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Sample records for histamine symposium held

  1. FIRST BH COCHRANE SYMPOSIUM HELD

    PubMed Central

    Mahmic-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Novo, Ahmed; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela

    2016-01-01

    The first BH Cochrane Symposium was held on 12 October 2015 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), organized by the Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Healthcare in Federation of BH (AKAZ) and Medical Faculty University of Sarajevo. A group of ten national and international experts presented the Cochrane organization and systematic reviews, as well as the IMPACT Observatory, development of guidelines in BH, and the role of AKAZ. Examples of the development and use of Cochrane reviews in evidence informed decision making in health as well as research integrity were presented and discussed. Major BH decision makers and interested professionals from all over BH participated in a symposium and its lively discussion, especially from the perspective of Cochrane and its activities in BH, and the collaboration with the Croatian Cochrane. It can be expected that this symposium will inspire further growth of participation and use of Cochrane in BH and increase the awareness of various aspects of evidence informed medicine and research integrity. PMID:27047274

  2. Beneficial Modifications of the Marine Environment. A Symposium Held March 11, 1968, Washington, D.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This volume contains papers presented at a symposium on beneficial modifications of the marine environment held in March, 1968. Included are four papers and accompanying discussions. One paper discusses the reason that the presence or absence of ice on the sea can influence the formation of climate and looks into the following two questions: (1)…

  3. Preserving Your Historical Records. Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Drake University (Des Moines, Iowa, October 21-22, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishbein, Toby, Ed.; Perry, Alan F., Ed.

    This volume is the edited transcript of the tape-recorded symposium of archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and historical agency administrators, which was held at Drake Univrsity in the fall of 1978. The papers presented are "The Law and Public Records: The Iowa Context" by Peter T. Harstad; "Being Selective: What to Collect and Preserve"…

  4. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Energy Science: Remarks from Steve Chu at the Scientific Symposium Held in his Honor

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steve

    2016-07-12

    Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize, presents a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium in his honor. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.

  5. Reproductive biology, stem cells biotechnology and regenerative medicine: a 1-day national symposium held at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Akyash, Fatemeh; Tahajjodi, Somayyeh Sadat; Sadeghian-Nodoushan, Fatemeh; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Abdoli, Ali-Mohammad; Nikukar, Habib; Aflatoonian, Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a 1 day national symposium entitled “Reproductive biology, stem cells biotechnology and regenerative medicine” held at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran on 3rd March 2016. Here, we collected the papers that presented and discussed at this meeting by specialists that currently researched about the overlaps of the fields of reproductive biology and stem cells and their applications in regenerative medicine.

  6. Report on the 13th symposium on invertebrate neurobiology held 26-30 August 2015 at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for ecological research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Crisford, Anna; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the lectures and posters presented at the International Society for Invertebrate Neurobiology's 13th symposium held 26-30 August 2015, at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Tihany, Hungary. The symposium provided an opportunity for scientists working on a range of topics in invertebrate neurobiology to meet and present their research and discuss ways to advance the discipline.

  7. [Conclusions of an international symposium held at Aachen on 4 and 5 May about mucolytic agents, especially oral acetylcysteine].

    PubMed

    Minette, A

    1979-01-01

    The usefulness of mucolytics for clinical purposes remains controversial. Although many authors agree with the opinion that some of these drugs, above all aerosols of acetylcysteine at convenient dosages, provided they are associated with beta 2-sympathomimetics, may be useful in the treatment of bronchial obstruction due to inspissated mucus in excess in the lumens, many specialists remain reluctant concerning the activity of mucolytics given by mouth. It seemed therefore interesting to organize an international meeting on this topic. First of all, I would like to pay honour to the initiative of the Zambon Laboratories who organized this symposium. I would also like to express my gratitude for having been involved in the preparation of the programme of these days and having been asked to present the general conclusions of the meeting. The following pages are devoted to these conclusions. We shall repeatedly make reference to the works which were presented in extenso during the meeting. The general report of the symposium will shortly appear in a special supplement of the European Journal of Respiratory Diseases. It seems however useful to give at the end of our text the complete list of the presented lectures.

  8. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Vinoy, Sophie; Laville, Martine; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1) the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS); 2) clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3) interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D. PMID:27388153

  9. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015).

    PubMed

    Vinoy, Sophie; Laville, Martine; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1) the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS); 2) clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3) interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D.

  10. Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies Held in Cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland-University College Inn and Conference Center March 23-26, 1998. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, tape optimization, new technology, performance, standards, site reports, vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on shared file systems, file system backups, data mining, and the dynamics of obsolescence.

  11. Considerations for the clinical application of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: observations from a recombinant DNA Advisory Committee Symposium held June 15, 2010.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund C J; Zaia, John; Rosenberg, Steven A; June, Carl H; Dotti, Gianpietro; Kahn, Jeffrey; Cooper, Laurence J N; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline; Strome, Scott E

    2011-05-01

    T cells that are genetically modified to express single-chain chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) have shown promise in early cancer immunotherapy clinical trials. Unfortunately, 2 recent deaths in cancer patients treated with CAR T cells have created some uncertainty on how to best mitigate patient risk, while continuing to advance this very promising therapeutic avenue. In order to address these concerns, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) held a symposium, the objectives of which were to first review the reported treatment-associated toxicities and, second, to discuss methods for improving safety and efficacy. This report highlights the issues raised as part of this discussion, with a specific focus on protocols infusing CAR T cells. Because this was not a consensus conference, the opinions described should not be construed to represent those of any individual RAC member, the RAC as a body, conference participants, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  12. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life.

  13. Subject Retrieval in the Seventies; New Directions. Proceedings of an International Symposium Held at the Center of Adult Education, University of Maryland, College Park, May 14 to 15, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellisch, Hans, Ed.; Wilson, Thomas D., Ed.

    The papers presented at a symposium on subject retrieval held at the University of Maryland in May 1971 are contained in this proceedings volume. The titles of the speeches are as follows: (1) Subject retrieval in the seventies -- methods, problems, prospects; (2) Recent research trends in the field of information retrieval languages; (3) A…

  14. In Pursuit of Useful Knowledge. A Symposium Held on the Occasion of the Governor's Awards for Excellence in the Arts, Humanities and Sciences. (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 3, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Governor's Office, Harrisburg.

    This document presents the proceedings of a symposium on education and the arts, humanities, and sciences convened by the State of Pennsylvania. The document begins with an introduction by Sondra Myers, Cultural Advisor to Governor, Robert P. Casey. The symposium was moderated by Thomas K. Gilhool, Secretary of Education, Commonwealth of…

  15. Handling of Nuclear Information; Proceedings of the Symposium... Organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and Held in Vienna, 16-20 February 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    An international nuclear information system (INIS) which applies computer techniques to the management of the world's nuclear literature is about to come into operation. This prompted the International Atomic Energy Agency to hold a symposium to provide a comprehensive review of the facilities and services available in the world for providing…

  16. Papers Presented at the ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Academic Education in Computer Science [held in Houston, Texas, November 16, 1970].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Robert M., Ed.

    1970-01-01

    The papers given at this symposium were selected for their description of how specific problems were tackled, and with what success, as opposed to proposals unsupported by experience. The goal was to permit the audience to profit from the trials (and errors) of others. The eighteen papers presented are: "Business and the University Computer…

  17. 32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

  18. Pacific Nations Broadcasting III and Bibliography; Symposium held at the Annual Broadcast Industry Conference (24th, San Francisco, April 21-25, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Benjamin, Ed.

    Contained in this document are the papers presented at the twenty-fourth annual Broadcast Industry Conference held at California State University in San Francisco in 1974. Following welcoming remarks, the contents include papers on a mass communication plan for India, plans for an institute for international communication located at San Francisco…

  19. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  20. Update from the''Radiochemistry at RIA'' Symposium held March 27, 2003 at the 225th American Chemical Society Meeting in New Orleans, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M A; Mantica, P F

    2003-05-27

    The scientific case for a new high-luminosity Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) Facility capable of accelerating essentially the entire chart of the nuclides has been established over more than a decade.[1-5] Preliminary experiments at new facilities [6] are promising as the frontier of RIB research continues to expand at a fast rate. Radiochemical experiments that could benefit many areas of research, from the basic science of astrophysics and heavy element research, to the applied science of Stockpile Stewardship and medical isotope production, are now for the first time being seriously discussed for a RIB facility. This paper attempts to highlight some areas of research which may be significantly enhanced should a premier radiochemical facility be co-located at a RIB accelerator facility such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). The purpose of the symposium was to gather together experts in a variety of fields to discuss the harvesting of radionuclides and its potential benefits to research in the heavy element research, medical isotope production, Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), environmental research, medical astrophysics and educational fields. Preliminary ideas as to the engineering features required for such a facility at RIA, to generate, handle, store and use isotopes of interest potentially containing very high levels of radioactivity, were discussed.

  1. Circadian variation of brain histamine in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tiffany A; Huston, Joseph P; Spieler, Richard E

    2003-01-15

    Teleosts may make an excellent model to study brain histamine function. Fishes are phylogenetically closer to the basic vertebrate blueprint than higher vertebrates. They appear to have a simpler histaminergic system in terms of central nervous system distribution and, contrary to higher vertebrates, brain histamine appears to be strictly neuronal. In this preliminary study, we examined circadian variation of brain histamine in goldfish, Carassius auratus, as this neurotransmitter correlates with circadian behavior of some mammals. Two groups of juvenile goldfish were held in 24 60L aquaria, six fish per aquarium, on reversed photoperiods; L:D 12:12 with light onset either at 0700 or 1900h. Fish were sampled every 4h. At a sampling time, all the fish in a tank were taken; each sampling, for both groups, was done in replicate. Brain histamine was determined by immunoassay. There was a significant circadian variation in histamine on both photoperiod regimes with the highest levels during the photophase. These results support the hypothesis of an early phylogenic role for histamine in vertebrate circadian physiology.

  2. Symposium Promotes Technological Literacy through STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havice, Bill; Marshall, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a symposium which promotes technological literacy through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The three-day symposium titled, "The Anderson, Oconee, Pickens Symposium on Teaching and Learning STEM Standards for the 21st Century," was held August 4-6, 2008 at the Tri-County Technical College (TCTC)…

  3. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  4. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  5. 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held in Pasadena Hilton, Pasadena, California on May 16-18, 2012. Lockheed Martin Space Systems cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include gimbals and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and Mars Science Laboratory mechanisms.

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2003 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, HELD AT THE 2003 NEW ENGLAND FUEL INSTITUTE CONVENTION AND 30TH NORTH AMERICAN HEATING AND ENERGY EXPOSITION, HYNES CONVENTION CENTER, PRUDENTIAL CENTER, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, JUNE 9 - 10, 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2003-06-09

    This meeting is the sixteenth oilheat industry technology meeting held since 1984 and the third since the National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) was formed. This year's symposium is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Fuel Flexibility Program under the United States Department of Energy, Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability Program (DEER). The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  7. Histamine and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Torrealba, Fernando; Riveros, Maria E.; Contreras, Marco; Valdes, Jose L.

    2012-01-01

    Brain histamine may affect a variety of different behavioral and physiological functions; however, its role in promoting wakefulness has overshadowed its other important functions. Here, we review evidence indicating that brain histamine plays a central role in motivation and emphasize its differential involvement in the appetitive and consummatory phases of motivated behaviors. We discuss the inputs that control histaminergic neurons of the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus, which determine the distinct role of these neurons in appetitive behavior, sleep/wake cycles, and food anticipatory responses. Moreover, we review evidence supporting the dysfunction of histaminergic neurons and the cortical input of histamine in regulating specific forms of decreased motivation (apathy). In addition, we discuss the relationship between the histamine system and drug addiction in the context of motivation. PMID:22783171

  8. 2001 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on June 19-21, 2001. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to attitude/orbit determination, prediction and control; attitude simulation; attitude sensor calibration; theoretical foundation of attitude computation; dynamics model improvements; autonomous navigation; constellation design and formation flying; estimation theory and computational techniques; Earth environment mission analysis and design; and, spacecraft re-entry mission design and operations.

  9. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  10. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  11. The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

  12. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  13. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The third Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS) was held 12-16 Jul. 1993, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. More than 800 presentations were made, and those abstracts are included in this publication.

  14. Proceedings of the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains summaries of the papers presented at the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, California, on 18-21 Jan. 1993. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overview of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans. This symposium is the third in a series of 'Spaceborne Imaging Radar' symposia held at JPL. The first symposium was held in Jan. 1983 and the second in 1986.

  15. A Symposium on Home and Family Life in a Changing Civilization. Addresses Delivered at the Second Regional Conference on Home Making Held at Ames, Iowa, November 10 and 11, 1930. Bulletin, 1931, No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, John William; Leib, Karl E.; Todd, Arthur J.; Lancelot, William E.

    1931-01-01

    This bulletin comprises a symposium on Home and Family Life in a Changing Civilization by William John Cooper, United States Commissioner of Education; Karlee E. Lib, professor of commerce, University of Iowa; Arthur J. Todd, professor of sociology, North-Wester University; and William H. Lancelot, head, vocational education department, Iowa State…

  16. SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS AND YOUNG SCIENTISTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM ENTITLED LANHTANIDES AND ACTINIDES: A CHEMISTS'S PERSPECTIVE MARCH 21-25, 2010 HELD IN SAN FRANCISCO, CA

    SciTech Connect

    CATHY S. CUTLER

    2011-02-01

    DOE Award DE-SC0003653 of $6,000.00 was used to support early career scientist to attend the Lanthanide and Actinide Symposium at the ACS meeting in March in San Francisco 2010. The award was for $6,000.00 and was used to support 12 early career scientists at $500.00/each.

  17. Histamine and histamine receptor regulation of gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Lindsey; Hodges, Kyle; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter released throughout the body that regulates multiple physiological responses. Primarily histamine is acknowledged for its role in inflammatory reactions to foreign pathogens that enter the body. Aside from inflammatory responses, histamine expression and synthesis has been detected in various cancer cell lines and multiple malignancies. Through experimentation histamine has demonstrated its ability to manage proliferation and angiogenesis in these cancerous cells, in either a positive or inhibitory manner. Regulation of angiogenesis and proliferation have been proven to be carried out by the stimulation or inhibition of numerous pathways and secondary response elements, such as VEGFA/C, IP3/Ca2+, G-proteins, cAMP, and many more. The activation of these different response pathways is linked to the binding of ligands to the histamine receptors H1-H4HR. These receptors exhibit various effects dependent on whether it binds an agonist, antagonist, or its specific ligand, histamine. In cancer cell lines and different tumor cells the binding of these different compounds has shown to be one of the main components in exerting proliferative or antiproliferative changes in the microenvironment. It is also known that the histamine receptors have varying degrees of expression in different forms of cancer, and this expression can impact the tumor in various ways. This clearly indicates the significance of histamine receptors in cancer formation, and one of the aims of this review is to cover this topic concisely and in depth. Histamine is produced from numerous cells such as basophils and mast cells and is synthesized from the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). In this review we will prominently discuss the function of mast cells and HDC in histamine expression in various gastrointestinal carcinomas. We also briefly discuss current studies to support these claims. In this review we hope to give the reader a clear and comprehensible overview of

  18. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  19. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  20. The Ninth National Space Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipskin, Beth Ann; Patterson, Sara; Brescia, David A.; Burk, Donna; Flannery, Jack; St. John, Pat; Zimkas, Chuck

    Proceedings of the Ninth National Space Symposium held 13-16 April 1993 by the United States Space Foundation are presented. Presentations made at the symposium are included. Topics discussed include: Change, Challenge and Opportunity; Washington Insiders: National Space Policy and Budget Issues; Civil Space: a Vision for the Future; Space Power for an Expanded Vision; Unparalled Launch Vehicle Propulsion Capabilities; National Security Space Issues; Perspectives on the Air Force in Space; Future Technology: Space Propulsion, Earth Observation and International Cooperation; Achieving Efficient Space Transportation; the Future in Space Exploration; Kids, Parents and Teachers are into Space; and Public Congressional Forum on Space - International Space Issues.

  1. 1985 EPRI cogeneration symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Limaye, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    In April 1985, EPRI sponsored a two-day Symposium on cogeneration to examine the major issues of current interest to utilities. The Symposium, held in San Diego, California, provided a forum for the review and exchange of information on the recent cogeneration experiences of utilities. Specific topics discussed included Cogeneration as a Utility Planning Option, Assessing Cogeneration Potential, Utility Participation in Cogeneration Ventures, and Negotiating Cogeneration Contracts. Some of the critical issues relative to cogeneration from the utility perspective were also explored in case studies, panel discussions, and question/answer sessions. A workshop on future research needs was also included.

  2. Growth and histamine formation of Morganella morganii in determining the safety and quality of inoculated and uninoculated bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix).

    PubMed

    Lorca, T A; Gingerich, T M; Pierson, M D; Flick, G J; Hackney, C R; Sumner, S S

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of normal microflora and Morganella morganii on histamine formation and olfactory acceptability in raw bluefish under controlled storage conditions. Fillets inoculated with and without M. morganii were stored at 5, 10, and 15 degrees C for 7 days. Microbial isolates from surface swabs were identified and screened for histidine decarboxylase activity. Olfactory acceptance was performed by an informal sensory panel. Histamine levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. While olfactory acceptance decreased, histamine concentration and bacterial counts increased. Storage temperature had a significant effect on histamine levels, bacterial counts, and olfactory acceptance of the bluefish. Inoculation with M. morganii had a positive significant effect on histamine formation for bluefish held at 10 and 15 degrees C (P < 0.0001). The results of the study will serve in supporting U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations regarding guidance and hazard levels of histamine in fresh bluefish.

  3. Proceedings: 1986 EPRI cogeneration symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Limaye, D.R.

    1987-06-01

    On October 14-15, 1986, EPRI sponsored a Symposium on cogeneration to examine the major issues of current interest to utilities. The Symposium, held in Washington, DC, provided a forum for the review and exchange of information on the recent cogeneration experiences of utilities. Specific topics discussed were federal cogeneration regulations and their impacts on utilities, cogeneration trends and prospects, utility leadership in cogeneration ventures, strategic utility planning relative to cogeneration, small cogeneration: implications for utilities; and electric alternatives to cogeneration. Some of the critical issues relative to cogeneration from the utility perspective were explored in case studies, discussions and question/answer sessions. This report contains the 24 papers presented and discussed at the Symposium. They are processed separately for the data base.

  4. Brain histamine and feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yamatodani, A

    2001-10-15

    Food intake is regulated by many endogenous substances, such as peptides and neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Based on the clinical observation that some antidepressants and antipsychotics with antihistaminic activity stimulate food intake and increase body weight, histamine has been thought to be an anorectic agent. Several lines of evidence suggest that histamine decreases food intake via H(1)-receptors (H1R) at least in the ventromedial hypothalamus or the paraventricular nucleus. Recently, mutant mice lacking H1R were generated and the interaction between the histaminergic system and leptin-induced suppression of food intake was evidenced by using these mice. In regulating food intake, histamine is indicated to functionally associate with neuropeptide Y, peptide YY, and bombesin. However, the question remained as to why the circadian variation in the level of histamine is inversely correlated to the pattern of feeding.

  5. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4) "The Call of Research: A…

  6. Symposium Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Richard G.

    2016-02-01

    The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the origin of electron spin are described in historical context. SPIN 2014 occurs on the fortieth anniversary of the first International High Energy Spin Physics Symposium at Argonne in 1974. A brief history of the international spin conference series is presented.

  7. 76 FR 17137 - Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium AGENCY... announcing the following meeting: Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium. The topic to be discussed is ``Prescription Drug Use in Pregnancy.'' Date and Time: The meeting will be held on May 17,...

  8. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  9. CPTAC Scientific Symposium Highlights - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The first CPTAC Public Scientific Symposium was recently held on November 13, 2013 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. The symposium brought together a record number of registrants, 450 scientists, who shared and discussed novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  10. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  11. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  12. Symposium on the Definition of Death: Summary Statement.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Melissa; Condic, Maureen L

    2016-06-01

    This statement summarizes the conclusions of the Symposium on the Definition of Death, held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. After providing the background and context for contemporary debates about brain death and describing the aims of the symposium, the statement notes points of unanimous and broad agreement among the participants, and highlights areas for further study.

  13. Symposium on the Definition of Death: Summary Statement.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Melissa; Condic, Maureen L

    2016-06-01

    This statement summarizes the conclusions of the Symposium on the Definition of Death, held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. After providing the background and context for contemporary debates about brain death and describing the aims of the symposium, the statement notes points of unanimous and broad agreement among the participants, and highlights areas for further study. PMID:27102243

  14. The 1975 Ride Quality Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of papers reported at the 1975 Ride Quality Symposium held in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 11-12, 1975. The symposium, jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Department of Transportation, was held to provide a forum for determining the current state of the art relative to the technology base of ride quality information applicable to current and proposed transportation systems. Emphasis focused on passenger reactions to ride environment and on implications of these reactions to the design and operation of air, land, and water transportation systems acceptable to the traveling public. Papers are grouped in the following five categories: needs and uses for ride quality technology, vehicle environments and dynamics, investigative approaches and testing procedures, experimental ride quality studies, and ride quality modeling and criteria.

  15. The 58th Shock and Vibration Symposium, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Walter D. (Compiler); Pilkey, Barbara F. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the 58th Shock and Vibration Symposium, held in Huntsville, Alabama, October 13 to 15, 1987 are given. Mechanical shock, dynamic analysis, space shuttle main engine vibration, isolation and damping, and analytical methods are discussed.

  16. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology was held February 14-16, 2001 in San Diego, California, USA. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The symposium featured sixty nine presentations covering a wide variety of technical topics relevant to Terahertz Technology. The presentations can be divided into five broad technology areas: Hot Electron Bolometers, superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) technology, local oscillator (LO) technology, Antennas and Measurements, and Direct Detectors. The symposium provides scientists, engineers, and researchers working in the terahertz technology and science fields to engineers their work and exchange ideas with colleagues.

  17. An Introduction to the Third International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the highlights of the Third International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy, which was held at the Manly Pacific Hotel in Sydney, Australia from April 21-24, 2006. This symposium built on those held in Ottawa and Vancouver in 1999 and 2001 respectively and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and…

  18. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Inside the 2015 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Ciccarese, Chiara; Verri, Elena; Burattini, Luciano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Nolè, Franco; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Rosen Shingle Creek, Orlando, FL, USA, 26-28 February 2015 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium was held in Orlando (FL, USA), from 26 to 28 February 2015. This meeting was focused on 'Integrating Biology into patient-centric care' and represented an attractive opportunity for oncology professionals with a special interest in the diagnosis and treatment of genitourinary tumors. The identification and validation of biomarkers for tumor response had been the focus of several researchers at the symposium, together with the development of novel targeted agents. This report is a summary of the highlights on kidney and prostate tumors presented at the 2015 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium by various investigators.

  20. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  1. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  2. Histamine function in brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Novoa, L; Cacabelos, R

    2001-10-15

    The neurotransmitter histamine (HA) has been implicated in the regulation of numerous and important activities of the central nervous system as arousal, cognition, circadian rhythms and neuroendocrine regulation. The data presented here indicate the participation of the histaminergic system in central nervous system disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. We also present experimental data on histamine in an animal model of neurodegeneration and the cytotoxic effects of histamine on cultured rat endothelial cells. More studies are needed to investigate the role of the histaminergic system in central nervous system disorders. Peripheral cellular studies in health and disease, molecular studies on receptors and in vivo pharmacological studies may help us to better understand the function of the histaminergic system in health and disease.

  3. 77 FR 16048 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection 2012 West Coast Trade Symposium: “Harmonizing Trade for a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... Symposium: ``Harmonizing Trade for a Stronger Economy'' AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... Economy.'' This document announces that the West Coast trade symposium will be held in Long...

  4. Symposium on New Materials for Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Seth R.

    1991-01-01

    The New Materials for Nonlinear Optics Symposium was held at the American Chemical Society National Meeting, in Boston on April 22 to 26, 1990. The meeting was a success. Throughout the week the average attendance was over 150 people/session. Several speakers had attendance over 300. The ACS organized a press conference about the meeting, held on Wednesday April 25, 1990 at 2 pm. At the time, the organizers devoted considerable time to educating the press about the importance of NLO research and the potential impact the NLO devices will have on the average person. The American Chemical Society is publishing an ACS Symposium Series monograph edited by the symposium organizers, to provide a permanent record of the proceeding of this meeting.

  5. International Equine Ophthalmology Consortium (IEOC) Symposium.

    PubMed

    Gilger, B C; Brooks, D E

    2009-07-01

    This first IEOC symposium met its goals of gathering a group of leading equine ophthalmology clinicians and researchers to identify the challenges of the field. To facilitate collaboration, notes from round-table discussions, including the ideas and plans that were discussed are being complied and will be distributed to the attendees. Development of an IEOC membership organisation and website was discussed and supported by the group in an effort further to advance the science of equine ophthalmology. To present results from the collaborations made at this first IEOC meeting, an IEOC mini-symposium will be held at the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists Annual Meeting in Chicago Illinois, on 6th November 2009. The second annual IEOC symposium will be held in Vienna, Austria on 4th and 5th June 2010.

  6. The 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by NASA Johnson Space Center and held at the South Shore Harbour Conference Facility on May 17-19, 1995, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  7. Women on Campus: 1970; A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Center for Continuing Education for Women.

    The symposium: Women on Campus, 1970, held at Michigan University on October 14, 1970, centered on 3 major topics: "Toward a New Psychology of Women"; "The Case of the Woman Graduate Student"; and "The University and Women." The papers that were presented concerning the first topic included: "Internal Barriers to Achievement in Women--An…

  8. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  9. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  11. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  12. The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancini, Ron (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  13. The 22nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium, which was held at the NASA Langley Research Center, on May 4 to 6, 1988, are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for space station docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  14. Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehe, David K.

    2015-06-01

    On June 9-12, 2014, the Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Applications (SORMA XV) took place at the University of Michigan campus. This was the 15th in the long-running series traditionally held every four years in Ann Arbor, and marked its 50th anniversary since inception. Attendance peaked again at nearly 500 conferees, with 135 students in attendance.

  15. The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation was held in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, from August 11-14, 2013, under the auspices of the International Society for Horticultural Science. The town of Fort Collins is home to the USDA-ARS, National Center for Genetic Resources Preservati...

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  17. Immunology update: symposium on antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Silver, R M

    1997-02-01

    The seventh international symposium on antiphospholipid antibodies was held in New Orleans, LA, USA, on October 9-13, 1996. The meeting was attended by over 230 people and was hosted by Azzudin E. Gharavi and Wendell A. Wilson. Workshops were also conducted on assays for lupus anticoagulant, antiphospholipid antibodies, and anti-endothelial cell antibodies. PMID:9080388

  18. The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  19. Symposium: A Beginning in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Peter; Fry, Paul H.; Carnochan, W. B.; Culler, Jonathan; Lerer, Seth; Marshall, Donald G.; Johnson, Barbara; Steiner, Wendy; Haack, Susan; Nussbaum, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    2001 marked Yale's 300th birthday. It seemed an opportunity for reflection on the evolution of the institution, and particularly on the vicissitudes of the humanities over those three centuries. This article presents essays which represent a selection from the symposium, "Beginning With the Humanities," held at the Whitney Humanities Center on…

  20. Histamine increases sickle erythrocyte adherence to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthew C; Eckman, James R; Wick, Timothy M

    2006-02-01

    Complications of sickle cell anaemia include vascular occlusion triggered by the adherence of sickle erythrocytes to endothelium in the postcapillary venules. Adherence can be promoted by inflammatory mediators that induce endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and arrest flowing erythrocytes. The present study characterised the effect of histamine stimulation on the kinetics of sickle cell adherence to large vessel and microvascular endothelium under physiological flow. Increased sickle cell adherence was observed within minutes of endothelial activation by histamine and reached a maximum value within 30 min. At steady state, sickle cell adherence to histamine-stimulated endothelium was 47 +/- 4 adherent cells/mm(2), 2.6-fold higher than sickle cell adherence to unstimulated endothelial cells. Histamine-induced sickle cell adherence occurred rapidly and transiently. Studies using histamine receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that histamine-induced sickle cell adhesion depends on simultaneous stimulation of the H(2) and H(4) histamine receptors and endothelial P-selectin expression. These data show that histamine release may promote sickle cell adherence and vaso-occlusion. In vivo histamine release should be studied to determine its role in sickle complications and whether blocking of specific histamine receptors may prevent clinical complications or adverse effects from histamine release stimulated by opiate analgesic treatment.

  1. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  2. 37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  3. 39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  4. DOE Grant to organize "International Symposium on Opportunities in Underground Physics", Asilomar, CA, May 24-27, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Kaladi S.

    2015-03-16

    The International Symposium in Opportunities in Underground Physics (ISOUP) was held in Asilomar, CA during May 24-27, 2013. The Symposium brought together scientists from the US and abroad for an open discussion on science opportunities provided by the possibility of a new generation of large underground detectors associated with long baseline neutrino beams. The Symposium was highly successful. The main focus of the Symposium was the science goals that could be achieved by placing such a detector deep underground.

  5. 1992 STEP Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Tony

    The year 1992 marks the quincentenary jubilee of the famous voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World, a trip which initiated sustained contact between Europe and the American continent. Courageous explorations often lead to advancement of mankind, be they in uncharted territory or science. As much as Columbus was unaware of what lay in store for his voyage, we were just as poorly informed about what lay beyond our home planet when we began space exploration about three decades ago. There is much similarity among the pioneering spirits characteristic of both endeavors. It is thus fitting to celebrate this quincentenary occasion by declaring 1992 International Space Year (ISY).In conjunction with the COSPAR Meeting and the International Convention of the World Space Congress to be held in Washington, D.C., from August to September 1992, a 4-day symposium on the initial results from the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) Facilities and Theory Campaigns will be held at Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., August 24-27. 1992.

  6. Effects of multivalent histamine supported on gold nanoparticles: activation of histamine receptors by derivatized histamine at subnanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gasiorek, Friederike; Pouokam, Ervice; Diener, Martin; Schlecht, Sabine; Wickleder, Mathias S

    2015-10-21

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles with a functionalized ligand shell were synthesized and used as new histamine receptor agonists. Mercaptoundecanoic acid moieties were attached to the surface of the nanoparticles and derivatized with native histamine. The multivalent presentation of the immobilized ligands carried by the gold nanoparticles resulted in extremely low activation concentrations for histamine receptors on rat colonic epithelium. As a functional read-out system, chloride secretion resulting from stimulation of neuronal and epithelial histamine H1 and H2 receptors was measured in Ussing chamber experiments. These responses were strictly attributed to the histamine entities as histamine-free particles Au-MUDOLS or the monovalent ligand AcS-MUDA-HA proved to be ineffective. The vitality of the tissues used was not impaired by the nanoparticles.

  7. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  8. Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at The Nagaragawa Convention Center in Gifu, Japan, on October 30 - November 1, 1997. The symposium included 13 sessions in which a total of 35 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of maglev, controls, high critical temperature (T(sub c)) superconductivity, bearings, magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBS), levitation, modeling, and applications. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  9. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  10. Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Radisson Hotel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, on December 1-3, 1999. The symposium included 18 sessions in which a total of 53 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, controls, modeling, electromagnetic launch, magnetic suspension in wind tunnels, applications flywheel energy storage, rotating machinery, vibration isolation, and maglev. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  11. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  12. Feedback Systems. Symposium 28. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on feedback systems held at a conference on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "The Role of Feedback in Management Development Training" (K. Peter Kuchinke), reports on a survey-based study that investigated the role of feedback in nine management development training settings in a…

  13. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  14. Histamine in neurotransmission and brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Panula, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    Apart from its central role in the mediation of allergic reactions, gastric acid secretion and inflammation in the periphery, histamine serves an important function as a neurotransitter in the central nervous system. The histaminergic neurons originate from the tuberomamillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus and send projections to most parts of the brain. The central histamine system is involved in many brain functions such as arousal, control of pituitary hormone secretion, suppression ofeating and cognitive functions. The effects of neuronal histamine are mediated via G-protein-coupled H1-H4 receptors. The prominent role of histamine as a wake-promoting substance has drawn interest to treat sleep-wake disorders, especially narcolepsy, via modulation of H3 receptor function. Post mortem studies have revealed alterations in histaminergic system in neurological and psychiatric diseases. Brain histamine levels are decreased in Alzheimer's disease patients whereas abnormally high histamine concentrations are found in the brains of Parkinson's disease and schizophrenic patients. Low histamine levels are associated with convulsions and seizures. The release of histamine is altered in response to different types of brain injury: e.g. increased release of histamine in an ischemic brain trauma might have a role in the recovery from neuronal damage. Neuronal histamine is also involved in the pain perception. Drugs that increase brain and spinal histamine concentrations have antinociceptive properties. Histaminergic drugs, most importantly histamine H3 receptors ligands, have shown efficacy in many animal models of the above-mentioned disorders. Ongoing clinical trials will reveal the efficacy and safety of these drugs in the treatment of human patients.

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Histamine- and Non-Histamine-Producing Photobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Leon, Maria; Dunlap, Paul V.; Benner, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-producing bacteria (HPBs) have recently been identified from the marine environment. The identification and characterization of HPBs is important to developing effective mitigation strategies for scombrotoxin fish poisoning. We report here the draft genomes of seven histamine-producing and two non-histamine-producing marine Photobacterium strains. PMID:27660786

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Histamine- and Non-Histamine-Producing Photobacterium Strains.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Sanchez Leon, Maria; Dunlap, Paul V; Benner, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-producing bacteria (HPBs) have recently been identified from the marine environment. The identification and characterization of HPBs is important to developing effective mitigation strategies for scombrotoxin fish poisoning. We report here the draft genomes of seven histamine-producing and two non-histamine-producing marine Photobacterium strains. PMID:27660786

  17. Kitasato symposium 2010: new prospects for cytokines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Second Kitasato Symposium: New Prospects for Cytokines brought together researchers and rheumatologists to consider the essential role of cytokines in health and their contributions to autoimmunity. Topics addressed during the Symposium - which was held in Berlin, Germany from 27 to 29 May 2010 - included established and new cytokine targets in arthritis and autoimmunity and innovative aspects of osteoimmunology as well as current perspectives from translational and clinical studies. The keynote lecture, delivered by George Kollias, focused on insights gained from animal models into the mechanisms of TNF function in chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. The presentations at the Symposium resulted in productive discussions regarding potential new targets for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:21235827

  18. MEETING SUMMARY: 11TH AMS Education Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Croft, P. J.; Hayes, M. J.; Murphy, K. A.; Mcdonnell, J. D.; Johnson, R. M.; Friedman, H. A.

    2004-03-01

    The 11th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Symposium was held from 13 to 15 January 2002 in Orlando, Florida, as part of the 82nd Annual Meeting of the AMS. The theme of the symposium was “creating opportunities in educational outreach in the atmospheric and related sciences.” Drawing from traditional strengths in meteorology and numerous national recommendations, the presentations and posters of the symposium highlighted three opportunities for reform. These opportunities build on partnerships between diverse educational stakeholders, efforts to make science education more like scientific practice, and strategies that place the atmospheric sciences within a larger, multi-disciplinary context that includes oceanography, hydrology, and earth-system science.

  19. Transonic Symposium: Theory, Application, and Experiment, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foughner, Jerome T., Jr. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the state of the art in transonic flow disciplines and to glimpse at future directions, NASA-Langley held a Transonic Symposium. Emphasis was placed on steady, three dimensional external, transonic flow and its simulation, both numerically and experimentally. The symposium included technical sessions on wind tunnel and flight experiments; computational fluid dynamic applications; inviscid methods and grid generation; viscous methods and boundary layer stability; and wind tunnel techniques and wall interference. This, being volume 1, is unclassified.

  20. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  1. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium.

  2. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  3. The Presence of Histamine and a Histamine Receptor in the Bivalve Mollusc, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jarreau; LaFleur, Kisha; Mantone, Daniel; Boisette, Beatrix; Harris, Ave; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, a biogenic amine, is a neurotransmitter in neurons and sensory receptors in invertebrates. Histamine has rarely been reported in bivalves. We used HPLC with pre-column derivatization using 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) as a fluorescent labeling agent to measure histamine in ganglia, and peripheral tissues of the oyster Crassostrea virginica. We also used Western Blot technique to look for the presence of a histamine receptor in the mantle rim. HPLC results found histamine present in ng amounts in both the cerebral and visceral ganglia, as well as the mantle rim and other peripheral tissues of C. virginica. The study confirms and quantifies histamine as an endogenous biogenic amine in C. virginica in the nervous system and innervated organs. Western Blot technique also identified a histamine H2-like receptor present in sensory tissue of the oyster's mantle rim. PMID:26120600

  4. PREFACE: Third International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumori, Atsuo

    2009-09-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Third Symposium (ISAT-3) was held on 5-6 March 2009 at the Tokyo International Exchange Center, Tokyo, Japan jointed with the Third Polyscale Technology Workshop (PTW-3). The ISAT-3 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies, which was successively held after ISAT-1 at Tsukuba and ISAT-2 at Awaji in 2007. The symposium was attended by 136 participants. There were 12 invited and 4 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 101. From all the contributions, 32 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The 'Atomic Technology Project' and the 'Polyscale Technology Project' were started in 2006 as the joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing atomic and polyscale technologies. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of these projects is to contribute to the development of atomic and polyscale science and technologies. In this symposium, four research fields were focused on: Biomedical Applications, Fabrication for Advanced Materials and Devices, Magnetic Applications, and Quantum and Molecular Engineering for Advanced Technologies. Atsuo Yasumori Conference Chair Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan.

  5. Histamine in the regulation of wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2011-02-01

    The histaminergic system is exclusively localized within the posterior hypothalamus with projection to almost all the major regions of the central nervous system. Strong and consistent evidence exist to suggest that histamine, acting via H₁ and/or H₃ receptor has a pivotal role in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness. Administration of histamine or H₁ receptor agonists induces wakefulness, whereas administration of H₁ receptor antagonists promotes sleep. The H₃ receptor functions as an auto-receptor and regulates the synthesis and release of histamine. Activation of H₃ receptor reduces histamine release and promotes sleep. Conversely, blockade of H₃ receptor promotes wakefulness. Histamine release in the hypothalamus and other target regions is highest during wakefulness. The histaminergic neurons display maximal activity during the state of high vigilance, and cease their activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The cerebrospinal levels of histamine are reduced in diseased states where hypersomnolence is a major symptom. The histamine deficient L-histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC KO) mice display sleep fragmentation and increased REM sleep during the light period along with profound wakefulness deficit at dark onset, and in novel environment. Similar results have been obtained when histamine neurons are lesioned. These studies strongly implicate the histaminergic neurons of the TMN to play a critical role in the maintenance of high vigilance state during wakefulness.

  6. HISTAMINE IN THE REGULATION OF WAKEFULNESS

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Mahesh M.

    2010-01-01

    The histaminergic system is exclusively localized within the posterior hypothalamus with projection to almost all the major regions of the central nervous system. Strong and consistent evidence exist to suggest that histamine, acting via H1 and/or H3 receptor has a pivotal role in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness. Administration of histamine or H1 receptor agonists induced wakefulness, whereas administration of H1 receptor antagonists promoted sleep. The H3 receptor functions as an auto-receptor and regulates the synthesis and release of histamine. Activation of H3 receptor decreased histamine release and promoted sleep. Conversely, blockade of H3 receptor promoted wakefulness. Histamine release in the hypothalamus and other target regions was highest during wakefulness. The histaminergic neurons displayed maximal activity during the state of vigilance, and cease their activity during NREM and REM sleep. The cerebrospinal levels of histamine were reduced in diseased states where hypersomnolence was a major symptom. The histamine deficient HDC KO mice displayed sleep fragmentation and increased REM sleep during the light period along with profound wakefulness deficit at dark onset, and in novel environment. Similar results were obtained when histamine neurons were lesioned. These studies strongly implicate the histaminergic neurons of the TMN to play a critical role in the maintenance of high vigilance state during wakefulness. PMID:20851648

  7. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  8. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #18: SYMPOSIUM SESSION ON "GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC CHANGE"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A session on "Understanding and Managing Effects of Global Atmospheric Change" will be held at the Fifth Symposium of the U.S. EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory. The Symposium topic is "Indicators in Health and Ecological Risk Assessment." The s...

  9. Brick and Click Libraries: An Academic Library Symposium (12th, Maryville, Missouri, October 26, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Johnson, Carolyn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty scholarly papers and fifteen abstracts comprise the content of the twelfth annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship.…

  10. Advances in berry research: the sixth biennial berry health benefits symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies to advance the potential health benefits of berries continue to increase as was evident at the sixth biennial meeting of the Berry Health Benefits Symposium (BHBS). The two and a half-day symposium was held on October 13-15, 2015, in Madison, Wisconsin, United States. The 2015 BHBS feature...

  11. Natural Areas--Needs and Opportunities, 1970 Symposium Proceedings, Northwest Scientific Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William J., Ed.; Trappe, James M., Ed.

    Proceedings of a symposium held at the Northwest Scientific Association Forty-Third Annual Meeting, Salem, Oregon, March, 1970, are presented. The symposium indicated that mutual understanding by educators, scientists, land managers, and politicians must be developed on the definition of naturalness, present and future use and management of…

  12. Triennial Reproduction Symposium: challenges and opportunities facing livestock reproduction in the 21st century.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2009 Triennial Reproduction Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science, American Dairy Science Association, and Canadian Society of Animal Science in Montreal, Canada, in July 2009. The intent of the symposium was to identify major ch...

  13. Making the Geography Curriculum: Reflections on the IGU-CGE London Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Clare

    2013-01-01

    "Curriculum making", highlighted in the Geographical Association's Manifesto in 2009, was the focus of a research symposium held in London in April 2011. Using an auto-ethnographic approach, I reflect on and explore my experience of participating in that symposium. The analysis explores the "cultures of influence" and the "forms of…

  14. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: SUMMARY OF THE 1991 EPRI/EPA/DOE S02 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 SO2 Control Symposium was held December 3–6, 1991, in Washington, D.C. The symposium, jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), focused attention...

  15. Status Report on the "Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts" Symposium and Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The “Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts” symposium and workshop, was held in Reno, Nevada on December 9-11, 2008. The purpose of this symposium was to synthesize the current understanding of the interactions of wildfire and invasive plants in the four U.S. deserts and the Colorado Pla...

  16. Overcoming Malnutrition: Putting Federal Programs to Work. A Report on the First National WIC Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Virginia; And Others

    This report describes the proceedings of a symposium on the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (SFP), held in January, 1977. The symposium was intended to bring together a variety of individuals concerned with providing adequate nutrition and health care to low-income…

  17. Brick & Click Libraries: An Academic Library Symposium (13th, Maryville, Missouri, November 1, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Johnson, Carolyn, Ed.; Park, Sarag G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six scholarly papers and ten abstracts comprise the content of the thirteenth annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. The…

  18. The 13th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltrus, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the James L. Waters Annual Symposium is to recognize pioneers in the development of instrumentation by preserving the early history of the cooperation and important contributions of inventors, scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, and marketing organizations. The symposium was held in Pittsburgh, United States in March 2002 to…

  19. Advances in the understanding of dairy and cheese flavors: Symposium Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A symposium titled “Advances in the Understanding of Dairy and Cheese Flavors” was held in September 2013 at the American Chemical Society’s 246th National Meeting in Indianapolis, IN. The symposium, which was sponsored by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, was to discuss the state of...

  20. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held from 15th-21st July, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The Symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilin...

  1. Proceedings of the First Annual Worldwide Robotic Renal Symposium: lessons learned for future robotic renal surgeons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Agnes J; Bhayani, Sam B

    2008-09-01

    The First Annual Worldwide Robotic Renal Symposium was held on 26-27 June 2008 at Washington University in Saint Louis. The symposium featured numerous live surgeries and lectures on all aspects of robotic renal surgery. Several innovations were discussed, which may allow participants to perform robotic renal surgery with greater efficiency and precision. PMID:27628255

  2. Symposium on Human-Computer Information Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Tunkelang, Daniel; Capra, Robert; Golovchinsky, Gene; Kules, Bill; Smith, Catherine; White, Ryen

    2013-03-01

    Human-computer information retrieval (HCIR) is the study of information retrieval techniques that integrate human intelligence and algorithmic search to help people explore, understand, and use information. Since 2007, we have held an annual gathering of researchers and practitioners to advance the state of the art in this field. This meeting report summarizes the history of the HCIR symposium and emphasizes its relevance to the data science community.

  3. Eighteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This volume provides the proceedings for the Eighteenth Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals held May 5-9, 1996 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The proceedings contains abstracts for oral and poster presentations.

  4. Histamine intolerance-like symptoms in healthy volunteers after oral provocation with liquid histamine.

    PubMed

    Wöhrl, Stefan; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Focke, Margarete; Rappersberger, Klemens; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2004-01-01

    Histamine in food at non-toxic doses has been proposed to be a major cause of food intolerance causing symptoms like diarrhea, hypotension, headache, pruritus and flush ("histamine intolerance"). Histamine-rich foods such as cheese, sausages, sauerkraut, tuna, tomatoes, and alcoholic beverages may contain histamine up to 500 mg/kg. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 10 healthy females (age range 22-36 years, mean 29.1 +/- 5.4) who were hospitalized and challenged on two consecutive days with placebo (peppermint tea) or 75 mg of pure histamine (equaling 124 mg histamine dihydrochloride, dissolved in peppermint tea). Objective parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, skin temperature, peak flow) as well as a total clinical symptom score using a standardized protocol were recorded at baseline, 10, 20, 40, 80 minutes, and 24 hours. The subjects received a histamine-free diet also low in allergen 24 hours before hospitalization and over the whole observation period. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, 10, 20, 40, and 80 minutes, and histamine and the histamine-degrading enzyme diamine oxidase (DAO) were determined. After histamine challenge, 5 of 10 subjects showed no reaction. One individual experienced tachycardia, mild hypotension after 20 minutes, sneezing, itching of the nose, and rhinorrhea after 60 minutes. Four subjects experienced delayed symptoms like diarrhea (4x), flatulence (3x), headache (3x), pruritus (2x) and ocular symptoms (1x) starting 3 to 24 hours after provocation. No subject reacted to placebo. No changes were observed in histamine and DAO levels within the first 80 minutes in non-reactors as well as reactors. There was no difference in challenge with histamine versus challenge with placebo. We conclude that 75 mg of pure liquid oral histamine--a dose found in normal meals--can provoke immediate as well as delayed symptoms in 50% of healthy females without a history of food intolerance. PMID:15603203

  5. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies.

  6. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S. (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  7. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  8. International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of peer reviewed papers presented at the 13th International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013) held from September 23-27, 2013, at Islamabad, Pakistan. In my capacity as ISAM-2013 Secretary, I feel honoured that the symposium has ended on a positive note. The ever increasing changes and intricacies that characterize modern industry necessitate a growing demand for technical information on advanced materials. ISAM and other similar forums serve to fulfill this need. The five day deliberations of ISAM 2013, consisted of 19 technical sessions and 2 poster sessions. In all, 277 papers were presented, inclusive of 80 contributory, invited and oral presentations. The symposium also hosted panel discussions led by renowned scientists and eminent researchers from foreign as well as local institutes. The ultimate aim of this proceeding is to record in writing the new findings in the field of advanced materials. I hope that the technical data available in this publication proves valuable to young scientists and researchers working in this area of science. At the same time, I wish to acknowledge Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing UK, for accepting the research papers from ISAM-2013 for publication in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The proceeding will be available on the IOP website as an online open access document. I am profoundly thankful to the Symposium Chairman for his steadfast support and valuable guidance without which ISAM 2013 could not have been the mega event that it turned out to be. My gratitude to all our distinguished participants, session chairs/co-chairs, and reviewers for their active role in the symposium. I appreciate the entire organizing committee for the zest and ardor with which each committee fulfilled its obligations to ISAM. Last yet not the least, my thankfulness goes to all our sponsors for wilfully financing the event. Dr. Sara Qaisar Symposium Secretary Further

  9. The 1992 4th NASA SERC Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the fourth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design, co-sponsored by the IEEE, are presented. Each year this symposium is organized by the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the University of Idaho and is held in conjunction with a quarterly meeting of the NASA Data System Technology Working Group (DSTWG). One task of the DSTWG is to develop new electronic technologies that will meet next generation electronic data system needs. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The NASA SERC is proud to offer, at its fourth symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories, the electronics industry, and universities. These speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  10. Cardiovascular histamine receptors in the domestic chicken.

    PubMed

    Chand, N; Eyre, P

    1975-08-01

    The effects of mepyramine (H1-antagonist) and burimamide (H2-antagonist) were studied on histamine, 2-methylhistamine (a selective H1-agonist), 4-methylhistamine (a selective H2-agonist) and acetylcholine-induced changes in systemic arterial and central venous pressure and respiration in anaesthetized chickens. The result of this study suggested a predominance of H1 and some H2 histamine receptors in the cardiovascular system of domestic fowl where both are mediating systemic hypotension. There also appears to be predominance of H1 receptors mediating venous hypertension and respiratory apnoea to large doses of histamine and 2-methylhistamine. In addition, a possible involvement of H2-receptors in the cardiovascular system of chicken is suggested by the finding that burimamide always blocked mepyramine potentiated secondary pressor response to histamine and its analogues.

  11. Flight Mechanics Symposium 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Donna M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium. This symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  12. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  13. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  14. International Symposium on Karst Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) and the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) joined the Hacettepe University of Ankara, Turkey, in sponsoring the International Symposium on Karst Water Resources. The other sponsors of the symposium were the Karst Water Resources Research Center Project of Hacettepe University and the United Nations Development Program through the United Nations Department of Technical Cooperation for Development, in addition to the following government organizations of Turkey: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, State Hydraulic, Works (DSI), General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA), Electrical Power Resources Survey and Development Administration (EIE) and Geological Engineering Department of the Engineering Faculty and Karst Hydrogeology Research Group (KRG) at the Hacettepe University Earth Sciences Application and Research Center. Cooperating organizations included the Turkish National Committee of the International Hydrological Program, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the International Water Resources Association (IWRA). The symposium was divided into two parts: a paper presentation session held at the new Turkish National Library in Ankara during July 7-12, 1985, and a field trip from Ankara through Konya and Antalya to Izmir during July 13-18. The symposium chairman was Gultekin Gunay of the Hydrogeological Engineering Department of Ankara's Hacettepe University, and the cochairman was A. Ivan Johnson, a water resources consultant from Denver, Colo., and editor of WaterWatch. Scientists from 27 countries were represented among the 200 or so participants in attendance.

  15. 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for organizing the AMS. Now in its 34th year, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 34th AMS, hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland, was held May 10, 11 and 12, 2000. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the vendor fair gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  16. The Foundations of Access to Knowledge. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Edward B., Ed.

    In 1965 the Syracuse University School of Library Science held a symposium to explore the nature of the relationship between the structure and transmission of knowledge, on the one hand, and the array of bibliographic devices which have been developed to facilitate access to that knowledge, on the other. Papers presented discussed the need for a…

  17. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  18. NUC Symposium on Environmental Preservation, 20-21 May 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Undersea Center, San Diego, CA.

    This publication consists of papers presented at an in-house symposium held at the Naval Undersea Research and Development (R and D) Center, San Diego, in May 1970. The topics discussed in these presentations are as follows: principles of evolution and the ecological crisis; alternatives to overpopulation; examples of San Diego noise climate;…

  19. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  20. The 2011 North American strawberry symposium: an introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2011 Symposium was held in conjunction with the 32nd North American Strawberry Growers Association (NASGA) Annual Conference on 8-11 Feb. 2011, at the Doubletree Hotel in Tampa, FL. The scientific program was conducted over two days and featured five sessions of oral and poster presentations sp...

  1. International symposium on erosion and landscape evolution abstracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book contains all of the extended abstracts from the ASABE specialty conference, the International Symposium on Erosion and Landscape Evolution (ISELE), held September 18-21, 2011 at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Three extended abstracts from the meeting keynote speakers as ...

  2. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  3. Symposium on microscale separations and analysis. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-08-27

    The ''Symposium on Microscale Separations and Analysis'' event, held as a section of the American Chemical Society Annual meeting on 27 August 2001, brought together engineers, physicists, and chemists from both academia and industry to discuss the latest research in the area of biomolecule analysis on microfluidic devices for genomic and proteomic applications.

  4. Highlights from the ISCB Student Council Symposium 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific content and activities of the annual symposium organized by the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), held in conjunction with the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) / European Conference on Computational Biology (ECCB) conference in Berlin, Germany, on July 19, 2013. PMID:25077567

  5. Symposium: Ionic and Respiratory Interaction in Aquatic Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented are eight abstracts of a symposium held in conjunction with the American Physiological Society (APS) and the American Society of Zoologists (ASZ). Fish gill structure and function, renal function, acid-base balance and ionic sensitivity are topics discussed. (EB)

  6. Space Symposium/76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A symposium dealing with career opportunities in the aerospace program for minorities was conducted and evaluated. The symposium was attended by students from eleven predominantly minority colleges and universities in and around Washington, D. C. and the eastern region, and from high schools in five jurisdictions of the Washington metropolitan area. Speakers included representatives of Howard University, NASA, and private industry. On display during the symposium was a NASA exhibit of moon rocks, space shuttles, a lunar module, command module, pacemaker, LANDSAT, and other items of interest.

  7. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  8. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Libraries Symposium (8th, Maryville, Missouri, November 7, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen scholarly papers and eighteen abstracts comprise the content of the 8th "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. Many of the…

  9. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (11th, Maryville, Missouri, November 4, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-three scholarly papers and twelve abstracts comprise the content of the eleventh annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of…

  10. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (6th, Maryville, Missouri, November 3, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    These proceedings document the sixth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri, on November 3, 2006. Thirty-four peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries…

  11. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri, October 14, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo., Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings document the fifth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium", held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. Thirty five peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries have references and…

  12. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Libraries Symposium (7th, Maryville, Missouri, November 2, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-three scholarly papers and eleven abstracts reflect the content of the seventh "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. Many of…

  13. Report from the second international symposium on animal genomics for animal health: critical needs, challenges and potential solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health held in Paris, France 31 May-2 June, 2010, assembled more than 140 participants representing research organizations from 40 countries. The symposium included a roundtable discussion on critical needs, challenges and opportunitie...

  14. Report from the Second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health: Critical Needs, Challenges and Potential Solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health held in Paris, France 31 May-2 June, 2010, assembled more than 140 participants representing research organizations from 40 countries. The symposium included a roundtable discussion on critical needs, challenges and opportunitie...

  15. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (9th, Maryville, Missouri, November 6, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-one scholarly papers and fourteen abstracts comprise the content of the ninth annual "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of…

  16. PROCEEDINGS: 1989 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, MARCH 6-9, 1989 VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the 1989 Joint Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 6-9, 1989, in San Francisco, CA. The symposium, sponsored by the U. S. EPA and EPRl, was the fifth in a series devoted solely to the discussion of control of NOx em...

  17. PROCEEDINGS: 1989 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, MARCH 6-9, 1989 VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the 1989 Joint Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 6-9. 1989. in San Francisco, CA. The symposium, sponsored by the U.S. EPA and EPRI, was the fifth in a series devoted solely to the discussion of control of NOx emi...

  18. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (10th, Maryville, Missouri, November 5, 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-one scholarly papers and fifteen abstracts comprise the content of the tenth annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of…

  19. Meat science and muscle biology symposium: In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium titled “In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ, July 15 to 19, 2012. The goal of this symposium was to highlight research on the impact of fetal...

  20. The Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operations, 2003-2004. Theme--Atmosphere--The Other Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This document reviews the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS) program for 2003-2004 which is a 10-month, precollege student research program held in Japan. The theme is AtmosphereThe Other Ocean. The program includes a one-week symposium of student delegates who have completed research projects in the sciences or have…

  1. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  2. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  3. Inhibition of guinea-pig lymphocyte activation by histamine and histamine analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Beets, J. L.; Dale, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    1 The incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into guinea-pig lymphocytes stimulated by a plant lectin (concanavalin A), soluble antigen (tuberculin (P.P.D.)) and syngeneic hepatoma cells, was partially inhibited (50%) by histamine in vitro. 2 The effect of histamine on both mitogen and antigen dose-response curves suggests a non-competitive, probably physiological antagonism. 3 The inhibitory dose range of histamine lay between 10 nM and 30 microM with an ID50 of approximately 400 nM. 4 The potency order for histamine analogues for the inhibition of lymphocyte activation was histamine greater than or equal to 4-methylhistamine greater than 2-methylhistamine greater than 3-methylhistamine. This is in accord with the mediation of the response through an H2-receptor. 5 H2-receptor antagonists reversed the inhibitory effect of histamine in a dose-related manner, but both metiamide and burimamide, in high concentrations, augmented lymphocyte activation in their own right. This precluded the determination of affinity constants and made it impossible to state with certainty that the inhibition of lymphocyte activation by histamine was mediated by an H2-receptor. PMID:526705

  4. Control of Histamine-Producing Bacteria and Histamine Formation in Fish Muscle by Trisodium Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Green, David P; Bolton, Greg E; McClellan-Green, Patricia D

    2015-06-01

    Scombrotoxin fish poisoning remains the primary cause of seafood poisoning outbreaks despite preventive guidelines. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of pH for the control of growth and histamine formation by histamine-producing bacteria in fish muscle. We examined pH effects on growth and histamine formation in tuna fish infusion broth and in inoculated tuna and mahi-mahi fish muscle. Histamine production was significantly less for all bacterial strains at pH 8.5 compared to pH 5.5 in tuna fish infusion broth with no significant difference in growth. Elevated pH due to phosphate treatment of fish muscle tissues significantly reduced histamine formation with no effect on the growth of histamine-producing bacteria. This study revealed that phosphate treatment of mahi-mahi and tuna fish muscle resulted in significantly lower histamine production over 4 d of storage at 10 °C. Phosphate treatment of fish muscle may serve as a secondary barrier in addition to FDA recommended time and temperature controls for reducing public health concerns of scombrotoxin fish poisoning.

  5. Insulin antagonizes the phagocytosis stimulating action of histamine in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1992-02-01

    Histamine increased specifically the phagocytic activity of the unicellular Tetrahymena, whereas insulin had no influence on it. Insulin antagonized the phagocytosis stimulating action of histamine after simultaneous exposure and after preexposure two days earlier as well, although in the latter case to a lesser degree. Double exposure to a combination of histamine+insulin didn't influence the phagocytic activity at all, demonstrating the histamine antagonizing effect of insulin in this model.

  6. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  7. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Histamine-Producing Morganella psychrotolerans Strains

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Maria Sanchez; Benner, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-producing bacteria are responsible for scombrotoxin (histamine) fish poisoning, a leading cause of fish poisoning in the United States. We report here the first draft genomes of three histamine-producing Morganella psychrotolerans strains, isolated from tuna and mahi-mahi. PMID:27635011

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Histamine-Producing Morganella psychrotolerans Strains.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Leon, Maria Sanchez; Benner, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-producing bacteria are responsible for scombrotoxin (histamine) fish poisoning, a leading cause of fish poisoning in the United States. We report here the first draft genomes of three histamine-producing Morganella psychrotolerans strains, isolated from tuna and mahi-mahi. PMID:27635011

  10. Skin Regeneration Symposium Cambridge, 12-13 April 2016.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosalind

    2016-07-01

    The Annual Skin Regeneration Symposium, held in Cambridge, UK, 12-13 April 2016, explored the latest advancements in skin repair, regeneration and restoration, and the impact this has on patients. With over 140 delegates from the disciplines of burn and trauma care, chronic wounds and esthetic medicine, the symposium sparked lively debate and the sharing of results from interesting case studies, clinical trials and basic research to support the use of a Regenerative Epithelial Suspension produced using the ReCell(®) technology. Furthermore, it enabled delegates and speakers alike to share ideas and discuss how to improve the quality of care for patients.

  11. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  12. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modeling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  13. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2013-09-30

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  14. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the 2nd International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Westin Hotel in Seattle, WA, on 11-13 Aug. 1993. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modelling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  15. Skin Regeneration Symposium Cambridge, 12-13 April 2016.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosalind

    2016-07-01

    The Annual Skin Regeneration Symposium, held in Cambridge, UK, 12-13 April 2016, explored the latest advancements in skin repair, regeneration and restoration, and the impact this has on patients. With over 140 delegates from the disciplines of burn and trauma care, chronic wounds and esthetic medicine, the symposium sparked lively debate and the sharing of results from interesting case studies, clinical trials and basic research to support the use of a Regenerative Epithelial Suspension produced using the ReCell(®) technology. Furthermore, it enabled delegates and speakers alike to share ideas and discuss how to improve the quality of care for patients. PMID:27357476

  16. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2016-07-12

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  17. Dynamics of histamine H(3) receptor antagonists on brain histamine metabolism: do all histamine H(3) receptor antagonists act at a single site?

    PubMed

    Barnes, W; Boyd, D; Hough, L

    2001-11-16

    Thioperamide, the prototypical histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, acts at the brain histamine H(3) autoreceptor to promote the release and metabolism of neuronal histamine, resulting in higher brain levels of the metabolite tele-methylhistamine. However, unlike thioperamide, several new histamine H(3) receptor antagonists enter the central nervous system (CNS), block brain histamine H(3) receptors and increase histamine release without increasing brain tele-methylhistamine levels. Experiments were performed presently in an attempt to understand these results. Consistent with previous findings, thioperamide significantly increased the content and synthesis rate of tele-methylhistamine in mouse and rat brain. In contrast, the histamine H(3) receptor antagonists GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and clobenpropit did not affect tele-methylhistamine synthesis rate in mouse whole brain. The histamine H(3) receptor ligand GT-2016 (5-cyclohexyl-1-(4-imidazol-4-ylpiperidyl)pentan-1-one) had no effect on tele-methylhistamine levels in any rat brain region and decreased tele-methylhistamine synthesis rates in the mouse whole brain. To examine the possibility that these histamine H(3) receptor antagonists might prevent the methylation of newly released histamine, they were co-administered with thioperamide to determine their effects on the thioperamide-induced stimulation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis. GT-2016 significantly reduced the thioperamide-induced activation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis in mouse whole brain and in several regions of rat brain. Although further clarification is needed, these results suggest that some histamine H(3) receptor antagonists may promote the release of neuronal histamine, but also act to reduce histamine methylation in vivo by an unknown mechanism.

  18. An Amazonia Symposium: Mixed Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Gloria; Shand, Hope

    1978-01-01

    Reporting on the second symposium on "Amazonia: Extinction or Survival" (Madison, Wisconsin, 1978), this article summarizes papers presented on colonization, health, education, law, etc., and presents the symposium's six resolutions. (JC)

  19. Brain histamine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A; Niigawa, H; Hariguchi, S; Tada, K; Nishimura, T; Wada, H; Brandeis, L; Pearson, J

    1989-05-01

    The concentration of histamine (HA) has been determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection in 21 different regions of brains from patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) and subjects (CB) whose causes of death were not related to neuropsychiatric, neurological and/or neurodegenerative diseases. The highest levels of HA in the central nervous system (CNS) of both control (CB) and SDAT samples were found in the posterior hypothalamus (CB = 3.13 +/- 0.63 pmol/mg; SDAT = 7.75 +/- 1.43 pmol/mg, p less than 0.005), where the HA neurons are located, and in the anterior hypothalamus (CB = 1.77 +/- 0.33 pmol/mg; SDAT = 2.82 +/- 0.45 pmol/mg, p less than 0.005). The lowest HA levels were detected in the cerebellum (CB = 0.12 +/- 0.04 pmol/mg; SDAT = 0.24 +/- 0.09 pmol/mg, p less than 0.01) and medulla oblongata. HA levels were significantly higher in SDAT than in CB in the following areas: motor cortex (Brodmann's area 4) (A4), premotor cortex (A6), postcentral gyrus (A1,2), posterior parietal cortex (A5,7), superior temporal gyrus (A41,42), temporal pole (A38), primary and secondary visual cortices (A17,18), anterior and posterior regions of the hypothalamus, putamen, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, thalamus, hippocampus, pons, medulla oblongata and cerebellum. No changes were seen in globus pallidus and corpus callosum. Since the origin of HA in the brain is dependent upon three main compartments (neuronal, mast cell, vascular smooth muscle), with approximately 60-80% of the total HA belonging to the neuronal pool, on the basis of neurochemical data we postulate that the increase in the levels of HA in SDAT might account for or be associated with alterations in neuroendocrine, cognitive, neurovascular and sleep-wakefulness functions. PMID:2755282

  20. Klebsiella pneumoniae produces no histamine: Raoultella planticola and Raoultella ornithinolytica strains are histamine producers.

    PubMed

    Kanki, Masashi; Yoda, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Teizo; Shibata, Tadayoshi

    2002-07-01

    Histamine fish poisoning is caused by histamine-producing bacteria (HPB). Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca are the best-known HPB in fish. However, 22 strains of HPB from fish first identified as K. pneumoniae or K. oxytoca by commercialized systems were later correctly identified as Raoultella planticola (formerly Klebsiella planticola) by additional tests. Similarly, five strains of Raoultella ornithinolytica (formerly Klebsiella ornithinolytica) were isolated from fish as new HPB. R. planticola and R. ornithinolytica strains were equal in their histamine-producing capabilities and were determined to possess the hdc genes, encoding histidine decarboxylase. On the other hand, a collection of 61 strains of K. pneumoniae and 18 strains of K. oxytoca produced no histamine.

  1. Pharmacological characterisation of cardiovascular histamine receptors in man in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boyce, M J

    1982-09-01

    Data from pharmacological studies carried out in healthy subjects using systemic histamine or impromidine and their antagonists are reviewed. Exogenous histamine by rapid injection appears to stimulate only H1-receptors. Chlorpheniramine alone antagonised the responses to histamine. The effects of cardiovascular H2-receptor stimulation are demonstrated best by a sustained and large dose of histamine given by infusion. If it be considered desirable to antagonise all the cardiovascular responses to endogenous histamine, the available pharmacological data in man suggest this would be achieved best by a combination of an H1-and H2-receptor antagonist.

  2. Histamine regulates the inflammatory response of the tunicate Styela plicata.

    PubMed

    García-García, Erick; Gómez-González, Nuria E; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Mulero, Victoriano

    2014-10-01

    Histamine is stored inside hemocytes of the tunicate Styela plicata (Chordata, Tunicata, Ascidiacea), but no evidence on its role in the regulation of the immune response of this species has been reported. We examined whether histamine participated in the regulation of inflammation and host defense in S. plicata. The presence of histamine inside S. plicata hemocytes was confirmed by flow cytometry, and histamine release was detected by ELISA, after in vitro hemocyte stimulation with different PAMPs. In vitro hemocyte treatment with histamine, or specific histamine-receptor agonists, reduced their phagocytic ability. Injection of histamine into the tunic recruited hemocytes to the site of injection. Systemic injection of histamine, or the histamine-releasing agent compound 48/80, decreased the phagocytic ability of hemocytes. Histamine promoted the constriction of tunic hemolymph vessels in vivo, having a direct effect on vasoconstriction in tunic explants. These results provide for the first time clear evidence for the involvement of histamine in the regulation of inflammation and host defense in tunicates.

  3. Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Don

    2002-01-01

    This is to report on the use of the funds provided by NASA to support the 'Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics'. The Symposium was held on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA, from 5-8 December 2001. It proved to be a forum for the discussion of a wide range of applied and basic research being conducted in the general areas of water and air resources, with the latter focusing on air quality in urban areas associated with complex terrain. This aspect of the Symposium was highlighted by twelve invited papers given by distinguished international scientists and roughly three hundred contributed manuscripts. Owing primarily to the current international situation, roughly 20% of the authors canceled their plans to attend the Symposium; while this was unfortunate, the Symposium went ahead with the enthusiastic participation of more than 250 scientists from forty nations.

  4. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  5. Histamine in diabetes: Is it time to reconsider?

    PubMed

    Pini, Alessandro; Obara, Ilona; Battell, Emma; Chazot, Paul L; Rosa, Arianna Carolina

    2016-09-01

    The first studies of histamine and diabetes date back to the 1950s. Since that time the involvement of histamine in diabetes was related to its well known vasoactive properties and permeability leakage effects. In particular, the first evidence for a correlation between histamine and diabetes arose in 1989 when an increase in plasma and leucocyte histamine content was observed. Limited independent evidence followed in the subsequent two decades, focusing on both histamine glyceamic control and macro- and microvascular complications of diabetes. However, recent observations have sparked the question whether it is time to reconsider the functional contribution of histamine in diabetes. We reveal an interesting upsurge in the field which provides scope for new insights into the role of histamine in diabetes. PMID:27343700

  6. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of histamine response measured by histamine iontophoresis laser Doppler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jones, Bridgette L; Roberts, Jessica K; Sherwin, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    The epicutaneous histamine (EH) test is the current gold standard method for the clinical evaluation of allergic conditions. However, the EH method is limited in providing an objective and qualitative assessment of histamine pharmacodynamic response. The histamine iontophoresis with laser Doppler (HILD) monitoring method, an alternative method, allows a fixed dose of histamine to be delivered and provides an objective, continuous, and dynamic measurement of histamine epicutaneous response in children and adults. However, due to the high sampling frequency (up to 40 Hz), the output files are usually too cumbersome to be directly used for further analysis. In this study, we developed an averaging algorithm that efficiently reduces the HILD data in size. The reduced data was further analyzed and a population linked effect pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe the local histamine response. The model consisted of a one-compartment PK model and a direct-response fractional maximum effect (Emax) model. The parameter estimates were obtained as follows: absorption rate constant (ka), 0.094/min; absorption lag time (Tlag), 2.72 min; partitioning clearance from local depot to systemic circulation (CLpar), 0.0006 L/min; baseline effect (E0), 13.1 flux unit; Emax, 13.4; concentration at half maximum effect (EC50) 31.1 mg/L. Covariate analysis indicated that age and race had significant influence on Tlag and EC50, respectively.

  7. Modulation of hematopoiesis through histamine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elke; Bertron, Anne-France; Dy, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Histamine is one of the most versatile biogenic amines targeting a variety of cells through extra- and intracellular binding sites and specific receptors, which trigger different signal transduction pathways. It has been associated with cell growth ever since G. Kahlson demonstrated that its synthesis was increased in rapidly growing tissues of plants and animals. He proposed that the newly formed amine, as opposed to its stored counterpart, might play a major role in growth processes. Later on, a number of investigators provided evidence for the contribution of histamine to the expansion of normal and malignant cells, whether of hematopoietic origin or not. These studies have generated conflicting results, revealing growth-promoting as well as inhibitory effects, most likely because the final outcome of exposure to histamine depends on the signaling pathways triggered by distinct receptors and their differential distribution among the target population. The purpose of the present review is to outline our current understanding of the regulatory functions of histamine during growth and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors, focusing on those mediated through its H4 receptor.

  8. Bronchial responsiveness to histamine in wheezy infants.

    PubMed Central

    Prendiville, A; Green, S; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Little is known about airway responsiveness in infancy. The bronchial response to incremental doses of nebulised histamine (to a maximum dose of 8 g/l) was measured in 11 wheezy infants with a mean age of 8.7 months. The study was repeated after a 30-40 minute recovery period in seven infants and again on a separate day in 10. The index of response was the provoking concentration of histamine that produced a 30% fall in the maximum expiratory flow at functional residual capacity (PC30), taken from partial forced expiratory flow-volume curves produced in a pressure jacket. Nine of 11 infants had a PC30 of less than 8 g/l. The response was consistent between tests in both the nine responders and the two who failed to respond at 8 g/l. The PC30 was lower in infants with more severe baseline airway obstruction. Spontaneous recovery after challenge was complete in 30 minutes in seven of eight infants studied. The highest doses of histamine caused changes in the configuration of the flow-volume curves and symptomatic cough and wheeze in addition to a change in forced flow rates. This study provides clear evidence of intrathoracic airway responsiveness to histamine in infancy. PMID:3433246

  9. PREFACE: XXXVII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, R.; Lerma, S.; Lizcano, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Physics is an international meeting organized every year since 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society. The 37th edition was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc in the state of Morelos, Mexico, from 6-9 January, 2014. The symposium is intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in different areas of nuclear physics (nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, neutrino physics, hadron physics and nuclear reactions among others). Both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists gathered in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. The symposium was organized in plenary sessions with invited talks and a poster session. In this edition the program consisted of 26 invited talks and 19 posters, whose subjects reflected the active areas and interests of the mexican nuclear physics community. The organization encouraged the participation of young scientist as speakers in the plenary sessions. Seven of the 26 invited talks were given by postdoctoral and doctoral students working in different institutions from Mexico, USA and Europe. The proceedings collect a total of 16 manuscripts from the invited speakers.

  10. 2007 Keystone Symposium on Autophagy in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    He, Congcong; Orvedahl, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The first Keystone Symposium on Autophagy in Health and Disease was held in Monterey, a scenic city on the Pacific coast in central California, April 15-20, 2007. The symposium brought together approximately 280 participants, from basic researchers to physicians and journalists. The meeting was composed of a joint keynote session with the meeting "Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Cell Death Pathways" and eight plenary sessions, covering the molecular mechanisms of autophagy and many emerging concepts and functions of autophagy in organelle degradation, physiological regulation, cell death and survival, and disease. Three afternoon workshops focused on short talks selected from the posters, and a special discussion session led by experts dealt with techniques and concerns regarding experimental detection of autophagy. The symposium highlighted autophagy as a potential therapeutic target in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, microbial infection, myopathies and neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Proceedings of the 2012 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Berridge, Brian R; Boyle, Michael C; Cora, Michelle C; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Kooistra, Linda; Laast, Victoria A; Morrison, James P; Rao, Deepa; Rinke, Matthias; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2013-02-01

    The 2012 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri," was held in Boston in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 31st annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting or discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium include eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia in a transgenic mouse model; differentiating adrenal cortical cystic degeneration from adenoma; atypical eosinophilic foci of altered hepatocytes; differentiating cardiac schwannoma from cardiomyopathy; diagnosis of cardiac papillary muscle lesions; intrahepatocytic erythrocytes and venous subendothelial hepatocytes; lesions in Rathke's cleft and pars distalis; pernicious anemia and megaloblastic disorders; embryonic neuroepithelial dysplasia, holoprosencephaly and exencephaly; and INHAND nomenclature for select cardiovascular lesions. PMID:23262640

  12. The 13th Tihany Symposium on Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2016-07-01

    The Symposium was held in Balatonalmádi, a beautiful city by the Lake Balaton, Hungary, between August 29 and September 3, 2015. This time - to meet the expectations of many colleagues and friends - a place close to the village Tihany was selected, where the first Tihany Symposium was organized in 1962. The participants beside the excellent lectures could also enjoy the panorama of the Lake from the rooms and from the terrace of Hotel Ramada. The number of participants was close to 170 from about 33 countries. The highest number of participants arrived from Poland (14), followed by France (11), Turkey (9) and China (9). The Symposium had 6-6 colleagues from Brazil, Israel, and Romania. Beside China, Asia was represented by a few scientists from the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and from Saudi Arabia.

  13. CHRONICLE: Third International Symposium on Modern Optics, Budapest, September 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhenskiĭ, M. F.; Nikitin, P. I.; Semenov, A. S.

    1989-07-01

    The Third International Symposium on Modern Optics (Optics-88), held in Budapest on 13-16 September 1988, was organized by the Hungarian Optical, Acoustic, and Cinematographic Society with the support of the International Commission on Optics and various scientific and industrial organizations in Hungary. The International Symposium Committee was composed of leading specialists from 11 countries in Asia, America, and Europe with A. M. Prokhorov (USSR) and N. Kroo (Hungary) as Co-chairmen. The purpose of this regular symposium is to summarize the scientific and technical progress underlying the developments in optics itself, discuss the branches of science where progress depends on optical methods in devices, and draw the attention of specialists to the most promising trends which should yield results in the immediate future.

  14. Fourth International Symposium on Long-Range Sound Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Long range sound propagation is an aspect of many acoustical problems ranging from en route aircraft noise to the acoustic detection of aircraft. Over the past decade, the University of Mississippi and the Open University of England, together with a third institution, have held a symposium approx. every 2 years so that experts in the field of long range propagation could exchange information on current research, identify areas needing additional work, and coordinate activities as much as possible. The Fourth International Symposium on Long Range Sound Propagation was jointly sponsored by the University of Mississippi, the Open University of England, and NASA. Papers were given in the following areas: ground effects on propagation; infrasound propagation; and meteorological effects on sound propagation. A compilation of the presentations made at the symposium is presented along with a list of attendees, and the agenda.

  15. Proceedings of the 2009 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Ute; Hailey, James R.; Hill, Georgette D.; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Latimer, Kenneth S.; Malarkey, David E.; Maronpot, Robert M.; Miller, Rodney A.; Moore, Rebecca R.; Morrison, James P.; Nolte, Thomas; Rinke, Matthias; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Suttie, Andrew W.; Travlos, Gregory S.; Vahle, John L.; Willson, Gabrielle A.; Elmore, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium is a one-day meeting that is held in conjunction with the annual Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) meeting. The topic of the 2009 Symposium was “Tumor Pathology and INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) Nomenclature.” The goal of this article is to provide summaries of each speaker’s presentation, including the diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with a few select images that were used for voting. The results of the voting process and interesting points of discussion that were raised during the presentation are also provided. A supplemental file with voting choices and voting results for each case presented at the symposium is available at http://tpx.sagepub.com/supplemental. PMID:20008954

  16. The Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows, held at the California State University, Long Beach, from 13 to 15 January 1992. The symposium, like its immediate predecessors, considers the calculation of flows of relevance to aircraft, ships, and missiles with emphasis on the solution of two-dimensional unsteady and three-dimensional equations.

  17. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  18. Overview of the International Symposium on Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) Biology, Impacts, and Control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunderson, Jeffrey L.; Klepinger, Michael R.; Bronte, Charles R.; Marsden, J. Ellen

    1998-01-01

    The International Symposium on the Biology and Management of Ruffe was organized to address the potential threat ruffe pose to North American fisheries. Scientists in diverse disciplines from Eurasia and North America were brought together in an attempt to examine all aspects of the North American invasion of ruffe, and to highlight the effects of similar introductions in Europe and Asia. The symposium, sponsored by the Minnesota and Michigan Sea Grant College programs, featured 48 oral and poster presentations and was held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during 21-23 March 1997. Papers from the symposium are published in a special section of this issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research.

  19. 32nd International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis (MSB 2016).

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Rawi

    2016-09-01

    32nd International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, 3-7 April 2016 The 32nd edition of the International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis (MSB) was held in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, from 3 to 7 April 2016. This article outlines the aim and the main distinctive features of the MSB symposium. A selection of the scientific research presented at MSB 2016 is highlighted with a special focus on microscale separation developments in the fields of sample preparation, (glyco)proteomics and metabolomics.

  20. Alzheimer's disease: a report from the 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Pikkarainen, Maria; Soininen, Hilkka

    2015-10-01

    The 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium was held on 11-13 June, 2015, in Kuopio, Finland and attracted ~250 attendees from 14 different countries around the world. The theme for the symposium in its seventh year was 'From mechanisms to prevention and intervention of Alzheimer's disease'. The 3-day international scientific symposium composed of seven oral sessions and a poster session. The program, spanning from molecular mechanisms to prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, provided a forum for the attendees to share their research, network and to obtain a comprehensive overview of the current status and future directions of research into Alzheimer's disease.

  1. The XIIth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Vivès, Eric

    2005-05-01

    The XIIth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Drug Delivery Systems was held from 21-24 February 2005 in Salt Lake City, UT, USA. Approximately 250 people attended this symposium dedicated to a broad variety of topics, ranging from recent advances in drug delivery systems to biomaterials and novel concepts in macromolecular therapeutics. A total of 33 people, all recognised specialists in the aforementioned fields, presented 30-min up-to-date reviews of these topics, as well as discussing recent results. In addition, the symposium included a poster session with approximately 100 displays highlighting various interesting data. PMID:16296778

  2. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  3. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, J.

    1999-06-01

    The beginning of the VLT era was marked by two major events: the VLT Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March 1999, preceded by the VLT Opening Symposium on 1-4 March. ESO is indebted to Professor J.A. Music Tomicic, Rector of the Universidad Católica del Norte, for hosting this symposium. Another major event occurred on the night of 4 March: First light was achieved ahead of schedule at Kueyen, the second 8.2-m VLT unit telescope.

  4. PREFACE: XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-10-01

    In the present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the 'XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics', which was held from 4-7 January 2011 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 19 contributions that were presented as invited talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. From the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium has been organized every year without interruption, which makes the present Symposium the 34th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks and 17 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure (Draayer, Pittel, Van Isacker, Fraser, Lerma, Cejnar, Hirsch, Stránský and Rath) and nuclear reactions (Aguilera, Gómez-Camacho, Scheid, Navrátil and Yennello) to radioactive beams (Padilla-Rodal and Galindo-Uribarri), nuclear astrophysics (Aprahamian, Civitarese and Escher), hadronic physics (Bijker, Valcarce and Hess), fundamental symmetries (Liu, Barrón-Palos and Baessler) and LHC physics (Menchaca-Rocha and Paic). The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. Libertad Barr

  5. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shu; Sekino, Tohru; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Sato, Tsugio; Lu, Li; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    The 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011) was held in Sendai, Japan, on 2-6 August 2011. This Special Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) consists of partial manuscripts which were presented at ISFM2011. Advanced materials have experienced a dramatic increase in demand for research, development and applications. The aim of the International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM) was to provide an overview of the present status with historical background and to foresee future trends in the field of functional materials. The 4th symposium, ISFM 2011, covered a wide variety of topics within state-of-the-art advanced materials science and technology, and focused especially on four major categories including: Environmental Materials, Electronic Materials, Energy Materials and Biomedical Materials. As you know, a massive earthquake and the Tsunami that followed occurred near the Tohoku region on 11 March 2011. After the earthquake, although there were many difficulties in continuing to organize the symposium, we received warm encouragement from many researchers and societies, especially from the members of the International Advisory Committee and Organizing Committee, so that ISFM2011 could be held on schedule. We are honored that ISFM2011 was the first formal international academic conference held in the Tohoku area of Japan after the 11 March earthquake. About 140 participants from 14 countries took part in the ISFM2011 symposium, which included five plenary talks by world-leading scientists, 32 invited talks, and many oral and poster presentations. We are delighted to see that many researchers are interested in the synthesis and the properties as well as the applications of functional materials. Many fruitful and exciting research achievements were presented in the symposium. We believe that this symposium provided a good chance for scientists to communicate and exchange opinions with each other. We would also like to

  6. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Instrumentation Science and Technology (ISIST'2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiubin, Tan

    2006-10-01

    On behalf of the International Program Committee of ISIST'2006 and the symposium coordinators, I would like to thank all the participants for their presence at the 4th International Symposium on Instrumentation Science and Technology (ISIST'2006), a platform for scientists, researchers and experts from different parts of the world to present their achievements and to exchange their views on ways and means to further develop modern instrumentation science and technology. In the present information age, instrumentation science and technology is playing a more and more important role, not only in the acquisition and conversion of information at the very beginning of the information transformation chain, but also in the transfer, manipulation and utilization of information. It provides an analysis and test means for bioengineering, medical engineering, life science, environmental engineering and micro/nanometer technology, and integrates these disciplines to form new subdivisions of their own. The major subject of the symposium is crossover and fusion between instrumentation science and technology and other sciences and technologies. ISIST'2006 received more than 800 full papers from 12 countries and regions, from which 300 papers were finally selected by the international program committee for inclusion in the proceedings of ISIST'2006, published in 2 volumes. The major topics include instrumentation basic theory and methodology, sensors and conversion technology, signal and image processing, instruments and systems, laser and optical fiber instrumentation, advanced optical instrumentation, optoelectronics instrumentation, MEMS, nanotechnology and instrumentation, biomedical and environmental instrumentation, automatic test and control. The International Symposium on Instrumentation Science and Technology (ISIST) is sponsored by ICMI, NSFC, CSM, and CIS, and organized by ICMI, HIT and IC-CSM, and held every two years. The 1st symposium was held in LuoYang, China in

  7. Reaching the hip-hop generation: Final (symposium proceedings) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The goal of this final (closing) report is to capture the flavor of the symposium held March 1 and 2, 1993 in New York City convened by Motivational Educational Entertainment, Inc. (MEE), a black-owned communications research, consulting, and video production company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The mission of MEE is to understand, reach, and positively affect inner-city youth. Traditional communication approaches from mainstream sources to at-risk youth often don`t account for the unique way youth communicate among themselves and how they relate to the media. This understanding, however, is crucial. To understand youth communication, the people who create and send both entertaining and educational messages to urban youth must be brought into the dialogue. The meeting in New York was intended to provide an important opportunity for senders to meet and evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of their messages. In addition, the MEE symposium provided a forum for the continuing public debate about what needs to be done to reach today`s urban teens. Included in this document is a description of symposium goals/objectives, symposium activities, the reaction to and analysis of the symposium, recommendations for future MEE courses of action, and an appendix containing copies of press articles.

  8. PREFACE: XXXVIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics (Cocoyoc 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.

    2015-09-01

    The 38th edition of the Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 6-9, 2015. As in previous years, the Symposium brought together leading scientists from all around the world, working on: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee that covered, in a balanced way, the experimental and theoretical work that currently is undergoing in the research fields of the Symposium. Ten posters complemented the program, providing students with an opportunity to bring their work to the attention of visiting scientists. This year, the conference activities also included a special talk presented by Archaeologist Omar Espinosa Severino about the ancient ruins found in Chalcatzingo, a village located approximately a 40 minute drive from the conference venue. The talk was followed by a visit to the archaeological site, guided by the group led by Archaeologist Mario Cordova Tello. The present volume contains 14 research articles based on invited talks presented at the Symposium. I would like to thank all the authors for their enthusiastic contribution. Special thanks to the anonymous referees for the time devoted to the review process, their input helped to maintain a high standard of the Conference Proceedings. Finally I would also like to thank the Symposiums' International Advisory Committee and the Sponsoring Organizations that made this event possible.

  9. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  10. PREFACE: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Maria L.; Dolganova, Irina N.; Gevorgyan, Narine; Guzman, Angela; Papoyan, Aram; Sarkisyan, Hayk; Yurchenko, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The ICTP smr2633: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications" (OPTICS-2014) http://indico.ictp.it/event/a13253/ was held in Yerevan and Ashtarak, Armenia, on 1-5 September 2014. The Symposium was organized by the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) with the collaboration of the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter, the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-Pyrkal, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the BMSTU SPIE & OSA student chapters. The International Symposium OPTICS-2014 was dedicated to the 50th anniversary of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics. This symposium "Optics and its Applications" was the First Official ICTP Scientific Event in Armenia. The presentations at OPTICS-2014 were centered on these topics: optical properties of nanostructures; quantum optics & information; singular optics and its applications; laser spectroscopy; strong field optics; nonlinear & ultrafast optics; photonics & fiber optics; optics of liquid crystals; and mathematical methods in optics.

  11. 2nd PEGS Annual Symposium on Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mitchell; Royston, Ivor; Beck, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The 2nd Annual Antibodies for Cancer Therapy symposium, organized again by Cambridge Healthtech Institute as part of the Protein Engineering Summit, was held in Boston, USA from April 30th to May 1st, 2012. Since the approval of the first cancer antibody therapeutic, rituximab, fifteen years ago, eleven have been approved for cancer therapy, although one, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, was withdrawn from the market.  The first day of the symposium started with a historical review of early work for lymphomas and leukemias and the evolution from murine to human antibodies. The symposium discussed the current status and future perspectives of therapeutic antibodies in the biology of immunoglobulin, emerging research on biosimilars and biobetters, and engineering bispecific antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates. The tumor penetration session was focused on the understanding of antibody therapy using ex vivo tumor spheroids and the development of novel agents targeting epithelial junctions in solid tumors. The second day of the symposium discussed the development of new generation recombinant immunotoxins with low immunogenicity, construction of chimeric antigen receptors, and the proof-of-concept of ‘photoimmunotherapy’. The preclinical and clinical session presented antibodies targeting Notch signaling and chemokine receptors.  Finally, the symposium discussed emerging technologies and platforms for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:22864478

  12. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  13. The Symposium's Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents the report of an International Labour Office (ILO) symposium on international development and the role of workers' education. Covers the general situation, issues, role of trade unions, educational aspects of workers' involvement in development issues, and the role of the ILO. (JOW)

  14. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and discusses the…

  15. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-04-01

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  16. Research Symposium I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings of this symposium consist of abstracts of talks presented by interns at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The interns assisted researchers at GRC in projects which primarily address the following topics: aircraft engines and propulsion, spacecraft propulsion, fuel cells, thin film photovoltaic cells, aerospace materials, computational fluid dynamics, aircraft icing, management, and computerized simulation.

  17. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and procedures for…

  18. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid information,…

  19. Tools in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on tools in human resource development (HRD). "Game Theory Methodology in HRD" (Thomas J. Chermack, Richard A. Swanson) explores the utility of game theory in helping the HRD profession address the complexity of integrating multiple theories for disciplinary understanding and fulfilling its…

  20. Learning Organization. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on the learning organization is comprised of three papers. "Leading the Learning Organization" (James R. Johnson) examines actions that four leaders of widely diverse organizations took to transform an organization into a learning organization. (Leaders who were successful in implementing the learning organization concept used it as…

  1. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency model for…

  2. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of Agriculture that…

  3. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  4. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's status. It…

  5. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and strategic issues…

  6. ILO European Symposium on Work for the Disabled. Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Creation (Warsaw, Poland, May 21-27, 1979; Stockholm, Sweden, May 27-June 1, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, N., Ed.

    This document is a report on a 12-day symposium on work for the disabled--vocational rehabilitation and employment creation--which was held in Poland and Sweden in 1979. The symposium was organized jointly by the government of Poland and Sweden in close cooperation with the International Labour Office (ILO), Geneva. The report is divided into five…

  7. 77 FR 17086 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection 2012 West Coast Trade Symposium: “Transforming Trade for a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Federal Register (77 FR 16048) on March 19, 2012, about the West Coast trade symposium which will be held... Symposium: ``Transforming Trade for a Stronger Economy'' AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... ``Transforming Trade for a Stronger Economy''; and to inform the public that the fees have changed for...

  8. Symposium on General Linear Model Approach to the Analysis of Experimental Data in Educational Research (Athens, Georgia, June 29-July 1, 1967). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashaw, W. L., Ed.; Findley, Warren G., Ed.

    This volume contains the five major addresses and subsequent discussion from the Symposium on the General Linear Models Approach to the Analysis of Experimental Data in Educational Research, which was held in 1967 in Athens, Georgia. The symposium was designed to produce systematic information, including new methodology, for dissemination to the…

  9. Low brain histamine content affects ethanol-induced motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Raatesalmi, Kristiina; Sallmen, Tina; Anichtchik, Oleg; Karlstedt, Kaj; Kaslin, Jan; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R; Panula, Pertti

    2002-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on motor performance in humans is well established but how neural mechanisms are affected by ethanol action remains largely unknown. To investigate whether the brain histaminergic system is important in it, we used a genetic model consisting of rat lines selectively outbred for differential ethanol sensitivity. Ethanol-sensitive rats had lower levels of brain histamine and lower densities of histamine-immunoreactive fibers than ethanol-insensitive rats, although both rat lines showed no changes in histamine synthesizing neurons. Lowering the high brain histamine content of the ethanol-insensitive rats with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine before ethanol administration increased their ethanol sensitivity in a behavioral motor function test. Higher H3 receptor ligand binding and histamine-induced G-protein activation was detected in several brain regions of ethanol-naive ethanol-sensitive rats. Brain histamine levels and possibly signaling via H3 receptors may thus correlate with genetic differences in ethanol-induced motor impairment.

  10. Plasma histamine after methacholine, allergen, and aspirin challenges.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, M; Salari, H; Chan, H; Tse, K S; Chan-Yeung, M

    1987-01-01

    Plasma histamine levels were measured by radio-enzymatic technique in seven patients following 10 challenges: five methacholine challenge tests, four antigen inhalation challenge tests, and one oral aspirin challenge test. Baseline plasma histamine was the same in all patients except in the aspirin-challenged patient, who had a higher baseline histamine level. There was no statistical change in the level of histamine throughout the test in either the methacholine-challenged or the antigen-challenged patients, whereas there was a marked increase in histamine levels in the aspirin challenged patient. A possible explanation is that methacholine and antigen are inhaled and therefore have primarily local effects on the lung, whereas oral aspirin has a systemic effect with consequently systemic changes in histamine which are detectable as changes in plasma level.

  11. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  12. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration.

  13. Histamine facilitates consolidation of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Juliana Sartori; Da Silva, Weber Cláudio; Da Silveira, Clarice Kras Borges; Köhler, Cristiano André; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2011-10-01

    Non-reinforced retrieval induces memory extinction, a phenomenon characterized by a decrease in the intensity of the learned response. This attribute has been used to develop extinction-based therapies to treat anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorders. Histamine modulates memory and anxiety but its role on fear extinction has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, using male Wistar rats, we determined the effect of the intra-hippocampal administration of different histaminergic agents on the extinction of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA), a form of aversive learning. We found that intra-CA1 infusion of histamine immediately after non-reinforced retrieval facilitated consolidation of IA extinction in a dose-dependent manner. This facilitation was mimicked by the histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor SKF91488 and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit, reversed by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine, and unaffected by the H1 antagonist pyrilamine, the H3 antagonist thioperamide and the antagonist at the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) polyamine-binding site ifenprodil. Neither the H1 agonist 2-2-pyridylethylamine nor the NMDAR polyamine-binding site agonist spermidine affected the consolidation of extinction while the H3 receptor agonist imetit hampered it. Extinction induced the phosphorylation of ERK1 in dorsal CA1 while intra-CA1 infusion of the MEK inhibitor U0126 blocked extinction of the avoidance response. The extinction-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 was enhanced by histamine and dimaprit and blocked by ranitidine administered to dorsal CA1 after non-reinforced retrieval. Taken together, our data indicate that the hippocampal histaminergic system modulates the consolidation of fear extinction through a mechanism involving the H2-dependent activation of ERK signalling.

  14. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1992-05-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  15. NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 3: Summary reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings and summaries of the earth resources survey symposium, sponsored by the NASA Headquarters Office of Applications and held in Houston, Texas, June 9 to 12, 1975. Topics include the use of remote sensing techniques in agriculture, in geology, for environmental monitoring, for land use planning, and for management of water resources and coastal zones. Details are provided about services available to various users. Significant applications, conclusions, and future needs are also discussed.

  16. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  17. February NICBR Symposium Highlights Careers in Science | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Poster Staff The first National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR) Exploring Careers in a Scientific Environment Symposium was held on Feb. 18 at the Advanced Technology Research Facility. The event drew more than 70 Frederick County public school teachers, who learned about the wide range of biomedical research being conducted by scientists in the NICBR agencies, as well as the variety of opportunities for students interested in pursuing careers in science and/or technology.

  18. Pulmonary serotonin and histamine in experimental asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, I.M.; Day, R.; Lemaire, S.

    1986-03-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were treated once with tracheal instillation of 5 mg Crysotile B asbestos fibers in 0.5 ml saline under ketamine/xylaxine anesthesia. Control rats (n = 37) received 0.5 ml saline. Test and control rats were killed at 7 and 14 d., and 1, 3 and 6 mo. post instillation. Serotonin (5-HT) was quantitated in lung tissue homogenate from all rats using HPLC and electrochemical detection. Among rats killed at 1, 3 and 6 mo., lung tissue histamine-o-phthaldialdehyde complex was quantitated using reverse phase HPLC coupled to a fluorometric detector. Furthermore, 5-HT was quantitated in the cytoplasm of grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells and in mast cells using formaldehyde-vapor-induced fluorescence and microspectrofluorometry, and mast cell numbers were determined. Test rats had higher pulmonary 5-HT and histamine levels than controls at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Test rats also had higher cellular 5-HT compared to controls in NEB's at 1 mo., but not in NECs, and tended to have higher 5-HT-levels in mast cells at 6 mo. Mast cell numbers were higher among tests at 1 and 3 mo. The authors results suggest that NEBs may contribute to the early asbestos induced rise in 5-HT, and that the major source of 5-HT and histamine is from the increased numbers of mast cells.

  19. Histamine poisoning (scombroid fish poisoning): an allergy-like intoxication.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S L; Stratton, J E; Nordlee, J A

    1989-01-01

    Histamine poisoning results from the consumption of foods, typically certain types of fish and cheeses, that contain unusually high levels of histamine. Spoiled fish of the families, Scombridae and Scomberesocidae (e.g. tuna, mackerel, bonito), are commonly implicated in incidents of histamine poisoning, which leads to the common usage of the term, "scombroid fish poisoning", to describe this illness. However, certain non-scombroid fish, most notably mahi-mahi, bluefish, and sardines, when spoiled are also commonly implicated in histamine poisoning. Also, on rare occasions, cheeses especially Swiss cheese, can be implicated in histamine poisoning. The symptoms of histamine poisoning generally resemble the symptoms encountered with IgE-mediated food allergies. The symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, an oral burning sensation or peppery taste, hives, itching, red rash, and hypotension. The onset of the symptoms usually occurs within a few minutes after ingestion of the implicated food, and the duration of symptoms ranges from a few hours to 24 h. Antihistamines can be used effectively to treat this intoxication. Histamine is formed in foods by certain bacteria that are able to decarboxylate the amino acid, histidine. However, foods containing unusually high levels of histamine may not appear to be outwardly spoiled. Foods with histamine concentrations exceeding 50 mg per 100 g of food are generally considered to be hazardous. Histamine formation in fish can be prevented by proper handling and refrigerated storage while the control of histamine formation in cheese seems dependent on insuring that histamine-producing bacteria are not present in significant numbers in the raw milk.

  20. Report of the International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-08-01

    The International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF2015) was held June 26-29, 2015, in Shanghai, China. This is the first time that a PSE meeting has been held in Asia and a PSE-PSA joint symposium provided an opportunity for communication between scientists from European and Asian countries. More than 270 scientists from 48 countries attended this meeting. ISPMF2015 assembled an exciting and diverse programme with 16 sessions, consisting of 12 plenary lectures, 20 invited talks, 55 short oral presentations, and in excess of 130 posters, dedicated to creating a podium for exchanging the latest research results on phytochemicals for food and human health.

  1. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Solid mechanics and processing: Analysis, measurement and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases.

  2. In vivo modulation of rat hypothalamic histamine release by the histamine H3 receptor ligands, immepip and clobenpropit. Effects of intrahypothalamic and peripheral application.

    PubMed

    Jansen, F P; Mochizuki, T; Yamamoto, Y; Timmerman, H; Yamatodani, A

    1998-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the new potent and selective histamine H3 receptor agonist, immepip, and the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit, on in vivo neuronal histamine release from the anterior hypothalamic area of urethane-anesthetized rats, using microdialysis. Intrahypothalamic perfusion with immepip at concentrations of 1 and 10 nM reduced histamine release to 75% and 35% of its basal level, respectively. Peripheral injection of immepip (5 mg/kg) caused a sustained decrease in histamine release of 50%. Clobenpropit potently increased histamine release after intrahypothalamic perfusion. The maximal increase in histamine release was 2-fold, observed at a concentration of 10 nM clobenpropit. Peripheral injection of clobenpropit (5-15 mg/kg) increased histamine release to about 150% of the basal value. A more marked increase in histamine release was found after injection of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, thioperamide (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, intrahypothalamic perfusion of the histamine H3 receptor agonist, immepip and the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit, potently and oppositely modulated in vivo histamine release from the anterior hypothalamic area. The decreased histamine release after peripheral injection of immepip indicates that this novel agonist readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, making it a potential candidate for in vivo histamine H3 receptor studies. The differential increase in histamine release after peripheral injection of clobenpropit and thioperamide is discussed.

  3. Role of Histamine and Its Receptors in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is recognized as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain, and it plays a major role in the pathogenic progression after cerebral ischemia. Extracellular histamine increases gradually after ischemia, and this may come from histaminergic neurons or mast cells. Histamine alleviates neuronal damage and infarct volume, and it promotes recovery of neurological function after ischemia; the H1, H2, and H3 receptors are all involved. Further studies suggest that histamine alleviates excitotoxicity, suppresses the release of glutamate and dopamine, and inhibits inflammation and glial scar formation. Histamine may also affect cerebral blood flow by targeting to vascular smooth muscle cells, and promote neurogenesis. Moreover, endogenous histamine is an essential mediator in the cerebral ischemic tolerance. Due to its multiple actions, affecting neurons, glia, vascular cells, and inflammatory cells, histamine is likely to be an important target in cerebral ischemia. But due to its low penetration of the blood-brain barrier and its wide actions in the periphery, histamine-related agents, like H3 antagonists and carnosine, show potential for cerebral ischemia therapy. However, important questions about the molecular aspects and pathophysiology of histamine and related agents in cerebral ischemia remain to be answered to form a solid scientific basis for therapeutic application. PMID:22860191

  4. Cardiovascular response to histamine during normoxaemia and hypoxaemia in piglets.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B J

    1989-02-01

    The cardiovascular effects of exogenously administered histamine were investigated in conscious newborn piglets aged 10-11 days during normoxia (21% (v/v) O2) and during isocapneic alveolar hypoxia (10% O2, 3% CO2, 87% N2) to determine its influence on preexisting vascular tone. In the first set of experiments (n = 6), four histamine doses (1,10,50,100 micrograms/kg) were tested in sequence during normoxia. Histamine was injected intravenously and cardiovascular variables were recorded. Heart rate increased at all doses studied. Pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures, cardiac output and stroke volume were unchanged at the low histamine doses (1 and 10 micrograms), but all decreased at the high doses (50 and 100 micrograms). Pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances were unchanged at each dose. In the second set of experiments (n = 7), two histamine doses (1 and 5 micrograms/kg) were administered during alveolar hypoxia. Hypoxia caused increases in heart rate and pulmonary arterial pressure and resistance. After injection of each dose of histamine, pulmonary pressure and resistance decreased but remained higher than baseline. No other measured cardiovascular variables were altered. Thus, during normoxia histamine did not alter vascular tone, but high doses did adversely affect myocardial function. During alveolar hypoxia histamine caused weak pulmonary vasodilation at doses that did not alter systemic vascular tone. Histamine is not a potent modifier of the circulation in the newborn piglet during conditions of normoxaemia or hypoxaemia.

  5. Histamine, norepinephrine and serotonin content of nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Bumsted, R M; El-Ackad, T; Smith, J M; Brody, M J

    1979-05-01

    Histamine, norepinephrine and serotonin were assayed and localized by fluorescence histochemistry in normal mucosa and nasal polyps because of their possible role in the development of inflammation and edema. Histamine was present in greater concentration in nasal polyps than in normal mucosa. Norepinephrine was present primarily in the base of nasal polyps and in greater concentration than in normal mucosa. Patients with aspirin sensitivity and asthma had much lower histamine concentrations in their nasal polyps than all other patients with nasal polyps. A proposal for a possible mechanism of formation of nasal polyps based on vascular and inflammatory mechanisms and incorporative roles for histamine and norepinephrine is presented.

  6. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  7. Second International Lygus Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, P. B.; Ellsworth, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Second International Lygus Symposium brought together 52 entomologists from six nations and 11 states representing universities, public agencies, and private entities to discuss the latest research on Lygus species and their relatives. Symposium topics included Lygus biology, behavior and ecology, IPM, insecticides and resistance, and biological control. Papers and posters dealt with Lygus as a pest of several crops, including cotton, strawberries, seed alfalfa, canola, dry beans, cucumbers, cereals, peaches, and new crops guayule and lesquerella. Intercrop movement of Lygus2008200820082008 species was another important topic of many presentations. In the capstone session, participants identified needs and priorities for ongoing Lygus research and education (available at http://ag.arizona.edu/apmc/Arid_SWPMC_RAMP.html). The conference was sponsored in part by FMC Corporation, the University of Arizona Arizona Pest Management Center, the University of California Statewide IPM Program, and a grant to Ellsworth et al. (CRIS# 0207436) from the USDA-CSREES, Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program (RAMP).

  8. Development of a homogeneous binding assay for histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Crane, Kathy; Shih, Daw-Tsun

    2004-12-01

    Histamine is critically involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes through its actions at different receptors. Thus, histamine receptors have been actively pursued as therapeutic targets in the pharmaceutical industry for the treatment of a variety of diseases. There are currently four histamine receptors that have been cloned, all of which are G protein-coupled receptors. Studies from both academia and pharmaceutical companies have identified compounds that modulate the function of specific histamine receptors. These efforts led to the successful introduction of histamine H(1) and H(2) receptor antagonists for the treatment of allergy and excess gastric acid secretion, respectively. Histamine H(3) receptor ligands are currently under investigation for the treatment of obesity and neurological disorders. The recently identified histamine H(4) receptor is preferentially expressed in the immune tissues, suggesting a potential role in normal immune functions and possibly in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Even with the long history of histamine research and the important applications of histamine receptor ligands, assays to measure the affinity of compounds binding to histamine receptors are still routinely analyzed using a filtration assay, a very low-throughput assay involving washing and filtration steps. This article describes a simple, robust, and homogeneous binding assay based on the scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology that provides results equivalent to those obtained using the more complex filtration assay. The SPA format is easily adapted to high-throughput screening because it is amenable to automation. In summary, this technique allows high-throughput screening of compounds against multiple histamine receptors and, thus, facilitates drug discovery efforts.

  9. Proceedings of the 1st International Symposium on Cancer Metastasis and Lymphovascular System: Basis for Rational Therapy, April 28-30, 2005, San Francisco, California, USA.

    PubMed

    2006-06-01

    The first international symposium on Cancer Metastasis and Lymphovascular System: Basis for Rational Therapy was held in San Francisco from April 20-30, 2005. There were a total of seven sessions and three lunch mini-symposia. The symposium was to address the critical issues of cancer metastasis and the lymphovascular system. It brought the basis scientists and clinicians together to interchange ideas so that laboratory findings can be applied to explain clinical dilemmas and clinical problems can be targeted for research in the laboratory. This symposium resulted in ten major manuscripts with each session or mini-symposium being formulated as the basis for each manuscript.

  10. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  11. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  12. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  13. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  14. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II.

    PubMed

    Artan, Murat; Hwang, Ara B; Lee, Seung V; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-06-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age-associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, includingC. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016.

  15. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung‐Jae V.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age‐associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, including C. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  16. FOREWORD: 6th International Symposium on Electronic Beam Ion Sources and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeby, L.

    1997-01-01

    The 6th International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion sources and their Applications was held at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory at Stockholm University, June 20-23, 1994. A symposium in this series is held every three years. The next one will be organised by Professor Reinhard Becker at the J. W. Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The Stockholm symposium had a total of 65 participants from 9 countries. 43 oral presentations were given and 7 posters were exhibited. For the first time in this series the proceedings have been refereed. The symposium was given generous support by the Marcus Wallbenberg Foundation for International Co-operation in Science, a support mainly used for inviting delegates from Russia and students. The organisation of the symposium was led by Dr. Carl Johan Herrlander. His efficiency, organising skill and never ending attention to all the aspects of the symposium were of the utmost importance for carrying it through. We deeply regret that the proceedings have been very much delayed. Physica Scripta has no part in causing the delay which is solely a result of my inability to enforce deadlines. We think though that the contents still is of interest in particular as a full documentation of the conference.

  17. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  18. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians. PMID:27177895

  19. Proceedings: First combined flue gas desulfurization and dry SO/sub 2/ control symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Emmel, B.B.

    1989-04-01

    The First Combined FGD and Dry SO/sub 2/ Control Symposium was held in St. Louis, Missouri, October 25-28, 1988. The Symposium, jointly sponsored by EPRI ad EPA, has as its objective the exchange of technical and regulatory information on sulfur oxide control technology, including wet and dry scrubbers, emerging processes, and international developments in clean coal/acid rain technologies. Specific topics covered during the Symposium included: retrofit economics, spray dryer technology, furnace sorbent injection topics (demonstration results, byproduct utilization, enhancements), wet FGD operation, municipal solid waste facilities, and post-combination dry technologies. Also included were concurrent sessions on special topics of interest, including dry FGD, new technologies, and FGD improvement. The Symposium Proceedings, published in two volumes, include 86 papers and 4 unpresented papers. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  20. Proceedings: First combined flue gas desulfurization and dry SO/sub 2/ control symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Emmel, B.B.

    1989-04-01

    The First Combined FGD and Dry SO/sub 2/ Control Symposium was held in St. Louis, Missouri, October 25--28, 1988. This Symposium, jointly sponsored by EPRI and EPA, had as its objective the exchange of technical and regulatory information on sulfur oxide control technology, including wet and dry scrubbers, emerging processes, and international developments in clean coal/acid rain technologies. Specific topics covered during the Symposium included: retrofit economics, spray dryer technology, furnace sorbent injection topics (demonstration results, byproduct utilization, enhancements), wet FGD operation, municipal solid waste facilities, and post-combustion dry technologies. Also included were concurrent sessions on special topics of interest, including dry FGD, new technologies, and FGD improvement. The Symposium Proceedings, published in two volumes, include 86 papers and 4 unpresented papers. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. Symposium Review: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites at MS&T 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2014-06-01

    This article reflects on the presentations made during the Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science and Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) held in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) from October 27 to 31. The symposium had three sessions on metal matrix composites and one session on polymer matrix composites containing a total of 23 presentations. While the abstracts and full-text papers are available through databases, the discussion that took place during the symposium is often not captured in writing and gets immediately lost. We have tried to recap some of the discussion in this article and hope that it will supplement the information present in the proceedings. The strong themes in the symposium were porous composites, aluminum matrix composites, and nanocomposites. The development of processing methods was also of interest to the speakers and attendees.

  2. The Lindsay Centennial Symposium. Eric Melvyn Lindsay and Astronomy in Ireland. Report and Selected Contributions from a Conference held in Armagh on 26 January 2007 to Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of E.M. Lindsay, Seventh Director of Armagh Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mark E.

    2007-11-01

    The Lindsay Centennial Symposium celebrates the wider importance of astronomy in Ireland and its unique role in advancing our understanding of the world in which we all live. Astronomy is an international endeavour that transcends political boundaries and helps to draw people together. Virtually every country in the world - and Ireland is no exception - looks to astronomy as part of its national heritage and as an activity, in common with other nations, that goes back almost to the dawn of civilization. In Ireland, astronomy can be traced back more than five thousand years to the time of the construction of megalithic monuments, such as the famous passage-tomb at Newgrange. More recently, Ireland was home to the largest optical telescope in the world, the so-called ‘Leviathan of Parsonstown’. Lindsay played a major role in advancing Irish astronomy. He recognized, very early on, that astronomy is not merely a national activity, but an international one as well, and one that on the island of Ireland must include close collaboration between the two jurisdictions: Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Astronomy attracts people, young and old, into science and to a more scientific way of thinking; it addresses issues of major significance for culture and for our understanding of mankind's place in the Universe; and provides young people with challenges in science and mathematics that are of the utmost technical difficulty and which bring important practical benefits to society. The occasion of the 100th anniversary of Lindsay's birth is a time of great optimism for political and economic developments on the island of Ireland, and especially for the growth of astronomy on both sides of the Border and as part of Ireland's involvement in wider European science.

  3. Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a 2500- to

  4. PREFACE: 13th IMEKO TC17-TC7 Joint Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sanowar

    2010-04-01

    'Without Measurement No Science, Without Science No Measurement' The 13th IMEKO (International Measurement Confederation) TC1-TC7 Joint Symposium was held at City University London, UK from 1-3 September 2010. For the first time this Symposium also included the involvement of IMEKO Technical Committee 13 (TC13) - Measurements in Biology and Medicine. This brings an added dimension to the Symposium in London since the area of measurement science and technology in biology and medicine is an important and a fast growing one. The Symposium was organized by the City University London (www.city.ac.uk) in collaboration with the Institute of Physics (IOP), UK (www.iop.org). The work of this Symposium is reported in this volume. The scope of the Symposium included the main topics covered by the above Technical Committees - education and training in measurement and instrumentation (TC1), measurement science (TC7) and measurements in biology and medicine. These themes underpinned the strap line of the Symposium, 'Without Measurement No Science, Without Science No Measurement' with the highest number of contributions from the measurement science area. The thematic areas were led by invited presentations from each of the areas by eminent speakers. The Symposium provided a useful forum for experts working in these areas for sharing and exchanging their work and ideas. The Symposium attracted participants from many countries of the world including the United States, Japan, Russia and Ukraine. In total over sixty papers are included in the volume and they are presented under the above three key thematic areas. Each paper was independently peer-reviewed by two reviewers from a distinguished international panel. The organizers of the Symposium, City University London have pioneered the establishment of measurement and instrumentation as an academic discipline in the UK through the work of Professor Ludwik Finkelstein who was for many years Chairman of TC1 and a founding member of TC

  5. Histamine-induced itch and its relationship with pain

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-01-01

    Itch is one of the major complications of skin diseases. Although there are various substances that induce itch or pruritus, it is evident that histamine is the best known endogenous agent that evokes itch. Even though histamine-induced itch has been studied for some time, the underlying mechanism of itch is just beginning to emerge. Although various downstream signaling pathways of histamine receptors have been revealed, more studies are required to determine the cause of histamine-induced itch. It appears that itch and pain involve different neuronal pathways. Pain generally inhibits itch, which indicates an inter-communication between the two. Complex interactions between itch and pain may be expected based on reports on disease states and opioids. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanism and the pharmacological aspects of histamine-induced itch. Especially, the underlying mechanism of TRPV1 (an anti-pruritus target) has been determined to some extent. PMID:18667087

  6. Histamine poisoning and control measures in fish and fishery products

    PubMed Central

    Visciano, Pierina; Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Histamine poisoning is one of the most common form of intoxication caused by the ingestion of fish and fishery products. Cooking, canning, or freezing cannot reduce the levels of histamine because this compound is heat stable. All humans are susceptible to histamine and its effects can be described as intolerance or intoxication depending on the severity of the symptoms. The amount of histamine in food, the individual sensitivity, and the detoxification activity in human organism represent the main factors affecting the toxicological response in consumers. Histamine is the only biogenic amine with regulatory limits set by European Legislation, up to a maximum of 200 mg/kg in fresh fish and 400 mg/kg in fishery products treated by enzyme maturation in brine. PMID:25295035

  7. Histamine H3 receptors and sleep-wake regulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Sheng; Sergeeva, Olga A; Haas, Helmut L

    2011-01-01

    The histaminergic system fulfills a major role in the maintenance of waking. Histaminergic neurons are located exclusively in the posterior hypothalamus from where they project to most areas of the central nervous system. The histamine H(3) receptors are autoreceptors damping histamine synthesis, the firing frequency of histamine neurons, and the release of histamine from axonal varicosities. It is noteworthy that this action also extends to heteroreceptors on the axons of most other neurotransmitter systems, allowing a powerful control over multiple homeostatic functions. The particular properties and locations of histamine H(3) receptors provide quite favorable attributes to make this a most promising target for pharmacological interventions of sleep and waking disorders associated with narcolepsy, Parkinson's disease, and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  8. Vasodilator response to histamine: dependence upon the site of administration.

    PubMed

    Galeno, T M; Knuepfer, M M; Brody, M J

    1979-06-15

    Histamine causes vasodilation in part by interacting with histamine H2 receptors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the difference in vasodilator sensitivity of H2 receptors on the inside compared to the outside of the vessel. In order to induce tone, norepinephrine was administered to an in vitro preparation of rabbit ear artery treated with mepyramine to block H1 receptors. Histamine was then either selectively perfused through the artery or added to the outside of the vessel via the organ bath. The outside of the artery was found to be twice as sensitive to the vasodilator effect of histamine as the inside. These data provide the first evidence for greater extraluminal sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle and suggest that the response to histamine will depend in part on the route the amine takes to reach receptors, e.g., from blood-borne sources or from extraluminal stores.

  9. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Symposia have become a mainstay of the gravitational wave community. Held every two years, they are the prime opportunity for our community to discuss the exciting science, technology, mission designs, and progress of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The 8th LISA symposium, held at Stanford University in the summer of 2010 was the largest symposium so far and was dominated by progress and hopes that the LISA mission will soon excel following the expected launch of the LISA pathfinder (LPF), no later than 2012, and the expected prioritization by the Decadal survey which was released 6 weeks later. The following years were challenging. Although the Decadal survey ranked LISA very high, NASA's budget issues, mostly due to the cost increase of the James Webb Space Telescope, and continued delays in LPF put too much stress on the LISA project and it officially ended in 2011. The LISA International Science Team (LIST), the core group of LISA scientists and technologists, was dissolved and the community in the U.S. was struggling to maintain cohesion. In the wake of these events, ESA started a new selection process for their next three large missions, L1, L2, and L3, and the European LISA team developed the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO), an evolved LISA concept, as an ESA only L1 candidate. A few weeks before the 9th LISA Symposium, held in Paris in May 2012, ESA announced its decision to select JUICE, a planetary mission to Jupiter and its moons, as its next large science mission (L1). Despite having the highest ranked science case, NGO was not selected due to further delays in LPF and the general feeling outside the GW community that the technology is perhaps too challenging to be pulled off in time for the L1 launch in 2022. Many U.S. members of the LISA community cancelled their travel plans and the mood at that symposium ranged from resignation to defiance. Hope for a somewhat timely launch of a LISA-like mission rested upon L2, the next

  10. Summaries of the Regional Conferences Held in Preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNEVOC Info, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, five regional conferences were held in preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education (TVE). The Asia-Pacific regional conference focused on challenges of the 21st century, demands of the world of work, and changing patterns in the delivery of training programs. The European symposium covered five…

  11. Proceedings of the Tenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences: Synergism of Analysis, Modeling, and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    The Tenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 11-13, 1992, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the seven technical sessions held at this meeting. This was the tenth annual symposium sponsored by the Engineering Research Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy. The central theme of this year's meeting was synergism of analysis, modeling, and experiment and related topics. Each year a group of selected researchers in the DOE/BES Engineering Research Program are invited to present their research findings in such an open forum. This Symposium was organized into seven technical sessions: fluid mechanics (two sessions); solid mechanics; analysis, nonlinear systems (two sessions); chemical processing; and instrumentation and diagnostics. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers in this report.

  12. Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties at High Temperatures: A Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond F.

    1961-01-01

    This book contains the program and all available abstracts of the 90' invited and contributed papers to be presented at the TUPAC Symposium on Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties at High Temperatures. The Symposium will be held in conjunction with the XVIIIth IUPAC Congress, Montreal, August 6 - 12, 1961. It has been organized, by the Subcommissions on Condensed States and on Gaseous States of the Commission on High Temperatures and Refractories and by the Subcommission on Experimental Thermodynamics of the Commission on Chemical Thermodynamics, acting in conjunction with the Organizing Committee of the IUPAC Congress. All inquiries concerning participation In the Symposium should be directed to: Secretary, XVIIIth International Congress of Pure and Applied Chemistry, National Research Council, Ottawa, 'Canada. Owing to the limited time and facilities available for the preparation and printing of the book, it has not been possible to refer the proofs of the abstracts to the authors for checking. Furthermore, it has not been possible to subject the manuscripts to a very thorough editorial examination. Some obvious errors in the manuscripts have been corrected; other errors undoubtedly have been introduced. Figures have been redrawn only when such a step was essential for reproduction purposes. Sincere apologies are offered to authors and readers for any errors which remain; however, in the circumstances neither the IUPAC Commissions who organized the Symposium, nor the U. S. Government Agencies who assisted in the preparation of this book can accept responsibility for the errors.

  13. FAA/NASA En Route Noise Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft community noise annoyance is traditionally a concern only in localities near airports. The proposed introduction of large commercial airplanes with advanced turboprop propulsion systems with supersonic propellers has given rise to concerns of noise annoyance in areas previously considered not to be impacted by aircraft noise. A symposium was held to assess the current knowledge of factors important to the impact of en route noise and to aid in the formulation of FAA and NASA programs in the area. Papers were invited on human response to aircraft noise in areas with low ambient noise levels, aircraft noise heard indoors and outdoors, aircraft noise in recreational areas, detection of propeller and jet aircraft noise, and methodological issues relevant to the design of future studies.

  14. Improving the quality of papers submitted to dental journals: Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Cape Town on Wednesday, 25 June 2014.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Giannobile, William V; Sourgen, Deborah L; Balaji, S M; Honkala, Eino; Lynch, Christopher D

    2015-08-01

    This satellite symposium was the fourth in a series for editors, publishers, reviewers and all those with an interest in scientific publishing. It was held on Wednesday 25th June 2014 at the IADR International meeting in Cape Town, South Africa. The symposium attracted more than 180 attendees. This symposium placed an emphasis on how the quality of papers submitted to dental journals could be improved. The panel included representation from editors, researchers and publishers from North America, India and the Gulf States. The symposium identified a number of challenges for editors and publishers, including the poor quality of many papers submitted to dental and other scientific journals, plagiarism, attempted duplicate publication and sometimes fraudulent results. Where possible speakers are identified by name. A subsequent symposium was held during the IADR meeting in Boston on March 11th 2015. Involvement open to editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing.

  15. Improving the quality of papers submitted to dental journals: Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Cape Town on Wednesday, 25 June 2014.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Giannobile, William V; Sourgen, Deborah L; Balaji, S M; Honkala, Eino; Lynch, Christopher D

    2015-08-01

    This satellite symposium was the fourth in a series for editors, publishers, reviewers and all those with an interest in scientific publishing. It was held on Wednesday 25th June 2014 at the IADR International meeting in Cape Town, South Africa. The symposium attracted more than 180 attendees. This symposium placed an emphasis on how the quality of papers submitted to dental journals could be improved. The panel included representation from editors, researchers and publishers from North America, India and the Gulf States. The symposium identified a number of challenges for editors and publishers, including the poor quality of many papers submitted to dental and other scientific journals, plagiarism, attempted duplicate publication and sometimes fraudulent results. Where possible speakers are identified by name. A subsequent symposium was held during the IADR meeting in Boston on March 11th 2015. Involvement open to editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. PMID:25748020

  16. Highlights from the 1st ISCB Latin American Student Council Symposium 2014

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific content and activities of the first edition of the Latin American Symposium organized by the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), held in conjunction with the Third Latin American conference from the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB-LA 2014) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on October 27, 2014. PMID:25955751

  17. Addendum: Tenth International Symposium on Alcohol Fuels, The road to commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Tenth International Symposium on ALCOHOL FUELS ``THE ROAD TO COMMERCIALIZATION`` was held at the Broadmoor Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA November 7--10, 1993. Twenty-seven papers on the production of alcohol fuels, specifications, their use in automobiles, buses and trucks, emission control, and government policies were presented. Individual papers have been processed separately for entry into the data base.

  18. Activities of the International Labour Office; Conclusions from an International Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The symposium on economic education for trade unionists held in Geneva identified areas of major interest, analyzed different ways of improving the economic knowledge of workers, discussed the planning and implementation of programs and materials, and reviewed ILO economic contributions to economic education. (Author/BP)

  19. Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on methodologies for intelligent systems (Poster Session)

    SciTech Connect

    Harber, K.S.

    1991-09-01

    This volume contains papers which have been selected for the poster Session at the Sixth International Symposium for Intelligent Systems held October 1991, The following major areas were covered: expert systems; intelligent databases; knowledge representation; learning and adaptive systems; and logic for artificial intelligence. Nineteen full papers are included. (GHH)

  20. Improving Productivity of School Systems Through Educational Technology. Final Report of Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Robert G.; Weinberger, JoAnn

    Full texts of ten commissioned papers are presented, along with discussants' remarks and an analytical review by the editors. The symposium was held to explore the potentials and implications of using advanced communications and technological systems to improve educational productivity. Major foci included: 1) the use of management models to…

  1. Mounting Pressures on Planet Earth. A Four-Part Bicentennial Symposium Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, David A., Ed.

    Detailed are the proceedings of the 1976 Bicentennial Symposium Series held under the general title of Mounting Pressures on Planet Earth. This event, co-sponsored by the Maryland State Department of Education and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, brought together researchers and educators to discuss solutions to the Earth's problems. The…

  2. Report on the National Symposium on Personal Privacy and Information Technology (October 4-7, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Montvale, NJ.

    A national symposium was held October 4-7, 1981, to explore the relationships among law, ethics, and informational technology as they relate to the individual's informational privacy. The introduction to this report describes the conference format; discusses the Privacy Act of 1974 and the Freedom of Information Act; and offers definitions of…

  3. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  4. Sheep symposium: Biology and management of low-input lambing in easy-care systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-input lambing management was the focus of the 2007 Sheep Symposium at the joint annual meetings of the American Society of Animal Science, the American Dairy Science Association, the Asociacio´n Mexicana de Produccio´n Animal, and the Poultry Science Association held in San Antonio, Texas, on Ju...

  5. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Growth and Development Symposium titled “Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, LA, July 10 to 14, 2011. T...

  6. Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resiliency after the Sandy Hook Tragedy. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    On February 27 and 28, 2013, The Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resilience after the Sandy Hook Tragedy, was held in Danbury, Connecticut. The event was hosted by the United Way of Western Connecticut and Western Connecticut State University. Frank J. Zenere, school psychologist and crisis team member in the Division of Student Services of the…

  7. CD-ROM Proceedings International Symposium on Erosion and Landscape Evolution (ISELE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This CD-ROM contains the abstracts and full papers for the proceedings from the ASABE specialty conference, the International Symposium on Erosion and Landscape Evolution (ISELE), held September 18-21, 2011 at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Three extended abstracts from the meeting...

  8. Symposium on Early Childhood Education (Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, November 9-10, 1997). Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Coll. of Education.

    This book compiles abstracts of presentations from a symposium held in honor of Dr. Bernard Spodek, a leading scholar in early childhood education, on the occasion of his retirement. Topics addressed are as follows: (1) culture in early childhood curriculum; (2) developmental and cultural appropriateness; (3) kindergarten in Japan; (4) pressure…

  9. Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Symposium honoring the 25th Anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on March 28, 1980. The following three papers were presented: Chemical Properties of Mendelevium; Nuclear Properties of Mendelevium; and Radioactive Decay of Md Isotopes. Besides these papers there were introductory remarks, reminiscences, and concluding remarks.

  10. Proceedings: National Symposium on Energy Conservation Education, Washington, D.C., October 24-26, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerji, Ranjit K., Ed.; Simpson, Camille D., Ed.

    This document reports the results of a symposium held to examine: (1) the need for educational programs in energy conservation; (2) the issues and processes involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of energy conservation educational programs; (3) the role of government in providing programs in energy conservation; and (4) the present…

  11. Production, management, and environment symposium: Environmental footprint of livestock production - Greenhouse gas emissions and climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is the introduction to the 2015 Production, Management, and Environment symposium titled “Environmental Footprint of Livestock Production – Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change” that was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the ASAS and ADSA at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort in...

  12. Proceedings of the 2nd symposium on valves for coal conversion and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Maxfield, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The 2nd symposium on valves for coal conversion and utilization was held October 15 to 17, 1980. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, in cooperation with the Valve Manufacturers Association. Seventeen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  13. Proceedings of the Stake Symposium on Educational Evaluation (Champaign, Illinois, May 8-9, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Rita, Ed.

    A symposium on educational evaluation was held to celebrate the career of Robert E. Stake. Contributions, which relate to many aspects of educational evaluation, include: (1) "The Issue of Advocacy in Evaluation" (Ernest House and Kenneth Howe); (2) "The Meaning of Bias" (Michael Scriven); (3) Commentary on Ernie House and Michael Scriven's…

  14. Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on the Molecular Breeding of Forage and Turf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 7th International Symposium on the Molecular Breeding of Forage and Turf, MBFT2012, was held in Salt Lake City, UT, USA, from 4-7 June 2012. One-hundred and fifteen researchers from around the world presented oral and poster formats relating to ten general topics: Genetic mechanisms and applic...

  15. Symposium on Minorities and Women in Science and Technology. Serial AA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Transcripts of four panel discussions are presented in these proceedings of a symposium held by the Congressional Black Caucus to review implementation of the Science and Technology Equal Opportunities Act of 1980. Topics and issues discussions include the underrepresentation of women and minorities in science and engineering (S/E); participation…

  16. Brief Report: State of the Science Symposium on Aging and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Tamar; Janicki, Matthew P.; Marks, Beth; Hammel, Joy; Factor, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The overall goal of the "2007 State of the Science Symposium on Aging with Developmental Disabilities: Charting Lifespan Trajectories and Supportive Environments for Healthy Community Living" (held in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.) was to increase the understanding and definition of how to improve the health, psychosocial well-being, and community…

  17. Mosquito Vector Control and Biology in Latin America - A 17th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 17th Annual Latin America American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 73rd Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL, in April 2007. The principal objective, as for the previous 16 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector cont...

  18. Proceedings of the 1980 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil energy processes

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The 1980 symposium on Instrumentation and Control for Fossil Energy Processes was held June 9-11, 1980, New Cavalier, Virginia Beach, Virginia. It was sponsored by the Argonne National Laboratory and the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. Forty-five papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; nine papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  19. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - A 25th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 25th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 81st Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in March 2015. The principal objective, for the previous 24 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  20. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 23rd symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 23nd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 79th Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, NJ in February 2013. The principal objective, as for the previous 22 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector contr...

  1. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 22nd Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 22nd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 78th Annual Meeting in Austin, TX in February 2012. The principal objective, as for the previous 21 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  2. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 24th symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 24th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 80th Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA in February 2014. The principal objective, as for the previous 23 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spe...

  3. The Third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization was held on 24-26 Sept. 1990. Sessions were on the following topics: dynamics and controls; multilevel optimization; sensitivity analysis; aerodynamic design software systems; optimization theory; analysis and design; shape optimization; vehicle components; structural optimization; aeroelasticity; artificial intelligence; multidisciplinary optimization; and composites.

  4. Discussing the Issues: A Report on the 2013 Ivies + Access Services Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    As access services emerges as a discrete discipline within the field of librarianship, opportunities for access services librarians to meet and discuss the issues facing today's libraries continue to grow. One annual meeting that has attracted less attention over the years is the Ivies + Access Services Symposium. Held at various member…

  5. PREFACE: High Performance Computing Symposium 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talon, Suzanne; Mousseau, Normand; Peslherbe, Gilles; Bertrand, François; Gauthier, Pierre; Kadem, Lyes; Moitessier, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy; Wittig, Rod

    2012-02-01

    HPCS (High Performance Computing Symposium) is a multidisciplinary conference that focuses on research involving High Performance Computing and its application. Attended by Canadian and international experts and renowned researchers in the sciences, all areas of engineering, the applied sciences, medicine and life sciences, mathematics, the humanities and social sciences, it is Canada's pre-eminent forum for HPC. The 25th edition was held in Montréal, at the Université du Québec à Montréal, from 15-17 June and focused on HPC in Medical Science. The conference was preceded by tutorials held at Concordia University, where 56 participants learned about HPC best practices, GPU computing, parallel computing, debugging and a number of high-level languages. 274 participants from six countries attended the main conference, which involved 11 invited and 37 contributed oral presentations, 33 posters, and an exhibit hall with 16 booths from our sponsors. The work that follows is a collection of papers presented at the conference covering HPC topics ranging from computer science to bioinformatics. They are divided here into four sections: HPC in Engineering, Physics and Materials Science, HPC in Medical Science, HPC Enabling to Explore our World and New Algorithms for HPC. We would once more like to thank the participants and invited speakers, the members of the Scientific Committee, the referees who spent time reviewing the papers and our invaluable sponsors. To hear the invited talks and learn about 25 years of HPC development in Canada visit the Symposium website: http://2011.hpcs.ca/lang/en/conference/keynote-speakers/ Enjoy the excellent papers that follow, and we look forward to seeing you in Vancouver for HPCS 2012! Gilles Peslherbe Chair of the Scientific Committee Normand Mousseau Co-Chair of HPCS 2011 Suzanne Talon Chair of the Organizing Committee UQAM Sponsors The PDF also contains photographs from the conference banquet.

  6. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  7. RICIS Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Integrated Environments for Large, Complex Systems is the theme for the RICIS symposium of 1988. Distinguished professionals from industry, government, and academia have been invited to participate and present their views and experiences regarding research, education, and future directions related to this topic. Within RICIS, more than half of the research being conducted is in the area of Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The focus of this research is on the software development life-cycle for large, complex, distributed systems. Within the education and training component of RICIS, the primary emphasis has been to provide education and training for software professionals.

  8. [Role of central histamine in amygdaloid kindled seizures].

    PubMed

    Kamei, C; Okuma, C

    2001-05-01

    The role of central histamine in amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats was studied. Histamine content in the amygdala was significantly decreased after development of amygdaloid kindling. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine resulted in inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. The H1-agonists 2-methylhistamine and 2-thiazolylethylamine also inhibited amygdaloid kindled seizures. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of histidine and metoprine inhibited amygdaloid kindled seizures at doses that caused increases in histamine contents of the brain. H1-antagonists (diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine) attenuated histamine- or histidine-induced inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. Both i.c.v. and i.p. injections of H3-antagonists (thioperamide, AQ0145 and clobenpropit) resulted in a dose-related inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. The effects of thioperamide and AQ0145 were inhibited by an H3-agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine and H1-antagonists. On the other hand, H2-antagonists showed no antagonistic effect. GABAmimetic drugs, diazepam, sodium valproate and muscimol potentiated the effect of clobenpropit. Bicuculline caused significant antagonism of the inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures induced by clobenpropit. These findings suggested that a histaminergic mechanism plays an important role in suppressing amygdaloid kindled seizures through histamine H1-receptors. In addition, an inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures induced by histamine is closely related with the action of GABA.

  9. Infralimbic cortex activation and motivated arousal induce histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Forray, María Inés; Torrealba, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Appetitive behaviours occur in a state of behavioural and physiological activation that allows the optimal performance of these goal-directed behaviours. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histamine neurons under the command of the infralimbic cortex are important to provide behavioural activation. Extracellular histamine and serotonin were measured by microdialysis of the medial prefrontal cortex in behaving rats in parallel with a picrotoxin microinjection into the infralimbic cortex. The injection aroused the rats behaviourally, increased histamine release and decreased serotonin levels. Inhibition of the infralimbic cortex with muscimol produced the opposite effects on neurotransmitter release. The behavioural activation induced by motivating hungry rats with caged food was paralleled by an immediate histamine release, whereas awakening induced by tapping their microdialysis bowl increased serotonin, but not histamine levels. In conclusion, picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex produces behavioural activation together with histamine release; in a similar manner, induction of an appetitive state produced histamine release, likely related to increased behavioural activation characteristic of an appetitive behaviour. PMID:25746330

  10. Interactions of the histamine and hypocretin systems in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ling; Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerome M

    2015-07-01

    Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder. Here, we review the role of the histamine and hypocretin systems in sleep-wake modulation. Furthermore, we summarize the neuropathological changes to these two systems in narcolepsy and discuss the possibility that narcolepsy-associated histamine abnormalities could mediate or result from the same processes that cause the hypocretin cell loss. We also review the changes in the hypocretin and histamine systems, and the associated sleep disruptions, in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic approaches for manipulation of the histamine system. PMID:26100750

  11. Itching for answers: how histamine relaxes lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    In the current issue of Microcirculation, studies by Kurtz et al. and Nizamutdinova et al. together provide new evidence supporting a role for histamine as an endothelial-derived molecule that inhibits lymphatic muscle contraction. In particular, Nizamutdinova et al. show that the effects of flow-induced shear stress on lymphatic endothelium are mediated by both nitric oxide and histamine, since only blockade of both prevents contraction strength and frequency from being altered by flow. Separately, Kurtz et al. used confocal microscopy to determine a preferential expression of histamine receptors on the lymphatic endothelium and demonstrated that histamine applied to spontaneously contracting collecting lymphatics inhibits contractions. Previous studies disagreed on whether histamine stimulates or inhibits lymphatic contractions, but also used differing concentrations, species, and preparations. Together these new reports shed light on how histamine acts within the lymphatic vasculature, but also raise important questions about the cell type on which histamine exerts its effects and the signaling pathways involved. This editorial briefly discusses the contribution of each study and its relevance to lymphatic biology.

  12. In vivo histamine voltammetry in the mouse premammillary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2015-06-01

    Histamine plays a major role in the mediation of allergic reactions such as peripheral inflammation. This classical monoamine is also a neurotransmitter involved in the central nervous system but its role in this context is poorly understood. Studying histamine neurotransmission is important due to its implications in many neurological disorders. The sensitivity, selectivity and high temporal resolution of fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offer many advantages for studying electroactive neurotransmitters. Histamine has previously been studied with FSCV; however, the lack of a robust Faradaic electrochemical signal makes it difficult to selectively identify histamine in complex media, as found in vivo. In this work, we optimize an electrochemical waveform that provides a stimulation-locked and unique electrochemical signal towards histamine. We describe in vitro waveform optimization and a novel in vivo physiological model for stimulating histamine release in the mouse premammillary nucleus via stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. We demonstrate that a robust signal can be used to effectively identify histamine and characterize its in vivo kinetics.

  13. Interactions of the histamine and hypocretin systems in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ling; Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerome M

    2015-07-01

    Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder. Here, we review the role of the histamine and hypocretin systems in sleep-wake modulation. Furthermore, we summarize the neuropathological changes to these two systems in narcolepsy and discuss the possibility that narcolepsy-associated histamine abnormalities could mediate or result from the same processes that cause the hypocretin cell loss. We also review the changes in the hypocretin and histamine systems, and the associated sleep disruptions, in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic approaches for manipulation of the histamine system.

  14. Cardiovascular reflexes evoked by histamine stimulation of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, C L; Theodossy, S J; Longhurst, J C

    1991-04-01

    This study examined the potential for histamine to cause cardiovascular reflexes when applied to the serosal or mucosal surface of the stomach. Thus, in chloralose-anesthetized cats, histamine was applied to the serosal surface of the stomach in concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1,000 micrograms/ml. This resulted in graded increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximal left ventricular pressure over time (dP/dt), and heart rate ranging from 9 +/- 4 to 30 +/- 3 mmHg, 450 +/- 103 to 1,710 +/- 610 mmHg/s, and 2 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 4 beats/min, respectively. Histamine stimulation of the gastric serosa evoked a greater pressor response than that observed when the same concentration of histamine (100 micrograms/ml) was applied to the gastric mucosa (43 +/- 7 vs. 13 +/- 3 mmHg, respectively). In six cats, celiac ganglionectomy abolished the previously observed cardiovascular response to histamine stimulation of the serosal surface of the stomach. When the gastric serosa was treated with the H1-receptor antagonist diphenhydramine (1 mg/ml) (n = 5), the cardiovascular response to histamine was abolished. In five other cats, administration of the H2-antagonist ranitidine (1 mg/ml) had no effect on the histamine-induced responses. When indomethacin (2-5 mg/ml), was applied to the serosal surface of the stomach (n = 6), histamine-induced increases in MAP and dP/dt were attenuated. However, application of PGE2 (1 microgram/ml) restored these two responses. These results suggest that histamine stimulates H1-receptors in the gastric wall to cause reflex cardiovascular responses that are dependent, in part, on the local production of prostaglandins.

  15. Women's technical and professional symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K; Mack, L

    1999-10-01

    This is the fourth LLNL-sponsored Women's Technical and Professional Symposium. This year's theme: ''Excellence through the Millennium,'' focuses on the cutting edge work being done at LLNL and the many contributions of women to our science and technology mission. We hope this Symposium gives each person attending a better idea of the broad scope of the Laboratory's mission and their place within the organization. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that we all work in support of science and technology despite the diversity of our experience. This Symposium provides an opportunity to reflect on our past and to begin to plan our future.

  16. The first Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; da Silva Marinho, Thiago

    2015-08-01

    The 1st Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium gathered paleontologists, geologists, and paleoartists in the city of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April 21st to 24th, 2013. The Dinosaur Symposium in the Pontal Campus of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil provided an opportunity to share many new results of dinosaur research being conducted around the world. The symposium coincided with a new dawn of scientific advances in dinosaur paleontology further expanding its importance, interest and credibility worldwide.

  17. Histamine regulation of hyperplastic and neoplastic cell growth in cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Onori, Paolo; Gaudio, Eugenio; Franchitto, Antonio; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Histamine has long been known to be involved in inflammatory events. The discovery of antihistamines dates back to the first half of the 20th century when a Swiss-Italian pharmacologist, Daniel Bovet began his work. In 1957 he was awarded a Nobel Prize for his production of antihistamines for allergy relief. Since that time, histamine has been found to play a role in other events besides allergic reaction. Possibly unbelievable to Bovet and his peers, histamine has now been marked as playing a role in liver pathologies including hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:21607141

  18. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  19. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  20. Origins of cancer symposium 2015: posttranslational modifications and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jason; Maupin, Kevin; Merrill, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The sixth annual Origins of Cancer Symposium was held July 10, 2015, at the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, MI. Its theme was Beyond the Genome, with talks focused on the various influences of posttranslational modifications in malignant transformation and the spread of cancer. This event was organized by senior Ph.D. students as part of their professional development training at the Van Andel Institute Graduate School and is a successor to the original Oncogene meetings established by the Foundation for Advanced Cancer Studies in the 1980s. The symposium featured eight world-renowned scientists who disclosed their new findings and reflected upon past work related to the array of posttranslational modifications that contribute to cancer.

  1. 3rd annual symposium of chemical and pharmaceutical structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Naidong; Zheng, Jenny; Lee, Mike

    2012-08-01

    The 3rd Annual Symposium on Chemical and Pharmaceutical Structure Analysis was once again held in Shanghai, where a rich history of 'East meets West' continued. This meeting is dedicated to bringing together scientists from pharmaceutical companies, academic institutes, CROs and instrument vendors to discuss current challenges and opportunities on the forefront of pharmaceutical research and development. The diversified symposia and roundtables are highly interactive events where scientists share their experiences and visions in a collegial setting. The symposium highlighted speakers and sessions that provided first-hand experiences as well as the latest guidance and industrial/regulatory thinking, which was reflected by the theme of this year's meeting 'From Bench to Decision Making - from Basics to Application.' In addition to the highly successful Young Scientist Excellence Award, new events were featured at this year's meeting, such as the Executive Roundtable and the inaugural Innovator Award.

  2. The 1979 CRC (Coordinating Research Council, Inc. ) Octane Rating Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The 1979 CRC (Coordinating Research Council, Inc.) Octane Rating Symposium was held in Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex. on 5/21-25/79 to encourage a more uniform application of the CRC E-15 octane requirement rating technique among experienced raters in the oil and automotive industries. Since a study of the E-15 technique showed that no quantifiable difference existed between full-throttle and part-throttle accelerations near the detent, part-throttle being simply defined as an acceleration at a constant manifold vacuum above detent, the part-throttle rating techniques were modified to provide a quantifiable difference, in terms of manifold vacuum, between the full- and part-throttle. The changes were incorporated into the 1979 program. Other major problems discussed at the symposium are summarized.

  3. Koch Institute Symposium on Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Adam; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Szeto, Gregory L; Zhu, Eric; Eisen, Herman N.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2013-01-01

    The 12th annual summer symposium of The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT was held in Cambridge, MA, on June 14th, 1023. The symposium entitled “Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy” focused on recent advances in preclinical research in basic immunology and biomedical engineering, and their clinical application in cancer therapies. The day-long gathering also provided a forum for discussion and potential collaborations between engineers and clinical investigators. The major topics presented include: (i) enhancement of adoptive cell therapy by engineering to improve the ability and functionality of T-cells against tumor cells; (ii) current therapies using protein and antibody therapeutics to modulate endogenous anti-tumor immunity; and (iii) new technologies to identify molecular targets and assess therapeutic efficacy, and devices to control and target drug delivery more effectively and efficiently. PMID:24466562

  4. p Ka calculation of poliprotic acid: histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Abreu, Heitor A.; De Almeida, Wagner B.; Duarte, Hélio A.

    2004-01-01

    Various theoretical studies have been reported addressing the performance of solvation models available to estimate p Ka values. However, no attention has been paid so far to the role played by the electronic, thermal and solvation energy individual contributions to the Gibbs free energy of the deprotonation process. In this work, we decompose the total Gibbs free energy into three distinct terms and then evaluate the dependence of each contribution on the level of theory employed for its determination using different levels of theory. The three possible p Kas of histamine have been estimated and compared with available experimental data. We found that the electronic energy term is sensitive to the level of theory and basis set, and, therefore, could be also a source of error in the theoretical calculation of p Kas.

  5. EDITORIAL: The 2nd International Symposium on Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Lai, M. O.

    2007-12-01

    Following the success of the 1st International Symposium on Functional Materials held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 5-8 December 2005, the second symposium was held in the beautiful city of Hangzhou, People's Republic of China, 16-19 May 2007. The latter symposium was a gathering of about 200 renowned researchers from 16 countries around the world. The conference consisted of 24 symposia, 5 keynote papers, 21 invited papers, 108 oral presentations and about 160 poster papers covering the frontier areas of materials science and technology of functional materials. They included topics such as energy storage materials, ferroelectric materials, ferromagnetic materials, ferroelectric thin films, applications of functional materials, nanofabrication, computational design, shape memory alloys, application of shape memory materials, ferroelectrics and thermoelectrics, advances in characterizations, magneto-optical materials, Zn and Ti oxides, synthesis of nanopowders and wires, and many other advanced functional materials. With the receipt of more than 396 abstracts, this conference was a gathering of great minds in one place to discuss the research frontiers and discoveries in functional materials. The Organizing Committee would like to express its sincere thanks to the members of the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable contributions to the symposium. The committee is also grateful for the generous support from the many sponsors. A word of sincere thanks needs to go to Professor Roger Wäppling, Editor-in-Chief and the editorial staff of IOP Publishing for the publication of selected papers in this special issue of Physica Scripta. Finally, our deepest gratitude should be directed to the National University of Singapore, Zhejiang University and the General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, People's Republic of China for, without their support, the conference would not have been a success.

  6. PREFACE: Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Yamanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science contains selected papers presented at the Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from June 8 to 10, 2015, at the Bale-Sawala of Universitas Padjadjaran in Jatinangor, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between researchers, in particular geophysicists and related scientists, and to enable sharing of knowledge and research findings concerning local and global geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by 126 participants and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Environmental Geophysics, Geophysical Explorations, and Geophysical Instrumentations and Methods. The symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the surrounding regions. For this first event the topic was ''The formation of Bandung-Basin between myths and facts: Exemplary cultural, geological and geophysical study on the evolution of the earth surface'', presented by invited speakers and local experts. This activity was aimed at extending our knowledge on this particular subject, which may have global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth's surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium. The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing committee. We want to specially thank Irwan A. Dharmawan for managing the programme, Anggie Susilawati and Mia U. Hasanah for the conference administration, and Dini Fitriani for financial management. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program. The conference photograph can be viewed in the PDF.

  7. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  8. Hand-held medical robots.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Medical robots have evolved from autonomous systems to tele-operated platforms and mechanically-grounded, cooperatively-controlled robots. Whilst these approaches have seen both commercial and clinical success, uptake of these robots remains moderate because of their high cost, large physical footprint and long setup times. More recently, researchers have moved toward developing hand-held robots that are completely ungrounded and manipulated by surgeons in free space, in a similar manner to how conventional instruments are handled. These devices provide specific functions that assist the surgeon in accomplishing tasks that are otherwise challenging with manual manipulation. Hand-held robots have the advantages of being compact and easily integrated into the normal surgical workflow since there is typically little or no setup time. Hand-held devices can also have a significantly reduced cost to healthcare providers as they do not necessitate the complex, multi degree-of-freedom linkages that grounded robots require. However, the development of such devices is faced with many technical challenges, including miniaturization, cost and sterility, control stability, inertial and gravity compensation and robust instrument tracking. This review presents the emerging technical trends in hand-held medical robots and future development opportunities for promoting their wider clinical uptake.

  9. Hand held explosives detection system

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sensitive hand-held explosives detection device capable of detecting the presence of extremely low quantities of high explosives molecules, and which is applicable to sampling vapors from personnel, baggage, cargo, etc., as part of an explosives detection system.

  10. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  11. Modafinil increases histamine release in the anterior hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Toshimi; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2003-03-20

    Modafinil, (RS)-2-(Diphenylmethylsulfinyl)acetamide, is a well known wake promoting drug used for the treatment of narcolepsy. We investigated the effect of modafinil on the hypothalamic histamine release in the anesthetized rat using in vivo microdialysis. Modafinil (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased histamine release by 150% of the basal release. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of modafinil (1 nmol) also increased histamine release, however, when modafinil (1 nmol) was injected directly into the tuberomammillary nucleus, a limited region where cell bodies of the histaminergic neurons are located, histamine release was not altered. These observations suggest that modafinil may promote waking via the activation of the histaminergic system, although it does not appear to be a direct pharmacological target of modafinil.

  12. Quality assurance of histamine analysis in fresh and canned fish.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Warlley P; Silva, Tarliane M; Guidi, Letícia R; Tette, Patrícia A S; Byrro, Ricardo M D; Santiago-Silva, Paula; Fernandes, Christian; Gloria, Maria Beatriz A

    2016-11-15

    Histamine determination is relevant for fish safety, quality and trade. Recently a study by the European Union (EU) compared the Codex and the EU mandated methods for the analysis of histamine and observed that they underestimated and overestimated the results, respectively. To solve this problem, a simple and efficient procedure for the extraction and quantification of histamine by ion-pair HPLC method with post-column derivatization and fluorimetric detection is proposed. It was optimized and validated for the analysis of histamine in fish. The method attended the performance criteria established by Commission Decision 2002/657/CE. The method was also submitted to proficiency testing; uncertainty was calculated; and the stability of solutions and standards was investigated. There was no matrix effect. The LOD, LOQ, CCα and CCβ were fit for the purpose. The method was successfully used in the analyses of freshwater fish and fresh and canned tuna. PMID:27283612

  13. Histamine: an undercover agent in multiple rare diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Melgarejo, Esther; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine performing pleiotropic effects in humans, involving tasks within the immune and neuroendocrine systems, neurotransmission, gastric secretion, cell life and death, and development. It is the product of the histidine decarboxylase activity, and its effects are mainly mediated through four different G-protein coupled receptors. Thus, histamine-related effects are the results of highly interconnected and tissue-specific signalling networks. Consequently, alterations in histamine-related factors could be an important part in the cause of multiple rare/orphan diseases. Bearing this hypothesis in mind, more than 25 rare diseases related to histamine physiopathology have been identified using a computationally assisted text mining approach. These newly integrated data will provide insight to elucidate the molecular causes of these rare diseases. The data can also help in devising new intervention strategies for personalized medicine for multiple rare diseases. PMID:22435405

  14. PREFACE: International Symposium on Molecular Conductors: Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions (ISMC 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2008-02-01

    The International Symposium on Molecular Conductors 2008 (ISMC2008) was held as the second international symposium of the project entitled `Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions', which was supported by the Grant-in-aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. The project lasted from September 2003 to March 2008, and was completed by this symposium held at Okazaki Conference Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan (23-25 July 2008), which about 100 scientists attended. During the symposium, five project teams gave summary talks and exciting talks were given on the topics developed recently not only by the members of the project but also by other scientists including invited speakers from abroad, who are doing active research on molecular conductors. It is expected that papers presented in the symposium will give valuable hints for the next step in the research of this field. Therefore the organizers of this symposium decided to publish this proceedings in order to demonstrate these activities, not only for the local community of the project, but also for the broad society of international scientists who are interested in molecular conductors. The editors, who are also the organizers of this symposium, believe that this proceedings provides a significant and relevant contribution to the field of molecular conductors since it is the first time we have published such a proceedings as an electronic journal. We note that all papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed by expert referees. Editors made every effort to satisfy the criterion of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. Toshihiro Takahashi and Yoshikazu Suzumura Editors: Toshihiro Takahashi (Gakushuin University) (Chairman) Kazushi Kanoda (University of Tokyo) Seiichi Kagoshima (University of Tokyo) Takehiko Mori (Tokyo

  15. Regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation by histamine in splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Radhika D; Khan, Manzoor M

    2011-06-01

    Histamine is implicated in allergic disease and asthma and ERK1/2 is involved in allergic inflammation including Th2 differentiation and proliferation. This study was designed to study the effects of histamine on ERK1/2 phosphorylation in splenocytes. C57/BL6 splenocytes were treated with different concentrations of histamine (10(-4) to 10(-11) M). Histamine (10(-4) M) increased ERK2 phosphorylation. There was, however, no significant effect seen at other concentrations (10(-11) to 10(-6) M). Surprisingly, H1 receptor agonist β-histine (10(-5) M), H2 agonist amthamine (10(-5) M), H3 agonist methimepip (10(-6) M), and H4 agonist 4-methyl histamine (10(-6) M), all increased ERK2 phosphorylation. H1R antagonist pyrilamine (10(-6) M), H2R antagonist ranitidine (10(-5) M), H3/H4R antagonist thioperamide (10(-6) M), and H3R antagonist clobenpropit (10(-5) M) inhibited histamine-mediated ERK2 phosphorylation suggesting that all four histamine receptor subtypes played some role in this phosphorylation. Because tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) causes phosphorylation of ERK1/2, we investigated whether histamine acted via secretion of TNF-α to affect ERK1/2 phosphorylation. As a consequence, TNF-α knockout mice were used and we found that there was inhibition of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation by H2, H3, and H4 agonists. This was in contrast to the wild-type splenocytes where histamine augmented the phosphorylation of ERK2 via H2, H3, and H4 receptors. In TNF-α knockout mice histamine did not affect the phosphorylation of ERK2 via H1 receptors. The results suggested that histamine indirectly caused the ERK2 phosphorylation via its effects on the secretion of TNF-α and these effects were mediated via H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors.

  16. Proceedings of the 6th European VLBI Network Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Eduardo; Porcas, Richard W.; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 6th Symposium of the European VLBI Network, held in Bonn on 25-28 June 2002. The initial aim of these biennial gatherings of European VLBI practitioners was to review in a timely manner new results and technical developments related to Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Now, however, interest and participation in the EVN Symposia reaches far beyond Europe, reflecting the fact that scientific research and development programs are carried out to a high degree in international and often truly global collaborations. More than 120 scientists from around the world registered for participation in the Symposium. The Symposium was hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie and was held at the Gustav Stresemann Institut. In addition to the scientific sessions and poster presentations, the program included an EVN Users Meeting, an MPIfR versus Rest-of-the-World football match (highly appropriate given the competing World Cup event!), a visit to the MPIfR's 100m radio telescope in Effelsberg, and a Conference Dinner held in the nearby old walled town of Bad Müunstereifel. To maximize the usefulness of these proceedings (and possibly as a daring precedent) the Editors decided to demand the written versions of talks and posters and to complete the editorial work before the meeting, and to deliver the book to the participants at the beginning of the Symposium. We thank the authors for their cooperation in delivering publication-ready electronic manuscripts and for meeting the strict deadlines. It is highly gratifying that only a handful of the 100 presentations are not represented in this volume. The editors have made minor changes to some of the contributions in order to improve readability, and take responsibility for any errors arising from these changes. Besides the authors, many individuals have contributed to the preparation of the meeting and its proceedings. In addition to many members of the MPIfR staff, we

  17. Molecular and biochemical pharmacology of the histamine H4 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Leurs, Rob; Chazot, Paul L; Shenton, Fiona C; Lim, Herman D; de Esch, Iwan JP

    2009-01-01

    The elucidation of the human genome has had a major impact on histamine receptor research. The identification of the human H4 receptor by several groups has been instrumental for a new appreciation of the role of histamine in the modulation of immune function. In this review, we summarize the historical developments and the molecular and biochemical pharmacology of the H4 receptor. PMID:19413568

  18. The role of histamine in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cabanié, M; Godfraind, T

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews briefly the role of histamine through its H1 and H2 receptors on the cardiovascular system and its action on calcium and catecholamines. The analogy between the adrenergic and the histaminergic systems is well demonstrated and there is evidence that histamine participates in myocardial damage and arrythmias, but the question of its exact role in the early stages of cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial ischaemia and atherosclerosis, requires further study.

  19. Influence of nitrovasodilators on bovine pulmonary histamine release.

    PubMed

    Valentovic, M A; Ball, J G; Morenas, M; Szarek, J L; Gruetter, C A

    1992-06-01

    The organic nitrates and related nitrovasodilators are relaxants of vascular and airway smooth muscle. Very little information is currently available regarding the influence of nitrates and related nitrovasodilators on pulmonary autacoid release. This study examined the influence of glyceryl trinitrate, isosorbide dinitrate and sodium nitroprusside on histamine release from bovine lung mince. Spontaneous histamine release from bovine lung mince was not altered by 0.1 nM to 1 microM glyceryl trinitrate, isosorbide dinitrate or sodium nitroprusside. Glyceryl trinitrate, isosorbide dinitrate and sodium nitroprusside produced a concentration-dependent decrease in A23187 (10 microM) stimulated histamine release. Glyceryl trinitrate also inhibited histamine liberation following the addition of compound 48/80. Further studies indicated that the inhibitory action of glyceryl trinitrate was reversed by coincubation with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue (10 microM). These findings indicate that glyceryl trinitrate, sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide dinitrate inhibit non-immunologically stimulated pulmonary histamine release and suggest that alterations in guanylate cyclase activity may influence pulmonary histamine release.

  20. Histamine N-methyl transferase: inhibition by drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, G M; Donatelli, P; Giuliani, L

    1992-01-01

    1. Histamine N-methyl transferase activity was measured in samples of human liver, brain, kidney, lung and intestinal mucosa. The mean (+/- s.d.) rate (nmol min-1 mg-1 protein) of histamine N-methylation was 1.78 +/- 0.59 (liver, n = 60), 1.15 +/- 0.38 (renal cortex, n = 8), 0.79 +/- 0.14 (renal medulla, n = 8), 0.35 +/- 0.08 (lung, n = 20), 0.47 +/- 0.18 (human intestine, n = 30) and 0.29 +/- 0.14 (brain, n = 13). 2. Inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase by 15 drugs was investigated in human liver. The IC50 for the various drugs ranged over three orders of magnitude; chloroquine was the most potent inhibitor. 3. The average IC50 values for chloroquine were 12.6, 22.0, 19.0, 21.6 microM in liver, renal cortex, brain and colon, respectively. These values are lower than the Michaelis-Menten constant for histamine N-methyltransferase in liver (43.8 microM) and kidney (45.5 microM). Chloroquine carried a mixed non-competitive inhibition of hepatic histamine N-methyl transferase. Some side-effects of chloroquine may be explained by inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase. PMID:1457266

  1. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.; Evans, Elizabeth; Valić, F.; Žuškin, Eugenija

    1973-01-01

    Nicholls, P. J., Evans, E., Valić, F., and Žuškin, E. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 142-145. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal. Extracts of dry and oiled sisal released histamine from pig and human but not from rat lung tissue. A suspension in Tyrode solution of the oil used for softening the sisal fibres had a pH of 8·1 and also released histamine from pig and human lung. The releasing activity was abolished when the pH of this suspension was adjusted to pH 7·4. As all the sisal extracts were adjusted to pH 7·4 for incubation with lung tissue, the histamine-releasing activity of sisal in vitro is unrelated to the presence of the oil. Significant (P < 0·01) mean reductions over the work shift of ventilatory capacity (PEF and FEV1·0) were recorded in all the workers exposed to airborne sisal dust. These reductions were greater in combers than in drawers and spinners. Sisal collected from combing machines possessed more histamine-releasing activity than material from drawing and spinning machines. These results indicate that histamine release by sisal may be the cause of acute ventilatory capacity changes in sisal exposure. PMID:4122162

  2. Histamine inhibits differentiation of skin fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Yamagata, Kaoru; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sawamukai, Norifumi; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Sakata, Kei; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-07-31

    Histamine and TGF-β, major mediators secreted by mast cells, are involved in skin inflammation and play critical roles in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. However, the roles of signaling mechanisms in the development of skin fibrosis remain largely unclear. Here we show that histamine suppressed the expression of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a marker of myofibroblasts, induced by TGF-β1 in skin fibroblasts. Histamine H1-receptor (H1R), but not H2-receptor (H2R) or H4-receptor (H4R), was expressed on skin fibroblasts at both mRNA and protein levels. Interestingly, an H1R antagonist, but not H2R or H4R antagonists, antagonized the histamine-mediated suppression of αSMA expression by TGF-β1. Correspondingly, phosphorylated Smad2 was detected after treatment with TGF-β1, whereas the addition of histamine inhibited this phosphorylation. Taken together, histamine-H1R decreased TGF-β1-mediated Smad2 phosphorylation and inhibited differentiation of skin fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

  3. Histamine Blood Concentration in Ischemic Heart Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zdravkovic, Vladimir; Pantovic, Suzana; Rosic, Gvozden; Tomic-Lucic, Aleksandra; Zdravkovic, Nemanja; Colic, Maja; Obradovic, Zdravko; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histamine blood concentration in subjects suffering from different types of ischemic heart diseases during the period of eight days. Our results showed that the histamine blood level was associated with different types of ischemic heart diseases. The blood histamine level in all investigated patients was significantly higher when compared to control subjects (44.87 ± 1.09 ng mL−1), indicating the increase of histamine release in patients suffering from coronary diseases. In patients suffering from ACS-UA and ACS-STEMI, the second day peak of histamine level occurs (90.85 ± 6.34 ng mL−1 and 121.7 ± 6.34 ng mL−1, resp.) probably as the reperfusion event. Furthermore, our data suggest that histamine can be additional parameter of myocardial ischemia along with cardiac specific enzymes and may prove to be an excellent single prognostic marker for multitude of ischemic heart diseases. PMID:21687546

  4. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by histamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    He, Shao-Heng; Xie, Hua; Fu, Yi-Ling

    2005-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of histamine receptor antagonists to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells induced by histamine. Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with histamine in the absence or presence of the histamine receptor antagonists, and the tryptase release was determined. It was found that histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 61.5% and 24% by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine and the H2 histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, respectively, when histamine and its antagonists were added to cells at the same time. The H3 histamine receptor antagonist clobenpropit had no effect on histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells at all concentrations tested. Preincubation of terfenadine, cimetidine or clobenpropit with cells for 20 minutes before challenging with histamine did not enhance the ability of these antihistamines to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. Apart from terfenadine at 100 microg/ml, the antagonists themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells following both 15 minutes and 35 minutes incubation periods. It was concluded that H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells. This not only added some new data to our hypothesis of self-amplification mechanisms of mast cell degranulation, but also suggested that combining these two types of antihistamine drugs could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  5. Organic cation transporter 3 modulates murine basophil functions by controlling intracellular histamine levels

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Elke; Machavoine, François; Pléau, Jean-Marie; Bertron, Anne-France; Thurmond, Robin L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takehiko; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Dy, Michel

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we identify the bidirectional organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3/Slc22a3) as the molecule responsible for histamine uptake by murine basophils. We demonstrate that OCT3 participates in the control of basophil functions because exogenous histamine can inhibit its own synthesis—and that of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and IL-13—through this means of transport. Furthermore, ligands of H3/H4 histamine receptors or OCT3 inhibit histamine uptake, and outward transport of newly synthesized histamine. By doing so, they increase the histamine content of basophils, which explains why they mimic the effect of exogenous histamine. These drugs were no longer effective in histamine-free histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-deficient mice, in contrast with histamine itself. Histamine was not taken up and lost its inhibitory effect in mice deficient for OCT3, which proved its specific involvement. Intracellular histamine levels were increased strongly in IL-3–induced OCT3−/− bone marrow basophils, and explained why they generated fewer cytokines than their wild-type counterpart. Their production was enhanced when histamine synthesis was blocked by the specific HDC inhibitor α-fluoro-methyl histidine, and underscored the determinant role of histamine in the inhibitory effect. We postulate that pharmacologic modulation of histamine transport might become instrumental in the control of basophil functions during allergic diseases. PMID:16061728

  6. Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report is the program and abstracts of the twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals, held on May 7--11, 1990, at Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The symposium, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Institute, Badger Engineers, Inc., Gas Research Institute, and American Chemical Society, consists of five sessions: Session 1, thermal, chemical, and biological processing; Session 2 and 3, applied biological research; Session 4, bioengineering research; and Session 5, biotechnology, bioengineering, and the solution of environmental problems. It also consists of a poster session of the same five subject categories.

  7. General overview of the Seventh International Symposium on Stem Cell Therapy and Cardiovascular Innovations.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Enrique; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Alvarez, Eugenia Vázquez; Villa, Adolfo; Fernández, Lucia; Vázquez, Sandra; Lorenzo, José; Fernández-Santos, Eugenia; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2011-04-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Stem Cell Therapy and Cardiovascular Innovations was held in Madrid on the 6th and 7th of May 2010. Gathering for the seventh consecutive year the most relevant researchers and opinion leaders on cardiovascular cell therapy, it has become the most important worldwide event on this field. A comprehensive review of the last developments on cell therapy, surgery for heart failure and tissue engineering was made, and the results of three clinical trials were reported. The Symposium was dedicated to the memory of Professor Helmut Drexler.

  8. Food bioactives research and the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Symposium introduction.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Somoza, Veronika; Finley, John

    2012-07-11

    The bioactive compounds in foods have been the topic of many papers over the past 20 years and are among those that have received a higher citation in agriculture and food science journals. With the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a Symposium on Food Bioactives was held during the 2011 American Chemical Society meeting in Denver, CO. The symposium was organized as an overview of the state of the art in knowledge of food bioactives and the perspectives and trends for the 21st century.

  9. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  10. Niobium - Proceedings of the international symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on niobium. Topics considered at the symposium included niobium mining, ore processing, uses, fabrication, microstructure, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, physical radiation effects, and marketing.

  11. Histamine dehydrogenase from Rhizobium sp.: gene cloning, expression in Escherichia coli, characterization and application to histamine determination.

    PubMed

    Bakke, Mikio; Sato, Tsuneo; Ichikawa, Keiichi; Nishimura, Ikuko

    2005-09-29

    The gene encoding histamine dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. 4--9 has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The coding region of the gene was 2,079 bp and encoded a protein of 693 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 76,732 Da. This histamine dehydrogenase was related to histamine dehydrogenase from Nocardioides simplex (54.5% identical), trimethylamine dehydrogenase from Methylophilus methylotrophus (39.3% identical) and dimethylamine dehydrogenase from Hyphomicrobium X (38.1% identical), which have a covalent 6-S-cysteinyl flavin mononucleotide and a [4Fe--4S] cluster as redox cofactors. Sequence alignment and a UV-visible absorption spectrum supported the presence of these cofactors in this histamine dehydrogenase. The investigation of the enzymatic properties suggested that this enzyme exhibited the most excellent substrate specificity toward histamine among all amine oxidases or dehydrogenases found to date. The recombinant enzyme was able to be used for the colorimetric determination of histamine, which gave a linear calibration curve and identical data with conventional methods. PMID:15964650

  12. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000 that was held on November 15-16, 2000 in Arlington, Virginia. The proceedings contains a wide range of papers that cover the presentations of myriad advances in the nonvolatile memory technology during the recent past including memory cell design, simulations, radiation environment, and emerging memory technologies. The papers presented in the proceedings address the design challenges and applications and deals with newer, emerging memory technologies as well as related issues of radiation environment and die packaging.

  13. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  14. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Daud, Taher; Strauss, Karl

    2001-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001 that was held on November 7-8, 2001 in San Diego, CA. The proceedings contains a a wide range of papers that cover current and new memory technologies including Flash memories, Magnetic Random Access Memories (MRAM and GMRAM), Ferro-electric RAM (FeRAM), and Chalcogenide RAM (CRAM). The papers presented in the proceedings address the use of these technologies for space applications as well as radiation effects and packaging issues.

  15. 26th Pezcoller symposium: cancers driven by hormones.

    PubMed

    Brown, Myles; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Farsetti, Antonella; Livingston, David M; Loda, Massimo; Schuele, Roland; Mihich, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    This symposium was held in Trento, Italy, on June 19-21, 2014, and was focused on advances in biology, physiology, and pathology of neoplasms affected by hormones, especially breast and prostate cancers. The stem cell function, the genetic and epigenetic interactions with hormones, the mechanisms of estrogen receptor transcription, biochemical markers and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, promotion of breast cancer carcinogenesis by progesterone, the basis for prostate cancer progression and the relevance of DNA repair processes, androgen receptor programming during prostate carcinogenesis, the metabolic stress role in tumor survival, and the diagnostic use of imaging in prostate cancer were discussed.

  16. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S. ); Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The eighth symposium on Space Nuclear Power Systems was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented in Part Three of the conference proceedings in the following areas of interest: space power electronics; heat pipe technology; space nuclear fuels for propulsion reactors; power systems concepts; use of artificial intelligence in space; key issues in space nuclear power; flight qualifications and testing (including SP-100 nuclear assembly test program); microgravity two phase flow; simulation and modeling; manufacturing and processing; and space environmental effects. (MB)

  17. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S. ); Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The eighth symposium on Space Nuclear Power Systems was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented in Part Two of the conference proceedings in the following areas of interest: nuclear electric propulsion: engine concepts; key nuclear technologies for human exploration of the solar system; materials and nuclear fuels; dynamic energy conversion; direct nuclear propulsion; thermionic conversion technology; reactor and power system control; thermal management; thermionic research; radiation effects to electronics; heat pipe technology; space nuclear fuels for power reactors; and radioisotope power systems. (MB)

  18. Evaluating Visual Analytics at the 2007 VAST Symposium Contest

    SciTech Connect

    Plaisant, Catherine; Grinstein, Georges; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.; O'Connell, Theresa; Laskowski, Sharon; Chien, Lynn; Tat, Annie; Wright, William; Gorg, Carsten; Lui, Zhicheng; Parekh, Neel; Singhal, Kanupriya; Stasko, John T.

    2008-03-01

    The second Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) contest was held in conjunction with the 2007 IEEE VAST Symposium. A synthetic data set was created containing a known scenario with embedded threats, therefore providing ground truth. Participants used visual analytic tools to explore the heterogeneous data collection and find the evidence of illegal and possible terrorist activities in the data. We describe the contest and the evaluation methodology, then provide details on the results and the two winning entries. Lessons learned are reported from different points of view: contest committee, participants, judges, stake holders and other researchers.

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2002-08-20

    This is the PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, which was Held at Oilheat Visions Conference, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, Rhode Island, August 20-21, 2002. The specific objectives of this conference are to: (1) identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  20. The Schoolwide Symposium: A Model for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottingham, Walt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the first schoolwide symposium at Hendersonville High School (North Carolina) in which, for one week, students and faculty were immersed in the culture and history of the Vietnam War era. Explains that because this first symposium was so successful in gaining student enthusiasm, the school organized three more symposiums. (CMK)

  1. CP-1 70th Anniversary Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    Len Koch; Harold Agnew

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Harold Agnew, retired director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of 49 people present on December 2, 1942 when the world’s first man-made controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved with the CP-1 reactor, and Dr. Len Koch, one of Argonne’s earliest staff members and a designer of EBR-I, the first liquid metal-cooled fast reactor, spoke about their early work during “The Dawn of the Nuclear Age”, a Director’s Special Symposium held as one of the events to commemorate the 70th anniversary year of CP-1 achieving criticality. The symposium was moderated by Dr. Charles Till, a retired Argonne associate laboratory director who led Argonne’s nuclear engineering programs throughout the 1980’s and ‘90’s. Dr. Agnew painted a vivid picture of the challenges and rewards of working in Enrico Fermi’s group under strict security conditions and the complete faith all in the group had in Fermi’s analyses. He stated that no one ever doubted that CP-1 would achieve criticality, and when the moment came, those present acknowledged the accomplishment with little more than a subdued toast of chianti from a bottle provided by reactor physicist Eugene Wigner. This experimental work on nuclear reactors was continued in the Chicago area and led first by Fermi and then Walter Zinn, another member of Fermi’s CP-1 group, resulting in the formal establishment of Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. Dr. Koch described how much he enjoyed working at Argonne through the 1950’s and ‘60’s and contributing to many of the research “firsts” that Argonne achieved in the nuclear energy field and led to the foundation of the commercial nuclear power generation industry. His reminiscences about all that was achieved with EBR-I and how that work then led into Argonne’s design, building, and operation of EBR-II as a full demonstration of a fast reactor power plant brought Argonne’s nuclear

  2. CP-1 70th Anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Len Koch; Harold Agnew

    2012-07-11

    Dr. Harold Agnew, retired director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of 49 people present on December 2, 1942 when the world’s first man-made controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved with the CP-1 reactor, and Dr. Len Koch, one of Argonne’s earliest staff members and a designer of EBR-I, the first liquid metal-cooled fast reactor, spoke about their early work during “The Dawn of the Nuclear Age”, a Director’s Special Symposium held as one of the events to commemorate the 70th anniversary year of CP-1 achieving criticality. The symposium was moderated by Dr. Charles Till, a retired Argonne associate laboratory director who led Argonne’s nuclear engineering programs throughout the 1980’s and ‘90’s. Dr. Agnew painted a vivid picture of the challenges and rewards of working in Enrico Fermi’s group under strict security conditions and the complete faith all in the group had in Fermi’s analyses. He stated that no one ever doubted that CP-1 would achieve criticality, and when the moment came, those present acknowledged the accomplishment with little more than a subdued toast of chianti from a bottle provided by reactor physicist Eugene Wigner. This experimental work on nuclear reactors was continued in the Chicago area and led first by Fermi and then Walter Zinn, another member of Fermi’s CP-1 group, resulting in the formal establishment of Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. Dr. Koch described how much he enjoyed working at Argonne through the 1950’s and ‘60’s and contributing to many of the research “firsts” that Argonne achieved in the nuclear energy field and led to the foundation of the commercial nuclear power generation industry. His reminiscences about all that was achieved with EBR-I and how that work then led into Argonne’s design, building, and operation of EBR-II as a full demonstration of a fast reactor power plant brought Argonne’s nuclear energy legacy to life for everyone in the auditorium. These

  3. Rotavirus landscape in Africa-Towards prevention and control: A report of the 8th African rotavirus symposium, Livingstone, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Cheryl; Mwenda, Jason; Chilengi, Roma

    2015-06-26

    The 8th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Livingstone, Zambia from the 12-13 June 2014. Over 130 delegates from 35 countries - 28 from African nations - participated in this symposium, which included scientists, clinicians, immunisation managers, public health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers. The theme for the symposium was Rotavirus Landscape in Africa-Towards Prevention and Control. At the time of the symposium, a total of 21 African countries had introduced the rotavirus vaccine into their national immunisation schedules. This meeting was particularly timely and relevant to review early data on vaccine adoption and impact from these countries. The concluding panel discussion proposed several recommendations for areas of focus moving forward in rotavirus advocacy and research.

  4. Histamine H3 and H4 receptor ligands modify vascular histamine levels in normal and arthritic large blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Zampeli, Evangelia; Palaiologou, Marina; Tiniakos, Dina; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence associates histamine with arthritis, but its implication in shaping vascular function in chronic inflammation remains largely elusive. This study explored the involvement of vascular histamine in the extra-articular responses in peripheral large blood vessels using a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Histamine levels were increased in the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava of arthritic animals. Contrary to the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene, histamine induction was observed following administration of the H3 and H4 receptor ligands GSK334429 and JNJ7777120, respectively. In arthritis, prophylactic treatment with GSK334429 partially attenuated the clinical signs and restored basal histamine levels only in the abdominal aorta. This study is the first to implicate the H3 and H4 receptors in a concerted constitutive regulation of basal vascular histamine in the rat large blood vessels and to identify the H3 receptor as a component that may influence arterial histamine during the onset of arthritis.

  5. Blood histamine release: A new allergy blood test

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Gottlieb, G.R.; Camp, V.M.; Lollies, P.

    1985-05-01

    Allergen-mediated histamine release from human leukocytes represents an important model for in vitro studies of allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the measurement of histamine released in allergic patients (pts) by radioenzymatic assay following mixing of their blood with common allergens represents a reliable index for diagnosis of atopic allergy. Three categories of allergies were used: (1) housedust and mite; (2) cat and dog dander; (3) trees and grasses and ragweed mixture. The presence of allergy was established by intradermal skin testing in the study group of 82 pts. Significant atopy was defined as greater than or equal to 3+ (overall range 0-4 +, negative to maximum) on skin testing. The test was carried out in tubes with 0.5 ml heparinized blood, 0.5 ml tris albumin buffer, and one of the allergens (60-100 PNU/ml). In 20 controls without allergy, there always was less than or equal to 4% histamine release (normal response). A significant allergen-mediated histamine release, ranging from 12 to 30% of the total blood histamine content, was observed in 96% of the pts with skin test sensitivity of greater than or equal to 3+. There was good agreement between skin testing and histamine release in terms of the allergen causing the response. Thus, measurement of histamine release in blood in response to allergen challenge represents a clinically useful in vitro test for the diagnosis of atopic allergy. Because data can be obtained from a single sample and are highly quantitative, this new method should have application to the longitudinal study of allergic pts and to the assessment of interventions.

  6. Inhibition of histidine decarboxylase ablates the autocrine tumorigenic effects of histamine in human cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Heather; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Onori, Paolo; White, Mellanie; Gaudio, Eugenio; Francis, Taylor; Greene, John F; Tran, Steve; Meininger, Cynthia J; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Background In several tumours the endogenous activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme stimulating histamine synthesis, sustains the autocrine trophic effect of histamine on cancer progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is a biliary cancer with limited treatment options. Histamine interacts with four G-protein coupled receptors, H1–H4 histamine receptors (HRs). Objective To determine the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition of histamine synthesis (by modulation of HDC) on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Methods In vitro studies were performed using multiple human cholangiocarcinoma lines. The expression levels of the histamine synthetic machinery and HRs were evaluated along with the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition on cholangiocarcinoma proliferation. A xenograft tumour model was used to measure tumour volume after treatment with histamine or inhibition of histamine synthesis by manipulation of HDC. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was measured in cholangiocarcinoma cells concomitant with the evaluation of the expression of CD31 in endothelial cells in the tumour microenvironment. Results Cholangiocarcinoma cells display (1) enhanced HDC and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression resulting in increased histamine secretion; and (2) increased expression of H1–H4 HRs. Inhibition of HDC and antagonising H1HR decreased histamine secretion in Mz-ChA-1 cells. Long-term treatment with histamine increased proliferation and VEGF expression in cholangiocarcinoma that was blocked by HDC inhibitor and the H1HR antagonist. In nude mice, histamine increased tumour growth (up to 25%) and VEGF expression whereas inhibition of histamine synthesis (by reduction of HDC) ablated the autocrine stimulation of histamine on tumour growth (~80%) and VEGF expression. No changes in angiogenesis (evaluated by changes in CD31 immunoreactivity) were detected in the in vivo treatment groups. Conclusion The novel concept that an autocrine loop

  7. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  8. Histamine H3 receptor in primary mouse microglia inhibits chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomomitsu; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Matsuzawa, Takuro; Naganuma, Fumito; Nakamura, Tadaho; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Harada, Ryuichi; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a physiological amine which initiates a multitude of physiological responses by binding to four known G-protein coupled histamine receptor subtypes as follows: histamine H1 receptor (H1 R), H2 R, H3 R, and H4 R. Brain histamine elicits neuronal excitation and regulates a variety of physiological processes such as learning and memory, sleep-awake cycle and appetite regulation. Microglia, the resident macrophages in the brain, express histamine receptors; however, the effects of histamine on critical microglial functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion have not been examined in primary cells. We demonstrated that mouse primary microglia express H2 R, H3 R, histidine decarboxylase, a histamine synthase, and histamine N-methyltransferase, a histamine metabolizing enzyme. Both forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation and ATP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients were reduced by the H3 R agonist imetit but not the H2 R agonist amthamine. H3 R activation on two ubiquitous second messenger signalling pathways suggests that H3 R can regulate various microglial functions. In fact, histamine and imetit dose-dependently inhibited microglial chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Furthermore, we confirmed that microglia produced histamine in the presence of LPS, suggesting that H3 R activation regulate microglial function by autocrine and/or paracrine signalling. In conclusion, we demonstrate the involvement of histamine in primary microglial functions, providing the novel insight into physiological roles of brain histamine.

  9. Proceedings of the 2011 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, Gary; Crabbs, Torrie A.; Kolenda-Roberts, Holly; Latimer, Ken; Miller, Andrew D.; Muravnick, Kathleen B.; Nyska, Abraham; Ochoa, Ricardo; Pardo, Ingrid D.; Ramot, Yuval; Rao, Deepa B.; Schuh, JoAnn; Suttie, Andrew; Travlos, Greg S.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elmore, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri,” was held in Denver, Colorado in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology’s 30th Annual Meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers’ presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting or discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium include: proliferative lesions from various fish species including ameloblastoma, gas gland hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hepatocellular hyperplasia, and malignant granulosa cell tumor; spontaneous cystic hyperplasia in the stomach of CD1 mice and histiocytic aggregates in the duodenal villous tips of treated mice; an olfactory neuroblastoma in a cynomolgus monkey; various rodent skin lesions, including follicular parakeratotic hyperkeratosis, adnexal degeneration, and epithelial intracytoplasmic accumulations; oligodendroglioma and microgliomas in rats; a diagnostically challenging microcytic, hypochromic, responsive anemia in rats; a review of microcytes and microcytosis; nasal lesions associated with green tea extract and Ginkgo biloba in rats; corneal dystrophy in Dutch belted rabbits; valvulopathy in rats; and lymphoproliferative disease in a cynomolgus monkey. PMID:22089839

  10. Proceedings of the 2013 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan A.; Boyle, Michael C.; Boyle, Molly H.; Cora, Michelle C.; Crabbs, Torrie A.; Cummings, Connie A.; Gruebbel, Margarita M.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Malarkey, David E.; McInnes, Elizabeth F.; Nolte, Thomas; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri” was held in Portland, Oregon in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 32nd annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a caudal tail vertebra duplication in mice; nephroblastematosis in rats; ectopic C cell tumor in a hamster; granular cell aggregates/tumor in the uterus of a hamster; Pneumocystis carinii in the lung of a rat; iatrogenic chronic inflammation in the lungs of control rats; hepatoblastoma arising within an adenoma in a mouse; humoral hypercalcemia of benignancy in a transgenic mouse; acetaminophen induced hepatoxicity in rats; electron microscopy images of iatrogenic intraerythrocytic inclusions in transgenic mice; questionable hepatocellular degeneration/cell death/artifact in rats; atypical endometrial hyperplasia in rats; malignant mixed Müllerian tumors/carcinosarcomas in rats; differential diagnoses of proliferative lesions the intestine of rodents; and finally obstructive nephropathy caused by melamine poisoning in a rat. PMID:24334674

  11. Proceedings of the 2015 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Farman, Cindy A; Hailey, James R; Kovi, Ramesh C; Malarkey, David E; Morrison, James P; Neel, Jennifer; Pesavento, Patricia A; Porter, Brian F; Szabo, Kathleen A; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Quist, Erin M

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 Annual National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the American College of Veterinary Pathologists/American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology/Society of Toxicologic Pathology combined meeting. The goal of this symposium is to present and discuss diagnostic pathology challenges or nomenclature issues. Because of the combined meeting, both laboratory and domestic animal cases were presented. This article presents summaries of the speakers' talks, including challenging diagnostic cases or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included hepatocellular lesions, a proposed harmonized diagnostic approach to rat cardiomyopathy, crop milk in a bird, avian feeding accoutrement, heat exchanger in a tuna, metastasis of a tobacco carcinogen-induced pulmonary carcinoma, neurocytoma in a rat, pituicytoma in a rat, rodent mammary gland whole mounts, dog and rat alveolar macrophage ultrastructure, dog and rat pulmonary phospholipidosis, alveolar macrophage aggregation in a dog, degenerating yeast in a cat liver aspirate, myeloid leukemia in lymph node aspirates from a dog, Trypanosoma cruzi in a dog, solanum toxicity in a cow, bovine astrovirus, malignant microglial tumor, and nomenclature challenges from the Special Senses International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria Organ Working Group.

  12. Proceedings of the 2013 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Boyle, Michael C; Boyle, Molly H; Cora, Michelle C; Crabbs, Torrie A; Cummings, Connie A; Gruebbel, Margarita M; Johnson, Crystal L; Malarkey, David E; McInnes, Elizabeth F; Nolte, Thomas; Shackelford, Cynthia C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri," was held in Portland, Oregon, in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 32nd annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a caudal tail vertebra duplication in mice; nephroblastematosis in rats; ectopic C cell tumor in a hamster; granular cell aggregates/tumor in the uterus of a hamster; Pneumocystis carinii in the lung of a rat; iatrogenic chronic inflammation in the lungs of control rats; hepatoblastoma arising within an adenoma in a mouse; humoral hypercalcemia of benignancy in a transgenic mouse; acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats; electron microscopy images of iatrogenic intraerythrocytic inclusions in transgenic mice; questionable hepatocellular degeneration/cell death/artifact in rats; atypical endometrial hyperplasia in rats; malignant mixed Müllerian tumors/carcinosarcomas in rats; differential diagnoses of proliferative lesions of the intestine of rodents; and finally obstructive nephropathy caused by melamine poisoning in a rat.

  13. Proceedings of the 2014 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Cora, Michelle C; Gruebbel, Margarita M; Hayes, Schantel A; Hoane, Jessica S; Koizumi, Haruko; Peters, Rachel; Rosol, Thomas J; Singh, Bhanu P; Szabo, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in Washington, D.C., in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 33rd annual meeting. The goal of this annual NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a pulmonary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a male B6C3F1 mouse; plexiform vasculopathy in Wistar Han (Crl:WI[Han]) rats; staging of the estrous cycle in rats and mice; peri-islet fibrosis, hemorrhage, lobular atrophy and inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats; retinal dysplasia in Crl:WI[Han] rats and B6C3F1 mice; multicentric lymphoma with intravascular microemboli and tumor lysis syndrome, and 2 cases of myopathy and vascular anomaly in Tg.rasH2 mice; benign thymomas in Crl:WI[Han] rats; angiomatous lesions in the mesenteric lymph nodes of Crl:WI[Han] rats; an unusual foveal lesion in a cynomolgous monkey; and finally a series of nomenclatures challenges from the endocrine International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) Organ Working Group (OWG).

  14. Summary of the 24th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zonglin

    2005-06-01

    The 24th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW24) was held at the Beijing Friendship Hotel from July 11 to July 16, 2004, in Beijing, China, after a one-year delay due to the SARS outbreak in Beijing shortly before the Symposium’s originally scheduled date in 2003. The event achieved success due to the continuous support and kind understanding from all the delegates and the International Advisory Committee. During the last three years, I have communicated constantly with so many people who encouraged me by providing their suggestions and advice whenever I was in need, from which I feel a sense of community: the community being full of friendship and understanding. It is very heart-warming to have such an experience and I am very happy to have served as chairman of the Symposium for such a community. On behalf of the Local Organizing Committee I would like to thank all of you for the contributions and help that you have given us, without which we would not have had the Symposium.

  15. Proceedings of the 2015 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Farman, Cindy A; Hailey, James R; Kovi, Ramesh C; Malarkey, David E; Morrison, James P; Neel, Jennifer; Pesavento, Patricia A; Porter, Brian F; Szabo, Kathleen A; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Quist, Erin M

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 Annual National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the American College of Veterinary Pathologists/American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology/Society of Toxicologic Pathology combined meeting. The goal of this symposium is to present and discuss diagnostic pathology challenges or nomenclature issues. Because of the combined meeting, both laboratory and domestic animal cases were presented. This article presents summaries of the speakers' talks, including challenging diagnostic cases or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included hepatocellular lesions, a proposed harmonized diagnostic approach to rat cardiomyopathy, crop milk in a bird, avian feeding accoutrement, heat exchanger in a tuna, metastasis of a tobacco carcinogen-induced pulmonary carcinoma, neurocytoma in a rat, pituicytoma in a rat, rodent mammary gland whole mounts, dog and rat alveolar macrophage ultrastructure, dog and rat pulmonary phospholipidosis, alveolar macrophage aggregation in a dog, degenerating yeast in a cat liver aspirate, myeloid leukemia in lymph node aspirates from a dog, Trypanosoma cruzi in a dog, solanum toxicity in a cow, bovine astrovirus, malignant microglial tumor, and nomenclature challenges from the Special Senses International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria Organ Working Group. PMID:27075180

  16. meeting summary 10th AMS Symposium on Education.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Hayes, M. C.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Zeitler, J. W.; Murphy, K. A.; Croft, P. J.; Nese, J. M.; Friedman, H. A.; Robinson, H. W.; Thormeyer, C. D.; Ruscher, P. A.; Pandya, R. E.

    2001-12-01

    The American Meteorological Society held its 10th Symposium on Education in conjunction with the 82nd Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The theme of 2001's symposium was enhancing public awareness of the atmospheric and oceanic environments. Thirty-six oral presentations and 38 poster presentations summarized a variety of educational programs or examined educational issues at both the precollege and university levels. There was a special session on increasing awareness of meteorology and oceanography through popular and informal educational activities, as well as a joint session with the 17th International Conference on Interactive Information and Processing Systems (IIPS) for Meteorology, Oceanography, and Hydrology on using the World Wide Web to deliver information pertaining to the atmosphere, oceans, and coastal zone. Over 200 people representing a wide spectrum of the Society attended one or more of the sessions in this 2-day conference. The program for the 10th Symposium on Education can be viewed in the November 2000 issue of the Bulletin.

  17. RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR - EEZ SYMPOSIUM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowland, Robert W.; McGregor, Bonnie A.

    1984-01-01

    The Presidential proclamation on March 10, 1983, of a 200-nautical-mile-wide Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) focuses attention on the mineral resources of a vast submarine area. The hard-mineral resources in the EEZ include shallow-water placer deposits, polymetallic sulfide deposits, and cobalt-enriched manganese crusts in deeper water. The petroleum resource potential of basins within the EEZ is of importance especially in the deep water of the continental slope and rise. In order to formulate a national program to assess the resources in the EEZ, a symposium on 'A National Program for the Assessment and Development of the Mineral Resources of the United States Exclusive Economic Zone', was held at the National Center of the US Geological Survey. The symposium covered resource evaluation, engineering development needs, and the legal framework for management of the assessment and development of this vast area. Recommendations resulting from the symposium are discussed as well as the initial steps for implementing those recommendations and formulating an effective national program.

  18. Conference report: 2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Lastow, Orest

    2014-02-01

    2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium 16 October 2013, Lund, Sweden The 2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium was arranged by the Medicon Valley Inhalation Consortium. It was held at the Medicon Village, which is the former AstraZeneca site in Lund, Sweden. It was a 1 day symposium focused on inhaled drug delivery and inhalation product development. 120 delegates listened to 11 speakers. The program was organized to follow the value chain of an inhalation product development. This year there was a focus on inhaled biomolecules. The inhaled delivery of insulin was covered by two presentations and a panel discussion. The future of inhaled drug delivery was discussed together with an overview of the current market situation. Two of the inhalation platforms, capsule inhalers and metered-dose inhalers, were discussed in terms of the present situation and the future opportunities. Much focus was on the regulatory and intellectual aspects of developing inhalation products. The manufacturing of a dry powder inhaler requires precision filling of powder, and the various techniques were presented. The benefits of nebulization and nasal delivery were illustrated with some case studies and examples. The eternal challenge of poor compliance was addressed from an industrial design perspective and some new approaches were introduced.

  19. Proceedings of the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Many organizations face high consequence safety situations where unwanted stimuli due to accidents, catastrophes, or inadvertent human actions can cause disasters. In order to improve interaction among such organizations and to build on each others` experience, preventive approaches, and assessment techniques, the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium was held July 12--14, 1994 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The symposium was conceived by Dick Schwoebel, Director of the SNL Surety Assessment Center. Stan Spray, Manager of the SNL System Studies Department, planned strategy and made many of the decisions necessary to bring the concept to fruition on a short time scale. Angela Campos and about 60 people worked on the nearly limitless implementation and administrative details. The initial symposium (future symposia are planned) was structured around 21 plenary presentations in five methodology-oriented sessions, along with a welcome address, a keynote address, and a banquet address. Poster papers addressing the individual session themes were available before and after the plenary sessions and during breaks.

  20. International Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures (Energy, Environment, and Health)

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, Puru

    2011-11-10

    The international Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures was held in Richmond, Virginia during November 7-10, 2011. The symposium focused on the roles clusters and nanostructures play in solving outstanding problems in clean and sustainable energy, environment, and health; three of the most important issues facing science and society. Many of the materials issues in renewable energies, environmental impacts of energy technologies as well as beneficial and toxicity issues of nanoparticles in health are intertwined. Realizing that both fundamental and applied materials issues require a multidisciplinary approach the symposium provided a forum by bringing researchers from physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering fields to share their ideas and results, identify outstanding problems, and develop new collaborations. Clean and sustainable energy sessions addressed challenges in production, storage, conversion, and efficiency of renewable energies such as solar, wind, bio, thermo-electric, and hydrogen. Environmental issues dealt with air- and water-pollution and conservation, environmental remediation and hydrocarbon processing. Topics in health included therapeutic and diagnostic methods as well as health hazards attributed to nanoparticles. Cross-cutting topics such as reactions, catalysis, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties were also covered.

  1. Histamine H3 receptors aggravate cerebral ischaemic injury by histamine-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haijing; Zhang, Xiangnan; Hu, Weiwei; Ma, Jing; Hou, Weiwei; Zhang, Xingzhou; Wang, Xiaofen; Gao, Jieqiong; Shen, Yao; Lv, Jianxin; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Han, Feng; Wang, Guanghui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The role of the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) in cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains unknown. Here we show that H3R expression is upregulated after I/R in two mouse models. H3R antagonists and H3R knockout attenuate I/R injury, which is reversed by an H3R-selective agonist. Interestingly, H1R and H2R antagonists, a histidine decarboxylase (HDC) inhibitor and HDC knockout all fail to compromise the protection by H3R blockade. H3R blockade inhibits mTOR phosphorylation and reinforces autophagy. The neuroprotection by H3R antagonism is reversed by 3-methyladenine and siRNA for Atg7, and is diminished in Atg5−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, the peptide Tat-H3RCT414-436, which blocks CLIC4 binding with H3Rs, or siRNA for CLIC4, further increases I/R-induced autophagy and protects against I/R injury. Therefore, H3R promotes I/R injury while its antagonism protects against ischaemic injury via histamine-independent mechanisms that involve suppressing H3R/CLIC4 binding-activated autophagy, suggesting that H3R inhibition is a therapeutic target for cerebral ischaemia. PMID:24566390

  2. Acute Pancreatitis-Progress and Challenges: A Report on an International Symposium.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Elham; Pandol, Stephen J; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Sutton, Robert; Wu, Bechien U; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Gorelick, Fred; Hirota, Morihisa; Windsor, John; Lo, Simon K; Freeman, Martin L; Lerch, Markus M; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Melmed, Gil Y; Wassef, Wahid; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-11-01

    An international symposium entitled "Acute pancreatitis: progress and challenges" was held on November 5, 2014 at the Hapuna Beach Hotel, Big Island, Hawaii, as part of the 45th Anniversary Meeting of the American Pancreatic Association and the Japanese Pancreas Society. The course was organized and directed by Drs. Stephen Pandol, Tooru Shimosegawa, Robert Sutton, Bechien Wu, and Santhi Swaroop Vege. The symposium objectives were to: (1) highlight current issues in management of acute pancreatitis, (2) discuss promising treatments, (3) consider development of quality indicators and improved measures of disease activity, and (4) present a framework for international collaboration for development of new therapies. This article represents a compilation and adaptation of brief summaries prepared by speakers at the symposium with the purpose of broadly disseminating information and initiatives. PMID:26465949

  3. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  4. Mosquito vector control and biology in Latin America--a second symposium.

    PubMed

    Clark, G G; Suárez, M F

    1992-09-01

    The second Spanish language symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 58th Annual Meeting in Corpus Christi, TX in March 1992. The principal objective, as it was for the 1991 symposium, was to increase and stimulate greater participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists and public health workers from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 25 individual presentations that were given in Spanish. The symposium included the following topics: biology and chemical control of Aedes aegypti and anopheline vectors of malaria; field and laboratory studies of biological control agents for Aedes aegypti; community participation in the prevention of dengue; and other various aspects of the biology of other medically important arthropods (e.g., Simulium ochraceum, Lutzomyia and Culicoides).

  5. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  6. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 1 - kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice, and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  7. Highlights of the ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, 11–12 March 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Marcelo Blanco; Bramajo, Marina; Bruno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, held in Buenos Aires, included national, regional, and international experts in the field of prostate cancer. More than 200 professionals from a variety of areas (clinical urologists, pathologists, oncologists, biologists, imaging specialists, radiation therapists, and generalist doctors, among others) attended, and they proposed multidisciplinary management of prostate pathology from the start in concordance with the ideas set forth by the organising committee. A radiotherapy workshop was also held during the symposium, in which new techniques and their possible uses were specifically discussed. In addition to the local doctors, Dr Lilian Faroni (COI Group, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Dr Leonardo Carmona (Chilean Head and Neck Institute, Chile), and Dr Anthony Addesa (Jupiter Medical Centre, Florida, USA) also participated in this symposium. PMID:27350786

  8. Highlights of the ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, 11-12 March 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Marcelo Blanco; Bramajo, Marina; Bruno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, held in Buenos Aires, included national, regional, and international experts in the field of prostate cancer. More than 200 professionals from a variety of areas (clinical urologists, pathologists, oncologists, biologists, imaging specialists, radiation therapists, and generalist doctors, among others) attended, and they proposed multidisciplinary management of prostate pathology from the start in concordance with the ideas set forth by the organising committee. A radiotherapy workshop was also held during the symposium, in which new techniques and their possible uses were specifically discussed. In addition to the local doctors, Dr Lilian Faroni (COI Group, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Dr Leonardo Carmona (Chilean Head and Neck Institute, Chile), and Dr Anthony Addesa (Jupiter Medical Centre, Florida, USA) also participated in this symposium. PMID:27350786

  9. Third annual symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on leading edge engineering from the 1997 NAE symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Hunziker, Janet

    1998-06-01

    This book is the third publication highlighting the presentations of the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) symposium series, Frontiers of Engineering. The Third Annual NAE Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering was held September 18-20, 1997, at the Beckman Center in Irvine, California. The 101 emerging engineering leaders from industry, academia, and federal laboratories who attended the meeting heard presentations and discussed pioneering research and technical work in a variety of engineering fields. Symposium speakers were asked to prepare extended abstracts of their presentations, and those papers are contained herein. Fifteen papers are organized under the following five headings: biomechanics, sensors and control for manufacturing processes, safety and security issues, decision-making tools for design and manufacturing, and intelligent transportation systems. Talks focused on such topics as implant design and technology, design and application of optical fiber sensors, quadrupole resonance explosive detection systems, multicriteria evaluation of manufacturing performance, and automated highway systems. The after-dinner speech, which focused on today's rapid pace of change, is also included.

  10. Updosing of Nonsedating Anti-histamines in Recalcitrant Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Godse, Kiran; Bhattar, Prachi; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a persistent, debiliating condition that causes severe impairment on the quality of life (QoL) of patient by interrupting work productivity. Current guidelines recommend second-generation (nonsedating) anti-histamines for the treatment for all forms of urticaria. In patients who do not respond adequately to conventional doses of anti-histamines, it is recommended to increase the dose to up to four times to obtain control. But there are only few controlled studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of nonsedating anti-histamines. Though sedating histamines are frequently used as an add-on therapy in severe cases, they have a negative impact on QoL by compromising sleep and performance. The use of other suggested therapeutic options (omalizumab, cyclosporine A, montelukast and dapsone) is also limited by paucity of data on their efficacy and adverse effect profile. Second-generation anti-histamines which are relatively safer require more proven data to support their judicious use to improve disease in patients with CU. PMID:27293247

  11. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2014-01-01

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness. PMID:25031227

  12. Updosing of Nonsedating Anti-histamines in Recalcitrant Chronic Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Godse, Kiran; Bhattar, Prachi; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a persistent, debiliating condition that causes severe impairment on the quality of life (QoL) of patient by interrupting work productivity. Current guidelines recommend second-generation (nonsedating) anti-histamines for the treatment for all forms of urticaria. In patients who do not respond adequately to conventional doses of anti-histamines, it is recommended to increase the dose to up to four times to obtain control. But there are only few controlled studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of nonsedating anti-histamines. Though sedating histamines are frequently used as an add-on therapy in severe cases, they have a negative impact on QoL by compromising sleep and performance. The use of other suggested therapeutic options (omalizumab, cyclosporine A, montelukast and dapsone) is also limited by paucity of data on their efficacy and adverse effect profile. Second-generation anti-histamines which are relatively safer require more proven data to support their judicious use to improve disease in patients with CU. PMID:27293247

  13. Neuronal histamine and cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Binder, Sonja; De Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Dere, Ekrem

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular amyloid plaque deposits, mainly composed of amyloid-beta peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Amyloid-beta represents a neurotoxic proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein. The progressive cognitive decline that is associated with Alzheimer's disease has been mainly attributed to a deficit in cholinergic neurotransmission due to the continuous degeneration of cholinergic neurons e.g. in the basal forebrain. There is evidence suggesting that other neurotransmitter systems including neuronal histamine also contribute to the development and maintenance of Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits. Pathological changes in the neuronal histaminergic system of such patients are highly predictive of ensuing cognitive deficits. Furthermore, histamine-related drugs, including histamine 3 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to alleviate cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes findings from animal and clinical research on the relationship between the neuronal histaminergic system and cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. The significance of the neuronal histaminergic system as a promising target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of cognitive symptoms is discussed. Furthermore, the option to use histamine-related agents as neurogenesis-stimulating therapy that counteracts progressive brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease is considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  14. The histamine H3 receptor and eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Passani, Maria Beatrice; Blandina, Patrizio; Torrealba, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the histaminergic system as a potential target for the treatment of feeding disorders is driven by the unsatisfactory history of the pharmacotherapy of obesity. Eating behavior is regulated by a complex interplay of central neurotransmitter systems, peripheral endocrine stimuli, the circadian rhythm, and environmental cues, all factors that change the behavioral state and alter homeostatic aspects of appetite and energy expenditure. Key factors driving eating behavior are appetite and satiety that are regulated through different mechanisms. Brain histamine has long been considered a satiety signal in the nervous system. Recent observations, however, indicate that histamine does not meet the criteria for being a satiety signal, because augmented histamine release accompanies the appetitive phase of feeding behavior rather than food consumption and satiety. The appetitive phase requires a high and yet optimal arousal state, and the histaminergic system is crucial for sustaining a high degree of arousal during motivated behavior. Histamine H(1) receptors in the brain are crucial for the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of food intake and the regulation of obesity; however, from a therapeutic standpoint, no brain-penetrating H(1) receptor agonists have been identified that would have antiobesity effects. Despite conflicting preclinical data, insights are emerging into the potential role of histamine H(3) receptors as a target of antiobesity therapeutics. The aim of this review is to outline the relevance of the histaminergic system in controlling feeding behavior and evaluate the potential therapeutic use of histaminergic ligands for the treatment of eating disorders.

  15. Histamine content does not influence the tolerance of wine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kanny, G; Bauza, T; Frémont, S; Guillemin, F; Blaise, A; Daumas, F; Cabanis, J C; Nicolas, J P; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    1999-02-01

    Histamine has been incriminated as having a responsibility for intolerance reaction to wines. We have made a study by double blind oral provocation test to find the effect of ingestion of a histamine-rich (22.8 mg.l-1) and a histamine free wine in eight healthy subjects. Blood samples were taken at 0, 10, 30 and 45 minutes after ingestion of the wine for measurement of plasma histamine and methylhistamine. Urines were collected 5 hours before and 5 hours after ingestion for measurement of urinary methylhistamine. No subject presented a reaction of intolerance after ingestion of wine rich or poor in histamine. No change in plasma histamine and plasma and urinary methylhistamine was seen. This study shows that the amount of histamine in wine has no clinical or biological effect in healthy subjects, and this emphasized the efficiency in man of the systems for degradation of histamine that is absorbed by the alimentary tract.

  16. Regulation of interleukin-1 synthesis by histamine produced by mouse peritoneal macrophages per se.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, H; Nakano, K

    1990-01-01

    The response of mouse peritoneal macrophages to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in induction of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and, consequently, of histamine production. Concanavalin A had no effect on the reactions. Alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of HDC, attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, both spontaneous and LPS-stimulated IL-1 synthesis by macrophages. IL-1 production was significantly blocked by either an H1 anti-histamine, diphenhydramine, or H2 anti-histamine ranitidine, in the absence of any exogenous histamine. Addition of exogenous histamine accentuated the IL-1 production by macrophages as a function of its dose. These results suggest that IL-1 production by mouse peritoneal macrophages is regulated by histamine synthesized in the system per se and that the effect of histamine is dependent on both H1 and H2 histamine receptors located on the surface of the cells. PMID:2312155

  17. The therapeutic potential of histamine receptor ligands in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Detlef; Seifert, Roland

    2014-09-01

    In the intestine of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease concentrations of histamine are increased compared to healthy controls. Genetic ablation of histamine production in mice ameliorates the course of experimentally induced colitis. These observations and first pharmacological studies indicate a function of histamine in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, a closer examination reveals that available data are highly heterogeneous, limiting the rational design of strategies addressing specific histamine receptor subtypes as possible target for pharmacological interaction. However, very recently first clinical data indicate that antagonism at the histamine receptor subtype H4 provides a beneficial effect in at least the skin. Here, we discuss the available data on histamine effects and histamine receptor subtype functions in inflammatory bowel disease with a special emphasis on the histamine H4-receptor.

  18. PREFACE: Fullerene Nano Materials (Symposium of IUMRS-ICA2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Kizuka, Tokushi; Matsuishi, Kiyoto; Ochiai, Yuichi; Tachibana, Masaru; Ogata, Hironori; Mashino, Tadahiko; Kumashiro, Ryotaro; Oikawa, Hidetoshi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains peer-reviewed invited and contributed papers that were presented in Symposium N 'Fullerene Nano Materials' at the IUMRS International Conference in Asia 2008 (IUMRS-ICA 2008), which was held on 9-13 December 2008, at Nagoya Congress Center, Nagoya, Japan. Over twenty years have passed since the discovery of C60 in 1985. The discovery of superconductivity of C60 in 1991 suggested infinite possibilities for fullerenes. On the other hand, a new field of nanocarbon has been developed recently, based on novel functions of the low-dimensional fullerene nanomaterials that include fullerene nanowhiskers, fullerene nanotubes, fullerene nanosheets, chemically modified fullerenes, endohedral fullerenes, thin films of fullerenes and so forth. Electrical, electrochemical, optical, thermal, mechanical and various other properties of fullerene nanomaterials have been investigated and their novel and anomalous nature has been reported. Biological properties of fullerene nanomaterials also have been investigated both in medical applications and toxicity aspects. The recent research developments of fullerene nanomaterials cover a variety of categories owing to their functional diversity. This symposium aimed to review the progress in the state-of-the-art technology based on fullerenes and to offer the forum for active interdisciplinary discussions. 24 oral papers containing 8 invited papers and 22 poster papers were presented at the two-day symposium. Topics on the social acceptance of nanomaterials including fullerene were presented on the first day of the symposium. Biological impacts of nanomaterials and the importance of standardization of nanomaterials characterization were also shown. On the second day, the synthesis, properties, functions and applications of various fullerene nanomaterials were shown in both the oral and poster presentations. We are grateful to all invited speakers and many participants for valuable contributions and active discussions

  19. PREFACE: The Third 21COE Symposium: Astrophysics as Interdisciplinary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Yamada, Shoichi; Daishido, Tsuneaki

    2006-03-01

    In the last decade, we have seen a remarkable progress in observations by air-borne and satellite-loaded detectors as well as large ground-based telescopes. Cosmological parameters have been precisely determined. For example, the age of the Universe is about 14 Gyrs and the curvature of our 3-space is almost zero. We have also recognized that most of the matter content of the Universe is unknown, the mystery of Dark Energy and Dark Matter. When we look at compact objects in the Universe, recent observations of supernovae and gamma ray bursts (up to cosmological distances) have revealed a variety of high energy astrophysical phenomena much beyond our expectations. Also found are quite exotic astrophysical objects such as magnetars and probably quark stars. Now we have a lot of new observational data. The present theoretical understanding, on the other hand, is far behind such observational advances. We may need new ideas to solve such problems. In the late 20th century, astrophysicists have learned much from particle physics and nuclear physics, resulting in the deeper understanding of how the big bang universe expands and stars evolve. Then we would like to extend this practice in different directions. This volume contains lectures and contributed papers presented at ``The Third 21COE Symposium: Astrophysics as Interdisciplinary Science'', which was held at Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, on September 1 3, 2005. The aim of the symposium is to obtain new insights into the important themes mentioned above by bringing together the latest ideas from various fields. In the symposium, we have discussed not only such mysterious and important astrophysical or cosmological objects but also some subjects closely related with other fields such as nonlinear dynamics, statistical physics and condensed matter physics. Hence the main topics in the symposium have included formations of large-scale structures, galaxies, stellar clusters as well as the nature of condensed matter in

  20. Frank N. Bash Symposium 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The University of Texas at Austin Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory will be hosting the sixth biennial Frank N. Bash Symposium on the topic of New Horizons in Astronomy, October 18-20, 2015, on The University of Texas at Austin campus. This meeting will bring together young researchers at the cutting edge of astronomy and astrophysics, to promote the exchange of research ideas and visions for the future of astronomy. The symposium will focus on invited review talks, and will include discussions and contributed poster papers from postdocs and students.

  1. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  2. Science education in partnership: the 2002 Australian American Fulbright Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, E.; Oliver, C.; Wilmoth, K.; Vozzo, L.

    The Australian American Fulbright 2002 Symposium: Science Education in Partnership was held in parallel--in partnership-- with the scientific meeting of the IAU 213 Bioastronomy 2002 Symposium: Life Among the Stars. In practice, the two meetings modeled partnership between educators and scientists, both professional events interacting while maintaining individual goals. Leading scientists attending the IAU meeting participated in the Fulbright with presentations based upon their work and their experiences. Educators and scientists interacted on how their work impacts science education and strategies for building direct connections between scientists and classrooms. Educators attending the Fulbright Symposium attended a number of scientific presentations in IAU meeting as well. A major issue in science education is teaching science in a way that is relevant to the student. Partnerships between scientists and teachers can provide real-life scientific research experience in the laboratory and the field for teachers and students. These partnerships enhance the quality of both teaching and learning, and engage students directly in projects and curricula that lead to a better understanding of the nature and practice of science. Scientists are often engaged in the development of new curricula as a part of the education and public outreach programs affiliated with research programs. Participants explored the similarities and differences between the approach to this endeavor in Australia and the US. Partnerships between all the professionals involved--scientists, teachers, and writers--creates an opportunity for innovative, cutting-edge research to reach the classroom. The excitement of seeking new knowledge, exploring the unknown, can motivate students to pursue science studies in high school and beyond at the university. Oral papers, posters and workshops presented the results of partnerships between scientists and educators in Australian and the US as well as

  3. PREFACE: International Symposium on Geohazards and Geomechanics (ISGG2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utili, S.

    2015-09-01

    These Conference Proceedings contain the full papers in electronic format of the International Symposium on 'Geohazards and Geomechanics', held at University of Warwick, UK, on September 10-11, 2015. The Symposium brings together the complementary expertise of world leading groups carrying out research on the engineering assessment, prevention and mitigation of geohazards. A total of 58 papers, including 8 keynote lectures cover phenomena such as landslide initiation and propagation, debris flow, rockfalls, soil liquefaction, ground improvement, hazard zonation, risk mapping, floods and gas and leachates. The techniques reported in the papers to investigate geohazards involve numerical modeling (finite element method, discrete element method, material point method, meshless methods and particle methods), experimentation (laboratory experiments, centrifuge tests and field monitoring) and analytical simplified techniques. All the contributions in this volume have been peered reviewed according to rigorous international standards. However the authors take full responsibility for the content of their papers. Agreements are in place for the edition of a special issue dedicated to the Symposium in three international journals: Engineering Geology, Computational Particle Mechanics and International Journal of Geohazards and Environment. Authors of selected papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work to these Journals that will independently assess the papers. The Symposium is supported by the Technical Committee 'Geo-mechanics from Micro to Macro' (TC105) of the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE), 'Slope Stability in Engineering Practice' (TC208), 'Forensic Geotechnical Engineering' (TC302), the British Geotechnical Association and the EU FP7 IRSES project 'Geohazards and Geomechanics'. Also the organizers would like to thank all authors and their supporting institutions for their contributions. For any

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    SciTech Connect

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  5. Links to Success: New Thinking on the Connections between Preschool, School, and Community. A Regional Symposium. Proceedings Paper (October 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangione, Peter L.

    These proceedings present five papers and other highlights of a symposium held to stimulate efforts to provide continuity and support for children and families in transition from early childhood to early elementary school programs. These papers are included: (1) "Connecting with Preschools: How Our Schools Help (and Fail to Help) Entering…

  6. Letter from Seoul: Correspondence from the International Arts Education Symposium and the Asia-Pacific Regional Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aprill, Arnold; Schroeder-Yu, Gigi

    2006-01-01

    Arts educator Gigi Schroeder-Yu and Arnold Aprill arrived in Seoul, Korea to participate in the International Arts Education Symposium and in the Asia-Pacific Regional Conference that are part of the wind up for the pitch of the UNESCO World Conference on Arts Education to be held in Lisbon in March 2006. In this article, they reflect on their…

  7. Report from the Third Annual Symposium of the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2014-08-15

    The third Annual Symposium of the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology was held at Ringberg castle, May 21-24, 2014. At this meeting 45 scientists from Japan and Germany presented the latest results from their research spanning a broad range of topics in chemical biology and glycobiology.

  8. EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND MITIGATION OF LEARNING PROBLEMS, ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM (3RD, NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY, MAY 19, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ.

    TWO SPEECHES PRESENTED AT THE THIRD ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM HELD BY RUTGERS STATE UNIVERSITY IN 1967 CONSIDER LEARNING DISABILITIES. IN "NEUROPHRENIC CHILDREN--THEIR EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT," EDGAR A. DOLL EXPLAINS HIS CONCEPT OF NEUROPHRENIA AND THE IMPORTANCE OF EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND DISCUSSES THE USE OF THE VINELAND SOCIAL MATURITY…

  9. BWRVIP-101: BWR Vessel and Internals Project: Proceedings: BWRVIP Symposium, Orlando, Florida, December 6-7, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on BWR vessel and internals issues. This BWRVIP symposium--held December 6-7, 2001--provided an overview of products completed to date and how they are being implemented at individual plants.

  10. A Crisis of Lost Opportunity--Conclusions from a Symposium on Challenges for Animal Population Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hird, David; King, Lonnie; Salman, Mo; Werge, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Describes a symposium on "Population Health Education" held at the University of California Davis on May 9-11, 2002. Its objectives were to assess the market needs and opportunities presented by the users of population medicine veterinarians, determine the degree to which veterinary colleges are producing professionals who meet these needs,…

  11. Symposium to Announce Finalists of NCI's "Up for a Challenge? Stimulating Innovation in Breast Cancer Genetic Epidemiology"

    Cancer.gov

    A symposium to announce the finalists of the Challenge was held on September 12, 2016, on the NIH main campus in Bethesda, MD. Finalists were chosen based on the identification of novel findings, replication of findings, innovation of approach, evidence of novel biological hypotheses, and collaboration.

  12. Symposium: The Changing Mission of the United States Employment Service: Increasing Productivity and Improving the Operation of the Labor Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Peter G., Ed.

    Conference addresses and summaries of group discussion are included in these proceedings of a symposium held to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Employment Service and to explore its future role. The first item is a research report, "The Potential Impact of the Employment Service on the Economy," by Charles Holt, followed by responses…

  13. Research & Information on Employment & Training. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hershey Convention Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 14-15, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchak, Stephen J., Ed.

    A compilation of 21 presentations given at a symposium held to improve communications between individuals and agencies (education, government and private industry) which produce or use occupational research and information for program planning and decisionmaking contains the following titles: Some Thoughts on Economic Illiteracy; We Can Survive:…

  14. International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons. (Bordeaux, France, September 8-14, 1981). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    Lagoons and their characteristic coastal bay-mouth bars represent 15 percent of the world coastal zone. They are among the most productive ecosystems in the biosphere, this productivity resulting from the interplay of ocean and continent. An International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons (ISCOL) was held to: assess the state of knowledge in the…

  15. PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

  16. The Second Annual Symposium of the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology.

    PubMed

    Spooner, B S

    1993-04-01

    The second annual meeting of the NSCORT in Gravitational Biology was held at Kansas State University on September 29-October 1, 1992. Symposium presentations at the meeting included ones on basic gravitational cellular and developmental biology, spaceflight hardware for biological studies, studies on Space Shuttle, and special talks on Space Station Freedom and on life support systems.

  17. EURO/PAHO Symposium on Appropriate Technology Following Birth (Trieste, October 7-11, 1986). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    In October, 1986, The World Health Organization's regional offices for Europe and the Americas held a joint symposium attended by over 40 participants from North and South America and Europe, including obstetricians, pediatricians, health administrators, sociologists, psychologists, economists, epidemiologists, medical journalists, and service…

  18. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium: The current status of heat shock in early embryonic survival and reproductive efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium entitled “The Current Status of Heat Shock in Early Embryonic Survival and Reproductive Efficiency” was held at the Joint ADSA-CSAS-AMPA-WSAS-ASAS Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, July 15 to 19, 2012. In recent years, data has accumulated suggesting a role for...

  19. Evidence that histamine is the inhibitory transmitter of the auditory interneuron ON1 of crickets.

    PubMed

    Skiebe, P; Corrette, B J; Wiese, K

    1990-08-24

    The omega neurons of crickets are connected with each other by reciprocal inhibition. This inhibition could be mimicked by bath-applied histamine and blocked by histamine H1-antagonists. Histamine, like ON1, also influenced the ascending interneuron AN2, so that its response pattern more closely reflected the temporal structure of the calling song. This evidence strongly suggests that histamine is the inhibitory transmitter of the ON1s.

  20. Output of histamine chloride from 7 nebulizers.

    PubMed

    Nortoft, E; Bundgaard, A

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the amount of aerosol delivered by seven different nebulizers. Six of the nebulizers were supplied by an airstream of 7.5 l/min and the seventh (Pari Inhalierboy) connected to a compressor supplying an airstream of 15 l/min. The nebulizer plus solution was weighed before and after one min of nebulization. In this way the amount of aerosol delivered was measured ten times for each nebulizer. Results are given as mean values +/- SD (gram/min): Hudson nebulizer model no. 2720: 0.2950 +/- 0.0154, Mefar Respi-Neb: 0.3574 +/- 0.0100, Sandoz: 0.4399 +/- 0.0201, VIx: 0.2824 +/- 0.0121, Acorn: 0.3619 +/- 0.0088, Pari Inhalierboy: 0.4865 +/- 0.0105, Raindrop: 0.2668 +/- 0.0082. Standard deviation calculated as per cent of the average were: Hudson nebulizer model no. 1720: 5.22%, Mefar Respi-Neb: 2.80%, Sandoz: 4.57% Vix: 4.28%, Acorn 2.43%, Pari Inhalierboy: 2.16%, Raindrop: 3.00%. Per cent variation between the products giving Hudson 100%: Mefar Respi-Neb: +18.77, Sandoz +46.19, Vix: -6.14, Acorn: +20.27, Pari Inhalierboy: +61.68, Raindrop: -9.56. The Hudson nebulizer was also tested with three different volumes of histamine chloride: 2 ml, 3 ml, and 4 ml. The mean values +/- SD (gram/min) for the aerosols were: 2 ml: 0.2986 +/- 0.0071, 3 ml: 0.2981 +/- 0.0080 and 4 ml: 0.2976 +/- 0.0056. The mean value of output from ten different Hudson nebulizers +/- SD was: 0.2767 +/- 0.0105 gram/min.

  1. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  2. International Symposium on Optics and its Applications (OPTICS-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Calvo, Maria L.; Kazaryan, Eduard M.; Papoyan, Aram V.; Sarkisyan, Hayk A.

    2012-03-01

    OPTICS Logo PREFACE The papers selected for this volume were reported at the International Symposium 'Optics and its applications' (OPTICS-2011, Yerevan & Ashtarak, Armenia, September 5-9, 2011), http://www.ipr.sci.am/optics2011/. The Symposium was organized by the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter and major Armenian R&D organizations, universities and industrial companies working in the field of basic and applied optics: Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Yerevan State University, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, and LT-PYRKAL Closed Joint Stock Company. OPTICS-2011 was primarily intended to support and promote the involvement of students and young scientists in various fields of modern optics, giving them the possibility to attend invited talks by prominent scientists and to present and discuss their own results. Furthermore, the Symposium allowed foreign participants from 14 countries to become acquainted with the achievements of optical science and technology in Armenia, which became a full member of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) in 2011. To follow this concept, the Symposium sessions were held in various host institutions. The creative and friendly ambience established at OPTICS-2011 promoted further international collaboration in the field and motivated many students to take up research in optics and photonics as a career. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series covers thematic sections of the Symposium (both oral and poster), which represent the main fields of interest in optics for Armenian scientists: quantum optics & information, laser spectroscopy, optical properties of nanostructures, photonics & fiber optics, and optics of liquid crystals. Such wide coverage is consistent with the general scope of the Symposium, allowing all the students involved in optics to present, discuss and publish their recent results, and for those who are making their first steps in science to choose

  3. Histamine H3 receptor agonists decrease hypothalamic histamine levels and increase stereotypical biting in mice challenged with methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Tanaka, Koh-ichi; Nishiyama, Nobuyoshi; Takemura, Motohiko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the histamine H3 receptor agonists (R)-α-methylhistamine, imetit and immepip on methamphetamine (METH)-induced stereotypical behavior were examined in mice. The administration of METH (10 mg/kg, i.p.) to male ddY mice induced behaviors including persistent locomotion and stereotypical behaviors, which were classified into four categories: stereotypical head-bobbing (1.9%), circling (1.7%), sniffing (14.3%), and biting (82.1%). Pretreatment with (R)-α-methylhistamine (3 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased stereotypical sniffing, but increased stereotypical biting induced by METH, in a dose-dependent manner. This effect of (R)-α-methylhistamine on behavior was mimicked by imetit or immepip (brain-penetrating selective histamine H3 receptor agonists; 10 mg/kg, i.p. for each drug). Hypothalamic histamine levels 1 h after METH challenge were significantly increased in mice pretreated with saline. These increases in histamine levels were significantly decreased by pretreatment with histamine H3 receptor agonists, effects which would appear to underlie the shift from METH-induced stereotypical sniffing to biting. PMID:21573995

  4. Histamine-producing bacteria in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) and their abilities to produce histamine and other biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Huang, Zhiyong; Chen, Xia

    2014-08-01

    Using decarboxylation medium and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) were isolated and identified, and the histamine-producing abilities of the isolated HPB were determined. Nine mesophilic strains (H1-H9) isolated from the muscle of blue scad were identified as the genera of HPB, including Arthrobacter bergeri (H1), Pseudomonas sp. (H2, H5 and H6), Psychrobacter sp. (H3), Shewanella baltica (H4 and H7), and Aeromonas salmonicida (H8 and H9), respectively. Results showed that most of the HPB strains were weak on histamine formation (13.0-20.4 mg/l), except for the H8 strain with the ability of producing 115 mg of histamine/l in trypticase soy broth containing 1.0 % L-histidine. As the strongest HPB in blue scad, bacterial strain H8 also presented a strong ability to produce other biogenic amines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and tryptamine. Therefore, the H8 strain identified as the genus of A. salmonicida was the dominant mesophilic HPB strain for producing histamine and other biogenic amines in blue scad at room temperature. PMID:24668182

  5. PREFACE: The 8th China International NanoScience and Technology Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hailin

    2009-09-01

    The 8th China International NanoScience and Technology Symposium, Xiangtan (2009) - Nano-products Exposition, sponsored by Chinese Society of Miro-nanoTechnology and IEEE Nanotechnology Council, etc will be held on 23-27 October 2009 in Xiangtan, China. This symposium is held in order to promote the technology for the development of micro- and nano-scale, cross-scale integration, to share new micro/nano technologies, to exchange information and knowledge over all fields and promote the industrialization and development of nanotechnology. This is a leading professional and traditional conference with at least 400 participants every year. Famous experts, professors and government officials at home and abroad will give lectures during the symposium, which provides a good platform for delegates to discover the latest developments and dynamics of nanotechnology. Researchers, teachers and students in colleges, and technical personnel in the industrial community are welcome to contribute and actively participate in the symposium. In our last symposium held in 2008, over 600 participants from all over the world attended, and we received over 570 abstract and paper submissions for the proceedings published in different languages in famous professional journals. And this year, we have already received over 400 submissions. After strict peer review, 60 of them are published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are confident that the event will be even more successful this year. Consequently, the organizing committee and proceedings editorial committee would like to thank our colleagues at the IOP Publishing, the invited speakers, our sponsors and all the delegates for their great contributions in this conference. Hailin Cong Vice Chair of the proceedings editorial committee

  6. The role of histamine in the cardiovascular effects of atracurium.

    PubMed

    Adt, M; Baumert, J H; Reimann, H J

    1992-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of a bolus injection of atracurium 0.6 mg kg-1 on the cardiovascular system in 16 patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass surgery. H1- and H2-receptor antagonists were administered to eight patients before the neuromuscular blocker. A standard anaesthetic was used comprising fentanyl, flunitrazepam, etomidate and enflurane. After administration of atracurium, haemodynamic changes and plasma histamine concentrations were measured at frequent intervals. In the first group, who received only atracurium, a brief but marked decrease in SVR and MAP occurred, accompanied by an increase in Cl, together with a marked increase in plasma concentration of histamine. In the second group, who received H1- and H2-receptor block, there was no decrease in MAP and only a small increase in plasma histamine concentration. However, there were significant changes in SVR and Cl similar to those in atracurium group.

  7. Histamine Poisoning from Ingestion of Fish or Scombroid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Vincenzo; Masciari, Peppino; Pezzi, Mario; Mola, Assunta; Tiburzi, Simona Paola; Zinzi, Maria Concetta; Scozzafava, Annamaria; Verre, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The scombroid poisoning is due to the ingestion of poorly preserved fish (especially tuna, sardines, and mackerel) out of the cold chain. Under the influence of the proliferation of gram negative bacteria that occurs for heating, the histidine content in the muscle of the fish is converted into histamine, by the action of the enzyme histidine decarboxylase. If the histamine is ingested in large quantities, it causes an anaphylactoid reaction with a variety of symptoms from moderate to severe to life-threating. We will describe two cases that came under our observation after consuming a meal of bluefin tuna. The diagnosis of scombroid syndrome was made on the basis of the anamnestic data and the clinical one. The rapid resolution of the signs and symptoms after treatment with histamines H1-H2 receptor blockers confirmed the suspected diagnosis. PMID:25544905

  8. Human eosinophils - potential pharmacological model applied in human histamine H4 receptor research.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors are well known for their immunomodulatory role in inflammation. In this review we describe the role of histamine and histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils. In the first part of article we provide short summary of histamine and histamine receptors role in physiology and histamine related therapeutics used in clinics. We briefly describe the human histamine receptor H4 and its ligands, as well as human eosinophils. In the second part of the review we provide detailed description of known histamine effects on eosinophils including: intracellular calcium concentration flux, actin polymerization, cellular shape change, upregulation of adhesion proteins and cellular chemotaxis. We provide proofs that these effects are mainly connected with the activation of histamine H4 receptor. When examining experimental data we discuss the controversial results and limitations of the studies performed on isolated eosinophils. In conclusion we believe that studies on histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils can provide interesting new biomarkers that can be used in clinical studies of histamine receptors, that in future might result in the development of new strategies in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like asthma or allergy, in which eosinophils are involved.

  9. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 7th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1976-06-01

    The Seventh ERDA-ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, on 29-31 July 1975. These Symposia are held as part of the activities in ASTM Subcommittee II on Lasers and Laser Materials, which is charged with the responsibilities of formulating standards and test procedures for laser materials, components, and devices. The Chairman of Subcommittee II is Haynes Lee, of Owens-Illinois, Inc. Co-chairmen for the Damage Symposia are Arthur Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory and Alexander J. Glass of Law-rence Livermore Laboratory. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard forty-five papers on topics relating fabrication procedures to laser induced damage in optical materials; on metal mirrors; in ir window materials; the multipulse, wavelength, and pulse length dependence of damage thresholds; damage in dielectric films and at exposed surfaces; as well as theoretical discussions on avalanche ionization and multiphoton processes of importance at shorter wavelengths. Of particular importance were the scaling relations developed from several parametric studies relating fundamental properties (refractive index, surface roughness etc.) to the damage threshold. This year many of the extrinsic influences tending to reduce a materials damage resistance were isolated such that measures of their egregious nature could be quantified. Much still needs to be accomplished to improve processing and fabrication procedures to allow a measurable approach to a materials intrinsic strength to be demonstrated.

  10. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors. PMID:20134954

  11. Histamine H3 receptors modulate reactive hyperemia in rat gut.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, W W; Obuchowicz, R; Pawlik, M W; Sendur, R; Biernat, J; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, S J

    2004-09-01

    Reactive hyperemia (RH) is an abrupt blood flow increase following release from mechanical occlusion of an artery, with restoration of intra-arterial pressure. The mechanism of this postocclusion increase in blood flow in the gut is multifactorial. Relaxation of intestinal resistance vessels, observed during RH, may involve myogenic, metabolic, hormonal and neurogenic factors. Evidence exists that histamine is an important endogenous mediator of various functions of the gut, including blood flow. The vascular effects of histamine in the intestinal circulation are due its agonistic action on histamine H1, H2 and H3 receptors. In the present study the hypothesis was tested that peripheral histamine H3 receptors are involved in the mediation of RH in the intestinal circulation. In anesthetized rats, anterior mesenteric artery blood flow (MBF) was determined with ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter, and arterial pressure (AP) was determined with a transducer. The increase in the volume of blood accumulating during RH (RH-volume), the peak increase of arterial blood flow (RH-peak response) and the duration of the hyperemia (RH-duration) were used to quantify RH after occluding the anterior mesenteric artery for 30, 60 and 120 s. Hyperemia parameters were determined before and after administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit. Pretreatment with clobenpropit was without any effect on control MBF and AP but significantly reduced most of RH responses. These findings support the hypothesis that histamine H3 receptors do not play any role in the control of intestinal vasculature at basal conditions but these receptors participate in the intestinal hyperemic reaction in response to complete temporal intestinal ischemia.

  12. Histamine fish poisoning in Australia, 2001 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Knope, Katrina; Sloan-Gardner, Timothy S; Stafford, Russell J

    2014-12-01

    We report on human illness due to histamine fish poisoning outbreaks in Australia from 2001 to 2013. Histamine fish poisoning results from the ingestion of histamine contained within the flesh of certain fish species that naturally contain histidine, which has been converted to histamine by spoilage bacteria following poor handling or temperature control after harvesting. While symptoms vary, allergic symptoms such as facial flushing, headaches and rashes are frequently reported. Using the OzFoodNet outbreak register, published case reports and surveillance reports, we found data on 57 outbreaks of histamine fish poisoning, which affected 187 people, of whom 14% were hospitalised. There were no deaths reported. Outbreaks were generally small in size, with a median of 2 cases per outbreak (range 1 to 22 people), with 88% of outbreaks comprising less than 5 people. Tuna (in the family Scombridae) was the most frequently reported food vehicle, while 18 outbreaks involved non-scombridae fish. Median incubation periods among the outbreaks were short; being less than 1 hour for 22 outbreaks. The most frequently reported symptoms were diarrhoea and rash. Symptoms of facial/body flushing were reported for at least one case in 19 outbreaks and tingling, burning or swelling of the skin, especially around the lips for at least 1 case in 13 outbreaks. In 3 outbreaks, one or more cases were reported to have had respiratory distress or difficulty breathing. While the condition is often mild, improved recognition and appropriate treatment is important, as it will reduce the possibility of any severe health effects resulting from this condition. Key features of histamine fish poisoning outbreaks are the high attack rate, rapid onset, the typical symptoms and their short duration.

  13. 8th Annual Glycoscience Symposium: Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Paratoo

    2015-09-24

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) of the University of Georgia holds a symposium yearly that highlights a broad range of carbohydrate research topics. The 8th Annual Georgia Glycoscience Symposium entitled “Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly” was held on April 7, 2014 at the CCRC. The focus of symposium was on the role of glycans in plant cell wall structure and synthesis. The goal was to have world leaders in conjunction with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and research scientists to propose the newest plant cell wall models. The symposium program closely followed the DOE’s mission and was specifically designed to highlight chemical and biochemical structures and processes important for the formation and modification of renewable plant cell walls which serve as the basis for biomaterial and biofuels. The symposium was attended by both senior investigators in the field as well as students including a total attendance of 103, which included 80 faculty/research scientists, 11 graduate students and 12 Postdoctoral students.

  14. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Symposia have become a mainstay of the gravitational wave community. Held every two years, they are the prime opportunity for our community to discuss the exciting science, technology, mission designs, and progress of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The 8th LISA symposium, held at Stanford University in the summer of 2010 was the largest symposium so far and was dominated by progress and hopes that the LISA mission will soon excel following the expected launch of the LISA pathfinder (LPF), no later than 2012, and the expected prioritization by the Decadal survey which was released 6 weeks later. The following years were challenging. Although the Decadal survey ranked LISA very high, NASA's budget issues, mostly due to the cost increase of the James Webb Space Telescope, and continued delays in LPF put too much stress on the LISA project and it officially ended in 2011. The LISA International Science Team (LIST), the core group of LISA scientists and technologists, was dissolved and the community in the U.S. was struggling to maintain cohesion. In the wake of these events, ESA started a new selection process for their next three large missions, L1, L2, and L3, and the European LISA team developed the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO), an evolved LISA concept, as an ESA only L1 candidate. A few weeks before the 9th LISA Symposium, held in Paris in May 2012, ESA announced its decision to select JUICE, a planetary mission to Jupiter and its moons, as its next large science mission (L1). Despite having the highest ranked science case, NGO was not selected due to further delays in LPF and the general feeling outside the GW community that the technology is perhaps too challenging to be pulled off in time for the L1 launch in 2022. Many U.S. members of the LISA community cancelled their travel plans and the mood at that symposium ranged from resignation to defiance. Hope for a somewhat timely launch of a LISA-like mission rested upon L2, the next

  15. PREFACE: XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof; Fossion, Ruben; Lizcano, David

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF gives a full listing of contributors and organisation members. In the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the "XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics", that was held from January 5-8, 2010 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings contain the plenary talks that were presented during the conference. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters, were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. After the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium was organized every year without interruption which makes the present one the 33rd in a row. This year's meeting was dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky, who passed away on April 1, 2009. Dr. Moshinsky was the most distinguished pioneer and promoter of nuclear physics in Mexico and Latin America and holds the record of 31 (out of 32) participations at the Symposium. In the inaugural session, Alejandro Frank (ICN-UNAM), Peter Hess (ICN-UNAM) and Jorge Flores (IF-UNAM) spoke in his honor and recalled the virtues that characterized him as a teacher, scientist, founder of schools and academic institutions, colleague and friend. His generosity, excellence and honesty were emphasized as the personal qualities that characterized both his personal and academic life. moshinksky_photo "Marcos Moshinsky (1921-2009)" The scientific program consisted of 26 invited talks and 20 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear

  16. The fate of released histamine: reception, response and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Rangachari, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Histamine released from ECL cells elicits responses from a variety of cellular targets in the vicinity. Three sets of receptors are involved (H1, H2 and H3). Receptor occupation is promptly transduced into cellular responses. The responses, in turn, are terminated by diverse mechanisms: enzymatic inactivation, cellular uptake and desensitization at the receptor level. Under specific pathological conditions, histamine effects could be exaggerated by the presence of derivatives that may be of marginal relevance under physiological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:10461350

  17. Histamine H2 receptor - Involvement in gastric ulceration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Brown, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The involvement of the H1 and H2 receptors for histamine in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers was investigated in rats. Metiamide, an H2 receptor antagonist, reliably reduced ulceration produced by stress alone or by a combination of stress and aspirin. In contrast, pyrilamine, which blocks only the H1 receptor, was without effect under these same conditions. The results support the hypothesis that histamine mediates both stress and stress plus aspirin induced ulceration by a mechanism involving the H2 receptor.

  18. Histamine 2 Receptor Antagonists and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Megan D; Aouthmany, Mouhammad; Sheehan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 50 years, the pharmacologic market for gastric disease has grown exponentially. Currently, medical management with histamine 2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are the mainstay of therapy over surgical intervention. These are generally regarded as safe medications, but there are growing numbers of cases documenting adverse effects, especially those manifesting in the skin. Here we review the pharmacology, common clinical applications, and adverse reactions of both histamine 2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors with a particular focus on the potential for allergic reactions including allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:27172303

  19. Foreign Language "Think Tank" Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kathleen H.

    At the Foreign Language"Think Tank" Symposium of April 1975, the following major problems of community college foreign language teachers were identified: (1) low enrollment; (2) attrition; (3) low achievers; (4) articulation with universities; and (5) lack of interest. Suggested solutions included: (Problem 1) advertisement, a foreign language…

  20. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were those of…

  1. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  2. Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

  3. 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerard (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Space Experiment Module (SEM), and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  4. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  5. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses studied;…

  6. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  7. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult learning as…

  8. HRD Future and Trends. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on the future of human resource development (HRD) and trends in HRD. "Searching for the Future of Human Resource Development" (Wendy E.A. Ruona, Susan A. Lynham, Tom Chermack) reports on a survey of 55 HRD and HRD-related practitioners and academics that examined trends in the HRD profession,…

  9. Consumer and Homemaking Education Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anza Coll., Cupertino, CA.

    Six contributions from the Consumer and Homemaking Education Symposium (March 1, 1974) are included. Elaine Shudlick discussed the role of the consumer education teacher, particularly in relation to a management of personal and family finance course, illustrated by a course outline including course description, prerequisities, text and references,…

  10. The Symposium on Integration Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Mary, Ed.

    This symposium of the ad hoc committee on integration of the Ontario (Canada) Teachers of English as a Second Language (TESL) reports educators' concerns with providing adequate support for immigrant and refugee students, maintaining the integrity, voice, and visibility of ESL education in school boards, and advocating and providing guidelines for…

  11. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  12. Copyright Law Symposium. No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, New York, NY.

    This book presents the five national prizewinning papers in the twenty-third copyright law symposium conducted by the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). Titles of the papers are "The USSR Joins the Universal Copyright Convention" (first prize), "Copyright Misuse: Thirty Years Waiting for the Other Shoe" (second prize),…

  13. Learning on the Job. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains two papers from a symposium on learning on the job. "Professional Crisis Workers: Impact of Repeated Exposure to Human Pain and Destructiveness" (Lynn Atkinson-Tovar) examines the following topics: (1) the secondary and vicarious traumatic stress disorder that affects many professional crisis workers who are repeatedly…

  14. Technological Change and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on technological change and human resource development. "New Technologies, Cognitive Demands, and the Implications for Learning Theory" (Richard J. Torraco) identifies four specific characteristics of the tasks involved in using new technologies (contingent versus deterministic tasks, distancing…

  15. Cross-Cultural HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The first of three papers from this symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD), "Determinants of Supply of Technical Training Opportunities for Human Capital Development in Kenya" (Moses Waithanji Ngware, Fredrick Muyia Nafukho) reports findings from interviews of technical training institute department heads in Kenya who…

  16. Women and Career Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on women and career development. "Enhancing the Career Success of Women Faculty: Mentoring as a Human Resource Development (HRD) Initiative in Higher Education" (Sharon K. Gibson) explores mentoring of women faculty, focusing on the key dimensions of roles and functions, outcomes, gender, and formal and…

  17. 7th Annual Symposium on Clinical and Pharmaceutical Solutions through Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi Tee; Wang, Li; Weng, Naidong; Dong, Kelly; Valaskovic, Gary; Lee, Mike

    2016-10-01

    7th Annual Symposium on Clinical & Pharmaceutical Solutions through Analysis, Renaissance Shanghai Pudong Hotel, Shanghai, China, 20-23 April 2016 The 7th Annual Shanghai Symposium on Innovative Approaches to Reduce Attrition and Predict Clinical Outcomes (CPSA Shanghai 2016) was held on 20-23 April 2016 in Renaissance Shanghai Pudong Hotel, Shanghai, China. The meeting was featured with highly interactive events including diversified symposia, round table discussions, workshops, poster sessions and conference awards. There were over 220 participants from more than ten countries, with 61 oral presentations and 29 posters presented. In addition, the meeting included one preconference workshop and three joint sessions held with bioanalytical experts from local communities. PMID:27610924

  18. STIP Symposium on Physical Interpretation of Solar/Interplanetary and Cometary Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1987-01-01

    The study of travelling interplanetary phenomena has continued over a period of years. The STIP (Study of Travelling Interplanetary Phenomena) Symposium on Physical Interpretation of Solar/Interplanetary and Cometary Intervals was held in Huntsville, Alabama, on May 12-15, 1987, the first of these meetings to be held in the United States. The Symposium's objective was to coordinate and disseminate new science gained from the recent solar-terrestrial and cometary intervals which can be used to better understand the linkage of physical events to the Sun's vagaries (flares, coronal holes, eruptive prominences) from their initial detection to their consequence. Fifty-one presentations were made during the four-day period. Abstracts of these reports are included as Appendix A.

  19. [Meeting Report: 20 years after the First International Symposium on hepatitis C virus and related viruses].

    PubMed

    Carnero, Elena; Díez, Juana; Fortes, Purificación; Gastaminza, Pablo; Majano, Pedro; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Pérez-del-Pulgar, Sofía; Quer, Josep; López-Labrador, F Xavier

    2013-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered by the team of Michael Houghton at Chiron Corporation in 1989 and the first symposium on HCV and related viruses was held in Venice, Italy, shortly after, in 1992. This conference was organized to advance knowledge on what then was a mysterious virus responsible for most cases of «non-A, non-B» hepatitis. During the 20 years since the first conference, the scientific quality of presentations has steadily increased, together with the tremendous advances in basic and clinical research and epidemiology. What started as a small conference on a new virus, about which there were very few data, has today become a first-in-class congress: a meeting place for basic researchers, clinicians, epidemiologists, public health experts, and industry members to present the most important advances and their application to HCV treatment and control. The nineteenth HCV symposium was held in September 2012, once again in Venice.

  20. Proceedings of the Ninth American Woodcock Symposium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2000-01-01

    The Ninth Woodcock Symposium was held January 26-28, 1997 in Baton Rough, Louisiana. Contents include: American Woodcock Management, Past, Present, and Future; Current Population Status and Likely Future Trends for American Woodcock; American Woodcock Use of Reclaimed Surface Mines in West Virginia; Food Habits and Preferences of American Woodcock in East Texas Pine Plantations; Activities and Preliminary Results of Research on Woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) in Europe; Determining Multiscale Habitat and Landscape Associations for American Woodcock in Pennsylvania; Habitat Management for Wintering American Woodcock in the Southeastern United States; Sources of Variation in Survival and Recovery Rates of American Woodcock; Survival of Female American Woodcock Breeding in Maine; Direct Recoveries From In-season Banding of American Woodcock in South-central Louisiana; Gonadal Condition of American Woodcock Harvested in Louisiana During the 1986-1988 Hunting Seasons; Weight Variation Among American Woodcock Wintering in South-central Louisiana; Factors Influencing Recruitment and Condition of American Woodcock in Minnesota; The Woodcock Trail Demonstration Area in Pennsylvania; Land-use/Land-cover Changes Along Woodcock Singing-ground Survey Routes in West Virginia; Assessing Habitat Selection in Spring by Male American Woodcock in Maine with a Geographic Information System.

  1. Keystone Symposium on Antibodies as Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The symposium on Antibodies as Drugs, organized by Keystone Symposia and chaired by J. Marks, (University of California Los Angeles, USA), E.S. Ward (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA) and L. Weiner (Georgetown University Medical Center, USA), was held in Whistler, British Columbia. This Canadian Rockies village, which will host the 2010 Olympic Games, served as an enchanting backdrop to the meeting. The more than 350 speakers and attendees included scientists from major pharmaceutical firms, e.g., Abbott, MedImmune/Astra Zeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck & Co., Pfizer, Sanofi-Aventis, Schering, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly, Hoffmann LaRoche, Novartis, Wyeth, and biotechnology companies, e.g., Ablynx, Medarex, Morphosys, GenMab, Amgen, Genentech, ImmunoGen, Agensys, Domantis, Biogen Idec, Centocor, LFB, Micromet, PDL Biopharma, Borean Pharma, Dyax Corp., Symphogen and Syntonix. Academic research groups at Imperial College London, University of Oxford, ETH Zürich, Scripps, Institute Cochin, Karolinska Institute, Utrecht University, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Baylor College, Paul Ehrlich Institute, University of California San Francisco, University of California San Diego, University of Nantes, University of Tours and Ludwig Institute were also represented, as were regulatory authorities, including the US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health and the Public Health Agency of Canada). The meeting was very interactive and included thoughtful exchanges during the different sessions and networking events. PMID:20068403

  2. Aplastic anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2010.

    PubMed

    Malcovati, Luca; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Risitano, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of rare hematological disorders belonging to the Bone Marrow Failure (BMF) syndromes. The Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes International Foundation (AA&MDSIF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting patients and families living with a BMF disease. They work to bring investigators together in a collaborative manner. This article summarizes key presentations from the last AA&MDSIF scientific symposium held in Bethesda, Maryland on March 2010.

  3. Fourth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Robert A., Jr. (Editor); Andersen, Dale T. (Editor); Bzik, Sara E. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This symposium was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, July 24-27, 1990. The NASA exobiology investigators reported their recent research findings. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  4. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis.

  6. Asia Federation Report on International Symposium on Grid Computing 2009 (ISGC 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois

    This report provides an overview of developments in the Asia-Pacific region, based on presentations made at the International Symposium on Grid Computing 2009 (ISGC 09), held 21-23 April. This document contains 14 sections, including a progress report on general Asia-EU Grid activities as well as progress reports by representatives of 13 Asian countries presented at ISGC 09. In alphabetical order, these are: Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

  7. Asia Federation Report on International Symposium on Grid Computing (ISGC) 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Lin, Simon C.

    This report provides an overview of developments in the Asia-Pacific region, based on presentations made at the International Symposium on Grid Computing 2010 (ISGC 2010), held 5-12 March at Academia Sinica, Taipei. The document includes a brief overview of the EUAsiaGrid project as well as progress reports by representatives of 13 Asian countries presented at ISGC 2010. In alphabetical order, these are: Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

  8. Proceedings of the 1981 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil-energy processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil-energy processes was held June 8-10, 1981, at the Sheraton-Palace Hotel, San Francisco, California. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy; Office of Fossil Energy; Argonne National Laboratory; and the Society for Control and Instrumentation of Energy Processes. Sixty-seven articles from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; thirteen articles had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  9. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  10. Lithium carbonate therapy for cluster headache. Changes in number of platelets, and serotonin and histamine levels.

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; Fareed, J; Diamond, S

    1980-09-01

    Three groups of patients were studied: Group A consisted of 12 patients with cluster headache that was treated with lithium carbonate. Group B consisted of six patients with cluster headache that was managed with other drugs. Group C consisted of five patients with muscle contraction headache who received lithium. Serum lithium levels, platelet count, platelet serotonin levels, and platelet-rich plasma histamine levels were determined before and during therapy. The frequency of the headache and levels of serotonin and histamine tended to follow a parallel course in groups A and B: as the headache frequency dropped, serotonin and histamine levels fell. The stable period was characterized by little change in serotonin and histamine levels. Recurrences of headaches were accompanied by a return of serotonin and histamine to pretreatment levels. The course of cluster headache is related to changes in serotonin and histamine levels. Lithium, by modifying the headache course, changes serotonin and histamine levels. PMID:7417056

  11. Histamine regulation of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer: a review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Taylor; Graf, Allyson; Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Price, Mattie; Kearney, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a dynamic organ that performs a multitude of functions within the body. Diseases that target the pancreas, like pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, are devastating and often fatal to the suffering patient. Histamine and histamine receptors (H1-H4HRs) have been found to play a critical role in biliary diseases. Accordingly, the biliary tract and the pancreas share similarities with regards to morphological, phenotypical and functional features and disease progression, studies related the role of H1-H4HRs in pancreatic diseases are important. In this review, we have highlighted the role that histamine, histidine decarboxylase (HDC), histamine receptors and mast cells (the main source of histamine in the body) play during both pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The objective of the review is to demonstrate that histamine and histamine signaling may be a potential therapeutic avenue towards treatment strategies for pancreatic diseases. PMID:24570946

  12. Study of histamine effects on phagocytosis and enzyme secretion of Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Z; Madarász, B; László, V

    1999-01-01

    1. The biogenic amine histamine develops effects not only in mammalian cells and tissues but in ciliated unicellular Tetrahymena as well. In addition to binding and internalization of labelled histamine, low concentrations can stimulate the phagocytosis of cells in inorganic salt solution. 2. In inorganic solution Tetrahymena cells secrete acid hydrolases to the medium. High concentration of histamine (10 mM) decreases the secretion of three investigated acid hydrolases in a different manner. We think that in this process the primary determinant is the alkaline character of histamine. 3. The effect of histamine on phagocytosis differs from the effect on secretion since the low, physiological concentration of histamine stimulates phagocytosis, the higher concentrations inhibit it. In the background of these effects possibly the hormone character is dominant. It is supported by the fact that histamine antagonists influence the process differently.

  13. Histamine H4 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, A; De Man, J G; Pelckmans, P A; De Winter, B Y

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a well-established mediator involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and exerts its effect through activation of four histamine receptors (H1–H4). The histamine H4 receptor is the newest member of this histamine receptor family, and is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract as well as in the liver, pancreas and bile ducts. Functional studies using a combination of selective and non-selective H4 receptor ligands have rapidly increased our knowledge of H4 receptor involvement in gastrointestinal processes both under physiological conditions and in models of disease. Strong evidence points towards a role for H4 receptors in the modulation of immune-mediated responses in gut inflammation such as in colitis, ischaemia/reperfusion injury, radiation-induced enteropathy and allergic gut reactions. In addition, data have emerged implicating H4 receptors in gastrointestinal cancerogenesis, sensory signalling, and visceral pain as well as in gastric ulceration. These studies highlight the potential of H4 receptor targeted therapy in the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and cancer. PMID:25363289

  14. Histamine Modulates Sweating and Affects Clinical Manifestations of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aya; Tani, Saki; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Many factors such as food or environmental allergens, bacteria, fungi, and mental stress aggravate the condition of atopic dermatitis (AD) eczema. Sweating can also exacerbate AD, and patients are aware of that. In the past, it has been reported that contamination of skin surface antigens by sweat induces acute allergic reactions and that sweating functions of AD patients via axonal reflexes are decreased. Histamine demonstrably inhibits acetylcholine-induced sweating in both mice and humans via histamine H1 receptor-mediated signaling. In sweat glands, acetylcholine inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a kinase involved in endocytosis and secretion, whereas simultaneous stimulation with histamine activates GSK3β and inhibits sweat secretion. Thus, histamine might be involved in the mechanism of abnormal skin dryness in patients with AD via decreasing sweat secretion. On another front, some patients secrete sweat normally. Patients with regular sweating are prone to develop skin disorders such as papules or erythema by residual sweat left on the skin surface. Patients with decreased sweating are prone to develop disorders characterized by xerosis, lichenoid changes, prurigo by elevated skin temperature, skin dryness, and compromised skin conditions. Careful inspection of skin manifestations provides a good indication of a patient's ability to sweat. PMID:27584962

  15. Conformational study of neutral histamine monomer and their vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, V.; Yadav, T.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular modeling and potential energy scanning of histamine molecule, which is an important neurotransmitter, with respect to the dihedral angle of methylamine side chain have done which prefer three different conformers of histamine monomer. We have calculated molecular structures and vibrational spectra with IR and Raman intensities of these conformers using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the exchange functional B3LYP incorporated with the basis set 6-31 ++G(d,p) and Hartree-Fock (HF) with the same basis set. We have also employed normal coordinate analysis (NCA) to scale the theoretical frequencies and to calculate potential energy distributions (PEDs) for the conspicuous assignments. Normal modes assignments of some of the vibrational frequencies of all the three conformers are in good agreement with the earlier reported experimental frequencies of histamine whereas others have modified. The standard deviations between the theoretical and experimental frequencies fall in the region 13-20 cm- 1 for the three conformers. NBO analyses of histamine conformers were also performed. The net charge transfers from ethylamine side chain to the imidazole ring. The intensive interactions between bonding and anti-bonding orbitals are found in imidazole ring. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap is nearly 5.50 eV.

  16. Mechanisms of histamine release by compound 48/80

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Rat and guinea-pig lung tissues were incubated for 20 min at 37° C in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer at pH 7·4, or in Tyrode-Tris buffer at pH 8·2, and the release of histamine produced by adding different concentrations of compound 48/80 to the incubation medium was determined. 2. At pH 7·4, increasing concentrations of 48/80 increased the release of histamine from the rat lung, with a tendency towards a maximum. No release of histamine from guinea-pig lung was observed at this pH. At pH 8·2, histamine release occurred both from rat and guinea-pig lung, and was proportional to the logarithm of the concentration of compound 48/80. 3. Histamine release from rat lung by 20 μg/ml. of 48/80 decreased when the pH was raised from 7·4 to 8·2; but the release caused by 1 mg/ml. of 48/80 increased both in rat and guinea-pig lung as the pH was raised. 4. 2-4-Dinitrophenol (DNP) inhibited the release of histamine from rat lung by a concentration of 20 μg/ml. of 48/80; the inhibition was prevented by glucose. DNP did not affect histamine release from rat or guinea-pig lung by a concentration of 1 mg/ml. of 48/80 and enhanced the release when the pH was raised from 7·4 to 8·2. 5. 1 mg/ml. of 48/80 did not inhibit the enhanced oxygen consumption produced by DNP in the isolated rat diaphragm. 6. Iodoacetic acid (IAA) or a Ca/Mg-free medium inhibited the release of histamine by 20 μg/ml. of 48/80 from rat lung but not the release produced by 1 mg/ml. in either rat or guinea-pig lung. 7. The degranulation of rat mesentery mast cells caused by 20 μg/ml. of compound 48/80 was inhibited by DNP. The degranulation evoked by 1 mg/ml. of 48/80 was also sensitive to this inhibitor; in this instance, however, the metachromatic staining reaction of the mesentery mast cells was greatly diminished. 8. It is concluded that two processes of histamine release by compound 48/80 occur in rat lung. One, dependent on cell metabolism, involves, mast cell granule secretion. The other

  17. The histamine H receptor as a new target for treatment of canine inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, Kristine; Stark, Holger; Sander, Kerstin; Leurs, Rob; Kietzmann, Manfred; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    Histamine is a well known mediator of allergic skin diseases and, with the discovery of the histamine H(4) receptor, the role of histamine is re-evaluated. There are only limited published data elucidating the role of the histamine H(4) receptor in dogs. Twelve beagles intradermally injected with histamine (0.25 micromol and 2.5 micromol/site) reacted with a classical wheal and flare reaction. None of the dogs showed signs of pruritus. The dogs reacted with a wheal and flare reaction after intradermal injection of histamine H(4) receptor agonist/H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0.1 micromol) and selective histamine H(4) receptor agonist VUF 8430 (1.5 micromol). Again, no scratching occurred in any of the dogs. The highly selective histamine H(4) receptor antagonist JNJ 7777120 reduced the histamine-induced wheal reaction in nine out of 12 dogs. To determine whether canine mast cells are susceptible to histamine H(4) receptor-mediated reactions, effects of clobenpropit and VUF 8430 were tested in canine mastocytoma cells (C2). Incubation with histamine H(4) receptor agonists (up to 10 micromol/L) induced a distinct calcium(2+) influx. C2 cells also responded with enhanced chemotaxis when stimulated with histamine, VUF 8430 and clobenpropit. Neither VUF 8430, nor clobenpropit (up to 10 micromol/L) led to a modulation of histamine concentration in supernatants of canine mastocytoma cells, whereas mastoparan, used as a positive control, enhanced histamine concentration in supernatants. For treatment of allergic skin diseases in dogs, a combination of H(1)R and H(4)R antagonists might be advantageous.

  18. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. L.; Dolganova, I. N.; Gevorgyan, N.; Guzman, A.; Papoyan, A.; Sarkisyan, H.; Yurchenko, S.

    2016-01-01

    The SPIE.FOCUS Armenia: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications'' (OPTICS-2015) http://rau.am/optics2015/ was held in Yerevan, Armenia, in the period October 1 - 5, 2015. The symposium was organized by the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), the Armenian SPIE student chapter with collaboration of the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-PYRKAL, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the SPIE & OSA student chapters of BMSTU, the Armenian OSA student chapter, and the SPIE student chapters of Lund University and Wroclaw University of Technology. The symposium OPTICS-2015 was dedicated to the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies. OPTICS-2015 was devoted to modern topics and optical technologies such as: optical properties of nanostructures, silicon photonics, quantum optics, singular optics & its applications, laser spectroscopy, strong field optics, biomedical optics, nonlinear & ultrafast optics, photonics & fiber optics, and mathematical methods in optics. OPTICS-2015 was attended by 100 scientists and students representing 17 countries: Armenia, China, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Germany, India, Iran, Italy, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Ukraine, and USA. Such a broad international community confirmed the important mission of science to be a uniting force between different countries, religions, and nations. We hope that OPTICS-2015 inspired and motivated students and young scientists to work in optics and in science in general. The present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes proceedings of the symposium covering various aspects of modern problems in optics. We are grateful to all people who were involved in the organization process. We gratefully acknowledge support from

  19. Proceedings of the Fourth Glacier Bay Science Symposium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, John F.; Gende, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    Foreword Glacier Bay was established as a National Monument in 1925, in part to protect its unique character and natural beauty, but also to create a natural laboratory to examine evolution of the glacial landscape. Today, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve is still a place of profound natural beauty and dynamic landscapes. It also remains a focal point for scientific research and includes continuing observations begun decades ago of glacial processes and terrestrial ecosystems. In recent years, research has focused on glacial-marine interactions and ecosystem processes that occur below the surface of the bay. In October 2004, Glacier Bay National Park convened the fourth in a series of science symposiums to provide an opportunity for researchers, managers, interpreters, educators, students and the general public to share knowledge about Glacier Bay. The Fourth Glacier Bay Science Symposium was held in Juneau, Alaska, rather than at the Park, reflecting a desire to maximize attendance and communication among a growing and diverse number of stakeholders interested in science in the park. More than 400 people attended the symposium. Participants provided 46 oral presentations and 41 posters covering a wide array of disciplines including geology, glaciology, oceanography, wildlife and fisheries biology, terrestrial and marine ecology, socio-cultural research and management issues. A panel discussion focused on the importance of connectivity in Glacier Bay research, and keynote speakers (Gary Davis and Terry Chapin) spoke of long-term monitoring and ecological processes. These proceedings include 56 papers from the symposium. A summary of the Glacier Bay Science Plan-itself a subject of a meeting during the symposium and the result of ongoing discussions between scientists and resource managers-also is provided. We hope these proceedings illustrate the diversity of completed and ongoing scientific studies, conducted within the Park. To this end, we invited all

  20. Behavioural effects of histamine and its antagonists: a review.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Rumbold, G R

    1988-01-01

    This review focuses on the behavioural effects of histamine and drugs which affect histaminergic function, particularly the H1- and H2-receptors antagonists. Research in this area has assumed considerable importance with increasing interest in the role of brain histamine, the clinical use of both H1 and H2 antagonists and evidence of nonmedical use of H1 antagonists. Results from a number of studies show that H1 and H2 antagonists have clear, but distinct subjective effects and that H1 antagonists have discriminative effects in animals. While H1 antagonists are reinforcers in certain conditions, histamine itself is a punisher. Moderate doses of H1 antagonists affect psychomotor performance in some situations, but the results are variable. The exceptions are terfenadine and astemizole, which do not seem to penetrate the blood-brain barrier readily. In studies of schedule-controlled behaviour, marked changes in response rate have been observed following administration of H1 antagonists, with the magnitude and direction dependent on the dose and the baseline behaviour. Histamine reduces avoidance responding, an effect mediated via H1-receptors. Changes in drinking and aggressive behaviour have also been observed following histamine administration and distinct roles for H1- and H2-receptors have been delineated. Separate H1- and H2-receptor mechanisms have also been suggested to account for changes in activity level. While the H2 antagonists do not always have strong behavioural effects when administered peripherally, there is evidence that cimetidine has a depressant effect on sexual function. These and other findings reveal an important role for histaminergic systems in a wide range of behaviour. PMID:3133686

  1. PREFACE: XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof; Fossion, Ruben; Lizcano, David

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF gives a full listing of contributors and organisation members. In the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the "XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics", that was held from January 5-8, 2010 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings contain the plenary talks that were presented during the conference. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters, were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. After the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium was organized every year without interruption which makes the present one the 33rd in a row. This year's meeting was dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky, who passed away on April 1, 2009. Dr. Moshinsky was the most distinguished pioneer and promoter of nuclear physics in Mexico and Latin America and holds the record of 31 (out of 32) participations at the Symposium. In the inaugural session, Alejandro Frank (ICN-UNAM), Peter Hess (ICN-UNAM) and Jorge Flores (IF-UNAM) spoke in his honor and recalled the virtues that characterized him as a teacher, scientist, founder of schools and academic institutions, colleague and friend. His generosity, excellence and honesty were emphasized as the personal qualities that characterized both his personal and academic life. moshinksky_photo "Marcos Moshinsky (1921-2009)" The scientific program consisted of 26 invited talks and 20 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear

  2. Report from the 37th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, 9–13th December 2014, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M; Esposito, E

    2015-01-01

    The 37th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) was held at the Henry B. Gonzalez Conference Centre in San Antonio, Texas, USA between the 9 and 13th of December 2014. It brought together an interaction between basic scientists and clinicians involved in the management of breast cancer. The symposium included six general sessions, poster discussion, and poster sessions. The most important highlights in the fields of advancing endocrine therapy; hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer and hormonal resistant therapy; targeted therapies; genetics and genomics; supportive (adjunct) care; chemotherapy treatments; breast screening and risk stratification; male breast cancer and future potential directions were included here. PMID:25729421

  3. Highlighting computations in bioscience and bioinformatics: review of the Symposium of Computations in Bioinformatics and Bioscience (SCBB07)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guoqing; Ni, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The Second Symposium on Computations in Bioinformatics and Bioscience (SCBB07) was held in Iowa City, Iowa, USA, on August 13–15, 2007. This annual event attracted dozens of bioinformatics professionals and students, who are interested in solving emerging computational problems in bioscience, from China, Japan, Taiwan and the United States. The Scientific Committee of the symposium selected 18 peer-reviewed papers for publication in this supplemental issue of BMC Bioinformatics. These papers cover a broad spectrum of topics in computational biology and bioinformatics, including DNA, protein and genome sequence analysis, gene expression and microarray analysis, computational proteomics and protein structure classification, systems biology and machine learning. PMID:18541044

  4. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms.

  5. XXth Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 2009, the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian (France), on the shore of the Geneva Lake, from 16-20 November. It was jointly organised by CERN and the French HEP community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). This year's symposium come at an important time for both the Tevatron and LHC communities. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sample, and it allowed an in-depth review of the readiness of the LHC and its detectors just before first collisions. The programme includes sessions on top-quark and electro-weak physics, QCD, B physics, new phenomena, electro-weak symmetry breaking, heavy ions, and the status and commissioning of the LHC machine and its experiments. Conference website : http://hcp2009.in2p3.fr/

  6. Summary and findings of the EPA and CDC symposium on air pollution exposure and health.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Halûk; Glenn, Barbara; Qualters, Judith R; Strosnider, Heather; McGeehin, Michael A; Zenick, Harold

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on "Air Pollution Exposure and Health" at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on September 19-20, 2006. The symposium brought together health and environmental scientists to discuss the state of the science and the cross-jurisdictional and methodological challenges in conducting air pollution epidemiology, environmental public health tracking and accountability research. The symposium was held over 2 days and consisted of technical presentations and breakout group discussions on each of the three principal themes of this meeting: (1) monitoring and exposure modeling information, (2) health effects data and (3) linkage of air quality and health data for research, tracking and accountability. This paper summarizes the symposium presentations and the conclusions and recommendations developed during the meeting. The accompanying two papers, which appear in this issue of the Journal, provide more in-depth discussion of issues pertinent to obtaining and analyzing air pollution exposure and health information. The symposium succeeded in identifying areas where there are critical gaps of knowledge in existing air pollution exposure and health information and in discovering institutional or programmatic barriers, which impede accessing and linking disparate data sets. Several suggestions and recommendations emerged from this meeting, directed toward (1) improving the utility of air monitoring data for exposure quantification, (2) improving access to and the quality of health data, (3) studying emerging air quality and health issues, (4) exploring improved or novel methods for linking data and (5) developing partnerships, building capacity and facilitating interdisciplinary communication. The meeting was successful in promoting an interdisciplinary dialogue around these issues and in formulating strategies to support these recommended activities. Finally

  7. Lymphatic diamine oxidase secretion stimulated by fat absorption is linked with histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Yasuhisa; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Qing; Xu, Min; Wollin, Armin; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) is abundantly expressed in mammalian small intestine catalyzing the oxidative breakdown of polyamines and histamine. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between stimulation of intestinal diamine oxidase secretion with intestinal fat absorption and histamine release. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated and intraduodenal tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic DAO activity and protein secretion were analyzed by radiometric assay and Western blot, respectively. Lymphatic histamine concentration was measured by ELISA. Infusion of Liposyn II (4.43 kcal/3 ml) resulted in a ∼3.5-fold increase in lymphatic DAO protein secretion and DAO activity, peaking at 1 h and lasting for 3 h. Liposyn II infusion also increased the lymphatic histamine release, a substrate for DAO. To determine the relationship of DAO release with histamine release, histamine was administered intraperitoneally (10 mg/kg) in fasting rats and resulted in a significant doubling in lymphatic DAO activity, supporting a link between histamine and DAO. In addition, ip administration of the histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 significantly reduced the Liposyn II-induced DAO output by 65.9%, whereas H1 (pyrilamine maleate), H2 (ranitidine), and H3 (thioperamide maleate) receptor antagonists had little effect. We conclude that DAO secretion may contribute to the catabolism of histamine released during fat absorption and this is probably mediated through the histamine H4 receptor. PMID:23413254

  8. Modulation of bradykinin-induced gastric-cardiovascular reflexes by histamine.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, C L; Stahl, G L; Theodossy, S J; Longhurst, J C

    1992-01-01

    Both histamine and bradykinin induce gastric-cardiovascular reflexes and are released during several pathophysiological conditions. This study examined the possibility that histamine modulates the magnitude of the reflex response to stimulation by bradykinin. Thus in chloralose anesthetized cats, the cardiovascular response to stimulation of the gastric serosa with 1 microgram/ml bradykinin was monitored before and after topical application of 100 micrograms/ml histamine (n = 6) or 1 mg/ml diphenhydramine (H1-receptor antagonist) and histamine (n = 5). After application of histamine, bradykinin-induced increases in mean arterial pressure and left ventricular pressure were attenuated by 23 and 27%, respectively. Conversely, when the H1-receptors on the serosal surface of the stomach were blocked (n = 5) before application of histamine, the pressor response to bradykinin was augmented by 26%. To determine the afferents that might contribute to the attenuating effect of histamine, we recorded single unit activity in 14 A delta and 21 C visceral afferent fibers in response to bradykinin stimulation before and after histamine stimulation. We observed that the impulse activity of 10 of the A delta and 14 of the C fibers to bradykinin stimulation was reduced after treatment with histamine. These results suggest that histamine induces an inhibitory effect on the nerve endings of visceral A delta and C fibers to the action of bradykinin through an H1-receptor mechanism. This inhibitory effect attenuates the magnitude of the consequent cardiovascular reflex response.

  9. Microinjection of histamine into the dentate gyrus produces antinociception in the formalin test in rats.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Farshid, Amir Abbas; Erfanparast, Amir

    2010-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of microinjection of histamine, chlorpheniramine (a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist), ranitidine (a histamine H(2) receptor antagonist) and thioperamide (a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist) into the dentate gyrus on the formalin-induced pain. A biphasic pattern (first phase: 0-5min and second phase: 15-60min) in nociceptive responses was induced after subcutaneous injection of formalin (50μl, 2.5%) into the ventral surface of the right hind paw. Microinjection of histamine (1 and 2μg) into the dentate gyrus decreased the intensity of nociceptive responses. Intra-dentate gyrus microinjection of chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same doses of 1 and 4μg had no effects, whereas thioperamide at a dose of 4μg suppressed both phases of formalin-induced pain. Pretreatments with chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same dose of 4μg prevented histamine (2μg)-induced antinociception, while thioperamide (4μg) increased histamine (2μg)-induced antinociception. These results indicated that activation of brain neuronal histamine at the levels of dentate gyrus produced antinociception. The post-synaptic H(1), H(2) receptors and pre-synaptic H(3) receptors of histamine may be involved in the histamine-induced antinociception at the level of the dentate gyrus.

  10. Determination of histamine in canned tuna by molecularly imprinted polymers-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Grant, Edward; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-11

    We introduce a rapid, cost effective and reliable approach to determine histamine level in canned tuna. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized as artificial antibodies towards histamine by utilizing the interaction between histamine and a functional monomer (methacrylic acid) to impress specific binding sites on polymer particles after polymerization. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was used to immobilize the MIPs, yielding a MIPs-PVC film that functioned as a recognition element to specifically separate histamine from tuna extract. A gold colloid solution served both as an eluting solvent to extract histamine from MIPs-PVC film and furnish a substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of histamine signals. Principal component analysis together with a partial least square regression (PLSR) model (R(2) = 0.947, RMSECV = 3.526) verified the reliability of MIPs-PVC-SERS approach for the detection and spectral analysis of histamine. Linear regression models were also constructed to relate the intensity of different histamine SERS bands with the corresponding spiking levels. One such model (using a band at 1576 cm(-1)) performed slightly better in predicting histamine content in tuna than the PLSR model. We conclude that our new MIPs-PVC-SERS approach can rapidly and reliably determine histamine at levels from 3 to 90 ppm in canned tuna meat. PMID:26614059

  11. Determination of histamine in canned tuna by molecularly imprinted polymers-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Grant, Edward; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-11

    We introduce a rapid, cost effective and reliable approach to determine histamine level in canned tuna. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized as artificial antibodies towards histamine by utilizing the interaction between histamine and a functional monomer (methacrylic acid) to impress specific binding sites on polymer particles after polymerization. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was used to immobilize the MIPs, yielding a MIPs-PVC film that functioned as a recognition element to specifically separate histamine from tuna extract. A gold colloid solution served both as an eluting solvent to extract histamine from MIPs-PVC film and furnish a substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of histamine signals. Principal component analysis together with a partial least square regression (PLSR) model (R(2) = 0.947, RMSECV = 3.526) verified the reliability of MIPs-PVC-SERS approach for the detection and spectral analysis of histamine. Linear regression models were also constructed to relate the intensity of different histamine SERS bands with the corresponding spiking levels. One such model (using a band at 1576 cm(-1)) performed slightly better in predicting histamine content in tuna than the PLSR model. We conclude that our new MIPs-PVC-SERS approach can rapidly and reliably determine histamine at levels from 3 to 90 ppm in canned tuna meat.

  12. Luminal Nalpha-methyl histamine stimulates gastric acid secretion in duodenal ulcer patients via releasing gastrin.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Sito, E; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Bielanski, W; Hahn, E G

    2001-01-26

    Nalpha-methyl histamine is an unusual histamine metabolite which is produced in the stomach infected by Helicobacter pylori and which was shown in animals to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to release gastrin in vitro isolated G-cells, but no information is available regarding its influence on gastric secretion and gastrin release in duodenal ulcer patients before and after H. pylori eradication. In this study, we compared the effects of intragastric administration of single or graded doses of Nalpha-methyl histamine on gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels in 16 male duodenal ulcer patients (aging from 35 to 48 years and weighing 65-82 kg) before and after the eradication of H. pylori. Furthermore, the gastric luminal histamine and gastrin contents were determined before and after H. pylori eradication. In H. pylori-infected duodenal ulcer patients, the intragastric application of Nalpha-methyl histamine failed to affect gastric acid secretion or plasma gastrin levels. Following eradication of H. pylori, gastric luminal histamine and gastrin, and both basal gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels, were significantly reduced. Nalpha-methyl histamine given intragastrically in graded doses to such H. pylori-eradicated duodenal ulcer patients was found to increase dose-dependently gastric acid output reaching at a dose of 5 mg, about 80% of histamine maximum induced by i.v. infusion of 25 microg/kg h of histamine dihydrochloride. We conclude that Nalpha-methyl histamine is a potent luminally active stimulant of gastrin release and gastric acid secretion in H. pylori-eradicated patients when luminal histamine is low but is not effective in H. pylori infected patients when luminal histamine is enhanced, possibly due to desensitization of gastrin (G-cells) and acid-producing (parietal) cells by Nalpha-methyl histamine produced excessively in H. pylori-infected stomach.

  13. Desensitization of histamine H1 receptor-mediated inositol phosphate production in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, D. R.; Zamani, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Histamine stimulated the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates (IPn) in control HeLa cells with an EC50 of 3.7 +/- 0.7 microM in the presence of 10 mM LiCl. The maximum response to histamine after 15 min incubation was 43 +/- 5% over basal accumulation and occurred at a concentration of 1 mM histamine. 2. The histamine-induced IPn production in HeLa cells was confirmed as H1 receptor-mediated, since the H1 antagonist mepyramine (10(-6) M) inhibited the histamine response (10(-4) M) by 83 +/- 7%, whereas the H2 antagonist, ranitidine (10(-4) M), and H3 antagonist, thioperamide (10(-6) M), were ineffective. 3. Histamine (10(-4) M) pretreatment of HeLa cells for 30 min desensitized the subsequent histamine-induced IPn accumulation. The desensitized cells accumulated IPn in response to histamine with an EC50 of 1.7 +/- 0.7 microM after 15 min incubation. The maximum histamine-induced IPn accumulation at 10(-4) M was 19 +/- 5% over basal and was significantly lower (P < 0.03) than the maximum response in control cells. 4. The desensitization of histamine-induced IPn accumulation was time-dependent and, at a desensitizing histamine concentration of 10(-4) M, the half-maximal attenuation occurred after approximately 9 min and maximum desensitization was achieved by 15-20 min. The desensitization of the IPn accumulation was a reversible phenomenon and full recovery of the response occurred 150 min after the removal of the desensitizing histamine-containing medium. The half-time for the recovery of the histamine-induced response was estimated at 120 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358540

  14. Introduction to the IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics and International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zuo-Guang; Tan, Xiaoli; Bokov, Alexei A

    2012-09-01

    The 20th IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics (ISAF) was held on July 24-27, 2011, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, jointly with the International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials (PFM). Over a period of four days, approximately 400 scientists, engineers, and students from around the world presented their work and discussed the latest developments in the field of ferroelectrics, related materials, and their applications. It is particularly encouraging to see that a large number of students (115) were attracted to the joint conference and presented high-quality research works. This trend is not only important to this conference series, but more importantly, it is vital to the future of the ferroelectrics field.

  15. Vasopeptidase-activated latent ligands of the histamine receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Gera, Lajos; Roy, Caroline; Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2013-11-01

    Whether peptidases present in vascular cells can activate prodrugs active on vascular cells has been tested with 2 potential latent ligands of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). First, a peptide consisting of the antihistamine cetirizine (CTZ) condensed at the N-terminus of ε-aminocaproyl-bradykinin (εACA-BK) was evaluated for an antihistamine activity that could be revealed by degradation of the peptide part of the molecule. CTZ-εACA-BK had a submicromolar affinity for the BK B2 receptor (B2R; IC50 of 590 nM, [(3)H]BK binding competition), but a non-negligible affinity for the human H1 receptor (H1R; IC50 of 11 μM for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding). In the human isolated umbilical vein, a system where both endogenous B2R and H1R mediate strong contractions, CTZ-εACA-BK exerted mild antagonist effects on histamine-induced contraction that were not modified by omapatrilat or by a B2R antagonist that prevents endocytosis of the BK conjugate. Cells expressing recombinant ACE or B2R incubated with CTZ-εACA-BK did not release a competitor of [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. Thus, there is no evidence that CTZ-εACA-BK can release free cetirizine in biological environments. The second prodrug was a blocked agonist, L-alanyl-histamine, potentially activated by aminopeptidase N (APN). This compound did not compete for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. The human umbilical vein contractility assay responded to L-alanyl-histamine (EC50 54.7 μM), but the APN inhibitor amastatin massively (17-fold) reduced its apparent potency. Amastatin did not influence the potency of histamine as a contractile agent. One of the 2 tested latent H1R ligands, L-alanyl-histamine, supported the feasibility of pro-drug activation by vascular ectopeptidases.

  16. Effects of high levels of dietary zinc oxide on ex vivo epithelial histamine response and investigations on histamine receptor action in the proximal colon of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Kröger, S; Pieper, R; Aschenbach, J R; Martin, L; Liu, P; Rieger, J; Schwelberger, H G; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effect of high dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) levels on the histamine-induced secretory-type response and histamine metabolism in the porcine proximal colon. After weaning at d 26, 3 diets with low (LZn), normal (NZn), and high (HZn) concentrations of zinc (57, 164, or 2,425 mg/kg) were fed to a total of 120 piglets. Digesta and tissue samples were taken from the ascending colon after 7 ± 1, 14 ± 1, 21 ± 1, and 28 ± 1 d. Partially stripped tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers, and histamine was applied either to the serosal or mucosal compartments. Tissue was pretreated with or without aminoguanidine and amodiaquine to block the histamine-degrading enzymes diamine oxidase (DAO) and histamine -methyltransferase (HMT), respectively. Gene expression and catalytic activity of DAO and HMT in the tissue were analyzed. The numbers of mast cells were determined in tissue samples, and histamine concentration was measured in the colon digesta. Colon tissue from another 12 piglets was used for functional studies on histamine H and H receptors by using the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and the H and H receptor blocker chloropyramine and famotidine, respectively. After serosal histamine application to colonic tissue in Ussing chambers, the change of short-circuit current (Δ) was not affected by pretreatment and was not different between Zn feeding groups. The Δ after mucosal histamine application was numerically lower ( = 0.168) in HZn compared to LZn and NZn pigs. Mast cell numbers increased from 32 to 46 d of life ( < 0.05). Further studies elucidated that the serosal histamine response was partly inhibited by chloropyramine or famotidine ( < 0.01). The response to mucosal histamine tended to be decreased when chloropyramine but not famotidine was applied from either the serosal or the mucosal side ( = 0.055). Tetrodotoxin alone or in combination with chloropyramine resulted in a similar reduction in the mucosal

  17. Effects of high levels of dietary zinc oxide on ex vivo epithelial histamine response and investigations on histamine receptor action in the proximal colon of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Kröger, S; Pieper, R; Aschenbach, J R; Martin, L; Liu, P; Rieger, J; Schwelberger, H G; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effect of high dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) levels on the histamine-induced secretory-type response and histamine metabolism in the porcine proximal colon. After weaning at d 26, 3 diets with low (LZn), normal (NZn), and high (HZn) concentrations of zinc (57, 164, or 2,425 mg/kg) were fed to a total of 120 piglets. Digesta and tissue samples were taken from the ascending colon after 7 ± 1, 14 ± 1, 21 ± 1, and 28 ± 1 d. Partially stripped tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers, and histamine was applied either to the serosal or mucosal compartments. Tissue was pretreated with or without aminoguanidine and amodiaquine to block the histamine-degrading enzymes diamine oxidase (DAO) and histamine -methyltransferase (HMT), respectively. Gene expression and catalytic activity of DAO and HMT in the tissue were analyzed. The numbers of mast cells were determined in tissue samples, and histamine concentration was measured in the colon digesta. Colon tissue from another 12 piglets was used for functional studies on histamine H and H receptors by using the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and the H and H receptor blocker chloropyramine and famotidine, respectively. After serosal histamine application to colonic tissue in Ussing chambers, the change of short-circuit current (Δ) was not affected by pretreatment and was not different between Zn feeding groups. The Δ after mucosal histamine application was numerically lower ( = 0.168) in HZn compared to LZn and NZn pigs. Mast cell numbers increased from 32 to 46 d of life ( < 0.05). Further studies elucidated that the serosal histamine response was partly inhibited by chloropyramine or famotidine ( < 0.01). The response to mucosal histamine tended to be decreased when chloropyramine but not famotidine was applied from either the serosal or the mucosal side ( = 0.055). Tetrodotoxin alone or in combination with chloropyramine resulted in a similar reduction in the mucosal

  18. Science Education in Partnership: The 2002 Australian American Fulbright Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, E.; Oliver, C.; Wilmoth, K.; Vozzo, L.

    2004-01-01

    The Australian American Fulbright 2002 Symposium: Science Education in Partnership was held in parallel-in partnership-with the scientific meeting of the IAU 213 Bioastronomy 2002 Symposium: Life Among the Stars. In practice, the two meetings modeled partnership between educators and scientists, both professional events interacting while maintaining individual goals. Leading scientists attending the IAU meeting participated in the Fulbright with presentations based upon their work and their experiences. Educators and scientists interacted on how their work impacts science education and strategies for building direct connections between scientists and classrooms. Educators attending the Fulbright Symposium attended a number of scientific presentations in IAU meeting as well. A major issue in science education is teaching science in a way that is relevant to the student. Partnerships between scientists and teachers can provide real-life scientific research experience in the laboratory and the field for teachers and students. These partnerships enhance the quality of both teaching and learning, and engage students directly in projects and curricula that lead to a better understanding of the nature and practice of science. Scientists are often engaged in the development of new curricula as a part of the education and public outreach programs affiliated with research programs. Participants explored the similarities and differences between the approach to this endeavor in Australia and the US. Partnerships between all the professionals involved-scientists, teachers, and writers-creates an opportunity for innovative, cutting-edge research to reach the classroom. The excitement of seeking new knowledge, exploring the unknown, can motivate students to pursue science studies in high school and beyond at the university. Oral papers, posters and workshops presented the results of partnerships between scientists and educators in Australian and the USA as well as opportunities

  19. Special issue: Behavioral Economics and Health Annual Symposium.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    The application of behavioral economics to health and health care has captured the imagination of policymakers across the political spectrum. The idea is that many people are irrational in predictable ways, and that this both contributes to unhealthy behaviors like smoking and holds one of the keys to changing those behaviors. Because health care costs continue to increase, and a substantial portion of costs are incurred because of unhealthy behaviors, employers and insurers have great interest in using financial incentives to change behaviors. However, it is in the details that complexity and controversies emerge. Who should the targets be, and what outcomes should be rewarded? How should incentives be structured, to maximize their effectiveness and minimize unintended consequences? In what situations should we be intervening to affect decisions by people who may prefer to be obese or to smoke, and in what situations should we accept their preferences? To begin to answer these questions, the Penn-CMU Roybal P30 Center on Behavioral Economics and Health held its first annual Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium on March 24-25, 2011 with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The symposium drew more than 50 researchers, scholars, and health professionals from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, public health, economics, law, management, marketing, and psychology. They heard perspectives on behavioral economics from public and private funders, the CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and the CEO of stickK.com, a start-up company that uses online, voluntary commitment contracts to help people achieve their goals. Participants formed eight working groups to review the current state-of-the-art in a variety of clinical contexts and to consider how behavioral economics could inform a research agenda to improve health. This Issue Brief summarizes the findings of these working groups and the symposium.

  20. Proceedings of the 2013 Joint JSTP/NTP Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan A.; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Katsuta, Osamu; Kokoshima, Hiroko; Maronpot, Robert; Nagai, Hiroaki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Seiichiro; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The first joint Japanese Society of Toxicologic Pathology (JSTP) and National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri,” was held on January 29th at Okura Frontier Hotel in Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan, in advance of the JSTP’s 29th Annual Meeting. The goal of this Symposium was to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers’ presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, select images that were used for audience voting or discussion, and the voting results. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium include: treatment-related atypical hepatocellular foci of cellular alteration in B6C3F1 mice; purulent ventriculoencephalitis in a young BALB/c mouse; a subcutaneous malignant schwannoma in a RccHan:WIST rat; spontaneous nasal septum hyalinosis/eosinophilic substance in B6C3F1 mice; a rare pancreatic ductal cell adenoma in a young Lewis rat; eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia in a transgenic mouse model; hyaline glomerulopathy in two female ddY mice; treatment-related intrahepatic erythrocytes in B6C3F1 mice; treatment-related subendothelial hepatocytes in B6C3F1 mice; spontaneous thyroid follicular cell vacuolar degeneration in a cynomolgus monkey; congenital hepatic fibrosis in a 1-year-old cat; a spontaneous adenocarcinoma of the middle ear in a young Crl:CD(SD) rat; and finally a series of cases illustrating some differences between cholangiofibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma in Sprague Dawley and F344 rats. PMID:23914068