRs) in arteriosclerosis. To define the roles of HHRs in arteriosclerosis, we investigated intimal remodeling in ligated carotid arteries of HHR-deficient mice (H1R(-/-) or H2R(-/-)). Quantitative analysis showed that H1R(-/-) mice had significantly less arteriosclerogenesis, whereas H2R(-/-) mice had more, as compared with WT mice. Bone marrow transplantation from H1R(-/-) or H2R(-/-) to WT mice confirmed the above observation. Furthermore, the increased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), adhesion molecules and liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR3), interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R), was consistent with the arteriosclerotic phenotype of H2R(-/-) mice. Peripheral progenitor cells in H2R(-/-) mice accelerate ligation-induced arteriosclerosis through their regulation of MCP-1, PDGF, adhesion molecules and LXR-related inflammatory signaling factors. In contrast, peripheral progenitor cells act to suppress arteriosclerosis in H1R(-/-) mice, indicating that HHRs reciprocally regulate inflammation in the ligation-induced arteriosclerosis.

  12. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiufen; Zafar, Mohammad Ishraq; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs) and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or with interleukin (IL)-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL). We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA)323-339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days later. IL-13 production was higher in bone marrow DCs generated with GM-CSF than in those generated with GM-CSF + IL-4. OVA-pulsed DCs and OVA-plus-DCL DCs showed increased IL-12 levels. OVA plus LPS increased both IL-10 and interferon-α. Although histamine or histamine receptor-1 antagonists did not influence DC LPS

  13. Histamine H3 receptors, the complex interaction with dopamine and its implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, B A

    2013-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptors are best known as presynaptic receptors inhibiting the release of histamine, as well as other neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and dopamine. However, in the dorsal and ventral striatum, the vast majority of H3 receptors are actually located postsynaptically on medium sized spiny output neurons. These cells also contain large numbers of dopamine (D1 and D2) receptors and it has been shown that H3 receptors form heterodimers with both D1 and D2 receptors. Thus, the anatomical localization of H3 receptors suggests a complex interaction that could both enhance and inhibit dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine, especially within the striatal complex, plays a crucial role in the development of addiction, both in the initial reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, as well as in maintenance, relapse and reinstatement of drug taking behaviour. It is, therefore, conceivable that H3 receptors can moderate the development and maintenance of drug addiction. In the present review, we appraise the current literature on the involvement of H3 receptors in drug addiction and try to explain these data within a theoretical framework, as well as provide suggestions for further research. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23647606

  14. Enhanced incorporation of fatty acid into phosphatidyl choline that parallels histamine discharge in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.D.; Castle, A.M.; Ma, A.K.; Stukenbrok, H.

    1984-01-01

    Purified rat peritoneal and pleural mast cells preincubated briefly with radioactively labeled fatty acid were treated with A23187, which bypasses primary receptors in stimulating exocytosis. An enhanced incorporation of fatty acid into phosphatidyl choline (PC) that occurred in parallel with histamine release at 24-25 degrees C was observed and was initially proportional to the total amount of histamine discharged. Enhanced PC labeling and histamine secretion were also proportional at temperatures ranging from 17-37 degrees C. Both radioactive linoleic and palmitic acids were incorporated selectively at the beta-position of the glycerol backbone of PC. PC labeling by (3H)choline was not detectably different in control and stimulated cells, and phosphatidic acid did not exhibit selectively enhanced beta-acylation. Thus, the stimulated labeling in A23187-treated cells may occur secondary to the action of a phospholipase A2 that favors PC as a substrate. Other peritoneal cell types exhibit a very similar A23187-stimulat

  15. Histamine H3 receptor blockade improves cardiac function in canine anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Chrusch, C; Sharma, S; Unruh, H; Bautista, E; Duke, K; Becker, A; Kepron, W; Mink, S N

    1999-10-01

    In anaphylactic shock (AS), the relative effects of the autacoids including histamine, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes on causing cardiovascular collapse and the extent to which receptor blocking agents and pathway inhibitors may prevent this collapse are not clear. In a ragweed model of anaphylaxis, we examined whether pretreatment with H1, H2, H3 receptor blockers, and cyclooxygenase and leukotriene pathway inhibitors was useful in preventing the depression in left ventricular (LV) contractility known to occur in this model. The dose of allergen was varied to produce similar degrees of shock between treatments. The animals were studied under pentobarbital anesthesia in which the treatment studies were approximately 3 wk apart. LV volumes were measured by sonomicrometric techniques. During challenge, mean arterial blood pressure (Pa), cardiac output (Q), and LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) decreased approximately 50% compared with preshock values in all treatments. Histamine H3 receptor blockade was associated with higher heart rates (HR) and higher stroke work (SW) (p < 0.05) as compared with the other treatment studies. We conclude that histamine H3 activation by inhibiting adrenergic neural norepinephrine release contributes to cardiovascular collapse in AS.

  16. Tyrosine Pretreatment Alleviates Suppression of Schedule-Controlled Responding Produced by Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology