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Sample records for histology-equivalent sectioning laser-scanning

  1. Multicolor immunophenotyping of tissue sections by laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Gerstner, Andreas O.; Lenz, Dominik; Osmancik, Pavel; Schneider, Peter; Trumpfheller, Christine; Racz, Pal; Tenner-Racz, Klara

    2002-05-01

    In lymphatic organs the quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of leukocytes would give relevant information about alterations during diseases (leukemia, HIV, AIDS) and their therapeutic regimen. Analysis of them in solid tissues is difficult to perform but would yield important data in a variety of clinical and experimental settings. We have developed an automated analysis method for LSC suitable for archived or fresh biopsy material of human lymph nodes and tonsils. Sections are stained with PI for DNA and up to three antigens using direct or indirect immunofluorescence staining. Measurement is triggered on DNA-fluorescence (Argon Laser). Due to the heterogeneity in cell density measurements are repeatedly performed at different threshold levels (low threshold: regions of low cellular density, germinal centers; high threshold: dense regions, mantle zone). Data are acquired by single- (Ar) or dual-laser excitation (Ar-HeNe) in order to determine data from single- (FITC), up to triple-staining (FITC/PE-Cy5/APC). Percentage and cellular density of cell-subsets is quantified in different structural regions of the specimen. Comparison with manual analysis of identical specimens showed very good correlation. With LSC a semi-automated operator-independent and immunophenotyping of lymphatic tissues with simultaneously up to four antibodies is possible. This technique should yield new insight into processes during diseases and should help to quantify the success of therapeutic interventions.

  2. Automatic Extraction of Tunnel Lining Cross-Sections from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun-Jian; Qiu, Wenge; Lei, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tunnel lining (bare-lining) cross-sections play an important role in analyzing deformations of tunnel linings. The goal of this paper is to develop an automatic method for extracting bare-lining cross-sections from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds. First, the combination of a 2D projection strategy and angle criterion is used for tunnel boundary point detection, from which we estimate the two boundary lines in the X-Y plane. The initial direction of the cross-sectional plane is defined to be orthogonal to one of the two boundary lines. In order to compute the final cross-sectional plane, the direction is adjusted twice with the total least squares method and Rodrigues’ rotation formula, respectively. The projection of nearby points is made onto the adjusted plane to generate tunnel cross-sections. Finally, we present a filtering algorithm (similar to the idea of the morphological erosion) to remove the non-lining points in the cross-section. The proposed method was implemented on railway tunnel data collected in Sichuan, China. Compared with an existing method of cross-sectional extraction, the proposed method can offer high accuracy and more reliable cross-sectional modeling. We also evaluated Type I and Type II errors of the proposed filter, at the same time, which gave suggestions on the parameter selection of the filter. PMID:27782063

  3. Automatic Extraction of Tunnel Lining Cross-Sections from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun-Jian; Qiu, Wenge; Lei, Jin

    2016-10-06

    Tunnel lining (bare-lining) cross-sections play an important role in analyzing deformations of tunnel linings. The goal of this paper is to develop an automatic method for extracting bare-lining cross-sections from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds. First, the combination of a 2D projection strategy and angle criterion is used for tunnel boundary point detection, from which we estimate the two boundary lines in the X-Y plane. The initial direction of the cross-sectional plane is defined to be orthogonal to one of the two boundary lines. In order to compute the final cross-sectional plane, the direction is adjusted twice with the total least squares method and Rodrigues' rotation formula, respectively. The projection of nearby points is made onto the adjusted plane to generate tunnel cross-sections. Finally, we present a filtering algorithm (similar to the idea of the morphological erosion) to remove the non-lining points in the cross-section. The proposed method was implemented on railway tunnel data collected in Sichuan, China. Compared with an existing method of cross-sectional extraction, the proposed method can offer high accuracy and more reliable cross-sectional modeling. We also evaluated Type I and Type II errors of the proposed filter, at the same time, which gave suggestions on the parameter selection of the filter.

  4. 3D imaging of cement-based materials at submicron resolution by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning.

    PubMed

    Yio, M H N; Mac, M J; Wong, H S; Buenfeld, N R

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to reconstruct large volumes of nontransparent porous materials at submicron resolution. The proposed method combines fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning to produce a series of overlapping confocal z-stacks, which are then aligned and stitched based on phase correlation. The method can be extended in the XY plane to further increase the overall image volume. Resolution of the reconstructed image volume does not degrade with increase in sample size. We have used the method to image cementitious materials, hardened cement paste and concrete and the results obtained show that the method is reliable. Possible applications of the method such as three-dimensional characterization of the pores and microcracks in hardened concrete, three-dimensional particle shape characterization of cementitious materials and three-dimensional characterization of other porous materials such as rocks and bioceramics are discussed.

  5. In vivo imaging flow cytometry based on laser scanning two-photon microscopy at kHz cross-sectional frame rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry has found numerous applications in biology and pharmacology. However, conventional cytometry does not provide the detailed morphological information that is needed to fully determine the phenotype of individual circulating cells. Imaging cytometry, capable of visualizing the morphology and dynamics of the circulating cells at high spatiotemporal resolution, is highly desired. Current wide-field based image cytometers are limited in the imaging depth and provide only two-dimensional resolution. For deep tissue imaging, laser scanning two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is widely adopted. However, for applications in flow cytometry, the axial scanning speed of current TPMs is inadequate to provide high-speed cross-sectional imaging of vasculature. We have integrated an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a standard TPM and achieved microsecond-scale axial scanning. With a galvo scanner for transverse scanning, we achieved kHz cross-sectional frame rate. Here we report its applications for in vivo deformability cytometry and in vivo imaging flow cytometry, and demonstrate the capability of imaging dynamical morphologies of flowing cells, distinguishing cells and cellular clusters, and simultaneously quantifying different cell populations based on their fluorescent labels.

  6. Digital laser scanning fundus camera.

    PubMed

    Plesch, A; Klingbeil, U; Bille, J

    1987-04-15

    Imaging and documentation of the human retina for clinical diagnostics are conventionally achieved by classical optical methods. We designed a digital laser scanning fundus camera. The optoelectronical instrument is based on scanning laser illumination of the retina and a modified video imaging procedure. It is coupled to a digital image buffer and a microcomputer for image storage and processing. Aside from its high sensitivity the LSF incorporates new ophthalmic imaging methods like polarization differential contrast. We give design considerations as well as a description of the instrument and its performance.

  7. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (mfMPLSM) in the biological and medical sciences has the potential to become a ubiquitous tool for obtaining high-resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of mfMPLSM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for mfMPLSM in which whole-field detection with a single detector, rather than detection with a matrix of detectors, such as a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, is implemented. This advance makes mfMPLSM fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method makes it possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single scan of the specimen.

  8. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunhai; Hu, Bian; Dai, Yakang; Yang, Haomin; Huang, Wei; Xue, Xiaojun; Li, Fazhi; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Chenyu; Gao, Fei; Chang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments. PMID:23585775

  9. The design of laser scanning galvanometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoling; Zhou, Bin; Xie, Weihao; Zhang, Yuangeng

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we designed the laser scanning galvanometer system according to our requirements. Based on scanning range of our laser scanning galvanometer system, the design parameters of this system were optimized. During this work, we focused on the design of the f-θ field lens. An optical system of patent lens in the optical manual book, which had three glasses structure, was used in our designs. Combining the aberration theory, the aberration corrections and image quality evaluations were finished using Code V optical design software. An optimum f-θ field lens was designed, which had focal length of 434 mm, pupil diameter of 30 mm, scanning range of 160 mm × 160 mm, and half field angle of 18°×18°. At the last, we studied the influences of temperature changes on our system.

  10. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  11. [Application of confocal laser scanning microscope in forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Luo; Hu, Le-Sheng; Zhou, Lan; Zheng, Na; Liang, Man; Yang, Fan; Liu, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy(CLSM) is a new technique for microscopic imaging, which can collect the transverse section image of the samples and produce three-dimensional reconstruction and present higher spatial resolution than the conventional light microscope. As a precision instrument for the microscopic image, it plays an important role in forensic pathology. The article reviews the recent research achievements from sudden cardiac death, bullet wound and nervous system damage, etc, and explores the potential applications of the forensic pathology research and forensic practice.

  12. Colonization of potato rhizosphere by GFP-tagged Bacillus subtilis MB73/2, Pseudomonas sp. P482 and Ochrobactrum sp. A44 shown on large sections of roots using enrichment sample preparation and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Dorota; Obuchowski, Michal; Bikowski, Mariusz; Rychlowski, Michal; Jafra, Sylwia

    2012-12-18

    The ability to colonize the host plants' rhizospheres is a crucial feature to study in the case of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPRs) with potential agricultural applications. In this work, we have created GFP-tagged derivatives of three candidate PGPRs: Bacillus subtilis MB73/2, Pseudomonas sp. P482 and Ochrobactrum sp. A44. The presence of these strains in the rhizosphere of soil-grown potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was detected with a classical fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). In this work, we have used a broad-field-of-view CLMS device, dedicated to in vivo analysis of macroscopic objects, equipped with an automated optical zoom system and tunable excitation and detection spectra. We show that features of this type of CLSM microscopes make them particularly well suited to study root colonization by microorganisms. To facilitate the detection of small and scattered bacterial populations, we have developed a fast and user-friendly enrichment method for root sample preparation. The described method, thanks to the in situ formation of mini-colonies, enables visualization of bacterial colonization sites on large root fragments. This approach can be easily modified to study colonization patterns of other fluorescently tagged strains. Additionally, dilution plating of the root extracts was performed to estimate the cell number of MB73/2, P482 and A44 in the rhizosphere of the inoculated plants.

  13. Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmerjahn, A.; Theer, P.; Helmchen, F.

    Since its inception more than 15 years ago, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) has found widespread use in biological and medical research. Two-photon microscopy is based on simultaneous absorption of two photons by fluorophores and subsequent fluorescence emission, a process which under normal illumination conditions is highly improbable. Theoretically described around 1930 by Maria Göppert-Mayer [1], the first experimental demonstration of two-photon excitation had to await the invention of the laser, which produced sufficiently high light intensities to observe two-photon absorption events [2]. Only after the development of ultrafast lasers providing subpicosecond light pulses with high peak power intensities, however, two-photon-excited fluorescence became practical in a laser-scanning microscope [3]. Since then 2PLSM has developed into the method of choice for high-resolution imaging in living animals (reviewed in [4,5]). One of the main reasons is the low sensitivity of 2PLSM to light scattering, which enables imaging relatively deep inside biological tissue and direct observation of the dynamic behavior of cells in their native environment. In this chapter, we introduce the physical principles governing 2PLSM and briefly describe the key instrument components. We give an overview of fluorescence labeling techniques and how they are combined with 2PLSM for functional imaging and photomanipulation in living tissue. Finally, we discuss limitations and provide some future perspectives.

  14. Mobile Laser Scanning for Indoor Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Backes, D.; Boehm, J.

    2013-10-01

    The process of capturing and modelling buildings has gained increased focus in recent years with the rise of Building Information Modelling (BIM). At the heart of BIM is a process change for the construction and facilities management industries whereby a BIM aids more collaborative working through better information exchange, and as a part of the process Geomatic/Land Surveyors are not immune from the changes. Terrestrial laser scanning has been proscribed as the preferred method for rapidly capturing buildings for BIM geometry. This is a process change from a traditional measured building survey just with a total station and is aided by the increasing acceptance of point cloud data being integrated with parametric building models in BIM tools such as Autodesk Revit or Bentley Architecture. Pilot projects carried out previously by the authors to investigate the geometry capture and modelling of BIM confirmed the view of others that the process of data capture with static laser scan setups is slow and very involved requiring at least two people for efficiency. Indoor Mobile Mapping Systems (IMMS) present a possible solution to these issues especially in time saved. Therefore this paper investigates their application as a capture device for BIM geometry creation over traditional static methods through a fit-for-purpose test.

  15. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  16. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    PubMed Central

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered. PMID:23112655

  17. Three-dimensional laser scanning for geometry documentation and construction management of highway tunnels during excavation.

    PubMed

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  18. Slate characterization using 3D laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M.; Taboada, J.; Martínez, J.; Matías, J. M.; Vilán, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Quality control is a necessary component of the slate slab manufacturing process so as to evaluate defects as defined by the current standard for slate. Quality control has traditionally been performed manually by an expert in the field, with the consequent human subjectivity. We studied the feasibility of using a 3D laser scanner to measure slate slabs and analyze possible defects that would lead to the rejection of slabs for particular industrial processes. The application requires slate characterization to be performed in real time and thereby requires a short computation time. We describe an optimized calibration method based on Tsai's approach that reduces calculation complexity and cost in this key 3D laser scanning stage. Configured and implemented for slate slab characterization, the system produces the required information in real time during the production process.

  19. Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Vegetation Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jeffrey J; Moskal, L. Monika; Bakker, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    We developed new vegetation indices utilizing terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to quantify the three-dimensional spatial configuration of plant communities. These indices leverage the novelty of TLS data and rely on the spatially biased arrangement of a TLS point cloud. We calculated these indices from TLS data acquired within an existing long term manipulation of forest structure in Central Oregon, USA, and used these data to test for differences in vegetation structure. Results provided quantitative evidence of a significant difference in vegetation density due to thinning and burning, and a marginally significant difference in vegetation patchiness due to grazing. A comparison to traditional field sampling highlighted the novelty of the TLS based method. By creating a linkage between traditional field sampling and landscape ecology, these indices enable field investigations of fine-scale spatial patterns. Applications include experimental assessment, long-term monitoring, and habitat characterization. PMID:25353981

  20. Terrestrial laser scanning for vegetation sampling.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jeffrey J; Moskal, L Monika; Bakker, Jonathan D

    2014-10-28

    We developed new vegetation indices utilizing terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to quantify the three-dimensional spatial configuration of plant communities. These indices leverage the novelty of TLS data and rely on the spatially biased arrangement of a TLS point cloud. We calculated these indices from TLS data acquired within an existing long term manipulation of forest structure in Central Oregon, USA, and used these data to test for differences in vegetation structure. Results provided quantitative evidence of a significant difference in vegetation density due to thinning and burning, and a marginally significant difference in vegetation patchiness due to grazing. A comparison to traditional field sampling highlighted the novelty of the TLS based method. By creating a linkage between traditional field sampling and landscape ecology, these indices enable field investigations of fine-scale spatial patterns. Applications include experimental assessment, long-term monitoring, and habitat characterization.

  1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  2. Automatic change detection using mobile laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebel, M.; Hammer, M.; Gordon, M.; Arens, M.

    2014-10-01

    Automatic change detection in 3D environments requires the comparison of multi-temporal data. By comparing current data with past data of the same area, changes can be automatically detected and identified. Volumetric changes in the scene hint at suspicious activities like the movement of military vehicles, the application of camouflage nets, or the placement of IEDs, etc. In contrast to broad research activities in remote sensing with optical cameras, this paper addresses the topic using 3D data acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS). We present a framework for immediate comparison of current MLS data to given 3D reference data. Our method extends the concept of occupancy grids known from robot mapping, which incorporates the sensor positions in the processing of the 3D point clouds. This allows extracting the information that is included in the data acquisition geometry. For each single range measurement, it becomes apparent that an object reflects laser pulses in the measured range distance, i.e., space is occupied at that 3D position. In addition, it is obvious that space is empty along the line of sight between sensor and the reflecting object. Everywhere else, the occupancy of space remains unknown. This approach handles occlusions and changes implicitly, such that the latter are identifiable by conflicts of empty space and occupied space. The presented concept of change detection has been successfully validated in experiments with recorded MLS data streams. Results are shown for test sites at which MLS data were acquired at different time intervals.

  3. Quality Analysis and Correction of Mobile Backpack Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rönnholm, P.; Liang, X.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Hyyppä, J.

    2016-06-01

    Backpack laser scanning systems have emerged recently enabling fast data collection and flexibility to make measurements also in areas that cannot be reached with, for example, vehicle-based laser scanners. Backpack laser scanning systems have been developed both for indoor and outdoor use. We have developed a quality analysis process in which the quality of backpack laser scanning data is evaluated in the forest environment. The reference data was collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) laser scanning system. The workflow included noise filtering, division of data into smaller patches, ground point extraction, ground data decimation, and ICP registration. As a result, we managed to observe the misalignments of backpack laser scanning data for 97 patches each including data from circa 10 seconds period of time. This evaluation revealed initial average misalignments of 0.227 m, 0.073 and -0.083 in the easting, northing and elevation directions, respectively. Furthermore, backpack data was corrected according to the ICP registration results. Our correction algorithm utilized the time-based linear transformation of backpack laser scanning point clouds. After the correction of data, the ICP registration was run again. This revealed remaining misalignments between the corrected backpack laser scanning data and the original UAV data. We found average misalignments of 0.084, 0.020 and -0.005 meters in the easting, northing and elevation directions, respectively.

  4. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle...

  5. Reservoir shore development in long range terrestrial laser scanning monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Halina

    2016-04-01

    Shore zones of reservoirs are in most cases very active, getting transformed as a result of coastal processes and mass movements initiated on the slopes surrounding the reservoir. From the point of view of the users of water reservoirs shore recession strongly undesirable as it causes destruction to infrastructure and buildings located in the immediate vicinity of the reservoir. For this reason, reservoir shores require continuous geodetic monitoring. Fast and accurate geodetic measurements covering shore sections several kilometers long, often in poorly accessible areas, are available using long range terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The possibilities of using long range terrestrial laser scanning are shown on the example of the reservoir Jeziorsko on the Warta River (Central Poland). This reservoir, created in the years 1986-1992, is a typical retention reservoir, the annual fluctuations of which reach 5 m. Depending on the water level its surface area ranges from 42.3 to 19.6 km2. The width of the reservoir is 2.5 km. The total shore length of the reservoir, developed in Quaternary till and sand-till sediments, is 44.3 km, including 30.1 km of the unreinforced shore. Out of the unreinforced shore 27% is subject to coastal erosion. The cliff heights vary from a few cm to 12.5 meters, and the current rate of the cliff recession ranges from 0 to 1.12 m/y. The study used a terrestrial long range laser scanner Riegl VZ-4000 of a range of up to 4000 m. It enabled conducting the measurements of the cliff recession from the opposite shore of the reservoir, with an angular resolution of 0.002°, which gives about 50 measurement points per 1 m2. The measurements were carried out in the years 2014-2015, twice a year, in early spring before high water level, and in late autumn at a dropping water level. This allowed the separation of the impact of coastal processes and frost weathering on the cliff recession and their quantitative determination. The size and nature of

  6. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  7. Efficient terrestrial laser scan segmentation exploiting data structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudabadi, Hamid; Olsen, Michael J.; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-09-01

    New technologies such as lidar enable the rapid collection of massive datasets to model a 3D scene as a point cloud. However, while hardware technology continues to advance, processing 3D point clouds into informative models remains complex and time consuming. A common approach to increase processing efficiently is to segment the point cloud into smaller sections. This paper proposes a novel approach for point cloud segmentation using computer vision algorithms to analyze panoramic representations of individual laser scans. These panoramas can be quickly created using an inherent neighborhood structure that is established during the scanning process, which scans at fixed angular increments in a cylindrical or spherical coordinate system. In the proposed approach, a selected image segmentation algorithm is applied on several input layers exploiting this angular structure including laser intensity, range, normal vectors, and color information. These segments are then mapped back to the 3D point cloud so that modeling can be completed more efficiently. This approach does not depend on pre-defined mathematical models and consequently setting parameters for them. Unlike common geometrical point cloud segmentation methods, the proposed method employs the colorimetric and intensity data as another source of information. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on several datasets encompassing variety of scenes and objects. Results show a very high perceptual (visual) level of segmentation and thereby the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. The proposed method is also more efficient compared to Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC), which is a common approach for point cloud segmentation.

  8. Stereo vision based hand-held laser scanning system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jinming

    2011-11-01

    Although 3D scanning system is used more and more broadly in many fields, such computer animate, computer aided design, digital museums, and so on, a convenient scanning device is expansive for most people to afford. In another hand, imaging devices are becoming cheaper, a stereo vision system with two video cameras cost little. In this paper, a hand held laser scanning system is design based on stereo vision principle. The two video cameras are fixed tighter, and are all calibrated in advance. The scanned object attached with some coded markers is in front of the stereo system, and can be changed its position and direction freely upon the need of scanning. When scanning, the operator swept a line laser source, and projected it on the object. At the same time, the stereo vision system captured the projected lines, and reconstructed their 3D shapes. The code markers are used to translate the coordinate system between scanned points under different view. Two methods are used to get more accurate results. One is to use NURBS curves to interpolate the sections of the laser lines to obtain accurate central points, and a thin plate spline is used to approximate the central points, and so, an exact laser central line is got, which guards an accurate correspondence between tow cameras. Another way is to incorporate the constraint of laser swept plane on the reconstructed 3D curves by a PCA (Principle Component Analysis) algorithm, and more accurate results are obtained. Some examples are given to verify the system.

  9. Managing multiple image stacks from confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbe, Joerg; Goetze, Christian H.; Zuschratter, Werner

    1999-05-01

    A major goal in neuroanatomy is to obtain precise information about the functional organization of neuronal assemblies and their interconnections. Therefore, the analysis of histological sections frequently requires high resolution images in combination with an overview about the structure. To overcome this conflict we have previously introduced a software for the automatic acquisition of multiple image stacks (3D-MISA) in confocal laser scanning microscopy. Here, we describe a Windows NT based software for fast and easy navigation through the multiple images stacks (MIS-browser), the visualization of individual channels and layers and the selection of user defined subregions. In addition, the MIS browser provides useful tools for the visualization and evaluation of the datavolume, as for instance brightness and contrast corrections of individual layers and channels. Moreover, it includes a maximum intensity projection, panning and zoom in/out functions within selected channels or focal planes (x/y) and tracking along the z-axis. The import module accepts any tiff-format and reconstructs the original image arrangement after the user has defined the sequence of images in x/y and z and the number of channels. The implemented export module allows storage of user defined subregions (new single image stacks) for further 3D-reconstruction and evaluation.

  10. Super-Resolution Laser Scanning Microscopy through Spatiotemporal Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ju; Min, Wei; Conchello, José-Angel; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Lichtman, Jeff W.

    2009-01-01

    Super-resolution optical microscopy has attracted great interest among researchers in many fields, especially in biology where the scale of physical structures and molecular processes fall below the diffraction limit of resolution for light. As one of the emerging techniques, structured illumination microscopy can double the resolution by shifting unresolvable spatial frequencies into the pass-band of the microscope through spatial frequency mixing with a wide-field structured illumination pattern. However, such a wide-field scheme typically can only image optically thin samples and is incompatible with multiphoton processes such as two-photon fluorescence, which require point scanning with a focused laser beam. Here, we propose two new super-resolution schemes for laser scanning microscopy by generalizing the concept of a spatially nonuniform imaging system. One scheme, scanning patterned illumination (SPIN) microscopy, employs modulation of the excitation combined with temporally cumulative imaging by a nondescanned array detector. The other scheme, scanning patterned detection (SPADE) microscopy, utilizes detection modulation together with spatially cumulative imaging, in this case by a nondescanned single-element detector. When combined with multiphoton excitation, both schemes can image thick samples with three-dimensional optical sectioning and much improved resolution. PMID:19743870

  11. Ultrafast pulse-pair control in multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    De, Arijit Kumar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    In multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy, ultrafast laser pulses [i.e., light pulses having pulse width sections of common fluorophores. Because of the broad overlapping two-photon absorption spectra of fluorophores and the large spectral bandwidth of a short pulse, simultaneous excitation of many fluorophores is common, which justifies a persistent demand for selective excitation of individual fluorophores. We describe the use of pulse-pair excitation with possibilities of controlling molecular fluorescence in laser-scanning microscopy and compare it with coherent control using pulse sequence [De and Goswami, "Coherent control in multiphoton fluorescence imaging," Proc. SPIE 7183, 71832B (2009)].

  12. Two-Photon Laser Scanning Stereomicroscopy for Fast Volumetric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanlong; Yao, Baoli; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Li, Runze; Horn, Mark Van; Chen, Xun; Li, Yang; Ye, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Bessel beams have been successfully used in two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy to extend the depth of field (EDF), which makes it possible to observe fast events volumetrically. However, the depth information is lost due to integration of fluorescence signals along the propagation direction. We describe the design and implementation of two-photon lasers scanning stereomicroscopy, which allows viewing dynamic processes in three-dimensional (3D) space stereoscopically in real-time with shutter glasses at the speed of 1.4 volumes per second. The depth information can be appreciated by human visual system or be recovered with correspondence algorithms for some cases. PMID:27997624

  13. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  14. Laser scanning cytometry as a tool for biomarker validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Anja; Füldner, Christiane; Lehmann, Jörg; Tarnok, Attila

    2013-03-01

    Biomarkers are essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. As diverse is the range of diseases the broad is the range of biomarkers and the material used for analysis. Whereas body fluids can be relatively easily obtained and analyzed, the investigation of tissue is in most cases more complicated. The same applies for the screening and the evaluation of new biomarkers and the estimation of the binding of biomarkers found in animal models which need to be transferred into applications in humans. The latter in particular is difficult if it recognizes proteins or cells in tissue. A better way to find suitable cellular biomarkers for immunoscintigraphy or PET analyses may be therefore the in situ analysis of the cells in the respective tissue. In this study we present a method for biomarker validation using Laser Scanning Cytometry which allows the emulation of future in vivo analysis. The biomarker validation is exemplarily shown for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on synovial membrane. Cryosections were scanned and analyzed by phantom contouring. Adequate statistical methods allowed the identification of suitable markers and combinations. The fluorescence analysis of the phantoms allowed the discrimination between synovial membrane of RA patients and non-RA control sections by using median fluorescence intensity and the "affected area". As intensity and area are relevant parameters of in vivo imaging (e.g. PET scan) too, the presented method allows emulation of a probable outcome of in vivo imaging, i.e. the binding of the target protein and hence, the validation of the potential of the respective biomarker.

  15. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF RAT FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to study follicular development in millimeter pieces of rat ovary. To use this technology, it is essential to stain the tissue before laser excitation with the confocal microscope. Various fluorescent stains (Yo-Pro, Bo-Pr...

  16. FOOD SURFACE TEXTURE MEASUREMENT USING REFLECTIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used in the reflection mode to characterize the surface texture (roughness) of sliced food surfaces. Sandpapers of grit size between 150 and 600 were used as the height reference to standardize the CLSM hardware settings. Sandpaper particle sizes were v...

  17. Laser-scanning techniques for rapid ballistics identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodburgy, R. C.; Nakich, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Two different laser-scanning methods may be utilized. In each case scanned cylindrical bullet surface is displayed ""unwrapped'' on oscilloscope screen. Bullets are compared by photographing each display and superimposing negatives of two images. With some modifications bullets can be scanned and compared by superimposing images on screen of dual-beam oscilloscope.

  18. Optimal lens design and use in laser-scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Negrean, Adrian; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2014-01-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy often an off-the-shelf achromatic doublet is used as a scan lens which can reduce the available diffraction-limited field-of-view (FOV) by a factor of 3 and introduce chromatic aberrations that are scan angle dependent. Here we present several simple lens designs of superior quality that fully make use of high-NA low-magnification objectives, offering diffraction-limited imaging over a large FOV and wavelength range. We constructed a two-photon laser-scanning microscope with optimized custom lenses which had a near diffraction limit point-spread-function (PSF) with less than 3.6% variation over a 400 µm FOV and less than 0.5 µm lateral color between 750 and 1050 nm. PMID:24877017

  19. Superconducting Magnet System for a Low Temperature Laser Scanning Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-22

    Our initial studies with the LTLSM bought with this equipment grant show that the intragrain critical current density crosses over with the...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Superconducting Magnet System for a Low Temperature Laser Scanning Microscope 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-05-1-0425 5c...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Applied Superconductivity Center 1500 Engineering Drive University of Wisconsin -Madison Room 909

  20. Software for visualization, analysis, and manipulation of laser scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnsides, Dennis B.

    1997-03-01

    The recent introduction of laser surface scanning to scientific applications presents a challenge to computer scientists and engineers. Full utilization of this two- dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) data requires advances in techniques and methods for data processing and visualization. This paper explores the development of software to support the visualization, analysis and manipulation of laser scan images. Specific examples presented are from on-going efforts at the Air Force Computerized Anthropometric Research and Design (CARD) Laboratory.

  1. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  2. Modelling Braided River Morphodynamics With Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.; Wheaton, J. M.; Vericat, D.; Hodge, R.

    2007-12-01

    Advances in topographic survey and terrain modelling have enabled a revolution in the study in the fluvial morphodynamics in the last decade. Prior to the advent of electronic tacheometry in the 1990s, the analysis of channel dynamics was typically inferred from a combination of cross-section surveys and planform mapping. Distributed surveys acquired with GPS or EDMs enabled this analysis to be dimensionally extended and the pattern and magnitude morphodynamics elucidated in 3D; in particular through DTM differencing. Continuing developments in survey technology are now posed to reset this field once again. Now no longer confined to the laboratory, ruggedized laser scanners are capable of acquiring between 4-50,000 observations per second, at ranges exceeding 100 m. This latest development creates the potential for typical reach-scale (1-10 km) topographic datasets to rise in size by 7 orders of magnitude (hundreds to billions of points) in the coming years. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) offers a wealth of opportunities to better monitor fluvial systems; improving models of cut-and-fill, roughness and enhancing the prospect for ever more detailed parameterizations for fluid models. While this technology enables the creation of 'virtual facsimiles' of landscapes, the demands of storing, processing and modelling geomorphological products from such data requires a wholesale reappraisal of our data management and modelling methods. Here we outline a field-to-product methodology for TLS of fluvial systems using data from two annual surveys of a 1 km reach of the River Feshie, Scotland. These surveys delivered 3D point cloud datasets, incorporating over 200 million xyz observations, with median spatial densities of over 1000 pts/m2. The surveys were fixed to a GPS-based control network, including over 200 coincident tie- points to register multiple setups to a global coordinate system (RMS errors 0.002-0.011 m). Modelling reach-scale geometries from such dense point

  3. Transmissive liquid-crystal device correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-03-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows 3D cross-sectional imaging inside biospecimens. However, certain aberrations produced can degrade the quality of the resulting images. We previously reported a transmissive liquid-crystal device that could compensate for the predominant spherical aberrations during the observations, particularly in deep regions of the samples. The device, inserted between the objective lens and the microscope revolver, improved the image quality of fixed-mouse-brain slices that were observed using two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy, which was originally degraded by spherical aberration. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism, motivated by the fact that these asymmetric aberrations can also often considerably deteriorate image quality, even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescent beads using single-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity in the image of the bead under a cover slip tilted in the y-direction was increased by 1.5 times after correction by the device. Furthermore, the y- and z-widths of the imaged bead were reduced to 66% and 65%, respectively. On the other hand, for the imaged bead sucked into a glass capillary in the longitudinal x-direction, correction with the device increased the fluorescence intensity by 2.2 times compared to that of the aberrated image. In addition, the x-, y-, and z-widths of the bead image were reduced to 75%, 53%, and 40%, respectively. Our device successfully corrected several asymmetric aberrations to improve the fluorescent signal and spatial resolution, and might be useful for observing various biospecimens.

  4. Visualization and quantification of dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    1997-07-01

    Dentin was visualized using a new fluorescence technique and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thirty extracted human teeth showing no clinical signs of caries were investigated. All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approximately 200 micrometers thickness and sections were subjected to different pretreatment conditions as follows: vacuum only, ultrasonication only, sodium hypochlorite only, sodium hypochlorite and vacuum, sodium hypochlorite and ultrasonication, and a combination of sodium hypochlorite, vacuum, and ultrasonication. Some samples were left untreated to serve as control. Following pretreatment, rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye was used for staining at concentrations ranging from 10-3 to 10-7 M for 1 to 24 h at pH 6.0, 6.5, or 7.4. Optical staining occurred at pH 7.4 and concentrations >= 10-5 M over 3 h or longer. Surface images obtained using confocal laser scanning microscopy were similar to those observed by scanning electron microscopy without the need for sample- altering conventional scanning electron microscope preparation techniques. Subsurface imaging to a depth of approximately 60 micrometers was achieved using confocal laser microscope techniques. This fluorescence technique offers a useful new alternative for visualization and quantification of dentin.

  5. Laser-scanning Doppler photoacoustic microscopy based on temporal correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-05-01

    We present a methodology to measure absolute flow velocity using laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy. To obtain the Doppler angle, the angle between ultrasonic detection axis and flow direction, we extracted the distances between the transducer and three adjacent scanning points along the flow and repeatedly applied the law of cosines. To measure flow velocity along the ultrasonic detection axis, we calculated the time shift between two consecutive photoacoustic waves at the same scanning point, then converted the time shift to velocity according to the sound velocity and time interval between two laser illuminations. We verified our method by imaging flow phantoms.

  6. Optics designs and system MTF for laser scanning displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urey, Hakan; Nestorovic, Ned; Ng, Baldwin S.; Gross, Abraham A.

    1999-07-01

    The Virtual Retinal DisplayTM (VRDTM) technology is a new display technology being developed at Microvision Inc. The displayed image is scanned onto the viewer's retina using low- power red, green, and blue light sources. Microvision's proprietary miniaturized scanner designs make VRD system very well suited for head-mounted displays. In this paper we discuss some of the advantages of the VRD technology, various ocular designs for HMD and other applications, and details of constructing a system MTF budget for laser scanning systems that includes electronics, modulators, scanners, and optics.

  7. Registration Procedures for Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Geomorphologic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, B. D.; Kayen, R.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Terrestrial based laser scanning, from either vehicle or tripod mounts allows the collection of geomorphologic data at previously unprecedented detail and volume. However, despite the ease of collecting this data in many settings, post-processing datasets collected without laser-visible reflectors within individual scans can lead to difficulties in both registration and georeferencing procedures. We have been actively involved in gathering data sets from a number of different environments and have been developing various techniques to post-process the data using surface registration methods. These methods use the point cloud or model surface to find a best-fit of the three-dimensional terrain. Recently, we have collected laser scan data of levee breaches in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, a glacial cirque basin in the Canadian Rockies, a deep-seated landslide mass in Ventura County, California, rapidly evolving coastal bluffs in Central California, and sand bars and archeological sites in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. In each of these projects, setting up accurately surveyed reflectors was impractical due to the locations dynamic and fairly inaccessible setting. Robust surface registration procedures were therefore needed to provide accurate terrain models. We have used laser scanning results from these projects to assess the efficiency of the various post- processing methodologies for obtaining final registered and georeferenced point clouds and surface models. We compared registration results obtained both with and without accurate GPS coordinates for the laser scanner origin (Ventura and coastal landslides), use of a supporting total station unit (Grand Canyon), and collection of DGPS data on targets imaged in the LIDAR data after the scanning process (Katrina Levees). In many of these settings, the model fit improved by four times, from a root mean square error of 20 cm to 5cm when accurately surveyed coordinates were utilized for the laser scan

  8. Monitoring stream bluff erosion using repeat terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, G.; Gran, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology provides high-resolution topographic data that can be used to detect geomorphic change in fluvial environments. In this study, we utilize successive terrestrial laser scans to investigate the relationship between peak flow rates and stream bluff erosion in the Amity Creek watershed in Duluth, Minnesota. We also combine TLS scan results with bluff inventories from airborne lidar to estimate the volume of sediment erosion from bluffs in the watershed, which is an important source of fine sediment contributing to the creek's turbidity impairment. We selected nine study bluffs to conduct terrestrial laser scans on after all significant flood events over a two-year time period. The study employs a Faro Focus 3D phase-shift laser to collect data. Post-processing of the TLS-point cloud data sets involves: (1) removal of vegetation and objects other than the erosional surface of interest; (2) decimation of the point cloud in PC Tools and extraction of zmin values to produce a data set manageable in GIS; (3) creation of a bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) for each set of scans using ArcMap; and (4) utilization of Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) software to generate DEMs of Difference (DODs) from subsequent terrestrial laser scans. Preliminary results from three flooding events indicate significant erosional activity at all field sites. Slumps were observed at two bluffs following spring melt and freeze/thaw cycling. Two major precipitation events in late spring and early summer provided a unique opportunity to observe the impact of extreme high flow events on bluff erosion throughout the watershed using TLS technology. 4.75 inches of intermittent rain over a six-day period in late May 2012 (May 23-28) resulted in slumping at many bluffs and one major failure. The ≥100-year flood that occurred on June 19-20 (7.25 inches), 2012 was powerful enough to induce considerable channel change. Slumps occurred at six study sites

  9. Automatic road edge detection from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabo, Carlos; García-Cortés, Silverio; Menéndez-Díaz, Agustín.; Ordoñez, Celestino

    2016-11-01

    In this article we present an algorithm for automatic road edge detection from MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning) data. The method takes advantage of linear structures derived from MLS point clouds. These lines are extracted from the point cloud and grouped following geometric restrictions. Then, the outlines of the groups are extracted as road edges. Finally, a moving window filter is applied to those points in order to remove outliers and delineate the road edge. The method was tested on an 800m stretch of road, and the results were checked through visual inspection. Correctness and completeness were 99.1% and 97.5%, respectively.

  10. Visualisation of urban airborne laser scanning data with occlusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinks, Tommy; Carr, Hamish; Gharibi, Hamid; Laefer, Debra F.

    2015-06-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) was introduced to provide rapid, high resolution scans of landforms for computational processing. More recently, ALS has been adapted for scanning urban areas. The greater complexity of urban scenes necessitates the development of novel methods to exploit urban ALS to best advantage. This paper presents occlusion images: a novel technique that exploits the geometric complexity of the urban environment to improve visualisation of small details for better feature recognition. The algorithm is based on an inversion of traditional occlusion techniques.

  11. Wedge-Filtering of Geomorphologic Terrestrial Laser Scan Data

    PubMed Central

    Panholzer, Helmut; Prokop, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning is of increasing importance for surveying and hazard assessments. Digital terrain models are generated using the resultant data to analyze surface processes. In order to determine the terrain surface as precisely as possible, it is often necessary to filter out points that do not represent the terrain surface. Examples are vegetation, vehicles, and animals. Filtering in mountainous terrain is more difficult than in other topography types. Here, existing automatic filtering solutions are not acceptable, because they are usually designed for airborne scan data. The present article describes a method specifically suitable for filtering terrestrial laser scanning data. This method is based on the direct line of sight between the scanner and the measured point and the assumption that no other surface point can be located in the area above this connection line. This assumption is only true for terrestrial laser data, but not for airborne data. We present a comparison of the wedge filtering to a modified inverse distance filtering method (IDWMO) filtered point cloud data. Both methods use manually filtered surfaces as reference. The comparison shows that the mean error and root–mean-square-error (RSME) between the results and the manually filtered surface of the two methods are similar. A significantly higher number of points of the terrain surface could be preserved, however, using the wedge-filtering approach. Therefore, we suggest that wedge-filtering should be integrated as a further parameter into already existing filtering processes, but is not suited as a standalone solution so far. PMID:23429548

  12. Categorisation of full waveform data provided by laser scanning devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Andreas; Pfennigbauer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    In 2004, a laser scanner device for commercial airborne laser scanning applications, the RIEGL LMS-Q560, was introduced to the market, making use of a radical alternative approach to the traditional analogue signal detection and processing schemes found in LIDAR instruments so far: digitizing the echo signals received by the instrument for every laser pulse and analysing these echo signals off-line in a so-called full waveform analysis in order to retrieve almost all information contained in the echo signal using transparent algorithms adaptable to specific applications. In the field of laser scanning the somewhat unspecific term "full waveform data" has since been established. We attempt a categorisation of the different types of the full waveform data found in the market. We discuss the challenges in echo digitization and waveform analysis from an instrument designer's point of view and we will address the benefits to be gained by using this technique, especially with respect to the so-called multi-target capability of pulsed time-of-flight LIDAR instruments.

  13. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X.; Wang, C.; Wan, Y. P.; Khuon, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS) technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009). This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project's data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  14. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  15. Land-Based Mobile Laser Scanning Systems: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, I.; González-Jorge, H.; Arias, P.; Armesto, J.

    2011-09-01

    Mobile mapping has been using various photogrammetric techniques for many years. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile mapping systems using laser scanners available in the market, partially because of the improvement in GNSS/INS performance for direct georeferencing. In this article, some of the most important land-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are reviewed. Firstly, the main characteristics of MLS systems vs. airborne (ALS) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) systems are compared. Secondly, a short overview of the mobile mapping technology is also provided so that the reader can fully grasp the complexity and operation of these devices. As we put forward in this paper, a comparison of different systems is briefly carried out regarding specifications provided by the manufacturers. Focuses on the current research are also addressed with emphasis on the practical applications of these systems. Most of them have been utilized for data collection on road infrastructures or building façades. This article shows that MLS technology is nowadays well established and proven, since the demand has grown to the point that there are several systems suppliers offering their products to satisfy this particular market.

  16. Automating laser scanning of 3D surfaces for reverse engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Vincent H.; Bradley, Colin H.; Vickers, Geoffrey W.

    1997-12-01

    Application of current 3-D laser scanning systems to reverse engineering is limited by two obstacles. The meticulous guidance of the laser scanner over the surface of the object being scanned and the segmentation of the cloud data which is collected by the laser scanner. Presently, both obstacles are being manually solved. The guidance of the laser scanning sensor at the correct surface to sensor distance is dependent on operator judgement and the segmentation of the collected data is reliant on the user to manually define surface boundaries on a computer screen. By applying a 2-D CCD camera, both of these problems can be resolved. Depth information on the location of the object surface can be derived from a pair of stereo images from the CCD camera. Using this depth information, the scanner path can be automatically calculated. Segmentation of the object surface can be accomplished by employing a Kohonen neural network into the CCD image. Successful segmentation of the image is conditional on the locations selected to start neural nodes as well as the prevention of the neuron connectors from bleeding onto neighboring patches. Thus the CCD camera allows for the automatic path planning of the laser scanner as well as the segmentation of the surface into patches defined along its natural boundaries.

  17. A semi-automatic 3D laser scan system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-11-01

    Digital 3D models are now used everywhere, from traditional fields of industrial design, artistic design, to heritage conservation. Although laser scan is very useful to get densely samples of the objects, nowadays, such an instrument is expensive and always need to be connected to a computer with stable power supply, which prevent it from usage for fieldworks. In this paper, a new semi-automatic 3D laser scan method is proposed using two line laser sources. The planes projected from the laser sources are orthogonal, one of which is fixed relative to the camera, and the other can be rotated along a settled axis. Before scanning, the system must be calibrated, from which the parameters of the camera, the position of the fixed laser plane and the settled axis are introduced. In scanning process, the fixed laser plane and the camera form a conventional structured light system, and the 3d positions of the intersection curves of the fixed laser plane with the object can be computed. The other laser plane is rotated manually or mechanically, and its position can be determined from the cross point intersecting with the fixed laser plane on the object, so the coordinates of sweeping points can be obtained. The new system can be used without a computer (The data can be processed later), which make it suitable for fieldworks. A scanning case is given in the end.

  18. Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by afault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2004-01-02

    Brittle deformation in granite can generate a fracture system with different patterns. Detailed fracture analyses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales, together with physical property data from a drill-core, are used to classify the effects of reverse fault deformation in four domains: (1) undeformed granite, (2) fractured granite with cataclastic seams, (3) fractured granite from the damage zone, and (4) foliated cataclasite from the core of the fault. Intact samples from two orthogonal directions, horizontal (H) and vertical (V), from the four domains indicate a developing fracture anisotropy toward the fault, which is highly developed in the damage zone. As a specific illustration of this phenomenon, resin impregnation, using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) technique is applied to visualize the fracture anisotropy developed in the Toki Granite, Japan. As a result, microcrack networks have been observed to develop in H sections and elongate open cracks in V sections, suggesting that flow pathways can be determined by deformation.

  19. Computer-Assisted Laser Scanning and Video Microscopy for Analysis of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Soil, Sediment, and Feces

    PubMed Central

    Anguish, L. J.; Ghiorse, W. C.

    1997-01-01

    A computer-assisted laser scanning microscope equipped for confocal laser scanning and color video microscopy was used to examine Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in two agricultural soils, a barnyard sediment, and calf fecal samples. An agar smear technique was developed for enumerating oocysts in soil and barnyard sediment samples. Enhanced counting efficiency and sensitivity (detection limit, 5.2 x 10(sup2) oocysts(middot)g [dry weight](sup-1)) were achieved by using a semiautomatic counting procedure and confocal laser scanning microscopy to enumerate immunostained oocysts and fragments of oocysts in the barnyard sediment. An agarose-acridine orange mounting procedure was developed for high-resolution confocal optical sectioning of oocysts in soil. Stereo images of serial optical sections revealed the three-dimensional spatial relationships between immunostained oocysts and the acridine orange-stained soil matrix material. In these hydrated, pyrophosphate-dispersed soil preparations, oocysts were not found to be attached to soil particles. A fluorogenic dye permeability assay for oocyst viability (A. T. Campbell, L. J. Robertson, and H. V. Smith, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3488-3493, 1992) was modified by adding an immunostaining step after application of the fluorogenic dyes propidium iodide and 4(prm1),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Comparison of conventional color epifluorescence and differential interference contrast images on one video monitor with comparable black-and-white laser-scanned confocal images on a second monitor allowed for efficient location and interpretation of fluorescently stained oocysts in the soil matrix. This multi-imaging procedure facilitated the interpretation of the viability assay results by overcoming the uncertainties caused by matrix interference and background fluorescence. PMID:16535523

  20. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  1. Road Orthophoto/dtm Generation from Mobile Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, B.; Papelard, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a pipeline to produce road orthophoto and DTM from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS). For the ortho, modern laser scanners provide a reflectance information allowing for high quality grayscale images, at a much finer resolution than aerial photography can offer. For DTM, MLS offers a much higher accuracy and density than aerial products. This increased precision and resolution leverages new applications for both ortho and DEM. The first task is to filter ground vs non ground, then an interpolation is conducted to build image tiles from the filtered points. Finally, multiple layers are registered and blended to allow for seamless fusion. Our proposed approach achieves high quality products and scaling up is demonstrated.

  2. Adaptive optics for confocal laser scanning microscopy with adjustable pinhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Han Woong; van Royen, Martin E.; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Verhaegen, Michel; Schitter, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The pinhole plays an important role in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for adaptive optics (AO) as well as in imaging, where the size of the pinhole denotes a trade-off between out-of-focus rejection and wavefront distortion. This contribution proposes an AO system for a commercial CLSM with an adjustable square pinhole to cope with such a trade-off. The proposed adjustable pinhole enables to calibrate the AO system and to evaluate the imaging performance. Experimental results with fluorescence beads on the coverslip and at a depth of 40 μm in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell spheroid demonstrate that the proposed AO system can improve the image quality by the proposed calibration method. The proposed pinhole intensity ratio also indicates the image improvement by the AO correction in intensity as well as resolution.

  3. Point-to-plane registration of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Darion; Bethel, James; Crawford, Melba

    2012-08-01

    The registration of pairs of Terrestrial Laser Scanning data (TLS) is an integral precursor to 3D data analysis. Of specific interest in this research work is the class of approaches that is considered to be fine registration and which does not require any targets or tie points. This paper presents a pairwise fine registration approach called P2P that is formulated using the General Least Squares adjustment model. Given some initial registration parameters, the proposed P2P approach utilizes the scanned points and estimated planar features of both scans, along with their stochastic properties. These quantities are used to determine the optimum registration parameters in the least squares sense. The proposed P2P approach was tested on both simulated and real TLS data, and experimental results showed it to be four times more accurate than the registration approach of Chen and Medioni (1991).

  4. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging. PMID:23162708

  5. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  6. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  7. Urban Tree Classification Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Zs.; Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria). The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries) and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas) on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  8. Cell depth imaging by point laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with an optical disk pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Tai-Ting; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Tiao, Golden

    2015-09-01

    A compact, cost-effective, and position-addressable digital laser scanning microscopy (DLSM) instrument is made using a commercially available Blu-ray disc read-only memory (BD-ROM) pickup head. Fluorescent cell images captured by DLSM have resolutions of 0.38 µm. Because of the position-addressable function, multispectral fluorescence cell images are captured using the same sample slide with different excitation laser sources. Specially designed objective lenses with the same working distance as the image-capturing beam are used for the different excitation laser sources. By accurately controlling the tilting angles of the sample slide or by moving the collimator lens of the image-capturing beam, the fluorescence cell images along different depth positions of the sample are obtained. Thus, z-section images with micrometer-depth resolutions are achievable.

  9. Estimation of big sagebrush leaf area index with terrestrial laser scanning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A remote-sensing technique is need to bridge the gap between airborne laser scanning (ALS) and ground-based field techniques for accurately assessing leaf area index (LAI) in sparsely vegetated landscapes like sagebrush steppe. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to measure structural variable...

  10. A line segment based registration method for Terrestrial Laser Scanning point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Ming; Lin, Yangbin; Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposed a 3d line segment based registration method for terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. The 3D line segment is adopted to describe the point cloud data and reduce geometric complexity. After that, we introduce a framework for registration. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method for rigid transformations in the presence of terrestrial laser scanning point cloud.

  11. Filtering method for 3D laser scanning point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Wang, Li; Hao, Yuncai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the hardware and software of the three-dimensional model acquisition, three-dimensional laser scanning technology is utilized in various aspects, especially in space exploration. The point cloud filter is very important before using the data. In the paper, considering both the processing quality and computing speed, an improved mean-shift point cloud filter method is proposed. Firstly, by analyze the relevance of the normal vector between the upcoming processing point and the near points, the iterative neighborhood of the mean-shift is selected dynamically, then the high frequency noise is constrained. Secondly, considering the normal vector of the processing point, the normal vector is updated. Finally, updated position is calculated for each point, then each point is moved in the normal vector according to the updated position. The experimental results show that the large features are retained, at the same time, the small sharp features are also existed for different size and shape of objects, so the target feature information is protected precisely. The computational complexity of the proposed method is not high, it can bring high precision results with fast speed, so it is very suitable for space application. It can also be utilized in civil, such as large object measurement, industrial measurement, car navigation etc. In the future, filter with the help of point strength will be further exploited.

  12. Quantifying Snow Volume Uncertainty from Repeat Terrestrial Laser Scanning Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadomski, P. J.; Hartzell, P. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; Glennie, C. L.; Deems, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) systems are capable of providing rapid, high density, 3D topographic measurements of snow surfaces from increasing standoff distances. By differencing snow surface with snow free measurements within a common scene, snow depths and volumes can be estimated. These data can support operational water management decision-making when combined with measured or modeled snow densities to estimate basin water content, evaluate in-situ data, or drive operational hydrologic models. In addition, change maps from differential TLS scans can also be used to support avalanche control operations to quantify loading patterns for both pre-control planning and post-control assessment. However, while methods for computing volume from TLS point cloud data are well documented, a rigorous quantification of the volumetric uncertainty has yet to be presented. Using repeat TLS data collected at the Arapahoe Basin Ski Area in Summit County, Colorado, we demonstrate the propagation of TLS point measurement and cloud registration uncertainties into 3D covariance matrices at the point level. The point covariances are then propagated through a volume computation to arrive at a single volume uncertainty value. Results from two volume computation methods are compared and the influence of data voids produced by occlusions examined.

  13. Laser Scanning System for Pressure and Temperature Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1997-01-01

    Acquiring pressure maps of aerodynamic surfaces is very important for improving and validating the performance of aerospace vehicles. Traditional pressure measurements are taken with pressure taps embedded in the model surface that are connected to transducers. While pressure taps allow highly accurate measurements to be acquired, they do have several drawbacks. Pressure taps do not give good spatial resolution due to the need for individual pressure tubes, compounded by limited space available inside models. Also, building a model proves very costly if taps are needed because of the large amount of labor necessary to drill, connect and test each one. The typical cost to install one tap is about $200. Recently, a new method for measuring pressure on aerodynamic surfaces has been developed utilizing a technology known as pressure sensitive paints (PSP). Using PSP, pressure distributions can be acquired optically with high spatial resolution and simple model preparation. Flow structures can be easily visualized using PSP, but are missed using low spatial resolution arrays of pressure taps. PSP even allows pressure distributions to be found on rotating machinery where previously this has been extremely difficult or even impossible. The goal of this research is to develop a laser scanning system for use with pressure sensitive paints that allows accurate pressure measurements to be obtained on various aerodynamic surfaces ranging from wind tunnel models to high speed jet engine compressor blades.

  14. Flow cytometric and laser scanning microscopic approaches in epigenetics research.

    PubMed

    Szekvolgyi, Lorant; Imre, Laszlo; Minh, Doan Xuan Quang; Hegedus, Eva; Bacso, Zsolt; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of epigenetics has been transformed in recent years by the advance of technological possibilities based primarily on a powerful tool, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). However, in many cases, the detection of epigenetic changes requires methods providing a high-throughput (HTP) platform. Cytometry has opened a novel approach for the quantitative measurement of molecules, including PCR products, anchored to appropriately addressed microbeads (Pataki et al. 2005. Cytometry 68, 45-52). Here we show selected examples for the utility of two different cytometry-based platforms of epigenetic analysis: ChIP-on-beads, a flow-cytometric test of local histone modifications (Szekvolgyi et al. 2006. Cytometry 69, 1086-1091), and the laser scanning cytometry-based measurement of global epigenetic modifications that might help predict clinical behavior in different pathological conditions. We anticipate that such alternative tools may shortly become indispensable in clinical practice, translating the systematic screening of epigenetic tags from basic research into routine diagnostics of HTP demand.

  15. Detection of windthrown trees using airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Mattias; Holmgren, Johan; Fransson, Johan E. S.; Olsson, Håkan

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a method has been developed for the detection of windthrown trees under a forest canopy, using the difference between two elevation models created from the same high density (65 points/m2) airborne laser scanning data. The difference image showing objects near the ground was created by subtracting a standard digital elevation model (DEM) from a more detailed DEM created using an active surface algorithm. Template matching was used to automatically detect windthrown trees in the difference image. The 54 ha study area is located in hemi-boreal forest in southern Sweden (Lat. 58°29‧ N, Long. 13°38‧ E) and is dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies) with 3.5% deciduous species (mostly birch) and 1.7% Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). The result was evaluated using 651 field measured windthrown trees. At individual tree level, the detection rate was 38% with a commission error of 36%. Much higher detection rates were obtained for taller trees; 89% of the trees taller than 27 m were detected. For pine the individual tree detection rate was 82%, most likely due to the more easily visible stem and lack of branches. When aggregating the results to 40 m square grid cells, at least one tree was detected in 77% of the grid cells which according to the field measurements contained one or more windthrown trees.

  16. Systematic Effects in Laser Scanning and Visualization by Confidence Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Karl-Rudolf; Brockmann, Jan Martin

    2016-12-01

    A new method for dealing with systematic effects in laser scanning and visualizing them by confidence regions is derived. The standard deviations of the systematic effects are obtained by repeatedly measuring three-dimensional coordinates by the laser scanner. In addition, autocovariance and cross-covariance functions are computed by the repeated measurements and give the correlations of the systematic effects. The normal distribution for the measurements and the multivariate uniform distribution for the systematic effects are applied to generate random variates for the measurements and random variates for the measurements plus systematic effects. Monte Carlo estimates of the expectations and the covariance matrix of the measurements with systematic effects are computed. The densities for the confidence ellipsoid for the measurements and the confidence region for the measurements with systematic effects are obtained by relative frequencies. They only depend on the size of the rectangular volume elements for which the densities are determined. The problem of sorting the densities is solved by sorting distances together with the densities. This allows a visualization of the confidence ellipsoid for the measurements and the confidence region for the measurements with systematic effects.

  17. Footprint Map Partitioning Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, B.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays many cities and countries are creating their 3D building models for a better daily management and smarter decision making. The newly created 3D models are required to be consistent with existing 2D footprint maps. Thereby the 2D maps are usually combined with height data for the task of 3D reconstruction. Many buildings are often composed by parts that are discontinuous over height. Building parts can be reconstructed independently and combined into a complete building. Therefore, most of the state-of-the-art work on 3D building reconstruction first decomposes a footprint map into parts. However, those works usually change the footprint maps for easier partitioning and cannot detect building parts that are fully inside the footprint polygon. In order to solve those problems, we introduce two methodologies, one more dependent on height data, and the other one more dependent on footprints. We also experimentally evaluate the two methodologies and compare their advantages and disadvantages. The experiments use Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data and two vector maps, one with 1:10,000 scale and another one with 1:500 scale.

  18. Semiquantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy applied to marine invertebrate ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Chandler, G Thomas; Volz, David C

    2004-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents a powerful, but largely unexplored ecotoxicologic tool for rapidly assessing in vivo effects of toxicants on marine invertebrate embryo quality and development. We describe here a new semiquantitative CLSM approach for assessing relative yolk quantity in marine invertebrate embryos (harpacticoid copepods) produced by parents reared from hatching to adult in the polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon chrysene. This method is based on fluorogenic labeling of embryo yolk and subsequent statistical analysis of areal pixel intensities over multiple Z-series using a general linear model (GLM)-nested analysis of variance. The fluorescent yolk-labeling method described here was able to detect statistically significant differences in yolk concentrations in marine copepod (Amphiascus tenuiremis) eggs or embryos from females exposed to ultraviolet light and chrysene-contaminated sediments. Yolk intensities in embryos from females cultured throughout their life cycles in clean sediments were statistically identical with or without UV exposure. In contrast, yolk intensities in embryos of females cultured throughout their life cycle in chrysene-contaminated sediments were significantly higher in the non-UV-exposed treatment with chrysene at 2500 ng/g sediment (65.7% higher) and the UV-exposed treatment with chrysene at 500 ng/g sediment (76.6% higher).

  19. Use of laser scanning cytometry to study tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, S; Wang, E; Panelli, M; Rossi, C R; Marincola, F M

    2003-04-01

    The study of phenomena occurring in the tumor microenvironment is a challenging task because of technical difficulties, particularly when dealing with hypocellular specimens. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a new laboratory technology that has been recently introduced to overcome the limitations of other traditional technologies. By combining the properties and the advantages of flow cytometry (FC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), LSC allows the investigator to obtain objective information on DNA content, protein expression and cellular localization is combination with morphological features. It has been already shown that LSC results are reliable compared to more traditional technologies, and its implementation in the clinical routine is under way. Its use in oncology, which is rapidly expanding, spans from apoptosis analysis to DNA content quantitation and tumor cell phenotyping. Here we describe the technology underlying this novel fluorescence-based device, review its use in oncology by dissecting the phenomena occurring in the tumor microenvironment and propose its application for the immunological follow-up of malignant lesions undergoing immunotherapeutic manipulation.

  20. Hierarchical extraction of urban objects from mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Dong, Zhen; Zhao, Gang; Dai, Wenxia

    2015-01-01

    Point clouds collected in urban scenes contain a huge number of points (e.g., billions), numerous objects with significant size variability, complex and incomplete structures, and variable point densities, raising great challenges for the automated extraction of urban objects in the field of photogrammetry, computer vision, and robotics. This paper addresses these challenges by proposing an automated method to extract urban objects robustly and efficiently. The proposed method generates multi-scale supervoxels from 3D point clouds using the point attributes (e.g., colors, intensities) and spatial distances between points, and then segments the supervoxels rather than individual points by combining graph based segmentation with multiple cues (e.g., principal direction, colors) of the supervoxels. The proposed method defines a set of rules for merging segments into meaningful units according to types of urban objects and forms the semantic knowledge of urban objects for the classification of objects. Finally, the proposed method extracts and classifies urban objects in a hierarchical order ranked by the saliency of the segments. Experiments show that the proposed method is efficient and robust for extracting buildings, streetlamps, trees, telegraph poles, traffic signs, cars, and enclosures from mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds, with an overall accuracy of 92.3%.

  1. Quantification of telomere length by FISH and laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John E.; Sahin, Ergun; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.; Protopopov, Alexei I.

    2008-02-01

    Telomeres play a critical role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. Telomere erosion, coupled with loss of DNA damage checkpoint function, results in genomic instability that promotes the development of cancer. The critical role of telomere dynamics in cancer has motivated the development of technologies designed to monitor telomere reserves in a highly quantitative and high-throughput manner in humans and model organisms. To this end, we have adapted and modified two established technologies, telomere-FISH and laser scanning cytometry. Specifically, we have produced a number of enhancements to the iCys LSC (CompuCyte) package including software updates, use of 60X dry objectives, and increased spatial resolution by 0.2 um size of stage steps. In addition, the 633 nm HeNe laser was replaced with a 532 nm green diode laser to better match the viewing options. Utilization of telomere-deficient mouse cells with short dysfunctional telomeres and matched telomerase reconstituted cultures demonstrated significantly higher mean integral specific fluorescence values for mTR transfectants relative to empty vector controls: 4.485M vs. 1.362M (p<0.0001). Histograms of average telomere intensities for individual cells were obtained and demonstrated intercellular heterogeneity in telomere lengths. The validation of the approach derives from a strong correlation between iCys LSC values and Southern blotting. This validated method greatly increases our experimental throughput and objectivity.

  2. Laser-scan cytometry: a new tool for clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hambsch, Joerg; Hennig, Bert; Nuesse, Michael; Schmid, Thomas; Schneider, Peter; Zotz, Rainer; Tarnok, Attila

    1999-04-01

    The common usage of flow cytometry (FCM) in research and clinical diagnostic is limited by the lack visualizing the fluorescence labelled cells. The Laser Scanning Cytometer (LSC) enables multicolor cytometric measurements on a slide featuring relocation of single cells for further investigation via brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, it is possible to capture these images for documentation. In a FISH application, the LSC was successfully used for automated scoring techniqeus for evaluating the frequency of aneuploid sperm in humans and mice. In just 30 minutes, we were able to acquire more than 15,000 sperms, a task which normally takes more than a day. After relocation, genetic defects were identified and confirmed via fluorescence microscopy. In an on going study, we investigate via the LSC the remain of a new radiopaque material for high resolution echocardiography in the blood circulation. At first the result exhibited that the radiopaque material is endocysed by leukocytes just after application but is still detectable via echocardiography for up to 40 minutes. In conclusion, with the additional data acquisition by the LSC, it is possible to perform further detailed information from very small samples. Therefore, we are working up to now on developing new methods to introduce the LSC in our clinical diagnostic of neonates undergoing cardiac surgery.

  3. Three-dimensional dental cast analyzing system using laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, T; Motohashi, N; Tominaga, R; Iwata, K

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the outline of our newly developed three-dimensional dental cast analyzing system with laser scanning, and its preliminary clinical applications. The system is composed of a measuring device with a slit-ray laser projector and two sets of coupled charged devised video cameras, an image processing unit, a 16-bit personal computer as a controller, and an engineering workstation as a post processor. The dental cast is projected and scanned with a slit-ray laser beam. The raster coordinates of the target are determined with an image processor. Triangulation is applied to determine the location of each point. Generation of three-dimensional graphics of the dental cast takes approximately 40 minutes. About 90,000 sets of X, Y, Z coordinates are stored in the main memory of the microcomputer. The measurement error is less than 0.05 mm. Besides the conventional linear and angular measurements of the dental cast, we are also able to demonstrate the size of the palatal surface area and the volume of the oral cavity. The advantage of this system is that it facilitates the otherwise complicated and time-consuming mock surgery necessary for treatment planning in orthognathic surgery.

  4. Pedestrian Detection by Laser Scanning and Depth Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsi, A.; Lovas, T.; Molnar, B.; Somogyi, A.; Igazvolgyi, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian flow is much less regulated and controlled compared to vehicle traffic. Estimating flow parameters would support many safety, security or commercial applications. Current paper discusses a method that enables acquiring information on pedestrian movements without disturbing and changing their motion. Profile laser scanner and depth camera have been applied to capture the geometry of the moving people as time series. Procedures have been developed to derive complex flow parameters, such as count, volume, walking direction and velocity from laser scanned point clouds. Since no images are captured from the faces of pedestrians, no privacy issues raised. The paper includes accuracy analysis of the estimated parameters based on video footage as reference. Due to the dense point clouds, detailed geometry analysis has been conducted to obtain the height and shoulder width of pedestrians and to detect whether luggage has been carried or not. The derived parameters support safety (e.g. detecting critical pedestrian density in mass events), security (e.g. detecting prohibited baggage in endangered areas) and commercial applications (e.g. counting pedestrians at all entrances/exits of a shopping mall).

  5. Multi-Pass Approach for Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, J.; Eckels, R.; Evers, M.; Singh, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS) has been utilised for an increasing number of corridor surveys. Current MTLS surveys require that many targets be placed along the corridor to monitor the MTLS trajectory's accuracy. These targets enable surveyors to directly evaluate the magnitude of GNSS errors at regular intervals and can also be used to adjust the trajectory to the survey control. However, this "Multi-Target" approach (MTA) is an onerous task that can significantly reduce efficiency. It also is inconvenient to the travelling public, as lanes are often blocked and traffic slowed to permit surveyors to work safely along the road corridor. This paper introduces a "Multi-Pass" approach (MPA), which minimises the number of targets required for monitoring the GNSS-controlled trajectory while still maintaining strict engineering accuracies. MPA uses the power of multiple, independent MTLS passes with different GNSS constellations to generate a "Control Polyline" from the point cloud for the corridor. The Control Polyline can be considered as a statistically valid survey measurement and be incorporated in a network adjustment to strengthen a control network by identifying outliers. Results from a test survey at the MTLS course maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  6. Multispectral Analysis of Indigenous Rock Art Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, B.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral analysis is a widely used technique in the photogrammetric and remote sensing industry. The use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in combination with imagery is becoming increasingly common, with its applications spreading to a wider range of fields. Both systems benefit from being a non-contact technique that can be used to accurately capture data regarding the target surface. Although multispectral analysis is actively performed within the spatial sciences field, its extent of application within an archaeological context has been limited. This study effectively aims to apply the multispectral techniques commonly used, to a remote Indigenous site that contains an extensive gallery of aging rock art. The ultimate goal for this research is the development of a systematic procedure that could be applied to numerous similar sites for the purpose of heritage preservation and research. The study consisted of extensive data capture of the rock art gallery using two different TLS systems and a digital SLR camera. The data was combined into a common 2D reference frame that allowed for standard image processing to be applied. An unsupervised k-means classifier was applied to the multiband images to detect the different types of rock art present. The result was unsatisfactory as the subsequent classification accuracy was relatively low. The procedure and technique does however show potential and further testing with different classification algorithms could possibly improve the result significantly.

  7. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  8. Automatic analysis for neuron by confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Kouhei; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Mataga, Nobuko; Hensh, Takao K.; Taki, Katuhiko

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that recognizes both the macro- and microscopic configurations of nerve cells and automatically performs the necessary 3-D measurements and functional classification of spines. The acquisition of 3-D images of cranial nerves has been enabled by the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope, although the highly accurate 3-D measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves and their classification based on their configurations have not yet been accomplished. In this study, in order to obtain highly accurate measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves, existing positions of spines were predicted by the 2-D image processing of tomographic images. Next, based on the positions that were predicted on the 2-D images, the positions and configurations of the spines were determined more accurately by 3-D image processing of the volume data. We report the successful construction of an automatic analysis system that uses a coarse-to-fine technique to analyze the microscopic structures of cranial nerves with high speed and accuracy by combining 2-D and 3-D image analyses.

  9. Intracellular phthalocyanine localization: confocal laser scanning microscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaeva, Elena B.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Leeuwen, A. G.

    1994-02-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) are promising second-generation photosensitizers for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. We report on the tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS4) localization in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In these cells AlPcS4 was found in granules surrounding Golgi apparatus and in the peripheral cytoplasmic region. Peripheral Pc-containing granules partially coincided with the acidic cellular compartments. The effect of irradiation with light on Pc intracellular distribution was also studied. In the Pc-free medium disruption of some Pc- containing granules was observed followed by appearance of Pc fluorescence in the cell plasma membrane, the nuclear envelope, and the near-nuclear region. When cells were irradiated in the presence of Pc in external medium a drastic increase of membrane permeability to Pc was observed, followed by Pc binding the cell plasma membrane, nuclear envelope, and some structures in the cytoplasm. Diffusive Pc fluorescence in the nucleus was also observed. The implication of observed Pc redistribution caused by irradiation with light for the PDT protocol is discussed.

  10. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  11. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of interphase cell nuclei with laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boecker, Wilfried; Radtke, Thomas; Streffer, Christian

    1998-10-01

    During the past decade 3D image processing has become an important key component in biological research mainly due to two different developments. The first is based on an optical instrument, the so-called confocal laser scanning microscope, allowing optical sectioning of the biological specimen. The second is a biological preparatory method, the so-called FISH-technique (Fluorescence-In-Situ- Hybridization), allowing labeling of certain cellular and sub-cellular compartments with highly specific fluorescent dyes. Both methods make it possible to investigate the 3D biological framework within cells and nuclei. Image acquisition with confocal laser scanning microscopy must deal with different limits of resolution along and across the optical axis. Although lateral resolution is about 0.7 times better than in non-confocal arrangements, axial resolution is more than 3 - 4 times poorer than that of the lateral (depending on the pinhole size). For 3D reconstruction it is desirable to improve axial resolution in order to provide nearly identical image information across the 3D specimen space. This presentation will give an overview of some of the most popular restoration and deblurring algorithms used in 3D image microscopy. After 3D image restoration, segmentation of certain details of the cell structure is usually the next step in image processing. We compared two different kinds of algorithms for segmentation of chromosome territories in interphase cell nuclei. One is based on Mathematical Morphology, the other on Split & Merge methods. The segmented image regions provided the basis for chromosome domain reconstruction as well as for regional localization for subsequent quantitative measurements. As a result the chromatin density within certain chromosome domains as well as some terminal DNA sequences (telomere signals) could be measured.

  13. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenda, Grzegorz; Uznański, Andrzej; Strach, Michał; Lewińska, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile), but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones). Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  14. Antecedents of two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, Barry R; So, Peter T C

    2004-01-01

    In 1931, Maria Göppert-Mayer published her doctoral dissertation on the theory of two-photon quantum transitions (two-photon absorption and emission) in atoms. This report describes and analyzes the theoretical and experimental work on nonlinear optics, in particular two-photon excitation processes, that occurred between 1931 and the experimental implementation of two-photon excitation microscopy by the group of Webb in 1990. In addition to Maria Göppert-Mayer's theoretical work, the invention of the laser has a key role in the development of two-photon microscopy. Nonlinear effects were previously observed in different frequency domains (low-frequency electric and magnetic fields and magnetization), but the high electric field strength afforded by lasers was necessary to demonstrate many nonlinear effects in the optical frequency range. In 1978, the first high-resolution nonlinear microscope with depth resolution was described by the Oxford group. Sheppard and Kompfner published a study in Applied Optics describing microscopic imaging based on second-harmonic generation. In their report, they further proposed that other nonlinear optical effects, such as two-photon fluorescence, could also be applied. However, the developments in the field of nonlinear optical stalled due to a lack of a suitable laser source. This obstacle was removed with the advent of femtosecond lasers in the 1980s. In 1990, the seminal study of Denk, Strickler, and Webb on two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy was published in Science. Their paper clearly demonstrated the capability of two-photon excitation microscopy for biology, and it served to convince a wide audience of scientists of the potential capability of the technique.

  15. Tree classification with fused mobile laser scanning and hyperspectral data.

    PubMed

    Puttonen, Eetu; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Litkey, Paula; Hyyppä, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin.

  16. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE AND RAT OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse and Rat Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research ...

  17. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (< 1 cm/year), they provide a single-point measurement construed to a location with limited to no information on the spatial pattern in marsh elevation response away from the measurement site. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) offers potential for high definition monitoring of marsh surface evolution. However, several challenges must be overcome in the application of the technology for geodetic imaging of marsh surfaces. These challenges include surface occlusion by dense vegetation, error propagation due to scan co-registration and referencing across time, impacts of scan angle, and filtering of non-ground points. Researchers at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a field-survey of a marsh within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using TLS and RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to

  18. Development of an Online Archive for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Lowry, Ben; McWhirter, Jeff; Phillips, David; Meertens, Chuck

    2013-04-01

    The UNAVCO Geodetic Imaging program provides terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) support to the Earth science research community through a TLS instrumentation pool of five scanners, field engineering, data processing, and technical training. As part of this community TLS support role, UNAVCO is responsible for generation of level one (L1) TLS data products and TLS data archive and access. A UNAVCO-organized and US National Science Foundation-funded TLS community workshop held October 2011 in Boulder, Colorado defined many of the challenges and requirements a TLS data archive and access system must address. TLS data acquisition presents unique challenges for metadata, provenance capture, and data archive. TLS datasets are often large and level zero (L0 - raw) data are stored in a variety of proprietary formats, requiring conversion and standardization for access and exchange. Due to the wide range of scientific and engineering objectives that motivate TLS data collection, field methods and collection techniques vary greatly and must be thoroughly documented in project metadata. These challenges make data and metadata capture, preservation, and provenance important objectives for an online TLS archive. To address these challenges, UNAVCO is developing a TLS archive based on the open source RAMADDA platform (http://ramadda.org). The UNAVCO TLS archive will provide online archive of L0 and L1 data products, capture field metadata and data processing workflows for provenance, and store original georeferencing information. In addition, the TLS repository provides on-demand services for simple point cloud visualization, data sub-setting and thinning, and file format (e.g., LAS, ASCII, proprietary) data conversion. The system also offers automation of RINEX processing of GPS data, OPUS and CSRS submission and solution ingestion, and generation of control point lists to streamline georeferencing of TLS point cloud data. Georeferencing metadata and GPS file provenance are

  19. Estimation of terracing characteristics from airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Žiga

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural terraces are a fundamental morphological form of the Slovenian landscape. They are present in all of its diverse geographical regions, from Mediterranean and Dinaric hills and plateaus, Alpine mountains and plains, to Pannonian hills. New systematic research based on mapping aerial orthophotos and historical maps revealed previously unrecorded distribution and extent of terracing. However, the extensive overgrowing of the Slovenian countryside in the past century, when forest cover has grown from 40% to more than 60%, hid many of the terraces under a thick forest canopy. This is especially true for the higher and more remote areas where unfavourable natural conditions have coupled with depopulation processes. In such conditions, the only reasonable technique to observe cultural terraces and other remains of past human activities over large areas is airborne laser scanning. With the country-wide airborne lidar data becoming available, many new possibilities for discovery as well as quantitative analyses are becoming available. We explored manual and semiautomatic approaches to obtain terracing characteristics around representative villages of diverse landscape types. Individual terraces can be described with several attributes, such as riser slope gradient, riser height, tread area, length and width, ratio of length and width, altitude, location of the terrace in the thermal band, distance to the settlement, number and type of trees, distance between trees, and number of vineyard rows. Such characteristics can be derived manually, which can be painstakingly slow, but with relative precisions reaching the order of centimetres and decimetres, or semiautomatically, which is much faster, but with worse precision levels, mainly due to various outliers and errors in processing. The success of attribute derivation is highly dependent on raw lidar data acquisition parameters and processing. Manual interpretation has a distinct advantage of the possibility to

  20. Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Coastal Geomorphologic Research in Western Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, D.; Tilly, N.; Curdt, C.; Aasen, H.; Ntageretzis, K.; Hadler, H.; Willershäuser, T.; Vött, A.; Bareth, G.

    2012-07-01

    We used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) for (i) accurate volume estimations of dislocated boulders moved by high-energy impacts and for (ii) monitoring of annual coastal changes. In this contribution, we present three selected sites in Western Greece that were surveyed during a time span of four years (2008-2011). The Riegl LMS-Z420i laser scanner was used in combination with a precise DGPS system (Topcon HiPer Pro). Each scan position and a further target were recorded for georeferencing and merging of the point clouds. For the annual detection of changes, reference points for the base station of the DGPS system were marked. Our studies show that TLS is capable to accurately estimate volumes of boulders, which were dislocated and deposited inland from the littoral zone. The mass of each boulder was calculated from this 3D-reconstructed volume and according density data. The masses turned out to be considerably smaller than common estimated masses based on tape-measurements and according density approximations. The accurate mass data was incorporated into wave transport equations, which estimate wave velocities of high-energy impacts. As expected, these show smaller wave velocities, due to the incorporated smaller mass. Furthermore, TLS is capable to monitor annual changes on coastal areas. The changes are detected by comparing high resolution digital elevation models from every year. On a beach site, larger areas of sea-weed and sandy sediments are eroded. In contrast, bigger gravel with 30-50 cm diameter was accumulated. At the other area with bigger boulders and a different coastal configuration only slightly differences were detectable. In low-lying coastal areas and along recent beaches, post-processing of point clouds turned out to be more difficult, due to noise effects by water and shadowing effects. However, our studies show that the application of TLS in different littoral settings is an appropriate and promising tool. The combination of both instruments

  1. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  2. Determination of Percent Body Fat Using 3D Whole Body Laser Scanning: A Preliminary Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    circumferences, 3D whole body laser scans and DEXA scans were performed on fifty-one men and women age 18-62. Mean percent body fat was not statistically...3D whole body laser scan , and DEXA scan to measure individuals during a one hour measurement session. 1 Report Documentation Page Form...underwent a 6 minute whole body DEXA scan using a GE Lunar Prodigy DEXA scanner running software version 7.53. Percent body fat was calculated from the

  3. Stop-and-Go Mode: Sensor Manipulation as Essential as Sensor Development in Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Hyyppä, Juha; Kukko, Antero

    2013-01-01

    This study was dedicated to illustrating the significance of sensor manipulation in the case of terrestrial laser scanning, which is a field now in quick development. In fact, this quickness was mainly rooted in the emergence of new sensors with better performance, while the implications of sensor manipulation have not been fully recognized by the whole community. For this technical gap, the stop-and-go mapping mode can be reckoned as one of the potential solution plans. Stop-and-go was first proposed to handle the low efficiency of traditional static terrestrial laser scanning, and then, it was re-emphasized to improve the stability of sample collections for the state-of-the-art technology of mobile laser scanning. This work reviewed the previous efforts of trying the stop-and-go mode for improving the performance of static and mobile terrestrial laser scanning and generalized their principles respectively. This work also analyzed its advantages compared to the fully-static and fully-kinematic terrestrial laser scanning, and suggested the plans with more automatic measures for raising the efficacy of terrestrial laser scanning. Overall, this literature review indicated that the stop-and-go mapping mode as a case with generic sense can verify the presumption of sensor manipulation as essential as sensor development. PMID:23799493

  4. Stop-and-go mode: sensor manipulation as essential as sensor development in terrestrial laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Hyyppä, Juha; Kukko, Antero

    2013-06-25

    This study was dedicated to illustrating the significance of sensor manipulation in the case of terrestrial laser scanning, which is a field now in quick development. In fact, this quickness was mainly rooted in the emergence of new sensors with better performance, while the implications of sensor manipulation have not been fully recognized by the whole community. For this technical gap, the stop-and-go mapping mode can be reckoned as one of the potential solution plans. Stop-and-go was first proposed to handle the low efficiency of traditional static terrestrial laser scanning, and then, it was re-emphasized to improve the stability of sample collections for the state-of-the-art technology of mobile laser scanning. This work reviewed the previous efforts of trying the stop-and-go mode for improving the performance of static and mobile terrestrial laser scanning and generalized their principles respectively. This work also analyzed its advantages compared to the fully-static and fully-kinematic terrestrial laser scanning, and suggested the plans with more automatic measures for raising the efficacy of terrestrial laser scanning. Overall, this literature review indicated that the stop-and-go mapping mode as a case with generic sense can verify the presumption of sensor manipulation as essential as sensor development.

  5. Mobile 3D laser scanning technology application in the surveying of urban underground rail transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Youmei; Yang, Bogang; Zhen, Yinan

    2016-11-01

    Mobile 3D laser scanning technology is one hot kind of digital earth technology. 3D completion surveying is relative new concept in surveying and mapping. A kind of mobile 3D laser scanning system was developed for the urban underground rail 3D completion surveying. According to the characteristics of underground rail environment and the characters of the mobile laser scanning system, it designed a suitable test scheme to improving the accuracy of this kind of mobile laser scanning system when it worked under no GPS signal environment. Then it completed the application of this technology in the No.15 rail 3D completion surveying. Meanwhile a set of production process was made for the 3D completion surveying based on this kind of mobile 3D laser scanning technology. These products were also proved the efficiency of the new technology in the rail 3D completion surveying. Using mobile 3D laser scanning technology to complete underground rail completion surveying has been the first time in China until now. It can provide a reference for 3D measurement of rail completion surveying or the 3D completion surveying of other areas.

  6. Laser scanning microscopy of broad freezing interfaces with applications to biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neils, Christopher Martin

    2000-09-01

    A new, vertical cryostage was used for microscopic observation of broad-front freezing in aqueous solutions. This cryostage complements traditional studies of cell behavior and interface morphology in cryobiology. Traditional systems directionally solidify thin samples perpendicular to the optical axis. Thin samples confer thermal and optical advantages for video brightfield microscopy. However, sample thickness can affect the interface morphology. In the new cryostage, ice propagates parallel to the microscope optical axis. The sample cup is 1 cm tall and 1.5 cm in diameter, with insulated sides and a nitrogen-cooled base to freeze the solution upward. The top of the solution is warmed passively through a cover glass or immersion objective. The freezing solutions contain dilute fluorescein dye, which is visible where it is concentrated by exclusion from the ice. The stage is mounted on a confocal laser-scanning microscope, and thermal control and image capture routines are centralized in a LabView user interface. Filtered water, physiological saline, 9.5% glycerol, and 10% glycerol with PBS were frozen at rates between -2°C/min and -10°C/min and sequential images at one plane were captured. Images distinctly revealed a lamellar interface but could not resolve 3-D morphology. The average lamellar spacing was quantified using image analysis. Physiological saline was frozen in flat glass capillary tubes with 0.05 to 0.4 mm path length, mounted vertically to observe internal ice in cross-section. Lamellae were randomly oriented with respect to the glass, suggesting caution when measuring dendrite spacing in a horizontal cryostage. No correlation between capillary size and lamellar spacing was noted. Cell monolayers and synthetic membranes were mounted horizontally to let a well-developed ice front approach the layer broadly. In transparent membranes, ice-membrane interaction was visible until ice grew over and obscured the membrane. The vertical cryostage improved

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of the intact mouse cochlea by fluorescent laser scanning confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Glen H.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2008-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the mammalian cochlea is most readily understood by representation in three-dimensions. However, the cochlea is often sectioned to minimize the effects of its anatomic complexity and optical properties on image acquisition by light microscopy. We have found that optical aberrations present in the decalcified cochlea can be greatly reduced by dehydration through graded ethanols followed by clearing with a mixture of 5 parts methyl salicylate and 3 parts benzyl benzoate (MSBB). Clearing the cochlea with MSBB enables acquisition of high-resolution images with multiple fluorescent labels, through the full volume of the cochlea by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The resulting images are readily applicable to three-dimensional morphometric analysis and volumetric visualizations. This method promises to be particularly useful for three-dimensional characterization of anatomy, innervation and expression of genes or proteins in the many new animal models of hearing and balance generated by genetic manipulation. Furthermore, the MSBB is compatible with most non-protein fluorophores used for histological labeling, and may be removed with traditional transitional solvents to allow subsequent epoxy embedding for sectioning. PMID:18573326

  8. Quantification of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility of collagen I using a laser scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Arne; Ortegren, Jonas; Hompland, Tord; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Lindgren, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic changes in the organization of fibrillar collagen can potentially serve as an early diagnostic marker in various pathological processes. Tissue types containing collagen I can be probed by pulsed high-intensity laser radiation, thereby generating second harmonic light that provides information about the composition and structure at a microscopic level. A technique was developed to determine the essential second harmonic generation (SHG) parameters in a laser scanning microscope setup. A rat-tail tendon frozen section was rotated in the xy-plane with the pulsed laser light propagating along the z-axis. By analyzing the generated second harmonic light in the forward direction with parallel and crossed polarizer relative to the polarization of the excitation laser beam, the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of the collagen fiber were determined. Systematic variations in SHG response between ordered and less ordered structures were recorded and evaluated. A 500 microm-thick z-cut lithiumniobate (LiNbO(3)) was used as reference. The method was applied on frozen sections of malignant melanoma and normal skin tissue. Significant differences were found in the values of d(22), indicating that this parameter has a potential role in differentiating between normal and pathological processes.

  9. Processing of airborne laser scanning data to generate accurate DTM for floodplain wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Mirosław-Świątek, Dorota; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Michałowski, Robert; Kardel, Ignacy

    2015-10-01

    Structure of the floodplain, especially its topography and vegetation, influences the overland flow and dynamics of floods which are key factors shaping ecosystems in surface water-fed wetlands. Therefore elaboration of the digital terrain model (DTM) of a high spatial accuracy is crucial in hydrodynamic flow modelling in river valleys. In this study the research was conducted in the unique Central European complex of fens and marshes - the Lower Biebrza river valley. The area is represented mainly by peat ecosystems which according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) are called "water-dependent ecosystems". Development of accurate DTM in these areas which are overgrown by dense wetland vegetation consisting of alder forest, willow shrubs, reed, sedges and grass is very difficult, therefore to represent terrain in high accuracy the airborne laser scanning data (ALS) with scanning density of 4 points/m2 was used and the correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM was executed. This correction was performed utilizing remotely sensed images, topographical survey using the Real Time Kinematic positioning and vegetation height measurements. In order to classify different types of vegetation within research area the object based image analysis (OBIA) was used. OBIA allowed partitioning remotely sensed imagery into meaningful image-objects, and assessing their characteristics through spatial and spectral scale. The final maps of vegetation patches that include attributes of vegetation height and vegetation spectral properties, utilized both the laser scanning data and the vegetation indices developed on the basis of airborne and satellite imagery. This data was used in process of segmentation, attribution and classification. Several different vegetation indices were tested to distinguish different types of vegetation in wetland area. The OBIA classification allowed correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM. The final digital terrain model was compared and examined

  10. a New Approach for Segmentation-Based Texturing of Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Habib, A.

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, laser scanning systems have been recognized as a fast and accurate technology for the acquisition of high density spatial data. The advent of these systems has reduced the cost and increased the availability of accurate 3D data for mapping, modelling, and monitoring applications. The original laser scanning data does not explicitly provide meaningful information about the characteristics of the scanned surfaces. Therefore, reliable processing procedures are applied for information extraction from these datasets. However, the derived surfaces through laser scanning data processing cannot be effectively interpreted due to the lack of spectral information. To resolve this problem, a new texturing procedure is introduced in this paper to improve the interpretability of laser scanning-derived surfaces using spectral information from overlapping imagery. In this texturing approach, individual planar regions, derived through a laser scanning data segmentation procedure, are textured using the available imagery. This texturing approach, which aims to overcome the computational inefficiency of the previously-developed point-based texturing techniques, is implemented in three steps. In the first step, the visibility of the segmented planar regions in the available imagery is checked and a list of appropriate images for texturing each planar region is established. An occlusion detection procedure is then performed to identify the parts of the segmented regions which are occluding/being occluded by other regions in the field of view of the utilized images. In the second step, visible parts of planar regions are decomposed into parts which should be textured using individual images. Finally, a rendering procedure is performed to texture these parts using available images. Experimental results from real laser scanning dataset and overlapping imagery demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for texturing laser scanning-derived surfaces using images.

  11. Geoarchaeological site documentation and analysis of 3D data derived by terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, D.; Zellmann, S.; Kindermann, K.; Pastoors, A.; Lang, U.; Bubenzer, O.; Weniger, G.-C.; Bareth, G.

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning was conducted to document and analyse sites of geoarchaeological interest in Jordan, Egypt and Spain. In those cases, the terrestrial laser scanner LMS-Z420i from Riegl was used in combination with an accurate RTK-GPS for georeferencing of the point clouds. Additionally, local surveying networks were integrated by established transformations and used for indirect registration purposes. All data were integrated in a workflow that involves different software and according results. The derived data were used for the documentation of the sites by accurate plans and cross-sections. Furthermore, the 3D data were analysed for geoarchaeological research problems, such as volumetric determinations, the ceiling thickness of a cave and lighting simulations based on path tracing. The method was reliable in harsh environmental conditions, but the weight of the instrument, the measuring time and the minimum measurement distance were a drawback. However, generally an accurate documentation of the sites was possible. Overall, the integration in a 3D GIS is easily possible by the accurate georeference of the derived data. In addition, local survey results are also implemented by the established transformations. Enhanced analyses based on the derived 3D data shows promising results.

  12. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  13. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  14. Automated quantification of distributed landslide movement using circular tree trunks extracted from terrestrial laser scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Jeremy C.; Olsen, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    This manuscript presents a novel algorithm to automatically detect landslide movement in a forested area using displacements of tree trunks distributed across the landslide surveyed repeatedly using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Common landslide monitoring techniques include: inclinometers, global position system (GPS), and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). While these techniques provide valuable data for monitoring landslides, they can be difficult to apply with adequate spatial or temporal resolution needed to understand complex landslides, specifically in forested environments. Comparison of the center coordinates (determined via least-squares fit of the TLS data) of a cross section of the tree trunk between consecutive surveys enable quantification of landslide movement rates, which can be used to analyze patterns of landslide displacement. The capabilities of this new methodology were tested through a case-study analyzing the Johnson Creek Landslide, a complex, quick moving coastal landslide, which has proven difficult to monitor using other techniques. A parametric analysis of fitting thresholds was also conducted to determine the reliability of tree trunk displacements calculated and the number of features that were extracted. The optimal parameters in selecting trees for movement analysis were found to be less than 1.5 cm for the RMS residuals of the circle fit and less than 1.0 cm for the difference in the calculated tree radii between epochs.

  15. Visualization and quantification of healthy and carious dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi; Berns, Michael W.

    1996-04-01

    In this study, a fluorescence technique was developed for visualization of dentin using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Eighteen extracted human teeth were used: 13 showing no clinical signs of caries and 5 with visually apparent decay. Preliminary study: All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approx. 200 micrometers thickness and pre-treated as follows: no pretreatment; vacuum only; ultrasonication only; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) only; vacuum and NaOCl; ultrasonication and NaOCl; or vacuum, ultrasonication and NaOCl. Samples were stained with Rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye at a concentration of 10-5 M in phosphate buffer saline for 1 to 24 hours. Caries study: Dentin surfaces, some with pre-existing caries, were visualized using CLSM. Most dentin tubules in sound dentin appeared open using CLSM, but most dentin tubules in carious dentin appeared closed or narrowed. Surface images obtained using CLSM were similar to those seen by SEM, but additional subsurface imaging was possible using CLSM at depth intervals of 1 micrometers to a depth of 30 - 50 micrometers . This technique shows good potential for non-invasive surface and subsurface imaging of dentin structures.

  16. Development of a high speed laser scanning confocal microscope with an acquisition rate up to 200 frames per second.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Kim, P; Boutilier, R; Kim, M Y; Lee, Y J; Lee, H

    2013-10-07

    There has been an increasing interest for observing fast biological phenomena such as cell movements in circulations and action potentials. The laser scanning confocal microscopy offers a good spatial resolution and optical sectioning ability to observe various in vivo animal models. We developed a high speed laser scanning confocal microscope capable of acquiring 512 by 512 pixel images at 200 fps (frames per second). We have incorporated a fast rotating polygonal scanning mirror with 128 facets for the X-axis scanner. In order to increase the throughput of the Y-axis scanner, we applied a bi-directional scanning method for vertical scanning. This made it possible to scan along the Y-axis two times during each scanner motion cycle. For the image acquisition, we used a custom photomultiplier tube amplifier with a broad frequency band. In addition, custom imaging software was written for the new microscope. In order to verify the acquisition speed of the developed confocal microscope, a resolution target moving at a series of constant speeds and a sedated mouse with slight movements due to heartbeats were observed. By comparing successive frames, the frame acquisition speeds were calculated.

  17. Deformation Monitoring of Motorway Underpasses Using Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, I.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2012-07-01

    voussoirs ranging between 1 mm and 5 mm. These deformations are under the tolerances predicted by the structure and confirm the success in the construction works developed. The laser scanning and the post-processing algorithms here developed appear as an easy methodology to make deformation monitoring of underpass structures and guarantee the load capacity of the structure.

  18. Assessment of DNA replication in central nervous system by Laser Scanning Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominik; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tárnok, Attila

    2004-07-01

    μIn neurons of patients with Alzheimers's disease (AD) signs of cell cycle re-entry as well as polyploidy have been reported1, 2, indicating that the entire or a part of the genome of the neurons is duplicated before its death but mitosis is not initiated so that the cellular DNA content remains tetraploid. It was concluded, that this imbalance is the direct cause of the neuronal loss in AD3. Manual counting of polyploidal cells is possible but time consuming and possibly statistically insufficient. The aim of this study was to develop an automated method that detects the neuronal DNA content abnormalities with Laser Scanning Cytometry (LSC).Frozen sections of formalin-fixed brain tissue of AD patients and control subjects were labelled with anti-cyclin B and anti-NeuN antibodies. Immunolabelling was performed using Cy5- and Cy2-conjugated secondary antibodies and biotin streptavidin or tyramid signal amplification. In the end sections of 20m thickness were incubated with propidium iodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC PI was used as trigger. Cells identified as neurons by NeuN expression were analyzed for cyclin B expression. Per specimen data of at least 10,000 neurons were acquired. In the frozen brain sections an automated quantification of the amount of nuclear DNA is possible with LSC. The DNA ploidy as well as the cell cycle distribution can be analyzed. A high number of neurons can be scanned and the duration of measuring is shorter than a manual examination. The amount of DNA is sufficiently represented by the PI fluorescence to be able to distinguish between eu- and polyploid neurons.

  19. Automated laser registration in image-guided surgery: evaluation of the correlation between laser scan resolution and navigation accuracy.

    PubMed

    Marmulla, R; Lüth, T; Mühling, J; Hassfeld, S

    2004-10-01

    Markerless patient registration based on the facial skin surface makes logistics prior to image-guided surgery much easier, as it is not necessary to place and measure registration markers. A laser scan registration of the surgical site takes the place of conventional marker-based registration. In a clinical study, the stability and accuracy of markerless patient registration was evaluated in 12 patients. Intraoral titanium markers served as targets for the infrared-pointer of the navigation system in order to check the accuracy of the markerless registration process. The correlation between laser scan resolution and navigation accuracy was checked using seven different laser scan resolutions (a cloud of 300,000 laser scan points down to 3750 laser scan points of the surgical site). The markerless patient registration was successful as long as high laser scan resolution was used (30,000 laser scan points and more): the titanium markers were detected with a mean deviation of 1.1 +/- 0.2 mm. Low resolution laser scans (6000 laser scan points of the surgical site and less) revealed inaccuracies up to 6 mm.

  20. Lateral resolution enhancement of laser scanning microscopy by a higher-order radially polarized mode beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Yuichi; Hibi, Terumasa; Sato, Aya; Horanai, Hibiki; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi; Sato, Shunichi

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate that the lateral resolution of confocal laser scanning microscopy is dramatically improved by a higher-order radially polarized (HRP) beam with six concentric rings. This beam was generated simply by inserting liquid crystal devices in front of an objective lens. An HRP beam visualized aggregated 0.17 μm beads individually and is also applicable to biological imaging. This method can extend the capability of conventional laser scanning microscopes without modification of the system, with the exception of the addition of the liquid crystal devices in the optical path.

  1. Local intracellular ion measurements with luminescent indicators using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitz, N.; Merten, E.; Acker, H.

    1995-09-01

    Ion sensitive fluoroprobes such as BCECF (pH) and FURA-II (Ca2+) are frequently used indicators for determination of ion activities in single cells and subcellular compartments, e.g. by video enhanced or video intensified microscopy. Moreover, using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with its inherent potential for noninvasive optical sectioning of cells and tissues and subsequent 3D image reconstruction, intracellular ion topographies can be monitored via pseudocolor encoded ratio imaging from pixel to pixel enabling in vivo measurements of dynamic intracellular processes. Regardless of the degree of spatial resolution, reliable qualtitative determinations essentially depend on accurate calibration of the intracellularly entrapped fluoroprobe. Calibration is either established on the basis of a whole cell or within a more or less extended subcellular compartment and the characteristics are displayed as concentration encoded pseudocolor bar within the image frame. This calibration is assumed to be valid for other cellular compartments and, in case of ion imaging, it is even thought to be valid for every single pixel of the complete pixel field. However, the assumption of a topographically invariant intracellular calibration requires a reliable behavior of the intracellularly applied indicator. This intracellular integrity of the dyes often does not seem to exist since intracellular calibration curves considerably deviate from in vitro calibration characteristics. Deviations may be due to intracellular interactions of indicator molecules with cytoplasmic macromolecules, e.g. proteins, resulting in spectral distortions and/or sensitivity deficits as demonstrated by the indicators BCECF and FURA-RED (a FURA-II analogue) or to intracellular redistribution of the indicator as exemplified by pH measurements using carboxy-SNARF-1. Consequences of these investigations as well as further potential interferences are discussed with special respect to ion imaging

  2. Penetration of tamoxifen citrate loaded ethosomes and liposomes across human skin: a comparative study with confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarwa, Khomendra K; Suresh, Preeti K; Rudrapal, Mithun; Verma, Vinod K

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, ethosomal and liposomal formulations containing tamoxifen citrate were prepared and evaluated for their penetration properties in human cadaver skin using Franz diffusion cell and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results clearly revealed that ethosomal vesicles showed a better drug permeation profile than that of liposomal vesicles. In addition, low fluorescence intensity in CLSM was recorded with liposomes as compared to ethosomes, indicating lower cumulative amount of drug permeation from liposomal vesicles. Furthermore, CLSM showed uniform fluorescence intensity across the entire depth of skin in ethosomal treatment, indicating high penetrability of ethosomal vesicles through human cadaver skin. In contrast, low penetrability of conventional liposomal vesicles was recorded as penetration was limited to the 7(th) section (i.e. upper epidermis layer) of skin as evident from visualization of intact liposomal vesicles in CLSM.

  3. Imaging of oxidative stress at subcellular level by confocal laser scanning microscopy after fluorescent derivatization of cellular carbonyls.

    PubMed Central

    Pompella, A.; Comporti, M.

    1993-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy plus image videoanalysis was used to visualize the tissue areas and the subcellular sites first involved by oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, in the well-established experimental model of lipid peroxidation induced by haloalkane intoxication in the liver cell. The fluorescent reagent 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydrazide was employed to derivativize the carbonyl functions originating from the lipoperoxidative process in situ, in liver cryostat sections from in vivo intoxicated rats, as well as in isolated hepatocytes exposed in vitro to the pro-oxidant action of haloalkanes. The results obtained indicate that: 1) the detection of fluorescent derivatives of carbonyls indeed offers a gain in sensitivity, 2) haloalkane-induced lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes primarily involves the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the plasma membrane and the nuclear compartment are unaffected, and 3) lipid peroxidation also induces an increase of liver autofluorescence. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8494040

  4. An attempt of the metadata standard creation for the technology of mobile laser scanning in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, P.; Parzyński, Z.; Uchański, J.; Uchański, Ł.

    2011-12-01

    Authors of the paper are presenting the attempt of the metadata standard creation for the technology of Mobile Laser Scanning. The research leading to the result presented in the publication was based on practical aspects of works realized within the usage of Mobile Laser Scanning measurements on the territory of Poland and theoretical issues concerned at Warsaw University of Technology in the area of metadata and standard creation. Usage of Mobile Laser Scanning gives the great advantage of acquisition impressive sets of data in short period of time finding their potential in the fields heritage preservation, architecture, deformation monitoring and industrial applications. In relation to the variety of applications and elements which needs to be concerned as the crucial parts of data sets like precise characteristic of the quality of acquired data authors attempt to create a metadata standard enabling potential prioritization and selection of data into normative which could in the future became a basis for regular normative creation considering this sort of measurements. Until now no sort of Laser Scanning tools has received its own standard despite the fact it is getting more and more necessary also by the fact of its growing popularization and variety of usage in different fields of life.

  5. D Model of AL Zubarah Fortress in Qatar - Terrestrial Laser Scanning VS. Dense Image Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, T.; Mechelke, K.; Maziull, L.

    2015-02-01

    In September 2011 the fortress Al Zubarah, built in 1938 as a typical Arabic fortress and restored in 1987 as a museum, was recorded by the HafenCity University Hamburg using terrestrial laser scanning with the IMAGER 5006h and digital photogrammetry for the Qatar Museum Authority within the framework of the Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project. One goal of the object recording was to provide detailed 2D/3D documentation of the fortress. This was used to complete specific detailed restoration work in the recent years. From the registered laser scanning point clouds several cuttings and 2D plans were generated as well as a 3D surface model by triangle meshing. Additionally, point clouds and surface models were automatically generated from digital imagery from a Nikon D70 using the open-source software Bundler/PMVS2, free software VisualSFM, Autodesk Web Service 123D Catch beta, and low-cost software Agisoft PhotoScan. These outputs were compared with the results from terrestrial laser scanning. The point clouds and surface models derived from imagery could not achieve the same quality of geometrical accuracy as laser scanning (i.e. 1-2 cm).

  6. Orientation of airborne laser scanning point clouds with multi-view, multi-scale image blocks.

    PubMed

    Rönnholm, Petri; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Haggrén, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters.

  7. a Study about Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Reconstruction of Precast Concrete to Support Qlassic Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, M. A.; Idris, K. M.; Majid, Z.; Ariff, M. F. M.; Yusoff, A. R.; Luh, L. C.; Abbas, M. A.; Chong, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, terrestrial laser scanning shows the potential to improve construction productivity by measuring the objects changes using real-time applications. This paper presents the process of implementation of an efficient framework for precast concrete using terrestrial laser scanning that enables contractors to acquire accurate data and support Quality Assessment System in Construction (QLASSIC). Leica Scanstation C10, black/white target, Autodesk Revit and Cyclone software were used in this study. The results were compared with the dimensional of based model precast concrete given by the company as a reference with the AutoDesk Revit model from the terrestrial laser scanning data and conventional method (measuring tape). To support QLASSIC, the tolerance dimensions of cast in-situ & precast elements is +10mm / -5mm. The results showed that the root mean square error for a Revit model is 2.972mm while using measuring tape is 13.687mm. The accuracy showed that terrestrial laser scanning has an advantage in construction jobs to support QLASSIC.

  8. Initial Tests and Accuracy Assesment of a Compact Mobile Laser Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julge, K.; Ellmann, A.; Vajakas, T.; Kolka, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a faster and cost-effective alternative to static laser scanning, even though there is a slight trade-off in accuracy. This contribution describes a compact mobile laser scanning system mounted on a vehicle. The technical parameters of the used system components, i.e. a small LIDAR sensor Velodyne VLP-16 and a dual antenna GNSS/INS system Advanced Navigation Spatial Dual, are reviewed, along with the integration of these components for spatial data acquisition. Calculation principles of 3D coordinates from the real-time data of all the involved sensors are discussed. The field tests were carried out in a controlled environment of a parking lot and at different velocities. Experiments were carried out to test the ability of the GNSS/INS system to cope with difficult conditions, e.g. sudden movements due to cornering or swerving. The accuracy of the resulting MLS point cloud is evaluated with respect to high-accuracy static terrestrial laser scanning data. Problems regarding combining LIDAR, GNSS and INS sensors are outlined, as well as the initial accuracy assessments. Initial tests revealed errors related to insufficient quality of inertial data and a need for the trajectory post-processing calculations. Although this study was carried out while the system was mounted on a car, there is potential for operating the system on an unmanned aerial vehicle, all-terrain vehicle or in a backpack mode due to its relatively compact size.

  9. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffery and Sally D. Perreault

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Prot...

  10. Recommendations for the design and the installation of large laser scanning microscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, P. Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has since the inventions of the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CLSM) and the Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscope (MPLSM) developed into an essential tool in contemporary life science and material science. The market provides an increasing number of turn-key and hands-off commercial LSM systems, un-problematic to purchase, set up and integrate even into minor research groups. However, the successful definition, financing, acquisition, installation and effective use of one or more large laser scanning microscopy systems, possibly of core facility character, often requires major efforts by senior staff members of large academic or industrial units. Here, a set of recommendations is presented, which are helpful during the process of establishing large systems for confocal or non-linear laser scanning microscopy as an effective operational resource in the scientific or industrial production process. Besides the description of technical difficulties and possible pitfalls, the article also illuminates some seemingly "less scientific" processes, i.e. the definition of specific laboratory demands, advertisement of the intention to purchase one or more large systems, evaluation of quotations, establishment of contracts and preparation of the local environment and laboratory infrastructure.

  11. Evaluation of a laser scanning sensor for variable-rate tree sprayer development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate canopy measurement capabilities are prerequisites to automate variable-rate sprayers. A 270° radial range laser scanning sensor was tested for its scanning accuracy to detect tree canopy profiles. Signals from the laser sensor and a ground speed sensor were processed with an embedded comput...

  12. Orientation of Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds with Multi-View, Multi-Scale Image Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Rönnholm, Petri; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Haggrén, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters. PMID:22454569

  13. QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BETA CELL APOPTOSIS AND CELL COMPOSITION OF ISOLATED, UNDISRUPTED HUMAN ISLETS BY LASER SCANNING CYTOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Ivan; Nair, Indu; Avakian-Mansoorian, Alina; Rawson, Jeffrey; Omori, Keiko; Ito, Taihei; Valiente, Luis; Iglesias-Meza, Itzia; Orr, Chris; Shiang, Keh D.; Ferreri, Kevin; Al-Abdullah, Ismail H.; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad

    2010-01-01

    Background Assays for assessing human islet cell quality which provide results prior to transplantation would be very beneficial to improving outcomes for islet transplantation therapy. Parameters such as percent beta cell apoptosis and cell composition are found to vary markedly between different islet preparations, and may serve as markers of islet quality. We have developed fluorescence-based assays using laser scanning cytometry (LSC) for assessing beta cell apoptosis and islet cell composition on serial sections of intact isolated islets. Methods Isolated human islets were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were immunostained for the pancreatic hormones, acinar and ductal cell markers. DNA fragmentation was used to label apoptotic cells. Stained cells were quantified using an iCys laser scanning cytometer. Results Islet preparations from 102 human pancreatic islet isolations were analyzed. For the whole set of islet preparations we found a mean islet cell composition of 54.5±1.2% insulin positive; 33.9±1.2% glucagon; 12.1±0.7% somatostatin and 1.5±0.2% pancreatic polypeptide positive cells. The apoptotic beta cells were 2.85±0.4% with a range of 0.27% to 18.3%. The percentage of apoptotic beta cells correlated well (p<0.0001, n=59) with results obtained in vivo by transplantation of the corresponding islets in diabetic NODscid mice. Conclusions The analysis of whole, non-dissociated islets for cell composition and beta cell apoptosis using LSC is giving reliable and reproducible results and could be done both before islet transplantation, as well as on preserved cell blocks at any future time. Thus, they can be a powerful tool for islet quality assessment. PMID:20697327

  14. Laser Scanning for 3D Object Characterization: Infrastructure for Exploration and Analysis of Vegetation Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2012-04-01

    Mapping and characterization of the three-dimensional nature of vegetation is increasingly gaining in importance. Deeper insight is required for e.g. forest management, biodiversity assessment, habitat analysis, precision agriculture, renewable energy production or the analysis of interaction between biosphere and atmosphere. However the potential of 3D vegetation characterization has not been exploited so far and new technologies are needed. Laser scanning has evolved into the state-of-the-art technology for highly accurate 3D data acquisition. By now several studies indicated a high value of 3D vegetation description by using laser data. The laser sensors provide a detailed geometric presentation (geometric information) of scanned objects as well as a full profile of laser energy that was scattered back to the sensor (radiometric information). In order to exploit the full potential of these datasets, profound knowledge on laser scanning technology for data acquisition, geoinformation technology for data analysis and object of interest (e.g. vegetation) for data interpretation have to be joined. A signature database is a collection of signatures of reference vegetation objects acquired under known conditions and sensor parameters and can be used to improve information extraction from unclassified vegetation datasets. Different vegetation elements (leaves, branches, etc.) at different heights above ground with different geometric composition contribute to the overall description (i.e. signature) of the scanned object. The developed tools allow analyzing tree objects according to single features (e.g. echo width and signal amplitude) and to any relation of features and derived statistical values (e.g. ratio of laser point attributes). For example, a single backscatter cross section value does not allow for tree species determination, whereas the average echo width per tree segment can give good estimates. Statistical values and/or distributions (e.g. Gaussian

  15. Laser scanning measurements on trees for logging harvesting operations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular.

  16. Laser Scanning Measurements on Trees for Logging Harvesting Operations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular. PMID:23012543

  17. Shining new light on braided rivers: capturing grain-to-reach scale morphodynamics with terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.; Williams, R. D.; Vericat, D.; Hicks, M.; Goodsell, B.

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed a technological revolution in the acquisition of geospatial data. These developments have profound implications for the practice of river science, creating a step-change in the dimensionality, resolution and precision of measurement of fluvial forms and processes. The pace of change has been remarkable; typical datasets of channel geometry have grown from cross-sections containing a few hundred survey observations, to airborne lidar surveys incorporating millions of points. With wide-area terrestrial laser scans comprising tens of billions observations now set to emerge, our data perspectives have been expanded by seven orders of magnitude. Such rapid modernization brings with it new challenges and necessitates the development of novel data management strategies, original algorithms to process dense 3d data, higher dimensional spatial metrics and innovative simulation methods to make optimal use of this rich vein of information. In this paper we describe a field-to-product methodology which aims to address these challenges and has been used to generate an unparalleled dataset capturing the morphological evolution of a labile gravel-bed braided river through a continuous sequence of floods between Oct 2009 and May 2010. These data were generated using a data-fusion approach that combines close-range terrestrial laser scanning with bathymetric data derived from non-metric aerial photography. Surveys were acquired over a 2.5 x 0.7 km reach of the Rees River; a piedmont braided system draining a highland catchment of Southern Alps of NZ. During a 10 month field campaign through the summer flood season, this study reach was resurveyed systematically after each competent flood event. Multi-scale DEMs were derived that capture the spatial distribution of facies and morphological changes at high precision. Results indicate that over 80% of the reach was subject to significant erosion or deposition, with a complex pattern of response to the

  18. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-07-03

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  19. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  20. New method for sperm evaluation by 3-dimensional laser scanning microscopy in different laboratory animal species.

    PubMed

    Weber, Klaus; Waletzky, Alexander; Fendl, Diana; Ordóñez, Patricia; Takawale, Pradeep; Hein, Felix; Riedel, Wolfram; König, Andres; Kunze, Marc; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Rivera, Javier; Quirici, Roberto; Romano, Ivano; Paepke, Susanne; Okazaki, Yoshimasa; Hardisty, Jerry F

    2014-01-01

    Sperm analysis is one of the end points in reproductive toxicology studies. Different methods for quantitative sperm analysis have been described. For qualitative morphological sperm analysis, either such techniques or smears of sperm and histological sperm staging are in use. Any of these methods provides morphological results on a light microscopy level. Laser scanning microscopy is a technique using a focused laser for scanning an object. The Olympus 3D Laser Scanning Microscope LEXT OLS4000 with optional possibilities of differential interference contrast provides a microscopic method for visualizing microasperities, which are far beyond the resolving power of a typical light or laser microscope. This technique was applied to sperm of mice, rats, rabbits, and cynomolgus monkeys at magnifications up to ×17 090. The obtained images are comparable to those of a scanning electron microscope under relatively low-power magnifications. Measurements on sperm parameters were taken by an integrated image analysis software tool. Abnormalities were easily detectable.

  1. Embedding complementary imaging data in laser scanning microscopy micrographs by reversible watermarking.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Coanda, Henri-George; Tranca, Denis E; Popescu, Marius; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-04-01

    Complementary laser scanning microscopy micrographs are considered as pairs consisting in a master image (MI) and a slave image (SI), the latter with potential for facilitating the interpretation of the MI. We propose a strategy based on reversible watermarking for embedding a lossy compressed version of the SI into the MI. The use of reversible watermarking ensures the exact recovery of the host image. By storing and/or transmitting the watermarked MI in a single file, the information contained in both images that constitute the pair is made available to a potential end-user, which simplifies data association and transfer. Examples are presented using support images collected by two complementary techniques, confocal scanning laser microscopy and transmission laser scanning microscopy, on Hematoxylin and Eosin stained tissue fragments. A strategy for minimizing the watermarking distortions of the MI, while preserving the content of the SI, is discussed in detail.

  2. Automated planimetric quality control in high accuracy airborne laser scanning surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosselman, George

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing point densities of airborne laser scanning surveys, the applications of the generated point clouds have evolved from the production of digital terrain models to 3D modelling of a wide variety of objects. Likewise in quality control procedures criteria for height accuracy are extended with measures to describe the planimetric accuracy. This paper introduces a measure for the potential accuracy of outlining objects in a point cloud. It describes how this accuracy can be verified with the use of ridge lines of gable roofs in strip overlaps. Because of the high accuracy of modern laser scanning surveys, the influence of roof tiles onto the estimation of ridge lines is explicitly modelled. New selection criteria are introduced that allow an automated, reliable and accurate extraction of ridge lines from point clouds. The applicability of the procedure is demonstrated in a pilot project in an area covering 100,000 ha with around 20 billion points.

  3. Embedding complementary imaging data in laser scanning microscopy micrographs by reversible watermarking

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Stanciu, Stefan G.; Hristu, Radu; Coanda, Henri-George; Tranca, Denis E.; Popescu, Marius; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-01-01

    Complementary laser scanning microscopy micrographs are considered as pairs consisting in a master image (MI) and a slave image (SI), the latter with potential for facilitating the interpretation of the MI. We propose a strategy based on reversible watermarking for embedding a lossy compressed version of the SI into the MI. The use of reversible watermarking ensures the exact recovery of the host image. By storing and/or transmitting the watermarked MI in a single file, the information contained in both images that constitute the pair is made available to a potential end-user, which simplifies data association and transfer. Examples are presented using support images collected by two complementary techniques, confocal scanning laser microscopy and transmission laser scanning microscopy, on Hematoxylin and Eosin stained tissue fragments. A strategy for minimizing the watermarking distortions of the MI, while preserving the content of the SI, is discussed in detail. PMID:27446641

  4. An entropy-based filtering approach for airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhe; Wan, Jiaxin; Liu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Parameter-tuning is a challenging task when generating digital terrain models from airborne laser scanning (light detection and ranging, LiDAR) data. To address this issue, this paper presents a filtering method for near-infrared laser scanning data that exploits the principle of entropy maximization as the optimization objective. The proposed approach generates ground elevation of point cloud by constructing a triangulated irregular network, calculates the entropy of the elevation from different parts, and automatically separates ground and non-ground points by the principle of entropy maximization. Experimental results from different ground surfaces show that the proposed entropy-based filtering method can effectively extract bare-earth points from the point cloud without adjusting thresholds.

  5. An Automatic Algorithm for Minimizing Anomalies and Discrepancies in Point Clouds Acquired by Laser Scanning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, Fabiane; Gonzaga, Luiz, Jr.; Galhardo Muller, Fabricio; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Scaioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning technique from airborne and land platforms has been largely used for collecting 3D data in large volumes in the field of geosciences. Furthermore, the laser pulse intensity has been widely exploited to analyze and classify rocks and biomass, and for carbon storage estimation. In general, a laser beam is emitted, collides with targets and only a percentage of emitted beam returns according to intrinsic properties of each target. Also, due interferences and partial collisions, the laser return intensity can be incorrect, introducing serious errors in classification and/or estimation processes. To address this problem and avoid misclassification and estimation errors, we have proposed a new algorithm to correct return intensity for laser scanning sensors. Different case studies have been used to evaluate and validated proposed approach.

  6. Standalone Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Efficiently Capturing Aec Buildings for As-Built Bim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassier, M.; Vergauwen, M.; Van Genechten, B.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing popularity of as-built building models for the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, the demand for highly accurate and dense point cloud data is rising. The current data acquisition methods are labour intensive and time consuming. In order to compete with indoor mobile mapping systems (IMMS), surveyors are now opting to use terrestrial laser scanning as a standalone solution. However, there is uncertainty about the accuracy of this approach. The emphasis of this paper is to determine the scope for which terrestrial laser scanners can be used without additional control. Multiple real life test cases are evaluated in order to identify the boundaries of this technique. Furthermore, this research presents a mathematical prediction model that provides an indication of the data accuracy given the project dimensions. This will enable surveyors to make informed discussions about the employability of terrestrial laser scanning without additional control in mid to large-scale projects.

  7. In vivo visualization of microneedle conduits in human skin using laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, S.; Kruithof, A. C.; Liebl, H.; Tomerius, M.; Bouwstra, J.; Lademann, J.; Meinke, M.

    2010-03-01

    Solid microneedles enhance the penetration of drugs into the viable skin but little is known about the geometry of the conduits in vivo. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the conduits of a microneedle system with needles at a length of 300 μm in 6 healthy subjects over a period of time. The model drug, a fluorescent dye was applied before and after piercing. Laser scanning microscopy was evaluated as being an excellent method to monitor the geometry and closure of the conduits over time. The used microneedle system was evaluated as suitable to enhance the transport of model drugs into the viable epidermis without bleeding and a short closure time of the conduits at the skin surface.

  8. Ultrasonic enrichment of microspheres for ultrasensitive biomedical analysis in confocal laser-scanning fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiklund, M.; Toivonen, J.; Tirri, M.; Hänninen, P.; Hertz, H. M.

    2004-07-01

    An ultrasonic particle concentrator based on a standing-wave hemispherical resonator is combined with confocal laser-scanning fluorescence detection. The goal is to perform ultrasensitive biomedical analysis by concentration of biologically active microspheres. The standing-wave resonator consists of a 4 MHz focusing ultrasonic transducer combined with the optically transparent plastic bottom of a disposable 96-well microplate platform. The ultrasonic particle concentrator collects suspended microspheres into dense, single-layer aggregates at well-defined positions in the sample vessel of the microplate, and the fluorescence from the aggregates is detected by the confocal laser-scanning system. The biochemical properties of the system are investigated using a microsphere-based human thyroid stimulating hormone assay.

  9. SAR Satellite Images and Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Forest Damages Mapping in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjalainen, Mika; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Hyyppa, Juha; Holopainen, Markus; Lyytikainen-Saarenmaa, Paivi; Krooks, Anssi; Jaakkola, Anttoni

    2010-12-01

    Forests are of high importance for the Finnish economy and environment. Forests inventories should not only provide information about the volume of growing stock, but also about the health status of forests, which is an indicator of the annual growth of forests and Carbon balance. One of the forest damage types is defoliation, which causes forest growth reduction and consequently potentially economical losses to the forest owners, but can be seen as an environmental indicator also. For example, in the past ten years, extensive and persistent needle defoliation caused by insects has been observed in the areas of Palokangas and Outokumpu in Eastern Finland. It is expected that the insect outbreaks are becoming more common and new species of insects may be spreading out in Finland due to the climate warming. Traditionally the intensity of needle defoliation has been estimated using visual observations, which are prone to errors and their areal extent is limited. Therefore, remote sensing can be seen as a potential tool for mapping defoliation. In this study, both Terrestrial Laser Scanning data and SAR satellite images have been exploited. On the one hand, Terrestrial Laser Scanning provides means to rapidly and objectively measure critical forest related information. On the other hand, SAR satellite images enable wide-area mapping and constant monitoring, which would be impossible in Finland using optical satellite images due to the cloudiness. The fusion of Laser scanning and SAR information could make a difference in forest health mapping. In this paper, preliminary results of the estimation of the needle defoliation intensity based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning and ERS and Envisat SAR (non-interferometric) satellite data are presented.

  10. An automated method to register airborne and terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Zang, Yufu; Dong, Zhen; Huang, Ronggang

    2015-11-01

    Laser scanning techniques have been widely used to capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of various scenes (e.g. urban scenes). In particular, airborne laser scanning (ALS) and mobile laser scanning (MLS), terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are effective to capture point clouds from top or side view. Registering the complimentary point clouds captured by ALS and MLS/TLS provides an aligned data source for many purposes (e.g. 3D reconstruction). Among these MLS can be directly geo-referenced to ALS according to the equipped position systems. For small scanning areas or dense building areas, TLS is used instead of MLS. However, registering ALS and TLS datasets suffers from poor automation and robustness because of few overlapping areas and sparse corresponding geometric features. A robust method for the registration of TLS and ALS datasets is proposed, which has four key steps. (1) extracts building outlines from TLS and ALS data sets independently; (2) obtains the potential matching pairs of outlines according to the geometric constraints between building outlines; (3) constructs the Laplacian matrices of the extracted building outlines to model the topology between the geometric features; (4) calculates the correlation coefficients of the extracted geometric features by decomposing the Laplacian matrices into the spectral space, providing correspondences between the extracted features for coarse registration. Finally, the multi-line adjustment strategy is employed for the fine registration. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified using field data, demonstrating a reliable and stable solution to accurately register ALS and TLS datasets.

  11. Automatic concrete cracks detection and mapping of terrestrial laser scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elhattab, Ahmed; Fayad, Atef

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning has become one of the standard technologies for object acquisition in surveying engineering. The high spatial resolution of imaging and the excellent capability of measuring the 3D space by laser scanning bear a great potential if combined for both data acquisition and data compilation. Automatic crack detection from concrete surface images is very effective for nondestructive testing. The crack information can be used to decide the appropriate rehabilitation method to fix the cracked structures and prevent any catastrophic failure. In practice, cracks on concrete surfaces are traced manually for diagnosis. On the other hand, automatic crack detection is highly desirable for efficient and objective crack assessment. The current paper submits a method for automatic concrete cracks detection and mapping from the data that was obtained during laser scanning survey. The method of cracks detection and mapping is achieved by three steps, namely the step of shading correction in the original image, step of crack detection and finally step of crack mapping and processing steps. The detected crack is defined in a pixel coordinate system. To remap the crack into the referred coordinate system, a reverse engineering is used. This is achieved by a hybrid concept of terrestrial laser-scanner point clouds and the corresponding camera image, i.e. a conversion from the pixel coordinate system to the terrestrial laser-scanner or global coordinate system. The results of the experiment show that the mean differences between terrestrial laser scan and the total station are about 30.5, 16.4 and 14.3 mms in x, y and z direction, respectively.

  12. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  13. Medical applications of three-dimensional and four-dimensional laser scanning of facial morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Lewis L.; Chen, Xiaoming; Figueroa, Alvaro A.; Aduss, Howard

    1991-04-01

    Two-degrees offreedom laser scanning devices offer the advantage ofspeed in data acquisition over three-degrees offreedom devices. Data acquisition on patients especially children requires speed in data gathering instantaneous verification ofdata integrity and more than two degrees offreedom to adequately describe morphology. A technique to generate a pseudo-third degree of freedom scan will be presented. An additional benefit of the technique is the ability to compare data acquired at different times.

  14. Comparison of a novel surface laser scanning anthropometric technique to traditional methods for facial parameter measurements.

    PubMed

    Joe, Paula S; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M; Oestenstad, Riedar K; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning techniques could be used to collect accurate anthropometric measurements, compared with traditional methods. The use of an alternative 3D method would allow for quick collection of data that could be used to change the parameters used for facepiece design, improving fit and protection for a wider variety of faces. In our study, 10 facial dimensions were collected using both the traditional calipers and tape method and a Konica-Minolta Vivid9i laser scanner. Scans were combined using RapidForm XOR software to create a single complete facial geometry of the subject as a triangulated surface with an associated texture image from which to obtain measurements. A paired t-test was performed on subject means in each measurement by method. Nine subjects were used in this study: five males (one African-American and four Caucasian females) and four females displaying a range of facial dimensions. Five measurements showed significant differences (p<0.05), with most accounted for by subject movements or amended by scanning technique modifications. Laser scanning measurements showed high precision and accuracy when compared with traditional methods. Significant differences found can be very small changes in measurements and are unlikely to present a practical difference. The laser scanning technique demonstrated reliable and quick anthropometric data collection for use in future projects in redesigning respirators.

  15. Multiparameter Correction Intensity of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data as AN Input for Rock Surface Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleček, V.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-06-01

    A large increase in the creation of 3D models of objects all around us can be observed in the last few years; thanks to the help of the rapid development of new advanced technologies for spatial data collection and robust software tools. A new commercially available airborne laser scanning data in Czech Republic, provided in the form of the Digital terrain model of the fifth generation as irregularly spaced points, enable locating the majority of rock formations. However, the positional and height accuracy of this type of landforms can reach huge errors in some cases. Therefore, it is necessary to start mapping using terrestrial laser scanning with the possibility of adding a point cloud data derived from ground or aerial photogrammetry. Intensity correction and noise removal is usually based on the distance between measured objects and the laser scanner, the incidence angle of the beam or on the radiometric and topographic characteristics of measured objects. This contribution represents the major undesirable effects that affect the quality of acquisition and processing of laser scanning data. Likewise there is introduced solutions to some of these problems.

  16. Decision model in the laser scanning system for pavement crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Huang, Jianping; Liu, Wanyu

    2011-12-01

    Pavement crack detection plays an important role in the pavement maintaining and management. Recently, the laser scanning technique for pavement crack detection becomes more and more popular due to its ability of discriminating dark areas, which are not caused by pavement distress such as tire marks, oil spills, and shadows. However, this technique still bears some errors for pavement crack recognition errors, thus in the present work, the factors contributed to these errors in laser scanning system are first analyzed, and then a decision model for the laser scanning pavement crack detection system based on the hypothesis test is proposed. Experimental analyses and results show that this model not only allows us to build the relationship between the contribution factors and crack detection accuracy and to provide the criteria to compare the detection accuracy for the different roads, but also can be used to judge whether the crack exists with a reasonable number of deformed light stripes. Therefore, the proposed decision model can provide guidance on the pavement crack detection and has a practical value.

  17. Roof Modelling Potential of Unmanned Air Vehicle Point Clouds with Respect to Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakis, Serkan; Gunes Sefercik, Umut; Atalay, Can

    2016-07-01

    In parallel with the improvement of laser scanning technologies, dense point clouds which provide the detailed description of terrain and non-terrain objects became indispensable for remotely-sensed data users. Owing to the large demand, besides laser scanning, point clouds were started to achieve using photogrammetric images. Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) images are one of the most preferred data for creating dense point clouds by the advantage of low cost, rapid and periodically gain. In this study, we tried to assess the roof modelling potential of UAV point clouds by comparing three dimensional (3D) roof models produced from UAV and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds. In the study, very popular low cost action camera SJ4000 and Faro Laser Scanner Focus3D X 330 were used to provide point clouds and the roof of Bulent Ecevit University Civil Aviation Academy building was utilized. For the validation of horizontal and vertical geolocation accuracies, standard deviation was used as the main indicator. The visual results demonstrated that UAV roof model is almost coherent with TLS roof model after the filtering-based refinement on noisy pixels and systematic bias correction. Moreover, the horizontal geolocation accuracy is approx. |5cm| both in X and Y directions and bias corrected vertical geolocation accuracy is approx. 17cm for zero roof slope.

  18. 3D laser scanning and modelling of the Dhow heritage for the Qatar National Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetherelt, A.; Cooper, J. P.; Zazzaro, C.

    2014-08-01

    Curating boats can be difficult. They are complex structures, often demanding to conserve whether in or out of the water; they are usually large, difficult to move on land, and demanding of gallery space. Communicating life on board to a visiting public in the terra firma context of a museum can be difficult. Boats in their native environment are inherently dynamic artifacts. In a museum they can be static and divorced from the maritime context that might inspire engagement. New technologies offer new approaches to these problems. 3D laser scanning and digital modeling offers museums a multifaceted means of recording, monitoring, studying and communicating watercraft in their care. In this paper we describe the application of 3D laser scanning and subsequent digital modeling. Laser scans were further developed using computer-generated imagery (CGI) modeling techniques to produce photorealistic 3D digital models for development into interactive, media-based museum displays. The scans were also used to generate 2D naval lines and orthographic drawings as a lasting curatorial record of the dhows held by the National Museum of Qatar.

  19. Compensation of temporal and spatial dispersion for multiphoton acousto-optic laser-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay; Saggau, Peter

    2003-10-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy, acousto-optic (AO) deflection provides a means to quickly position a laser beam to random locations throughout the field-of-view. Compared to conventional laser-scanning using galvanometer-driven mirrors, this approach increases the frame rate and signal-to-noise ratio, and reduces time spent illuminating sites of no interest. However, random-access AO scanning has not yet been combined with multi-photon microscopy, primarily because the femtosecond laser pulses employed are subject to significant amounts of both spatial and temporal dispersion upon propagation through common AO materials. Left uncompensated, spatial dispersion reduces the microscope"s spatial resolution while temporal dispersion reduces the multi-photon excitation efficacy. In previous work, we have demonstrated, 1) the efficacy of a single diffraction grating scheme which reduces the spatial dispersion at least 3-fold throughout the field-of-view, and 2) the use of a novel stacked-prism pre-chirper for compensating the temporal dispersion of a pair of AODs using a shorter mechanical path length (2-4X) than standard prism-pair arrangements. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the use of these compensation approaches with a custom-made large-area slow-shear TeO2 AOD specifically suited for the development of a high-resolution 2-D random-access AO scanning multi-photon laser-scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM).

  20. A large-field polarisation-resolved laser scanning microscope: applications to CARS imaging.

    PubMed

    DE Vito, G; Canta, A; Marmiroli, P; Piazza, V

    2015-11-01

    Laser-scanning imaging techniques are frequently used to probe the molecule spatial orientation in a sample of interest by exploiting selection rules depending on the polarisation of the excitation light. For the successful implementation of these techniques the precise control of the polarisation at the sample level is of fundamental importance. Polarisation distortions induced by the optical elements are often the main limitation factor for the maximum size of the field-of-view in polarisation-resolved (PR) laser-scanning microscopy, since for large scanning angles the polarisation distortions may mask the real sample structure. Here we shall demonstrate the implementation of large-field-of-view PR microscopy and show PR CARS imaging of mouse spinal cord thanks to a careful design of the laser-beam optical path. We shall show that this design leads to strongly suppressed distortions and quantify their effects on the final images. Although the focus of this work is on CARS imaging, we stress that the approaches described here can be successfully applied to a wide range of PR laser-scanning techniques.

  1. Analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry Data for Documentation of Historical Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuçak, R. A.; Kiliç, F.; Kisa, A.

    2016-10-01

    Historical artifacts living from the past until today exposed to many destructions non-naturally or naturally. For this reason, The protection and documentation studies of Cultural Heritage to inform the next generations are accelerating day by day in the whole world. The preservation of historical artifacts using advanced 3D measurement technologies becomes an efficient tool for mapping solutions. There are many methods for documentation and restoration of historic structures. In addition to traditional methods such as simple hand measurement and tachometry, terrestrial laser scanning is rapidly becoming one of the most commonly used techniques due to its completeness, accuracy and fastness characteristics. This study evaluates terrestrial laser scanning(TLS) technology and photogrammetry for documenting the historical artifacts facade data in 3D Environment. PhotoModeler software developed by Eos System was preferred for Photogrammetric method. Leica HDS 6000 laser scanner developed by Leica Geosystems and Cyclone software which is the laser data evaluation software belonging to the company is preferred for Terrestrial Laser Scanning method. Taking into account the results obtained with this software product is intended to provide a contribution to the studies for the documentation of cultural heritage.

  2. Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Measuring Stream Bank Erosion within Legacy Sediments: Data Processing and Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starek, M. J.; Mitasova, H.; Wegmann, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    Land clearing for agricultural purposes following European settlement of America resulted in upland erosion rates 50-400 times above long-term geologic rates in much of the North Carolina Piedmont region. A considerable amount of the eroded sediment was subsequently aggraded on floodplains and impounded in the slackwater ponds behind milldams. This trapped "legacy" sediment is commonly mistaken for natural floodplain deposition and has remained largely unrecognized as a potential source of accelerated sediment erosion contributing to modern water quality impairment. In this study, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is utilized to monitor stream bank evolution along a reach that has breached a former millpond. Due to the unique surface geometry and orientation of the stream bank, vegetation occlusion, and true 3D structure of the point cloud, a systematic data processing approach is implemented to compute the change in sediment volume between repeat TLS surveys. The processing approach consists of the following four steps: 1) segmentation of the stream bank point cloud; 2) transformation of the point cloud such that the xy plane is parallel to the trend of the bank; 3) filter vegetation by selecting local lowest point within a grid cell; 4) smooth high frequency noise 5) generate bare earth digital elevation model (DEM). From the DEMs, change in volume was quantified for a 13 m x 3.5 m section of the stream bank providing an estimate on erosion rates and slumping between surveys. The major mechanisms for the observed changes are freeze-thaw events and fluvial entrainment. To evaluate the surface evolution between the distinct sedimentary layers (legacy vs non-legacy) that comprise the stream bank, elevation change is modeled as a continuous trivariate function z = f(x,y,t) where x,y is horizontal location, t is time, and z is a first-surface referenced elevation. Hence, z=0 for all x,y at t=0, time of first survey. The filtered, transformed, and first

  3. Laser scanning methods and a phase comparison, modulated laser range finder for terrain sensing on a Mars roving vehicle. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herb, G. T.

    1973-01-01

    Two areas of a laser range finder for a Mars roving vehicle are investigated: (1) laser scanning systems, and (2) range finder methods and implementation. Several ways of rapidly scanning a laser are studied. Two digital deflectors and a matrix of laser diodes, are found to be acceptable. A complete range finder scanning system of high accuracy is proposed. The problem of incident laser spot distortion on the terrain is discussed. The instrumentation for a phase comparison, modulated laser range finder is developed and sections of it are tested.

  4. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  5. Ship Maintenance Processes with Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management and 3D Terrestrial Laser Scanning Tools: Reducing Costs and Increasing Productivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-30

    approach that incorporates the 3D terrestrial laser scanning (3D TLS) and collaborative product lifecycle management (collab- PLM ) tool suite. Results...incorporated into final implementation of the 3D TLS and collab- PLM tools. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...terrestrial laser scanning (3D TLS) and collaborative product lifecycle management (collab- PLM ) tool suite. Results suggest that when the SHIPMAIN process

  6. Terrestrial laser scanning for high resolution cyclostratigraphy of chert in pelagic limestone series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penasa, L.; Franceschi, M.; Preto, N.

    2012-04-01

    We here propose the use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) for the mapping of chert on natural outcrops and for rapid extraction of its distribution along stratigraphic sections. The technique permits rapid production of high-definition time series for cyclostratigraphic analysis. Chert, sometimes referred to as flint, is a widespread component of sedimentary successions. It is often found in deep water and pelagic sediments and is constituted by cryptocrystalline varieties of quartz. It is generally accepted that the origin of chert is principally biogenic; it derives from the slow alteration, through a process called maturation, of opaline organic components as tests and spicules under the influence of pore waters. Most often, chert forms nodules of various size, or more or less continuous layers. Its color shows strong variability (white, red, gray, black). Although it could record paleoceanographic and climatic changes because of its biogenic nature, the cyclostratigraphic study of chert is largely neglected. This is mainly due to the difficulty of logging it. Hand logging is time consuming, but also, because of nodules' highly variable shape, lateral variability of chert abundance is large. Photographic image-processing techniques could help in principle, but they become difficult to use when chert has a color similar to that of the host rock. Chert is easily detectable in TLS generated images because of its very low reflectivity at infrared (IR) wavelengths, also where the color of chert in visible light is close to that of the host rock. Thus, TLS data can be used to map the distribution of chert on an outcrop, and to compute its abundance along a stratigraphic section. The ultimate result of such data processing, for which a suite of original procedures was implemented, is a stratigraphic log that is suitable for time series analysis. A section in the early Cretaceous Maiolica Formation of Central Italy (Gubbio) was considered as preliminary case study for

  7. CdSe/CdS-quantum rods: fluorescent probes for in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, Jelena; Krapf, Lisa; Wolter, Christopher; Schmidtke, Christian; Merkl, Jan-Philip; Jochum, Tobias; Kornowski, Andreas; Schüth, Anna; Gebert, Andreas; Hüttmann, Gereon; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Weller, Horst

    2014-08-01

    CdSe/CdS-Quantum-dots-quantum-rods (QDQRs) with an aspect ratio of ~6 are prepared via the seeded growth method, encapsulated within a shell of crosslinked poly(isoprene)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PI-b-PEG) diblock copolymer, and transferred from the organic phase into aqueous media. Their photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 78% is not compromised by the phase transfer. Within a period of two months the PLQY of QDQRs in aqueous solution at neutral pH decreases only slightly (to ~65%). The two-photon (TP) action cross sections of QDQRs (~105 GM) are two orders of magnitude higher than those of CdSe/CdS/ZnS-core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs, ~103 GM) with comparable diameter (~5 nm). After applying PI-b-PEG encapsulated QDQRs onto the small intestinal mucosa of mice in vivo, their strong red fluorescence can easily be observed by two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and clearly distinguished from autofluorescent background. Our results demonstrate that PI-b-PEG encapsulated CdSe/CdS-QDQRs are excellent probes for studying the uptake and fate of nanoparticles by two-photon imaging techniques in vivo.CdSe/CdS-Quantum-dots-quantum-rods (QDQRs) with an aspect ratio of ~6 are prepared via the seeded growth method, encapsulated within a shell of crosslinked poly(isoprene)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PI-b-PEG) diblock copolymer, and transferred from the organic phase into aqueous media. Their photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 78% is not compromised by the phase transfer. Within a period of two months the PLQY of QDQRs in aqueous solution at neutral pH decreases only slightly (to ~65%). The two-photon (TP) action cross sections of QDQRs (~105 GM) are two orders of magnitude higher than those of CdSe/CdS/ZnS-core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs, ~103 GM) with comparable diameter (~5 nm). After applying PI-b-PEG encapsulated QDQRs onto the small intestinal mucosa of mice in vivo, their strong red fluorescence can easily be observed by two-photon laser

  8. Improving peatland erosion rate measurements through the use of terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, R.; Holden, J.; Jones, R.; Lloyd, A.

    2013-12-01

    Globally peatlands account for 30-50% of all carbon stored within soils (Holden, 2005). Within the UK they represent the single largest terrestrial carbon store, with blanket bogs covering roughly 7.5% (Tallis et al., 1997); unfortunately these upland blanket bogs are often found in a degraded state. The amount of carbon being lost to erosional processes in peatlands is poorly constrained, with estimates typically being based on traditional low-tech methods. Erosion pins have been the primary method for measuring erosion rates in peatlands; however their use is prone to error due to the depth of peat and its high water content which allows both horizontal and vertical movement through time. Erosion pins can only realistically be used over a relatively small area and assume erosion remains constant between pins making any upscaling problematic. Therefore, innovative methods are required to improve estimates of peatland erosion that are capable of increasing both spatial coverage and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanning is increasingly being used by geomorphologists to produce highly detailed 3D topographic maps. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the ability of terrestrial laser scanning to measure erosion rates within peatlands and to identify any obstacles that may need to be overcome. An actively eroding blanket bog in northern England was chosen as the test site with surveys being carried out before and after winter as active erosion is most likely during winter months. Erosion measurements were also made using erosion pins to allow comparisons between the two methods. Terrestrial laser scanning was not only found to offer vastly improved spatial coverage compared with erosion pins but was also able to provide data at a much higher resolution. Erosion rates calculated using erosion pins were significantly higher than the average rate calculated using terrestrial laser scanning (-35mm compared to +2.5mm), this overestimation by the erosion pins primarily

  9. Extraction of Forest Roads from Full-waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricic, Ana; Hollaus, Markus

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge about the position of forest roads is important for the management and protection of forests. Most often this information is not available on a digital form so that it can be integrated into a GIS to use it e.g. for routing applications or to plan harvesting activities. Furthermore, the available information about forest roads is often not up-to-date. The extraction of forest roads from remote sensing data i.e. aerial photographs is often limited due to the visibility of the terrain within a forest. The increasing availability of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data has changed this situation during the last years. As an active measurement system ALS provide geometric information from the forest floor as well as the forest canopy. Additionally, the new generation of ALS sensors, the so-called full-waveform sensors provide in addition to the geometric information (i.e. 3D position, echo width) radiometric information (i.e. backscatter cross section) about the backscattering objects, which are excellent data sources to describe the terrain surface within a forest. Thus the aim of this study is to develop a semi-automatic method to extract the position of forest roads from full-waveform ALS data. Based on the 3D point cloud different raster layers were derived such as the digital terrain model (DTM), the slope, the backscatter cross section, different roughness parameters (i.e. echo width, standard deviation of plane fitting residuals of terrain points), the vertical component of the surface normals and the normalized digital surface model (nDSM), which represents the object height above the natural ground. The developed workflow classifies each input raster separately into the classes roads and non-roads. Morphological operations were applied on the classified raster datasets to smooth the outline of the extracted roads and to remove any small gaps in the detected roads. Several raster outputs were combined and used further for additional GIS analysis and

  10. The Benefits of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data Fusion Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, S. J.; Kurz, T. H.; Schneider, D.

    2012-10-01

    Close range hyperspectral imaging is a developing method for the analysis and identification of material composition in many applications, such as in within the earth sciences. Using compact imaging devices in the field allows near-vertical topography to be imaged, thus bypassing the key limitations of viewing angle and resolution that preclude the use of airborne and spaceborne platforms. Terrestrial laser scanning allows 3D topography to be captured with high precision and spatial resolution. The combination of 3D geometry from laser scanning, and material properties from hyperspectral imaging allows new fusion products to be created, adding new information for solving application problems. This paper highlights the advantages of terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral integration, focussing on the qualitative and quantitative aspects, with examples from a geological field application. Accurate co-registration of the two data types is required. This allows 2D pixels to be linked to the 3D lidar geometry, giving increased quantitative analysis as classified material vectors are projected to 3D space for calculation of areas and examination of spatial relationships. User interpretation of hyperspectral results in a spatially-meaningful manner is facilitated using visual methods that combine the geometric and mineralogical products in a 3D environment. Point cloud classification and the use of photorealistic modelling enhance qualitative validation and interpretation, and allow image registration accuracy to be checked. A method for texture mapping of lidar meshes with multiple image textures, both conventional digital photos and hyperspectral results, is described. The integration of terrestrial laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging is a valuable means of providing new analysis methods, suitable for many applications requiring linked geometric and chemical information.

  11. Gravel transport by ice in a subarctic river from accurate laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsari, Eliisa; Wang, Yunsheng; Kaartinen, Harri; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Kukko, Antero; Vaaja, Matti; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Alho, Petteri

    2015-10-01

    For decades the importance of ice and the effects of cold-region processes on river channel morphology have been discussed, with a general consensus as to their importance emerging only recently. River ice cover, anchor ice, frazil ice, and ice jams may not only scour the channel bed and banks but also pick up, transport, and deposit fine sediments and gravels during winter, especially during the spring ice breakup period. However, knowledge of the interactions between coarse sediment transport and ice processes remains insufficient, particularly in rockier river reaches, with a lack of accurate and sufficiently extensive data hindering their quantification. The aim of this study was to quantify and analyse the impact of river ice on gravel transport in a subarctic river during one winter via the acquisition of laser scanning data for the river channel and ice surface. Terrestrial and mobile laser scanning were performed in 2012-2013 on the Tana River in northern Finland. Both of these techniques are considered accurate and applicable for detecting elevation and volumetric changes in river bed, defining gravel clast sizes, and detecting the movement of individual clasts. More importantly, ice surface, thickness, and decay during spring were also captured via laser scanning. In the winter of 2012-2013, a period characterised by an absence of ice jams and mid-winter ice-decay periods, with spring ice breakup discharges close to average yearly conditions, ice had the most significant role, greater than that of flowing water, in erosion and transport of coarse sediment from the channel bed and gently sloping banks. Changes in river bed elevation and volume were recorded throughout the study site, and erosion predominated. In addition to broader scale erosion, the movement of single clasts up to 2 m in size occurred. However, the observed overall channel change patterns did not coincide with the areas of fastest ice decay. The obtained results could also be applied to

  12. Tree-centric mapping of forest carbon density from airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral data.

    PubMed

    Dalponte, Michele; Coomes, David A

    2016-10-01

    Forests are a major component of the global carbon cycle, and accurate estimation of forest carbon stocks and fluxes is important in the context of anthropogenic global change. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data sets are increasingly recognized as outstanding data sources for high-fidelity mapping of carbon stocks at regional scales.We develop a tree-centric approach to carbon mapping, based on identifying individual tree crowns (ITCs) and species from airborne remote sensing data, from which individual tree carbon stocks are calculated. We identify ITCs from the laser scanning point cloud using a region-growing algorithm and identifying species from airborne hyperspectral data by machine learning. For each detected tree, we predict stem diameter from its height and crown-width estimate. From that point on, we use well-established approaches developed for field-based inventories: above-ground biomasses of trees are estimated using published allometries and summed within plots to estimate carbon density.We show this approach is highly reliable: tests in the Italian Alps demonstrated a close relationship between field- and ALS-based estimates of carbon stocks (r(2) = 0·98). Small trees are invisible from the air, and a correction factor is required to accommodate this effect.An advantage of the tree-centric approach over existing area-based methods is that it can produce maps at any scale and is fundamentally based on field-based inventory methods, making it intuitive and transparent. Airborne laser scanning, hyperspectral sensing and computational power are all advancing rapidly, making it increasingly feasible to use ITC approaches for effective mapping of forest carbon density also inside wider carbon mapping programs like REDD++.

  13. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of porcine skin: implications for human wound healing studies

    PubMed Central

    VARDAXIS, N. J.; BRANS, T. A.; BOON, M. E.; KREIS, R. W.; MARRES, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of porcine skin as examined by light microscopy is reviewed and its similarities to and differences from human skin are highlighted. Special imaging techniques and staining procedures are described and their use in gathering morphological information in porcine skin is discussed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was employed to examine the structure of porcine skin and the findings are presented as an adjunct to the information already available in the literature. It is concluded that CLSM provides valuable additional morphological information to material examined by conventional microscopy and is useful for wound healing studies in the porcine model. PMID:9183682

  14. Documenting Bronze Age Akrotiri on Thera Using Laser Scanning, Image-Based Modelling and Geophysical Prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinks, I.; Wallner, M.; Kucera, M.; Verhoeven, G.; Torrejón Valdelomar, J.; Löcker, K.; Nau, E.; Sevara, C.; Aldrian, L.; Neubauer, E.; Klein, M.

    2017-02-01

    The excavated architecture of the exceptional prehistoric site of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Thera/Santorini is endangered by gradual decay, damage due to accidents, and seismic shocks, being located on an active volcano in an earthquake-prone area. Therefore, in 2013 and 2014 a digital documentation project has been conducted with support of the National Geographic Society in order to generate a detailed digital model of Akrotiri's architecture using terrestrial laser scanning and image-based modeling. Additionally, non-invasive geophysical prospection has been tested in order to investigate its potential to explore and map yet buried archaeological remains. This article describes the project and the generated results.

  15. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  16. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; ...

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  17. Automatic Geo-Referencing Mobile Laser Scanning Data to Uav Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Huang, X.; Zhang, F.; Fu, Z.; Yang, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a framework for adjusting mobile laser scanning point cloud data to improve the accuracy is proposed by integrating high resolution UAV images and MLS. First, aerial triangulated images with a few high accuracy ground control points are taken as control information. Then, a hierarchical strategy is proposed for robust pairwise registration of feature points between point cloud and images, so as to find the deviation of the point cloud. In the next step, a shape-preserving piecewise cubic interpolating method is employed to fit the time dependent error model of the trajectory. Finally, experiments are given to prove the effectiveness of proposed framework.

  18. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  19. Re-description of Craspodema reflectans (Nematoda, Cyatholaimidae) using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Semprucci, Federica; Burattini, Sabrina

    2015-06-12

    Craspodema reflectans, erected by Gerlach 1964, is here re-described from some specimens recently found in the Maldivian archipelago and the implication of the new findings for the taxonomy of the Craspodema genus is discussed. Accordingly, an emended diagnosis of Craspodema genus and C. reflectans species are proposed. New data are also provided with the aid of the confocal laser scanning microscopy, using the natural fluorescence of the nematodes. The approach described here lays new foundations for the study of Museum collection material and it may be decisive for capture of new morphological details.

  20. Image distortion and its correction in linear galvanometric mirrors-based laser-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Zhenguo; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    To simplify imaging focusing and calibration tasks, a laser-scanning microscope needs to scan at a moderate frame rate. The inertia of a galvanometric scanner leads to time delays when following external commands, which subsequently introduces image distortions that deteriorate as scan frequency increases. Sinusoidal and triangular waveforms were examined as fast axis driving patterns. The interplay among driving pattern, frequency, sampling rate, phase shift, linear scanning range, and their effect on reconstructed images was discussed. Utilizing position feedback from the linear galvo scanners, the effect of response time could be automatically compensated in real time. Precompensated triangular driving waveform offered the least amount of image distortion.

  1. A Survey Study of the Blast Furnace at Kuangshan Village Using 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Huang, Xing; Qian, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The blast furnace from the Northern Song Dynasty at Kuangshan Village is the tallest blast furnace that remains from ancient China. Previous studies have assumed that the furnace had a closed mouth. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) model of the blast furnace is constructed using 3D laser scanning technology, and accurate profile data are obtained using software. It is shown that the furnace throat is smaller than had been previously thought and that the furnace mouth is of the open type. This new furnace profile constitutes a discovery in the history of iron-smelting technology.

  2. Ti-6Al-4V electron beam weld qualification using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjara, P. . E-mail: priti.wanjara@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca; Brochu, M.; Jahazi, M.

    2005-03-15

    Processing conditions for manufacturing Ti-6Al-4V components by welding using an electron beam source are known to influence the transformation microstructure in the narrow fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld region. This work examined the effect of multiple-sequence welding on the characteristics of the transformed beta microstructure, using laser scanning confocal microscopy to resolve the Widmanstaetten alpha-beta structure in the fusion zone. The evolution in the alpha interlamellar spacing and plate thickness with processing was then related to microhardness measurements in the weld region.

  3. Terrestrial Laser Scanning Cultural Heritage preservation in case of natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordic, B.; Medak, D.; Pribicevic, B.

    2009-04-01

    Croatian Adriatic coast and the City of Zagreb area are hazardous with respect to earthquake occurance. These areas are rich with cultural monuments, buildings, sculptures... Accurate 3D documentation is needed for reconstruction in case of damage caused by natural disasters like earthquake, landslide ,fire... The technology of terestrial laser scanning is a promising method for providing exact 3D models of cultural heritage. Meshes, point-clouds and models should be collected and constructed. Georeferenced models can be used for tourism as a basis for virtual worlds available both in the WWW or on DVD-s...

  4. On-line monitoring of quality by laser scanning on rolled aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedl, Roland; Maneke, Gerd; Benninghoff, Heinz-Juergen

    1993-12-01

    On-line inspection of fast moving surfaces is one of the domains of laser scanning methods, especially whenever extremely small flaws are to be monitored on high quality products. Results of surface inspection on rolled aluminum based on several years' experience with several generations of inspection equipment are presented. Surface texture and characteristics of aluminum flaws require a problem related design of the laser scanner hardware for operation in the environment of a rolling mill plant. Fast intelligent data processing develops the inspection equipment to the center part of a plant-wide quality concept that strongly supports the idea of producing quality instead of only selecting quality.

  5. Applying RANSAC Algorithm for Fitting Scanning Strips from Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszczak-Bąk, Wioleta; Janicka, Joanna; Sobieraj-Żłobińska, Anna

    2016-12-01

    During the development of the data acquired by airborne laser scanning the important issue is the fitting and georeferencing of ALS point clouds by means of the tie surfaces and the reference planes. The process of scanning strips adjustment is based on mutual integration of point clouds (scanning strips) and their adaptation to the reference planes. In simultaneous adjustment all strips are combined into one geometrically coherent block, to which the coordinates are given. In the process of determining discrepancies between scanning strips it is important to determine the correct size of the shifts (offsets). Authors propose to do this by using RANSAC algorithm.

  6. Monitoring gully change: A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning using a case study from Aratula, Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R.; Armston, John D.; Muir, Jasmine; Stiller, Issac

    2017-04-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technologies capture spatially detailed estimates of surface topography and when collected multi-temporally can be used to assess geomorphic change. The sensitivity and repeatability of ALS measurements to characterise geomorphic change in topographically complex environments such as gullies; however, remains an area lacking quantitative research. In this study, we captured coincident ALS and TLS datasets to assess their ability and synergies to detect geomorphic change for a gully located in Aratula, southeast Queensland, Australia. We initially used the higher spatial density and ranging accuracy of TLS to provide an assessment of the Digital Elevation Models (DEM) derived from ALS within a gully environment. Results indicated mean residual errors of 0.13 and 0.09 m along with standard deviation (SD) of residual errors of 0.20 and 0.16 m using pixel sizes of 0.5 and 1.0 m, respectively. The positive mean residual errors confirm that TLS data consistently detected deeper sections of the gully than ALS. We also compared the repeatability of ALS and TLS for characterising gully morphology. This indicated that the sensitivity to detect change using ALS is substantially lower than TLS, as expected, and that the ALS survey characteristics influence the ability to detect change. Notably, we found that using one ALS transect (mean density of 5 points / m2) as opposed to three transects increased the SD of residual error by approximately 30%. The supplied classification of ALS ground points was also demonstrated to misclassify gully features as non-ground, with minimum elevation filtering found to provide a more accurate DEM of the gully. The number and placement of terrestrial laser scans were also found to influence the derived DEMs. Furthermore, we applied change detection using two ALS data captures over a four year period and four TLS field surveys over an eight month period. This demonstrated that

  7. Voxel-Based Approach for Estimating Urban Tree Volume from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonderach, C.; Voegtle, T.; Adler, P.

    2012-07-01

    The importance of single trees and the determination of related parameters has been recognized in recent years, e.g. for forest inventories or management. For urban areas an increasing interest in the data acquisition of trees can be observed concerning aspects like urban climate, CO2 balance, and environmental protection. Urban trees differ significantly from natural systems with regard to the site conditions (e.g. technogenic soils, contaminants, lower groundwater level, regular disturbance), climate (increased temperature, reduced humidity) and species composition and arrangement (habitus and health status) and therefore allometric relations cannot be transferred from natural sites to urban areas. To overcome this problem an extended approach was developed for a fast and non-destructive extraction of branch volume, DBH (diameter at breast height) and height of single trees from point clouds of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). For data acquisition, the trees were scanned with highest scan resolution from several (up to five) positions located around the tree. The resulting point clouds (20 to 60 million points) are analysed with an algorithm based on voxel (volume elements) structure, leading to an appropriate data reduction. In a first step, two kinds of noise reduction are carried out: the elimination of isolated voxels as well as voxels with marginal point density. To obtain correct volume estimates, the voxels inside the stem and branches (interior voxels) where voxels contain no laser points must be regarded. For this filling process, an easy and robust approach was developed based on a layer-wise (horizontal layers of the voxel structure) intersection of four orthogonal viewing directions. However, this procedure also generates several erroneous "phantom" voxels, which have to be eliminated. For this purpose the previous approach was extended by a special region growing algorithm. In a final step the volume is determined layer-wise based on the extracted

  8. 3D Imaging of Porous Media Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy with Application to Microscale Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.

    1999-02-10

    We present advances in the application of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the microgeometry of porous geologic and engineering materials. We discuss technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including both its advantages and limitations. Confocal imaging can be used to optically section a material, with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes. The resultant volumetric image data, consisting of fluorescence intensities for typically {approximately}50 million voxels in XYZ space, can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the two-phase medium. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in sandstone, characterizing brittle failure processes in low-porosity rock deformed under triaxial loading conditions in the laboratory, and analyzing the microstructure of porous ceramic insulations. We then describe approaches to extract statistical microgeometric descriptions from volumetric image data, and present results derived from confocal volumetric data sets. Finally, we develop the use of confocal image data to automatically generate a three-dimensional mesh for numerical pore-scale flow simulations.

  9. Semi-automated extraction and delineation of 3D roads of street scene from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Fang, Lina; Li, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Accurate 3D road information is important for applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D modeling. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is an efficient technique for capturing dense point clouds that can be used to construct detailed road models for large areas. This paper presents a method for extracting and delineating roads from large-scale MLS point clouds. The proposed method partitions MLS point clouds into a set of consecutive "scanning lines", which each consists of a road cross section. A moving window operator is used to filter out non-ground points line by line, and curb points are detected based on curb patterns. The detected curb points are tracked and refined so that they are both globally consistent and locally similar. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, experiments were conducted using two types of street-scene point clouds captured by Optech's Lynx Mobile Mapper System. The completeness, correctness, and quality of the extracted roads are over 94.42%, 91.13%, and 91.3%, respectively, which proves the proposed method is a promising solution for extracting 3D roads from MLS point clouds.

  10. 3D modelling of facade features on large sites acquired by vehicle based laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulaassal, H.; Landes, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2011-12-01

    Mobile mapping laser scanning systems have become more and more widespread for the acquisition of millions of 3D points on large and geometrically complex urban sites. Vehicle-based Laser Scanning (VLS) systems travel many kilometers while acquiring raw point clouds which are registered in real time in a common coordinate system. Improvements of the acquisition steps as well as the automatic processing of the collected point clouds are still a conundrum for researchers. This paper shows some results obtained by application, on mobile laser scanner data, of segmentation and reconstruction algorithms intended initially to generate individual vector facade models using stationary Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data. The operating algorithms are adapted so as to take into account characteristics of VLS data. The intrinsic geometry of a point cloud as well as the relative geometry between registered point clouds are different from that obtained by a static TLS. The amount of data provided by this acquisition technique is another issue. Such particularities should be taken into consideration while processing this type of point clouds. The segmentation of VLS data is carried out based on an adaptation of RANSAC algorithm. Edge points of each element are extracted by applying a second algorithm. Afterwards, the vector models of each facade element are reconstructed. In order to validate the results, large samples with different characteristics have been introduced in the developed processing chain. The limitations as well as the capabilities of each process will be emphasized in terms of geometry and processing time.

  11. Effects of scanning orientation on outlier formation in 3D laser scanning of reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutao; Feng, Hsi-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Inspecting objects with reflective surfaces using 3D laser scanning is a demanded but challenging part inspection task due to undesirable specular reflections, which produce extensive outliers in the scanned point cloud. These outliers need to be removed in order to alleviate subsequent data processing issues. Many existing automatic outlier removal methods do not detect outliers according to the outlier formation properties. As a result, these methods only offer limited capabilities in removing extensive and complex outliers from scanning objects with reflective surfaces. This paper reports an empirical study which experimentally investigates the outlier formation characteristics in relation to the scanning orientation of the laser probe. The objective is to characterize the scanning orientation effects on outlier formation in order to facilitate the development of an effective outlier detection and removal method. Such an experimental investigation was hardly done before. It has been found in this work that scanning orientation can directly affect outlier extensity and occurrence in 3D laser scanning. A general guidance on proper scan path planning can then be provided with an aim to reduce the occurrence of outliers. Further, the observed dependency of outlier formation on scanning orientation can be exploited to facilitate effective and automatic outlier detection and removal.

  12. Entropy-Based Registration of Point Clouds Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Smartphone GPS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maolin; Wang, Siying; Wang, Mingwei; Wan, Youchuan; He, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    Automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning point clouds is a crucial but unresolved topic that is of great interest in many domains. This study combines terrestrial laser scanner with a smartphone for the coarse registration of leveled point clouds with small roll and pitch angles and height differences, which is a novel sensor combination mode for terrestrial laser scanning. The approximate distance between two neighboring scan positions is firstly calculated with smartphone GPS coordinates. Then, 2D distribution entropy is used to measure the distribution coherence between the two scans and search for the optimal initial transformation parameters. To this end, we propose a method called Iterative Minimum Entropy (IME) to correct initial transformation parameters based on two criteria: the difference between the average and minimum entropy and the deviation from the minimum entropy to the expected entropy. Finally, the presented method is evaluated using two data sets that contain tens of millions of points from panoramic and non-panoramic, vegetation-dominated and building-dominated cases and can achieve high accuracy and efficiency. PMID:28117693

  13. Benchmarking the Performance of Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Kukko, Antero; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    The performance of various mobile laser scanning systems was tested on an established urban test field. The test was connected to the European Spatial Data Research (EuroSDR) project “Mobile Mapping—Road Environment Mapping Using Mobile Laser Scanning”. Several commercial and research systems collected laser point cloud data on the same test field. The system comparisons focused on planimetric and elevation errors using a filtered digital elevation model, poles, and building corners as the reference objects. The results revealed the high quality of the point clouds generated by all of the tested systems under good GNSS conditions. With all professional systems properly calibrated, the elevation accuracy was better than 3.5 cm up to a range of 35 m. The best system achieved a planimetric accuracy of 2.5 cm over a range of 45 m. The planimetric errors increased as a function of range, but moderately so if the system was properly calibrated. The main focus on mobile laser scanning development in the near future should be on the improvement of the trajectory solution, especially under non-ideal conditions, using both improvements in hardware and software. Test fields are relatively easy to implement in built environments and they are feasible for verifying and comparing the performance of different systems and also for improving system calibration to achieve optimum quality.

  14. Entropy-Based Registration of Point Clouds Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Smartphone GPS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maolin; Wang, Siying; Wang, Mingwei; Wan, Youchuan; He, Peipei

    2017-01-20

    Automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning point clouds is a crucial but unresolved topic that is of great interest in many domains. This study combines terrestrial laser scanner with a smartphone for the coarse registration of leveled point clouds with small roll and pitch angles and height differences, which is a novel sensor combination mode for terrestrial laser scanning. The approximate distance between two neighboring scan positions is firstly calculated with smartphone GPS coordinates. Then, 2D distribution entropy is used to measure the distribution coherence between the two scans and search for the optimal initial transformation parameters. To this end, we propose a method called Iterative Minimum Entropy (IME) to correct initial transformation parameters based on two criteria: the difference between the average and minimum entropy and the deviation from the minimum entropy to the expected entropy. Finally, the presented method is evaluated using two data sets that contain tens of millions of points from panoramic and non-panoramic, vegetation-dominated and building-dominated cases and can achieve high accuracy and efficiency.

  15. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-05-04

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach.

  16. Compact two-photon laser-scanning microscope made from minimally modified commercial components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay; Hoogland, Tycho; Losavio, Bradley E.; McQuiston, A. R.; Saggau, Peter

    2002-06-01

    A compact two-photon laser-scanning microscope (TPLSM) was constructed using a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser (Biolight 1000, Coherent Laser Group) and a small confocal laser scan-head (PCM2000, Nikon Bioscience). The laser emits at 1047nm and is fiber-coupled to a compact compressor unit producing a pulse-width of ~175fsec. Both the pulse compressor and confocal scan head were interfaced on a small optical breadboard that was directly attached to an upright research microscope (Eclipse E600FN, Nikon Bioscience). Two-photon fluorescence emitted from the specimen was collected into a multimode fiber and transmitted directly to an external PMT supplied with the Nikon confocal system. The modifications to the scanhead were minimal (a single mirror replacement) and did not interfere with its confocal function. The resulting system offers several advantages: compact size, turnkey operation, and the ability to translate the microscope rather than an often delicate specimen. In addition, it is possible to switch between confocal and two-photon operation, allowing for straightforward comparison. Using this compact TPLSM, we obtained structural and functional images from hippocampal neurons in living brain slices using commonly available fluorophores.

  17. Application of laser scan microscopy in vivo for wound healing characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaika, V.; Alborova, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.; Koch, S.

    2010-09-01

    Considering the advancing age of the population, wound healing disturbances are becoming increasingly important in clinical routine. The development of wound healing creams and lotions as well as therapy control require an objective evaluation of the wound healing process, which represents the destruction of the barrier. Therefore, transepidermal water loss measurements are often carried out. These measurements have the disadvantage that they are disturbed by the interstitial fluid, which is located on the surface of chronic wounds and also by water components of the creams and lotions. Additionally, the TEWL measurements are very sensitive to temperature changes and to the anxiety of the volunteers. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the reepithelialization and barrier recovery of standardized wounds produced by the suction blister technique. It was demonstrated that this non-invasive, on-line spectroscopic method allows the evaluation of the wound healing process, without any disturbances. It was found that the wound healing starts not only from the edges of the wound, but also out of the hair follicles. The in vivo laser scanning microscopy is well suited to evaluate the efficacy of wound healing creams and for therapy control.

  18. Measuring calcium levels in Saprolegnia ferax using the two-photon laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilje, Osu

    2003-07-01

    xThe genus Saprolegnia in the phylum Oomycetes contains a number of parasitic species that can cause a range of important animal diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the calcium gradient, one of the growth regulating mechanisms, in Saprolegnia ferax. The two-photon laser scanning microscope allowed for detailed physiological measurements of calcium levels along the fungus-like hyphae of S.ferax. Calcium concentration was determined by making ratiometric calculation of emission levels of the calcium-sensitive fluorochrome Indo-1 at 485nm to 405nm. The calculated values were compared to the intracellular calibration values. The advantage of the two-photon laser scanning microscope is that it allows minor changes in concentration to be detected in highly localized regions of the hyphae. The technique used in this study minimized background and autofluorescence and therefore allowed for more accurate changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration to be detected. The calcium concentration at the hyphal tip and 5, 10 and 40μm distal to the tip were calculated to be 65, 17, 38 and 20nM respectively, confirming other studies that suggest a tip-high calcium gradient.

  19. Point-based and model-based geolocation analysis of airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefercik, Umut Gunes; Buyuksalih, Gurcan; Jacobsen, Karsten; Alkan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is one of the most effective remote sensing technologies providing precise three-dimensional (3-D) dense point clouds. A large-size ALS digital surface model (DSM) covering the whole Istanbul province was analyzed by point-based and model-based comprehensive statistical approaches. Point-based analysis was performed using checkpoints on flat areas. Model-based approaches were implemented in two steps as strip to strip comparing overlapping ALS DSMs individually in three subareas and comparing the merged ALS DSMs with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) DSMs in four other subareas. In the model-based approach, the standard deviation of height and normalized median absolute deviation were used as the accuracy indicators combined with the dependency of terrain inclination. The results demonstrate that terrain roughness has a strong impact on the vertical accuracy of ALS DSMs. From the relative horizontal shifts determined and partially improved by merging the overlapping strips and comparison of the ALS, and the TLS, data were found not to be negligible. The analysis of ALS DSM in relation to TLS DSM allowed us to determine the characteristics of the DSM in detail.

  20. LIDAR and Ins Fusion in Periods of GPS Outages for Mobile Laser Scanning Mapping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, I.; Filin, S.

    2011-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning systems are becoming an increasingly popular means to obtain 3D coverage on a large scale. To perform the mapping, the exact position of the vehicle must be known throughout the trajectory. Exact position is achieved via integration of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). Yet, in urban environments, cases of complete or even partial GPS outages may occur leaving the navigation solution to rely only on the INS. The INS navigation solution degrades with time as the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) measurements contains noise, which permeates into the navigation equations. Degradation of the position determination leads to loss of data in such segments. To circumvent such drift and its effects, we propose fusing INS with lidar data by using building edges. This detection of edges is then translated into position data, which is used as an aiding to the INS. It thereby enables the determination of the vehicle position with a satisfactory level accuracy, sufficient to perform the laser-scanning based mapping in those outage periods.

  1. Laser Scanning of a Monolithic Column during Processing in Middle Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajioka, O.; Hori, Y.

    2011-09-01

    From ancient quarries around Akoris in Middle Egypt, which belong to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, the stone blocks could be carried to the working area located in the outside of the city. Those blocks included a giant monolithic column measured approximately 14m in length, which had been cracked for reasons unknown and must have contributed to disuse of monolith. The first deal is a comparison of plans drawn by the point clouds by laser scanning with those coming from plane-tabling, which had been one of popular methods for measuring in the last century. This part shows how the laser scanning technology is useful in far better measuring and documentation of the site. The second discuss is about a detailed assessment of the procedure of processing through the observation of chisel marks and the detail analysis about the 3 dimensional data. In the result, we are succeed to show the restoration of the procedure of the proceedings using guidelines and a wooden curve since we concentrate attention on the point of abstracting the centre line and shaving the surface into the round shape.

  2. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  3. Laser-scanned fluorescence of nonlased/normal, lased/normal, nonlased/carious, and lased/carious enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariasen, Kenneth L.; Barron, Joseph R.; Paton, Barry E.

    1992-06-01

    Research has shown that low levels of CO2 laser irradiation raise enamel resistance to sub-surface demineralization. Additionally, laser scanned fluorescence analysis of enamel, as well a laser and white light reflection studies, have potential for both clinical diagnosis and comparative research investigations of the caries process. This study was designed to compare laser fluorescence and laser/white light reflection of (1) non-lased/normal with lased/normal enamel and (2) non-lased/normal with non-lased/carious and lased/carious enamel. Specimens were buccal surfaces of extracted third molars, coated with acid resistant varnish except for either two or three 2.25 mm2 windows (two window specimens: non-lased/normal, lased/normal--three window specimens: non-lased/normal, non-lased carious, lased/carious). Teeth exhibiting carious windows were immersed in a demineralizing solution for twelve days. Non-carious windows were covered with wax during immersion. Following immersion, the wax was removed, and fluorescence and laser/white light reflection analyses were performed on all windows utilizing a custom scanning laser fluorescence spectrometer which focuses light from a 25 mWatt He-Cd laser at 442 nm through an objective lens onto a cross-section >= 3 (mu) in diameter. For laser/white light reflection analyses, reflected light intensities were measured. A HeNe laser was used for laser light reflection studies. Following analyses, the teeth are sectioned bucco-lingually into 80 micrometers sections, examined under polarized light microscopy, and the lesions photographed. This permits comparison between fluorescence/reflected light values and the visualized decalcification areas for each section, and thus comparisons between various enamel treatments and normal enamel. The enamel specimens are currently being analyzed.

  4. Tissomics: two- and three-dimensional distribution of nuclei in brain tissue using laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Domnik; Mittag, Anja; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-03-01

    Automated quantitative (i.e. stochiometric) analysis of tissues is of eminent importance in the understanding of all interactions between cells in their natural environment. In tissue cytometry a solid trigger is necessary in order to unequivocally differentiate between cellular and non-cellular events. This can be best performed by nuclear staining. Aim of this study was to analyze a brain tissue section by laser scanning cytometry (LSC) in order to depict the threedimensional distribution of nuclei in the tissue. To this end the section was measured in several foci and different nuclei detected in several depths of the tissue were assigned to the respective layer. Frozen sections of formalin-fixed rat or human brain tissue (120μm thickness) were incubated with propidiumiodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC propidiumiodide was used as trigger. After a first analysis focussed on the top of the tissue, the focus was adjusted in 30μm steps deeper into the tissue. Per analysis data of at least 50,000 cells were acquired. After finishing measurements from all depths of the field were merged, i.e. data were combined into a composite data file. With the special features of the LSC it was possible to develop a method depicting the threedimensional distribution of the nuclei in solid tissue sections. LSC can be useful tool for this relatively new field of solid tissue cytometry termed tissomics. After evaluation of methods like this, so far not available data can be analysed for diagnostic purposes. By these studies we intend to demonstrate the power of the LSC for the routine pathological use. This should add up to the bright versatility of applications for the LSC as a cytometric instrument suitable for high throughput and high content analysis.

  5. Three-dimensional volume reconstruction of extracellular matrix proteins in uveal melanoma from fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscope images

    PubMed Central

    BAJCSY, P.; LEE, S-C.; LIN, A.; FOLBERG, R.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The distribution of looping patterns of laminin in uveal melanomas and other tumours has been associated with adverse outcome. Moreover, these patterns are generated by highly invasive tumour cells through the process of vasculogenic mimicry and are not therefore blood vessels. Nevertheless, these extravascular matrix patterns conduct plasma. The three-dimensional (3D) configuration of these laminin-rich patterns compared with blood vessels has been the subject of speculation and intensive investigation. We have developed a method for the 3D reconstruction of volume for these extravascular matrix proteins from serial paraffin sections cut at 4 μm thicknesses and stained with a fluorescently labelled antibody to laminin (Maniotis et al., 2002). Each section was examined via confocal laser-scanning focal microscopy (CLSM) and 13 images were recorded in the Z-dimension for each slide. The input CLSM imagery is composed of a set of 3D subvolumes (stacks of 2D images) acquired at multiple confocal depths, from a sequence of consecutive slides. Steps for automated reconstruction included (1) unsupervised methods for selecting an image frame from a subvolume based on entropy and contrast criteria, (2) a fully automated registration technique for image alignment and (3) an improved histogram equalization method that compensates for spatially varying image intensities in CLSM imagery due to photo-bleaching. We compared image alignment accuracy of a fully automated method with registration accuracy achieved by human subjects using a manual method. Automated 3D volume reconstruction was found to provide significant improvement in accuracy, consistency of results and performance time for CLSM images acquired from serial paraffin sections. PMID:16438687

  6. Laser Scanning for the definition of high resolution topography in the Apuan Alps (IT) marble district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccucci, Silvia; Salvini, Riccardo; Francioni, Mirko

    2010-05-01

    The present paper describes the results of five laser scanning surveys performed by a Leica™ ScanStation2 with the aim of producing an high definition topography of a quarry, at the scale of 1:1,000. The project comes from a joint research carried out by the Authors in collaboration with the Local Sanitary Unit Agency (ASL n.1) of Massa and Carrara (IT). The main objective of this work has been the survey of both the exploited quarry walls and the upper residual and natural slopes. The area of interest is characterized by several quarry fronts which develop to variable and alternate directions to create very evident rock spurs, from NW-SE to NE-SW trending for a total wideness of about 2 hectares. Moreover, the quarry walls are sub-vertical and sometimes overhang by a total height of 100 m in respect to the quarry floor. Differential GPS and orthometric correction have been applied in order to co-register and to georeference the five point clouds; for these purposes a series of optical targets have been measured using a Laser Total Station. The subsequent phase has been the mesh construction and editing, from which a topographic map, 25 cm equidistance contours lines, has been created. The planimetric map shows the position and the geometry of crests, banks, escarpments, walls and all others exploitation features and the characteristics of the upper natural slopes. Morphological profiles along the maximum slope have been realized in order to better plan the future extractive activities according to the regional law. In order to make easier the prospective observation of detailed and overall areas, 3D views of multi-directional orientation have been realized. The produced data has been published by using the free LeicaTM TruView plug-in for Internet Explorer in a way to easily view the photographs and to measure the laser scan point clouds. Processing results have highlighted the higher spatial resolution of data coming from laser scanning in respect to the

  7. Gravity combined with laser-scan in Grotta Gigante: a benchmark cave for gravity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetta, Tommaso; Braitenberg, Carla

    2014-05-01

    Laser scanning has become one of the most important topographic techniques in the last decades, due to its ability to reconstruct complex surfaces with high resolution and precision and due to its fast acquisition time. Recently a laser-scan survey has been acquired (Fingolo et al., 2011) in the "Grotta Gigante" cave near Trieste, Italy, the biggest cave worldwide according to the Guinness Awards. In this paper this survey is used to obtain a 3D discretization of the cave with prisms. Then through this new model, with the densities derived from campaign measurements, the exact gravimetric effect of the structure was computed (Nagy et al., 2000) and compared with the gravity observation at the surface. The transition from the cloud of laser-scan points to the prism model was carried out by different computer elaborations; first of all the reduction of the data density through an averaging process that allows to pass from over 10000 points/m2 to less than 10points/m2. Then the whole dataset was filtered from the outliers by the means of a simple quadratic surface that fit the data (Turner, 1999). The reduced data points should be divided into the 2 surfaces of top and bottom, that are used to define the prisms. This step was performed using the local regression method (Loess) to calculate a surface located halfway between top and bottom points. Once the top and bottom interfaces were obtained it was possible to get the final prism representation and calculate the gravity signal. The observed Bouguer field is explained very well by our model and the residuals are used to evaluate possible secondary caves. The final prism model together with the gravity database on surface and inside the cave form a perfect benchmark to test forward and inverse potential field algorithms. References Fingolo M., Facco L., Ceccato A., Breganze C., Paganini P., Cezza M., Grotta Gigante di Trieste. Tra realtà virtuale e rilievi 3D ad alta risoluzione, Veneto Geologi, 75, pp.21-25, 2011

  8. Robust statistical approaches for local planar surface fitting in 3D laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurunnabi, Abdul; Belton, David; West, Geoff

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes robust methods for local planar surface fitting in 3D laser scanning data. Searching through the literature revealed that many authors frequently used Least Squares (LS) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for point cloud processing without any treatment of outliers. It is known that LS and PCA are sensitive to outliers and can give inconsistent and misleading estimates. RANdom SAmple Consensus (RANSAC) is one of the most well-known robust methods used for model fitting when noise and/or outliers are present. We concentrate on the recently introduced Deterministic Minimum Covariance Determinant estimator and robust PCA, and propose two variants of statistically robust algorithms for fitting planar surfaces to 3D laser scanning point cloud data. The performance of the proposed robust methods is demonstrated by qualitative and quantitative analysis through several synthetic and mobile laser scanning 3D data sets for different applications. Using simulated data, and comparisons with LS, PCA, RANSAC, variants of RANSAC and other robust statistical methods, we demonstrate that the new algorithms are significantly more efficient, faster, and produce more accurate fits and robust local statistics (e.g. surface normals), necessary for many point cloud processing tasks. Consider one example data set used consisting of 100 points with 20% outliers representing a plane. The proposed methods called DetRD-PCA and DetRPCA, produce bias angles (angle between the fitted planes with and without outliers) of 0.20° and 0.24° respectively, whereas LS, PCA and RANSAC produce worse bias angles of 52.49°, 39.55° and 0.79° respectively. In terms of speed, DetRD-PCA takes 0.033 s on average for fitting a plane, which is approximately 6.5, 25.4 and 25.8 times faster than RANSAC, and two other robust statistical methods, respectively. The estimated robust surface normals and curvatures from the new methods have been used for plane fitting, sharp feature

  9. Capturing and modelling high-complex alluvial topography with UAS-borne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlburger, Gottfried; Wieser, Martin; Pfennigbauer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Due to fluvial activity alluvial forests are zones of highest complexity and relief energy. Alluvial forests are dominated by new and pristine channels in consequence of current and historic flood events. Apart from topographic features, the vegetation structure is typically very complex featuring, both, dense under story as well as high trees. Furthermore, deadwood and debris carried from upstream during periods of high discharge within the river channel are deposited in these areas. Therefore, precise modelling of the micro relief of alluvial forests using standard tools like Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is hardly feasible. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), in turn, is very time consuming for capturing larger areas as many scan positions are necessary for obtaining complete coverage due to view occlusions in the forest. In the recent past, the technological development of Unmanned Arial Systems (UAS) has reached a level that light-weight survey-grade laser scanners can be operated from these platforms. For capturing alluvial topography this could bridge the gap between ALS and TLS in terms of providing a very detailed description of the topography and the vegetation structure due to the achievable very high point density of >100 points per m2. In our contribution we demonstrate the feasibility to apply UAS-borne laser scanning for capturing and modelling the complex topography of the study area Neubacher Au, an alluvial forest at the pre-alpine River Pielach (Lower Austria). The area was captured with Riegl's VUX-1 compact time-of-flight laser scanner mounted on a RiCopter (X-8 array octocopter). The scanner features an effective scan rate of 500 kHz and was flown in 50-100 m above ground. At this flying height the laser footprint is 25-50 mm allowing mapping of very small surface details. Furthermore, online waveform processing of the backscattered laser energy enables the retrieval of multiple targets for single laser shots resulting in a dense point cloud of

  10. Concomitant use of Congo red staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect amyloidosis in oral biopsy: A clinicopathological study of 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Scivetti, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco; Fatone, Laura; Maiorano, Eugenio; Crincoli, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Twenty oral biopsies from 16 patients were analyzed both by traditional microscopy and by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using conventional histopathological techniques, the diagnosis of amyloidosis was confirmed only in 15 biopsies. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, amyloid deposits were detected in all of the samples. The current study shows that confocal laser scanning analysis helps to identify minimal amyloid deposits that could be overlooked using traditional microscopy, thus raising the sensitivity of oral biopsy up to 100%.

  11. Low cost and compact nonlinear (SHG/TPE) laser scanning endoscope for bio-medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiayun; Lim, Ken Choong; Li, Hao; Seck, Hon Luen; Yu, Xia; Kok, Shaw Wei; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPE) and second harmonic generation (SHG) can been used to extract biological information from tissues at the molecular level, which is blind to traditional microscopes. Through these two image contrast mechanisms, a nonlinear laser scanning endoscope (NLSE) is able to image tissue cells and the extra cellular matrix (ECM) through a special fiber and miniaturized scanner without the requirement of poisonous chemical staining. Therefore, NLSE reserves high potential for in-vivo pathological study and disease diagnosis. However, the high cost and bulky size of a NLSE system has become one of the major issues preventing this technology from practical clinical operation. In this paper, we report a fiber laser based multi-modality NLSE system with compact size and low cost, ideal for in-vivo applications in clinical environments. The demonstration of the developed NLSE nonlinear imaging capability on different bio-structures in liver, retina and skin are also presented.

  12. Further study of trichosanthin's effect on mouse embryos with confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-09-01

    Trichosanthin(TCS), a ribosome inactivating protein extracted from the root tuber of a traditional Chinese medicine herb Tian Huo Fen(THF), possessed abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) activities. For centuries in China, THF has been used as an effective folk medicine to terminate early and midtrimester pregnancies and to treat ectopic pregnancies, hydatidiform moles and trophoblastic tumor. We observed the changes in reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium in mouse embryos induced by TCS with confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with the fluorescene diacetate (DCFHDA) and Fluo-3-AM. The results indicated that TCS induced increase in intracellular calcium and production of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryos , and TCS inhibited the development of mouse embryos effectively. Mouse embryos of different developmental stages before implantation are used in the experiments. This provides new insight into mechanism for abortifacient activity of TCS.

  13. Static terrestrial laser scanning of juvenile understory trees for field phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lin, Yi

    2014-11-01

    This study was to attempt the cutting-edge 3D remote sensing technique of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) for parametric 3D reconstruction of juvenile understory trees. The data for test was collected with a Leica HDS6100 TLS system in a single-scan way. The geometrical structures of juvenile understory trees are extracted by model fitting. Cones are used to model trunks and branches. Principal component analysis (PCA) is adopted to calculate their major axes. Coordinate transformation and orthogonal projection are used to estimate the parameters of the cones. Then, AutoCAD is utilized to simulate the morphological characteristics of the understory trees, and to add secondary branches and leaves in a random way. Comparison of the reference values and the estimated values gives the regression equation and shows that the proposed algorithm of extracting parameters is credible. The results have basically verified the applicability of TLS for field phenotyping of juvenile understory trees.

  14. Design and development of multi functional confocal laser scanning microscope with UV / VIS laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kanzaki, Yousuke; Wakaki, Moriaki; Takeyama, Norihide

    2005-08-01

    A high resolution Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) with UV / VIS light sources was developed as the first step of multi-functional microscope. The optical system is designed to optimize for both UV and VIS wavelengths. An UV laser is used to achieve higher resolution, and a VIS is for multi functions. A new objective lens specialized for this application was designed and fabricated. Specification of the lens and the optical system is NA:0.95, EFL:2.5mm, WD:1.5mm, Resolution:160nm and achromatic for two wavelengths of UV 325.0nm / VIS 632.8nm. Several specimens were characterized to check the performance of the system. Some optical materials under study were measured for evaluation, and interesting results could be obtained. Multi-functional measurements are being planed as a next step. This system will help the research of nano-structures, photonic-crystals and biology.

  15. Correlation-based technique for automated tunable diode laser scan stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1992-01-01

    A software-based method for real-time, active stabilization of tunable diode laser spectral scans is described. The procedure is suitable for use with field and laboratory instrumentation where automated, unattended spectrometer operation is required. An autocorrelation of two high-resolution reference gas infrared spectra is computed at regular intervals, and the location of the maximum value of the autocorrelation provides the relative abscissa shift between the spectra. Small adjustments to the laser scan parameters are thereby made to ensure that drifts in the laser output frequency are tracked and compensated. Calculations required for stabilization of a 512-point spectrum can be completed in under 25 ms using an inexpensive, moderate-speed, array processor installed in a PC.

  16. In vivo observation of papillae of the human tongue using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Just, Tino; Stave, Joachim; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Guthoff, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to visualize the epithelial structures of the tongue using confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The human tongue epithelium of 28 healthy subjects, aged 21-67 years, mean age 38 years, 14 women and 14 men, was examined in vivo by LSM. Using LSM, a combination of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph HRT II and the Rostock Cornea Module, up to 800-fold magnifications were obtained. On the tongue surface both filiform and fungiform papillae and their taste pores were easily identified. The epithelium of the tongue with its subcellular structures could be observed up to a depth of 50 microm, cellular structures up to 150 microm and subepithelial vessels up to 300 microm. Additionally the papillary crests and blood flow were visible. Confocal LSM seems suitable for noninvasive in vivo examination of the tongue. The hydraulic z scan, the manual start setting and the measurement of the depth allow a clear classification of the observed structures.

  17. Geometric validation of a mobile laser scanning system for urban applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Liu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) technologies have been actively studied and implemented over the past decade, as their application fields are rapidly expanding and extending beyond conventional topographic mapping. Trimble's MX-8, as one of the MLS systems in the current market, generates rich survey-grade laser and image data for urban surveying. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Trimble MX-8 MLS data satisfies the accuracy requirements of urban surveying. According to the formula of geo-referencing, accuracies of navigation solution and laser scanner determines the accuracy of the collected LiDAR point clouds. Two test sites were selected to test the performance of Trimble MX-8. Those extensive tests confirm that Trimble MX-8 offers a very promising tool to survey complex urban areas.

  18. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  19. Evaluation of the Cytotoxic Behavior of Fungal Extracellular Synthesized Ag Nanoparticles Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Salaheldin, Taher A.; Husseiny, Sherif M.; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M.; Elzatahry, Ahmed; Cowley, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been synthesized by subjecting a reaction medium to a Fusarium oxysporum biomass at 28 °C for 96 h. The biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles were characterized on the basis of their anticipated peak at 405 nm using UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. Structural confirmation was evident from the characteristic X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, high-resolution transmission electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and the particle size analyzer. The Ag nanoparticles were of dimension 40 ± 5 nm and spherical in shape. The study mainly focused on using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to examine the cytotoxic activities of fungal synthesized Ag nanoparticles on a human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 cell, which featured remarkable vacuolation, thus indicating a potent cytotoxic activity. PMID:26950118

  20. Confocal laser scanning microscopy detection of chlorophylls and carotenoids in chloroplasts and chromoplasts of tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Lucio; Amenós, Montse; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells are unique among eukaryotic cells because of the presence of plastids, including chloroplasts and chromoplasts. Chloroplasts are found in green tissues and harbor the photosynthetic machinery (including chlorophyll molecules), while chromoplasts are present in non-photosynthetic tissues and accumulate large amounts of carotenoids. During tomato fruit development, chloroplasts are converted into chromoplasts that accumulate high levels of lycopene, a linear carotenoid responsible for the characteristic red color of ripe fruit. Here, we describe a simple and fast method to detect both types of fully differentiated plastids (chloroplasts and chromoplasts), as well as intermediate stages, in fresh tomato fruits. The method is based on the differential autofluorescence of chlorophylls and carotenoids (lycopene) detected by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  1. Characterization of acoustic lenses with the Foucault test by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed Mohamed, E. T.; Abdelrahman, A.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the Foucault knife-edge test, which has traditionally been known as the classic test for optical imaging devices, is used to characterize an acoustic lens for operation at 1.2 GHz. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used as the illumination and detection device utilizing its pinhole instead of the classical knife edge that is normally employed in the Foucault test. Information about the geometrical characteristics, such as the half opening angle of the acoustic lens, were determined as well as the quality of the calotte of the lens used for focusing. The smallest focal spot size that could be achieved with the examined lens employed as a spherical reflector was found to be about 1 μm. By comparison to the idealized resolution a degradation of about a factor of 2 can be deduced. This limits the actual quality of the acoustic focus.

  2. The Use of Computer Vision Algorithms for Automatic Orientation of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, Jakub Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents analysis of the orientation of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. In the proposed data processing methodology, point clouds are considered as panoramic images enriched by the depth map. Computer vision (CV) algorithms are used for orientation, which are applied for testing the correctness of the detection of tie points and time of computations, and for assessing difficulties in their implementation. The BRISK, FASRT, MSER, SIFT, SURF, ASIFT and CenSurE algorithms are used to search for key-points. The source data are point clouds acquired using a Z+F 5006h terrestrial laser scanner on the ruins of Iłża Castle, Poland. Algorithms allowing combination of the photogrammetric and CV approaches are also presented.

  3. A handheld laser scanning confocal reflectance imaging–confocal Raman microspectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Chetan A.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Mackanos, Mark A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy have shown potential for non-destructive analysis of samples at micron-scale resolutions. Current studies utilizing these techniques often employ large bench-top microscopes, and are not suited for use outside of laboratory settings. We have developed a microscope which combines laser scanning confocal reflectance imaging and confocal Raman spectroscopy into a compact handheld probe that is capable of high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in a variety of settings. The compact size of the probe is largely due to the use of a MEMS mirror for beam scanning. The probe is capable of axial resolutions of up to 4 μm for the confocal imaging channel and 10 μm for the confocal Raman spectroscopy channel. Here, we report instrument design, characterize optical performance, and provide images and spectra from normal skin to demonstrate the instrument’s capabilities for clinical diagnostics. PMID:22435097

  4. Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data for Features Extraction of High Accuracy Driving Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Dong, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    High Accuracy Driving Maps (HADMs) are the core component of Intelligent Drive Assistant Systems (IDAS), which can effectively reduce the traffic accidents due to human error and provide more comfortable driving experiences. Vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. This paper proposes a novel method to extract road features (e.g., road surfaces, road boundaries, road markings, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, vehicles and so on) for HADMs in highway environment. Quantitative evaluations show that the proposed algorithm attains an average precision and recall in terms of 90.6% and 91.2% in extracting road features. Results demonstrate the efficiencies and feasibilities of the proposed method for extraction of road features for HADMs.

  5. Pharmaceutical applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy: the physical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Pygall, Samuel R; Whetstone, Joanne; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2007-12-10

    The application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to the physicochemical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems is not as widespread as its application within the field of cell biology. However, methods have been developed to exploit the imaging capabilities of CLSM to study a wide range of pharmaceutical systems, including phase-separated polymers, colloidal systems, microspheres, pellets, tablets, film coatings, hydrophilic matrices, and chromatographic stationary phases. Additionally, methods to measure diffusion in gels, bioadhesives, and for monitoring microenvironmental pH change within dosage forms have been utilised. CLSM has also been used in the study of the physical interaction of dosage forms with biological barriers such as the eye, skin and intestinal epithelia, and in particular, to determine the effectiveness of a plethora of pharmaceutical systems to deliver drugs through these barriers. In the future, there is continuing scope for wider exploitation of existing techniques, and continuing advancements in instrumentation.

  6. Trypan blue as a fluorochrome for confocal laser scanning microscopy of arbuscular mycorrhizae in three mangroves.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T; Majumdar, A; Das, P; Sarafis, V; Ghose, M

    2008-06-01

    Roots of three mangroves, Acanthus ilicifolius, Ceriops tagal and Excoecaria agallocha, collected from forests of the Sundarbans of India were stained with trypan blue to observe arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi isolated from rhizospheric soil, collected together with the root samples, also were stained for testing the suitability of the dye as a fluorochrome. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were constructed. A. ilicifolius and E. agallocha exhibited "Arum" type colonization with highly branched arbuscules, whereas C. tagal showed "Paris" type association with clumped and collapsed arbuscules. We demonstrated that trypan blue is a suitable fluorochrome for staining arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spores, fungal hyphae, arbuscules and vesicles, which presumably have a considerable amount of surface chitin. It appears that as the integration of chitin into the fungal cell wall changes, its accessibility to trypan blue dye also changes.

  7. Parallel deconvolution of large 3D images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawliczek, Piotr; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Soltys, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    Various deconvolution algorithms are often used for restoration of digital images. Image deconvolution is especially needed for the correction of three-dimensional images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the Z dimension. As a result, reliable automatic segmentation of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Effective deconvolution algorithms are memory-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, we propose a parallel version of the well-known Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm developed for a system with distributed memory and implemented with the use of Message Passing Interface (MPI). It enables significantly more rapid deconvolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional images by efficiently splitting the computation across multiple computers. The implementation of this algorithm can be used on professional clusters provided by computing centers as well as on simple networks of ordinary PC machines.

  8. An alternative method of promoter assessment by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Ranjan, Rajiv; Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Alok; Sahoo, Bhabani S; Raha, Sumita; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2009-10-01

    A rapid and useful method of promoter activity analysis using techniques of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is described in the present study. The activities of some pararetroviral promoters such as CaMV35S (Cauliflower mosaic virus), FMVSgt3 (Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript) and MMVFLt12 (Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript) coupled to GFP (green fluorescent protein) and GUS (beta-glucuronidase) reporter genes were determined simultaneously by the CLSM technique and other available conventional methods for reporter gene assay based on relevant biochemical and molecular approaches. Consistent and comparable results obtained by CLSM as well as by other conventional assay methods confirm the effectiveness of the CLSM approach for assessment of promoter activity. Hence the CLSM method can be suggested as an alternative way for promoter analysis on the basis of high throughput.

  9. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    PubMed

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2005-08-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. The operator configures separate channels (laser, filters, detector settings) for each fluorochrome used in a particular experiment. Then, 3-D reconstructions are made from Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important and measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is then performed to increase resolution. In the 3-D reconstruction program described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationship of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures seen in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided wherever possible.

  10. Building Facade Documentation Using Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry and Data Implementation Into Bim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Matoušková, E.; Šedina, J.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    A project started last year called MORE-CONNECT, which focuses on the renovation of buildings (especially building facades) using prefabricated elements. The aim of this project is to create a competitive solution consisting of a technology and processes which enable fast, cost-effective renovation with minimal difficulties to inhabitants. Significant cost savings in renovation costs lies in the usage of prefabricated elements and the reduction of construction works on site. The precision of the prefabricated element depends on the precision of the construction, project and building documentation. This article offers an overview of the possible methods for building documentation and spatial data transfer into BIM (Building Information Modelling) software. The description of methods focuses on laser scanning and photogrammetry (including RPAS based), its advantages, disadvantages and limitations according to the documented building, level of renovation, situation on site etc. The next part involves spatial data transfer into BIM software. A proposed solution is tested in a case study.

  11. Application of a hybrid 3D-2D laser scanning system to the characterization of slate slabs.

    PubMed

    López, Marcos; Martínez, Javier; Matías, José María; Vilán, José Antonio; Taboada, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Dimensional control based on 3D laser scanning techniques is widely used in practice. We describe the application of a hybrid 3D-2D laser scanning system to the characterization of slate slabs with structural defects that are difficult for the human eye to characterize objectively. Our study is based on automating the process using a 3D laser scanner and a 2D camera. Our results demonstrate that the application of this hybrid system optimally characterizes slate slabs in terms of the defects described by the Spanish UNE-EN 12326-1 standard.

  12. Robust Locally Weighted Regression For Ground Surface Extraction In Mobile Laser Scanning 3D Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurunnabi, A.; West, G.; Belton, D.

    2013-10-01

    A new robust way for ground surface extraction from mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data is proposed in this paper. Fitting polynomials along 2D/3D points is one of the well-known methods for filtering ground points, but it is evident that unorganized point clouds consist of multiple complex structures by nature so it is not suitable for fitting a parametric global model. The aim of this research is to develop and implement an algorithm to classify ground and non-ground points based on statistically robust locally weighted regression which fits a regression surface (line in 2D) by fitting without any predefined global functional relation among the variables of interest. Afterwards, the z (elevation)-values are robustly down weighted based on the residuals for the fitted points. The new set of down weighted z-values along with x (or y) values are used to get a new fit of the (lower) surface (line). The process of fitting and down-weighting continues until the difference between two consecutive fits is insignificant. Then the final fit represents the ground level of the given point cloud and the ground surface points can be extracted. The performance of the new method has been demonstrated through vehicle based mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data from urban areas which include different problematic objects such as short walls, large buildings, electric poles, sign posts and cars. The method has potential in areas like building/construction footprint determination, 3D city modelling, corridor mapping and asset management.

  13. Automated matching of multiple terrestrial laser scans for stem mapping without the use of artificial references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingbin; Liang, Xinlian; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Lehtomäki, Matti; Pyörälä, Jiri; Zhu, Lingli; Wang, Yunsheng; Chen, Ruizhi

    2017-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning has been widely used to analyze the 3D structure of a forest in detail and to generate data at the level of a reference plot for forest inventories without destructive measurements. Multi-scan terrestrial laser scanning is more commonly applied to collect plot-level data so that all of the stems can be detected and analyzed. However, it is necessary to match the point clouds of multiple scans to yield a point cloud with automated processing. Mismatches between datasets will lead to errors during the processing of multi-scan data. Classic registration methods based on flat surfaces cannot be directly applied in forest environments; therefore, artificial reference objects have conventionally been used to assist with scan matching. The use of artificial references requires additional labor and expertise, as well as greatly increasing the cost. In this study, we present an automated processing method for plot-level stem mapping that matches multiple scans without artificial references. In contrast to previous studies, the registration method developed in this study exploits the natural geometric characteristics among a set of tree stems in a plot and combines the point clouds of multiple scans into a unified coordinate system. Integrating multiple scans improves the overall performance of stem mapping in terms of the correctness of tree detection, as well as the bias and the root-mean-square errors of forest attributes such as diameter at breast height and tree height. In addition, the automated processing method makes stem mapping more reliable and consistent among plots, reduces the costs associated with plot-based stem mapping, and enhances the efficiency.

  14. Automatic Feature Detection, Description and Matching from Mobile Laser Scanning Data and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussnain, Zille; Oude Elberink, Sander; Vosselman, George

    2016-06-01

    In mobile laser scanning systems, the platform's position is measured by GNSS and IMU, which is often not reliable in urban areas. Consequently, derived Mobile Laser Scanning Point Cloud (MLSPC) lacks expected positioning reliability and accuracy. Many of the current solutions are either semi-automatic or unable to achieve pixel level accuracy. We propose an automatic feature extraction method which involves utilizing corresponding aerial images as a reference data set. The proposed method comprise three steps; image feature detection, description and matching between corresponding patches of nadir aerial and MLSPC ortho images. In the data pre-processing step the MLSPC is patch-wise cropped and converted to ortho images. Furthermore, each aerial image patch covering the area of the corresponding MLSPC patch is also cropped from the aerial image. For feature detection, we implemented an adaptive variant of Harris-operator to automatically detect corner feature points on the vertices of road markings. In feature description phase, we used the LATCH binary descriptor, which is robust to data from different sensors. For descriptor matching, we developed an outlier filtering technique, which exploits the arrangements of relative Euclidean-distances and angles between corresponding sets of feature points. We found that the positioning accuracy of the computed correspondence has achieved the pixel level accuracy, where the image resolution is 12cm. Furthermore, the developed approach is reliable when enough road markings are available in the data sets. We conclude that, in urban areas, the developed approach can reliably extract features necessary to improve the MLSPC accuracy to pixel level.

  15. Feature-Based Laser Scan Matching and Its Application for Indoor Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayuan; Zhong, Ruofei; Hu, Qingwu; Ai, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    Scan matching, an approach to recover the relative position and orientation of two laser scans, is a very important technique for indoor positioning and indoor modeling. The iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm and its variants are the most well-known techniques for such a problem. However, ICP algorithms rely highly on the initial guess of the relative transformation, which will reduce its power for practical applications. In this paper, an initial-free 2D laser scan matching method based on point and line features is proposed. We carefully design a framework for the detection of point and line feature correspondences. First, distinct feature points are detected based on an extended 1D SIFT, and line features are extracted via a modified Split-and-Merge algorithm. In this stage, we also give an effective strategy for discarding unreliable features. The point and line features are then described by a distance histogram; the pairs achieving best matching scores are accepted as potential correct correspondences. The histogram cluster technique is adapted to filter outliers and provide an accurate initial value of the rigid transformation. We also proposed a new relative pose estimation method that is robust to outliers. We use the lq-norm (0 < q < 1) metric in this approach, in contrast to classic optimization methods whose cost function is based on the l2-norm of residuals. Extensive experiments on real data demonstrate that the proposed method is almost as accurate as ICPs and is initial free. We also show that our scan matching method can be integrated into a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) system for indoor mapping. PMID:27517932

  16. Street-side vehicle detection, classification and change detection using mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Statistics on street-side car parks, e.g. occupancy rates, parked vehicle types, parking durations, are of great importance for urban planning and policy making. Related studies, e.g. vehicle detection and classification, mostly focus on static images or video. Whereas mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are increasingly utilized for urban street environment perception due to their direct 3D information acquisition, high accuracy and movability. In this paper, we design a complete system for car park monitoring, including vehicle recognition, localization, classification and change detection, from laser scanning point clouds. The experimental data are acquired by an MLS system using high frequency laser scanner which scans the streets vertically along the system's moving trajectory. The point clouds are firstly classified as ground, building façade, and street objects which are then segmented using state-of-the-art methods. Each segment is treated as an object hypothesis, and its geometric features are extracted. Moreover, a deformable vehicle model is fitted to each object. By fitting an explicit model to the vehicle points, detailed information, such as precise position and orientation, can be obtained. The model parameters are also treated as vehicle features. Together with the geometric features, they are applied to a supervised learning procedure for vehicle or non-vehicle recognition. The classes of detected vehicles are also investigated. Whether vehicles have changed across two datasets acquired at different times is detected to estimate the durations. Here, vehicles are trained pair-wisely. Two same or different vehicles are paired up as training samples. As a result, the vehicle recognition, classification and change detection accuracies are 95.9%, 86.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Vehicle modelling improves not only the recognition rate, but also the localization precision compared to bounding boxes.

  17. Keypoint-based 4-Points Congruent Sets - Automated marker-less registration of laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, Pascal Willy; Wegner, Jan Dirk; Schindler, Konrad

    2014-10-01

    We propose a method to automatically register two point clouds acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner without placing any markers in the scene. What makes this task challenging are the strongly varying point densities caused by the line-of-sight measurement principle, and the huge amount of data. The first property leads to low point densities in potential overlap areas with scans taken from different viewpoints while the latter calls for highly efficient methods in terms of runtime and memory requirements. A crucial yet largely unsolved step is the initial coarse alignment of two scans without any simplifying assumptions, that is, point clouds are given in arbitrary local coordinates and no knowledge about their relative orientation is available. Once coarse alignment has been solved, scans can easily be fine-registered with standard methods like least-squares surface or Iterative Closest Point matching. In order to drastically thin out the original point clouds while retaining characteristic features, we resort to extracting 3D keypoints. Such clouds of keypoints, which can be viewed as a sparse but nevertheless discriminative representation of the original scans, are then used as input to a very efficient matching method originally developed in computer graphics, called 4-Points Congruent Sets (4PCS) algorithm. We adapt the 4PCS matching approach to better suit the characteristics of laser scans. The resulting Keypoint-based 4-Points Congruent Sets (K-4PCS) method is extensively evaluated on challenging indoor and outdoor scans. Beyond the evaluation on real terrestrial laser scans, we also perform experiments with simulated indoor scenes, paying particular attention to the sensitivity of the approach with respect to highly symmetric scenes.

  18. Geodetic Laser Scanning: Refractive Optics Offer Wide Variety of Scan Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, C. K.; Shrestha, K. Y.; Cossio, T.

    2005-12-01

    Most commercial geodetic laser mapping instruments use reflective element scanners, often a single nutating or oscillating mirror, and sometimes dual axis units, to create a specific pattern of laser spots on the surface being mapped. The user may be able to set the scanning speed (scan lines per second) and field of coverage (range of scan angles), but the basic pattern of points sampled is fixed. Engineers developing scanners for a surprisingly diverse set of applications, ranging from bar code scanning, to compensating for image motion in astronomical telescopes, to scanning spectrometers, have increasingly turned to refractive scanners-most particularly to scanners that utilize "Risley prisms." Samuel Doty Risley (1845-1920), an ophthalmologist, invented an optometer that contained a pair of thin prisms that rotated in opposite directions about their optical axes to change the convergence of light rays from a single source. He used his optometer measure the visual acuity of patients eyes, as a function of distance. In this original application, both prisms were driven by a common gear assembly, which resulted in a nearly linear scan line. But if the prisms are driven independently in both direction and angular speed, a wide variety of scan patterns can be generated. The University of Florida is developing, a photon counting geodetic laser scanning instrument that will use a Risley prism scanner. The scanner, being built by Sigma Space Inc., will be capable of producing nearly linear scan lines (saw tooth pattern from moving platform), circular scans lines (helical pattern from a moving platform) and any number of rosette scan patterns that are particularly interesting for fixed ground based work. The flexibility provided by the scanner offers the possibility of using the same sensor for airborne and ground based geodetic laser scanning. Examples of the scanner patterns and the initial results from laboratory and early field tests will be presented.

  19. CD87-positive tumor cells in bone marrow aspirates identified by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Noack, F; Helmecke, D; Rosenberg, R; Thorban, S; Nekarda, H; Fink, U; Lewald, J; Stich, M; Schutze, K; Harbeck, N; Magdolen, V; Graeff, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-10-01

    Dissemination of single tumor cells to the bone marrow is a common event in cancer. The clinical significance of cytokeratin-positive cells detected in the bone marrow of cancer patients is still a matter of debate. In gastric cancer, overexpression of the receptor (uPAR or CD87) for the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in disseminated cancer cells indicates shorter survival of cancer patients. A new immunofluorescence approach, applying confocal laser scanning microscopy, is introduced to locate CD87 antigen in cytokeratin-positive tumor cells and to quantify the CD87 antigen by consecutive scanning. At first, cytokeratin 8/18/19-positive carcinoma cells are identified at excitation wavelength 488 nm using monoclonal antibody A45B/B3 to the cytokeratins and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with the fluorochrome Alexa488. Next, CD87 in tumor cells is identified by chicken antibody HU277 to the uPA-receptor and goat anti-chicken IgY labeled with fluorochrome Alexa568 (excitation wavelength 568 nm) and the fluorescence signal quantified on a single cell basis using fluorescently labeled latex beads as the fluorescence reference. From 16 patients with gastric or esophageal carcinoma, bone marrow aspirates were obtained, stained for cytokeratins and CD87 and then subjected to laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. Three of six gastric cancer patients had tumor cells present in the bone marrow of which 2 stained for CD87. Three of ten esophageal carcinoma patients had tumor cells in the bone marrow, all three samples stained for CD87. CD87-positive tumor cells were also dissected from stained bone marrow aspirates by laser microdissection microscope to allow analysis of single cells at the gene level.

  20. Fluorescence liftime imaging (FLIM) using ps-pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Angelika C.; Dolp, Frank; Happ, Claudia; Steiner, Rudolf; Beil, Michael

    2003-06-01

    A setup consisting on a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units was developed for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for on-line detection of structural changes of various biomolecules. Short-pulsed excitation was performed with a diode laser which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps duration. The laser was coupled to the laser scanning microscope. For time resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of an Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images (τ-mapping). The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of 5-ALA (5-aminolevulinic-acid), as well as 5-ALAhe (5-aminolevulinic-acid-hexylester)- induced protoporphyrine IX (PPIX) were investigated before and during PDT with subcellular resolution. For cells which were incubated with 5-ALA, a component with a fluorescence lifetime of about 7 ns was correlated with a structured fluorescence, which probably coincides with mitochondria, whereas a shorter lifetime was found in the cytoplasm. In the case of 5-ALAhe the lifetime of PPIX was longer, which could be due to different localization. During PDT the component with the longer lifetime completely vanished, whereas the shorter liftime was retained. It seems that FLIM is a valuable method to selectively identify and localize the photodynamically active photosensitizer.

  1. Large-field-of-view laser-scanning OR-PAM using a fibre optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. J.; Zhang, E.; Beard, P. C.

    2015-03-01

    Laser-Scanning-Optical-Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (LSOR-PAM) requires an ultrasound detector with a low noise equivalent pressure (NEP) and a large angular detection aperture in order to image a large field of view (FOV). It is however challenging to meet these requirements when using piezoelectric receivers since using a small sensing element size (<100μm) in order to achieve a large angular detection aperture will inevitability reduce the sensitivity of the detector as it scales with decreasing element size. Fibre optic ultrasound sensors based on a Fabry Perot cavity do not suffer from this limitation and can provide high detection sensitivity (NEP<0.1kPa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth) with a large angular detection aperture due to their small active element size (~10μm). A LSOR-PAM system was developed and combined with this type of fibre optic ultrasound sensor. A set of phantom studies were undertaken. The first study demonstrated that a high resolution image over a large field of view (Ø11mm) could be obtained with a sampledetector separation of only 1.6mm. In the second study, a 12μm diameter tube filled with methylene blue whose absorption coefficient was similar to that of blood was visualised demonstrating that the fibre optic sensor could provide sufficient SNR for in-vivo microvascular OR-PAM imaging. These preliminary results suggest that the fibre optic sensor has the potential to outperform piezoelectric detectors for Laser-Scanning Optical Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (LSOR-PAM).

  2. Terrestrial laser scanning and pin meter measurements for erosion and roughness assessment in boreal peatland forest ditches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, Leena; Tuukkanen, Tapio; Finér, Leena; Marttila, Hannu; Piirainen, Sirpa; Kløve, Bjørn; Koivusalo, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Drainage and the maintenance of drainage ditches in peatland forests increase erosion and sediment load reducing water quality downstream. The understanding of the sediment source area processes requires reliable methods for topographical change detection in the peatland forest ditches. The objective of this study was to quantify erosion and changes in surface roughness with two different methods: terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and manual pin meter measurements. Two newly cleaned boreal peatland forest ditches were studied, one peat ditch and one with exposed till soil under the thin peat layer. The topographies of a 4-meter-long section of the ditches were measured sequentially during the 11-20 months study period. In the ditch with thin peat layer, erosion estimates were quite similar with both methods. However, in the peat ditch the erosion measured with the pin meter considerably exceeded the results provided by TLS. Surface roughness indicated by the TLS data was greater than the surface roughness calculated from the pin meter data. According to both methods, surface roughness increased more at the ditch with thin peat layer. Both methods could be adopted to measure erosion and surface roughness in peatland forest conditions. However, the methods had difficulties to distinguish the bed of the peat ditch. TLS encountered problems to detect dark peat soil bed under shallow layer of humic ditch water resulting in no-data areas at the bed of the ditch. Pin meter device was able to measure under the water but the soft peat bed increased the uncertainty of the measurements.

  3. Application of a plasma-jet for skin antisepsis: analysis of the thermal action of the plasma by laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, O.; Richter, H.; Patzelt, A.; Alborova, A.; Humme, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Hartmann, B.; Hinz, P.; Kramer, A.; Koch, S.

    2010-06-01

    Recently, it was reported that a plasma-jet could be efficiently applied for the antisepsis of wounds. In this case, the discharge in an argon gas stream was used to produce a so-called ``cold plasma'' on the skin surface. The thermal action of the plasma on the skin was investigated in the present study by means of laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and by histological analysis. Consequently, the plasma beam was moved with a definite velocity at an optimal distance over the skin surface. The structural changes of the tissue were analyzed. It was found by LSM that a thermal damage could be detected only in the upper cell layers of the stratum corneum (SC) at moving velocities of the plasma beam, usually applied in clinical practice. Deeper parts of the SC were not damaged. The structural changes were so superficial that they could be detected only by LSM but not by analysis of the histological sections.

  4. Three-Dimensional Mapping of AN Ancient Cave Paintings Using Close-Range Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Z.; Ariff, M. F. M.; Idris, K. M.; Yusoff, A. R.; Idris, K. M.; Aspuri, A.; Abbas, M. A.; Zainuddin, K.; Ghani, A. R. A.; Saeman, A. A. Bin

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the used of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning technologies as an innovative technology for acquiring the three-dimensional data of an ancient cave paintings. The close-range photogrammetry technology used in the research was divided in two categories which are the UAV-based close-range photogrammetry and the terrestrialbased close-range photogrammetry. The UAV-based technology involved with the used of calibrated Phantom 4 System while the terrestrial-based technology involved with the calibrated Sony F828 digital camera and pPhotoModeler software. Both stereo and convergent image acquisition techniques were used to acquire the images of the paintings. The ancient cave paintings were also recorded using terrestrial laser scanning technology. In the research, the FARO Focus 3D terrestrial laser scanner was used to capture the three-dimensional point clouds and images of the paintings. The finding shows that both close-range photogrammetry and laser scanning technologies provide excellent solutions to map and to record the ancient paintings. As compared to the conventional method, both close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning technology provide a noncontact solution for data acquisition and the data was recorded in digital format for better protection and security.

  5. Correcting spherical aberrations in a biospecimen using a transmissive liquid crystal device in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy has enabled the visualization of deep regions in a biospecimen. However, refractive-index mismatches in the optical path cause spherical aberrations that degrade spatial resolution and the fluorescence signal, especially during observation at deeper regions. Recently, we developed transmissive liquid-crystal devices for correcting spherical aberration without changing the basic design of the optical path in a conventional laser scanning microscope. In this study, the device was inserted in front of the objective lens and supplied with the appropriate voltage according to the observation depth. First, we evaluated the device by observing fluorescent beads in single- and two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopes. Using a 25× water-immersion objective lens with a numerical aperture of 1.1 and a sample with a refractive index of 1.38, the device recovered the spatial resolution and the fluorescence signal degraded within a depth of ±0.6 mm. Finally, we implemented the device for observation of a mouse brain slice in a two-photon excitation laser scanning microscope. An optical clearing reagent with a refractive index of 1.42 rendered the fixed mouse brain transparent. The device improved the spatial resolution and the yellow fluorescent protein signal within a depth of 0-0.54 mm.

  6. USE OF MULTIPHOTON LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO IMAGE BENZO[A]PYRENE AND METABOLITES IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiphoton laser scanning micrsocopy holds promise as a tool to study the tissue distribution of environmental chemical contaminants during fish early life stage development. One such chemical for which this is possible is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon that a...

  7. The illuminating role of laser scanning digital elevation models in precision agriculture experimental designs - an agro-ecology perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser scanning data streams, when linked with multi-spectral, hyperspectral, apparent soil electro-conductivity (ECa), or other kinds of geo-referenced data streams, aid in the creation of maps that allow useful applications in agricultural systems. These combinations of georeferenced information p...

  8. Accuracy in estimation of timber assortments and stem distribution - A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Ville; Vauhkonen, Jari; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko; Joensuu, Marianna; Krooks, Anssi; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu; Alho, Petteri; Viitala, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Detailed information about timber assortments and diameter distributions is required in forest management. Forest owners can make better decisions concerning the timing of timber sales and forest companies can utilize more detailed information to optimize their wood supply chain from forest to factory. The objective here was to compare the accuracies of high-density laser scanning techniques for the estimation of tree-level diameter distribution and timber assortments. We also introduce a method that utilizes a combination of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning in timber assortment estimation. The study was conducted in Evo, Finland. Harvester measurements were used as a reference for 144 trees within a single clear-cut stand. The results showed that accurate tree-level timber assortments and diameter distributions can be obtained, using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or a combination of TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS). Saw log volumes were estimated with higher accuracy than pulpwood volumes. The saw log volumes were estimated with relative root-mean-squared errors of 17.5% and 16.8% with TLS and a combination of TLS and ALS, respectively. The respective accuracies for pulpwood were 60.1% and 59.3%. The differences in the bucking method used also caused some large errors. In addition, tree quality factors highly affected the bucking accuracy, especially with pulpwood volume.

  9. Documentation and Visualization of AN As-Built Tunnel by Combining 3d Laser Scanning and Web Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Arditi, D.; Chen, Z.

    2013-08-01

    A new way to document and visualize the as-built condition of an urban tunnel project with high accuracy is described in this paper, based on recent developments of laser scanning technology. In traditional surveying, the components of a tunnel are organized on the basis of the location of stations and offsets along the project alignment specified in the drawings. It is difficult for people without an engineering background to understand the information involved in surveying reports, drawings, and engineering data. However, in the interest of transparency, public agencies that commission construction projects have to make project information available to government officials and to the general public. This paper discusses the combined use of laser scanning technology and web mapping services to improve the documentation and visualization of an urban metro tunnel. Laser scanning technology is introduced to perform the surveyor's task, document the as-built condition, and geo-reference the construction elements. A set of panoramic pictures is generated by laser scanning that allows for taking measurements and extracting 3D coordinates. An XML file that contains geo-reference information is appended to each panoramic picture. Using application programming interface (API), this information is referenced to a web mapping service. A case study of the CTA Red line Tunnel in Chicago, IL demonstrates this method in a real life project.

  10. USE OF MULTIPHOTON LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO IMAGE BENZO[A]PYRENE AND METABOLITES IN FISH EGGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) is a promising tool to study the tissue distribution of environmental chemical contaminants during fish early life stages. One such chemical for which this is possible is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that a...

  11. Terrestrial Laser Scanning of Peatland Surface Morphology for Eco-Hydrological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Karen; Bennie, Jonathan; Wetherelt, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Ombrotrophic (rain-fed) lowland raised bogs are scarce habitats with high conservation importance in Europe. A reproducible measurement technique which is capable of capturing the spatial patterning of vegetation and surface topography is important in peatlands because structure is linked to ecological function, hydrology, biodiversity and carbon sequestration. Little attention has been given in the literature to the potential capabilities of active remote sensing systems such as LiDAR for monitoring peatland status, despite the clear opportunity posed by adopting a structurally-focused approach. APPROACH: The research described in this paper set out to establish the information content of laser scanning data for peatland condition monitoring. Our approach was to use fine scale laser scan data acquired from a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) so as to understand the data requirements for these types of application. We adopted a transect approach to sampling at the Wedholme Flow peatland site in Cumbria, UK. This is a lowland ombrotrophic peatland exhibiting a range of eco-hydrological condition types and was thus a suitable test-bed for the methodology. Seven sites located along a hydrological gradient were measured using TLS. A Leica HDS 3000 instrument, mounted on a tracked vehicle was used to survey the peatland surface from three viewpoints at each site, meaning that shadows cast by the plant canopy were in-filled during post-processing of the point cloud. Each site was also instrumented with hydrological dipwell recorders and assessed using detailed ecological surveys. Positional data from a differential GPS survey (collected simultaneously) were used to elucidate interpretation of spatial patterns in the TLS data. RESULTS: The results demonstrate the capabilities of TLS for describing peatland microtopography and vegetation canopy characteristics at a fine spatial scale (cm resolution over 10 m spatial extent). Geostatistical analyses of the laser

  12. Digital Terrain Models from Mobile Laser Scanning Data in Moravian Karst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagur, N.; Hollaus, M.

    2016-06-01

    During the last ten years, mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a very popular and efficient technology for capturing reality in 3D. A 3D laser scanner mounted on the top of a moving vehicle (e.g. car) allows the high precision capturing of the environment in a fast way. Mostly this technology is used in cities for capturing roads and buildings facades to create 3D city models. In our work, we used an MLS system in Moravian Karst, which is a protected nature reserve in the Eastern Part of the Czech Republic, with a steep rocky terrain covered by forests. For the 3D data collection, the Riegl VMX 450, mounted on a car, was used with integrated IMU/GNSS equipment, which provides low noise, rich and very dense 3D point clouds. The aim of this work is to create a digital terrain model (DTM) from several MLS data sets acquired in the neighbourhood of a road. The total length of two covered areas is 3.9 and 6.1 km respectively, with an average width of 100 m. For the DTM generation, a fully automatic, robust, hierarchic approach was applied. The derivation of the DTM is based on combinations of hierarchical interpolation and robust filtering for different resolution levels. For the generation of the final DTMs, different interpolation algorithms are applied to the classified terrain points. The used parameters were determined by explorative analysis. All MLS data sets were processed with one parameter set. As a result, a high precise DTM was derived with high spatial resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 m. The quality of the DTMs was checked by geodetic measurements and visual comparison with raw point clouds. The high quality of the derived DTM can be used for analysing terrain changes and morphological structures. Finally, the derived DTM was compared with the DTM of the Czech Republic (DMR 4G) with a resolution of 5 x 5 m, which was created from airborne laser scanning data. The vertical accuracy of the derived DTMs is around 0.10 m.

  13. Diameter distribution estimation with laser scanning based multisource single tree inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Ville; Liang, Xinlian; Vastaranta, Mikko; Yu, Xiaowei; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-10-01

    Tree detection and tree species recognition are bottlenecks of the airborne remote sensing-based single tree inventories. The effect of these factors in forest attribute estimation can be reduced if airborne measurements are aided with tree mapping information that is collected from the ground. The main objective here was to demonstrate the use of terrestrial laser scanning-derived (TLS) tree maps in aiding airborne laser scanning-based (ALS) single tree inventory (multisource single tree inventory, MS-STI) and its capability in predicting diameter distribution in various forest conditions. Automatic measurement of TLS point clouds provided the tree maps and the required reference information from the tree attributes. The study area was located in Evo, Finland, and the reference data was acquired from 27 different sample plots with varying forest conditions. The workflow of MS-STI included: (1) creation of automatic tree map from TLS point clouds, (2) automatic diameter at breast height (DBH) measurement from TLS point clouds, (3) individual tree detection (ITD) based on ALS, (4) matching the ITD segments to the field-measured reference, (5) ALS point cloud metric extraction from the single tree segments and (6) DBH estimation based on the derived metrics. MS-STI proved to be accurate and efficient method for DBH estimation and predicting diameter distribution. The overall accuracy (root mean squared error, RMSE) of the DBH was 36.9 mm. Results showed that the DBH accuracy decreased if the tree density (trees/ha) increased. The highest accuracies were found in old-growth forests (tree densities less than 500 stems/ha). MS-STI resulted in the best accuracies regarding Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.)-dominated forests (RMSE of 29.9 mm). Diameter distributions were predicted with low error indices, thereby resulting in a good fit compared to the reference. Based on the results, diameter distribution estimation with MS-STI is highly dependent on the forest

  14. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  15. Roughness of biopores and cracks in Bt-horizons by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leue, Martin; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    During preferential flow events in structured soils, the movement of water and reactive solutes is mostly restricted to larger inter-aggregate pores, cracks, and biopores. The micro-topography of such macropores in terms of pore shapes, geometry, and roughness is crucial for describing the exchange of water and solutes between macropores and the soil matrix. The objective of this study was to determine the surface roughness of intact structural surfaces from the Bt-horizon of Luvisols by confocal laser scanning microscopy. For this purpose, samples with the structural surface types including cracks with and without clay-organic coatings from Bt-horizons developed on loess and glacial till were compared. The surface roughness of these structures was calculated in terms of three parameters from selected surface regions of 0.36 mm² determined with a confocal laser scanning microscope of the type Keyence VK-X100K. These data were evaluated in terms of the root-mean-squared roughness, Rq, the curvature, Rku, and the ratio between surface area and base area, RA. Values of Rq and RA were smaller for coated as compared to uncoated cracks and earthworm burrows of the Bt-horizons from both parent materials. The results indicated that the illuviation of clayey material led to a "smoothing" of the crack surfaces, which was similar for the coarser textured till-Bt and the finer-textured loess-Bt surfaces. The roughness indicated by Rq and RA values was only slightly smaller and that indicated by Rku slightly higher for the structural surfaces from the loess as compared to those from the glacial till. These results suggest a minor importance of the parent material on the roughness of structural surfaces in the Bt-horizon. The similarity of Rq, RA, and Rku values between surfaces of earthworm burrows and uncoated cracks did not confirm an expected smoothing effect of the burrow walls by the earthworm. In contrast to burrow walls, root channels from the loess-Bt were smoother

  16. Combining mobile terrestrial laser scanning geometric and radiometric data to eliminate accessories in circular metro tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kai; Cheng, Xiaojun; Ju, Qiaoqiao

    2016-07-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a noninvasive technique to monitor surface conditions and morphological characteristics of structures and has been successfully introduced to the regular inspection and maintenance of metro tunnels. To accurately analyze the deformation and structural conditions of a metro tunnel, nonliner points (e.g., outliers and accessories) should be detected and eliminated. Nevertheless, the accessories are attached very closely to the liner and cannot be thoroughly eliminated by three-dimensional (3D) geometric information. This study proposes to separate the liner and accessories by combining TLS geometric and radiometric information. A refitted mobile Faro Focus3D X330 system is used for data collection of a new-built metro tunnel in Hangzhou, China. The results show that the corrected intensity data are an effective physical criterion and a complementary data source to remove accessories that cannot be eliminated by geometric data. After the removal of accessories by geometric and radiometric data, the remaining liner points can accurately reflect the actual structural and deformation conditions of metro tunnels.

  17. Grammar-based Automatic 3D Model Reconstruction from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.; West, G.

    2014-04-01

    The automatic reconstruction of 3D buildings has been an important research topic during the last years. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to automatically reconstruct the 3D building models from segmented data based on pre-defined formal grammar and rules. Such segmented data can be extracted e.g. from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning devices. Two steps are considered in detail. The first step is to transform the segmented data into 3D shapes, for instance using the DXF (Drawing Exchange Format) format which is a CAD data file format used for data interchange between AutoCAD and other program. Second, we develop a formal grammar to describe the building model structure and integrate the pre-defined grammars into the reconstruction process. Depending on the different segmented data, the selected grammar and rules are applied to drive the reconstruction process in an automatic manner. Compared with other existing approaches, our proposed method allows the model reconstruction directly from 3D shapes and takes the whole building into account.

  18. Multi-frequency AOM for multi-beam laser scanning exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinada, Hidetoshi

    2016-10-01

    Digital printing systems recorded on films or computer to plates (CTPs) have been required to improve their productivity and image quality. Under the circumstance, a printing technology of the multi-beam laser scanning for the drum capstan system, which is almost the same as optics configuration as the flat bed system, was developed using a newly developed multi-frequency acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as a key device instead of ultra-fast scanning devices toward a main scan direction. The multi-frequency AOM was developed with phased array-type transducers, achieving a wider bandwidth of over 160 MHz. The design consisted of a simultaneous three beams generation with interlace scan to avoid the beat effect by adjacent Doppler-shifted beams, which consequently attained the fastest recording speed of 5.0 mm/s compared with 2.0-3.0 mm/s of existing systems in those days. Furthermore, a couple of critical parameters of the multi-frequency AOM are studied, for example, a treatment of third-order intermodulation and also beat effect in connection with photosensitive media. As a result, the necessity of interlaces scanning to obtain good image quality without beat effect and also to allow a lower laser power to apply is proposed.

  19. A dual growing method for the automatic extraction of individual trees from mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Li, Dalin; Zhu, Haihong; Li, You

    2016-10-01

    Street trees interlaced with other objects in cluttered point clouds of urban scenes inhibit the automatic extraction of individual trees. This paper proposes a method for the automatic extraction of individual trees from mobile laser scanning data, according to the general constitution of trees. Two components of each individual tree - a trunk and a crown can be extracted by the dual growing method. This method consists of coarse classification, through which most of artifacts are removed; the automatic selection of appropriate seeds for individual trees, by which the common manual initial setting is avoided; a dual growing process that separates one tree from others by circumscribing a trunk in an adaptive growing radius and segmenting a crown in constrained growing regions; and a refining process that draws a singular trunk from the interlaced other objects. The method is verified by two datasets with over 98% completeness and over 96% correctness. The low mean absolute percentage errors in capturing the morphological parameters of individual trees indicate that this method can output individual trees with high precision.

  20. Quantification of chemotaxis during pediatric cardiac surgery by flow and laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Schmid, Joerg W.; Osmancik, Pavel; Lenz, Dominik; Pipek, Michal; Hambsch, Joerg; Gerstner, Andreas O.; Schneider, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) alters the leukocyte composition of the peripheral blood (PB). This response contributes to the sometimes adverse outcome with capillary leakage. Migration of activated cells to sites of inflammation, driven by chemokines is part of this response. In order to determine the chemotactic activity of patients serum during and after surgery we established an assay for PB leukocytes (PBL). PBL from healthy donors were isolated and 250,000 cells were placed into a migration chamber separated by a filter from a second lower chamber filled with patient serum. After incubation cells from top and bottom chamber were removed and stained with a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies for leukocyte subsets and analyzed on a flow cytometer (FCM). Cells at the bottom of the filter belong to the migrating compartment and were quantified by LSC after staining of nucleated cells. Increased chemotactic activity started at onset of anaesthesia followed by a phase of low activity immediately after surgery and a second phase of a high post-operative activity. The in vitro results correlated with results obtained by immunopenotyping of circulating PBL. Manipulation of the chemokine pattern might prove beneficial to prevent extravasation of cells leading to tissue damage. In chemotaxis assays with low amount of available serum the combined use of FCM and Laser Scanning LSC proved as an appropriate analytical tool.

  1. Error Analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data by Means of Spherical Statistics and 3D Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Cuartero, Aurora; Armesto, Julia; Rodríguez, Pablo G.; Arias, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a complete analysis of the positional errors of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data based on spherical statistics and 3D graphs. Spherical statistics are preferred because of the 3D vectorial nature of the spatial error. Error vectors have three metric elements (one module and two angles) that were analyzed by spherical statistics. A study case has been presented and discussed in detail. Errors were calculating using 53 check points (CP) and CP coordinates were measured by a digitizer with submillimetre accuracy. The positional accuracy was analyzed by both the conventional method (modular errors analysis) and the proposed method (angular errors analysis) by 3D graphics and numerical spherical statistics. Two packages in R programming language were performed to obtain graphics automatically. The results indicated that the proposed method is advantageous as it offers a more complete analysis of the positional accuracy, such as angular error component, uniformity of the vector distribution, error isotropy, and error, in addition the modular error component by linear statistics. PMID:22163461

  2. Topographical surveys: Classical method versus 3D laser scanning. Case study - An application in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoraş, I.-R.; Covăsnianu, A.; Pleşu, G.; Benedict, B.

    2009-04-01

    The paper describes an experiment which took place in Iasi town, Romania, consisted in two different topographical survey techniques applied for one and the same objective placed in a block within the city (western part) - a thermal power station. The purpose was to compare those methods and to determine which one is proper to be used in this domain in terms of fastness, optimization and speed of data processing. First technique applied for our survey was the classical one, with a total station. Using the CAD technique, we obtained a final product (a dwg file) and a list of coordinates (a text file). The second method, which we focused our attention more, was the measurement with a very precise 3D laser scanstation, also very suitable in archeology. The data obtained were processed with special software. Result was a 3D model of the thermal power plant composed of measurable cloud point data. Finally, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of each method, we came to the conclusion that the 3D laser scanning which we used matches well the application, in this case civil engineering, but the future of accepting and implementing this technique is in the hands of Romanian authorities.

  3. Use of naturally available reference targets to calibrate airborne laser scanning intensity data.

    PubMed

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  4. Combined molecular ecological and confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of peat bog methanogen populations.

    PubMed

    Upton, M; Hill, B; Edwards, C; Saunders, J R; Ritchie, D A; Lloyd, D

    2000-12-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy, using fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of different physiological groups of methanogens, was used to identify which methanogenic genera were present and to describe their in situ spatial locations in samples taken at different depths from blanket peat bog cores. Total bacterial DNA was also extracted and purified from the samples and used as template for amplification of 16S rRNA and regions of methyl CoM reductase-encoding genes using the polymerase chain reaction, as well as for oligonucleotide hybridisation experiments. These techniques, used in concert, demonstrated that methanogens of several physiological groups were present in highest numbers in the mid regions of 25 cm deep peat cores. Some discrepancies were apparent in the findings of the microscopic and molecular methods, though these may be partially accounted for by the different sensitivities of the techniques employed. The combined approaches used in this study gave an insight into the diversity and distribution of methanogens in peat environments not possible using molecular ecological methods alone.

  5. Use of Naturally Available Reference Targets to Calibrate Airborne Laser Scanning Intensity Data

    PubMed Central

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties. PMID:22574045

  6. Terrestrial laser scanning for geometry extraction and change monitoring of rubble mound breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, I.; Lindenbergh, R.; González-Jorge, H.; Arias, P.

    2014-05-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters are coastal defense structures that protect harbors and beaches from the impacts of both littoral drift and storm waves. They occasionally break, leading to catastrophic damage to surrounding human populations and resulting in huge economic and environmental losses. Ensuring their stability is considered to be of vital importance and the major reason for setting up breakwater monitoring systems. Terrestrial laser scanning has been recognized as a monitoring technique of existing infrastructures. Its capability for measuring large amounts of accurate points in a short period of time is also well proven. In this paper we first introduce a method for the automatic extraction of face geometry of concrete cubic blocks, as typically used in breakwaters. Point clouds are segmented based on their orientation and location. Then we compare corresponding cuboids of three co-registered point clouds to estimate their transformation parameters over time. The first method is demonstrated on scan data from the Baiona breakwater (Spain) while the change detection is demonstrated on repeated scan data of concrete bricks, where the changing scenario was simulated. The application of the presented methodology has verified its effectiveness for outlining the 3D breakwater units and analyzing their changes at the millimeter level. Breakwater management activities could benefit from this initial version of the method in order to improve their productivity.

  7. Triangular mesh establishment of 3D laser scanning data based on ellipsoidal projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, De-hua; Xu, Jia; Li, Jia; Wang, Xin-sen

    2011-10-01

    The establishment of high quality triangular mesh is one of the key steps in 3D laser scanning data processing. Traditional triangulation algorithms have been proposed directly on the basis of adjacency relation between points in 3D space. However, when the point density is non-uniform or the noise exists, the problems such as surface hole, dough sheet overlapping and inconsistent normal appear easily. In this paper, a triangular mesh establishing algorithm based on ellipsoidal projection is proposed. After comparing the theory of ellipsoidal projection and cylindrical projection, the proposed triangular mesh establishing algorithm is analyzed in detail including basic idea and implementation method. To evaluate the performance and efficiency of the proposed algorithm, two experiments are then carried out on the 3D point cloud data of a foundation pit. The results indicate that though the computational efficiency of proposed algorithm is a little inferior to the algorithm based on cylindrical projection, the proposed algorithm is more effective for establishing point cloud of both top and bottom of the object and the original topological relation of 3D scanning points can be maintained better.

  8. Possibilities of a Personal Laser Scanning System for Forest Mapping and Ecosystem Services

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinlian; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Wang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-01

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH) was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking. PMID:24434879

  9. Evaluation of Wavelet Denoising Methods for Small-Scale Joint Roughness Estimation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitenc, M.; Kieffer, D. S.; Khoshelham, K.

    2015-08-01

    The precision of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) data depends mainly on the inherent random range error, which hinders extraction of small details from TLS measurements. New post processing algorithms have been developed that reduce or eliminate the noise and therefore enable modelling details at a smaller scale than one would traditionally expect. The aim of this research is to find the optimum denoising method such that the corrected TLS data provides a reliable estimation of small-scale rock joint roughness. Two wavelet-based denoising methods are considered, namely Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT), in combination with different thresholding procedures. The question is, which technique provides a more accurate roughness estimates considering (i) wavelet transform (SWT or DWT), (ii) thresholding method (fixed-form or penalised low) and (iii) thresholding mode (soft or hard). The performance of denoising methods is tested by two analyses, namely method noise and method sensitivity to noise. The reference data are precise Advanced TOpometric Sensor (ATOS) measurements obtained on 20 × 30 cm rock joint sample, which are for the second analysis corrupted by different levels of noise. With such a controlled noise level experiments it is possible to evaluate the methods' performance for different amounts of noise, which might be present in TLS data. Qualitative visual checks of denoised surfaces and quantitative parameters such as grid height and roughness are considered in a comparative analysis of denoising methods. Results indicate that the preferred method for realistic roughness estimation is DWT with penalised low hard thresholding.

  10. Terrestrial laser scanning observations of geomorphic changes and varying lava lake levels at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Laura K.; Kyle, Philip R.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Frechette, Jedediah D.; Okal, Marianne H.

    2015-03-01

    A Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) instrument was used to image the topography of the Main Crater at Erebus volcano each December in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Our high-spatial resolution TLS scans provide unique insights into annual and decadal scale geomorphic evolution of the summit area when integrated with comparable data collected by an airborne instrument in 2001. We observe both a pattern of subsidence within the Inner Crater of the volcano and an ~ 3 m per-year drop in the lava lake level over the same time period that are suggestive of decreasing overpressure in an underlying magma reservoir. We also scanned the active phonolite lava lake hosted within the Inner Crater, and recorded rapid cyclic fluctuations in the level of the lake. These were sporadically interrupted by minor explosions by bursting gas bubbles at the lake surface. The TLS data permit calculation of lake level rise and fall speeds and associated rates of volumetric change within the lake. These new observations, when considered with prior determinations of rates of lake surface motion and gas output, are indicative of unsteady magma flow in the conduit and its associated variability in gas volume fraction.

  11. A wavelet based algorithm for DTM extraction from airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yang, Yan; Tian, Qingjiu

    2007-06-01

    The automatic extraction of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from point clouds acquired by airborne laser scanning (ALS) equipment remains a problem in ALS data filtering nowadays. Many filter algorithms have been developed to remove object points and outliers, and to extract DTM automatically. However, it is difficult to filter in areas where few points have identical morphological or geological features that can present the bare earth. Especially in sloped terrain covered by dense vegetation, points representing bare earth are often identified as noisy data below ground. To extract terrain surface in these areas, a new algorithm is proposed. First, the point clouds are cut into profiles based on a scan line segmentation algorithm. In each profile, a 1D filtering procedure is determined from the wavelet theory, which is superior in detecting high frequency discontinuities. After combining profiles from different directions, an interpolated grid data representing DTM is generated. In order to evaluate the performance of this new approach, we applied it to the data set used in the ISPRS filter test in 2003. 2 samples containing mostly vegetation on slopes have been processed by the proposed algorithm. It can be seen that it filtered most of the objects like vegetation and buildings in sloped area, and smoothed the hilly mountain to be more close to its real terrain surface.

  12. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  13. Geometry and intensity based culvert detection in mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Hyyppa, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS), which recently has been developing so quickly as a promising technology for mapping and remote sensing (RS), offers a good means to measure the fundamental geographic data, e.g. culverts, for urban planning and road engineering. This study as the first try presents a new automatic method to detect culverts in MLS point clouds, in which actually only partial characterization of this category of objects can be presented due to the restricted scanning zenith of MLS. The schematic is based on the raster-form of the data, and the digital terrain models (DTMs) with multi-leveled resolutions are first yielded by local minimum filtering. Then, the common layout of the expanded areas containing culverts is generalized as the theoretical basis, and the schematic components are derived to deploy the concrete judgment. The geometry and intensity information about culverts are both utilized to determine the real locations from coarse- to fine-scales. Numerical analysis based on the real-measured MLS data at the Espoonlahti test site has basically validated the proposed approach. Concretely, the statistical errors of the retrieved lengths and widths of the pedestrian culverts are less than 9% and 16% compared to the real ones individually, notwithstanding the inner heights innately in-accessible.

  14. Inspection of float glass using a novel retroreflective laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jonathan D.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1988, Image Automation has marketed a float glass inspection system using a novel retro-reflective laser scanning system. The (patented) instrument scans a laser beam by use of a polygon through the glass onto a retro-reflective screen, and collects the retro-reflected light off the polygon, such that a stationary image of the moving spot on the screen is produced. The spot image is then analyzed for optical effects introduced by defects within the glass, which typically distort and attenuate the scanned laser beam, by use of suitable detectors. The inspection system processing provides output of defect size, shape and severity, to the factory network for use in rejection or sorting of glass plates to the end customer. This paper briefly describes the principles of operation, the system architecture, and limitations to sensitivity and measurement repeatability. New instruments based on the retro-reflective scanning method have recently been developed. The principles and implementation are described. They include: (1) Simultaneous detection of defects within the glass and defects in a mirror coating on the glass surface using polarized light. (2) A novel distortion detector for very dark glass. (3) Measurement of optical quality (flatness/refractive homogeneity) of the glass using a position sensitive detector.

  15. Combined Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and IR Thermography Applied to a Historical Building

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Antonio; Minasi, Mario; Casula, Giuseppe; Musacchio, Massimo; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia

    2015-01-01

    The conservation of architectural heritage usually requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a variety of specialist expertise and techniques. Nevertheless, destructive techniques should be avoided, wherever possible, in order to preserve the integrity of the historical buildings, therefore the development of non-destructive and non-contact techniques is extremely important. In this framework, a methodology for combining the terrestrial laser scanning and the infrared thermal images is proposed, in order to obtain a reconnaissance of the conservation state of a historical building. The proposed case study is represented by St. Augustine Monumental Compound, located in the historical centre of the town of Cosenza (Calabria, South Italy). Adopting the proposed methodology, the paper illustrates the main results obtained for the building test overlaying and comparing the collected data with both techniques, in order to outline the capabilities both to detect the anomalies and to improve the knowledge on health state of the masonry building. The 3D model, also, allows to provide a reference model, laying the groundwork for implementation of a monitoring multisensor system based on the use of non-destructive techniques. PMID:25609042

  16. Automatic Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds using Panoramic Reflectance Images

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhizhong; Li, Jonathan; Zhang, Liqiang; Zhao, Qile; Zlatanova, Sisi

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds using panoramic reflectance images. The approach follows a two-step procedure that includes both pair-wise registration and global registration. The pair-wise registration consists of image matching (pixel-to-pixel correspondence) and point cloud registration (point-to-point correspondence), as the correspondence between the image and the point cloud (pixel-to-point) is inherent to the reflectance images. False correspondences are removed by a geometric invariance check. The pixel-to-point correspondence and the computation of the rigid transformation parameters (RTPs) are integrated into an iterative process that allows for the pair-wise registration to be optimised. The global registration of all point clouds is obtained by a bundle adjustment using a circular self-closure constraint. Our approach is tested with both indoor and outdoor scenes acquired by a FARO LS 880 laser scanner with an angular resolution of 0.036° and 0.045°, respectively. The results show that the pair-wise and global registration accuracies are of millimetre and centimetre orders, respectively, and that the process is fully automatic and converges quickly. PMID:22574036

  17. Towards Automatic Single-Sensor Mapping by Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Matikainen, L.; Karila, K.; Litkey, P.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of the Optech Titan multispectral airborne laser scanner in the fields of mapping and forestry. Investigation was targeted to six land cover classes. Multispectral laser scanner data can be used to distinguish land cover classes of the ground surface, including the roads and separate road surface classes. For forest inventory using point cloud metrics and intensity features combined, total accuracy of 93.5% was achieved for classification of three main boreal tree species (pine, spruce and birch).When using intensity features - without point height metrics - a classification accuracy of 91% was achieved for these three tree species. It was also shown that deciduous trees can be further classified into more species. We propose that intensity-related features and waveform-type features are combined with point height metrics for forest attribute derivation in area-based prediction, which is an operatively applied forest inventory process in Scandinavia. It is expected that multispectral airborne laser scanning can provide highly valuable data for city and forest mapping and is a highly relevant data asset for national and local mapping agencies in the near future.

  18. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  19. Co-Registration of DSMs Generated by Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancil Persad, Ravi; Armenakis, Costas

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the co-registration of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) is proposed. Specifically, a wavelet-based feature descriptor for matching surface keypoints on the 2.5D DSMs is developed. DSMs are useful in wide-scope of various applications such as 3D building modelling and reconstruction, cultural heritage, urban and environmental planning, aircraft navigation/path routing, accident and crime scene reconstruction, mining as well as, topographic map revision and change detection. For these listed applications, it is not uncommon that there will be a need for automatically aligning multi-temporal DSMs which may have been acquired from multiple sensors, with different specifications over a period of time, and may have various overlaps. Terrestrial laser scanners usually capture urban facades in an accurate manner; however this is not the case for building roof structures. On the other hand, vertical photography from UAVs can capture the roofs. Therefore, the automatic fusion of UAV and laser-scanning based DSMs is addressed here as it serves various geospatial applications.

  20. Combined use of terrestrial laser scanning and IR thermography applied to a historical building.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Antonio; Minasi, Mario; Casula, Giuseppe; Musacchio, Massimo; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia

    2014-12-24

    The conservation of architectural heritage usually requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a variety of specialist expertise and techniques. Nevertheless, destructive techniques should be avoided, wherever possible, in order to preserve the integrity of the historical buildings, therefore the development of non-destructive and non-contact techniques is extremely important. In this framework, a methodology for combining the terrestrial laser scanning and the infrared thermal images is proposed, in order to obtain a reconnaissance of the conservation state of a historical building. The proposed case study is represented by St. Augustine Monumental Compound, located in the historical centre of the town of Cosenza (Calabria, South Italy). Adopting the proposed methodology, the paper illustrates the main results obtained for the building test overlaying and comparing the collected data with both techniques, in order to outline the capabilities both to detect the anomalies and to improve the knowledge on health state of the masonry building. The 3D model, also, allows to provide a reference model, laying the groundwork for implementation of a monitoring multisensor system based on the use of non-destructive techniques.

  1. Reflective confocal laser scanning microscopy and nonlinear microscopy of cross-linked rabbit cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Alexander; Hovakimyan, Marina; Ramirez, Diego F.; Stachs, Oliver; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking of the cornea with application of Ribovlavin and UV-A light is an evolving clinical treatment of the eye disease keratoconus. Despite the positive clinical track record of corneal cross-linking, the complex wound healing process after the treatment is still under investigation. In this study an animal model was used to clarify the state of wound healing 5 weeks after treatment. Cross-linked rabbit corneae were imaged with reflective confocal laser scanning and nonlinear microscopy, namely second harmonic imaging microscopy (SHIM) and two-photon excited autofluorescence. First results show that the NAD(P) H-autofluorescence of the corneal keratocytes and their scattering signal still show a signature of the treatment five weeks after the cross-linking procedure. The SHIM signals show the structural morphology of the fibrous collagen sheets in the stroma of the cornea. SHIM detected in the forward direction differs substantially from backward SHIM, but no signature of treatment was found in both detection channels of the SHIM signal.

  2. High Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Imaging with a Small Uav Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Kaňuk, Ján; Dvorný, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS) have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology) in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  3. Automatic Extraction of Road Surface and Curbstone Edges from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraliakbari, A.; Hahn, M.; Sok, S.

    2015-05-01

    We present a procedure for automatic extraction of the road surface from geo-referenced mobile laser scanning data. The basic assumption of the procedure is that the road surface is smooth and limited by curbstones. Two variants of jump detection are investigated for detecting curbstone edges, one based on height differences the other one based on histograms of the height data. Region growing algorithms are proposed which use the irregular laser point cloud. Two- and four-neighbourhood growing strategies utilize the two height criteria for examining the neighborhood. Both height criteria rely on an assumption about the minimum height of a low curbstone. Road boundaries with lower or no jumps will not stop the region growing process. In contrast to this objects on the road can terminate the process. Therefore further processing such as bridging gaps between detected road boundary points and the removal of wrongly detected curbstone edges is necessary. Road boundaries are finally approximated by splines. Experiments are carried out with a ca. 2 km network of smalls streets located in the neighbourhood of University of Applied Sciences in Stuttgart. For accuracy assessment of the extracted road surfaces, ground truth measurements are digitized manually from the laser scanner data. For completeness and correctness of the region growing result values between 92% and 95% are achieved.

  4. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and laser tweezers based experiments to understand dentine-bacteria interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Sum Chee; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gupta, P. K.; Kishen, Anil

    2007-02-01

    Failure of endodontic treatment is commonly due to Enterococcal infection. In this study influence of chemical treatments of type-I collagen membrane by chemical agents commonly used in endodontic treatment on Enterococcus faecalis cell adherence was evaluated. In order to determine the change in number of adhering bacteria after chemical treatment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used. For this, overnight culture of E faecalis in All Culture broth was applied to chemically treated type-I collagen membrane. It was found that Ca(OH) II treated groups had statistically significant (p value=0.05) increase in population of bacteria adherence. The change in adhesion force between bacteria and collagen was determined by using optical tweezers (1064 nm). For this experiment, Type-I collagen membrane was soaked for 5 mins in a media that contained 50% all culture media and 50% saturated Ca(OH) II . The membrane was spread on the coverslip, on which diluted bacterial suspension was added. The force of laser tweezers on the bacteria was estimated at different trap power levels using viscous drag method and trapping stiffness was calculated using Equipartition theorem method. Presence of Ca(OH) II was found to increase the cell-substrate adherence force from 0.38pN to >2.1pN. Together, these experiments show that it was highly probable that the increase in adherence to collagen was due to a stronger adhesion in the presence of Ca (OH) II.

  5. Parallel Processing Method for Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using a PC Cluster and a Virtual Grid.

    PubMed

    Han, Soo Hee; Heo, Joon; Sohn, Hong Gyoo; Yu, Kiyun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a parallel processing method using a PC cluster and a virtual grid is proposed for the fast processing of enormous amounts of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. The method creates a raster digital surface model (DSM) by interpolating point data with inverse distance weighting (IDW), and produces a digital terrain model (DTM) by local minimum filtering of the DSM. To make a consistent comparison of performance between sequential and parallel processing approaches, the means of dealing with boundary data and of selecting interpolation centers were controlled for each processing node in parallel approach. To test the speedup, efficiency and linearity of the proposed algorithm, actual ALS data up to 134 million points were processed with a PC cluster consisting of one master node and eight slave nodes. The results showed that parallel processing provides better performance when the computational overhead, the number of processors, and the data size become large. It was verified that the proposed algorithm is a linear time operation and that the products obtained by parallel processing are identical to those produced by sequential processing.

  6. Assessing and modeling moose (Alces alces) habitats with airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, M.; Packalén, P.; Matala, J.; Mehtätalo, L.; Pusenius, J.

    2013-08-01

    In the analysis of forest resources, the use of ALS (airborne laser scanning) enables detailed three dimensional (3D) descriptions of forests and their vegetation. Simultaneously, ecologists have recognized that 3D information on vegetation is highly important in analyzing the habitat suitability of a given site. Recently, animals’ habitat preferences have been analyzed, for example, with GPS-collared animals. This has resulted in detailed knowledge about the animals’ movements both spatially and temporally. This study combines 3D information on vegetation obtained from ALS data with information about animal locations from GPS data. The aim was to map and analyze the habitat preferences of moose. The study area was located on the west coast of Finland. The data consisted of 18 GPS-collared moose (monitored from 2009 to 2010) and ALS data collected in 2010. We investigated how habitat structure changes as a function of distance to observed moose locations and how observed moose locations differ from randomly selected locations in terms of 3D structure. We also created a model-based habitat suitability map and tested it against moose occurrences. The results suggested that there are clear differences between the areas occupied and not occupied by moose and that these differences can be detected from ALS data. More importantly, ALS proved its potential in linking 3D descriptions of vegetation directly to observed moose locations without any proxy variables. These observations strongly support future studies.

  7. Revealing the Secrets of Stonehenge Through the Application of Laser Scanning, Photogrammetry and Visualisation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, P. G.; Abbott, M.; Dodson, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Stonehenge is perhaps the most famous prehistoric monument in the world. Begun as a simple earthwork enclosure, it was built in several stages with the unique lintelled stone circle being erected in the Neolithic period in around 2,500 BC. Today Stonehenge, together with Avebury and other associated sites, form the heart of a World Heritage Site (WHS) with a unique and dense concentration of outstanding prehistoric monuments. In 2011 English Heritage (EH) embarked on a new survey of the monument. Undertaken by the Greenhatch Group, a commercial survey company based near Derby, a combination of laser scanning and photogrammetric approaches were used to generate the required scale and detailed level of output required by English Heritage. This paper will describe the background to this project and its context within previous survey activities at this World Heritage Site. It will explain the data acquisition technology and processes undertaken on site, the datasets derived from post-processing and their filtering and analysis within both subsequent research projects. Alongside a description of how the data is currently being exploited and proposed future applications within the conservation and management of the site, it will finish by considering the impact of developing geospatial imaging technologies.

  8. Applicability of confocal laser scanning microscopy for evaluation and monitoring of cutaneous wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Bob, Adrienne; Terhorst, Dorothea; Ulrich, Martina; Fluhr, Joachim; Mendez, Gil; Roewert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    There is a high demand for noninvasive imaging techniques for wound assessment. In vivo reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an innovative optical technique for noninvasive evaluation of normal and diseased skin in vivo at near cellular resolution. This study was designed to test the feasibility of CLSM for noninvasive analysis of cutaneous wound healing in 15 patients (7 male/8 female), including acute and chronic, superficial and deep dermal skin wounds. A commercially available CLSM system was used for the assessment of wound bed and wound margins in order to obtain descriptive cellular and morphological parameters of cutaneous wound repair noninvasively and over time. CLSM was able to visualize features of cutaneous wound repair in epidermal and superficial dermal wounds, including aspects of inflammation, neovascularisation, and tissue remodelling in vivo. Limitations include the lack of mechanic fixation of the optical system on moist surfaces restricting the analysis of chronic skin wounds to the wound margins, as well as a limited optical resolution in areas of significant slough formation. By describing CLSM features of cutaneous inflammation, vascularisation, and epithelialisation, the findings of this study support the role of CLSM in modern wound research and management.

  9. Performance analysis of freeware filtering algorithms for determining ground surface from airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julge, Kalev; Ellmann, Artu; Gruno, Anti

    2014-01-01

    Numerous filtering algorithms have been developed in order to distinguish the ground surface from nonground points acquired by airborne laser scanning. These algorithms automatically attempt to determine the ground points using various features such as predefined parameters and statistical analysis. Their efficiency also depends on landscape characteristics. The aim of this contribution is to test the performance of six common filtering algorithms embedded in three freeware programs. The algorithms' adaptive TIN, elevation threshold with expand window, maximum local slope, progressive morphology, multiscale curvature, and linear prediction were tested on four relatively large (4 to 8 km2) and diverse landscape areas, which included steep sloped hills, urban areas, ridge-like eskers, and a river valley. The results show that in diverse test areas each algorithm yields various commission and omission errors. It appears that adaptive TIN is suitable in urban areas while the multiscale curvature algorithm is best suited in wooded areas. The multiscale curvature algorithm yielded the overall best results with average root-mean-square error values of 0.35 m.

  10. a Feasibility Study on Use of Generic Mobile Laser Scanning System for Detecting Asphalt Pavement Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinqu; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm) within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  11. The investigation of the dynamic morphology of block copolymer solutions by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjung

    2005-03-01

    Recently we applied laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) for the study of block copolymer 3D morphology. Besides static measurement of microstructures (direct 3-D imaging of block copolymer morphology), LSCM also enables the tracking of the fast dynamic process which has been impossible by conventional microscopic techniques such as TEM (transmission electron microscopy) or AFM (atomic force microscopy). In this study, in-situ LSCM investigation of the morphology of confined photonic BCP solution was performed in conjunction with spectroscopic measurement for the first time. When a lamellar forming polystyrene-b-isoprene (480k-360k, PS/PI) in cumene was placed between cover glasses, the continuous evaporation of the solvent induced a shear field along the radial direction (evaporation direction). As a result, the photonic lamellar BCP solution over the whole area developed a series of concentric ring pattern covering entire visible colors (blue to red). Comparison of the experimental result with theoretical calculation (transfer matrix method) revealed that this phenomenon mainly comes from the change of the orientation of BCP lamella based on the reflectivity at each region along the radius..

  12. Further resolution enhancement of high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy applied to mouse endogenous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Kazuaki; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    Photothermal microscopy has intrinsically super resolution capability due to the bilinear dependence of signal intensity of pump and probe. In the present paper, we have made further resolution improvement of high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy by applying non-linear detection. By this, the new method has the following advantages: (1) super resolution with 61% and 42% enhancement from the diffraction limit values of the probe and pump wavelengths, respectively, by a second-order non-linear scheme, (2) compact light source using inexpensive conventional diode lasers, (3) wide applicability to nonfluorescent materials such as gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and hematoxylin-eosin stained biological samples, (4) relative robustness to optical damage, and (5) a high-frame rate using a Galvano mirror. The maximum resolution is determined to be 160 nm in the second-order non-linear detection mode and 270 nm in the linear detection mode by the PT signal of GNPs. The pixel rate and frame rate for 300 × 300 pixel image are 50 μs and 4.5 s, respectively. The pixel and frame rate are shorter than the rates, which are 1 ms and 100 s, respectively, using the piezo-driven stage system.

  13. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  14. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of capillaries in normal and psoriatic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archid, Rami; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Ulrich, Martina; Stockfleth, Eggert; Philipp, Sandra; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2012-10-01

    An important and most likely active role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been attributed to changes in cutaneous blood vessels. The purpose of this study was to use confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate dermal capillaries in psoriatic and normal skin. The structures of the capillary loops in 5 healthy participants were compared with those in affected skin of 13 psoriasis patients. The diameters of the capillaries and papillae were measured for each group with CLSM. All investigated psoriasis patients showed elongated, widened, and tortuous microvessels in the papillary dermis, whereas all healthy controls showed a single capillary loop in each dermal papilla. The capillaries of the papillary loop and the dermal papilla were significantly enlarged in the psoriatic skin lesions (diameters 24.39±2.34 and 146.46±28.52 μm, respectively) in comparison to healthy skin (diameters 9.53±1.8 and 69.48±17.16 μm, respectively) (P<0.001). CLSM appears to represent a promising noninvasive technique for evaluating dermal capillaries in patients with psoriasis. The diameter of the vessels could be seen as a well-quantifiable indicator for the state of psoriatic skin. CLSM could be useful for therapeutic monitoring to delay possible recurrences.

  15. Imaging of the surface resistance of an SRF cavity by low-temperature laser scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, S.M. Anlage, A.V. Gurevich

    2013-06-01

    Temperature mapping of the outer surface of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity is a technique that is often used to identify lossy areas on the cavity surface. In this contribution, we present 2-D images of the superconducting state surface resistance R{sub s} of the inner surface of a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity obtained by low-temperature laser scanning microscopy. This technique, which is applied for the first time to study lossy regions in an operating SRF cavity, allows identifying 'hotspots' with about one order of magnitude better spatial resolution ( ~2 mm) than by thermometry. The R{sub s}-resolution is of the order of 1 {micro}{Ohm} at 3.3 GHz. Surface resistance maps with different laser power and optical images of the cavity surface are discussed in this contribution. It is also shown that the thermal gradient on the niobium surface created by the laser beam can move some of the hotspots, which are identified as locations of trapped bundle of fluxoids. The prospects for this microscope to identify defects that limit the performance of SRF cavities will also be discussed.

  16. Analysis of shallow landslides by morphometry parameters derived from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, A.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; Wiegand, C.; Kringer, K.; Geitner, C.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion by shallow landslides is a widespread and growing phenomenon in mountainous areas. The major consequences are loss of soil and regolith as well as damages on infrastructure and provision of unconsolidated material for secondary processes such as mudflows. In this study we present a concept for extracting morphometry parameters from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds in order to investigate the relation between slope surface structure and regolith depth. TLS is used to collect high-resolution point cloud data of an affected slope in the Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). Regolith depth is considered to be one of the important factors for the development of shallow landslides. However, direct field measurements are labour- and time-consuming. In this study we developed an approach, to investigate the relation between regolith depth and surface morphometry parameters. The reference regolith depth information is derived from lightweight dynamic cone penetrometer tests (DCPT) within the test site. The suggested approach integrates spatial analysis of Geographic Information Systems and point cloud processing algorithms. It will help to enhance the prediction of shallow landslide occurrence by (i) deriving high resolution 3D morphometric parameters and (ii) determining regolith depth with a reasonable effort due to automation. In future we want to be able to contribute with this concept to the detailed modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility on alpine slopes.

  17. A novel near real-time laser scanning device for geometrical determination of pleural cavity surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michele M; Zhu, Timothy C

    2013-02-02

    During HPPH-mediated pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT), it is critical to determine the anatomic geometry of the pleural surface quickly as there may be movement during treatment resulting in changes with the cavity. We have developed a laser scanning device for this purpose, which has the potential to obtain the surface geometry in real-time. A red diode laser with a holographic template to create a pattern and a camera with auto-focusing abilities are used to scan the cavity. In conjunction with a calibration with a known surface, we can use methods of triangulation to reconstruct the surface. Using a chest phantom, we are able to obtain a 360 degree scan of the interior in under 1 minute. The chest phantom scan was compared to an existing CT scan to determine its accuracy. The laser-camera separation can be determined through the calibration with 2mm accuracy. The device is best suited for environments that are on the scale of a chest cavity (between 10cm and 40cm). This technique has the potential to produce cavity geometry in real-time during treatment. This would enable PDT treatment dosage to be determined with greater accuracy. Works are ongoing to build a miniaturized device that moves the light source and camera via a fiber-optics bundle commonly used for endoscopy with increased accuracy.

  18. Obstacle detection and spectral discrimination using multi-wavelength motionless wide angle laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Sahba, Kaveh; Alameh, Kamal E; Smith, Clifton L

    2008-04-14

    Static laser scanning over a wide angle is demonstrated by ranging to 20 laser beams generated by a novel cylindrical quasi-cavity waveguide, using laser triangulation. Baseline distances and outgoing angles unique to each laser beam are calculated by modelling the triangulation arrangement using a system of linear equations and plotting principal rays. The quasi-cavity waveguide, imaging lens and focal plane are also plotted. The system is calibrated by finding optimal values for uncertain instrumental parameters using constrained non-linear optimization. Distances calculated over 5m indoors result in accuracies above 93%. Discrete laser spectroscopy using 640nm and 785nm laser diodes is also demonstrated. Both injected laser beams follow the same optical path through the quasi-cavity waveguide, enabling spectral measurements to be made from the same point on an object for both wavelengths. The reflected red and infrared laser light is digitally recorded by a CCD imager and differences in reflected intensity enable discrimination between various natural objects. This provides more complete information about the perturbing object, including its 3D coordinates as well as limited identification of its surface material.

  19. Laser-scan lithography onto ultra-fine pipes 100 μm in diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Sagara, Tomoya; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    It is required to develop a simple but effective method for fabricating micro components with cylindrical shapes such as spring parts used for contact-probe springs of electrical testing systems. Here, laser-scan lithography was researched for printing fine resist patterns used for etching masks on ultra-fine stainless-steel pipes with a diameter of 100 μm. At first, a pipe was coated with 3-μm thick positive resist. Second, the resist is exposed to laser light. As the laser light source, a violet laser with a wavelength of 408 nm was used. The laser beam was reshaped in a circle, and irradiated on the pipe by reducing it in 1/20 using a reduction projection optics composed of a 10X objective lens and a 2X imaging lens. The pipe was supported by the chuck of rotation stage, and exposured by moving it up and down and rotating it. The pipe position was adjusted as the laser spot came on the pipe center using the XY stage. Linearly arrayed 22 slit patterns with a length of 180 μm and a separation of 70μm were printed at each 90° rotation angle. That is, 88 slits in total were delineated at an exposure speed of 110 μm/s.

  20. Monitoring of Fluvial Transport in the Mountain River Bed Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozkow, G.; Borkowski, A.; Kasprzak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The fluvial transport is the surface process that has a strong impact on the topography changes, especially in mountain areas. Traditional hydrological measurements usually give a good understanding of the river flow, however, the information of the bedload movement in the rivers is still insufficient. In particular, there is limited knowledge about the movement of the largest clasts, i.e. boulders. This investigation addresses mentioned issues by employing Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to monitor annual changes of the mountain river bed. The vertical changes were estimated based on the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of difference (DoD) while transported boulders were identified based on the distances between point clouds and RGB-coloured points. Combined RGB point clouds allowed also to measure 3D displacements of boulders. The results showed that the highest dynamic of the fluvial process occurred between years 2012-2013. Obtained DoD clearly indicated alternating zones of erosion and deposition of the sediment finer fractions in the local sedimentary traps. The horizontal displacement of the rock material in the river bed showed high complexity resulting in the displacement of large boulders (major axis about 0.8 m) for the distance up to 2.3 m.

  1. Laser scanning confocal microscope with programmable amplitude, phase, and polarization of the illumination beam.

    PubMed

    Boruah, B R; Neil, M A A

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design and construction of a laser scanning confocal microscope with programmable beam forming optics. The amplitude, phase, and polarization of the laser beam used in the microscope can be controlled in real time with the help of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator, acting as a computer generated hologram, in conjunction with a polarizing beam splitter and two right angled prisms assembly. Two scan mirrors, comprising an on-axis fast moving scan mirror for line scanning and an off-axis slow moving scan mirror for frame scanning, configured in a way to minimize the movement of the scanned beam over the pupil plane of the microscope objective, form the XY scan unit. The confocal system, that incorporates the programmable beam forming unit and the scan unit, has been implemented to image in both reflected and fluorescence light from the specimen. Efficiency of the system to programmably generate custom defined vector beams has been demonstrated by generating a bottle structured focal volume, which in fact is the overlap of two cross polarized beams, that can simultaneously improve both the lateral and axial resolutions if used as the de-excitation beam in a stimulated emission depletion confocal microscope.

  2. Improved Correction Method for Water-Refracted Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data Acquired in the Mountain Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, N.; Asano, Y.; Moribe, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Detailed information of underwater topography is required for better understanding and prediction of water and sediment transport in a mountain channel. Recent research showed promising utility of green-wavelength Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) for measuring submerged stream-bed structure in fluvial environment. However, difficulty in acquiring reliable underwater data has been remained in the part of mountain channel where water surface has some gradient. Since horizontal water surface was a major premise for the existing water refraction correction method, significant error was resulted in such area. Therefore, this paper presents a modified method to correct water-refracted TLS data acquired over mountain channel with complex water-surface slope. Applicability of the modified method was validated using the field data and compared with the existing correction method and non-corrected data. The results showed that the modified method has much smaller error with RMSE value of 3 mm than the existing method (RMSE = 10 mm) and non-corrected data (RMSE = 23 mm). Presented method successfully corrected water-refracted TLS data acquired over sloped channel. This would enable us to quantitatively measure whole units of complex mountain channels, and help us to understand water dynamics better in the area.

  3. Parallel Processing Method for Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using a PC Cluster and a Virtual Grid

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Hee; Heo, Joon; Sohn, Hong Gyoo; Yu, Kiyun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a parallel processing method using a PC cluster and a virtual grid is proposed for the fast processing of enormous amounts of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. The method creates a raster digital surface model (DSM) by interpolating point data with inverse distance weighting (IDW), and produces a digital terrain model (DTM) by local minimum filtering of the DSM. To make a consistent comparison of performance between sequential and parallel processing approaches, the means of dealing with boundary data and of selecting interpolation centers were controlled for each processing node in parallel approach. To test the speedup, efficiency and linearity of the proposed algorithm, actual ALS data up to 134 million points were processed with a PC cluster consisting of one master node and eight slave nodes. The results showed that parallel processing provides better performance when the computational overhead, the number of processors, and the data size become large. It was verified that the proposed algorithm is a linear time operation and that the products obtained by parallel processing are identical to those produced by sequential processing. PMID:22574032

  4. Presynaptic structure of Aplysia single live neuron by atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Aee-Young; Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Seonghoon

    2013-05-02

    The structural and functional plasticity of Aplysia mechanosensory presynaptic neurons has been studied in relation with the mechanism underlying learning and memory. Long-term facilitation (LTF), which is a well-known cellular model for long-term memory in Aplysia, is accompanied by new synaptic structural growth or change. We developed a combined atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope (AFM-CLSM) system integrated with a MATLAB routine for image processing to concurrently obtain high-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) outer-surface morphological images and 3D interior fluorescence images. With our combined AFM-CLSM system, volumetric changes in the presynaptic structures (varicosities) of Aplysia live sensory-motor neuron cocultures were observed. The spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle molecules in the preexisting varicosities was monitored together with a volumetric change in the varicosities. Our combined AFM-CLSM system is successfully adapted for measuring learning-related structural changes and the movement of synaptic molecules in the single live neuron through interaction force and fluorescence imaging.

  5. Visualization of ultradeformable liposomes penetration pathways and their skin interaction by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Subongkot, Thirapit; Wonglertnirant, Nanthida; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2013-01-30

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the skin penetration pathway of the generated ultradeformable liposomes (ULs) with terpenes for transdermal drug delivery of fluorescein sodium (NaFl). ULs with d-limonene were selected to investigate the penetration pathways and vesicle-skin interaction in terms of release and attachment processes via Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). A co-localization technique was employed to visualize the skin penetration behavior of UL-labeled red fluorescence (Rh-PE) and fluorescence-entrapped drug (NaFl) through porcine skin. Our results suggested that ULs with entrapped drug might attach to any part of the skin before releasing the entrapped drug into the skin. Most ULs and entrapped drug penetrated through hair follicles more than through the nonfollicular region. In summary, the transfollicular pathway was the major penetration pathway of ULs with d-limonene for transdermal drug delivery of NaFl, whereas the intercellular and transcellular pathways were the minor penetration pathways.

  6. Two-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy image correlation for nanoparticle flow velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Brian; Giarra, Matthew; Golz, Brian; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    We present a methodology to mitigate the major sources of error associated with two-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images of nanoparticles flowing through a microfluidic channel. The correlation-based velocity measurements from CLSM images are subject to random error due to the Brownian motion of nanometer-sized tracer particles, and a bias error due to the formation of images by raster scanning. Here, we develop a novel ensemble phase correlation with dynamic optimal filter that maximizes the correlation strength, which diminishes the random error. In addition, we introduce an analytical model of CLSM measurement bias error correction due to two-dimensional image scanning of tracer particles. We tested our technique using both synthetic and experimental images of nanoparticles flowing through a microfluidic channel. We observed that our technique reduced the error by up to a factor of ten compared to ensemble standard cross correlation (SCC) for the images tested in the present work. Subsequently, we will assess our framework further, by interrogating nanoscale flow in the cell culture environment (transport within the lacunar-canalicular system) to demonstrate our ability to accurately resolve flow measurements in a biological system.

  7. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    PubMed

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-04-10

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible.

  8. Fast and Robust STEM Reconstruction in Complex Environments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Hollaus, M.; Puttonen, E.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is an effective tool in forest research and management. However, accurate estimation of tree parameters still remains challenging in complex forests. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for stem modeling in complex environments. This method does not require accurate delineation of stem points from the original point cloud. The stem reconstruction features a self-adaptive cylinder growing scheme. This algorithm is tested for a landslide region in the federal state of Vorarlberg, Austria. The algorithm results are compared with field reference data, which show that our algorithm is able to accurately retrieve the diameter at breast height (DBH) with a root mean square error (RMSE) of ~1.9 cm. This algorithm is further facilitated by applying an advanced sampling technique. Different sampling rates are applied and tested. It is found that a sampling rate of 7.5% is already able to retain the stem fitting quality and simultaneously reduce the computation time significantly by ~88%.

  9. Adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method for estimating tree diameter based on single terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Guochao; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to extract accurate forest biophysical parameters for inventory purposes. The diameter at breast height (DBH) is a key parameter for individual trees because it has the potential for modeling the height, volume, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential of the tree based on empirical allometric scaling equations. In order to extract the DBH from the single-scan data of TLS automatically and accurately within a certain range, we proposed an adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method based on the point cloud transect. This proposed method can correct the error caused by the simple circle fitting method when a tree is slanted. A slanted tree was detected by the circle-ellipse fitting analysis, then the corresponding slant angle was found based on the ellipse fitting result. With this information, the DBH of the trees could be recalculated based on reslicing the point cloud data at breast height. Artificial stem data simulated by a cylindrical model of leaning trees and the scanning data acquired with the RIEGL VZ-400 were used to test the proposed adaptive fitting method. The results shown that the proposed method can detect the trees and accurately estimate the DBH for leaning trees.

  10. Plasmon resonance and the imaging of metal-impregnated neurons with the laser scanning confocal microscope

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Karen J; Harley, Cynthia M; Barthel, Grant M; Sanders, Mark A; Mesce, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The staining of neurons with silver began in the 1800s, but until now the great resolving power of the laser scanning confocal microscope has not been utilized to capture the in-focus and three-dimensional cytoarchitecture of metal-impregnated cells. Here, we demonstrate how spectral confocal microscopy, typically reserved for fluorescent imaging, can be used to visualize metal-labeled tissues. This imaging does not involve the reflectance of metal particles, but rather the excitation of silver (or gold) nanoparticles and their putative surface plasmon resonance. To induce such resonance, silver or gold particles were excited with visible-wavelength laser lines (561 or 640 nm), and the maximal emission signal was collected at a shorter wavelength (i.e., higher energy state). Because the surface plasmon resonances of noble metal nanoparticles offer a superior optical signal and do not photobleach, our novel protocol holds enormous promise of a rebirth and further development of silver- and gold-based cell labeling protocols. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09388.001 PMID:26670545

  11. Integrating optical satellite data and airborne laser scanning in habitat classification for wildlife management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijland, W.; Coops, N. C.; Nielsen, S. E.; Stenhouse, G.

    2015-06-01

    Wildlife habitat selection is determined by a wide range of factors including food availability, shelter, security and landscape heterogeneity all of which are closely related to the more readily mapped landcover types and disturbance regimes. Regional wildlife habitat studies often used moderate resolution multispectral satellite imagery for wall to wall mapping, because it offers a favourable mix of availability, cost and resolution. However, certain habitat characteristics such as canopy structure and topographic factors are not well discriminated with these passive, optical datasets. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) provides highly accurate three dimensional data on canopy structure and the underlying terrain, thereby offers significant enhancements to wildlife habitat mapping. In this paper, we introduce an approach to integrate ALS data and multispectral images to develop a new heuristic wildlife habitat classifier for western Alberta. Our method combines ALS direct measures of canopy height, and cover with optical estimates of species (conifer vs. deciduous) composition into a decision tree classifier for habitat - or landcover types. We believe this new approach is highly versatile and transferable, because class rules can be easily adapted for other species or functional groups. We discuss the implications of increased ALS availability for habitat mapping and wildlife management and provide recommendations for integrating multispectral and ALS data into wildlife management.

  12. Landslides Identification Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data Derived Topographic Terrain Attributes and Support Vector Machine Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłuszek, Kamila; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Since the availability of high-resolution Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data, substantial progress in geomorphological research, especially in landslide analysis, has been carried out. First and second order derivatives of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) have become a popular and powerful tool in landslide inventory mapping. Nevertheless, an automatic landslide mapping based on sophisticated classifiers including Support Vector Machine (SVM), Artificial Neural Network or Random Forests is often computationally time consuming. The objective of this research is to deeply explore topographic information provided by ALS data and overcome computational time limitation. For this reason, an extended set of topographic features and the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used to reduce redundant information. The proposed novel approach was tested on a susceptible area affected by more than 50 landslides located on Rożnów Lake in Carpathian Mountains, Poland. The initial seven PCA components with 90% of the total variability in the original topographic attributes were used for SVM classification. Comparing results with landslide inventory map, the average user's accuracy (UA), producer's accuracy (PA), and overall accuracy (OA) were calculated for two models according to the classification results. Thereby, for the PCA-feature-reduced model UA, PA, and OA were found to be 72%, 76%, and 72%, respectively. Similarly, UA, PA, and OA in the non-reduced original topographic model, was 74%, 77% and 74%, respectively. Using the initial seven PCA components instead of the twenty original topographic attributes does not significantly change identification accuracy but reduce computational time.

  13. Wide-Area Mapping of Forest with National Airborne Laser Scanning and Field Inventory Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnet, J.-M.; Ginzler, C.; Clivaz, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) remote sensing data are now available for entire countries such as Switzerland. Methods for the estimation of forest parameters from ALS have been intensively investigated in the past years. However, the implementation of a forest mapping workflow based on available data at a regional level still remains challenging. A case study was implemented in the Canton of Valais (Switzerland). The national ALS dataset and field data of the Swiss National Forest Inventory were used to calibrate estimation models for mean and maximum height, basal area, stem density, mean diameter and stem volume. When stratification was performed based on ALS acquisition settings and geographical criteria, satisfactory prediction models were obtained for volume (R2 = 0.61 with a root mean square error of 47 %) and basal area (respectively 0.51 and 45 %) while height variables had an error lower than 19%. This case study shows that the use of nationwide ALS and field datasets for forest resources mapping is cost efficient, but additional investigations are required to handle the limitations of the input data and optimize the accuracy.

  14. Urban Road Detection in Airbone Laser Scanning Point Cloud Using Random Forest Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczałek, B.; Borkowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to detect points that describe a road surface in an unclassified point cloud of the airborne laser scanning (ALS). For this purpose we use the Random Forest learning algorithm. The proposed methodology consists of two stages: preparation of features and supervised point cloud classification. In this approach we consider ALS points, representing only the last echo. For these points RGB, intensity, the normal vectors, their mean values and the standard deviations are provided. Moreover, local and global height variations are taken into account as components of a feature vector. The feature vectors are calculated on a basis of the 3D Delaunay triangulation. The proposed methodology was tested on point clouds with the average point density of 12 pts/m2 that represent large urban scene. The significance level of 15% was set up for a decision tree of the learning algorithm. As a result of the Random Forest classification we received two subsets of ALS points. One of those groups represents points belonging to the road network. After the classification evaluation we achieved from 90% of the overall classification accuracy. Finally, the ALS points representing roads were merged and simplified into road network polylines using morphological operations.

  15. In vivo assessment of the structure of skin microcirculation by reflectance confocal-laser-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugata, Keiichi; Osanai, Osamu; Kawada, Hiromitsu

    2012-02-01

    One of the major roles of the skin microcirculation is to supply oxygen and nutrition to the surrounding tissue. Regardless of the close relationship between the microcirculation and the surrounding tissue, there are few non-invasive methods that can evaluate both the microcirculation and its surrounding tissue at the same site. We visualized microcapillary plexus structures in human skin using in vivo reflectance confocal-laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), Vivascope 3000® (Lucid Inc., USA) and Image J software (National Institutes of Health, USA) for video image processing. CLSM is a non-invasive technique that can visualize the internal structure of the skin at the cellular level. In addition to internal morphological information such as the extracellular matrix, our method reveals capillary structures up to the depth of the subpapillary plexus at the same site without the need for additional optical systems. Video images at specific depths of the inner forearm skin were recorded. By creating frame-to-frame difference images from the video images using off-line video image processing, we obtained images that emphasize the brightness depending on changes of intensity coming from the movement of blood cells. Merging images from different depths of the skin elucidates the 3-dimensional fine line-structure of the microcirculation. Overall our results show the feasibility of a non-invasive, high-resolution imaging technique to characterize the skin microcirculation and the surrounding tissue.

  16. Automatic Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds using Panoramic Reflectance Images.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhizhong; Li, Jonathan; Zhang, Liqiang; Zhao, Qile; Zlatanova, Sisi

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds using panoramic reflectance images. The approach follows a two-step procedure that includes both pair-wise registration and global registration. The pair-wise registration consists of image matching (pixel-to-pixel correspondence) and point cloud registration (point-to-point correspondence), as the correspondence between the image and the point cloud (pixel-to-point) is inherent to the reflectance images. False correspondences are removed by a geometric invariance check. The pixel-to-point correspondence and the computation of the rigid transformation parameters (RTPs) are integrated into an iterative process that allows for the pair-wise registration to be optimised. The global registration of all point clouds is obtained by a bundle adjustment using a circular self-closure constraint. Our approach is tested with both indoor and outdoor scenes acquired by a FARO LS 880 laser scanner with an angular resolution of 0.036° and 0.045°, respectively. The results show that the pair-wise and global registration accuracies are of millimetre and centimetre orders, respectively, and that the process is fully automatic and converges quickly.

  17. Automated analysis of barley organs using 3D laser scanning: an approach for high throughput phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-07-15

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R(2) = 0:99 for the leaf area and R(2) = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored.

  18. Dynamic occlusion detection and inpainting of in situ captured terrestrial laser scanning point clouds sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi; Yang, Bisheng

    2016-09-01

    Laser point clouds captured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in an uncontrollable urban outdoor or indoor scene suffer from irregular shaped data blanks caused by dynamic occlusion that temporarily exists, i.e., moving objects, such as pedestrians or cars, resulting in integrality and quality losses of the scene data. This paper proposes a novel automatic dynamic occlusion detection and inpainting method for sequential TLS point clouds captured from one scan position. In situ collected laser point clouds sequences are indexed by establishing a novel panoramic space partition that assigns a three dimensional voxel to each laser point according to the scanning setups. Then two stationary background models are constructed at the ray voxel level using the laser reflectance intensity and geometrical attributes of the point set inside each voxel across the TLS sequence. Finally, the background models are combined to detect the points on the dynamic object, and the ray voxels of the detected dynamic points are tracked for further inpainting by replacing the ray voxels with the corresponding background voxels from another scan. The resulting scene is free of dynamic occlusions. Experiments validated the effectiveness of the proposed method for indoor and outdoor TLS point clouds captured by a commercial terrestrial scanner. The proposed method achieves high precision and recall rate for dynamic occlusion detection and produces clean inpainted point clouds for further processing.

  19. Assessment of relative accuracy of AHN-2 laser scanning data using planar features.

    PubMed

    van der Sande, Corné; Soudarissanane, Sylvie; Khoshelham, Kourosh

    2010-01-01

    AHN-2 is the second part of the Actueel Hoogtebestand Nederland project, which concerns the acquisition of high-resolution altimetry data over the entire Netherlands using airborne laser scanning. The accuracy assessment of laser altimetry data usually relies on comparing corresponding tie elements, often points or lines, in the overlapping strips. This paper proposes a new approach to strip adjustment and accuracy assessment of AHN-2 data by using planar features. In the proposed approach a transformation is estimated between two overlapping strips by minimizing the distances between points in one strip and their corresponding planes in the other. The planes and the corresponding points are extracted in an automated segmentation process. The point-to-plane distances are used as observables in an estimation model, whereby the parameters of a transformation between the two strips and their associated quality measures are estimated. We demonstrate the performance of the method for the accuracy assessment of the AHN-2 dataset over Zeeland province of The Netherlands. The results show vertical offsets of up to 4 cm between the overlapping strips, and horizontal offsets ranging from 2 cm to 34 cm.

  20. Performance Analysis of a Pole and Tree Trunk Detection Method for Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtomäki, M.; Jaakkola, A.; Hyyppä, J.; Kukko, A.; Kaartinen, H.

    2011-09-01

    Dense point clouds can be collected efficiently from large areas using mobile laser scanning (MLS) technology. Accurate MLS data can be used for detailed 3D modelling of the road surface and objects around it. The 3D models can be utilised, for example, in street planning and maintenance and noise modelling. Utility poles, traffic signs, and lamp posts can be considered an important part of road infrastructure. Poles and trees stand out from the environment and should be included in realistic 3D models. Detection of narrow vertical objects, such as poles and tree trunks, from MLS data was studied. MLS produces huge amounts of data and, therefore, processing methods should be as automatic as possible and for the methods to be practical, the algorithms should run in an acceptable time. The automatic pole detection method tested in this study is based on first finding point clusters that are good candidates for poles and then separating poles and tree trunks from other clusters using features calculated from the clusters and by applying a mask that acts as a model of a pole. The method achieved detection rates of 77.7% and 69.7% in the field tests while 81.0% and 86.5% of the detected targets were correct. Pole-like targets that were surrounded by other objects, such as tree trunks that were inside branches, were the most difficult to detect. Most of the false detections came from wall structures, which could be corrected in further processing.

  1. Laser scanning confocal microscopy for in situ monitoring of alkali-silica reaction.

    PubMed

    Collins, C L; Ideker, J H; Kurtis, K E

    2004-02-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) occurs in concrete between reactive siliceous components in the aggregate and the strongly alkaline pore solution, resulting in the formation of a potentially expansive gel product. Lithium additives have been shown to reduce expansion associated with ASR, but the mechanism(s) by which lithium reduces expansion have not been understood. Therefore, development of an in situ method to observe reactions associated with ASR is highly desirable, as it will allow for non-destructive observation of the reaction product formation and damage evolution over time, as the reaction progresses. A technique to image into mortar through glass aggregate by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), producing three-dimensional representations of the sample was developed. This LSCM technique was utilized to monitor the progress of alkali-silica reaction in mortar samples prepared with alkali-reactive glass aggregate both in the presence and in the absence of lithium additives: LiNO3, LiCl or LiOH. The method proved to be effective in qualitatively monitoring crack formation and growth and product formation, within cracks and at the paste/aggregate interface. In particular, dendritic products were observed at the paste/aggregate interface only in those samples containing lithium, suggesting that these products may play a role in ASR mitigation.

  2. Elastomeric photo-actuators and their investigation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Ilčíková, Markéta; Krupa, Igor; Mičušík, Matej; Kasák, Peter; Pavlova, Ewa; Mosnáček, Jaroslav; Chorvát, Dušan, Jr.; Omastová, Mária

    2013-10-01

    The photo-actuation behavior of nanocomposites based on ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) block copolymer filled with well-dispersed and modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is discussed in this paper. The nanocomposites were prepared by casting from solution. To improve the dispersion of the MWCNTs in EVA, the MWCNT surface was modified with a non-covalent surfactant, cholesteryl 1-pyrenecarboxylate (PyChol). To prepare SIS nanocomposites, the MWCNT surface was covalently modified with polystyrene chains. The good dispersion of the filler was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Special, custom-made punch/die molds were used to create a Braille element (BE)-like shape, which under shear forces induces a uniaxial orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrix. The uniaxial orientation of MWCNTs is an essential precondition to ensure the photo-actuating behavior of MWCNTs in polymeric matrices. The orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrices was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite BEs were illuminated from the bottom by a red light-emitting diode (LED), and the photo-actuation was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). When the BEs were exposed to light, a temporary increase in the height of the element was detected. This process was observed to be reversible: after switching off the light, the BEs returned to their original shape and height.

  3. Research of the coastal zone by the airborne laser scanning data (Verbyanaya bay-bar, sea of Azov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Anatoliy V.; Antonenko, Mihail; Boyko, Evgeniy

    2015-06-01

    In the area Verbyanaya bay-bar (Sea of Azov) in an attempt to create large-scale cartographic base and subsequent thematic mapping of the geographical environment components airborne laser scanning and aerial photography were conducted. Airborne laser scanning data formed the basis of a comprehensive study of the coastal zone components. Methodical research apparatus includes receiving and processing technology of laser reflection points, constructing highprecision digital elevation model and raster surfaces. Mosaic of aerial photography is converted into a format mosaic - a geometrically correct image of the terrain. Set of high-precision digital surface models and thematic raster images obtained for specific dates, allows to analyze the dynamic adjustment of components of the coastal zone (shoreline, beach, shore dam with surge prism).

  4. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  5. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  6. Analysis of a head-mounted display-type multifocus display system using a laser scanning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Park, Q.-Han; Kim, Sung-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    We developed a head-mounted display (HMD)-type multifocus display system using a laser-scanning method to provide an accommodation effect for viewers. This accomplishment indicates that providing a monocular depth cue is possible through this multifocus system. In the system, the optical path is changed by a scanning action. To provide an accurate accommodation effect for the viewer, the multifocus display system is designed and manufactured in accordance with the geometric analysis of the system's scanning action. Using a video camera as a substitute for the viewer, correct focus adjustment without the scanning action problem is demonstrated. By analyzing the scanning action and experimental results, we are able to illustrate the formation of a viewpoint in an HMD-type multifocus display system using a laser-scanning method. In addition, we demonstrate that the accommodation effect could be provided independent of the viewing condition of the viewer.

  7. Increase of Readability and Accuracy of 3d Models Using Fusion of Close Range Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gašparović, M.; Malarić, I.

    2012-07-01

    The development of laser scanning technology has opened a new page in geodesy and enabled an entirely new way of presenting data. Products obtained by the method of laser scanning are used in many sciences, as well as in archaeology. It should be noted that 3D models of archaeological artefacts obtained by laser scanning are fully measurable, written in 1:1 scale and have high accuracy. On the other hand, texture and RGB values of the surface of the object obtained by a laser scanner have lower resolution and poorer radiometric characteristics in relation to the textures captured with a digital camera. Scientific research and the goal of this paper are to increase the accuracy and readability of the 3D model with textures obtained with a digital camera. Laser scanning was performed with triangulation scanner of high accuracy, Vivid 9i (Konica Minolta), while for photogrammetric recording digital camera Nikon D90 with a lens of fixed focal length 20 mm, was used. It is important to stress that a posteriori accuracy score of the global registration of point clouds in the form of the standard deviation was ± 0.136 mm while the average distance was only ± 0.080 mm. Also research has proven that the quality projection texture model increases readability. Recording of archaeological artefacts and making their photorealistic 3D model greatly contributes to archaeology as a science, accelerates processing and reconstruction of the findings. It also allows the presentation of findings to the general public, not just to the experts.

  8. Improving Canopy Vertical Structure Measurements with Dual-Wavelength Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Howe, G.; Hewawasam, K.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Yang, X.; Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    Forest canopy structure regulates radiation interception through the canopy, affects the canopy microclimate, and consequently influences the energy, water, and carbon fluxes between soil, vegetation and atmosphere through its interaction with leaf physiological functioning. To observe vertical canopy forest structure in finer and more accurate detail, we retrieved vertical profiles of leaf and woody components separately with a terrestrial laser scanner, the Dual-Wavelength Echidna Lidar (DWEL). DWEL scans of a hardwood site at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts, USA, in early May and in late September in 2014, revealed the spatial heterogeneity of the canopy vertical structure of the two vegetation components: leaves and woody materials. The DWEL collects simultaneous scans of forests with two lasers at different wavelengths, 1064 nm (NIR) and 1548 nm (SWIR). Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. This spectral contrast between leaves and woody materials, along with spatial context information. discriminates leaves and woody materials accurately in 3-D space, thus allowing the measurement of separate leaf and woody area profiles. We also captured the change in the canopy vertical structure over the seven years by a comparison between the current measurements by the DWEL in 2014 and past measurements in 2007 at the same site by the DWEL's predecessor, a single-wavelength terrestrial lidar, the Echidna Validation Instrument. The comparison also demonstrates the advantage of dual-wavelength laser scanning by the DWEL for canopy structure measurements.

  9. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Nengchao; Huang, Gang; Wu, Chaozhong; Duan, Zhicheng; Li, Pingfan

    2017-01-01

    In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle’s collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident’s form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke’s law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D) data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials. PMID:28264517

  10. Using mobile laser scanning data for automated extraction of road markings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Wang, Cheng; Chapman, Michael; Yang, Bisheng

    2014-01-01

    A mobile laser scanning (MLS) system allows direct collection of accurate 3D point information in unprecedented detail at highway speeds and at less than traditional survey costs, which serves the fast growing demands of transportation-related road surveying including road surface geometry and road environment. As one type of road feature in traffic management systems, road markings on paved roadways have important functions in providing guidance and information to drivers and pedestrians. This paper presents a stepwise procedure to recognize road markings from MLS point clouds. To improve computational efficiency, we first propose a curb-based method for road surface extraction. This method first partitions the raw MLS data into a set of profiles according to vehicle trajectory data, and then extracts small height jumps caused by curbs in the profiles via slope and elevation-difference thresholds. Next, points belonging to the extracted road surface are interpolated into a geo-referenced intensity image using an extended inverse-distance-weighted (IDW) approach. Finally, we dynamically segment the geo-referenced intensity image into road-marking candidates with multiple thresholds that correspond to different ranges determined by point-density appropriate normality. A morphological closing operation with a linear structuring element is finally used to refine the road-marking candidates by removing noise and improving completeness. This road-marking extraction algorithm is comprehensively discussed in the analysis of parameter sensitivity and overall performance. An experimental study performed on a set of road markings with ground-truth shows that the proposed algorithm provides a promising solution to the road-marking extraction from MLS data.

  11. Computing multiple aggregation levels and contextual features for road facilities recognition using mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Dong, Zhen; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, updating the inventory of road infrastructures based on field work is labor intensive, time consuming, and costly. Fortunately, vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. However, robust recognition of road facilities from huge volumes of 3D point clouds is still a challenging issue because of complicated and incomplete structures, occlusions and varied point densities. Most existing methods utilize point or object based features to recognize object candidates, and can only extract limited types of objects with a relatively low recognition rate, especially for incomplete and small objects. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a semantic labeling framework by combing multiple aggregation levels (point-segment-object) of features and contextual features to recognize road facilities, such as road surfaces, road boundaries, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, and cars, for highway infrastructure inventory. The proposed method first identifies ground and non-ground points, and extracts road surfaces facilities from ground points. Non-ground points are segmented into individual candidate objects based on the proposed multi-rule region growing method. Then, the multiple aggregation levels of features and the contextual features (relative positions, relative directions, and spatial patterns) associated with each candidate object are calculated and fed into a SVM classifier to label the corresponding candidate object. The recognition performance of combining multiple aggregation levels and contextual features was compared with single level (point, segment, or object) based features using large-scale highway scene point clouds. Comparative studies demonstrated that the proposed semantic labeling framework significantly improves road facilities recognition

  12. Accuracy analysis of height difference models derived from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glira, Philipp; Briese, Christian; Pfeifer, Norbert; Dusik, Jana; Hilger, Ludwig; Neugirg, Fabian; Baewert, Henning

    2014-05-01

    In many research areas the temporal development of the earth surface topography is investigated for geomorphological analysis (e.g. landslide monitoring). Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) often is used for this purpose, as it allows a fast and detailed 3d reconstruction of the sampled object. The temporal development of the earth surface usually is investigated on the basis of rasterized data, i.e. digital terrain models (DTM). The difference between two DTMs - the difference model - should preferably correspond to the terrain height changes occurred between the measurement campaigns. Actually, these height differences can be influenced by numerous potential error sources. The height accuracy of each raster cell is affected primarily by (a) the measurement accuracy of the deployed TLS, (b) the terrain topography (e.g. roughness), (c) the registration accuracy, (d) the georeferencing accuracy and (e) the raster interpolation method. Thus, in this contribution, height differences are treated as stochastic variables in order to estimate their precision. For an accurate estimation of the height difference precision a detailed knowledge about the whole processing pipeline (from the raw point clouds to the final difference model) is essential. In this study, first the height difference precision is estimated by a rigorous error propagation. As main result, for each raster cell of the difference model, a corresponding height error is estimated, forming an error map. A statistical hypothesis test is presented in order to judge the significance of a height difference. Furthermore, in order to asses the effect of single factors on the final height difference precision, multivariate statistic methods are applied. This analysis allows the deduction of a simple error propagation model, neglecting error sources with small impact on the final precision. The proposed method is demonstrated by means of TLS data acquired at the Gepatschferner (Tyrol, Austria). This study was carried

  13. Understanding the structure of Exmoor's peatland ecosystems using laser-scanning technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscombe, D. J.; Anderson, K.; Wetherelt, A.; Grand-Clement, E.; Le-Feuvre, N.; Smith, D.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    Upland blanket peatlands in the UK are of high conservation value and in an intact state, provide important landscape services, such as carbon sequestration and flood attenuation. The drainage of many such wetlands for agricultural reclamation has resulted in changes to upland blanket mire topography, ecology, hydrological processes and carbon fluxes. There is a need for spatially explicit monitoring approaches at peatland sites in the UK as although there has been a national effort to restore drained peat uplands, baseline and post restoration monitoring of changes to ecosystem structure and function is largely absent. Climate change policy and the emerging carbon markets also necessitate the need for enhanced system understanding to inform carbon targets and understand the impacts of restoration. Exmoor is the focus of this research because many areas of upland peat have, in the past, been extensively drained through government "moorland reclamation" programs. A large restoration project funded by South West Water is currently underway in association with Exmoor National Park, The Environment Agency and Natural England. Exmoor also provides an analogue for other westerly peatlands in the British Isles in terms of its climate, ecology and drainage characteristics. Our approach employed airborne LiDAR data gathered by the Environment Agency Geomatics Group coupled with Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys. LiDAR data were processed to produce digital surface models (DSM) of the peatland surface at a 0.5m resolution. These data were further interrogated to separate vegetation structures and geomorphic features such as man-made drainage channels which have damaged the peatland. Over small extents the LiDAR derived DSM surface was then compared to a TLS derived DSM to examine the ability of these models to describe fine scale vegetation and geomorphic structure, which could then be extrapolated to larger spatial extents. Exploration of the data has shown that

  14. Evaluation of Vertical Lacunarity Profiles in Forested Areas Using Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, B.; Kania, A.; Standovár, T.; Heilmeier, H.

    2016-06-01

    The horizontal variation and vertical layering of the vegetation are important properties of the canopy structure determining the habitat; three-dimensional (3D) distribution of objects (shrub layers, understory vegetation, etc.) is related to the environmental factors (e.g., illumination, visibility). It has been shown that gaps in forests, mosaic-like structures are essential to biodiversity; various methods have been introduced to quantify this property. As the distribution of gaps in the vegetation is a multi-scale phenomenon, in order to capture it in its entirety, scale-independent methods are preferred; one of these is the calculation of lacunarity. We used Airborne Laser Scanning point clouds measured over a forest plantation situated in a former floodplain. The flat topographic relief ensured that the tree growth is independent of the topographic effects. The tree pattern in the plantation crops provided various quasi-regular and irregular patterns, as well as various ages of the stands. The point clouds were voxelized and layers of voxels were considered as images for two-dimensional input. These images calculated for a certain vicinity of reference points were taken as images for the computation of lacunarity curves, providing a stack of lacunarity curves for each reference points. These sets of curves have been compared to reveal spatial changes of this property. As the dynamic range of the lacunarity values is very large, the natural logarithms of the values were considered. Logarithms of lacunarity functions show canopy-related variations, we analysed these variations along transects. The spatial variation can be related to forest properties and ecology-specific aspects.

  15. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  16. Automatic Stem Mapping by Merging Several Terrestrial Laser Scans at the Feature and Decision Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinlian; Hyyppä, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Detailed up-to-date ground reference data have become increasingly important in quantitative forest inventories. Field reference data are conventionally collected at the sample plot level by means of manual measurements, which are both labor-intensive and time-consuming. In addition, the number of attributes collected from the tree stem is limited. More recently, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), using both single-scan and multi-scan techniques, has proven to be a promising solution for efficient stem mapping at the plot level. In the single-scan method, the laser scanner is placed at the center of the plot, creating only one scan, and all trees are mapped from the single-scan point cloud. Consequently, the occlusion of stems increases as the range of the scanner increases, depending on the forest's attributes. In the conventional multi-scan method, several scans are made simultaneously inside and outside of the plot to collect point clouds representing all trees within the plot, and these scans are accurately co-registered by using artificial reference targets manually placed throughout the plot. The additional difficulty of applying the multi-scan method is due to the point-cloud registration of several scans not being fully automated yet. This paper proposes a multi-single-scan (MSS) method to map the sample plot. The method does not require artificial reference targets placed on the plot or point-level registration. The MSS method is based on the fully automated processing of each scan independently and on the merging of the stem positions automatically detected from multiple scans to accurately map the sample plot. The proposed MSS method was tested on five dense forest plots. The results show that the MSS method significantly improves the stem-detection accuracy compared with the single-scan approach and achieves a mapping accuracy similar to that achieved with the multi-scan method, without the need for the point-level registration. PMID:23353143

  17. Airborne laser scanning of forested landslides characterization: Terrain model quality and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, K. A.; Straatsma, M. W.; van Westen, C. J.; Malet, J.-P.; de Jong, S. M.

    2011-03-01

    Mapping complex landslides under forested terrain requires an appropriate quality of digital terrain models (DTMs), which preserve small diagnostic features for landslide classification such as primary and secondary scarps, cracks, and displacement structures (flow-type and rigid-type). Optical satellite imagery, aerial photographs and synthetic aperture radar images are less effective to create reliable DTMs under tree coverage. Here, we utilized a very high density airborne laser scanning (ALS) data, with a point density of 140 points m - 2 for generating a high quality DTM for mapping landslides in forested terrain in the Barcelonnette region, the Southern French Alps. We quantitatively evaluated the preservation of morphological features and qualitatively assessed the visualization of ALS-derived DTMs. We presented a filter parameterization method suitable for landslide mapping and compared it with two default filters from the hierarchical robust interpolation (HRI) and one default filter from the progressive TIN densification (PTD) method. The results indicate that the vertical accuracy of the DTM derived from the landslide filter is about 0.04 m less accurate than that from the PTD filter. However, the landslide filter yields a better quality of the image for the recognition of small diagnostic features as depicted by expert image interpreters. Several DTM visualization techniques were compared for visual interpretation. The openness map visualized in a stereoscopic model reveals more morphologically relevant features for landslide mapping than the other filter products. We also analyzed the minimal point density in ALS data for landslide mapping and found that a point density of more than 6 points m - 2 is considered suitable for a detailed analysis of morphological features. This study illustrates the suitability of high density ALS data with an appropriate parameterization for the bare-earth extraction used for landslide identification and characterization

  18. Automated identification and geometrical features extraction of individual trees from Mobile Laser Scanning data in Budapest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Zsófia; Székely, Balázs; Folly-Ritvay, Zoltán; Skobrák, Ferenc; Koenig, Kristina; Höfle, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) is an evolving operational measurement technique for urban environment providing large amounts of high resolution information about trees, street features, pole-like objects on the street sides or near to motorways. In this study we investigate a robust segmentation method to extract the individual trees automatically in order to build an object-based tree database system. We focused on the large urban parks in Budapest (Margitsziget and Városliget; KARESZ project) which contained large diversity of different kind of tree species. The MLS data contained high density point cloud data with 1-8 cm mean absolute accuracy 80-100 meter distance from streets. The robust segmentation method contained following steps: The ground points are determined first. As a second step cylinders are fitted in vertical slice 1-1.5 meter relative height above ground, which is used to determine the potential location of each single trees trunk and cylinder-like object. Finally, residual values are calculated as deviation of each point from a vertically expanded fitted cylinder; these residual values are used to separate cylinder-like object from individual trees. After successful parameterization, the model parameters and the corresponding residual values of the fitted object are extracted and imported into the tree database. Additionally, geometric features are calculated for each segmented individual tree like crown base, crown width, crown length, diameter of trunk, volume of the individual trees. In case of incompletely scanned trees, the extraction of geometric features is based on fitted circles. The result of the study is a tree database containing detailed information about urban trees, which can be a valuable dataset for ecologist, city planners, planting and mapping purposes. Furthermore, the established database will be the initial point for classification trees into single species. MLS data used in this project had been measured in the framework of

  19. A reference-free micro defect visualization using pulse laser scanning thermography and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyeol; Choi, Jaemook; Hwang, Soonkyu; An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-08-01

    As quality control of micro devices and early detection of micro defects in these devices are becoming increasingly important, the demand for a fast and automated online inspection technique to detect micro defects with high spatial resolution is increasing. In this study, a reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm is developed based on laser scanning thermography to detect micro defects in devices instantaneously and automatically with high spatial resolution. A pulse modulated continuous wave laser generates thermal waves in a target device, and the corresponding thermal responses are recorded by an infrared (IR) camera. When the thermal wave encounters a micro defect, the propagation of the thermal wave is blocked at the interface of the micro defect. The blockage of the thermal wave is detected by the proposed reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm. First, an edge detection algorithm is applied to a raw thermal image obtained at a specific time point to extract the thermal discontinuities formed at the boundaries of the defect. The edge images obtained from all time sequences are then assembled into a single accumulated edge image to accentuate defect-induced thermal disturbances in the form of edge features. Finally, the accumulated edge image is automatically processed using a binary imaging algorithm to visualize the micro defect in the target device. The performance of the proposed reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm is examined using two types of specimens, semiconductor chips and ceramic-epoxy composites. The proposed algorithm successfully diagnoses micro defects ranging from 4 μm to 40 μm in width.

  20. Application of laser scanning microscopy for the analysis of oral biofilm dissolution by different endodontic irrigants

    PubMed Central

    del Carpio-Perochena, Aldo; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Hungaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Andrade, Flaviana Bombarda; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Villas-Bôas, Marcelo Haas; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Amoroso-Silva, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multi-specie biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobials due to cellular interactions found in them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by confocal laser scanning microscopy, the biofilm dissolution effectiveness of different irrigant solutions on biofilms developed on infected dentin in situ. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 bovine dentin specimens infected intraorally (30/group) were treated by the following solutions: 2% of chlorhexidine digluconate, 1%, 2.5% and 5.25% of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The solutions were utilized for 5, 15 and 30 min with 2 experimental volumes 500 μL and 1 mL. All the samples were stained using an acridine orange and the biofilm thickness before (control group) and after the experiments were evaluated, utilizing a confocal microscope at ×40. The Mann-Whitney U and the nom-parametric Kruskal-Wallis Dunns tests were utilized to determine the influence of the volume and to perform the comparisons among the groups respectively. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results: Statistical differences were not found among the control and the 2% chlorhexidine digluconate groups at any experimental period (P > 0.05). The biofilm dissolution treated with 1% NaOCl was directly proportional to the exposure time (P < 0.05). The higher values of biofilm dissolution were found in 2.5% and 5.25% NaOCl groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The higher exposure times and concentrations of NaOCl were not sufficient to dissolve 100% of the biofilm. However, all NaOCl solutions were more effective than 2% chlorhexidine digluconate to dissolve organic matter. PMID:25225556

  1. Geomorphological Mapping with Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Uav-Based Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilly, N.; Kelterbaum, D.; Zeese, R.

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) are useful for the detailed mapping of geomorphological features. Nowadays various sensors and platforms are available to collect 3D data. The presented study compares terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and low-cost unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV)-based imaging in terms of their usability for capturing small-scale surface structures. In October 2014 and June 2015 measurements with both systems were carried out in an episodically water-filled karst depression under pasture farming in the region of Hohenlohe (Southwest Germany). The overall aims were to establish high-resolution DEMs and monitor changes of the relief caused by dissolution and compare the advantages and drawbacks of both systems for such studies. Due to the short time between the campaigns the clear detection of temporal changes was hardly possible. However, the multi-temporal campaigns allowed an extensive investigation of the usability of both sensors under different environmental conditions. In addition to the remote sensing measurements, the coordinates of several positions in the study area were measured with a RTK-DGPS system as independent reference data sets in both campaigns. The TLS- and UAV-derived DEM heights at these positions were validated against the DGPS-derived heights. The accuracy of the TLS-derived values is supported by low mean differences between TLS and DGPS measurements while the UAV-derived models show a weaker performance. In the future years additional simultaneous measurements with both approaches under more similar vegetation conditions are necessary to detect surface movements. Moreover, by investigating the subsurface the interaction of above and below ground processes might be detected.

  2. Thermal maturity of Tasmanites microfossils from confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kus, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, spectral properties of Tasmanites microfossils determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM, using Ar 458 nm excitation). The Tasmanites occur in a well-characterized natural maturation sequence (Ro 0.48–0.74%) of Devonian shale (n = 3 samples) from the Appalachian Basin. Spectral property λmax shows excellent agreement (r2 = 0.99) with extant spectra from interlaboratory studies which used conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques. This result suggests spectral measurements from CLSM can be used to infer thermal maturity of fluorescent organic materials in geologic samples. Spectra of regions with high fluorescence intensity at fold apices and flanks in individual Tasmanites are blue-shifted relative to less-deformed areas in the same body that have lower fluorescence intensity. This is interpreted to result from decreased quenching moiety concentration at these locations, and indicates caution is needed in the selection of measurement regions in conventional fluorescence microscopy, where it is common practice to select high intensity regions for improved signal intensity and better signal to noise ratios. This study also documents application of CLSM to microstructural characterization of Tasmanites microfossils. Finally, based on an extant empirical relation between conventional λmax values and bitumen reflectance, λmax values from CLSM of Tasmanites microfossils can be used to calculate a bitumen reflectance equivalent value. The results presented herein can be used as a basis to broaden the future application of CLSM in the geological sciences into hydrocarbon prospecting and basin analysis.

  3. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Nengchao; Huang, Gang; Wu, Chaozhong; Duan, Zhicheng; Li, Pingfan

    2017-02-28

    In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle's collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident's form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke's law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D) data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  4. The Effect of Wind on Tree STEM Parameter Estimation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaaja, M. T.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Kurkela, M.; Lehtola, V.; Hyyppä, J.; Hyyppä, H.

    2016-06-01

    The 3D measurement technique of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories has shown great potential for improving the accuracy and efficiency of both individual tree and plot level data collection. However, the effect of wind has been poorly estimated in the error analysis of TLS tree measurements although it causes varying deformations to the trees. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of wind on tree stem parameter estimation at different heights using TLS. The data consists of one measured Scots pine captured from three different scanning directions with two different scanning resolutions, 6.3 mm and 3.1 mm at 10 m. The measurements were conducted under two different wind speeds, approximately 3 m/s and 9 m/s, as recorded by a nearby weather station of the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Our results show that the wind may cause both the underestimation and overestimation of tree diameter when using TLS. The duration of the scanning is found to have an impact for the measured shape of the tree stem under 9 m/s wind conditions. The results also indicate that a 9 m/s wind does not have a significant effect on the stem parameters of the lower part of a tree (<28% of the tree height). However, as the results imply, the wind conditions should be taken into account more comprehensively in analysis of TLS tree measurements, especially if multiple scans from different positions are registered together. In addition, TLS could potentially be applied to indirectly measure wind speed by observing the tree stem movement.

  5. Morphological Changes Along a Dike Landside Slope Sampled by 4d High Resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Huertaa, Mónica; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Ponsioen, Luc; van Damme, Myron

    2016-06-01

    Emergence of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology provides new tools for geomorphologic studies improving spatial and temporal resolution of data sampling hydrogeological instability phenomena. Specifically, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) collects high resolution 3D point clouds allowing more accurate monitoring of erosion rates and processes, and thus, quantify the geomorphologic change on vertical landforms like dike landside slopes. Even so, TLS captures observations rapidly and automatically but unselectively. In this research, we demonstrate the potential of TLS for morphological change detection, profile creation and time series analysis in an emergency simulation for characterizing and monitoring slope movements in a dike. The experiment was performed near Schellebelle (Belgium) in November 2015, using a Leica Scan Station C10. Wave overtopping and overflow over a dike were simulated whereby the loading conditions were incrementally increased and 14 successful scans were performed. The aim of the present study is to analyse short-term morphological dynamic processes and the spatial distribution of erosion and deposition areas along a dike landside slope. As a result, we are able to quantify the eroded material coming from the impact on the terrain induced by wave overtopping which caused the dike failure in a few minutes in normal storm scenarios (Q = 25 l/s/m) as 1.24 m3. As this shows that the amount of erosion is measurable using close range techniques; the amount and rate of erosion could be monitored to predict dike collapse in emergency situation. The results confirm the feasibility of the proposed methodology, providing scalability to a comprehensive analysis over a large extension of a dike (tens of meters).

  6. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Säynäjoki, Raita; Packalén, Petteri; Maltamo, Matti; Vehmas, Mikko; Eerikäinen, Kalle

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L.) from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM) was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF) and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species. PMID:27873799

  7. Comparison of Discrete Return and Waveform Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Dense Vegetation Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, A.; Pirotti, F.; Vettore, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we present the results of the comparison between two terrestrial laser scanners (TLS), a discrete return system (Riegl LMS-Z620) and an echo-digitizing system (Riegl VZ-400), employed for the survey of a dense forested area, in the italian Alps. The site is actually undergoing a strong debate among the inhabitants and local government authorities about the exploitation of the area as a huge quarry to produce building material. The dispute originates from the uncertainty about the instability of the underlying mountain slope, which was interested in 1966 by a landslide. The whole area was surveyed with the two laser scanners on February 2011 during the vegetation dormant period. A slight different processing workflow was applied to the collected datasets: the VZ-400 scans were pre-filtered by exploiting the "calibrated relative reflectance" readings and the multi-target capability provided by this laser scanning system. Next, two different spatial filters were applied to both the resulting georeferenced 3D models, in order to eliminate as much vegetation as possible: iterative filter and a custom morphological filter, developed by the authors. Achieved results show that for both datasets, the iterative and the morphological filters perform quite well for eliminating the vegetation, though some manual editing is still required since vegetation does not feature a prevalent growing direction. Furthermore, the comparison between the number of points left in the final DTMs shows that the VZ-400 provided a one order of magnitude denser point cloud wrt. the LMS-Z620. This demonstrates that a TLS with multi-target capability can potentially provide a more detailed DTM even in presence of dense vegetation.

  8. Biochar Erosion in a Temperate Forest Assessed with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, Milutin; Bruckman, Viktor; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Biochar amendment in soils is seen as a potential greenhouse gas mitigation strategy. There are a number of examples of successful amendment strategies in agricultural ecosystems, where biochar is mixed with the mineral topsoil by ploughing or similar manipulation techniques. The application in forest ecosystems, however, comes with the limitation that biochar can only be applied directly on the surface. Light-weight biochar particles may be prone to erosion by environmental forces, such as precipitation and wind. We therefore assessed biochar erosion patterns by using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in combination with a time-lapse camera on a micro topography scale in a temperate spruce-dominated forest with herbaceous ground vegetation. TLS is a photogrammetric technique that utilizes the laser light detection and ranging (LiDAR) principle to provide high resolution, 3D geometrical information of the object at millimeter scale. A biochar-amended (10 t/ha) plot with the size of ca. 3m x 3m was surveyed with 4 TLS scans taken from each of 4 plot's sides. The acquired scans were co-registered using the professional targets that were installed on the plot's corners. The resulting point cloud was then used as a base for calculating digital terrain model (DTM), to spatially map vegetation heights, vegetation density and roughness. These TLS products were derived by analyzing the geometrical properties of the acquired point cloud. A time-lapse camera was installed during summer 2013, continuously observing the entire plot at 3min intervals. A single, representative, precipitation event in August was selected for a detailed image analysis of biochar particle movement. The analysis showed that areas of notable particle movement correspond to places of flow accumulation simulated from the DTM. This suggests that the very high resolution terrain information can be usefully for planning the biochar amendment on temperate forest ecosystems.

  9. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Markus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Maier, Bernhard; Schadauer, Klemens

    2007-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth's surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the canopy. Thus it is possible to reconstruct both the three-dimensional structure of the forest canopy and the terrain surface. For the retrieval of quantitative forest parameters such as stem volume or biomass it is necessary to use models that combine ALS with inventory data. One approach is to use multiplicative regression models that are trained with local inventory data. This method has been widely applied over boreal forest regions, but so far little experience exists with applying this method for mapping alpine forest. In this study the transferability of this approach to a 128 km2 large mountainous region in Vorarlberg, Austria, was evaluated. For the calibration of the model, inventory data as operationally collected by Austrian foresters were used. Despite these inventory data are based on variable sample plot sizes, they could be used for mapping stem volume for the entire alpine study area. The coefficient of determination R2 was 0.85 and the root mean square error (RMSE) 90.9 m3ha−1 (relative error of 21.4%) which is comparable to results of ALS studies conducted over topographically less complex environments. Due to the increasing availability, ALS data could become an operational part of Austrian's forest inventories.

  10. Terrestrial laser scanning for detection of landfill gas: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetyuk, Yuriy; Mårtensson, Stig-Göran

    2014-04-01

    Methane built up in landfills as a result of breaking down of organic materials can be a renewable energy source if it is taken advantage of. The aim of research presented in this paper is to detect landfill gas (that contains methane) by means of terrestrial laser scanning. The hypothesis is that where no surface leakage has been reported, the landfill gas will expand or migrate. Therefore, it is possible to detect it through repeated scanning of the same area and comparison of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) generated from the point clouds. Only the most significant movements, i.e. vertical, are of interest in this case. During September-November 2011, a small area at Forsbacka landfill in the vicinity of Gävle was scanned 10 times. Epoch-to-epoch comparisons of the resulting DTMs have shown two significant changes (-27 and +19 mm) in elevation of the surface, and it is not impossible that they are caused by migrating landfill gas. The method tested in this study is deemed to be rigorous and accurate for detecting small-scale swell-shrink behaviour of the ground surface (in our case a landfill surface). However, both data processing and interpretation of the results have been considerably complicated by presence of low vegetation (weeds) on the study site, which was dificult to filter away completely from the data. Based on our pilot study, we recommend that a larger area and a longer period of time are chosen to give basis for more grounded conclusions about presence of landfill gas.

  11. Aboveground total and green biomass of dryland shrub derived from terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsoy, Peter J.; Glenn, Nancy F.; Clark, Patrick E.; Derryberry, DeWayne R.

    2014-02-01

    Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), a dominant shrub species in the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem of the western US, is declining from its historical distribution due to feedbacks between climate and land use change, fire, and invasive species. Quantifying aboveground biomass of sagebrush is important for assessing carbon storage and monitoring the presence and distribution of this rapidly changing dryland ecosystem. Models of shrub canopy volume, derived from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds, were used to accurately estimate aboveground sagebrush biomass. Ninety-one sagebrush plants were scanned and sampled across three study sites in the Great Basin, USA. Half of the plants were scanned and destructively sampled in the spring (n = 46), while the other half were scanned again in the fall before destructive sampling (n = 45). The latter set of sagebrush plants was scanned during both spring and fall to further test the ability of the TLS to quantify seasonal changes in green biomass. Sagebrush biomass was estimated using both a voxel and a 3-D convex hull approach applied to TLS point cloud data. The 3-D convex hull model estimated total and green biomass more accurately (R2 = 0.92 and R2 = 0.83, respectively) than the voxel-based method (R2 = 0.86 and R2 = 0.73, respectively). Seasonal differences in TLS-predicted green biomass were detected at two of the sites (p < 0.001 and p = 0.029), elucidating the amount of ephemeral leaf loss in the face of summer drought. The methods presented herein are directly transferable to other dryland shrubs, and implementation of the convex hull model with similar sagebrush species is straightforward.

  12. Algorithm for the Automatic Estimation of Agricultural Tree Geometric Parameters Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaś, E.; Borkowski, A.; Estornell, J.

    2016-06-01

    The estimation of dendrometric parameters has become an important issue for the agricultural planning and management. Since the classical field measurements are time consuming and inefficient, Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data can be used for this purpose. Point clouds acquired for orchard areas allow to determine orchard structures and geometric parameters of individual trees. In this research we propose an automatic method that allows to determine geometric parameters of individual olive trees using ALS data. The method is based on the α-shape algorithm applied for normalized point clouds. The algorithm returns polygons representing crown shapes. For points located inside each polygon, we select the maximum height and the minimum height and then we estimate the tree height and the crown base height. We use the first two components of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as the estimators for crown diameters. The α-shape algorithm requires to define the radius parameter R. In this study we investigated how sensitive are the results to the radius size, by comparing the results obtained with various settings of the R with reference values of estimated parameters from field measurements. Our study area was the olive orchard located in the Castellon Province, Spain. We used a set of ALS data with an average density of 4 points m-2. We noticed, that there was a narrow range of the R parameter, from 0.48 m to 0.80 m, for which all trees were detected and for which we obtained a high correlation coefficient (> 0.9) between estimated and measured values. We compared our estimates with field measurements. The RMSE of differences was 0.8 m for the tree height, 0.5 m for the crown base height, 0.6 m and 0.4 m for the longest and shorter crown diameter, respectively. The accuracy obtained with the method is thus sufficient for agricultural applications.

  13. A cost-effective laser scanning method for mapping stream channel geometry and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Norris; Nathanson, Marcus; Lundgren, Niclas; Rehnström, Robin; Lyon, Steve

    2015-04-01

    In this pilot project, we combine an Arduino Uno and SICK LMS111 outdoor laser ranging camera to acquire high resolution topographic area scans for a stream channel. The microprocessor and imaging system was installed in a custom gondola and suspended from a wire cable system. To demonstrate the systems capabilities for capturing stream channel topography, a small stream (< 2m wide) in the Krycklan Catchment Study was temporarily diverted and scanned. Area scans along the stream channel resulted in a point spacing of 4mm and a point cloud density of 5600 points/m2 for the 5m by 2m area. A grain size distribution of the streambed material was extracted from the point cloud using a moving window, local maxima search algorithm. The median, 84th and 90th percentiles (common metrics to describe channel roughness) of this distribution were found to be within the range of measured values while the largest modelled element was approximately 35% smaller than its measured counterpart. The laser scanning system captured grain sizes between 30mm and 255mm (coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders based on the Wentworth (1922) scale). This demonstrates that our system was capable of resolving both large-scale geometry (e.g. bed slope and stream channel width) and small-scale channel roughness elements (e.g. coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders) for the study area. We further show that the point cloud resolution is suitable for estimating ecohydraulic parameters such as Manning's n and hydraulic radius. Although more work is needed to fine-tune our system's design, these preliminary results are encouraging, specifically for those with a limited operational budget.

  14. Testing of Land Cover Classification from Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.; Kupidura, P.; Jełowicki, Ł.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning provides a new opportunity for airborne data collection. It provides high-density topographic surveying and is also a useful tool for land cover mapping. Use of a minimum of three intensity images from a multiwavelength laser scanner and 3D information included in the digital surface model has the potential for land cover/use classification and a discussion about the application of this type of data in land cover/use mapping has recently begun. In the test study, three laser reflectance intensity images (orthogonalized point cloud) acquired in green, near-infrared and short-wave infrared bands, together with a digital surface model, were used in land cover/use classification where six classes were distinguished: water, sand and gravel, concrete and asphalt, low vegetation, trees and buildings. In the tested methods, different approaches for classification were applied: spectral (based only on laser reflectance intensity images), spectral with elevation data as additional input data, and spectro-textural, using morphological granulometry as a method of texture analysis of both types of data: spectral images and the digital surface model. The method of generating the intensity raster was also tested in the experiment. Reference data were created based on visual interpretation of ALS data and traditional optical aerial and satellite images. The results have shown that multispectral ALS data are unlike typical multispectral optical images, and they have a major potential for land cover/use classification. An overall accuracy of classification over 90% was achieved. The fusion of multi-wavelength laser intensity images and elevation data, with the additional use of textural information derived from granulometric analysis of images, helped to improve the accuracy of classification significantly. The method of interpolation for the intensity raster was not very helpful, and using intensity rasters with both first and last return

  15. Novel Laser Scan Lithography onto Deep Inside Surfaces of Fine Pipes Using a Reflection Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Kenta; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    A novel laser scan lithography for patterning in deep fine pipes using a reflection rod was developed. As a previous research, patterning results using an optical fiber rod or a light-emitting diode (LED) rod were reported. However, the minimum inner diameter was 6 mm, and the pattern width was approximately 200 µm. Here, more precise patterning onto the inside of much finer pipes using a novel reflection rod is demonstrated. A violet laser beam of 408 nm wavelength was shaped using a micropinhole and focused onto the inner surface of the pipe by way of a reflection rod of 500 µm diameter. The tip of the reflection rod was cut and polished in 45° mirror surface and the laser beam was bent in a right angle when reflected on the mirror surface. A beam spot observation system composed of a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a television monitor was also added to observe the laser beam spot during the exposure. Specimen pipes were coated with 1-µm-thick positive THMR iP-3300 (Tokyo Ohka Kogyo) resist and scanned using a linear stage and a rotation stage and exposed to the laser light. The inside lithography was demonstrated for fine pipes of 1 mm inner diameter. Helical patterns with space widths of 9-20 µm were successfully delineated even at the deep inside position 20 mm away from the pipe entrance. Dense helical patterns of 100 µm narrow pitch and 12 µm space width and character patterns of 15 µm space width were also successfully delineated.

  16. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3-D reconstructions of neuronal structures in human brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Belichenko, P V; Dahlström, A

    1995-09-01

    Human brain material was studied with Lucifer yellow (LY) microinjections, indirect Texas red immunofluorescence, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The scanned images were transferred to a Silicon Graphics (SG) IRIS computer equipped with software for reconstructing the 3-D architecture of cells. By employing dual channel CLSM (Bio-Rad MRC 600), LY-injected cells and Texas red immunofluorescence could be studied simultaneously. Autopsy material with 2- to 48-h postmortem delays (6 control and 2 Rett's syndrome cases) as well as biopsy material (14 cases with therapy-resistant partial epilepsy--TRPE--undergoing neurosurgery) were used. In each specimen, 100-200 pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons were visualized by LY microinjection. Single neurons were imaged and 2-D reconstructions of each neuron were made using z-projections of serial optical images; 3-D reconstructions and rotations were computed using the SG workstation, with VoxelView software from Vital Images (UK), and stored in a "neuronal library" on laser or magnetic optical disks. In Ret's syndrome cases and in patients with TRPE various abnormalities in the dendritic geometry of pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells have been found. The combination of LY injections with immunofluorescence allows the investigation of transmitter-related substances around the LY-injected cells. Using antibodies to synaptic vesicle proteins, presynaptic elements docking onto individual spines have been demonstrated. This approach may contribute to the understanding of different neurological and psychiatric disorders and may be useful in the Mapping of the Human Brain project. It may also be integrated with functional imaging by PET scan and with the human genome project.

  17. Laser scanning confocal microscopy characterization of water repellent distribution in a sandstone pore network.

    PubMed

    Zoghlami, Karima; Gómez-Gras, David; Corbella, Mercè; Darragi, Fadila

    2008-11-01

    In the present work, we propose the use of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) to determine the effect of water repellents on rock's pore-network configuration and interconnection. The rocks studied are sandstones of Miocene age, a building material that is commonly found in the architectural heritage of Tunisia. The porosity quantitative data of treated and untreated samples, obtained by mercury porosimetry tests, were compared. The results show a slight decrease in total porosity with the water repellent treatment, which reduced both microporosity and macroporosity. This reduction produced a modification in pore size distribution and a shift of the pore access size mode interval toward smaller pore diameters (from the 30-40 microm to the 20-30 microm intervals). The water repellent was observed in SEM images as a continuous film coating grain surfaces; moreover, it was easily visualized in LSCM, by staining the water repellent with Epodye fluorochrome, and the coating thickness was straightforwardly measured (1.5-2 microm). In fact, the combination of mercury intrusion porosimetry data and LSCM observations suggests that the porosity reduction and the shift of the pore diameter mode were mainly due to the general reduction of pore diameters, but also to the plugging of the smallest pores (less than 3-4 microm in diameter) by the water repellent film. Finally, the LSCM technique enabled the reconstruction of 3D views of the water repellent coating film in the pore network, indicating that its distribution was uniform and continuous over the 100 microm thick sample. The LSCM imaging facilitates the integration and interpretation of mercury porosimetry and SEM data.

  18. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Model Fuel Characteristics in Shrub-Steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Glenn, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    Biological invasion, climate change, and other anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic factors are altering ecosystem function of arid shrublands in the western U.S., with notable effects including changes in community composition and increased incidence and severity of wildfires. Wildfire itself contributes to replacement of native flora communities with fire-prone invasives (prominently cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum), a positive feedback loop which threatens long-term degradation of burned areas. Efficient methods of vegetation inventory over large areas are essential to study and manage changes in ecological paradigms, and furthermore to anticipate and control wildfire. However, the application of remote sensing information from aerial or satellite platforms to shrub-steppe ecosystems is limited by spectral signal mixing and coarseness of data relative to low-stature vegetation. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology provides rapid collection of high-resolution structural information at ranges up to hundreds of meters, offering an opportunity to efficiently record vegetation characteristics in large swaths. We tested the ability of TLS to quantify abundance and biomass of different vegetation stem diameter classes in shrub-steppe plots in southwestern Idaho, with classes selected to emulate timelag fuel classes commonly used in fuel inventories and fire modeling. We used data from destructively-sampled reference quadrats within scans for training and evaluation of TLS-derived estimates. We demonstrate TLS as an effective standalone tool for shrubland vegetation inventory, while future applications of these methods include collecting training data for interpretation of coarser remote sensing information, and providing accurate 3D simulations of fuel beds to spatially explicit wildfire models.

  19. Modeling river bed morphology, roughness, and surface sedimentology using high resolution terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.; Vericat, D.; Rychkov, I.

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in technology have revolutionized the acquisition of topographic data, offering new perspectives on the structure and morphology of the Earth's surface. These developments have had a profound impact on the practice of river science, creating a step change in the dimensionality, resolution, and precision of fluvial terrain models. The emergence of "hyperscale" survey methods, including structure from motion photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), now presents the opportunity to acquire 3-D point cloud data that capture grain-scale detail over reach-scale extents. Translating these data into geomorphologically relevant products is, however, not straightforward. Unlike traditional survey methods, TLS acquires observations rapidly and automatically, but unselectively. This results in considerable "noise" associated with backscatter from vegetation and other artifacts. Moreover, the large data volumes are difficult to visualize; require very high capacity storage; and are not incorporated readily into GIS and simulation models. In this paper we analyze the geomorphological integrity of multiscale terrain models rendered from a TLS survey of the braided River Feshie, Scotland. These raster terrain models are generated using a new, computationally efficient geospatial toolkit: the topographic point cloud analysis toolkit (ToPCAT). This performs an intelligent decimation of point cloud data into a set of 2.5-D terrain models that retain information on the high-frequency subgrid topography, as the moments of the locally detrended elevation distribution. The results quantify the degree of terrain generalization inherent in conventional fluvial DEMs and illustrate how subgrid topographic statistics can be used to map the spatial pattern of particle size, grain roughness, and sedimentary facies at the reach scale.

  20. Quantification of Overnight Movement of Birch (Betula pendula) Branches and Foliage with Short Interval Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Puttonen, Eetu; Briese, Christian; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Wieser, Martin; Pfennigbauer, Martin; Zlinszky, András; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to determine circadian movements of silver birch (Petula Bendula) branches and foliage detected with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The study consisted of two geographically separate experiments conducted in Finland and in Austria. Both experiments were carried out at the same time of the year and under similar outdoor conditions. Experiments consisted of 14 (Finland) and 77 (Austria) individual laser scans taken between sunset and sunrise. The resulting point clouds were used in creating a time series of branch movements. In the Finnish data, the vertical movement of the whole tree crown was monitored due to low volumetric point density. In the Austrian data, movements of manually selected representative points on branches were monitored. The movements were monitored from dusk until morning hours in order to avoid daytime wind effects. The results indicated that height deciles of the Finnish birch crown had vertical movements between -10.0 and 5.0 cm compared to the situation at sunset. In the Austrian data, the maximum detected representative point movement was 10.0 cm. The temporal development of the movements followed a highly similar pattern in both experiments, with the maximum movements occurring about an hour and a half before (Austria) or around (Finland) sunrise. The results demonstrate the potential of terrestrial laser scanning measurements in support of chronobiology. PMID:26973668

  1. a Low Budget Mobile Laser Scanning Solution Using on Board Sensors and Field Bus Systems of TODAY'S Consumer Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vock, D. M. M.; Jungmichel, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning systems (MLS) offer a great potential for acquiring detailed point cloud data of urban and suburban surroundings with minimum effort. In this paper a new solution for MLSs is presented, requiring solely a combination of a profile laser scanning device and systems that are included in today's serialized end consumer vehicles. While today's mobile laser scan systems require different and expensive additional hardware that needs to be mounted onto the vehicle, the devices included within vehicle electronics offer good alternatives without additional costs.The actual scan consists of a continuous profile scan together with information gathered from on-board sensor modules. In a post- processing step, the sensor data is used to reconstruct the car's trajectory for the period of the scan and, based on this information, the track of the scan device for every measured laser pixel. Synchronization of pixel data and vehicle movement is realized via a timestamp signal which is transmitted to the car's field bus system and the scan device. To generate the final point cloud scenario, the trajectory is interpolated for every single scan point and used to convert its local position within the profile into the global coordinate system (Fig.1, Left).

  2. Mobile connected dermatoscope and confocal laser scanning microscope: a useful combination applied in facial simple sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Zha, W F; Song, W M; Ai, J J; Xu, A E

    2012-08-01

    Little is known as the effects of mobile connected dermatoscope services on diagnostic accuracy for sensitive skin. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) can non-invasively measure the thickness of epidermis. Combination of the two devices to observe sensitive skin may receive unexpected effects. To evaluate the application effect on sensitive skin with the combination of Handyscope and confocal laser scanning microscope. Twenty simple sensitive-skinned patients and 20 volunteers participated in the study. Cheek, typically, dermoscopic images were obtained from patients, and the changes in the skin texture were observed. Their epidermis thicknesses as well as the volunteers' were measured so that the thicknesses of the two groups were compared. Dermoscopic pictures of the skin texture obviously showed that dilated capillaries looked like earthworms with pigmented patches more or less floating above, and skin roughness as well as deepened dermatoglyph were also conspicuously present in some patients. The mean epidermal thickness of the patients was 79.01 μm and the volunteers' was 85.78 μm. The difference between the two groups reached 6.77 μm. There was a statistical significance (P = 0.001). Mobile connected dermatoscope and confocal laser scanning microscope might be the choice for simple sensitive skin investigation.

  3. Acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy: Applications and implications for optical neurobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay

    Multiphoton excitation of molecular probes has become an important tool in experimental neurobiology owing to the intrinsic optical sectioning and low light scattering it affords. Using molecular functional indicators, multiphoton excitation allows physiological signals within single neurons to be observed from within living brain tissue. Ideally, it would be possible to record from multiple sites located throughout the elaborately branching dendritic arbors, in order to study the correlations of structure and function both within and across experiments. However, existing multiphoton microscope systems based on scanning mirrors do not allow optical recordings to be obtained from more than a handful of sites simultaneously at the high rates required to capture the fast physiological signals of interest (>100Hz for Ca2+ signals, >1kHz for membrane potential transients). In order to overcome this limitation, two-dimensional acousto-optic deflection was employed, to allow an ultrafast laser beam suited for multiphoton excitation to be rapidly repositioned with low latency (˜15mus). This supports a random-access scanning mode in which the beam can repeatedly visit a succession of user-selected sites of interest within the microscope's field-of-view at high rates, with minimal sacrifice of pixel dwell time. This technique of acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM) was demonstrated to allow the spatial profile of signals arising in response to physiological stimulation to be rapidly mapped. Means to compensate or avoid problems of dispersion which have hampered AO-MPLSM in the past are presented, with the latter being implemented. Separately, the combination of photon counting detection with multiphoton excitation, termed generally multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy (MP-PCS), was also considered, with particular emphasis on the technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). MP-PCS was shown to allow information about molecular

  4. Detection of morphological changes in cliff face surrounding a waterfall using terrestrial laser scanning and unmanned aerial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Obanawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Waterfall or bedrock knickpoint appears as an erosional front in bedrock rivers forming deep v-shaped valley downstream. Following the rapid fluvial erosion of waterfall, rockfalls and gravita-tional collapses often occur in surrounding steep cliffs. Although morphological changes of such steep cliffs are sometimes visually observed, quantitative and precise measurements of their spatio-temporal distribution have been limited due to the difficulties in direct access to such cliffs if with classical measurement methods. However, for the clarification of geomorphological processes oc-curring in the cliffs, multi-temporal mapping of the cliff face at a high resolution is necessary. Re-mote sensing approaches are therefore suitable for the topographic measurements and detection of changes in such inaccessible cliffs. To achieve accurate topographic mapping of cliffs around a wa-terfall, here we perform multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), as well as structure-from-motion multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) photogrammetry based on unmanned aerial system (UAS). The study site is Kegon Falls in central Japan, having a vertical drop of surface water from top of its overhanging cliff, as well as groundwater outflows from its lower portions. The bedrock is composed of alternate layers of andesite lava and conglomerates. Minor rockfalls in the cliffs are often ob-served by local people. The latest major rockfall occurred in 1986, causing ca. 8-m upstream propa-gation of the waterfall lip. This provides a good opportunity to examine the changes in the surround-ing cliffs following the waterfall recession. Multi-time point clouds were obtained by TLS measure-ment over years, and the three-dimensional changes of the rock surface were detected, uncovering the locus of small rockfalls and gully developments. Erosion seems particularly frequent in relatively weak the conglomerates layer, whereas small rockfalls seems to have occurred in the andesite layers. Also, shadows in the

  5. Expression of keratin 14 in the basal cells of the lingual epithelium of mice during the morphogenesis of filiform papillae: visualization by fluorescent immunostaining and confocal laser-scanning microscopy in the transmission mode.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2007-07-01

    We examined the expression of keratin 14 (K14) on the lingual epithelium by immunofluorescent staining while monitoring morphological changes in the filiform papillae of mice by confocal laser-scanning microscopy in the transmission mode of the same sections to define both the histology and the morphology of cells. It is difficult to visualize histological details of the fetal lingual epithelium of the mouse on semi-ultrathin sections by light microscopy after immunohistochemical staining because the histological structures in such sections cannot be distinguished by standard counterstaining. To solve this problem and to visualize the immunoreactivity specific for K14, we analyzed the results of immunofluorescent staining of semi-ultrathin sections in combination with an examination of the corresponding images by laser-scanning microscopy in the transmission mode after staining of specimens with toluidine blue. No immunoreactivity specific for K14 was detected on the lingual epithelium of fetuses on embryonic day 15 (E15), but immunoreactivity was distinct at all postnatal stages from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P21.

  6. Mapping of local-scale flooding on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina; Groom, Geoffrey; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2014-05-01

    The agricultural use of riverine lowlands is often dependent on complex hydrological regimes including localized flooding. Knowledge about spatio-temporal inundation patterns enables a better understanding of the state of agricultural areas in lowlands and provides valuable and objective information on land suitability for land use administration and environmental planning. Data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), also referred to as LiDAR, have become one of the most important sources of elevation data during the last two decades. Recently, geometric and radiometric attributes of ALS have also been explored for analysing the extent of water surfaces. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a method for mapping the spatial extent of floodplain inundation by means of remote sensing data. Our study focusses on analysing floodwaters partly covered by some vegetation, which is a major challenge in flood mapping. We hypothesize that ALS data due to its high sampling density and high rate of canopy penetration can effectively be used for floodwater detection in such areas. This research utilizes full-waveform ALS data with an average point density of 20 points/m2 obtained for an area of ca. 8 km2 of the Nørreå River valley in Jutland, Denmark. The study area is characterised by the presence of improved or semi-improved grasslands (meadows and pasture), few arable fields, irregularly scattered group of trees and bushes, and an extensive ditch network. Our approach is based on an inspection of properties of single laser points with regard to water vs. vegetation coverage within the laser footprint, which is compared with very detailed field reference data. Exploratory analysis and classification of ALS data were preceded by radiometric calibration of point cloud data, utilizing in situ measurements of reference targets reflectance. The resulting calibration derivatives provide very stable estimates of surface characteristics and are used as the main input in

  7. Observations of drainage network change in a recently burned watershed using terrestrial laser scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis; Wasklewicz, Thad; Kean, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Wildfire enhances the geomorphic response of a watershed to precipitation events, effectively altering the form of the hillslope and channel drainage network. Typically, drainage networks expand following rainfall on a recently burned watershed. Expansion of drainage networks following wildfire increases in erosion and sediment transport rates, and the probability of flash-flooding and debris-flows at downstream locations. Observations of the response of hillslope and channel drainage to individual precipitation events are vital to unraveling the dynamics of erosion processes in recently burned watersheds. Here, we apply terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) methods to produce digital terrain models (DTMs) of a recently burned watershed at an unprecedented spatial resolution. The DTM data aid the quantification of changes in the hillslope and channel drainage networks at several spatial scales. Two TLS surveys were conducted, one survey between 28-30 September 2008 to document pre-rainfall conditions, and one between 18-21 December 2008, three days after 52 mm of rainfall over a period of 22 hours. A Leica Geosystems ScanStation 2 TLS was used to generate 1 cm resolution DTMs, from which the hillslope and channel drainage networks were derived. The location and magnitude of erosion and deposition for each pixel within the basin was determined by calculating the topographic differences between DTMs. Changes in the drainage network morphology were identified through the analysis of bifurcation ratio, drainage density (including rills), rill length, horizontal migration of rills, width-depth ratios and upstream migration of knickpoints. Comparisons of these measures were made between morphologically distinct sub-basins within the study area, and between surveys. Analyses of bifurcation ratios, and measures of rill position and gullyhead migration indicate an expansion of the rill network and upstream migration of knickpoints. These results suggest that expansion of the

  8. Practical aspects of registration the transformation of a river valley by beavers using terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brykała, Dariusz; Gierszewski, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Halina; Kordowski, Jarosław; Słowiński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Activity of beavers (Castor fiber) often significantly affects the environment in which they life. The most commonly observed effect of their being in environment is construction of beaver dams and formation a pond upstream. However, in case of a sudden break of a dam and beaver pond drainage, the valley below the dam may also undergo remodelling. The nature and magnitude of these changes depends on the quantity of water and its energy as well as on the geological structure of the valley. The effects of such events can be riverbank erosion, and the deposition of the displaced of erosion products in the form of sandbars or fans. The material can also be accumulated in local depressions or delivered to water bodies. Such events may occur multiple times in the same area. To assess their impact on the environment it is important to quantify the displaced material. The study of such transformations was performed within a small valley of the river of Struga Czechowska (Tuchola Pinewood Forest, Poland). The valley is mainly cut in sands and gravels. Its steep banks are overgrown with bushes and trees. The assessment of changes in morphology were based on the event of the beaver pond drainage of 2015. The study uses the measurements from the terrestrial laser scanning (scanner Riegl VZ-4000). The measurements were performed before and after the event. Each of the two models obtained for comparison was made up of more than 20 measurement stations. Point clouds were joined by Multi-Station Adjustment without placing in the terrain any objects of reference. During measurements attention was paid to the changes in morphology of both riverbed and valley surrounding. The paper presents the example of the recorded changes as well as the measurement procedure. Moreover, the aspects of fieldwork and issues related to post-processing, such as merging, filtering of point clouds and detection of changes, are also presented. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of

  9. Integration of Airborne Laser Scanning Altimetry Data in Alpine Geomorphological and Hazard Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijmonsbergen, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    A digital terrain and surface model derived from an airborne laser scanning (ALS) altimetry dataset was used in the Austrian Alps for the preparation, improvement and the evaluation of a digital geomorphological hazard map. The geomorphology in the study area consists of a wide variety of landforms, which include glacial landforms such as cirques, hanging valleys, and moraine deposits, of pre- and postglacial mass movement landforms and processes, such as deep seated slope failures, rock fall, debris flows and solifluction. The area includes naked and covered gypsum karst, collapse dolines and fluvial landforms and deposits such as river terraces, incisions, alluvial fans and gullies. A detailed symbol based paper geomorphological map served as a basis for the digitalization of basic morphogenetic landform and process units. These units were assigned a `geomorphological unit type`, `hazard type` and `activity` code in the attribute table, according to a morphogenetic classification scheme. Selected zonal statistical attributes - mean height, aspect and slope angle - were calculated in a GIS using the vector based morphogenetic landform and process units and the underlying 1m resolution laser altimetry raster dataset. This statistical information was added to the attribute table of the `geomorphological hazard map`. Interpretation of the zonal statistical information shows that indicative topographic signatures exist for the various geomorphological and hazard units in this region of the Alps. Based on this experience a further step is made towards semi-automated geomorphological hazard classification of segmented laser altimetry data using expert knowledge rules. The first results indicate a classification accuracy of 50-70 percent for most landform associations. Areas affected by slide processes resulted in less accurate classification, probably because of their polygenetic history in this area. It is concluded that the use of lidar data improves visual

  10. Use of terrestrial laser scanning for the documentation of quaternary caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Wiśniewska, Daria; Urban, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Due to the nature of their occurrence and genesis, caves in the Polish Lowlands represent a peculiarity of geological heritage, unique on the European scale. They are developed in Quaternary deposits, mostly at the contact of slabs or irregular bodies of cemented glacial or glaciofluvial deposits: conglomerates and sandstones, with unconsolidated deposits, mostly sands, gravels and clays. So far, 20 such caves have been recorded in Polish Lowlands. Most caves are only several meters long, the largest one is over 60 m long. Regardless of their origins, the character of host rocks is the reason that processes leading to their formation are simultaneously the destroying processes. Thus, the studied caves, as well as other caves of this region, are unstable, gradually evolving objects. The changes taking place in them are continuous and intense enough, therefore the documentation of their shape with the greatest possible accuracy and resolution becomes crucial. Such possibility can provide the technique of laser scanning. In 2014 three caves, including one recently discovered, were scanned using the TLS. Measurements of caves and their surroundings were conducted in May and July 2014 with a scanner RIEGL VZ-4000. Point clouds from several scanner positions were combined using the module Multi Station Adjustment in the RiSCAN software. This module allows to connect point clouds from successive positions without any objects of reference. After the merger of point clouds from individual positions and their filtration, a collection of several million points was obtained. The number of points projected on the wall was over 20 000 per m2. The using of TLS enabled to present the morphometric features impossible to obtain using traditional methods. High density of the point clouds allows registering even small details on the cave walls, as well as monitoring leaching, falling, grinding and flaking processes taking place in them. Thus, the most important advantage of the TLS is

  11. Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing, 3D Laser Scanning Technology, and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management on Ship Maintenance and Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing , 3D Laser Scanning Technology, and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management on Ship...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing , 3D Laser Scanning Technology...management during operations 4 Potential Technology 3: Additive Manufacturing (“3D Printing”) 5 • 3D design/image (e.g. from 3D LS) of final part

  12. Airborne Laser Scanning - based vegetation classification in grasslands: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, András; Vári, Ágnes; Deák, Balázs; Mücke, Werner; Székely, Balázs

    2013-04-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning is traditionally used for topography mapping, exploiting its ability to map terrain elevation under vegetation cover. Parallel to this, the application of ALS for vegetation classification and mapping of ecological variables is rapidly emerging. Point clouds surveyed by ALS provide accurate representations of vegetation structure and are therefore considered suitable for mapping vegetation classes as long as their vertical structure is characteristic. For this reason, most ALS-based vegetation mapping studies have been carried out in forests, with some rare applications for shrublands or tall grass vegetation such as reeds. The use of remote-sensing derived vegetation maps is widespread in ecological research and is also gaining importance in practical conservation. There is an increasing demand for reliable, high-resolution datasets covering large protected areas. ALS can provide both the coverage and the high resolution, and can prove to be an economical solution due to the potential for automatic processing and the wide range of uses that allows spreading costs. Grasslands have a high importance in nature conservation as due to the drastical land use changes (arable lands, afforestation, fragmentation by linear structures) in the last centuries the extent of these habitats have been considerably reduced. Among the habitat types protected by the Habitat Directive of the Natura 2000 system, several grassland habitat types (e.g. hay meadows, dry grasslands harbouring rare Orchid species) have special priority for conservation. For preserving these habitat types application of a proper management - including mowing or grazing - has a crucial role. Therefore not only the mapping of the locations of habitats but the way of management is needed for representing the natural processes. The objective of this study was to test the applicability of airborne laser scanning for ecological vegetation mapping in and around grasslands. The study site is

  13. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  14. Cell volume kinetics of adherent epithelial cells measured by laser scanning reflection microscopy: determination of water permeability changes of renal principal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maric, K; Wiesner, B; Lorenz, D; Klussmann, E; Betz, T; Rosenthal, W

    2001-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a key component of the antidiuretic machinery in the kidney, is rapidly regulated by the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. The hormone exerts its action by inducing a translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles to the cell membrane. This step requires the elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP. We describe here a new method, laser scanning reflection microscopy (LSRM), suitable for determining cellular osmotic water permeability coefficient changes in primary cultured inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells. The recording of vertical-reflection-mode x-z-scan section areas of unstained, living IMCD cells proved useful and valid for the investigation of osmotic water permeability changes. The time-dependent increases of reflection-mode x-z-scan section areas of swelling cells were fitted to a single-exponential equation. The analysis of the time constants of these processes indicates a twofold increase in osmotic water permeability of IMCD cells after treatment of the cells both with forskolin, a cyclic AMP-elevating agent, and with Clostridium difficile toxin B, an inhibitor of Rho proteins that leads to depolymerization of F-actin-containing stress fibers. This indicates that both agents lead to the functional insertion of AQP2 into the cell membrane. Thus, we have established a new functional assay for the study of the regulation of the water permeability at the cellular level. PMID:11259291

  15. CAD/CAM bilateral ear prostheses construction for Treacher Collins syndrome patients using laser scanning and rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; De Crescenzio, Francesca; Fantini, Massimiliano; Scotti, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Ear defects in patients affected by Treacher Collins syndrome necessitate the replacement of the existing anatomic residuals of the ears with custom-made prostheses. This paper describes a multidisciplinary protocol involving both medicine and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing for manufacturing ear prostheses. Using innovative prototyping technologies together with conventional silicone processing procedures, a step-by-step procedure is presented. The complete workflow includes laser scanning of the defective regions of a patient's face, the use of 3D anatomic models from an ear digital library and rapid prototyping of both substructures for bar anchoring and moulds for silicone processing.

  16. SarConfoCal: simultaneous sarcomere length and cytoplasmic calcium measurements for laser scanning confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Pasqualin, Côme; Gannier, François; Yu, Angèle; Malécot, Claire O; Bredeloux, Pierre; Maupoil, Véronique

    2016-12-22

    Simultaneous recordings of myocytes contractility and their cytoplasmic calcium concentration allow powerful studies, particularly on heart failure and other cardiac dysfunctions. Such studies require dedicated and expensive experimental devices that are difficult to use. Thus we propose SarConfoCal, the first and only software to simultaneously analyse both cytoplasmic calcium variations (from fluorescence signal) and myocytes contractility (from sarcomere length measurement) on laser scanning confocal microscopy images. SarConfoCal is easy to set up and use, especially by people without programming skills.

  17. 3-D confocal laser scanning microscopy used in morphometric analysis of rat Purkinje cell dendritic spines after chronic ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Wenisch, S; Fortmann, B; Steinmetz, T; Kriete, A; Leiser, R; Bitsch, I

    1998-12-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (with a 543 nm laser) was used for imaging rat Purkinje cell dendritic spines at high 3-D resolution. In a nutritionally controlled study of the rat, 5 months of ethanol consumption was demonstrated to alter the spines of Purkinje cell dendrites in rat cerebellum. Intact spines showed significant elongation after ethanol exposure, whereas this neuromorphological alteration could not be detected in controls. Spine elongation could be regarded as compensative growth of spines in search of new synaptic contacts due to alcohol induced cell loss.

  18. Intercomparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Instruments for Assessing Forested Ecosystems: A Brisbane Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armston, J.; Newnham, G.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Danson, M.; Gaulton, R.; Zhang, Z.; Disney, M.; Sparrow, B.; Phinn, S. R.; Schaefer, M.; Burt, A.; Counter, S.; Erb, A.; Goodwin, N.; Hancock, S.; Howe, G.; Johansen, K.; Li, Z.; Lollback, G.; Martel, J.; Muir, J.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Scarth, P.; Tindall, D.; Walker, L.; Witte, C.; Woodgate, W.; Wu, S.

    2013-12-01

    themes include retrieval of leaf area index and related parameters; retrieval of tree diameters, above-ground biomass, and height; approaches to calibration; waveform vs. discrete return data; value of dual wavelength data; ray tracing simulations driven by scanning; and others. This effort was initiated as an activity of the Terrestrial Laser Scanning International Interest Group. The primary objective of this international collaboration is to advance the understanding and application of TLS to forest management and inventory, rapid and automated measurement of vegetation structure parameters, monitoring vegetation dynamics, calibration and validation of large area above-ground biomass mapping, and the development of new low-cost portable scanners to enable wider application of these technologies. Immediate application of the data sets and techniques developed will be through national collaborative research programs, such as NEON and TERN, which enable the techniques and infrastructure developed to be applied consistently. These collaborations and the data and techniques developed and shared openly are essential to enable consistent production of forest structural property maps in science and management applications.

  19. Use of terrestrial laser scanning to characterize rock glacier surface morphology and deformation, Handcart Gulch, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddus, Y.; Caine, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    While there has been extensive, recent research on the kinematics of rock glaciers, few studies have been able to examine surface deformation and strain utilizing terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). TLS captures a high precision, three-dimensional point cloud of X, Y, Z data. We scanned a portion of the Handcart Gulch Rock Glacier (HRG) surface at centimeter scale resolution (standard deviation of 0.64 cm). Although the origins of rock glacier formation and subsequent kinematics are poorly understood, the general consensus is that periglacial rock glaciers are a type of mass-driven permafrost that moves on the order of tens of cm per year. Velocity near the surface is thought to be faster than at depth, producing ridge- or moraine-like structures possibly formed by near-surface, compressional buckling. The HRG, located in Pike National Forest just below the Continental Divide, is multi-lobed and composed of hydrothermally altered Proterozoic metamorphic rock. In addition to commonly observed "compressional ridges", the rock glacier surface shows a number of scarp-like discontinuities that may be indicative of extension. The rock glacier surface has limited vegetative cover and a thin, but laterally extensive, layer of unidentified black lichen and lesser amounts of green Rhizocarpon lichen. The curviplanar scarps are up to about 4 m in height and are marked by discrete discontinuities that cut the lichen-covered rock glacier surface, revealing steeply dipping (> 35°) faces that are not covered with lichen. The lichen-covered surface appears to have been displaced, top-down in the direction of the maximum topographic gradient, and along the relatively lichen-free scarps thus resembling normal faults. Lichenometry is a useful method for providing a relative dating of rock glacial movement. Rhizocarpon is commonly used for dating due to its well documented, slow growth rate and ease of identification. After a century of growth the maximum diameter of Front Range

  20. Terrestrial laser scanning of anthropogenic beach berms for urban flood defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, B. F.; Schubert, J.; Gallien, T.; Shakeri Majd, M.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, over 20 million people reside below present high tide levels and as many as 200 million are vulnerable to flooding during extreme events. In California, coastal flooding is driven by a combination of factors such as high astronomical tides, waves, storm surge, and other fluctuations such as those caused by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and climate change is likely to exacerbate those factors testing the limits of coastal flood defenses. Beaches provide natural flood protection during storms by mitigating the effects of high water levels and wave runup, and a process known as beach berming can be used to temporarily enhance the ability of beaches to withstand overtopping. In cases where beaches serve as primary protection for development, anthropogenic berms may represent an attractive management option for temporarily addressing future flood hazards. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or lidar has emerged as a valuable technology for capturing the three dimensional geometry of complex surfaces and objects, and in the context of coastal flood prediction mobile TLS could prove invaluable by quickly mapping beach topography before an imminent flood threat and reducing associated uncertainties in coastal flood forecasting systems. The research presented here highlights the results of a field campaign to document the initial conditions and dynamic erosion of anthropogenic berms using TLS. On three occasions in February and March of 2012, a prototype berm was constructed on the foreshore of the city of Newport Beach, CA at low tide, and was scanned to document its initial shape, and then scanned in near-continuous fashion with the rising tide to characterize its subsequent erosion. The purpose is two-fold: (1) to measure the performance of the TLS system relative to accuracy and assess strengths and drawbacks that are likely to bear on the suitability of this technology to support flood prediction as described above, and (2) to develop a better

  1. Feasibility of Terrestrial laser scanning for collecting stem volume information from single trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, Ninni; Kankare, Ville; Vastaranta, Mikko; Luoma, Ville; Pyörälä, Jiri; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Liang, Xinlian; Kaartinen, Harri; Kukko, Antero; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Yu, Xiaowei; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Interest in measuring forest biomass and carbon stock has increased as a result of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and sustainable planning of forest resources is therefore essential. Biomass and carbon stock estimates are based on the large area estimates of growing stock volume provided by national forest inventories (NFIs). The estimates for growing stock volume based on the NFIs depend on stem volume estimates of individual trees. Data collection for formulating stem volume and biomass models is challenging, because the amount of data required is considerable, and the fact that the detailed destructive measurements required to provide these data are laborious. Due to natural diversity, sample size for developing allometric models should be rather large. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has proved to be an efficient tool for collecting information on tree stems. Therefore, we investigated how TLS data for deriving stem volume information from single trees should be collected. The broader context of the study was to determine the feasibility of replacing destructive and laborious field measurements, which have been needed for development of empirical stem volume models, with TLS. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of the TLS data captured at various distance (i.e. corresponding 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of tree height) on the accuracy of the stem volume derived. In addition, we examined how multiple TLS point cloud data acquired at various distances improved the results. Analysis was carried out with two ways when multiple point clouds were used: individual tree attributes were derived from separate point clouds and the volume was estimated based on these separate values (multiple-scan A), and point clouds were georeferenced as a combined point cloud from which the stem volume was estimated (multiple-scan B). This permitted us to deal with the practical aspects of TLS data collection and data processing for development of

  2. Geodetic Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes: Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Glennie, C. L.; Sartori, M.; Fernandez-Diaz, J.; National CenterAirborne Laser Mapping Operational Center

    2010-12-01

    To the residents of an area struck by a strong earthquake quantitative information on damage to the infrastructure, and its attendant impact on relief and recovery efforts, is urgent and of primary concern. To earth scientists a strong earthquake offers an opportunity to learn more about earthquake mechanisms, and to compare their models with the real world, in hopes of one day being able to accurately predict the precise locations, magnitudes, and times of large (and potentially disastrous) earthquakes. Airborne laser scanning (also referred to as airborne LiDAR or Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) is particularly well suited for rapid assessment of earthquakes, both for immediately estimating the damage to infrastructure and for providing information for the scientific study of earthquakes. ALS observations collected at low altitude (500—1000m) from a relatively slow (70—100m/sec) aircraft can provide dense (5—15 points/m2) sets of surface features (buildings, vegetation, ground), extending over hundreds of square kilometers with turn around times of several hours to a few days. The actual response time to any given event depends on several factors, including such bureaucratic issues as approval of funds, export license formalities, and clearance to fly over the area to be mapped, and operational factors such as the deployment of the aircraft and ground teams may also take a number of days for remote locations. Of course the need for immediate mapping of earthquake damage generally is not as urgent in remote regions with less infrastructure and few inhabitants. During August 16-19, 2010 the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) mapped the area affected by the magnitude 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake (Northern Baja California Earthquake), which occurred on April 4, 2010, and was felt throughout southern California, Arizona, Nevada, and Baja California North, Mexico. From initial ground observations the fault rupture appeared to extend 75 km

  3. Semi-automatic mapping of cultural heritage from airborne laser scanning using deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Due Trier, Øivind; Salberg, Arnt-Børre; Holger Pilø, Lars; Tonning, Christer; Marius Johansen, Hans; Aarsten, Dagrun

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes to use deep learning to improve semi-automatic mapping of cultural heritage from airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. Automatic detection methods, based on traditional pattern recognition, have been applied in a number of cultural heritage mapping projects in Norway for the past five years. Automatic detection of pits and heaps have been combined with visual interpretation of the ALS data for the mapping of deer hunting systems, iron production sites, grave mounds and charcoal kilns. However, the performance of the automatic detection methods varies substantially between ALS datasets. For the mapping of deer hunting systems on flat gravel and sand sediment deposits, the automatic detection results were almost perfect. However, some false detections appeared in the terrain outside of the sediment deposits. These could be explained by other pit-like landscape features, like parts of river courses, spaces between boulders, and modern terrain modifications. However, these were easy to spot during visual interpretation, and the number of missed individual pitfall traps was still low. For the mapping of grave mounds, the automatic method produced a large number of false detections, reducing the usefulness of the semi-automatic approach. The mound structure is a very common natural terrain feature, and the grave mounds are less distinct in shape than the pitfall traps. Still, applying automatic mound detection on an entire municipality did lead to a new discovery of an Iron Age grave field with more than 15 individual mounds. Automatic mound detection also proved to be useful for a detailed re-mapping of Norway's largest Iron Age grave yard, which contains almost 1000 individual graves. Combined pit and mound detection has been applied to the mapping of more than 1000 charcoal kilns that were used by an iron work 350-200 years ago. The majority of charcoal kilns were indirectly detected as either pits on the circumference, a central mound, or both

  4. An interactive mapping tool for visualizing lacunarity of laser scanned point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Adam; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space in a certain model or real space over large spatial scales, is found to be a useful descriptive quantity in many fields using imagery, including, among others, geology, dentistry, neurology. Its application in ecology was suggested more than 20 years ago. The main problem of its application was the lack of appropriate high resolution data. Nowadays, full-waveform laser scanning, also known as FWF LiDAR, provides the tool for mapping the vegetation in unprecedented details and accuracy. Consequently, the lacunarity concept can be revitalized, in order to study the structure of the vegetation in this sense as well. Calculation of lacunarity, even if it is done in two dimensions (2D), is still has its problems: on one hand it is a number-crunching procedure, on the other hand, it produces 4D results: at each 3D point it returns a set of data that are function of scale. These data sets are difficult to visualize, to evaluate, and to compare. In order to solve this problem, an interactive mapping tool has been conceptualized that is designed to manipulate and visualize the data, lets the user set parameters for best visualization or comparison results. The system is able to load large amounts of data, visualize them as lacunarity curves, or map view as horizontal slices or in 3D point clouds coloured according to the user's choice. Lacunarity maps are presented as a series of (usually) horizontal profiles, e.g. rasters, which cells contain color-mapped values of selected lacunarity of the point cloud. As lacunarity is usually analysed in a series of successive windows sizes, the tool can show a series of rasters with sequentially animated lacunarity maps calculated for various window sizes. A very fast switching of colour schemes is possible to facilitate rapid visual feedback to better understand underlying data patterns exposed by lacunarity functions. In the comparison mode, two sites (or two areas

  5. Airborne laser scanning based quantification of dead-ice melting in recently deglaciated terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, C.; Sailer, R.; Schümberg, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Dead-ice is explained as stagnant glacial ice, not influenced by glacier flow anymore. Whenever glaciers have negative mass balances and an accumulation of debris-cover on the surface, dead-ice may form. Although, there are numerous conceptual process-sediment-landform models for the melt-out of dead-ice bodies and areas of dead-ice environments at glacier margins are easily accessible, just a few quantitative studies of dead-ice melting have been carried out so far. Processes and rates of dead-ice melting are commonly believed to be controlled by climate and debris-cover properties, but there is still a lack of knowledge about this fact. This study has a focus on the quantification of process induced volumetric changes caused by dead-ice melting. The research for this project was conducted at Hintereisferner (Ötztal Alps, Austria), Gepatschferner (Ötztal Alps, Austria) and Schrankar (Stubai Alps, Austria), areas for which a good data basis of ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning) measurements is available. 'Hintereisferner' can be characterized as a typical high alpine environment in mid-latitudes, which ranges between approximately 2250 m and 3740 m a.s.l.. The Hintereisferner region has been investigated intensively since many decades. Two dead ice bodies at the orographic right side and one at the orographic left side of the Hintereisferner glacier terminus (approx. at 2500 m to 2550 m a.s.l.) were identified. Since 2001, ALS measurements have been carried out regularly at Hintereisferner resulting in a unique data record of 21 ALS flight campaigns, allowing long-term explorations of the two dead-ice areas. The second study area of 'Gepatschferner' in the Kaunertal ranges between 2060 m and 3520 m a.s.l. and is the second largest glacier of Austria. Near the glacier tongue at the orographic right side a significant dead ice body has formed. The ALS data used for quantification include a period of time of 4 years (2006 - 2010). 'Schrankar' is located in the Western

  6. Rock and stone weathering at Citadel fortifications, Gozo (Malta): benefits from terrestrial laser scanning combined with conventional investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapete, D.; Gigli, G.; Mugnai, F.; Vannocci, P.; Pecchioni, E.; Morelli, S.; Fanti, R.; Casagli, N.

    2012-04-01

    Military architecture heritage is frequently built on rock masses affected by slope instability and weathering processes, which progressively undermine the foundations and cause collapses and toppling of the masonries. The latter can be also weakened by alteration of the stone surfaces, as a consequence of the interactions with the local environmental conditions. These conservation issues are emphasized for those sites, whose susceptibility to structural damages is also due to the similarity between the lithotypes constituting the geologic substratum and the construction materials. Effective solutions for the protection from such a type of phenomena can be achieved if the whole "rock mass - built heritage system" is analyzed. In this perspective, we propose a new approach for the study of the weathering processes affecting historic hilltop sites, taking benefits from the combination of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and conventional investigations, the latter including geotechnical and minero-petrographic analyses. In particular, the results here presented were obtained from specific tests on the fortifications of Citadel, Gozo (Malta), performed in co-operation with the Restoration Unit, Works Division, Maltese Ministry for Resources and Rural Affairs and the private company Politecnica Ingegneria e Architettura. The Citadel fortifications are built at the top of a relatively stiff and brittle limestone plate, formed by Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) and overlying a thick Blue Clay (BC) layer. Differential weathering creates extensively fractured ledges on the cap and erosion niches in the strata beneath, thereby favouring block detachment, even rockfall events, such as the last one occurred in 2001. The locally quarried Globigerina Limestone (GL), historically employed in restoration masonries, is also exposed to alveolization and powdering, and several collapses damaged the underwalling interventions. Since the erosion pattern distribution suggested a

  7. The determination of firing distance applying a microscopic quantitative method and confocal laser scanning microscopy for detection of gunshot residue particles.

    PubMed

    Neri, Margherita; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we applied a microscopic quantitative method based on the use of sodium rhodizonate to verify the presence of residues and their distribution on the cutis of gunshot wounds. A total of 250 skin samples were selected from cases in which the manner of death (accidental, suicide, and homicide) and the shooting distance could be reliably determined. The samples were examined under a light microscope, in transmitted bright field illumination and phase contrast mode, and with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all skin specimens the area of each histological section was directly measured by an image analysis system. Both the number and the size of powder particles were measured. The distribution of gunshot residues (GSR) in the epidermal and subepidermal layers was also analyzed. The evaluation of the microscopic entrance wounds demonstrated different findings related to the range of fire. The data derived from the evaluation of both macroscopic and microscopic features demonstrated that the amount and the spatial distribution of GSR deposits in the skin surrounding entrance wounds strictly correlate with shooting distance.

  8. An endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in central Switzerland: characterization by reflection spectroscopy, pigment analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Horath, T; Neu, T R; Bachofen, R

    2006-04-01

    A community of endolithic microorganisms dominated by phototrophs was found as a distinct band a few millimeters below the surface of bare exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Alps. Using in situ reflectance spectroscopy, we detected chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycobilins, carotenoids, and an unknown type of bacteriochlorophyll-like pigment absorbing in vivo at about 720 nm. In cross sections, the data indicated a defined distribution of different groups of organisms perpendicular to the rock surface. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of pigments extracted with organic solvents confirmed the presence of two types of bacteriochlorophylls besides chlorophylls and various carotenoids. Spherical organisms of varying sizes and small filaments were observed in situ with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (one- and two-photon technique). The latter allowed visualization of the distribution of phototrophic microorganisms by the autofluorescence of their pigments within the rock. Coccoid cyanobacteria of various sizes predominated over filamentous ones. Application of fluorescence-labeled lectins demonstrated that most cyanobacteria were embedded in an exopolymeric matrix. Nucleic acid stains revealed a wide distribution of small heterotrophs. Some biological structures emitting a green autofluorescence remain to be identified.

  9. Density of point clouds in mobile laser scanning. (Polish Title: Gestosc chmury punktow pochodzacej z mobilnego skanowania laserowego)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchoł, A.

    2015-12-01

    The LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is becoming a more and more popular method to collect spatial information. The acquisition of 3D data by means of one or several laser scanners mounted on a mobile platform (car) could quickly provide large volumes of dense data with centimeter-level accuracy. This is, therefore, the ideal solution to obtain information about objects with elongated shapes (corridors), and their surroundings. Point clouds used by specific applications must fulfill certain quality criteria, such as quantitative and qualitative indicators (i.e. precision, accuracy, density, completeness).Usually, the client fixes some parameter values that must be achieved. In terms of the precision, this parameter is well described, whereas in the case of density point clouds the discussion is still open. Due to the specificities of the MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning), the solution from ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning) cannot be directly applied. Hence, the density of the final point clouds, calculated as the number of points divided by "flat" surface area, is inappropriate. We present in this article three different ways of determining and interpreting point cloud density on three different test fields. The first method divides the number of points by the "flat" area, the second by the "three-dimensional" area, and the last one refers to a voxel approach. The most reliable method seems to be the voxel method, which in addition to the local density values also presents their spatial distribution.

  10. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W.; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  11. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changjae; Habib, Ayman; Pyeon, Muwook; Kwon, Goo-rak; Jung, Jaehoon; Heo, Joon

    2016-01-22

    Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1) reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2) considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3) works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes' high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information.

  12. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2016-02-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems.

  13. Documenting a Complex Modern Heritage Building Using Multi Image Close Range Photogrammetry and 3d Laser Scanned Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianna Baptista, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers' intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry) were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  14. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changjae; Habib, Ayman; Pyeon, Muwook; Kwon, Goo-rak; Jung, Jaehoon; Heo, Joon

    2016-01-01

    Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1) reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2) considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3) works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes’ high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information. PMID:26805849

  15. Estimation of regeneration coverage in a temperate forest by 3D segmentation using airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Nina; Yao, Wei; Heurich, Marco; Krzystek, Peter; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2016-10-01

    Forest understory and regeneration are important factors in sustainable forest management. However, understanding their spatial distribution in multilayered forests requires accurate and continuously updated field data, which are difficult and time-consuming to obtain. Therefore, cost-efficient inventory methods are required, and airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a promising tool for obtaining such information. In this study, we examine a clustering-based 3D segmentation in combination with ALS data for regeneration coverage estimation in a multilayered temperate forest. The core of our method is a two-tiered segmentation of the 3D point clouds into segments associated with regeneration trees. First, small parts of trees (super-voxels) are constructed through mean shift clustering, a nonparametric procedure for finding the local maxima of a density function. In the second step, we form a graph based on the mean shift clusters and merge them into larger segments using the normalized cut algorithm. These segments are used to obtain regeneration coverage of the target plot. Results show that, based on validation data from field inventory and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), our approach correctly estimates up to 70% of regeneration coverage across the plots with different properties, such as tree height and tree species. The proposed method is negatively impacted by the density of the overstory because of decreasing ground point density. In addition, the estimated coverage has a strong relationship with the overstory tree species composition.

  16. Determination of changes on tooth-colored cervical restorations in vivo using a three-dimensional laser scanning device.

    PubMed

    Folwaczny, M; Mehl, A; Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    2000-06-01

    The present study aimed at the determination of changes of tooth-colored cervical restorations in vivo using an optical 3-dimensional laser scanning device. The study was performed on 197 cervical restorations placed on incisors, canines, and premolars. Four different tooth-colored restoration materials, a composite, a polyacid-modified resin composite, and two resin-modified glass ionomer cements, were used for the restoration of the lesions. For the determination of changes, images were taken at baseline and 15, 24 and 36 months after the placement of the fillings using a 3D-laser scanning device. The images were superimposed automatically, and digital subtraction was made by a specially developed image analysis software. The total substance loss on the entire filling surface at 36 months for the resin-modified glass ionomer Photac-Fil was 44 (+/-23) microm, for Fuji II LC 45 (+/-26) microm, for Dyract 71 (+/-47) microm and for Tetric 18 (+/-12) microm. Differentiating between the class of lesion, a higher wear rate was observed at 36 months on restorations which had been placed in erosion/non-carious cervical cavities (66 (+/-33) microm). In conclusion, the composite material demonstrated a distinctly lower surface wear rate over time in comparison to the resin-modified glass ionomer cements and the polyacid-modified resin composite.

  17. Characterization of atopic skin and the effect of a hyperforin-rich cream by laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Martina C.; Richter, Heike; Kleemann, Anke; Lademann, Juergen; Tscherch, Kathrin; Rohn, Sascha; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults in an increasing manner. The treatment of AD often reduces subjective skin parameters, such as itching, dryness, and tension, but the inflammation cannot be cured. Laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the skin surface, epidermal, and dermal characteristics of dry and atopic skin before and after treatment with an ointment rich in hyperforin, which is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. The results were compared to subjective parameters and transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum moisture, and stratum corneum lipids. Using biophysical methods, in particular laser scanning microscopy, it was found that atopic skin has distinct features compared to healthy skin. Treatment with a hyperforin-rich ointment resulted in an improvement of the stratum corneum moisture, skin surface dryness, skin lipids, and the subjective skin parameters, indicating that the barrier is stabilized and improved by the ointment. But in contrast to the improved skin surface, the inflammation in the deeper epidermis/dermis often continues to exist. This could be clearly shown by the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) measurements. Therefore, RCM measurements could be used to investigate the progress in treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  18. Terrestrial laser scanning and a degenerated cylinder model to determine gross morphological change of cadavers under conditions of natural decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Glennie, Craig L; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Lindgren, Natalie K; Lynne, Aaron M

    2014-08-01

    Decomposition can be a highly variable process with stages that are difficult to quantify. Using high accuracy terrestrial laser scanning a repeated three-dimensional (3D) documentation of volumetric changes of a human body during early decomposition is recorded. To determine temporal volumetric variations as well as 3D distribution of the changed locations in the body over time, this paper introduces the use of multiple degenerated cylinder models to provide a reasonable approximation of body parts against which 3D change can be measured and visualized. An iterative closest point algorithm is used for 3D registration, and a method for determining volumetric change is presented. Comparison of the laser scanning estimates of volumetric change shows good agreement with repeated in-situ measurements of abdomen and limb circumference that were taken diurnally. The 3D visualizations of volumetric changes demonstrate that bloat is a process with a beginning, middle, and end rather than a state of presence or absence. Additionally, the 3D visualizations show conclusively that cadaver bloat is not isolated to the abdominal cavity, but also occurs in the limbs. Detailed quantification of the bloat stage of decay has the potential to alter how the beginning and end of bloat are determined by researchers and can provide further insight into the effects of the ecosystem on decomposition.

  19. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes.

  20. Terrestrial and Aerial Laser Scanning Data Integration Using Wavelet Analysis for the Purpose of 3D Building Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kedzierski, Michal; Fryskowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Visualization techniques have been greatly developed in the past few years. Three-dimensional models based on satellite and aerial imagery are now being enhanced by models generated using Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data. The most modern of such scanning systems have the ability to acquire over 50 points per square meter and to register a multiple echo, which allows the reconstruction of the terrain together with the terrain cover. However, ALS data accuracy is less than 10 cm and the data is often incomplete: there is no information about ground level (in most scanning systems), and often around the facade or structures which have been covered by other structures. However, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) not only acquires higher accuracy data (1–5 cm) but is also capable of registering those elements which are incomplete or not visible using ALS methods (facades, complicated structures, interiors, etc.). Therefore, to generate a complete 3D model of a building in high Level of Details, integration of TLS and ALS data is necessary. This paper presents the wavelet-based method of processing and integrating data from ALS and TLS. Methods of choosing tie points to combine point clouds in different datum will be analyzed. PMID:25004157

  1. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  2. Terrestrial and aerial laser scanning data integration using wavelet analysis for the purpose of 3D building modeling.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Michal; Fryskowska, Anna

    2014-07-07

    Visualization techniques have been greatly developed in the past few years. Three-dimensional models based on satellite and aerial imagery are now being enhanced by models generated using Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data. The most modern of such scanning systems have the ability to acquire over 50 points per square meter and to register a multiple echo, which allows the reconstruction of the terrain together with the terrain cover. However, ALS data accuracy is less than 10 cm and the data is often incomplete: there is no information about ground level (in most scanning systems), and often around the facade or structures which have been covered by other structures. However, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) not only acquires higher accuracy data (1-5 cm) but is also capable of registering those elements which are incomplete or not visible using ALS methods (facades, complicated structures, interiors, etc.). Therefore, to generate a complete 3D model of a building in high Level of Details, integration of TLS and ALS data is necessary. This paper presents the wavelet-based method of processing and integrating data from ALS and TLS. Methods of choosing tie points to combine point clouds in different datum will be analyzed.

  3. Characterization of atopic skin and the effect of a hyperforin-rich cream by laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Martina C; Richter, Heike; Kleemann, Anke; Lademann, Juergen; Tscherch, Kathrin; Rohn, Sascha; Schempp, Christoph M

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults in an increasing manner. The treatment of AD often reduces subjective skin parameters, such as itching, dryness, and tension, but the inflammation cannot be cured. Laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the skin surface, epidermal, and dermal characteristics of dry and atopic skin before and after treatment with an ointment rich in hyperforin, which is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. The results were compared to subjective parameters and transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum moisture, and stratum corneum lipids. Using biophysical methods, in particular laser scanning microscopy, it was found that atopic skin has distinct features compared to healthy skin. Treatment with a hyperforin-rich ointment resulted in an improvement of the stratum corneum moisture, skin surface dryness, skin lipids, and the subjective skin parameters, indicating that the barrier is stabilized and improved by the ointment. But in contrast to the improved skin surface, the inflammation in the deeper epidermis/dermis often continues to exist. This could be clearly shown by the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) measurements. Therefore, RCM measurements could be used to investigate the progress in treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  4. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J; Gonchukov, S A; Koenig, K

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  5. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems.

  6. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems. PMID:26922872

  7. Quantification of facial movements by optical instruments: surface laser scanning and optoelectronic three-dimensional motion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sidequersky, Fernanda Vincia; Verzé, Laura; Mapelli, Andrea; Ramieri, Guglielmo Amedeo; Sforza, Chiarella

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of displacements of tracing landmarks in standardized facial movements. Forty healthy persons were evaluated in 2 different groups (20 men and 20 women, aged 18-30 years) with optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning. The displacements of tracing landmarks in brow lift and smile were calculated, and the 2 methods (optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning) were compared in healthy persons. Side-related differences were found in the tracing landmark (superciliare) during brow lift movements between both methods (the largest movements were found on the right side, P = 0.044), whereas in smile movements the tracing landmark cheilion did not show significant differences between the 2 sides. In both movements, the differences of the tracing landmark displacements between the 2 systems and sexes were on average less than 2 mm, without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In conclusion, normal young adult men and women had similar standardized facial movements. The 2 analyzed movements can be measured by both optical instruments with comparable results.

  8. Recent rock fall activity in the Wetterstein Mountains revealed by a time series of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpa, Anne; Baewert, Henning; Cook, Kristen; Morche, David

    2015-04-01

    The north face of the Hochwanner in the Reintal valley, Wetterstein Mountains, southern Germany, has been a site of frequent rock fall activity for the past several hundred years. The so-called 'Steingerümpel' rock fall included an estimated volume of 2.3-2.7 x 106 m3 and led to damming of the Partnach river. This event was dated to 1400-1600 AD. The rock fall left a prominent scar in the rock face where subsequent rock fall activity was concentrated, postulated to be a 'delayed consequence' of the Steingerümpel event. Previous workers used airborne and terrestrial laser scan data to evaluate the volume of the detached material and the deposits on the talus cone at the foot of the slope from the 'delayed consequence' activity between 2006 and 2008 (Heckmann et al., 2012). The largest event during this period was a 5 x 104 m3 rock fall in August 2007. We compared the data of six terrestrial laser scans, which were acquired in June and September 2008, September 2010, June 2011, August 2013, October and November 2014, in order to assess the volumes of detached material after the large rock fall event of 2007. The aim is to investigate the post-event activity at a site of a large rock fall in order to give estimates about the timing when the activity is back to normal conditions in relation to the magnitude of the large event. Although no large rock fall occurred in the observation period, the comparison of the laser scan data indicate that the average rock wall retreat at this site is still higher compared to the mean annual rock wall retreat rate of 0.54 mm/yr for the last millennium in the Reintal valley (Krautblatter et al., 2012). This shows that sites of large rock falls remain active even years after the event. Heckmann, T.; Bimböse, M.; Krautblatter, M.; Haas, F.; Becht, M.; Morche, D. (2012): From geotechnical analysis to quantification and modelling using LiDAR data: a study on rockfall in the Reintal catchment, Bavarian Alps, Germany; Earth Surface

  9. NAVIS-An UGV Indoor Positioning System Using Laser Scan Matching for Large-Area Real-Time Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian.; Chen, Yuwei.; Jaakkola, Anttoni.; Liu, Jinbing.; Hyyppä, Juha.; Hyyppä, Hannu.

    2014-01-01

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  10. NAVIS-An UGV indoor positioning system using laser scan matching for large-area real-time applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liu, Jinbing; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2014-07-04

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  11. Mapping tree health using airborne full-waveform laser scans and hyperspectral imagery: a case study for floodplain eucalypt forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendryk, I.; Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.

    2014-12-01

    Barmah-Millewa Forest (BMF), the largest River Red Gum forest in the world, located in south-eastern Australia is suffering from severe dieback, thus diminishing its ecological and economical value. Previous research showed that dieback is a good predictor of the forest health and stressed the need for BMF health mapping and change monitoring. In this respect, airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging offer extensive spatial and spectral coverage of measurements and represent an ideal tool for forest health mapping at individual tree scale. The aim of this project is to quantify the health of individual, structurally complex floodplain eucalypt trees by integrating airborne hyperspectral imagery, full-waveform laser scans and field measurements. An aerial survey, conducted in May 2014, was designed to provide a representative sample of BMF tree health. The positioning of 17 flight lines aimed to capture the heterogeneity of the forest health and flood frequency. Preliminary analysis of the aerial remote sensing data with regards to chlorophyll concentrations, dieback levels and canopy densities allowed us to target our field campaign (conducted in June 2014). Field measurements included accurate position measurements, LAI, visual assessment, spectral measurement and mensuration of individual trees in 30 m2 plots. For detection of individual tree trunks from airborne laser scans we used a novel approach based on Euclidean distance clustering, taking advantage of the intensity and pulse width difference between woody and leaf tree compartments. The detected trunks were used to seed a minimum cut algorithm for tree crown delineation. In situ measurements confirmed the high structural diversity of the forest and allowed the calibration of the tree detection algorithm. An overall accuracy of the tree detection of 54% and 67% was achieved for trees with circumference over 40 cm and over 100 cm respectively. As a further step, 3D point clusters representing

  12. Coastal cliff monitoring and analysis of mass wasting processes with the application of terrestrial laser scanning: A case study of Rügen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Dirk; Prüfer, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    An active landslide, affecting a composite sea cliff section of the island of Rügen, Germany was investigated and monitored using terrestrial laser scanning. Biannual surveys were performed from 2006 to 2011. High resolution scans were used to delineate landslide extensions, monitor the spatial and temporal changes, and evaluate the processes of mass wasting along the cliff section. Between May 2006 and May 2011 the multi-temporal analysis documents a strong landward progression of the landslide that resulted in an increase in the planimetric area by 32%. In the same period, 9365 m3 of soil volume has been removed primarily due to rainfall triggered surface runoff erosion and the resulting slumping. This volume loss correlates with the preferential erosion of weak and unconsolidated sediments building up the major part of the cliff face. This produced a maximum cliff top retreat of 17.32 m with an average retreat rate of 3.46 m yr- 1. The quantification of the mass wasting processes and cliff top retreat demonstrates the substantial effect of local cliff lithology on slope stability, and supports a prognosis of the near future development of the landslide. Furthermore, the absence of local wave attack indicators or human activity highlights the major role of subaerial processes in the erosion of the sea cliff. These results can be transferred to cliff locations in the urbanised cliff top area nearby that currently suffer similar cliff erosion processes and episodic events of large cliff top retreats. The study therefore provides reliable data for the local authorities in charge of hazard assessment and planning and implementation of adaptive countermeasures.

  13. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for detection of ground surface deformation in small mud volcano (Murono, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2016-07-01

    We perform terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to detect changes in surface morphology of a mud volcano in Murono, north-central Japan. The study site underwent significant deformation by a strong earthquake in 2011, and the surface deformation has continued in the following years. The point cloud datasets were obtained by TLS at three different times in 2011, 2013 and 2014. Those point clouds were aligned by cloud-based registration, which minimizes the closest point distance of point clouds of unchanged ground features, and the TLS-based point cloud data appear to be suitable for detecting centimeter-order deformations in the central domain of the mud volcano, as well as for measurements of topographic features including cracks of paved ground surface. The spatial patterns and accumulative amount of the vertical deformation during 2011-2014 captured by TLS correspond well with those previously reported based on point-based leveling surveys, supporting the validity of TLS survey.

  14. Extracting the ridge set as a graph for actin filament length estimation from confocal laser scanning microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, Harald

    2012-04-01

    The progress in image acquisition techniques provides life sciences with an abundance of data. Image analysis facilitates the assessment. The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in understanding the behavior of osteoblastic cells on biomaterials. In the flat basal part of the cells, it can be visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In the microscopic images, the stained cytoskeleton appears as a dense network of bright ridges which is so far only qualitatively assessed. For its quantification, there is a need for ridge detection techniques that provide a geometrical description of this graph feature. The state of the art methods do not cope with the systematical degradation by noise, unspecific luminance, and uneven dye uptake. This work presents the key part of a ridge-tracking technique, which makes more efficient use of context information, and evaluate it by its length measurement accuracy. Two random models illustrate the performance against ground truth. Representative microscopic images confirm the applicability.

  15. Capturing Detailed Outcrop Geology Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Lidar) and Other Digital Technologies: Current Status and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. R.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Geospatial data acquisition at global to regional scales has wide acceptance, and tools such as Google Earth have been instrumental in extending Earth visualisation far beyond specialist users of GIS and satellite imagery. At the outcrop scale, the number of industry and academic geoscientists adopting digital technologies to gather field data is steadily increasing. When integrated with traditional field skills, these technologies offer two fundamental advantages: firstly, outcrop geology can now be recorded with very high detail and precision; secondly, observations and data are precisely georeferenced, which is a prerequisite for 2D and 3D spatial analysis. Digital outcrop data are being used in a wide variety of ways, many of which can be characterised in terms of two end members. Firstly, using methods such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry, it is possible to create highly realistic virtual copies of the outcrop. These virtual outcrop models can be used to great effect to enhance teaching, to provide virtual field-trips (most effective in conjunction with a real visit to the outcrop), to promote group discussion and interpretation, or as part of Health & Safety briefing. Secondly, digital outcrop data is also being used to derive quantitative attribute measurements from specific geological features. Here the emphasis is not on capturing a photo-realistic copy of the outcrop, but rather on gathering the relevant types of data at the most appropriate resolution and geospatial precision for the type of analysis undertaken. In addition to laser scanning, useful technologies include dGPS, laser range-finding, and Total Station surveying. Examples of this kind of quantitative analysis include fault curvature, roughness, branch-line geometry, spatial variation in fault displacement, fracture spacing and 3D spatial clustering, fold curvature, sedimentary channel morphology, lateral and vertical facies variations, and geomorphological analysis of

  16. Low-Cost 3D Laser Scanning in Air or Water Using Self-Calibrating Structured Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, M.; Nüchter, A.

    2017-02-01

    In-situ calibration of structured light scanners in underwater environments is time-consuming and complicated. This paper presents a self-calibrating line laser scanning system, which enables the creation of dense 3D models with a single fixed camera and a freely moving hand-held cross line laser projector. The proposed approach exploits geometric constraints, such as coplanarities, to recover the depth information and is applicable without any prior knowledge of the position and orientation of the laser projector. By employing an off-the-shelf underwater camera and a waterproof housing with high power line lasers an affordable 3D scanning solution can be built. In experiments the performance of the proposed technique is studied and compared with 3D reconstruction using explicit calibration. We demonstrate that the scanning system can be applied to above-the-water as well as underwater scenes.

  17. Investigation of biological cell-protein interactions using SPR sensor through laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Liquan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Wang, Xueliang; Liu, Guiying; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2014-03-01

    A new method for investigating biological cell-protein interactions was developed by using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance (LSCI-SPR) system. Mouse normal IgG was modified on the SPR chip. The suspension mouse lymphocyte cancer cells (L5178Y cells) labeled by Hoechst33342 freely flowed into the surface of the SPR sensor chip. By changing the concentration of the cells, the fluorescence images and the SPR signal were synchronously recorded in real time. The red fluorescence points in the imaging region increased with increase in the concentration of the mouse lymphocyte cancer cells and fit well with the change in the SPR signal. Different suspending cells were chosen to investigate cell-protein interactions through antigen-antibody reactions on the biological cell surfaces through binding detection. This method has potential application in cell biology and pharmacology.

  18. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  19. High-resolution Crop Surface Models (CSM) and Crop Volume Models (CVM) on field level by terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Bolten, Andreas; Curdt, Constanze; Waldhoff, Guido; Bareth, Georg

    2010-11-01

    The interdisciplinary Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (CRC/TR 32) works on exchange processes between soil, vegetation, and the adjacent atmospheric boundary layer (SVA). Within this research project a terrestrial laser scanning sensor is used in a multitemporal approach for determining agricultural plant parameters. In contrast to other studies with phase-change or optical probe sensors, time-of-flight measurements are used. On three dates in the year 2008 a sugar beet field (4.3 ha) in Western Germany was surveyed by a terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl LMS-Z420i). Point clouds are georeferenced, trimmed, and compared with official elevation data. The estimated plant parameters are (i) surface model comparison between different crop surfaces and (ii) crop volumes as well as (iii) soil roughness parameters for SVA-Modelling. The results show, that the estimation of these parameters is possible and the method should be validated and extended.

  20. An optical-axis freezing stage for laser-scanning microscopy of broad ice-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Neils, C M; Diller, K R

    2004-12-01

    This article presents a method to view a dynamic ice interface along the axis of ice growth using a laser-scanning microscope. A deep liquid volume is chilled from below so that ice growth is directed upward toward the microscope objective. The interface is made visible by rejection of fluorescent dye from the solid phase into the liquid. Images of the interface morphology in water with solutes of interest to cryobiology illustrate the imaging capability. These images are processed to quantify the lamellar structure of the ice interface. The optical-axis cryostage provides advantages over horizontal arrangements because (1) immersion objectives enhance, rather than disturb, the desired thermal gradient, and (2) features in the ice interface are not confined within a narrow capillary tube or microscope slide. This arrangement loses some of the thermal control found in planar freezing stages, and the dynamic, refractive interface presents challenges to confocal microscopy.

  1. Remote z-scanning with a macroscopic voice coil motor for fast 3D multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prendergast, Andrew; Wyart, Claire; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2016-01-01

    There is a high demand for 3D multiphoton imaging in neuroscience and other fields but scanning in axial direction presents technical challenges. We developed a focusing technique based on a remote movable mirror that is conjugate to the specimen plane and translated by a voice coil motor. We constructed cost-effective z-scanning modules from off-the-shelf components that can be mounted onto standard multiphoton laser scanning microscopes to extend scan patterns from 2D to 3D. Systems were designed for large objectives and provide high resolution, high speed and a large z-scan range (>300 μm). We used these systems for 3D multiphoton calcium imaging in the adult zebrafish brain and measured odor-evoked activity patterns across >1500 neurons with single-neuron resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27231612

  2. Analysis of the penetration of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Schanzer, S.; Klenk, A.; Sterry, W.; Patzelt, A.

    2010-02-01

    In previous in vitro investigations, it was demonstrated that caffeine is able to stimulate the hair growth. Therefore, a penetration of caffeine into the hair follicle is necessary. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to investigate the penetration and storage of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles. It was shown that a 2-min contact time of the shampoo with the skin was enough to accumulate significant parts of the shampoo in the hair follicles. A penetration of the shampoo up to a depth of approx. 200 μm could be detected, which represents the detection limit of the LSM. At this depth, the close network of the blood capillaries surrounding the hair follicles commences. Even after 24 h, the substance was still detectable in the hair follicles. This demonstrates the long-term reservoir function of the hair follicles for topically applied substances such as caffeine.

  3. Integration of Point Clouds from Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Image-Based Matching for Generating High-Resolution Orthoimages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salach, A.; Markiewicza, J. S.; Zawieska, D.

    2016-06-01

    An orthoimage is one of the basic photogrammetric products used for architectural documentation of historical objects; recently, it has become a standard in such work. Considering the increasing popularity of photogrammetric techniques applied in the cultural heritage domain, this research examines the two most popular measuring technologies: terrestrial laser scanning, and automatic processing of digital photographs. The basic objective of the performed works presented in this paper was to optimize the quality of generated high-resolution orthoimages using integration of data acquired by a Z+F 5006 terrestrial laser scanner and a Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera. The subject was one of the walls of the "Blue Chamber" of the Museum of King Jan III's Palace at Wilanów (Warsaw, Poland). The high-resolution images resulting from integration of the point clouds acquired by the different methods were analysed in detail with respect to geometric and radiometric correctness.

  4. Reflection imaging of China ink-perfused brain vasculature using confocal laser-scanning microscopy after clarification of brain tissue by the Spalteholz method.

    PubMed

    Gutierre, R C; Vannucci Campos, D; Mortara, R A; Coppi, A A; Arida, R M

    2017-01-05

    Confocal laser-scanning microscopy is a useful tool for visualizing neurons and glia in transparent preparations of brain tissue from laboratory animals. Currently, imaging capillaries and venules in transparent brain tissues requires the use of fluorescent proteins. Here, we show that vessels can be imaged by confocal laser-scanning microscopy in transparent cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar preparations after clarification of China ink-injected specimens by the Spalteholz method. This method may be suitable for global, three-dimensional, quantitative analyses of vessels, including stereological estimations of total volume and length and of surface area of vessels, which constitute indirect approaches to investigate angiogenesis.

  5. Utilization of aerial laser scanning data in investigations of modern fortifications complexes in Poland. (Polish Title: Wykorzystanie danych lotniczego skaningu laserowego w metodyce badawczej zespołów fortyfikacji nowszej w Polsce)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawieska, D.; Ostrowski, W.; Antoszewski, M.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the turbulent history extremely reach and unique resources of military architectural objects (modern fortification complexes) are located in Poland. The paper presents results of analysis of utilization of aerial laser scanning data for identification and visualization of forts in Poland. A cloud of point from the ISOK Projects has been utilized for that purpose. Two types of areas are distinguished in this Project, covered by products of diversified standards: standards II - laser scanning of the increased density (12 points per sq.m.), standard I - laser scanning of the basic density (4 points per sq.m.). Investigations were carried out concerning the quality of geospatial data classification with respect to further topographic analysis of fortifications. These investigations were performed for four test sites, two test sites for each standard. Objects were selected in such a way that fortifications were characterized by the sufficient level of restoration and that at least one point located in forest and one point located in an open area could be located for each standard. The preliminary verification of the classification correctness was performed with the use of ArcGIS 10.1 software package, basing on the shaded Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and the Digital Fortification Model (DFM), an orthophotomap and the analysis of sections of the spatial cloud of points. Changes of classification of point clouds were introduced with the use of TerraSolid software package. Basing on the performed analysis two groups of errors of point cloud classification were detected. In the first group fragments of fortification facilities were classified with errors; in the case of the second group - entire elements of fortifications were classified with errors or they remained unclassified. The first type error, which occurs in the majority of cases, results in errors of 2x4 meters in object locations and variations of elevations of those fragments of DFM, which achieve up to

  6. Development of kinematic 3D laser scanning system for indoor mapping and as-built BIM using constrained SLAM.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-10-16

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy.

  7. Determination of spatial distributions of zinc and active biomass in microbial biofilms by two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Houston, Paul L; Hay, Anthony G; Shuler, Michael L; Abruña, Héctor D; Ghiorse, William C; Lion, Leonard W

    2005-07-01

    The spatial distributions of zinc, a representative transition metal, and active biomass in bacterial biofilms were determined using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM). Application of 2P-LSM permits analysis of thicker biofilms than are amenable to observation with confocal laser scanning microscopy and also provides selective excitation of a smaller focal volume with greater depth localization. Thin Escherichia coli PHL628 biofilms were grown in a minimal mineral salts medium using pyruvate as the carbon and energy source under batch conditions, and thick biofilms were grown in Luria-Bertani medium using a continuous-flow drip system. The biofilms were visualized by 2P-LSM and shown to have heterogeneous structures with dispersed dense cell clusters, rough surfaces, and void spaces. Contrary to homogeneous biofilm model predictions that active biomass would be located predominantly in the outer regions of the biofilm and inactive or dead biomass (biomass debris) in the inner regions, significant active biomass fractions were observed at all depths in biofilms (up to 350 microm) using live/dead fluorescent stains. The active fractions were dependent on biofilm thickness and are attributed to the heterogeneous characteristics of biofilm structures. A zinc-binding fluorochrome (8-hydroxy-5-dimethylsulfoamidoquinoline) was synthesized and used to visualize the spatial location of added Zn within biofilms. Zn was distributed evenly in a thin (12 microm) biofilm but was located only at the surface of thick biofilms, penetrating less than 20 microm after 1 h of exposure. The relatively slow movement of Zn into deeper biofilm layers provides direct evidence in support of the concept that thick biofilms may confer resistance to toxic metal species by binding metals at the biofilm-bulk liquid interface, thereby retarding metal diffusion into the biofilm (G. M. Teitzel and M. R. Park, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:2313-2320, 2003).

  8. Development of Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning System for Indoor Mapping and As-Built BIM Using Constrained SLAM

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy. PMID:26501292

  9. Application of confocal laser scanning microscopy for the diagnosis of amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Chiara; Fedrigo, Marny; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Barbera, Mila Della; Thiene, Gaetano; Valente, Marialuisa; Adami, Fausto; Angelini, Annalisa

    2017-02-20

    We analysed specificity and sensitivity of confocal laser microscopy (CLSM) on tissue sections for a diagnosis of amyloidosis, in an attempt to reduce technical errors and better standardise pathological diagnosis. We first set up a protocol for the use of CLSM on this type of specimen, using a group of 20 amyloid negative and 20 positive samples. Of all specimens, 2, 4 and 8-μm sections were cut. Sections were stained with Congo red (CR) and thioflavin-T (ThT) and observed by cross-polarised light microscopy (CR-PL), epifluorescence microscopy (CRF-epiFM and ThT-epiFM) and CLSM (CRF-CLSM and ThT-CLSM). To validate the method in a diagnostic setting, we examined tissue samples from 116 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of amyloidosis, selected from the period 2005 to 2014 from the database of the Pathology Unit of the University of Padua. The results were compared with those of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which we consider as reference. We found that with CRF-CLSM, the false negative rate was reduced from 17 to 5%, while the sensitivity of detection increased to 12%. The results were in complete agreement with those of TEM ThT-CLSM; both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Finally, ThT-CLSM results did not vary with section thickness, and small amounts of amyloid could even be detected in 2-μm sections. In conclusion, we found ThT-CLSM to be more sensitive as a screening method for amyloidosis than CR and ThT epifluorescence optical imaging. The method was easier to standardise, provided images with better resolution and resulted in more consistent pathologist diagnoses.

  10. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Flaviana Bombarda; ARIAS, Marcela Paola Castro; MALIZA, Amanda Garcia Alves; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; GRAEFF, Márcia Sirlene Zardin; AMOROSO-SILVA, Pablo Andrés; MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; de MORAES, Ivaldo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Material and Methods Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B). These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C). Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalis during the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD® for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. Results The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p<0.05). No differences were observed between group A and B (p>0.05). The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05). Conclusion The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods. PMID:26200524

  11. Design of an affordable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Christin; Knobbe, Jens; Grüger, Heinrich; Lakner, Hubert

    2012-12-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopes are a promising imaging tool in medical diagnostics due to their capability to selectively survey cross-sections of individual layers from `thick' samples. Non-invasive depth resolved investigation of neoplastic skin disorders is one example among other applications. However these microscopes are at present uncommon in medical practice. This is due to their main application area in research. The instruments dealt with here are generally complex, stationary units and are accordingly cost-intensive. It is for this reason, that we have designed a robust and portable MEMS based confocal fluorescence microscope with a field of view of 0.6mm x 0.6mm. This has been made possible by the integration of a 2D micro scanner mirror developed at Fraunhofer IPMS. A variable acquisition depth of cross-sectional images of the fluorescence specimen is enabled by an integrated z-shifter. With the use of commercially available optics an optical demonstrator set up has been realized. To characterize and to demonstrate the ability of this system test measurements were performed. The resolution of the microscope is better than 228 lp/mm determined by 1951 USAF resolution test target. Images of various biological samples are presented and optical sectioning capabilities are shown. A comparison of the measured with the predicted system performance will be given.

  12. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER TECHNOLOGY: Determination of the two-dimensional distribution of potentials in integrated circuits by the laser scanning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, L. A.; Kravchenko, L. N.; Sagiyan, G. M.

    1988-08-01

    Experimental contactless optical measurements were made of the electrical potentials at points inside integrated circuits utilizing semiconductors exhibiting the electrooptic effect. The method developed had a voltage measurement sensitivity of 0.1 V. For the first time a two-dimensional image of the structure of a semiconductor represented by the potential contrast was obtained by the laser scanning method.

  13. The Structure of the Kaali Impact Crater (Estonia) Based on 3D Laser Scanning, Electro-Resistivity Tomography, and iSale Hydrocode Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, M.; Wilk, J.; Kukko, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Kohv, M.; Jõeleht, A.; Välja, R.; Paavel, K.; Kriiska, A.; Plado, J.; Losiak, A.; Wisniowski, T.; Huber, M.; Zhu, M. H.

    2015-09-01

    A field investigation using 3D laser scans, ERT, and strike and dip measurements has produced the highest resolution DEM and structural characterization of the Kaali Main crater to date. We use field measurements to constrain iSale formation models.

  14. a Comparison of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion as Applied to the Great Barn at Harmondsworth, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. P.; Bedford, J.; Bryan, P. G.

    2013-07-01

    The great barn at Harmondsworth near London Heathrow airport, United Kingdom (UK), was built in 1426-7 for the Bishop of Winchester. At 58 metres long and 11.4 metres wide, it is one of the largest ever known to have been built in the UK, and the largest intact medieval timber-framed barn in England. The barn is built almost entirely of oak, although the walls rest on a low masonry sill-wall. Internally the space is divided into a central "nave" with a lower aisle to each side, and is divided along its length into 12 bays. There are three doorways on the east side. For an entirely timber-framed barn, the fabric is exceptionally well preserved. Even the external weatherboarding may be partly original. Following years of neglect, however, there are a number of on-going structural and conservation problems, so in 2011 the barn was bought by English Heritage in order to allow these needs to be addressed. English Heritage is the government agency responsible for the historic sites and buildings in the care of the state of England and is also the UK government's lead advisor on the built heritage. As one of the first steps in the conservation process the English Heritage Geospatial Imaging and Imaging & Visualisation teams undertook a four-day campaign of survey data collection. This took the form of laser scanning of the interior and exterior of the barn plus the acquisition of photography of the exterior elevations to be used with structure from motion (SFM) software. A comparison of the results of these complimentary yet potentially competing technologies will be given, as well as an evaluation of when they can be successfully used together. This paper will describe the procedures and problems involved with collecting the survey data and its subsequent analysis. The laser scanning was undertaken using a FARO Focus 3D phase based instrument. Approximately 60 scans were acquired in order to provide as comprehensive as possible coverage given the site circumstances. A

  15. Comparing terrestrial laser scanning with ground and UAV-based imaging for national-level assessment of upland soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShane, Gareth; Farrow, Luke; Morgan, David; Glendell, Miriam; James, Mike; Quinton, John; Evans, Martin; Anderson, Karen; Rawlins, Barry; Quine, Timothy; Debell, Leon; Benaud, Pia; Jones, Lee; Kirkham, Matthew; Lark, Murray; Rickson, Jane; Brazier, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying soil loss through erosion processes at a high resolution can be a time consuming and costly undertaking. In this pilot study 'a cost effective framework for monitoring soil erosion in England and Wales', funded by the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), we compare methods for collecting suitable topographic measurements via remote sensing. The aim is to enable efficient but detailed site-scale studies of erosion forms in inaccessible UK upland environments, to quantify dynamic processes, such as erosion and mass movement. The techniques assessed are terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photography and ground-based photography, both processed using structure-from-motion (SfM) 3D reconstruction software. Compared to other established techniques, such as expensive TLS, SfM offers a potentially low-cost alternative for the reconstruction of 3D high-resolution micro-topographic models from photographs taken with consumer grade cameras. However, whilst an increasing number of research papers examine the relative merits of these novel versus more established survey techniques, no study to date has compared both ground-based and aerial SfM photogrammetry with TLS scanning across a range of scales (from m2 to 16ha). The evaluation of these novel low cost techniques is particularly relevant in upland landscapes, where the remoteness and inaccessibility of field sites may render some of the more established survey techniques impractical. Volumetric estimates of soil loss are quantified using the digital surface models (DSMs) derived from the data from each technique and subtracted from a modelled pre-erosion surface. The results from each technique are compared. The UAV was able to capture information over a wide area, a range of altitudes and angles over the study area. Combined with automated SfM-based processing, this technique was able to produce rapid orthophotos to support ground-based data

  16. An efficient solid modeling system based on a hand-held 3D laser scan device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The hand-held 3D laser scanner sold in the market is appealing for its port and convenient to use, but price is expensive. To develop such a system based cheap devices using the same principles as the commercial systems is impossible. In this paper, a simple hand-held 3D laser scanner is developed based on a volume reconstruction method using cheap devices. Unlike convenient laser scanner to collect point cloud of an object surface, the proposed method only scan few key profile curves on the surface. Planar section curve network can be generated from these profile curves to construct a volume model of the object. The details of design are presented, and illustrated by the example of a complex shaped object.

  17. Time-resolved microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence lifetime imaging of photosensitizers using picosecond pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes.

    PubMed

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas; Steiner, Rudolf; Dolp, Frank; Erdmann, Rainer; Ortmann, Uwe; Rück, Angelika

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of two different photosensitizers in single cells, in detail mTHPC and 5-ALA induced PPIX, which are currently clinically used in photodynamic therapy. The fluorescence lifetime of the drugs was determined in the cells from time-gated spectra as well as single photon counting, using a picosecond pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation. The diode laser, which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps full width at half maximum duration, was coupled to a confocal laser scanning microscope. For time-resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of a Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images. The fluorescence lifetime of mTHPC decreased from 7.5 to 5.5 ns during incubation from 1 to 6 h. This decrease was probably attributed to enhanced formation of aggregates during incubation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging showed that longer lifetimes were correlated with accumulation in the cytoplasm in the neighborhood of the cell nucleus, whereas shorter lifetimes were found in the outer cytoplasm. For cells that were incubated with 5-ALA, a fluorescence lifetime of 7.4 ns was found for PPIX; a shorter lifetime at 3.6 ns was probably attributed to photoproducts and aggregates of PPIX. In contrast from fluorescence intensity images alone, different fluorescence species could not be distinguished. However, in the lifetime image a structured fluorescence distribution in the cytoplasm was correlated with the longer lifetime and probably coincides with mitochondria. In conclusion, picosecond diode lasers coupled to a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units allows time-resolved spectroscopy and lifetime imaging

  18. The transport kinetics of lanthanide species in a single erythrocyte probed by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Huo, Q; Lu, J; Li, R; Wang, K

    1999-08-01

    A novel method has been developed to visualize and follow the temporal course of lanthanide transport across the membrane into a single living erythrocyte. By means of confocal scanning microscopy and the optical section technique, the entry of lanthanide ions was followed by the fluorescence quenching of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled membrane and cytosol. From the difference of the quenching kinetics of the whole section and the central area, the time for diffusion through the membrane and the diffusion in the extracellular and intracellular media can be deduced. To clarify the mechanism of lanthanide-induced fluorescence quenching of FITC-labeled erythrocytes and to ensure that this reaction can be used in this method, the reaction was investigated by steady-state fluorescence techniques. The results showed that the lanthanides strongly quenched the florescence emitted by FITC covalently bound to membrane proteins and cytosolic proteins. The static quenching mechanism is responsible for the fluorescence quenching of FITC-labeled proteins by Ln species. The quenching mechanism is discussed on the basis of complex formation. The dependence of fluorescence quenching on both ion size and the total orbital angular momentum L supports the complexation mechanism. The transport time across the membrane is strikingly correlated with Ln species and extracellular concentration. For a given concentration, the transport time of [Ln(cit)2]3- is much shorter than that of Ln3+, since they enter the cells via the anion channel. This is supported by the inhibition effect of 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenendisulfonate on the transport of [Ln(cit)2]3-. On the other hand, the transport of free Ln3+ might be attributed to the enhanced permeability of erythrocytes owing to Ln3+ binding. These findings strongly demonstrate the existence of the non-internalization mechanism of Ln species uptake by erythrocytes.

  19. Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion teaching resources for undergraduate field education courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Shervais, K.; Crosby, C. J.; Douglas, B. J.; Niemi, N. A.; Wang, G.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fieldwork is an integral part of the geosciences and there is a longstanding tradition of teaching field methods as part of the undergraduate curriculum. As new technology changes the ways in which we scientifically examine the Earth, and as workforce development demands evolve, there is growing interest in introducing these new technologies into field education courses. In collaboration with field education instructors, UNAVCO, the National Science Foundation's geodetic facility, has developed a module of teaching resources to integrate terrestrial lidar scanning into field courses. An NSF facility is well positioned to develop scalable resources that can then be distributed or adapted for broader implementation. The modules can also be accomplished using Structure from Motion methods in place of lidar scanning. Modules goals are for students to be able to: (A) design and conduct a complex TLS survey to address a geologic research question and (B) articulate the societal impetus for answering these research questions and identify why TLS is the appropriate method in some circumstances. The module is comprised of five units: (1) Introduction to survey design, (2) Stratigraphic section analysis, (3) Fault scarp analysis, (4) Geomorphic change detection, (5) Student-led survey design summative assessment. The modules, apart from the Introduction, are independent, thus select modules can be employed in a given field setting. Prototype module materials were developed from the last five years of UNAVCO support of undergraduate field courses. The current versions of the modules were tested in summer 2015 at the Indiana University and University of Michigan field camps. Results show that the majority of students are able to achieve the intended learning goals. Module materials are available on the UNAVCO Education and Community Engagement website.

  20. Creation of High Resolution Terrain Models of Barringer Meteorite Crater (Meteor Crater) Using Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Holland, Donald E.; McKellip, Rodney D.; Brannon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Barringer Meteorite Crater or Meteor Crater, AZ, has been a site of high interest for lunar and Mars analog crater and terrain studies since the early days of the Apollo-Saturn program. It continues to be a site of exceptional interest to lunar, Mars, and other planetary crater and impact analog studies because of its relatively young age (est. 50 thousand years) and well-preserved structure. High resolution (2 meter to 1 decimeter) digital terrain models of Meteor Crater in whole or in part were created at NASA Stennis Space Center to support several lunar surface analog modeling activities using photogrammetric and ground based laser scanning techniques. The dataset created by this activity provides new and highly accurate 3D models of the inside slope of the crater as well as the downslope rock distribution of the western ejecta field. The data are presented to the science community for possible use in furthering studies of Meteor Crater and impact craters in general as well as its current near term lunar exploration use in providing a beneficial test model for lunar surface analog modeling and surface operation studies.

  1. Using object-based analysis to derive surface complexity information for improved filtering of airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Menglong; Blaschke, Thomas; Tang, Hongzhao; Xiao, Chenchao; Sun, Xian; Zhang, Daobing; Fu, Kun

    2017-03-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a technique used to obtain Digital Surface Models (DSM) and Digital Terrain Models (DTM) efficiently, and filtering is the key procedure used to derive DTM from point clouds. Generating seed points is an initial step for most filtering algorithms, whereas existing algorithms usually define a regular window size to generate seed points. This may lead to an inadequate density of seed points, and further introduce error type I, especially in steep terrain and forested areas. In this study, we propose the use of objectbased analysis to derive surface complexity information from ALS datasets, which can then be used to improve seed point generation.We assume that an area is complex if it is composed of many small objects, with no buildings within the area. Using these assumptions, we propose and implement a new segmentation algorithm based on a grid index, which we call the Edge and Slope Restricted Region Growing (ESRGG) algorithm. Surface complexity information is obtained by statistical analysis of the number of objects derived by segmentation in each area. Then, for complex areas, a smaller window size is defined to generate seed points. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm could greatly improve the filtering results in complex areas, especially in steep terrain and forested areas.

  2. Study of Upper Albian rudist buildups in the Edwards Formation using ground-based hyperspectral imaging and terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupnik, Diana; Khan, Shuhab; Okyay, Unal; Hartzell, Preston; Zhou, Hua-Wei

    2016-11-01

    Ground-based hyperspectral imaging is used for development of digital outcrop models which can facilitate detailed qualitative and quantitative sedimentological analysis and augment the study of depositional environment, diagenetic processes, and hydrocarbon reservoir characterization in areas which are physically inaccessible. For this investigation, ground-based hyperspectral imaging is combined with terrestrial laser scanning to produce mineralogical maps of Late Albian rudist buildups of the Edwards formation in the Lake Georgetown Spillway in Williamson County, Texas. The Edwards Formation consists of shallow water deposits of reef and associated interreef facies. It is an aquifer in western Texas and was investigated as a hydrocarbon play in south Texas. Hyperspectral data were registered to a geometrically accurate laser point cloud-generated mesh with sub-pixel accuracy and were used to map compositional variation by distinguishing spectral properties unique to each material. More calcitic flat-topped toucasid-rich bioherm facies were distinguished from overlying porous sucrosic dolostones, and peloid wackestones and packstones of back-reef facies. Ground truth was established by petrographic study of samples from this area. This research integrates high-resolution datasets to analyze geometrical and compositional properties of this carbonate formation at a finer scale than traditional methods have achieved and to model the geometry and composition of rudist buildups.

  3. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo.

  4. Lab-on-DVD: standard DVD drives as a novel laser scanning microscope for image based point of care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ramachandraiah, Harisha; Amasia, Mary; Cole, Jackie; Sheard, Paul; Pickhaver, Simon; Walker, Chris; Wirta, Valtteri; Lexow, Preben; Lione, Richard; Russom, Aman

    2013-04-21

    We present a novel "Lab-on-DVD" system and demonstrate its capability for rapid and low-cost HIV diagnostics by counting CD4+ cells isolated from whole blood. We show that a commercial DVD drive can, with certain modifications, be turned into an improved DVD-based laser scanning microscope (DVD-LSM). The system consists of a multi-layered disposable polymer disc and a modified commercial DVD reader with rotational control for sample handling, temperature control for optimized bioassay, a photodiode array for detection, and software for signal processing and user interface - all the necessary components required for a truly integrated lab-on-a-chip system, with the capability to deliver high-resolution images down to 1 μm in size. Using discs modified with antibodies, we specifically captured CD4+ cells from whole blood, demonstrating single cell resolution imaging. The novel integrated DVD platform with sub-micron image resolution brings, for the first time, affordable cellular diagnostic testing to the point-of-care and should be readily applicable at resource-limited settings.

  5. Stochastic gradient boosting classification trees for forest fuel types mapping through airborne laser scanning and IRS LISS-III imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirici, G.; Scotti, R.; Montaghi, A.; Barbati, A.; Cartisano, R.; Lopez, G.; Marchetti, M.; McRoberts, R. E.; Olsson, H.; Corona, P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an application of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data in conjunction with an IRS LISS-III image for mapping forest fuel types. For two study areas of 165 km2 and 487 km2 in Sicily (Italy), 16,761 plots of size 30-m × 30-m were distributed using a tessellation-based stratified sampling scheme. ALS metrics and spectral signatures from IRS extracted for each plot were used as predictors to classify forest fuel types observed and identified by photointerpretation and fieldwork. Following use of traditional parametric methods that produced unsatisfactory results, three non-parametric classification approaches were tested: (i) classification and regression tree (CART), (ii) the CART bagging method called Random Forests, and (iii) the CART bagging/boosting stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) approach. This contribution summarizes previous experiences using ALS data for estimating forest variables useful for fire management in general and for fuel type mapping, in particular. It summarizes characteristics of classification and regression trees, presents the pre-processing operation, the classification algorithms, and the achieved results. The results demonstrated superiority of the SGB method with overall accuracy of 84%. The most relevant ALS metric was canopy cover, defined as the percent of non-ground returns. Other relevant metrics included the spectral information from IRS and several other ALS metrics such as percentiles of the height distribution, the mean height of all returns, and the number of returns.

  6. The Inventory Of High Objects Applying Laser Scanning, Focus On The Cataloguing A Reinforced Concrete Industrial Chimney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawałkiewicz, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    There are many surveying methods to measure the inclination of a chimney with the use of classical protractor instruments (Theo 010A/B, T2 Wild), electronic theodolites (TC2002 Wild-Leica), electronic total stations, including mirrorless ones, allowing to define indirectly the course of the construction's axis on the selected observation levels. The methods are the following: indentations, direct projection, double-edged method, polar method with the option of mirrorless measurement. At the moment a very practical and quick measurement technology, significantly eliminating the influence of human errors on the observation results, is laser scanning. The article presents the results of the scanning of 120-metres high reinforced concrete industrial chimney of the Cement Plant "Ożarów", with the application of modern scanning total station VX Spatial Station by Trimble, as an alternative to the methods applied so far. The advantage of scanning is the possibility to obtain a point cloud, which, apart from the information on the course of the chimney axis in the space, provides detail information on the real shape and deformations of the coating of the object's core.

  7. The use of airborne laser scanning to develop a pixel-based stratification for a verified carbon offset project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The voluntary carbon market is a new and growing market that is increasingly important to consider in managing forestland. Monitoring, reporting, and verifying carbon stocks and fluxes at a project level is the single largest direct cost of a forest carbon offset project. There are now many methods for estimating forest stocks with high accuracy that use both Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) and high-resolution optical remote sensing data. However, many of these methods are not appropriate for use under existing carbon offset standards and most have not been field tested. Results This paper presents a pixel-based forest stratification method that uses both ALS and optical remote sensing data to optimally partition the variability across an ~10,000 ha forest ownership in Mendocino County, CA, USA. This new stratification approach improved the accuracy of the forest inventory, reduced the cost of field-based inventory, and provides a powerful tool for future management planning. This approach also details a method of determining the optimum pixel size to best partition a forest. Conclusions The use of ALS and optical remote sensing data can help reduce the cost of field inventory and can help to locate areas that need the most intensive inventory effort. This pixel-based stratification method may provide a cost-effective approach to reducing inventory costs over larger areas when the remote sensing data acquisition costs can be kept low on a per acre basis. PMID:22004847

  8. Analysis of thin baked-on silicone layers by FTIR and 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Pre-filled syringes (PFS) and auto-injection devices with cartridges are increasingly used for parenteral administration. To assure functionality, silicone oil is applied to the inner surface of the glass barrel. Silicone oil migration into the product can be minimized by applying a thin but sufficient layer of silicone oil emulsion followed by thermal bake-on versus spraying-on silicone oil. Silicone layers thicker than 100nm resulting from regular spray-on siliconization can be characterized using interferometric profilometers. However, the analysis of thin silicone layers generated by bake-on siliconization is more challenging. In this paper, we have evaluated Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy after solvent extraction and a new 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy (3D-LSM) to overcome this challenge. A multi-step solvent extraction and subsequent FTIR spectroscopy enabled to quantify baked-on silicone levels as low as 21-325μg per 5mL cartridge. 3D-LSM was successfully established to visualize and measure baked-on silicone layers as thin as 10nm. 3D-LSM was additionally used to analyze the silicone oil distribution within cartridges at such low levels. Both methods provided new, highly valuable insights to characterize the siliconization after processing, in order to achieve functionality.

  9. Direct observation of the asphaltene structure in paving-grade bitumen using confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bearsley, S; Forbes, A; Haverkamp, R G

    2004-08-01

    The structure of the asphaltene phase in the bitumen is believed to have a significant effect on its rheological properties. It has traditionally been difficult to observe the asphaltene phase in unaltered samples of bitumen. The maltenes are thought to form a continuous phase in which the asphaltenes are 'dispersed'. In this study, confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) operating in fluorescence mode was used to examine the structure of paving-grade Safaniya and San Joaquin bitumen. The asphaltene fraction fluoresces in the 515-545 nm wavelength range when irradiated with light with a wavelength of 488 nm. The major advantages of CLSM are that the bitumen sample requires little pretreatment or preparation that may affect the original dispersion of asphaltenes and the bitumen is observed at ambient temperature and pressure. This reduces the possibility of producing images that are not representative of the original material. CLSM was able to show the distribution of maltene and asphaltene components in bitumen. The asphaltene aggregates in the bitumen were observed to be 2-7 micro m in size and formed a dispersed 'sol' structure in the continuous maltene matrix rather than a network 'gel' structure. Surprisingly, the structure and fluorescence of the asphaltene phase does not appear to alter radically upon oxidative ageing. The structure of the asphaltene phase of an AR4000 San Joaquin bitumen was found to be more homogeneous than that of Safaniya bitumen, illustrating the range of structures that can be observed in bitumens by this method.

  10. Release etch modeling analysis and the use of laser scanning microscopy for etch time prediction of micromachined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamis, George; Gogoi, Bishnu P.; Monk, David J.; McNeil, Andrew; Burrows, Veronica A.

    2000-08-01

    An alternative non-destructive analysis method using laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to study etch release distances in MEMS pressure sensor. The LSM method eliminates samples preparation and is easy to implement in a MEMS manufacturing environment. In this study, various diaphragm structures were etched using a highly concentrated HF based solution. Experimental etch data were obtained for both SiO2 and PSG films under these various structures. Both the height and the width of the sacrificial layer port/channel had a significant effect on etch rate for both films. As expected, a non-linear etch rate was obtained for both SiO2 and PSG films. Since the HF concentration changes over time in a manufacturing bath process, careful selection of processing time is required in order to fully release MEMS structures. Future theoretical modeling with the assistance of experimental data obtained in this study is being pursued to strengthen past work done by Eaton et al, Monk et al, and Liu et al.

  11. A custom CMOS imager for multi-beam laser scanning microscopy and an improvement of scanning speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2013-02-01

    Multi-beam laser scanning confocal microscopy with a 256 × 256-pixel custom CMOS imager performing focal-plane pinhole effect, in which any rotating disk is not required, is demonstrated. A specimen is illuminated by 32 × 32 diffraction limited light spots whose wavelength and pitch are 532nm and 8.4 μm, respectively. The spot array is generated by a microlens array, which is scanned by two-dimensional piezo actuator according to the scanning of the image sensor. The frame rate of the prototype is 0.17 Hz, which is limited by the actuator. The confocal effect has been confirmed by comparing the axial resolution in the confocal imaging mode with that of the normal imaging mode. The axial resolution in the confocal mode measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a planar mirror was 8.9 μm, which is showed that the confocality has been achieved with the proposed CMOS image sensor. The focal-plane pinhole effect in the confocal microscopy with the proposed CMOS imager has been demonstrated at low frame rate. An improvement of the scanning speed and a CMOS imager with photo-sensitivity modulation pixels suitable for high-speed scanning are also discussed.

  12. Effect of paeoniflorin on the calcium ion concentration in salivary gland cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xian; Shi, Xiaolu; Wang, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of paeoniflorin, the main monomer component of Jinxueyuan granules, on the Ca2+ concentrations in salivary gland cells to further explore the salivation-promoting mechanism and effective monomer components of Jinxueyuan granules. Methods: The salivary gland cells of suckling rats were cultured in vitro and loaded with a Fluo-3AM fluorescent probe, and changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations were observed using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Results: No significant changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations were demonstrated (P>0.05) in the paeoniflorin-free Hank’s media treatment group or in the higher-dose paeoniflorin (10-2 mol/L) Hank’s media treatment group; however, a significant increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in the lower-dose paeoniflorin (10-4 mol/L) treatment group was observed (P=0.001). Further study showed that treatment with the calcium channel blocker verapamil hydrochloride or with Ca2+-free D-Hank’s media did not block the paeoniflorin-induced (10-4 mol/L) increase in intracellular Ca2+ (P<0.05). Conclusion: Paeoniflorin promotes the release of endogenous calcium to upregulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Further studies should be performed to investigate the association between paeoniflorin and the Ca2+ concentration in salivary gland cells and to elucidate the corresponding functional pathways. PMID:27725850

  13. Correlative analysis of immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Nakatani, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Yo; Unzai, Tomo; Matsuda, Wakoto; Iwai, Haruki; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Uemura, Masanori; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of the brain has been realized with minimal effort by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with focused ion beam (FIB) milling (FIB-SEM). Application of immunohistochemical staining in electron microscopy (EM) provides a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures. Thus, we applied immunocytochemistry for FIB-SEM and correlated this immunoreactivity with that in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM). Dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in the rat neostriatum were visualized using a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion. Moreover, the thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). After detection of the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites by using CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for EM by using immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB) methods, respectively. In contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitations and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were as easily recognizable as those in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Furthermore, in the sites of interest, some appositions displayed synaptic specializations of an asymmetric type. Thus, the present method was useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connections in the central neural circuit.

  14. Precision Automation of Cell Type Classification and Sub-Cellular Fluorescence Quantification from Laser Scanning Confocal Images

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Hardy C.; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Fischer, Urs

    2016-01-01

    While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to (1) segment radial plant organs into individual cells, (2) classify cells into cell type categories based upon Random Forest classification, (3) divide each cell into sub-regions, and (4) quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types. PMID:26904081

  15. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  16. Real-time in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy of melanin-containing cells: A promising diagnostic intervention.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wenzhong; Song, Xiuzu; Peng, Jianzhong; Xu, Aie; Bi, Zhigang

    2015-12-01

    The use of noninvasive imaging techniques to evaluate different types of skin lesions is increasing popular. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a new method for high resolution non-invasive imaging of intact skin in situ and in vivo. Although many studies have investigated melanin-containing cells in lesions by in vivo CLSM, few studies have systematically characterized melanin-containing cells based on their morphology, size, arrangement, density, borders, and brightness. In this study, the characteristics of melanin-containing cells were further investigated by in vivo CLSM. A total of 130 lesions, including common nevi, giant congenital pigmented nevi, vitiligo, melasma, melanoma, and chronic eczema, were imaged by in vivo CLSM. This research helps dermatologists understand the characteristics of melanin-containing cells and facilitate the clinical application of melanin-containing cells in the investigation of dermatological disease. In summary, melanin-containing cells include keratinocytes, melanocytes, macrophages, and melanocytic skin tumor cells. Our study presents the CLSM characteristics of melanin-containing cells to potentially facilitate in vivo diagnosis based on shape, size, arrangement, density, borders, and brightness.

  17. Optical effects of the cranium in trans-cranial in vivo two photon laser scanning microscopy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, P. Johannes; Ottersen, Ole P.; Nase, Gabriele

    2007-02-01

    The combination of multi photon laser scanning microscopy with transgenic techniques has set the stage for in vivo studies of long term dynamics of the central nervous system in mice. Brain structures located within 100μm to 200μm below the brain surface can be observed minimum-invasively during the post-adolescent life of the animal. However, even when selecting the most appropriate microscope optics available for the purpose, trans-cranial observation is compromised by the aberrations induced by the cranium and the tissue interposed between the cranium and the actual focus. It still is an un-resolved task to calculate these aberrational effects or to, at least, estimate quantitatively the distortions they induce onto the recorded images. Here, we report about measurements of the reflection, the absorption, and the effects on the objective point spread function of the mouse cranium as a function of the thickness of the cranium, the locus of trans-cranial observation and the wavelength. There is experimental evidence for pronounced Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) effects.

  18. Extracting Roof Parameters and Heat Bridges Over the City of Oldenburg from Hyperspectral, Thermal, and Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannehr, L.; Luhmann, Th.; Piechel, J.; Roelfs, T.; Schmidt, An.

    2011-09-01

    Remote sensing methods are used to obtain different kinds of information about the state of the environment. Within the cooperative research project HiReSens, funded by the German BMBF, a hyperspectral scanner, an airborne laser scanner, a thermal camera, and a RGB-camera are employed on a small aircraft to determine roof material parameters and heat bridges of house tops over the city Oldenburg, Lower Saxony. HiReSens aims to combine various geometrical highly resolved data in order to achieve relevant evidence about the state of the city buildings. Thermal data are used to obtain the energy distribution of single buildings. The use of hyperspectral data yields information about material consistence of roofs. From airborne laser scanning data (ALS) digital surface models are inferred. They build the basis to locate the best orientations for solar panels of the city buildings. The combination of the different data sets offers the opportunity to capitalize synergies between differently working systems. Central goals are the development of tools for the collection of heat bridges by means of thermal data, spectral collection of roofs parameters on basis of hyperspectral data as well as 3D-capture of buildings from airborne lasers scanner data. Collecting, analyzing and merging of the data are not trivial especially not when the resolution and accuracy is aimed in the domain of a few decimetre. The results achieved need to be regarded as preliminary. Further investigations are still required to prove the accuracy in detail.

  19. Optical biopsy of early gastroesophageal cancer by catheter-based reflectance-type laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Madoka; Yoshida, Shigeto; Tanaka, Shinji; Takemura, Yoshito; Oka, Shiro; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2008-01-01

    Magnified endoscopic observation of the gastrointestinal tract has become possible. However, such observation at the cellular level remains difficult. Laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LCM) is a novel, noninvasive optical imaging method that provides instant microscopic images of untreated tissue under endoscopy. We compare prototype catheter-based reflectance-type LCM images in vivo and histologic images of early gastroesophageal cancer to assess the usefulness of LCM in diagnosing such cancer. 20 sites in the esophagus and 40 sites in the stomach are examined by LCM under endoscopy prior to endoscopic or surgical resection. A prototype catheter LCM system, equipped with a semiconductor laser that oscillates at 685 nm and analyzes reflected light (Mauna Kea Technologies, Paris, France; Fujinon, Saitama, Japan) is used in vivo without fluorescent agent. In all normal esophageal mucosa and esophageal cancers, the nuclei are visualized. In nine of the ten normal esophageal mucosa, cell membranes are visualized, and in five of the ten esophageal cancers, cell membranes are visualized. In all normal gastric mucosa, nuclei and cell membranes are not visualized, but in ten of the 20 gastric cancers, nuclei are visualized. This novel method will aid in immediate diagnosis under endoscopy without the need for biopsy.

  20. Effects of a topically applied wound ointment on epidermal wound healing studied by in vivo fluorescence laser scanning microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Alborova, Alena; Krüger-Corcoran, Daniela; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Kramer, Axel; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Epidermal wound healing is a complex and dynamic regenerative process necessary to reestablish skin integrity. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (FLSM) is a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for evaluation of inflammatory and neoplastic skin disorders in vivo and at high resolution. We employed FLSM to investigate the evolution of epidermal wound healing noninvasively over time and in vivo. Two suction blisters were induced on the volar forearms of the study participants, followed by removal of the epidermis. To study the impact of wound ointment on the process of reepithelization, test sites were divided into two groups, of which one test site was left untreated as a negative control. FLSM was used for serial/consecutive evaluations up to 8 days. FLSM was able to visualize the development of thin keratinocyte layers developing near the wound edge and around hair follicles until the entire epidermis has been reestablished. Wounds treated with the wound ointment were found to heal significantly faster than untreated wounds. This technique allows monitoring of the kinetics of wound healing noninvasively and over time, while offering new insights into the potential effects of topically applied drugs on the process of tissue repair.

  1. An Energy-Based Approach for Detection and Characterization of Subtle Entities Within Laser Scanning Point-Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Reuma; Filin, Sagi

    2016-06-01

    Airborne laser scans present an optimal tool to describe geomorphological features in natural environments. However, a challenge arises in the detection of such phenomena, as they are embedded in the topography, tend to blend into their surroundings and leave only a subtle signature within the data. Most object-recognition studies address mainly urban environments and follow a general pipeline where the data are partitioned into segments with uniform properties. These approaches are restricted to man-made domain and are capable to handle limited features that answer a well-defined geometric form. As natural environments present a more complex set of features, the common interpretation of the data is still manual at large. In this paper, we propose a data-aware detection scheme, unbound to specific domains or shapes. We define the recognition question as an energy optimization problem, solved by variational means. Our approach, based on the level-set method, characterizes geometrically local surfaces within the data, and uses these characteristics as potential field for minimization. The main advantage here is that it allows topological changes of the evolving curves, such as merging and breaking. We demonstrate the proposed methodology on the detection of collapse sinkholes.

  2. Video rate confocal laser scanning reflection microscopy in the investigation of normal and neoplastic living cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesely, P; Boyde, A

    1996-01-01

    The introduction of video rate confocal laser scanning microscopes (VRCLSM) used in reflection mode with high magnification, high aperture objective lenses and with further magnification by a zoom facility allowed the first detailed observations of the activity of living cytoplasm and offered a new tool for investigation of the structural transition from the living state to the specimen fixed for electron microscopy (EM). We used a Noran Odyssey VRCLSM in reflection (backscattered) mode. A greater degree of oversampling and more comfortable viewing of the liver or taped video image was achieved at zoom factor 5, giving a display monitor field width of 10 microns. A series of mesenchyme derived cell lines--from normal cells to sarcoma cells of different malignancy--was used to compare behaviour of the observed intracellular structures and results of fixation. We contrasted the dynamic behaviour of fine features in the cytoplasm of normal and neoplastic living cells and changes induced by various treatments. The tubulomembraneous 3D structure of cytoplasm in living cells is dynamic with motion observable at the new limits of resolution provided by VRCLSM. All organelles appear integrated into one functional compartment supporting the continuous 3D trafficking of small particles (vesicles). This integrated dynamic spatial network (IDSN) was found to be largest in neoplastic cells.

  3. A 3-d laser scanning system and scan data processing method for the monitoring of tunnel deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelina, Klaus; Jansa, Josef; Hesina, Gerd; Traxler, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    The paper presents the mobile multi-sensor system Orthos Plus for the monitoring and mapping of tunnel walls, a scan data processing method for the evaluation of 3-d tunnel wall displacements from subsequent wall scans and, finally, a virtual reality tool supporting the interpretation of data. The measuring system consists of a 3-d laser scanner, a motorised total station and a digital camera that are integrated on a light metal frame that is installed on a mobile platform. It has been designed to perform tunnel measurements most efficiently and to meet the special requirements of tunnels under construction. The evaluation of 3-d displacements is based on a 3-d matching algorithm that takes advantage of the particular conditions of tunnel (shotcrete) surfaces. The virtual reality tool allows viewing of data in a 3-d virtual reality tunnel model and their animation in time and space in order supports understanding in an optimal way. The measuring system Orthos Plus has been developed in the course of a national research project, the 3-d matching method in the frame of the Austrian Christian Doppler Laboratory Spatial Data from Laser Scanning and Remote Sensing and the VR tool in the Austrian COMET K1 Competence Center VRVis Center (www.vrvis.at).

  4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy elucidation of the micromorphology of the leaf cuticle and analysis of its chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Nadiminti, Pavani P; Rookes, James E; Boyd, Ben J; Cahill, David M

    2015-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been invaluable tools for the study of the micromorphology of plant cuticles. However, for electron microscopy, the preparation techniques required may invariably introduce artefacts in cuticle preservation. Further, there are a limited number of methods available for quantifying the image data obtained through electron microscopy. Therefore, in this study, optical microscopy techniques were coupled with staining procedures and, along with SEM were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the ultrastructure of plant leaf cuticles. Leaf cryosections of Triticum aestivum (wheat), Zea mays (maize), and Lupinus angustifolius (lupin) were stained with either fat-soluble azo stain Sudan IV or fluorescent, diarylmethane Auramine O and were observed under confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). For all the plant species tested, the cuticle on the leaf surfaces could be clearly resolved in many cases into cuticular proper (CP), external cuticular layer (ECL), and internal cuticular layer (ICL). Novel image data analysis procedures for quantifying the epicuticular wax micromorphology were developed, and epicuticular waxes of L. angustifolius were described here for the first time. Together, application of a multifaceted approach involving the use of a range of techniques to study the plant cuticle has led to a better understanding of cuticular structure and provides new insights into leaf surface architecture.

  5. Molecular characterization and confocal laser scanning microscopic study of Pygidiopsis macrostomum (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) parasites of guppies Poecilia vivipara.

    PubMed

    Borges, J N; Costa, V S; Mantovani, C; Barros, E; Santos, E G N; Mafra, C L; Santos, C P

    2017-02-01

    Pygidiopsis macrostomum and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) pindoramensis (Digenea: Heterophyidae) parasitize guppies as intermediate hosts and, respectively, fish-eating mammals or birds as definitive hosts. Heterophyids have zoonotic potential, and molecular studies associated with morphological and ecological aspects have helped to clarify their taxonomy and phylogeny. Poecilia vivipara naturally parasitized by metacercariae of both species (100% prevalence) exhibit no external signs of parasitism. In this work, four new sequences of P. macrostomum (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA and ITS2 rDNA) and one new sequence of A. (P.) pindoramensis (mtDNA cox-1) are presented. Phylogeny reconstructions linked P. macrostomum to other heterophyids, but the separation of the Heterophyidae and Opisthorchiidae remains unclear. Additionally, we used indirect immunocytochemistry and the phalloidin-fluorescence techniques allied with confocal laser scanning microscopy to describe muscular and neuronal structures of P. macrostomum. A complex arrangement of muscular fibres is associated with the tegument, suckers, gut and reproductive system. Radial fibres around the ventral sucker are thick, branched and extend to the body wall. High-resolution confocal imaging revealed a typical digenean muscular arrangement and important heterophyid morphological traits. These data will support future control measures to reduce the parasitism in guppies reared in fish farming systems, especially for aquarium and experimental purposes.

  6. Cutaneous penetration of the topically applied photosensitizer Pc 4 as detected by intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alex Y; Myers, Jay T; Barkauskas, Deborah; Howell, Scott J; Oleinick, Nancy L; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D; Lam, Minh

    2012-09-01

    The fundamental mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced cell death has been characterized, but early critical PDT events in vivo remain incompletely defined. With the recent development in advanced fluorescence imaging modalities, such as intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), researchers are now able to investigate and visualize biological processes with high resolution in real time. This powerful imaging technology allows deep tissue visualization with single-cell resolution, thus providing dynamic information on the 3-dimensional architectural makeup of the tissue. The main goal of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a topically applied photosensitizer, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, into the skin of live animals and to assess the effective absorption of Pc 4 through the skin barrier. Our 2P-LSM images indicate that Pc 4 penetrates to the epidermal/dermal junction of mouse skin. The data also indicate that the degree of Pc 4 absorption is dose dependent. These findings represent initial steps that may help in improving the clinical utilization of topical Pc 4-PDT.

  7. Bag-of-visual-phrases and hierarchical deep models for traffic sign detection and recognition in mobile laser scanning data