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Sample records for histopathology tissue samples

  1. A low dimensional entropy-based descriptor of several tissues in skin cancer histopathology samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Pablo; Corredor, Germán.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The use of low-level visual features to assign high level labels in datasets of histopathology images is a possible solution to the problems derived from manual labeling by experts. However, in many cases, the visual cues are not enough. In this article we propose the use of features derived exclusively from the spatial distribution of the cell nuclei. These features are calculated using the weight of k-nn graphs constructed from the distances between cells. Results show that there are k values with enhanced discriminatory power, especially when comparing cancerous and non-cancerous tissue.

  2. THz imaging of histo-pathological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Pascal; Schmalstieg, K.; Koch, Martin; Rehberg, E.; Vauti, F.; Donhuijsen, K.

    2001-10-01

    We investigate the potential of THz imaging for the examination of histo-pathological samples. Data obtained on a pig larynx and on a human liver containing cancerous tissue are presented. Different types of tissue are clearly resolved due to their distinct spectral absorption characteristics or due to a density dependent THz transmission.

  3. Histopathological evaluation of tissue undergoing thermal insult

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Minal; Bonde, Dushyant; Patil, Swati; Gawande, Madhuri; Hande, Alka; Jain, Deepali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Thermal insult is the major cause of thermal injury or death and in case of death due to thermal injury the body often has to be recovered from the site. Histologically, one can predict whether the victim was alive or dead when the fire was on going. However, determination of probable cause of thermal insult to which victim subjected to be difficult when the victim's body is found somewhere else from the crime scene or accident site or found alone. Hence, histopathological evaluation of the tissue which has undergone thermal insult in such conditions could help to place evidence in front of law officials, regarding probable condition, or scenario at time of burn of victim. Aims: Keeping this as a criteria in this study we aim to evaluate burnt tissue histopathologically, that undergone various degree of thermal insult, which simulates various real life scenario for mortality in burn cases. Settings and Design: We evaluate the changes in hematoxylin and eosin staining pattern of tissue which has undergone thermal insult compared to normal tissue and also the progressive changes in staining pattern, architectural, and cellular details. Materials and Methods: Samples were taken from the patients, in various surgical procedures. Each sample was cut into five parts with close margins so that each burnt tissue is evaluated for same field or region. The tissue that obtained was immediately subjected to varying degree of temperature over a specific period so as to simulate the various real-life condition. Then the tissues were fixed, processed, and stained with routine H and E staining. The processed slides of tissue were examined under the microscope, and the staining, and architectural changes were evaluated and described. Results: Results show that there was a progressive changes in the architectural pattern of the epithelium and connective tissue showing cleft formation and vacuolization, staining pattern also shows mixing of stains progressively as the

  4. Identifying HIV infection in diagnostic histopathology tissue samples--the role of HIV-1 p24 immunohistochemistry in identifying clinically unsuspected HIV infection: a 3-year analysis.

    PubMed

    Moonim, Mufaddal T; Alarcon, Lida; Freeman, Janet; Mahadeva, Ula; van der Walt, Jon D; Lucas, Sebastian B

    2010-03-01

    Because of the clinical difficulty in identifying the early stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the histopathologist often has to consider the diagnosis of HIV in tissue samples from patients with no previous suspicion of HIV infection. The aim was to investigate the practicality and utility of routine HIV-1 p24 immunohistochemistry on tissue samples received at a London histopathology laboratory. Over a 3-year period, HIV-1 p24 was evaluated immunohistochemically on 123 cases. Of these, 37 (30%) showed positive expression of p24 in lesional follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Of these 37 cases, 11 were not clinically suspected to be HIV+ and had no prior serological evidence of HIV infection. These cases represented lymph node biopsies, tonsillar and nasopharyngeal biopsies and a parotid excision. In addition to expression on FDCs, in 22 cases (60%), p24 also highlighted mononuclear cells and macrophages. p24 was also useful in confirming the presence of HIV in lymphoid tissue in non-lymphoid organs such as the lung, anus, salivary gland and brain. Immunonegativity occurred in occasional known HIV+ cases, probably related to treatment or tissue processing. This study confirms the usefulness of this technique in detecting unsuspected HIV infection in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs on histopathological material and should be part of routine evaluation of lymph nodes and lymphoid tissue in other organs if morphological or clinical features suggest HIV infection.

  5. Effect of substrate choice and tissue type on tissue preparation for spectral histopathology by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fullwood, Leanne M; Griffiths, Dave; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Timothy; Lea, Robert W; Davis, Charles; Bonnier, Franck; Byrne, Hugh J; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-01-21

    Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive, non-invasive, rapid and economical technique which has the potential to be an excellent method for the diagnosis of cancer and understanding disease progression through retrospective studies of archived tissue samples. Historically, biobanks are generally comprised of formalin fixed paraffin preserved tissue and as a result these specimens are often used in spectroscopic research. Tissue in this state has to be dewaxed prior to Raman analysis to reduce paraffin contributions in the spectra. However, although the procedures are derived from histopathological clinical practice, the efficacy of the dewaxing procedures that are currently employed is questionable. Ineffective removal of paraffin results in corruption of the spectra and previous experiments have shown that the efficacy can depend on the dewaxing medium and processing time. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of commonly used spectroscopic substrates (CaF2, Spectrosil quartz and low-E slides) and the influence of different histological tissue types (normal, cancerous and metastatic) on tissue preparation and to assess their use for spectral histopathology. Results show that CaF2 followed by Spectrosil contribute the least to the spectral background. However, both substrates retain paraffin after dewaxing. Low-E substrates, which exhibit the most intense spectral background, do not retain wax and resulting spectra are not affected by paraffin peaks. We also show a disparity in paraffin retention depending upon the histological identity of the tissue with abnormal tissue retaining more paraffin than normal.

  6. Histopathological findings, phenotyping of inflammatory cells, and expression of markers of nitritative injury in joint tissue samples from calves after vaccination and intraarticular challenge with Mycoplasma bovis strain 1067

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of caseonecrotic lesions developing in lungs and joints of calves infected with Mycoplasma bovis is not clear and attempts to prevent M. bovis-induced disease by vaccines have been largely unsuccessful. In this investigation, joint samples from 4 calves, i.e. 2 vaccinated and 2 non-vaccinated, of a vaccination experiment with intraarticular challenge were examined. The aim was to characterize the histopathological findings, the phenotypes of inflammatory cells, the expression of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II) molecules, and the expression of markers for nitritative stress, i.e. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine (NT), in synovial membrane samples from these calves. Furthermore, the samples were examined for M. bovis antigens including variable surface protein (Vsp) antigens and M. bovis organisms by cultivation techniques. Results The inoculated joints of all 4 calves had caseonecrotic and inflammatory lesions. Necrotic foci were demarcated by phagocytic cells, i.e. macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes, and by T and B lymphocytes. The presence of M. bovis antigens in necrotic tissue lesions was associated with expression of iNOS and NT by macrophages. Only single macrophages demarcating the necrotic foci were positive for MHC class II. Microbiological results revealed that M. bovis had spread to approximately 27% of the non-inoculated joints. Differences in extent or severity between the lesions in samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated animals were not seen. Conclusions The results suggest that nitritative injury, as in pneumonic lung tissue of M. bovis-infected calves, is involved in the development of caseonecrotic joint lesions. Only single macrophages were positive for MHC class II indicating down-regulation of antigen-presenting mechanisms possibly caused by local production of iNOS and NO by infiltrating macrophages. PMID:25162202

  7. Magnetic resonance microscopy at 14 Tesla and correlative histopathology of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  9. The mandate for a proper preservation in histopathological tissues.

    PubMed

    Comănescu, Maria; Arsene, D; Ardeleanu, Carmen; Bussolati, G

    2012-01-01

    A sequence of technically reproducible procedures is mandatory to guarantee a proper preservation of tissues and to build up the basis for sound diagnoses. However, while the goal of these procedures was, until recently, to assure only structural (histological and cytological) preservation, an appropriate preservation of antigenic properties and of nucleic acid integrity is now additionally requested, in order to permit pathologists to provide the biological information necessary for the adoption of personalized therapies. The present review analyses the sequence of technical steps open to critical variations. Passages such as dehydration, paraffin embedding, sectioning and staining are relatively well standardized and allow adoption of dedicated (automatic) apparatuses, while other pre-analytical steps, i.e. time and modalities of transfer of surgical specimens from the surgical theatre to the pathology laboratory (s.c. "ischemia time") and the type and length of fixation are not standardized and are a potential cause of discrepancies in diagnostic results. Our group is involved in European-funded projects tackling these problems with the concrete objective of implementing a model of effective tumors investigations by high performance genetic and molecular methodologies. The problem of the discrepant quality level of histopathological and cytological preparations involved five European countries and exploiting the potential of "virtual slide technology". Concrete issues, techniques and pitfalls, as well as proposed guidelines for processing the tissues are shown in this presentation.

  10. Shaved margin histopathology and imprint cytology for assessment of excision in canine mast cell tumors and soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Milovancev, Milan; Townsend, Kaitlin L; Gorman, Elena; Bracha, Shay; Curran, Katie; Russell, Duncan S

    2017-08-01

    To determine the feasibility and agreement of margin assessment by imprint cytology, shaved margin histopathology, and radial section histopathology in canine cutaneous and subcutaneous mast cell tumors (MCT) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Prospective clinical study. Three hundred and forty margins from 72 excised tumors (52 MCT and 20 STS) in 54 client-owned dogs. Imprint cytology samples were acquired by pressing glass slides to the cut surgical margin of the freshly excised surgical specimen. Shaved margin samples were obtained from the patient wound bed using a scalpel immediately prior to closure. Radial section histopathology was performed as part of routine histopathologic processing. All margins were assessed as either positive or negative for presence of tumor cells at the surgical margin. Agreement among methods was calculated using Fleiss Kappa coefficients and an association of method, margin direction, and tumor type with positive margin status was evaluated using a general linear mixed model. Positive margin detection rates differed for MCT (imprint cytology 21%, radial section histopathology 9%, and shaved margin histopathology 3%; P < .0001) but not for STS. Intermethod agreement was poor (Fleiss Kappa = 0.051 and 0.176 for MCT and STS, respectively). Margin direction did not influence margin status for either tumor type. Imprint cytology and shaved margin histopathology are feasible, but their results are frequently disparate from routine radial section histopathology. Future studies are needed to evaluate the correlation of each method with local recurrence rates. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Histopathological changes in supraspinous ligaments, ligamentum flava and paraspinal muscle tissues of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Xu, Hongfei; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chu, Tongwei; Zhou, Yue

    2016-04-01

    To examine the histopathological changes in spinal tissues of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Tissue samples from 10 AS patients and 10 control subjects were obtained. Hematoxylin and eosin, picrosirius, Masson and van Gieson stainings were utilized to determine the pathological changes in tissues. Ultrastructural alterations were examined by electronic microscopy. Proteoglycan levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that the density of collagen fibrils was reduced in the supraspinous ligaments of AS tissue and fibrils were loosely and irregularly organized as compared to a regular distribution of collagen fibrils in controls. In ligamentum flava from AS patients, activated fibroblasts with enlarged nuclei were detected, while the number of elastic fibers was greatly decreased. Paraspinal muscle tissues of AS patients exhibited increased collagen fibril accumulation and atrophy. Significantly decreased proteoglycan and elevated MMP-3 levels were found in supraspinous ligament samples from AS patients (P < 0.01). Additionally, the levels of TGF-β1 in ligamentum flava and paraspinal muscle tissues of AS patients were increased (P < 0.01). The expression of TNF-α was also upregulated in the ligamentum flavum (P < 0.01), with no significant difference in the paraspinal muscle between control and AS patients (P > 0.05). Our findings reveal histopathological changes that occur in certain spinal tissues of AS patients and suggest that increased levels of MMP-3 and TGF-β1 may contribute to the pathogenesis of AS. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases published by Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Revisiting peri-implant soft tissuehistopathological study of the peri-implant soft tissue

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eduarda; Félix, Sérgio; Rodriguez-Archilla, Alberto; Oliveira, Pedro; Martins dos Santos, José

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implant soft tissues are essential for osseointegration. The peri-implant mucosa may lack vascular supply, and histological observation, even without plaque, shows the presence of inflammatory cells. The objectives of this study were to assess the histopathological changes of the epithelium and connective tissue around the implant. Twenty patients of both genders were studied. Twelve weeks after implant placement, fragments of peri-implant gingival sulcus were harvested and processed for light microscopy. Group I (10): without clinical inflammatory signs (control); Group II (10): with clinical inflammatory signs. Histopathological parameters were analyzed and classified in 3 grades: mild, moderate or severe (grade 1, 2 or 3). Control group showed only slight changes, grade 1. In group II we found edema with moderate to severe cellular and nuclear changes. There are more women than men with all grades of inflammation. All patients with moderate edema are male and all patients with severe edema are female. A significant association (p=0.007) exists between these two variables. Significant differences were found when comparing the degree of inflammation with nuclear alterations (p=0.001) and the same results when comparing the degree of edema and nuclear changes (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that clinical examination can be used, with a small margin of error, to monitor and control the state of the peri-implant mucosa. In clinics the predisposition of female patients to greater degree of edema and inflammation should be accounted for. PMID:24551281

  14. [Comments on histopathology examinations in forensic medicine -- the importance, indications and basic principles of preserving the tissues].

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Zbigniew; Pieśniak, Dorota

    2007-01-01

    Histopathology examinations and their usefulness in postmortem diagnosis and medico-legal expertise have always been regarded extremely important by the Faculty of the Chair and Department of Forensic Medicine at the Medical University of Gdansk. The authors postulate acceptance of indication criteria for histopathology examination in forensic autopsies and propose rules for collecting tissue samples from internal organs and the placenta. They also remind the readers of the principles of proceeding with the preserved material. The present paper may be helpful for doctors other than forensic pathologists, who perform autopsies in institutions other than university departments of forensic medicine.

  15. Large scale tissue histopathology image classification, segmentation, and visualization via deep convolutional activation features.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Zhipeng; Wang, Liang-Bo; Ai, Yuqing; Zhang, Fang; Lai, Maode; Chang, Eric I-Chao

    2017-05-26

    Histopathology image analysis is a gold standard for cancer recognition and diagnosis. Automatic analysis of histopathology images can help pathologists diagnose tumor and cancer subtypes, alleviating the workload of pathologists. There are two basic types of tasks in digital histopathology image analysis: image classification and image segmentation. Typical problems with histopathology images that hamper automatic analysis include complex clinical representations, limited quantities of training images in a dataset, and the extremely large size of singular images (usually up to gigapixels). The property of extremely large size for a single image also makes a histopathology image dataset be considered large-scale, even if the number of images in the dataset is limited. In this paper, we propose leveraging deep convolutional neural network (CNN) activation features to perform classification, segmentation and visualization in large-scale tissue histopathology images. Our framework transfers features extracted from CNNs trained by a large natural image database, ImageNet, to histopathology images. We also explore the characteristics of CNN features by visualizing the response of individual neuron components in the last hidden layer. Some of these characteristics reveal biological insights that have been verified by pathologists. According to our experiments, the framework proposed has shown state-of-the-art performance on a brain tumor dataset from the MICCAI 2014 Brain Tumor Digital Pathology Challenge and a colon cancer histopathology image dataset. The framework proposed is a simple, efficient and effective system for histopathology image automatic analysis. We successfully transfer ImageNet knowledge as deep convolutional activation features to the classification and segmentation of histopathology images with little training data. CNN features are significantly more powerful than expert-designed features.

  16. Quality Measures in Pre-Analytical Phase of Tissue Processing: Understanding Its Value in Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shalinee; Masilamani, Suresh; Sundaram, Sandhya; Duvuru, Prathiba; Swaminathan, Rajendiran

    2016-01-01

    Quality monitoring in histopathology unit is categorized into three phases, pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical, to cover various steps in the entire test cycle. Review of literature on quality evaluation studies pertaining to histopathology revealed that earlier reports were mainly focused on analytical aspects with limited studies on assessment of pre-analytical phase. Pre-analytical phase encompasses several processing steps and handling of specimen/sample by multiple individuals, thus allowing enough scope for errors. Due to its critical nature and limited studies in the past to assess quality in pre-analytical phase, it deserves more attention. This study was undertaken to analyse and assess the quality parameters in pre-analytical phase in a histopathology laboratory. This was a retrospective study done on pre-analytical parameters in histopathology laboratory of a tertiary care centre on 18,626 tissue specimens received in 34 months. Registers and records were checked for efficiency and errors for pre-analytical quality variables: specimen identification, specimen in appropriate fixatives, lost specimens, daily internal quality control performance on staining, performance in inter-laboratory quality assessment program {External quality assurance program (EQAS)} and evaluation of internal non-conformities (NC) for other errors. The study revealed incorrect specimen labelling in 0.04%, 0.01% and 0.01% in 2007, 2008 and 2009 respectively. About 0.04%, 0.07% and 0.18% specimens were not sent in fixatives in 2007, 2008 and 2009 respectively. There was no incidence of specimen lost. A total of 113 non-conformities were identified out of which 92.9% belonged to the pre-analytical phase. The predominant NC (any deviation from normal standard which may generate an error and result in compromising with quality standards) identified was wrong labelling of slides. Performance in EQAS for pre-analytical phase was satisfactory in 6 of 9 cycles. A low incidence

  17. Histopathologic changes in liver and kidney tissues induced by carbaryl in Bufotes variabilis (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Çakıcı, Özlem

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate for the first time histopathologic effects of carbaryl in liver and kidney tissues of Bufotes variabilis. After 96h following exposure to carbaryl (low dose: 0.05, medium dose: 0.1 and high dose: 0.2mg/g), the toads were euthanized and dissected. In liver tissue, vacuolization in hepatocytes, necrosis, mononuclear cell infiltration, an increase in melanomacrophage number, enlargement of sinusoids, hemorrhage and congestion were determined in exposed toads. In kidney tissue, mononuclear cell infiltration, hypertrophied Bowman's capsule cells, deformation, vacuolization, karyolysis and necrosis of renal tubule epithelium, brush border destruction, glomerular shrinkage, hemorrhage and fibrosis were observed in carbaryl-treated groups. According to this investigation, carbaryl caused histopathologic damages in liver and kidney tissues of B. variabilis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. [Parasitological, immunohistochemical and histopathological study for Leishmania chagasi detection in splenic tissues of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Tasca, Karen Ingrid; Buzetti, Wilma Aparecida Starke; Tenorio, Michely da Silva; Paulan, Silvana de Cássia; Lima, Flávia Luna; de Queiroz, Nina Mari Gual Pimenta; Machado, Rosângela Zacarias; Oliveira, Tricia Maria Ferreira de Souza; Neves, Maria Francisca; de Noronha, Antonio Carlos Faconti; de Assis, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was a Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis--CVL study by parasitological direct examination of Leishmania (L.) chagasi (imprinting and histological), immunohistochemical test and histopathological analysis using spleen tissues from 34 dogs euthanized by the Zoonotic Disease Control Centre from Ilha Solteira, SP, Brazil. According to the clinical signs, the dogs were divided in three groups: asymptomatics (8 dogs), oligosymptomatics (17 dogs) and symptomatics (9 dogs). After the accomplishment of all diagnostic tests, 22 dogs were considered positives (64.7%) and 12 (35.3%) were negatives to CVL. From these positive dogs, 1/22 (4.5%) was asymptomatic, 12/22(54.5%) were oligosymptomatics and 8/22 (40.1%) were symptomatics. The histopathological study in spleen tissues from positive, especially symptomatic dogs, showed a diffuse chronic inflammation with thickness of capsular and trabecular regions and there was extensive morphologic alteration of the red and white pulp by the presence of abundant macrophages full with amastigotes, the granulomatous inflammatory reaction and haemorrhagic areas. The data of this work from histopathologic examination and direct microscopic visualization of L. (L.) chagasi showed that the spleen was an useful organ to collect sample tissues for CVL diagnosis. The immunostaining detected the highest number of positive dogs and were considered an important and conclusive method to be used in addition to parasitological methods for CVL, particularly in asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic dogs.

  19. The post-analytical phase of histopathology practice: Storage, retention and use of human tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kapila, Supriya Nikita; Boaz, Karen; Natarajan, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    There are several aspects to a histopathology practice besides the acquisition of biopsy specimens and histopathological diagnosis. Pathology Departments are home to an abundant source of knowledge in the form of stored specimens and slides. We attempt to highlight the importance of regulation of storage, retention, and appropriate use of human tissue material in research and ownership rights to the same. We also discuss requirement and waiver of informed consent for scientific work involving the use of such tissues, which in the absence of defined laws come under the purview of Institution Review Boards. Pathology Departments, under the binding of the parent institution, are conceded the responsibility of maintenance and retention of pathology specimens. This communication highlights some of the important aspects in human tissue material handling and research, underscoring the necessity for established regulations regarding the same. PMID:26958513

  20. The post-analytical phase of histopathology practice: Storage, retention and use of human tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Kapila, Supriya Nikita; Boaz, Karen; Natarajan, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    There are several aspects to a histopathology practice besides the acquisition of biopsy specimens and histopathological diagnosis. Pathology Departments are home to an abundant source of knowledge in the form of stored specimens and slides. We attempt to highlight the importance of regulation of storage, retention, and appropriate use of human tissue material in research and ownership rights to the same. We also discuss requirement and waiver of informed consent for scientific work involving the use of such tissues, which in the absence of defined laws come under the purview of Institution Review Boards. Pathology Departments, under the binding of the parent institution, are conceded the responsibility of maintenance and retention of pathology specimens. This communication highlights some of the important aspects in human tissue material handling and research, underscoring the necessity for established regulations regarding the same.

  1. Conventional xylene and xylene-free methods for routine histopathological preparation of tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Metgud, R; Astekar, M S; Soni, A; Naik, S; Vanishree, M

    2013-07-01

    Xylene customarily has been used as a clearing agent for routine tissue processing. Because xylene is a relatively hazardous solvent, laboratories are under pressure to seek less toxic alternatives for routine use. We prepared 30 paired soft tissue specimens for routine histopathological evaluation using conventional xylene and xylene-free methods to evaluate and compare their efficacy for fixation, processing, embedding, staining and turnaround time. All specimens were measured before and after processing. Three pathologists evaluated and scored the histological sections. Tissue shrinkage was greater when using the xylene method compared to the xylene-free method. The quality of tissue sections including tissue architecture; quality of staining; preservation of epithelial, fibrous, glandular, muscle and adipose tissue; inflammatory cells; and vascular tissue was better after using the xylene method, but differences were not statistically significant. Xylene-free method produced adequate results that nearly equaled the xylene method. Added advantages included cost effectiveness, better working atmosphere and decreased toxicity.

  2. Direct comparison between confocal and multiphoton microscopy for rapid histopathological evaluation of unfixed human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Tadayuki; Giacomelli, Michael G.; Cahill, Lucas C.; Schmolze, Daniel B.; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid histopathological examination of surgical specimen margins using fluorescence microscopy during breast conservation therapy has the potential to reduce the rate of positive margins on postoperative histopathology and the need for repeat surgeries. To assess the suitability of imaging modalities, we perform a direct comparison between confocal fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy for imaging unfixed tissue and compare to paraffin-embedded histology. An imaging protocol including dual channel detection of two contrast agents to implement virtual hematoxylin and eosin images is introduced that provides high quality imaging under both one and two photon excitation. Corresponding images of unfixed human breast tissue show that both confocal and multiphoton microscopy can reproduce the appearance of conventional histology without the need for physical sectioning. We further compare normal breast tissue and invasive cancer specimens imaged at multiple magnifications, and assess the effects of photobleaching for both modalities using the staining protocol. The results demonstrate that confocal fluorescence microscopy is a promising and cost-effective alternative to multiphoton microscopy for rapid histopathological evaluation of ex vivo breast tissue.

  3. Metabolic, pathologic, and genetic analysis of prostate tissues: quantitative evaluation of histopathologic and mRNA integrity after HR-MAS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carissa F; Kurhanewicz, John; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Simko, Jeffry P; Keshari, Kayvan R; Gbegnon, Akpene; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Federman, Scot; Shinohara, Katsuto; Carroll, Peter R; Haqq, Christopher M; Swanson, Mark G

    2010-05-01

    The impact of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) spectroscopy on the histopathologic and mRNA integrity of human prostate tissues was evaluated. Forty prostate tissues were harvested at transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy (n = 20) or radical prostatectomy surgery (n = 20), snap-frozen on dry ice, and stored at -80°C until use. Twenty-one samples (n = 11 biopsy, n = 10 surgical) underwent HR-MAS spectroscopy prior to histopathologic and cDNA microarray analysis, while 19 control samples (n = 9 biopsy, n = 10 surgical) underwent only histopathologic and microarray analysis. Frozen tissues were sectioned at 14-µm intervals and placed on individual histopathology slides. Every 8th slide was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and used to target areas of predominantly epithelial tissue on the remaining slides for mRNA integrity and cDNA microarray analysis. Histopathologic integrity was graded from 1 (best) to 5 (worst) by two 'blinded' pathologists. Histopathologic integrity scores were not significantly different for post-surgical tissues (HR-MAS vs controls); however, one pathologist's scores were significantly lower for biopsy tissues following HR-MAS while the other pathologist's scores were not. mRNA integrity assays were performed using an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer and the electrophoretic traces were scored with an RNA integrity number (RIN) from 1 (degraded) to 10 (intact). RIN scores were not significantly different for surgical tissues, but were significantly lower for biopsy tissues following HR-MAS spectroscopy. The isolated mRNA then underwent two rounds of amplification, conversion to cDNA, coupling to Cy3 and Cy5 dyes, microarray hybridization, imaging, and analysis. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) identified no significantly over- or under-expressed genes, including 14 housekeeping genes, between HR-MAS and control samples of surgical and biopsy tissues (5% false discovery rate). This study

  4. Metabolic, pathologic, and genetic analysis of prostate tissues: quantitative evaluation of histopathologic and mRNA integrity after HR-MAS spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carissa F.; Kurhanewicz, John; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Simko, Jeffry P.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gbegnon, Akpene; Santos, Romelyn DeLos; Federman, Scot; Shinohara, Katsuto; Carroll, Peter R.; Haqq, Christopher M.; Swanson, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) spectroscopy on the histopathologic and mRNA integrity of human prostate tissues was evaluated. Forty prostate tissues were harvested at transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy (n =20) or radical prostatectomy surgery (n =20), snap-frozen on dry ice, and stored at −80°C until use. Twenty-one samples (n =11 biopsy, n =10 surgical) underwent HR-MAS spectroscopy prior to histopathologic and cDNA microarray analysis, while 19 control samples (n =9 biopsy, n =10 surgical) underwent only histopathologic and microarray analysis. Frozen tissues were sectioned at 14-μm intervals and placed on individual histopathology slides. Every 8th slide was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and used to target areas of predominantly epithelial tissue on the remaining slides for mRNA integrity and cDNA microarray analysis. Histopathologic integrity was graded from 1 (best) to 5 (worst) by two ‘blinded’ pathologists. Histopathologic integrity scores were not significantly different for post-surgical tissues (HR-MAS vs controls); however, one pathologist’s scores were significantly lower for biopsy tissues following HR-MAS while the other pathologist’s scores were not. mRNA integrity assays were performed using an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer and the electrophoretic traces were scored with an RNA integrity number (RIN) from 1 (degraded) to 10 (intact). RIN scores were not significantly different for surgical tissues, but were significantly lower for biopsy tissues following HR-MAS spectroscopy. The isolated mRNA then underwent two rounds of amplification, conversion to cDNA, coupling to Cy3 and Cy5 dyes, microarray hybridization, imaging, and analysis. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) identified no significantly over- or under-expressed genes, including 14 housekeeping genes, between HR-MAS and control samples of surgical and biopsy tissues (5% false discovery rate). This study demonstrates that

  5. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV: A Case With Histopathologic Findings in First-Trimester Placental Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B; Lund, Allan M

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies.

  6. Hyperthermic tissue sealing devices: a proposed histopathologic protocol for standardizing the evaluation of thermally sealed vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Ryan H.; Vos, Jeffrey A.; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermic tissue sealing devices are advancing modern laparoscopy and other minimally invasive surgical approaches. Histopathologic evaluation of thermally sealed vessels can provide important information on their associated tissue effects and reactions. However, a standardized systematic approach has not been historically used in the literature. This paper proposes a histologic approach for the analysis of thermally sealed vessels and their basis of hemostasis, including thermal tissue changes, healing, and thrombosis. Histologic evaluation during the first week (Days 3-7) can assess the seal's primary tissue properties. These parameters include the thermal seal's length, architecture, tissue layers involved, adventitial collagen denaturation length, entrapped vapor or blood pockets, tissue homogenization and thermal tissue injury zones. While the architectural features can be assessed in Day 0-3 specimens, the latter thermal injury zones are essentially not assessable in Day 0-3 specimens. Day 14 specimens can provide information on the early healing response to the sealed vessel. Day 30 and longer specimens can be used to evaluate the seal's healing reactions. Assessment of the healing response should include seal site inflammation, granulation tissue, necrosis resorption, fibroproliferative scar healing, and thrombus organization. In order to accurately evaluate these parameters, careful specimen orientation, embedding and multiple histologic sections across the entire seal width are required. When appropriate in vivo post-treatment times are used, thermal vessel seals can be evaluated with routine light microscopy and common histologic staining methods.

  7. 7-tesla MR imaging of non-melanoma skin cancer samples: correlation with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Sébastien; Leclerc, Olga; Tremblay, Luc; Rizcallah, Edmond; Croteau, Frédéric; Orfali, Charles; Lepage, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The aims of this study were to compare in vitro magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of keratinocytic skin cancer assessed by a 7-tesla (T) MRI with histopathology, and to describe MRI features of skin tumors. This prospective study included 30 skin tumors treated by surgery. MR images of skin samples were acquired on a 7-T MR scanner using a fast spin-echo T(2)-weighted and an isotropic 3D gradient-echo T(1)-weighted sequence. Length, width, Breslow index and margins of the lesions were measured. The presence or absence of the following was noted: healthy margins, ulceration of the dermis, in situ lesions, superficial and deep dermis involvement, subcutaneous involvement, superficial and intratumoral keratin. MR results were compared to histopathology. Interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was very good for the evaluation of the width (ICC = 0.86) and Breslow index (ICC = 0.87). The ICC was good for the evaluation of the margins (ICC = 0.70) but for length, ICC was lower (ICC = 0.67). Mean bias between MRI and histopathology was inferior to 1 mm for width, Breslow index and margin. In vitro 7-T MRI of keratinocytic skin cancer allows delineation of lesions with good correlation with histopathology. After in vivo confirmation it could have a diagnostic role regarding the delineation of surgical margins but its actual limitations prevent its practical adoption at this time. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Alteration of the Total Nuclear DNA Ploidy in Different Histopathological Liver Tissues Negative and Positive for HCV RNA.

    PubMed

    Tabll, Ashraf A; Kishta, Sara S; Farrag, Abdel Razik H; El Din, Noha G Bader; Mohamed, Mervat S; El Abd, Yasmine S; El Esawy, Basem H; Kishta, Sobhy A; Dawood, Reham M; Ismail, Allaa; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated carcinogenesis are unknown. We aim to investigate the alteration of the total nuclear DNA content (ploidy) in different histopathological liver tissues infected with HCV and their relation to the seropositivity of HCV RNA. Blood and liver tissues were collected from 26 patients. Diagnosis was carried out according to clinical and pathological examinations by specialized physicians. HCV RNA was detected in patients' sera and tissue samples by RT-PCR. To examine nuclear DNA ploidy, liver tissues were stained with blue Fulgen using the image analysis techniques. Finally, the patients' DNA content was examined by histochemical analysis depending on the optical density of DNA from liver biopsies using the grey image menu in each specimen. The HCV RT-PCR results demonstrated that 13/26 (50%) patients had detectable HCV RNA in their sera samples while 18/26 (69%) had detectable HCV RNA in liver tissues. The DNA content from those patients measured by image cytometry showed a high level of alteration of nuclear DNA ploidy and proliferation in liver tissues with HCC, less alteration of nuclear DNA ploidy in cirrhotic patients, and least proliferation nearly normal in liver fibrosis patients. Moreover, the results of histochemical analysis confirmed the DNA image cytometry results and showed that positive HCV RNA liver tissues had more DNA ploidy than negative HCV RNA liver tissues with statistical significance (p-value < 0.05). HCV positive liver tissue had alterations in DNA content (ploidy) which may lead to liver disease progression, malignant transformation of the liver cells and development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Histopathology effects of nickel nanoparticles on lungs, liver, and spleen tissues in male mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, Marziyeh; Ziaee Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh

    2014-09-01

    Because of the classification of the nickel compounds as carcinogenic substances, there is a need for in vivo tests to nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) for observing their effects on health experimentally. Spherical NiNPs with 10 nm in diameter and 75 ppm concentration were applied for investigating their toxicities within male albino mice as an in vivo model. We randomly made sham group, control group, and 75 ppm group (with five animals in each group). Then, the nanoparticles were injected into mice intraperitonealy for 7 days and after that their lungs, liver, and spleen were removed for histopathological observations. At the end of the test, section microscopic observations of liver, spleen, and lung in sham and control groups showed normal tissues but these tissues underwent significant abnormal effects in 75 ppm group. NiNPs can cause undesirable effects in lungs, liver, and spleen tissues with same condition of this study.

  10. Segmentation of epidermal tissue with histopathological damage in images of haematoxylin and eosin stained human skin.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Juliana M; Wang, Xiao N; Dickinson, Anne; O'Malley, Chris J; Martin, Elaine B

    2014-02-12

    Digital image analysis has the potential to address issues surrounding traditional histological techniques including a lack of objectivity and high variability, through the application of quantitative analysis. A key initial step in image analysis is the identification of regions of interest. A widely applied methodology is that of segmentation. This paper proposes the application of image analysis techniques to segment skin tissue with varying degrees of histopathological damage. The segmentation of human tissue is challenging as a consequence of the complexity of the tissue structures and inconsistencies in tissue preparation, hence there is a need for a new robust method with the capability to handle the additional challenges materialising from histopathological damage. A new algorithm has been developed which combines enhanced colour information, created following a transformation to the L*a*b* colourspace, with general image intensity information. A colour normalisation step is included to enhance the algorithm's robustness to variations in the lighting and staining of the input images. The resulting optimised image is subjected to thresholding and the segmentation is fine-tuned using a combination of morphological processing and object classification rules. The segmentation algorithm was tested on 40 digital images of haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) stained skin biopsies. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the algorithmic procedure were assessed through the comparison of the proposed methodology against manual methods. Experimental results show the proposed fully automated methodology segments the epidermis with a mean specificity of 97.7%, a mean sensitivity of 89.4% and a mean accuracy of 96.5%. When a simple user interaction step is included, the specificity increases to 98.0%, the sensitivity to 91.0% and the accuracy to 96.8%. The algorithm segments effectively for different severities of tissue damage. Epidermal segmentation is a crucial first step in

  11. Segmentation of epidermal tissue with histopathological damage in images of haematoxylin and eosin stained human skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Digital image analysis has the potential to address issues surrounding traditional histological techniques including a lack of objectivity and high variability, through the application of quantitative analysis. A key initial step in image analysis is the identification of regions of interest. A widely applied methodology is that of segmentation. This paper proposes the application of image analysis techniques to segment skin tissue with varying degrees of histopathological damage. The segmentation of human tissue is challenging as a consequence of the complexity of the tissue structures and inconsistencies in tissue preparation, hence there is a need for a new robust method with the capability to handle the additional challenges materialising from histopathological damage. Methods A new algorithm has been developed which combines enhanced colour information, created following a transformation to the L*a*b* colourspace, with general image intensity information. A colour normalisation step is included to enhance the algorithm’s robustness to variations in the lighting and staining of the input images. The resulting optimised image is subjected to thresholding and the segmentation is fine-tuned using a combination of morphological processing and object classification rules. The segmentation algorithm was tested on 40 digital images of haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) stained skin biopsies. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the algorithmic procedure were assessed through the comparison of the proposed methodology against manual methods. Results Experimental results show the proposed fully automated methodology segments the epidermis with a mean specificity of 97.7%, a mean sensitivity of 89.4% and a mean accuracy of 96.5%. When a simple user interaction step is included, the specificity increases to 98.0%, the sensitivity to 91.0% and the accuracy to 96.8%. The algorithm segments effectively for different severities of tissue damage. Conclusions Epidermal

  12. Effects of avermectin on heat shock proteins expression and histopathology in spleen tissues of pigeon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ci; Wang, Xian-Song; Xu, Zhe; Li, Ming; Zhang, Zi-Wei; Min, Ya-Hong; Khoso, Pervez Ahmed; Li, Shu

    2014-12-05

    Avermectin (AVM) is the active component of some insecticidal and nematicidal product used in agriculture and veterinary medicine for the prevention of parasitic diseases. Residues of AVM in environment have toxic effects on non-target aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are commonly used by environmental toxicologists as biochemical markers of exposure to various chemical and other stressors. The objective of this study was to investigate whether sub-chronic AVM exposure would alter the levels of stress proteins, Hsps in the pigeon spleen after 30, 60 and 90days. Our results showed that Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90, and their corresponding messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptions (as well as Hsp30) significantly elevated, meanwhile, obviously histopathological changes were not observed in pigeons spleens after early AVM exposure. Then the expression of Hsps relatively decreased and obvious histopathological damages occurred in the spleen tissues with continued AVM exposure. So we suggest that the elevations of Hsps can be as a part of protective mechanism to reduce cellular damage, and important markers to help assess the toxicity induced by AVM. The reduction of Hsps in spleen implies that the tissues are damaged by long-term and excessive AVM exposure. Thus, the information presented in this study is believed to be helpful in supplementing data for further AVM toxicity study.

  13. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings in lymphoid tissues of the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Peña, Laura; Garcia, Pilar; Jiménez, Maria Angeles; Benito, Alberto; Pérez Alenza, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Belén

    2006-01-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is the most threatened wild feline in the world. Little is known about the diseases and pathology that affect this animal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histopathological status of the peripheral lymphoid tissues and thymus of Iberian lynxes necropsied between 1998 and 2003. Seventeen animals including females (n=8) and males (n=9), age range of 10 months to 16 years, with different causes of death were histopathologically and immunohistochemically (anti-CD3, CD79, MAC387, CD68) studied. Feline immunosuppressive virus laboratorial tests were negative. Five individuals presented neoplasia and/or tuberculosis. All animals presented some degree of both B and T cells depletion in peripheral lymphoid tissues and follicular hyalinosis in the center of depleted follicles. A viral origin of the lymphoid depletion is postulated although other causes (inbreeding, stress, toxic) are not ruled out. The loss of the effectiveness of the immune system increases the vulnerability of the critically endangered Iberian lynx to pathogens.

  14. Is tissue an issue? Current practice and opinion in Western Australia for routine histopathology on products of conception.

    PubMed

    Yap, Shui-Jean; Watts, Jared C; Faithfull, Tiffany J; Wong, Sabrina Z; Wylde, Kate L; McGurgan, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    An anonymous questionnaire-based survey was used to determine current practices and opinions of senior health professionals working in Western Australian (WA) hospitals performing gynaecological procedures, regarding the routine use of histopathology for products of conception (POC) obtained either from the surgical management of miscarriage or termination of pregnancy. Sixty-one senior health professionals completed the survey. Tissue histopathology on POC was routinely requested for miscarriage and termination of pregnancy (TOP) by 87 and 59% of respondents, respectively. Respondents listed the main reasons for requesting routine histopathology as avoidance of misdiagnosis, medico-legal and quality assurance. There were inconsistent practices among WA health professionals regarding sending POC for histopathology; 63% of gynaecology head of departments recommend the introduction of state or national guidelines for the use of histopathology in the surgical management of miscarriages or terminations of pregnancy. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Minimizing tissue damage in electroosmotic sampling

    PubMed Central

    Hamsher, Amy E.; Xu, Hongjuan; Guy, Yifat; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Electroosmotic sampling is a potentially powerful method for pulling extracellular fluid into a fused-silica capillary in contact with the surface of tissue. An electric field is created in tissue by passing current through an electrolyte-filled capillary and then through the tissue. The resulting field acts on the counter ions to the surface charges in the extracellular space to create electroosmotic fluid flow within the extracellular space of a tissue. Part of the development of this approach is to define conditions under which electroosmotic sampling minimizes damage to the tissue, in this case organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). We have assessed tissue damage by measuring fluorescence resulting from exposing sampled tissue to propidium iodide solution 16 – 24 h after sampling. Sampling has been carried out with a variety of capillary diameters, capillary tip-tissue distance, and applied voltages. Tissue damage is negligible when the power (current × potential drop) created in the tissue is less than 120 µW. In practical terms, smaller capillary IDs, lower voltages, and greater tissue to capillary distances lead to lower power. PMID:20698578

  16. A handcrafted tissue microarray for a matrix arrangement of tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, João P A; Cavalcante, José R; Furtado, Francisco N N; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C P; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Almeida, Paulo R C

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microarray (TMA) was first designed to enable more efficient immunohistochemical screening of antibodies and tissues. However, due to the high cost of commercial TMA builder instrument, such method is not affordable for many pathology laboratories. Then, methodological adaptations have been proposed in order to reduce TMA-associated cost. A manual leather puncher with an inner diameter of 2mm was used to collect a tissue sample from the donor paraffin block. The conventional TMA method was adopted as a control group. Empty paraffin recipient blocks were prepared and a standard 2-mm crochet needle was used to create 24 equidistant holes in the recipient block. Tissue cores obtained from the donor blocks were transferred to the holes in the recipient blocks and routine histopathological techniques were then performed. In this study we proposed a new approach to produce TMA recipient blocks as an alternative to the conventional TMA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue After Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, A.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation in space, including types from solar particle events (SPE's), poses serious health risks to astronauts and is especially dangerous for long duration missions. Protons are the most abundant particles in deep space and to date there is little known about the details of the negative consequences crew members will face upon exposure to them. This ongoing project involves a mouse model subjected to several minutes of proton radiation at an energy of 250 MeV and doses of 0 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy. The gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the small intestine was isolated and flash-frozen. Three specimens per dose were studied. Tissue was homogenized and RNA was isolated in order for cDNA synthesis and real-time PCR to be performed. Gene expression changes are currently being analyzed specific to mouse apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry will be used to confirm any significant changes found in the analyses. Immunohistochemistry is also being used to observe gamma H2AX staining to learn of any DNA damage that occurred as a result of proton exposure. We expect to see increased DNA damage due to proton exposure. Finally, histopathologic observation of the tissue will be completed using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes. Increased apoptosis is expected to be seen in the tissues which is typical of radiation damage. Observations will be confirmed by a pathologist.

  18. The impact on histopathology practice of new human tissue legislation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Underwood, J C E

    2006-09-01

    The undisclosed or unauthorized retention of tissue from autopsies in the UK and elsewhere has caused considerable public concern and much distress to some families. Histopathologists involved in these cases have also been discomfited. These events have exposed deficiencies in prevailing legislation, principally in the Human Tissue Act 1961 and the Coroners Rules 1984. New human tissue legislation comes into force in the UK in September 2006. The Human Tissue Act 2004 and the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006 make it unlawful to remove, store and use tissue from the dead without appropriate authority. The Human Tissue Act 2004, which does not apply in Scotland, also prohibits the removal, storage and use of tissue from living individuals for purposes specified in the Act unless appropriate consent has been obtained. The Coroners (Amendment) Rules 2005, which came into force in June 2005, introduced new arrangements for dealing with the retention of tissue from bodies undergoing coroner's autopsies. This new legislative regime is intended to create a climate in which pathologists, patients and the public can have confidence that tissue is used appropriately and, when necessary, with proper authority or valid consent. However, other than in Scotland, there may be unintended consequences arising from restrictions on archiving, for audit and diagnostic review, tissue samples from coronial autopsies.

  19. [General principles of handling tissues and organs intended for examination in histopathology - pathologists requirements for surgeons].

    PubMed

    Trnková, M

    2014-03-01

    Histopathology has continued to develop into a complex discipline of laboratory medicine in the last 30 years. Implementation of new techniques such as immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, molecular pathology and gene profiling yields a large amount of information which is used not only to establish diagnosis, but also for prediction and prognosis. The basic conditions for precision and correctness of this information which directly influence the choice of therapy and the outcome for the patient, and eventually the health and the life of the patient, are obtaining a suitable specimen and the best laboratory processing. The first step in this procedure is collection of samples, fixation and submission to the pathology laboratory - the pre-analytical phase. Knowledge of the principles of this phase and their implementation in daily practice in surgery is of main importance for the quality and quantity of information obtained. We introduce the basic rules for proper handling of different specimens depending on the use of conventional and "new" histopathology methods.

  20. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue after Proton Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    Radiation in space, especially energetic protons emitted from solar particle events (SPEs), poses serious health risks to astronauts and is especially dangerous for long duration missions. Protons are the most abundant particles in space and to date there is little known about the details of the negative consequences crew members will face upon exposure to them. To elucidate some of the possible health effects induced by protons, BALB/C mice were subjected to 250 MeV of proton radiation at doses of 0 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy. Three specimens per dose were studied. The gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard HE staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed a marked increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the dose response showed possible hyper sensitivities at low dose. Tissue of the gastrointestinal tract was also homogenized and RNA was isolated for cDNA synthesis and real-time PCR analysis for genes involved in apoptosis. Results of gene expression changes revealed consistent up or down regulation of a number of genes for all of the exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced apoptosis (e.g. Hsp90ab1). In addition, several genes were found to have significant changes in the RNA level after only the low dose (0.1 Gy), but not the high dose (1 and 2 Gy), proton exposures (e.g. Bok and Casp1), whereas some genes had expression changes only after high dose proton exposures (e.g. Tsc22d3). These findings demonstrated that apoptosis may occur in gastrointestinal tracts after even low dose proton exposures, and the different gene expression patterns between low and high dose proton irradiated mice may offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of the possible hyper

  1. Graph-based pancreatic islet segmentation for early type 2 diabetes mellitus on histopathological tissue.

    PubMed

    Floros, Xenofon; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rechsteiner, Markus P; Spinas, Giatgen; Moch, Holger; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that in 2010 more than 220 million people will be affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Early evidence indicates that specific markers for alpha and beta cells in pancreatic islets of Langerhans can be used for early T2DM diagnosis. Currently, the analysis of such histological tissues is manually performed by trained pathologists using a light microscope. To objectify classification results and to reduce the processing time of histological tissues, an automated computational pathology framework for segmentation of pancreatic islets from histopathological fluorescence images is proposed. Due to high variability in the staining intensities for alpha and beta cells, classical medical imaging approaches fail in this scenario. The main contribution of this paper consists of a novel graph-based segmentation approach based on cell nuclei detection with randomized tree ensembles. The algorithm is trained via a cross validation scheme on a ground truth set of islet images manually segmented by 4 expert pathologists. Test errors obtained from the cross validation procedure demonstrate that the graph-based computational pathology analysis proposed is performing competitively to the expert pathologists while outperforming a baseline morphological approach.

  2. A survey of spontaneous occurrence of ochratoxin A residues in chicken tissues and concurrence with histopathological changes in liver and kidneys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milicevic, Dragan; Jovanovic, Milijan; Matekalosverak, Vesna; Radicevic, Tatjana; Petrovic, Milan M.; Lilic, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Toxicological and histopathological investigations of tissues of commercially slaughtered chickens were carried out to provide a preliminary evaluation of the incidence of occurrence of ochratoxin A (OTA) in chicken sold in Serbian retail market. In addition, the etiology of nephropathies of these chickens was elucidated. The majority of these tissue samples were not found to contain measurable amounts of OTA. Moreover, the OTA levels found in analyzed tissues were generally low and there was no positive correlation between the presence of OTA and the frequency of histopathological changes. Histopathological changes such as degenerative changes in the kidneys and liver differed from the classical description of the mycotoxic nephropathy, indicating that the chicken nephropathy observed in Serbia may have a multitoxic etiology with possible synergistic effect between microorganisms and natural toxins, usually present in low concentrations. The low OTA results also suggested that chicken meat available in the retail market in Serbia are unlikely to pose any significant adverse health risk to the consumers with respect to OTA toxicity.

  3. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, V.; Giurea, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK) as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK). One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue. PMID:27766256

  4. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R.; Amoroso, M.

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm3 blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  5. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of tissues outside central nervous system in bovine rabies.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Camila C; Nakayama, Priscilla A; Nogueira, Clayton I; Mesquita, Leonardo P; Lopes, Priscila F R; Wouters, Flademir; Varaschin, Mary S; Bezerra, Pedro S

    2014-08-01

    We performed a histopathological and immunohistochemical study of tissues outside the central nervous system in 48 cases of bovine rabies confirmed by direct immunofluorescence and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the central nervous system. In the bovines of this study, mononuclear inflammation in all ganglia (trigeminal, spinal, stellate, and celiac) and adrenal medulla was observed. This injury also occurred in 85 % of neuro-pituitaries in 55 % of pars intermediate and 15 % of the pars distalis of pituitary evaluated. IHC was positive in 92.31 % of lumbar spinal ganglia, 90.9 % of trigeminal ganglia, stellate ganglia of 41.67 and 16.67 % of the celiac ganglia. One of the evaluated adrenal (1/17) showed strong immunohistochemical labeling in the cytoplasm of pheochromocytes. The pituitary IHC was positive in one case in the neurohypophysis (1/20) and in one case in the pars intermedia of the adenohypophysis (1/20). Data from this study indicate that in suspected cases of rabies, besides the complex pituitary rete mirabile and trigeminal ganglion, the evaluation of other ganglia, particularly the lumbar spinal, and adrenal may also contribute to the diagnosis and understanding of the clinical presentation and pathogenesis of the disease in bovines.

  6. Effects of topical Catalase application on dental pulp tissue: a histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alaçam, A; Tulunoglu, O; Oygür, T; Bilici, S

    2000-07-01

    recently, the role of antioxidant enzymes in wound healing and their therapeutic potential has been a subject of interest in medical sciences. However there is restricted knowledge on the results of topical application, optimal therapeutic dosage and carrier types. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wound healing response of dental pulp after direct pulp capping with an antioxidant enzyme; Catalase (C-40). three mongrel dogs were used in this study. A total of 32 perforated Cl V preparations were treated with either 0.8mg (n=16) or 1.6mg (n=16) Catalase (C-40) which was incorporated in gelatin carriers whereas 16 control teeth had carriers without Catalase. One millimeter thick Teflon disks were placed over the gelatin pellets and the cavities restored with silver amalgam. Short term and long term histopathologic reactions were evaluated after 7 and 90 days. there were no statistically significant differences between the inflammatory cell responses of control and either dosage groups of Catalase at the 7-day evaluation period. However, after 90 days, better tissue healing was observed in the teeth treated with Catalase, resulting in significant differences with the control group. it can be concluded that the results of this study encourage the topical use of antioxidant Catalase as a pulp-capping agent. However, further studies are required to determine optimal antioxidant dosages.

  7. Opening a Window into Living Tissue: Histopathologic Features of Confocal Microscopic Findings in Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Tavoloni Braga, Juliana Casagrande; de Paula Ramos Castro, Raquel; Moraes Pinto Blumetti, Tatiana Cristina; Rocha Mendes, Fernanda Berti; Arêas de Souza Lima Beltrame Ferreira, Juliana; Rezze, Gisele Gargantini

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of histopathology and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy correlation has several potential applications. Reflectance confocal microscopy can be performed in all skin tumors, and in this article, the most common histopathologic features of confocal microscopic findings in melanocytic skin tumors and nonmelanocytic skin tumors are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Histopathologic findings in uterine biopsy samples from subfertile bitches: 399 cases (1990-2005).

    PubMed

    Gifford, Angela T; Scarlett, Janet M; Schlafer, Donald H

    2014-01-15

    To determine the prevalence of various lesion types detected by histologic evaluation of uterine biopsy samples collected from subfertile bitches. Retrospective case series. 399 sexually intact bitches. Results of histologic evaluation of canine uterine biopsy samples submitted by a single veterinary practice and clinical histories of dogs from which samples were obtained were reviewed. Clinical data including age, reason for biopsy, and histopathologic findings were recorded. The prevalence of specific lesions was determined, categorized by severity and age, and statistically analyzed. Endometritis (170/399 [42.6%] cases) and cystic endometrial changes, including cystic endometrial hyperplasia (133/399 [33.3%]) were the most prevalent lesions in the study population. Eighty-nine of 170 (52.4%) cases of endometritis were characterized as chronic with predominantly lymphocytic or lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory infiltrates, 51 (30.0%) included mixed inflammatory reactions, and 30 (17.6%) were characterized as having acute inflammation with neutrophils, eosinophils, or both. Fibrosis was common (101/399 [25.3%] cases). Eosinophilic endometritis was significantly associated with a history of fetal loss during the same breeding cycle. No significant difference was found in prevalence of lesions among age groups. The high prevalence of endometritis in this population of dogs suggested that acute and chronic endometritis may be related to subfertility in bitches. The association of eosinophilic endometrial infiltrates with a history of fetal loss may be an important diagnostic finding in dogs with endometritis.

  9. Effect of dietary selenomethionine on growth performance, tissue burden, and histopathology in green and white sturgeon.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Nicola; Lee, Jang-Won; Huang, Susie S Y; Moniello, Giuseppe; Hung, Silas S O

    2014-03-01

    A comparative examination of potential differences in selenium (Se) sensitivity was conducted on two sturgeon species indigenous to the San Francisco Bay-Delta. Juvenile green (Acipenser medirostris), recently given a federally threatened status, and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were exposed to one of four nominal concentrations of dietary l-selenomethionine (SeMet) (0 (control), 50, 100, or 200 mg SeMet/kg diet) for 8 weeks. Mortality, growth performance, whole body composition, histopathology, and Se burdens of the whole body, liver, kidneys, gills, heart, and white muscle were determined every 2 to 4 weeks. Significant (p<0.05) mortality was observed in green sturgeon fed the highest SeMet diet after 2 weeks, whereas no mortality was observed in white sturgeon. Growth rates were significantly reduced in both species; however, green sturgeon was more adversely affected by the treatment. Dietary SeMet significantly affected whole body composition and most noticeably, in the decline of lipid contents in green sturgeon. Selenium accumulated significantly in all tissues relative to the control groups. After 4 and 8 weeks of exposure, marked abnormalities were observed in the kidneys and liver of both sturgeon species; however, green sturgeon was more susceptible to SeMet than white sturgeon at all dietary SeMet levels. Our results showed that a dietary Se concentration at 19.7 ± 0.6 mg Se/kg, which is in range with the reported Se concentrations of the benthic macro-vertebrate community of the San Francisco Bay, had adverse effects on both sturgeon species. However, the exposure had a more severe pathological effect on green sturgeon, suggesting that when implementing conservation measures, this federally listed threatened species should be monitored and managed independently from white sturgeon.

  10. Tissue distribution and histopathological effects of dietary methylmercury in benthic grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, E.; Audet, C.

    1995-05-01

    There is a need to test deterministic models predicting the behavior and effects of chemicals on aquatic systems by conducting experiments with more than one trophic step at a time. This approach requires the set-up of an experimental food chain in pounds or mesocosm facilities which can be used for dietary uptake studies and assessment of sublethal stress induced by contaminated food. In the course of our current research program at the INRS marine mesocosms facilities, a model benthic food chain including inter- and sub-tidal species such as the mussel (Mytilus edulis), clam (Mya arenaria), starfish (Leptasterias polaris), polychaete (Nereis virens), amphipod (Gammarus sp.), gastropod (Buccinum undatum), and fishes (Pleuronectec americanus, Myoxocephalus aenaeus), is used for testing food uptake models and for the development of sublethal toxicity tests which could be used in the environmental assessment of coastal and estuarine waters. Among these test organisms, the grubby (M. aenaeus) is a small coastal fish (12-15 cm) characterized by a broad head. The grubby is tolerant of water temperature and salinity variations and lives on a wide variety of bottom strata at low depths. The grubby is carnivorous and consumes a wide variety of molluscs and the young of many species of fish. Because of its size, its estuarine and coastal distribution and its large spectrum of prey, this species was seen as an ideal fish to fit into our experimental food chain model. This paper reports a preliminary experiment designed to measure distribution of mercury in tissues and to test the response of various histopathological and biochemical stress indicators in grubby exposed to dietary contamination by methylmercury (MeHg) for a 20-day exposure period. MeHg was chosen because it is rapidly bioaccumulated by most living organisms and its toxicity has been studied for decades in numerous aquatic ecosystems. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Furcation Perforation: Periradicular Tissue Response to Biodentine as a Repair Material by Histopathologic and Indirect Immunofluorescence Analyses.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Pieroni, Karina Alessandra Michelão Grecca; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Hernandéz-Gatón, Patrícia; Lucisano, Marília Pacífico; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo response of periradicular tissues after sealing of furcation perforations with Biodentine, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and gutta-percha by means of histopathologic and indirect immunofluorescence analyses. Thirty teeth of 3 dogs were divided into 3 groups: Biodentine (n = 14 teeth), MTA (negative control, n = 10 teeth), and gutta-percha (positive control, n = 6 teeth). After endodontic treatment, perforations were made on the center of the pulp chamber floor and filled with the materials. After 120 days, the animals were killed, and blocks containing the teeth and periradicular tissues were processed histotechnically for histopathologic semiquantitative (new mineralized tissue formation and bone resorption at the perforation site) and quantitative (thickness and area of newly formed mineralized tissue and number of inflammatory cells) analyses and RUNX2 immunofluorescence assay. Data were analyzed by χ(2), Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney test, one-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Dunn posttest (α = 0.05). MTA and Biodentine induced the formation of significantly more new mineralized tissue (P < .0001) than gutta-percha, which did not induce the formation of mineralized tissue in any case. Complete sealing of the perforations was more frequent with MTA, which formed mineralized tissue with greater thickness and area. Biodentine and MTA exhibited no bone resorption in the furcation region, fewer inflammatory cells, and greater RUNX2 immunostaining intensity than gutta-percha. Although MTA presented higher frequency of complete sealing and greater thickness and area of newly formed mineralized tissue, Biodentine also had good histopathologic results and can be considered as an adequate furcation perforation repair material. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA adduct analysis and histopathological biomarkers in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) sampled from UK estuaries.

    PubMed

    Lyons, B P; Stentiford, G D; Green, M; Bignell, J; Bateman, K; Feist, S W; Goodsir, F; Reynolds, W J; Thain, J E

    2004-08-18

    The presence of genotoxic and potentially carcinogenic chemical contaminants in the estuarine and coastal marine environment is well documented. In this study, European flounder (Platichthys flesus) sampled from eight UK estuaries were analysed for hepatic DNA adducts, using the 32P-postlabelling assay and liver histopathology as part of an on going survey to establish the health status of UK estuaries. Fish were collected from the estuaries Tyne, Mersey, Thames, Alde (reference site), Belfast, Forth, Clyde and Southampton. At the majority of contaminated sites (Southampton, Thames, Clyde, Tyne and Mersey) the predominant DNA adduct profile consisted of diagonal radioactive zones (DRZs). In contrast, flounder collected from the Forth, Alde and Belfast lacked DRZs with only background levels of DNA damage being observed. Statistically significant differences were observed between several of the sites sampled with the hepatic DNA adduct levels detected in flounder from Southampton, Thames and Clyde statistically elevated (P < 0.05) over those levels detected at the Tyne (Southampton and Thames only), Forth, Alde and Belfast. Histological analysis of these samples revealed a range of lesions including foci of cellular alteration, hepatocellular fibrillar inclusions, nuclear pleomorphisms along with non-toxicopathic changes/alterations, such as those associated with cell turnover (apoptosis, necrosis, regeneration) and immune-related functions (melanomacrophage aggregates, inflammation). Although it is difficult to associate higher prevalence of these lesion types with specific sites, generally, the lowest prevalence was seen in flounder captured from the Alde estuary, with higher prevalence (particularly of melanomacrophage aggregates, inflammation and necrotic foci) seen in fish from the contaminated sites.

  13. Avian bornavirus is present in many tissues of psittacine birds with histopathologic evidence of proventricular dilatation disease.

    PubMed

    Raghav, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Delay, Josepha; Ojkic, Davor; Pearl, David L; Kistler, Amy L; Derisi, Joseph L; Ganem, Donald; Smith, Dale A

    2010-07-01

    Proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) is a neurologic disease of psittacine birds suspected to be caused by a recently identified Avian bornavirus (ABV). In the current report, data supporting the causal association of ABV with PDD are presented. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with rabbit polyclonal antiserum raised against ABV nucleocapsid protein was used to identify cell and organ distribution of viral antigen. The ABV antigen was most consistently detected in brain, spinal cord, adrenal gland, pancreas, and kidney. Histopathologic evaluation was correlated with ABV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemical tests in multiple tissues from 16 psittacine birds with and without PDD. Using histopathologic diagnosis as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of IHC for ABV antigens were found to be 100% and 100%, respectively. Many more tissues were positive for ABV RNA by reverse transcription PCR than were positive for pathologic changes or viral antigens by IHC, indicating the presence of subclinical or asymptomatic infection at many sites.

  14. Histopathology Discrepancy of Preoperative Endometrial Sampling and Final Specimen: How Does This Influence Selective Lymph Node Dissection?

    PubMed

    Corr, Bradley R; Carrubba, Aakriti; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Cheng, Georgina; Guntupalli, Saketh R

    2017-02-01

    Preoperative histology is a major component in the perioperative selective lymph node (LN) dissection decision process. Discrepancy between preoperative endometrial sampling and final specimen histopathology is generally accepted. The goals of this project are to determine if discrepancy of histopathology is associated with alteration of adjuvant treatment or outcome. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of all patients undergoing surgery for endometrial cancer at a single institution from 2010 to 2014. All patients had preoperative endometrial sampling. Histopathology discrepancy was evaluated for potential in variation of perioperative LN dissection. Criteria for not performing LN dissection was defined as preoperative endometrioid histology, grade 1 or 2 lesion, myometrial invasion of 50% or less, and primary tumor diameter 2 cm or less. A total of 352 patients were identified; 44 were excluded because of no preoperative pathology or no residual disease on final pathology. Discrepancy of histopathology was noted in 64/308 (20.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.2%-25.3%) patients. Preoperative endometrioid histology was noted in 272 patients, and 17/272 (6.3%; 95% CI, 3.4%-9.1%) had preoperative sampling reviewed as a grade 1 or 2 endometrioid lesion and final specimen was upgraded to grade 3. Downstaging occurred in 3/272 (1.1%; 95% CI, 0%-2.3%) patients with preoperative grade 3 lesion and final specimen demonstrated grade 1 or 2 disease. All 3 patients' primary tumor diameter was greater than 2 cm and therefore received LN dissection. Histopathological discrepancy that would alter perioperative LN dissection decision based on the aforementioned criteria occurred in 2/272 (0.7%; 95% CI, 0%-1.8%). Despite a 20% discrepancy of preoperative and postoperative histopathology, discrepancy that would alter a perioperative decision for LN dissection occurs in only 0.7% of cases in this retrospective single-institutional experience. Myometrial

  15. Experimental study on histopathological changes and tissue tropism of Iranian infectious bronchitis serotype 793/B-like virus in SPF chickens.

    PubMed

    Bijanzad, Peyman; Momayez, Reza; Bozorgmehrifard, Mohammad H; Hablolvarid, Mohammad H; Pourbakhsh, Seyed A

    2013-05-28

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is prevalent in all countries with intensive poultry flocks. This disease is characterised primarily by respiratory signs, but some IBV strains may also infect other organs such as the intestinal and urogenital tracts. The aim of this study was to characterise the histopathological lesions and tissue tropism of Iranian isolate IR/773/2001(793/B) of avian infectious bronchitis virus in different organs of experimentally infected SPF chickens. Forty-two one-day-old, specific pathogen-free (SPF) chicks were divided randomly into two groups (21 chicks to each group). At the age of 12 days, one group was inoculated intra-ocularly with 10(3) EID 50 of the 793/B isolate, and the other was kept as the control group. Tissue samples were collected at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 days post-inoculation (PI). The IBV virus was detected in the caecal tonsils and cloaca from the 2nd to the 12th day PI. The virus was also detected in the kidneys from days 4-10 PI and in the bursa of Fabricius from days 4-12 PI. The virus was detected in the trachea, lungs and thymus. The most obvious histopathological lesions were found in the trachea, kidney, lungs and bursa of Fabricius. Amongst the lymphoid tissues, histopathological changes were found most frequently in the bursa of Fabricius. The results of this study indicated that the 793/B serotype of IBV is unlikely to cause mortality, severe clinical signs or gross lesions in infected chickens, but its replication in some tissues including the bursa of Fabricius could render birds susceptible to other micro-organisms.

  16. Histopathological changes in tissues of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos incubated in crude extracts of camellia seed and mangosteen pericarp.

    PubMed

    Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Pinlaor, Somchai; Tesana, Smarn; Aunpromma, Surasit; Booyarat, Chantana; Sriraj, Pranee; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Punjaruk, Wiyada

    2013-10-01

    The present study was performed to observe histopathological changes in tissues of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos (Gastropoda, Bithyniidae) incubated in crude extract solutions of camellia (Camellia oleifera) seed and mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) pericarp, and furthermore to estimate the molluscicidal effects of 2 plant substances. Substantial numbers of bithyniid snails were incubated in various concentrations of 2 plant solution for 24 hr. As the positive control, snails incubated in various concentrations of niclosamide, a chemical molluscicide, were used. The histopathological findings were observed in sectioned snail specimens of each experimental and control groups. The results showed that both camellia and mangosteen extracts had molluscicidal effects at 24 hr with 50% lethal concentration (LC50) at concentrations of 0.003 and 0.002 g/ml, respectively, while niclosamide had LC50 at concentrations 0.599 ppm. B. siamensis goniomphalos snail tissues (foot, gill, and digestive system) showed disruption of columnar muscle fibers of the foot, reduction of the length and number of gill cilia, numerous mucous vacuoles, and irregularly shaped of epithelial cells. Irregular apical and calciferous cells, dilatation of the digestive gland tubule, and large hemolymphatic spaces, and irregular apical surfaces, detachment of cilia, and enlargement of lysosomal vacuoles of epidermis were also shown in all groups. By the present study, it is confirmed that 2 plants, camellia and mangosteen, are keeping some substance having molluscicidal effects, and histopathological findings obtained in this study will provide some clues in further studies on their action mechanisms to use them as natural molluscicides.

  17. Histopathological Changes in Tissues of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos Incubated in Crude Extracts of Camellia Seed and Mangosteen Pericarp

    PubMed Central

    Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Pinlaor, Somchai; Tesana, Smarn; Aunpromma, Surasit; Booyarat, Chantana; Sriraj, Pranee; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Punjaruk, Wiyada

    2013-01-01

    The present study was performed to observe histopathological changes in tissues of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos (Gastropoda, Bithyniidae) incubated in crude extract solutions of camellia (Camellia oleifera) seed and mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) pericarp, and furthermore to estimate the molluscicidal effects of 2 plant substances. Substantial numbers of bithyniid snails were incubated in various concentrations of 2 plant solution for 24 hr. As the positive control, snails incubated in various concentrations of niclosamide, a chemical molluscicide, were used. The histopathological findings were observed in sectioned snail specimens of each experimental and control groups. The results showed that both camellia and mangosteen extracts had molluscicidal effects at 24 hr with 50% lethal concentration (LC50) at concentrations of 0.003 and 0.002 g/ml, respectively, while niclosamide had LC50 at concentrations 0.599 ppm. B. siamensis goniomphalos snail tissues (foot, gill, and digestive system) showed disruption of columnar muscle fibers of the foot, reduction of the length and number of gill cilia, numerous mucous vacuoles, and irregularly shaped of epithelial cells. Irregular apical and calciferous cells, dilatation of the digestive gland tubule, and large hemolymphatic spaces, and irregular apical surfaces, detachment of cilia, and enlargement of lysosomal vacuoles of epidermis were also shown in all groups. By the present study, it is confirmed that 2 plants, camellia and mangosteen, are keeping some substance having molluscicidal effects, and histopathological findings obtained in this study will provide some clues in further studies on their action mechanisms to use them as natural molluscicides. PMID:24327779

  18. A comparison of cytological and histopathological findings and role of immunostains in the diagnosis of soft tissue tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Shaham; Vasenwala, Shaista M; Haider, Nazima; Ahmad, S Shamshad; Maheshwari, Veena; Khan, MA

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) has been employed as a useful technique for the initial diagnosis of soft tissue tumors (STT) as well for the identification of recurrent and metastatic cases. Aim: We conducted this study on soft tissue tumors to find the efficacy of FNAC and to finalize the histological diagnosis with immunostains. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 126 patients of soft tissue tumors. FNAC and histopathology was performed in all the cases. Results: Hundred and five cases (83.3%) were diagnosed as benign and 21 cases (16.7%) as malignant. On FNAC, tumors were divided into six cytomorphological categories i.e. lipomatous, spindle cell, round cell, myxoid, pleomorphic and vascular tumors. Seventeen cases were inconclusive on cytology. In five cases, the type of malignancy was changed on histological examination. There were three false positive and two false negative cases giving a positive predictive value of 97.2 % in terms of malignancy, a sensitivity of 98.1% and a specificity of 96.7%. Conclusions: FNAC has a definite role in forming the initial diagnosis of STT, while histopathology with the aid of immunomarkers provides the final diagnosis. PMID:22787293

  19. A Systematic Approach to the Application of Soft Tissue Histopathology in Paleopathology

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Christina; Peschel, Oliver; Nerlich, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    The application of histology to soft tissue remains offers an important technique to obtain diagnostically important information on various physiological and pathological conditions in paleopathology. In a series of 29 cases with mummified tissue ranging between 16 months and c. 5.200 years of postmortem time interval, we systematically investigated paleohistology and the preservation of various tissues. We established a reproducible histological ranking system for the evaluation of mummified tissue preservation. The application of this scheme to the series showed good tissue preservation of tissues with high connective tissue content but also fat tissue and connective tissue rich organs, such as lung tissue, while most other internal organs were less well preserved despite highly different postmortem time intervals. There are some organs with only poor conservation even in short term periods such as the kidneys and CNS. Artificial mummification does not provide better conservation than naturally mummified tissues; “cold” mummies may be much better conserved than those from desert areas. The identification of specific pathologies underlines the potential power of paleohistology. PMID:26346981

  20. Histopathological examination of nerve samples from pure neural leprosy patients: obtaining maximum information to improve diagnostic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sérgio Luiz Gomes; Chimelli, Leila; Jardim, Márcia Rodrigues; Vital, Robson Teixeira; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Corte-Real, Suzana; Hacker, Mariana Andréa Vilas Boas; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2012-03-01

    Nerve biopsy examination is an important auxiliary procedure for diagnosing pure neural leprosy (PNL). When acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are not detected in the nerve sample, the value of other nonspecific histological alterations should be considered along with pertinent clinical, electroneuromyographical and laboratory data (the detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA with polymerase chain reaction and the detection of serum anti-phenolic glycolipid 1 antibodies) to support a possible or probable PNL diagnosis. Three hundred forty nerve samples [144 from PNL patients and 196 from patients with non-leprosy peripheral neuropathies (NLN)] were examined. Both AFB-negative and AFB-positive PNL samples had more frequent histopathological alterations (epithelioid granulomas, mononuclear infiltrates, fibrosis, perineurial and subperineurial oedema and decreased numbers of myelinated fibres) than the NLN group. Multivariate analysis revealed that independently, mononuclear infiltrate and perineurial fibrosis were more common in the PNL group and were able to correctly classify AFB-negative PNL samples. These results indicate that even in the absence of AFB, these histopathological nerve alterations may justify a PNL diagnosis when observed in conjunction with pertinent clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data.

  1. In vivo confocal microscopy and histopathology of the conjunctiva in trachomatous scarring and normal tissue: a systematic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Victor H; Holland, Martin J; Cree, Ian A; Pullin, James; Weiss, Helen A; Massae, Patrick; Makupa, William; Mabey, David C W; Bailey, Robin L; Burton, Matthew J; Luthert, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Aim To compare in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) with the histopathological examination of tissue and cellular changes in normal and diseased conjunctiva. Methods Participants underwent clinical examination and IVCM of the tarsal conjunctiva. A biopsy of the upper tarsal conjunctiva was collected and stained with tinctorial stains and by immunohistochemical staining for CD45 and CD83. Connective tissue scarring, inflammatory cell density and the presence of dendritiform cells were quantitatively assessed in a masked manner by both IVCM and histological assessments for comparative analysis. Results Thirty-four participants with severe trachomatous conjunctival scarring and 33 participants with healthy conjunctiva were recruited. The IVCM connective tissue scarring score was strongly associated with the histological grading of scarring (p<0.001). There was limited evidence of an association between the IVCM inflammatory cell infiltrate and the histological inflammatory cell grade (p=0.05). We did not find any evidence to support the hypothesis that dendritiform cells seen with IVCM are mature, conventional dendritic cells. Conclusions The results show that IVCM can be used to robustly quantitate connective tissue scarring and also has a role in measuring the inflammatory cell infiltrate. The discordance between IVCM dendritiform cells and immunohistochemical dendritic cells may be a result of study limitations or may be because these dendritiform structures represent another cell type, such as fibroblasts, rather than dendritic cells. PMID:23922266

  2. Radioprotective effects of hesperidin on oxidative damages and histopathological changes induced by X-irradiation in rats heart tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeyan, Abolhasan; Haddadi, Gholam Hassan; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Moradi, Maryam; Najafi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate radioprotective effects of hesperidin (HES) administration before the irradiation on the cardiac oxidative stress and histopathological changes in an experimental rat model. The cardiovascular complications of radiation exposure cause morbidity and mortality in patients who received radiotherapy. HES, an antioxidant flavonoid found in citrus fruits, suggests the protection against the tissue damage. Fifty-eight rats were divided into four groups: Group 1 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and sham radiation; Group 2, HES and sham radiation; Group 3, PBS and radiation; and Group 4, HES and radiation. The rats were exposed to single dose of 18 Gy of 6 MV X-ray. One hundred milligrams per kilogram doses of HES was administered for 7 days before irradiation. The estimation of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and histopathological analyses was performed at 24 h and 8 weeks after radiation exposure. The irradiation of chest area resulted in an elevated MDA level and decreased SOD activity. Moreover, long-term pathological lesions of radiation were inflammation, fibrosis, the increased number of mast cells and macrophages, and development of plaque, vascular leakage, myocardial degeneration, and myocyte necrosis. Although the administration of HES decreases inflammation, fibrosis, mast cell and macrophage numbers, and myocyte necrosis, it did not result in reduced thrombus, myocardium degeneration, and vascular leakage. In conclusion, these results suggest that HES can perform a radioprotection action. The protective effect of HES may be attributable to its immunomodulatory effects and free radical-scavenging properties. PMID:27651565

  3. Fluoride-induced changes in haem biosynthesis pathway, neurological variables and tissue histopathology of rats.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Swapnila; Lomash, Vinay; Flora, S J S

    2010-01-01

    This study intended to determine the effects of various concentrations of fluoride (1, 10, 50 and 100 ppm) in drinking water for a period of 12 weeks on changes in haem biosynthesis pathway, oxidative stress and neurological variables supported by histopathological observations and fluoride in rats. The data indicates significant alterations in the parameters related to haeme synthesis pathway like inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase, oxidative stress like depletion of glutathione (GSH) and increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. These changes were accompanied by depletion in GSH:GSSG ratio, whole brain biogenic amine levels and a dose-dependent increase in fluoride concentration. Interestingly and most significantly, these changes were more pronounced at lower concentrations of fluoride compared with higher fluoride dose. Biochemical changes were supported by the histological observations, which also revealed that at high concentrations of fluoride, toxic effects and damages to organs were more pronounced. These changes support our earlier findings regarding the role of decreased ionic mobility of fluoride ion at higher concentrations, leading to less pronounced toxicity.

  4. Abnormally extended ductal tissue into the aorta is indicated by similar histopathology and shared apoptosis in patients with coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Ee-Kyung; Kim, Woong-Han; Shim, Gyu Hong; Kim, Han-Suk; Park, June Dong; Bae, Eun Jung; Kim, Beyong Il; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung-Hwan

    2010-11-19

    The pathogenesis of coarctation of the aorta (CoA) has not been clearly elucidated. It is hypothesized that CoA patients have abnormal extension of ductal tissue into the aorta which plays some pathogenic role. The aim of this study was to investigate the extension of ductal tissue into the aorta in CoA patients by comparative analysis of ductal and aortic tissue histopathology, smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes and apoptosis. Fifteen cases of surgically resected specimens including coarctation segment (CS), ductus arteriosus (DA) and transition zone (TZ) were histologically reviewed. SMC phenotypes were determined by immunohistochemistry for myosin heavy chain isoforms SM1, SM2, SMemb and α-smooth muscle actin. Apoptotic cell death was estimated by the TUNEL method. A considerable amount of ductal tissue was found in CS and TZ in all investigated cases. CS showed a histologic pattern similar to that of closing DA. CS showed the least differentiated SMC phenotype and TZ intima displayed SMC phenotype more similar to that of DA than that of the normal aorta. TUNEL-positive cell deaths were frequently found in the media of both CS and DA, but absent in TZ. Abnormal extension of ductal tissue into the aorta in CoA patients was indicated by similar histology and shared apoptosis. SMC phenotypic modulation may be involved in the formation of CoA. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that abnormal extension of ductal tissue in the aorta plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CoA. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Histopathological and ultrastructural effects of cutting radiofrequency energy on palatal soft tissues: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Paul; Kotecha, Bhik

    2011-12-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) surgery has gained popularity as a safe and effective method for treating patients with snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Both interstitial and cutting radiofrequency energy may be used for multi-segmental management of the upper airway. Little is known about the effect of cutting radiofrequency energy on human soft palate. Excessive collateral injury may have an impact on tissue healing and functional outcomes. A histological analysis of specimens of human soft palate and uvula following resection with cutting RF energy was performed. In addition, ultrastructural analysis using scanning electron microscopy of excision margins was performed and compared with CO(2) LASER. Twelve patients were included. In ten patients, specimens of redundant uvula and faucial pillars were collected and underwent formal histological analysis. The maximum depth of tissue injury was 1 mm in two specimens and overall average depth of injury was 0.15 mm. Injury depth was independent of tissue subtype at the resection margin. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated accurate incision when compared to CO(2) LASER. Cutting RF energy causes minimal collateral injury to the soft palate during resection for the treatment of snoring and mild OSA. A detailed knowledge of local effects on resection specimens allows accurate inference of in vivo tissue injury at the resection margin and may enable more precise prediction of healing patterns and repair.

  6. Nickel content of human palatine tonsils: analysis of small tissue samples by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Torjussen, W; Andersen, I; Zachariasen, H

    1977-06-01

    We describe a method for determining the nickel content of small tissue samples by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry in this case biopsy specimens from human palatine tonsils. Contact between tissue samples and metallic objects was avoided, except for the use of biopsy forceps (Type No. 8150.00 Wolf, stainless steel) for collecting samples, to imitate the actual procedure when small biopsy specimens are removed from the nasal mucosal membranes in nickel workers for histopathological and chemical investigations. Nickel contamination from this instrument was insignificant at the precision of the present procedures. The mean concentration of nickel in 15 tonsils was 13.5 +/- 7.0 (SD) microng/100g (wet wt). The mean nickel concentration in eight different samples of the same tonsil was 5.6 +/- 2.7 (SD microng/100 g.

  7. Histopathological changes induced in rat tissues by oral intake of lead acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, N.; Saxena, R.; Anand, S.

    1986-10-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to observe the pathological alterations brought about in the intestine, liver, and kidney of lead-intoxicated rats. A short-term exposure to a sublethal dose of lead (44 mg/kg body wt/day) is seen to cause conspicuous degenerative changes in the three tissues. The intestinal mucosal epithelium is affected which leads to malabsorption, while in the kidney proximal tubular cells degenerate causing secretion of essential materials such as glucose, amino acids, etc., in the urine.

  8. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-02-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor.

  9. Ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed brain sample.

    PubMed

    Forest, Fabien; Cinotti, Elisa; Yvorel, Violaine; Habougit, Cyril; Vassal, François; Nuti, Christophe; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Péoc'h, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Confocal microscopy is a technique able to realize "optic sections" of a tissue with increasing applications. We wondered if we could apply an ex vivo confocal microscope designed for dermatological purpose in a routine use for the most frequent brain tumors. The aim of this work was to identify tumor tissue and its histopathological hallmarks, and to assess grading criteria used in neuropathological practice without tissue loss on freshly removed brain tissue. Seven infiltrating gliomas, nine meningiomas and three metastases of carcinomas were included. We compared imaging results obtained with the confocal microscope to frozen sections, smears and tissue sections of formalin-fixed tissue. Our results show that ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging can be applied to brain tumors in order to quickly identify tumor tissue without tissue loss. It can differentiate tumors and can assess most of grading criteria. Confocal microscopy could represent a new tool to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed sample and could help in selecting areas for biobanking of tumor tissue.

  10. Antioxidant response and histopathological changes in brain tissue of pigeon exposed to avermectin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; You, Tian-Zi; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Zhao, Bing; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2013-10-01

    Avermectins (AVMs) are the active components of some insecticidal and nematicidal products used in agriculture and veterinary medicine for the prevention of parasitic diseases. Residues of AVM drugs or their metabolites in livestock feces have toxic effects on non-target aquatic and terrestrial organisms. In this study, oxidative stress responses and pathological changes on pigeon brain tissues and serum after subchronic exposure to AVM for 30, 60 and 90 days were investigated. The decrease in antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px) activities and increase in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde content in a dose-time-dependent manner in the brain and serum of pigeon were observed. The protein carbonyl content, an indicator of protein oxidation, and DNA-protein crosslink coefficient were significantly augmented with dose-time-dependent properties. The microscopic structures of the cerebrum, cerebellum and optic lobe altered obviously, the severity of which increased with the concentration of AVM and exposure time. The results imply that AVM could induce oxidative damage to the brain tissue and serum of pigeon. The information presented in this study is helpful to understand the mechanism of AVM-induced oxidative stress in birds.

  11. Investigation of biochemical and histopathological effects of Mentha piperita Labiatae and Mentha spicata Labiatae on liver tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, M; Ozguner, M; Aydin, G; Gokalp, O

    2004-01-01

    The plant Mentha piperita, or peppermint, is commonly used in the treatment of loss of appetite, common cold, bronchitis, sinusitis, fever, nausea and vomiting, and indigestion as a herbal agent. In this study, we aimed to investigate biochemical and histological effects of M. piperita Labiatae, growing in the Yenisar Bademli town of Isparta city, and Mentha spicata Labiatae, growing in the Anamas high plateau of the Yenisar Bademli town, on the rat liver tissue. Forty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 200-250 g were used for this study. Rats were divided into four groups of 12 animals: Group I received no herbal tea (control group); Group II received 20 g/L M. piperita tea; Group III received 20 g/L M. spicata tea; and Group IV received 40 g/L M. spicata tea. Herbal teas were prepared daily and provided at all times to the rats during 30 days as drinking water. Liver function tests, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) activities were measured. To evaluate liver antioxidant defences, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) activities were determined in the homogenates of liver tissue. In addition, liver tissues were submitted for histopathologic examination. AST and ALT activities were increased in Group II, Group III and Group IV gradually when compared with the control group. The difference between Group II and the control group was not statistically significant (P > 0.016). Increases in AST and ALT activities of Group III and Group IV were statistically significant when compared with the control group. SOD, GSH-Px and CAT activities were increased in Group II when compared with the control group but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.016). However, SOD, GSH-Px activities and the TBARS level were significantly increased, and CAT activity was significantly decreased in Group III when compared with the

  12. Multimodal Raman-fluorescence spectroscopy of formalin fixed samples is able to discriminate brain tumors from dysplastic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, there has been a considerable surge in the application of spectroscopy for disease diagnosis. Raman and fluorescence spectra provide characteristic spectral profile related to biochemical and morphological changes when tissues progress from normal state towards malignancy. Spectroscopic techniques offer the advantage of being minimally invasive compared to traditional histopathology, real time and quantitative. In biomedical optical diagnostics, freshly excised specimens are preferred for making ex-vivo spectroscopic measurements. With regard to fresh tissues, if the lab is located far away from the clinic it could pose a problem as spectral measurements have to be performed immediately after dissection. Tissue samples are usually placed in a fixative agent such as 4% formaldehyde to preserve the samples before processing them for routine histopathological studies. Fixation prevents the tissues from decomposition by arresting autolysis. In the present study, we intend to investigate the possibility of using formalin fixed samples for discrimination of brain tumours from dysplastic tissue using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Formalin fixed samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline for about 5 minutes in order to remove the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. In case of fluorescence spectroscopy, changes in spectral profile have been observed in the region between 550-670 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. For Raman measurements, we found significant differences in the spectral profiles between dysplasia and tumor. In conclusion, formalin fixed samples can be potentially used for the spectroscopic discrimination of tumor against dysplastic tissue in brain samples.

  13. Positive predictive value of endometrial polyps in Pipelle aspiration sampling: a histopathological study of 195 cases.

    PubMed

    Seto, Mimi T Y; Ip, Philip P C; Ngu, Siew-Fei; Cheung, Annie N Y; Pun, Ting-Chung

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the positive predictive value of Pipelle endometrial sampling in detecting the presence of an underlying endometrial polyp. The secondary objective is to examine the histologic features that can predict the presence of endometrial polyps. This is a retrospective case review study. 195 women who had undergone diagnostic hysteroscopy and/or polypectomy were identified in a University teaching hospital. All patients had a prior polyp diagnosis in the Pipelle endometrial sample. The histology of these samples were compared and analyzed with subsequent DH findings and final hysteroscopic biopsies. Slides were reviewed by 2 gynaecological pathologists. 162 women were premenopausal (mean age 46.1, SD=4.6) and 33 were postmenopausal (mean age 57.2, SD=8.1). The commonest indication for a Pipelle endometrial sampling was abnormal uterine bleeding. Presence of polyp was confirmed by DH in 56.3% (111/195) cases. Of these, 81.1% (90/111) were confirmed histologically. The positive predictive value of detection of polyps in Pipelle endometrial samples for premenopausal and postmenopausal women was 53.7% and 72.7%, respectively (p=.05). The most reliable histologic features that can predict the presence of an underlying polyp was fibrous stroma (p=.01) and focal glandular clustering (p=.03). The prevalence of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma in women who was confirmed to have polyp was 11.7% (13/111). The positive predictive value of Pipelle endometrial samples in detecting endometrial polyps was 56.3%. It was higher in the postmenopausal women (72.7%) compared to premenopausal women (53.7%). The prevalence of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma in women who was confirmed to have polyp was consistent with the rate reported in the literature. Using ultrasonography as an adjunct maybe helpful in diagnosing endometrial polyps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance assessment of automated tissue characterization for prostate H and E stained histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFranco, Matthew D.; Reynolds, Hayley M.; Mitchell, Catherine; Williams, Scott; Allan, Prue; Haworth, Annette

    2015-03-01

    Reliable automated prostate tumor detection and characterization in whole-mount histology images is sought in many applications, including post-resection tumor staging and as ground-truth data for multi-parametric MRI interpretation. In this study, an ensemble-based supervised classification algorithm for high-resolution histology images was trained on tile-based image features including histogram and gray-level co-occurrence statistics. The algorithm was assessed using different combinations of H and E prostate slides from two separate medical centers and at two different magnifications (400x and 200x), with the aim of applying tumor classification models to new data. Slides from both datasets were annotated by expert pathologists in order to identify homogeneous cancerous and non-cancerous tissue regions of interest, which were then categorized as (1) low-grade tumor (LG-PCa), including Gleason 3 and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN), (2) high-grade tumor (HG-PCa), including various Gleason 4 and 5 patterns, or (3) non-cancerous, including benign stroma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Classification models for both LG-PCa and HG-PCa were separately trained using a support vector machine (SVM) approach, and per-tile tumor prediction maps were generated from the resulting ensembles. Results showed high sensitivity for predicting HG-PCa with an AUC up to 0.822 using training data from both medical centres, while LG-PCa showed a lower sensitivity of 0.763 with the same training data. Visual inspection of cancer probability heatmaps from 9 patients showed that 17/19 tumors were detected, and HG-PCa generally reported less false positives than LG-PCa.

  15. Measuring the elastic modulus of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Erkamp, R Q; Wiggins, P; Skovoroda, A R; Emelianov, S Y; O'Donnell, M

    1998-01-01

    Independent measurements of the elastic modulus (Young's modulus) of tissue are necessary step in turning elasticity imaging into a clinical tool. A system capable of measuring the elastic modulus of small tissue samples was developed. The system tolerates the constraints of biological tissue, such as limited sample size (< or = 1.5 cm3) and imperfections in sample geometry. A known deformation is applied to the tissue sample while simultaneously measuring the resulting force. These measurements are then converted to an elastic modulus, where the conversion uses prior calibration of the system with plastisol samples of known Young's modulus. Accurate measurements have been obtained from 10 to 80 kPa, covering a wide range of tissue modulus values. In addition, the performance of the system was further investigated using finite element analysis. Finally, preliminary elasticity measurements on canine kidney samples are presented and discussed.

  16. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue After Proton Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Whole body exposure to protons in mice causes significant apoptosis in the crypts of the small intestine. Increasing numbers of crypts contained more apoptotic lesions as the dose of exposure increased. 16 genes associated with apoptotic pathways were shown to have significantly altered expression as compared to control samples for at least one of the doses of proton exposure 1 gene, Trp53inp1, was significantly up-regulated across all three doses. Those animals exposed to 0.1 Gy of proton irradiation showed greater amounts of significant alterations in gene expression as compared to 1 Gy and 2 Gy exposures. The differences in gene expression changes of low and high dose proton irradiated mice may offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of the possible high sensitivity at low proton doses. RAIDD (CRADD) may be responsible for the hypersensitivity observed in the duodenum of mice exposed to low doses of protons. Caspase-1 may also play a role in the hypersensitivity seen following proton irradiation at a dose of 0.1 Gy. FOXO3A may be involved in the down-regulation of GILZ observed at high doses of proton exposure.

  17. Organochlorine-induced histopathology in kidney and liver tissue from Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Wolkers, Hans; Leifsson, Pall S; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Oystein; Dietz, Rune; Kirkegaard, Maja; Muir, Derek C G; Jørgensen, Even

    2008-04-01

    The effects of persistent organic pollutants on renal and liver morphology in farmed arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) were studied under experimental conditions. Control animals received a diet containing pork (Sus scrofa) fat with low amounts of persistent organic pollutants, while the diet of the exposed animals contained whale blubber, 'naturally' contaminated with persistent organic pollutants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticide (OCP) concentrations in the whale blubber were 488 and 395 ng/g wet weight, respectively. Animals were sacrificed and sampled when they were at their fattest (winter) as well as their lowest body weight (summer). The results show that PCB and OCP exposure causes renal (and probably also liver) lesions in arctic foxes. The prevalence of glomerular, tubular and interstitial lesions was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi-square: all p<0.05). The frequency of liver lesions (steatosis, intravascular granulocyte accumulations, interstitial cell infiltrations, lipid granulomas, portal fibrosis and bile duct hyperplasia) were also highest in the exposed group, although not significantly (chi-square: all p>0.05). The prevalence of lesions was not significantly different between lean (winter) and fat (summer) foxes for any of the lesions (chi-square: all p>0.05). We suggest that wild arctic foxes exposed to an environmental cocktail of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs and OCPs, in their natural diet are at risk for developing chronic kidney and liver damage. Whether such lesions may have an impact on age and health of the animals remains uncertain.

  18. A Comparison of Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton- or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    There are many consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment which can adversely affect the health of a crew member. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) involving nausea and vomiting, damage to radio-sensitive tissue such as the blood forming organs and gastrointestinal tract, and cancer are some of these negative effects. The space radiation environment is ample with protons and contains gamma rays as well. Little knowledge exists to this point, however, regarding the effects of protons on mammalian systems; conversely several studies have been performed observing the effects of gamma rays on different animal models. For the research presented here, we wish to compare our previous work looking at whole-body exposure to protons using a mouse model to our studies of mice experiencing whole-body exposure to gamma rays as part of the radio-adaptive response. Radio-adaptation is a well-documented phenomenon in which cells exposed to a priming low dose of radiation prior to a higher dose display a reduction in endpoints like chromosomal aberrations, cell death, micronucleus formation, and more when compared to their counterparts receiving high dose-irradiation only. Our group has recently completed a radio-adaptive experiment with C57BL/6 mice. For both this study and the preceding proton research, the gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest doses of 0.1 Gy of protons and 0.05 Gy of gamma rays, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. A smaller percentage of crypts showed 3 or more apoptotic lesions in animals that received 6 Gy of gamma-irradiation compared to mice

  19. Leaf tissue sampling and DNA extraction protocols.

    PubMed

    Semagn, Kassa

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomists must be familiar with a number of issues in collecting and transporting samples using freezing methods (liquid nitrogen and dry ice), desiccants (silica gel and blotter paper), and preservatives (CTAB, ethanol, and isopropanol), with each method having its own merits and limitations. For most molecular studies, a reasonably good quality and quantity of DNA is required, which can only be obtained using standard DNA extraction protocols. There are many DNA extraction protocols that vary from simple and quick ones that yield low-quality DNA but good enough for routine analyses to the laborious and time-consuming standard methods that usually produce high quality and quantities of DNA. The protocol to be chosen will depend on the quality and quantity of DNA needed, the nature of samples, and the presence of natural substances that may interfere with the extraction and subsequent analysis. The protocol described in this chapter has been tested for extracting DNA from eight species and provided very good quality and quantity of DNA for different applications, including those genotyping methods that use restriction enzymes.

  20. A comparative investigation of biochemical and histopathological effects of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate on ischemia-reperfusion induced oxidative damage in rat ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Demiryilmaz, Ismail; Sener, Ebru; Cetin, Nihal; Altuner, Durdu; Akcay, Fatih; Suleyman, Halis

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the biochemical and histopathological effects of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate on ischemia-reperfusion induced oxidative damage in rat ovarian tissue were investigated. Animals were divided into four groups of six rat each, ovarian ischemia-reperfusion (IR), 25 mg/kg thiamine + ovarian ischemia-reperfusion (TIR), 25 mg/kg thiamine pyrophosphate + ovarian ischemia-reperfusion (TPIR) and Sham group (SG). The results of the biochemical experiments have shown that the rat ovarian tissue with thiamine treatment, the level of MDA, GSH and the 8-hydroxyguanine are almost the same as the IR group; while in the group with thiamine pyrophosphate treatment, the level of MDA, GSH and the 8-hydroxyguanine are almost the same as the SG. Ovarian tissue of rats in the IR group were congested and dilated vessels, edema, hemorrhage, necrotic and apoptotic cells. In this group, the migration and the adhesion of the polymorphonuclear leucocytes to the endothelium were observed. Both ovaries in TPIR group, there was no difference according to the SG. Histopathology of ovarian tissues in the TIR group was almost the same with the IR group. Our results indicate that thiamine pyrophosphate significantly prevents the ischemia-reperfusion induced oxidative damage in ovarian tissue, whereas thiamine has no effect. In conclusion, we have found that thiamine pyrophosphate prevents oxidative damage due to ischemia-reperfusion injury, whereas thiamine does not have this effect. Furthermore, we have confirmed that the results of our biochemical analyses are in concordance with the histopathological findings.

  1. [Histopathological studies of periodontal tissue reactions to perforations in the furcation of dogs' teeth treated with cyanoacrylate cement (FH Cement)].

    PubMed

    Morinaga, K; Furusawa, M; Kitamura, M; Sato, H; Watanabe, H; Yokoya, S; Nakagawa, K; Asai, Y

    1989-06-01

    In the previous study (Shikwa Gakuho, 85: 413-451, 1985.), Morinaga reported on the histopathology of furcation perforations treated with ethyl cyanoacrylate and showed that, because of its properties, this material cannot be expected to effect a permanent blockade. It did not, however, irritate the wound. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a new cyanoacrylate cement (FH Cement) when applied to furcation perforations. Subjects were 25 mandibular and maxilla premolars and molars obtained from 3 adult dogs. The method used in the study was as follows. After administration of pentobarbital-sodium general anesthesia, the pulp chamber was opened by means of a high-speed air turbine fitted with a diamond point. According to usual procedures, the pulp was removed, and the main root canal was filled. Next the floor of the pulp chamber was deliberately perforated by means of a 1mm round bur that had been previously sterilized in advance pouring a physiological sodium chloride solution at the same time. The perforated areas were then washed with a same solution, wiped, and dried with aseptic cotton pellets. They were then stuffed with cyanoacrylate cement. The cavity was lined with gutta-percha temporary stopping, and the remainder of the cavity was filled with silver amalgam. At periods of 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the operation, the animals were sacrificed by means of electricity under general anesthesia. The jaw bones were removed, fixed, decalcified, and embedded in celloidin. Longitudinal sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results 1. Periodontal tissues around perforated sites were healed by means of scar tissue, though suppuration occurred in a few cases. 2. Hard tissue was appended to the teeth in a small number of cases. 3. Repair of the alveolar bone was observed in the damaged site in about half of all cases. From the result mentioned above, cyanoacrylate cement (FH Cement) was seemed to did not close the site perforation for

  2. Investigation of biochemical and histopathological effects of Mentha piperita L. and Mentha spicata L. on kidney tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Mehmet; Kilinç, Ibrahim; Oncu, Meral; Karaoz, Erdal; Delibas, Namik

    2003-04-01

    Peppermint plants have been used as a herbal medicine for many conditions, including loss of appetite, common cold, bronchitis, sinusitis, fever, nausea, vomiting and indigestion. This study is aimed at investigating the biochemical and histological effects of Mentha piperita L., growing in the Yenisar Bademli town of Isparta City, and Mentha spicata L., growing on the Anamas high plateau of Isparta City, on rat kidney tissue. Forty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 200-250 g were used for this study. Animals were divided into four experimental groups, each with 12 rats, as follows: control group (group I); 20 g/L M. piperita tea (group II); 20 g/L M. spicata tea (group III); 40 g/L M. spicata tea (group IV). The control group rats were given commercial drinking water (Hayat DANONESA water). The tea for the other groups was prepared daily and provided at all times to the rats during 30 days as drinking water. Plasma urea and creatinine levels were determined, and the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were studied in the homogenates of kidney tissue. The levels of plasma urea and creatinine were increased significantly (P < 0.0033) in groups III and IV when compared with group I. The activities of SOD and GSH-Px were decreased significantly (P < 0.0033) in group IV when compared with group I. The activities of CAT were decreased significantly in groups III and IV (P < 0.033, P < 0.0033, respectively) when compared with group I. TBARS levels were increased significantly (P < 0.0033) in groups III and IV when compared with group I. In groups II, III and IV, hydropic degeneration of tubular epithelial cells, the epithelial cells with picnotic nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm, tubular dilatation and enlargements in Bowman capsules were observed histologically. However, in group II histopathological changes were more slight than in groups III

  3. An effective plasma membrane proteomics approach for small tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, Katrien; Lombaert, Nathalie; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    Advancing the quest for new drug targets demands the development of innovative plasma membrane proteome research strategies applicable to small, functionally defined tissue samples. Biotinylation of acute tissue slices and streptavidin pull-down followed by shotgun proteomics allowed the selective extraction and identification of >1,600 proteins of which >60% are associated with the plasma membrane, including (G-protein coupled) receptors, ion channels and transporters, and this from mm3-scale tissue. PMID:26047021

  4. Measuring the elastic modulus of ex vivo small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Abbas; Bishop, Jonathan; Luginbuhl, Chris; Plewes, Donald B.

    2003-07-01

    Over the past decade, several methods have been proposed to image tissue elasticity based on imaging methods collectively called elastography. While progress in developing these systems has been rapid, the basic understanding of tissue properties to interpret elastography images is generally lacking. To address this limitation, we developed a system to measure the Young's modulus of small soft tissue specimens. This system was designed to accommodate biological soft tissue constraints such as sample size, geometry imperfection and heterogeneity. The measurement technique consists of indenting an unconfined small block of tissue while measuring the resulting force. We show that the measured force-displacement slope of such a geometry can be transformed to the tissue Young's modulus via a conversion factor related to the sample's geometry and boundary conditions using finite element analysis. We also demonstrate another measurement technique for tissue elasticity based on quasi-static magnetic resonance elastography in which a tissue specimen encased in a gelatine-agarose block undergoes cyclical compression with resulting displacements measured using a phase contrast MRI technique. The tissue Young's modulus is then reconstructed from the measured displacements using an inversion technique. Finally, preliminary elasticity measurement results of various breast tissues are presented and discussed.

  5. Improved selenium recovery from tissue with modified sample decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W. G.; Walther, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper describes a simple modification of a recently reported decomposition method for determination of selenium in biological tissue by hydride generation atomic absorption. The modified method yielded slightly higher selenium recoveries (3-4%) for selected reference tissues and fish tissue spiked with selenomethionine. Radiotracer experiments indicated that the addition of a small volume of hydrochloric acid to the wet digestate mixture reduced slight losses of selenium as the sample initially went to dryness before ashing. With the modified method, selenium spiked as selenomethionine behaved more like the selenium in reference tissues than did the inorganic spike forms when this digestion modification was used.

  6. Histology and Biaxial Mechanical Behavior of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Pancheri, Francesco Q; Peattie, Robert A; Reddy, Nithin D; Ahamed, Touhid; Lin, Wenjian; Ouellette, Timothy D; Iafrati, Mark D; Luis Dorfmann, A

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent permanent, localized dilations of the abdominal aorta that can be life-threatening if progressing to rupture. Evaluation of risk of rupture depends on understanding the mechanical behavior of patient AAA walls. In this project, a series of patient AAA wall tissue samples have been evaluated through a combined anamnestic, mechanical, and histopathologic approach. Mechanical properties of the samples have been characterized using a novel, strain-controlled, planar biaxial testing protocol emulating the in vivo deformation of the aorta. Histologically, the tissue ultrastructure was highly disrupted. All samples showed pronounced mechanical stiffening with stretch and were notably anisotropic, with greater stiffness in the circumferential than the axial direction. However, there were significant intrapatient variations in wall stiffness and stress. In biaxial tests in which the longitudinal stretch was held constant at 1.1 as the circumferential stretch was extended to 1.1, the maximum average circumferential stress was 330 ± 70 kPa, while the maximum average axial stress was 190 ± 30 kPa. A constitutive model considering the wall as anisotropic with two preferred directions fit the measured data well. No statistically significant differences in tissue mechanical properties were found based on patient gender, age, maximum bulge diameter, height, weight, body mass index, or smoking history. Although a larger patient cohort is merited to confirm these conclusions, the project provides new insight into the relationships between patient natural history, histopathology, and mechanical behavior that may be useful in the development of accurate methods for rupture risk evaluation.

  7. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  8. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  9. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Thomas, Edward V.

    1997-01-01

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  10. Analysis of chemical components from plant tissue samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Information is given on the type and concentration of sterols, free fatty acids, and total fatty acids in plant tissue samples. All samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and then by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combination. In each case the mass spectral data was accumulated as a computer printout and plot. Typical gas chromatograms are included as well as tables describing test results.

  11. Different extent of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats: histopathology, hemodynamic, virtual touch tissue quantification and neurobehavioral observation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Da; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Xin-Hong; Deng, Xiang-Fa; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Yan; Wang, Lei; Tang, Shi; Li, Zhi-Xian

    2015-01-01

    To explore the correlation between pathological and ultrasound changes applying conventional ultrasound, Color Doppler ultrasound andVirtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) technique in newborn hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) rat models. To provide theoretical basis for early diagnosis and treatment of HIBD neonatal. A total of 90 newborn Wistar rats were divided into ischemia, asphyxia and control group according to different HIBD molding methods. Conventional ultrasound, Color Doppler ultrasound and VTQ were applied on 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h postoperative. After the observation of 72 h, 10 rats in each group were randomly selected for pathological specimens production. The rest rats were raised for 30 days for neuroethology detection. In ischemia group and asphyxia group, there were 4 deaths and 6 deaths in the modeling process; the mortality rate was 13.33% (4/30) and 20.00% (6/30) respectively. For ischemia group, the systoli velocity (Vs), diastolic velocity (Vd) and resistance index (RI) of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) were significantly decreased after operation (P<0.05). For asphyxia group, the Vs and RI of right MCA were significantly decreased after operation (P<0.05), while the Vd of right MCA was significantly increased after operation (P<0.05), which lead to the postoperative RI value in each time point was all significantly lower than that in ischemia group (P<0.05). For ischemia group and asphyxia group, the VTQ results increased significantly postoperative (P<0.05), and compared with ischemia group and control group, the postoperative VTQ value in each time point was all significantly higher in asphyxia group (P<0.05). The neuroethology results were significantly lower in the ischemia group and asphyxia group (P<0.05), and the results in ischemia group were significantly higher than those of asphyxia group (P<0.05). And the results are consistent with the pathological findings. There is a consistent correlation among

  12. Discriminating healthy from tumor and necrosis tissue in rat brain tissue samples by Raman spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Amharref, Nadia; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate molecular changes associated with glioma tissues by Raman microspectroscopy in order to develop its use in clinical practice. Spectroscopic markers obtained from C6 glioma tissues were compared to conventional histological and histochemical techniques. Cholesterol and phospholipid contents were highest in corpus callosum and decreased gradually towards the cortex surface as well as in the tumor. Two different necrotic areas have been identified: a fully necrotic zone characterized by the presence of plasma proteins and a peri-necrotic area with a high lipid content. This result was confirmed by Nile Red staining. Additionally, one structure was detected in the periphery of the tumor. Invisible with histopathological hematoxylin and eosin staining, it was revealed by immunohistochemical Ki-67 and MT1-MMP staining used to visualize the proliferative and invasive activities of glioma, respectively. Hierarchical cluster analysis on the only cluster averaged spectra showed a clear distinction between normal, tumoral, necrotic and edematous tissues. Raman microspectroscopy can discriminate between healthy and tumoral brain tissue and yield spectroscopic markers associated with the proliferative and invasive properties of glioblastoma. Development of in vivo Raman spectroscopy could thus accurately define tumor margins, identify tumor remnants, and help in the development of novel therapies for glioblastoma.

  13. Surrogate matrix: opportunities and challenges for tissue sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Stacy; Gao, Hong

    2015-09-23

    Often there is limited availability of matching tissue matrix and/or the analyte may occur endogenously in the target tissue. Surrogate matrix provides an option for quantitation of drug, metabolite(s) and biomarker(s) in these circumstances. However, the use of a surrogate matrix also presents challenges. This paper summarizes and discusses the challenges of selecting a proper surrogate, validating the suitability of the surrogate and establishing a surrogate tissue method using the fit-for-purpose approach. This paper also systematically reviews the current practices for evaluating key parameters of a surrogate tissue assay, including sensitivity, specificity, selectivity, interference, precision, accuracy, recovery, matrix effects and stability. Considerations and suggestions are provided for dealing with such challenges during method establishment and tissue sample analysis.

  14. Heavy metals in selected tissues and histopathological changes in liver and kidney of common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) from Anzali Wetland, the south Caspian Sea, Iran.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Negin; Etemadi-Deylami, Eelia; Movahedinia, Abdolali; Mohammadi, Yaghoob

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to measure the concentrations of Sn, Pb, Zn, Hg, Cu, Ni and Cd in the muscle and liver of 40 Common Moorhens (Gallinula chloropus) hunted from four stations in Anzali Wetland (Pirbazar, Ghalam-Koudeh, Selkeh and Abkenar). The histopathologic alteration index (HAI) of liver and kidney was also assessed in these birds. The highest concentrations of selected metals were measured in the liver of birds collected from Ghalam-Koudeh (Pb: 4.59±0.21, Sn: 6.663±0.282, Zn: 29.867±2.011, Cu: 24.07±1.84, Hg: 7.5±0.257, Ni: 6.85±0.52, Cd: 1.879±0.4mg kg(-1) dw). The lowest concentrations of metals were measured in the muscle of birds caught from Abkenar (Pb: 0.799±0.207, Sn: 1.873±0.066, Zn: 18.533±1.582, Hg: 0.86±0.08, Ni: 0.53±0.117, Cu: 6.63±1.114, Cd: 0.08±0.002mg kg(-1) dw). Also the highest and lowest concentrations of metals were recorded in sediment of Ghalam-Koudeh and Abkenar stations, respectively. These stations were located next to multi-industry Anzali Port. However, the concentration of Sn and Zn in sediment and tissues of Common Moorhens collected from different stations was lower than the permissible limit suggested by WHO and Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME). But, Pb, Hg and Ni concentration in sediment and birds caught from all stations was higher than the permissible limit defined by WHO and CCME. Cu and Cd concentration in tissue samples and sediment of Ghalam-Koudeh and Pirbazar was also higher than the permissible limit defined by WHO and CCME. Hemorrhage, melanomacrophage aggregations, sinusoidal congestion and hepatocyte vacuolation were the most pathological changes found in the liver. Reduction of the Bowman space, melanomacrophage aggregations and hemorrhage also were observed in the kidney. The HAI means of G. chloropus collected from Ghalam-Koudeh and Pirbazar were significantly higher than other sites. Based on the HAI values and metal bioaccumulation in the tissues of G. chloropus

  15. DNA Yield From Tissue Samples in Surgical Pathology and Minimum Tissue Requirements for Molecular Testing.

    PubMed

    Austin, Melissa C; Smith, Christina; Pritchard, Colin C; Tait, Jonathan F

    2016-02-01

    Complex molecular assays are increasingly used to direct therapy and provide diagnostic and prognostic information but can require relatively large amounts of DNA. To provide data to pathologists to help them assess tissue adequacy and provide prospective guidance on the amount of tissue that should be procured. We used slide-based measurements to establish a relationship between processed tissue volume and DNA yield by A260 from 366 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples submitted for the 3 most common molecular assays performed in our laboratory (EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF). We determined the average DNA yield per unit of tissue volume, and we used the distribution of DNA yields to calculate the minimum volume of tissue that should yield sufficient DNA 99% of the time. All samples with a volume greater than 8 mm(3) yielded at least 1 μg of DNA, and more than 80% of samples producing less than 1 μg were extracted from less than 4 mm(3) of tissue. Nine square millimeters of tissue should produce more than 1 μg of DNA 99% of the time. We conclude that 2 tissue cores, each 1 cm long and obtained with an 18-gauge needle, will almost always provide enough DNA for complex multigene assays, and our methodology may be readily extrapolated to individual institutional practice.

  16. Translational research in pediatrics: tissue sampling and biobanking.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Alayne R; Matsui, Doreen; Rieder, Michael J; Fraser, Douglas D

    2012-01-01

    Translational research is expanding and has become a focus of National Research funding agencies, touted as the primary avenue to improve health care practice. The use of human tissues for research on disease etiology is a pillar of translational research, particularly with innovations in research technologies to investigate the building blocks of disease. In pediatrics, translational research using human tissues has been hindered by the many practical and ethical considerations associated with tissue procurement from children and also by a limited population base for study, by the increasing complexities in conducting clinical research, and by a lack of dedicated child-health research funding. Given these obstacles, pediatric translational research can be enhanced by developing strategic and efficient biobanks that will provide scientists with quality tissue specimens to render accurate and reproducible research results. Indeed, tissue sampling and biobanking within pediatric academic settings has potential to impact child health by promoting bidirectional interaction between clinicians and scientists, helping to maximize research productivity, and providing a competitive edge for attracting and maintaining high-quality personnel. The authors of this review outline key issues and practical solutions to optimize pediatric tissue sampling and biobanking for translational research, activities that will ultimately reduce the burden of childhood disease.

  17. [PCR-based diagnosis of mucormycosis in tissue samples].

    PubMed

    Bialek, R; Zelck, U E

    2013-11-01

    Mucormycosis is characterized by a rapid, often fatal progression. Early diagnosis of invasive mucormycosis is the key for timely therapeutic intervention and improved survival. Contrary to the more prevalent aspergillosis, effective antifungal therapy of mucormycosis is mainly limited to amphotericin B. Given the importance to guide the timely initiation of amphotericin B and possible surgical intervention, rapid and specific identification of fungal hyphae is essential. Conventional histopathology depends on abundance and morphology of the fungi as well as on the skills of the personnel, and usually shows an accuracy of 80 %. PCR assays targeting fungal ribosomal genes to identify Mucorales at least at genus level increase sensitivity, allow a rapid identification as well as detection of double mold infections. Thus, PCR assays are beneficial to complement existing approaches. They are recommended to rapidly specify tissue diagnosis and accurate identification of fungi. This will help to guide effective therapy and thereby, survival will increase. Retrospective analyses of mucormycosis by PCR help to evaluate therapeutic interventions and will optimize treatment options.

  18. Light propagation in tissues: effect of finite size of tissue sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rusina, Tatyana V.

    1995-12-01

    Laser beam propagation inside tissues with different lateral dimensions has been considered. Scattering and anisotropic properties of tissue critically determine spatial fluence distribution and predict sizes of tissue specimens when deviations of this distribution can be neglected. Along the axis of incident beam the fluence rate weakly depends on sample size whereas its relative increase (more than 20%) towards the lateral boundaries. The finite sizes were considered to be substantial only for samples with sizes comparable with the diameter of the laser beam. Interstitial irradiance patterns simulated by Monte Carlo method were compared with direct measurements in human brain specimens.

  19. Ultra-trace analysis of platinum in human tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Elisabeth; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard; Reiter, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Background levels of platinum were determined in human autopsy tissues taken from five individuals. The investigated specimens were lung, liver and kidney. Sample preparation involved microwave digestion followed by an open vessel treatment. Inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was applied in combination with an ultrasonic nebulization/membrane desolvation system for sample introduction. Isotope dilution analysis was employed for accurate quantification of platinum. Excellent procedural detection limits (3 s validation) of 20, 20 and 34 pg g(-1) dry weight were obtained for lung, liver and kidney tissue, respectively. Due to the lack of appropriate biological reference material, road dust (BCR-723) was used for method validation. Platinum levels ranging between 0.03 and 1.42 ng g(-1) were determined in the investigated samples. The platinum concentrations observed in human lung tissue may reflect the increasing atmospheric background levels of platinum originating from car catalysts. The presence of platinum in kidney and liver tissue samples clearly indicates the bioavailability of the element.

  20. Histopathological follow-up by tissue micro-array in a survival study after melanoma treated by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; Chen, Xinmei; Swanson, R James; Schoenbach, Karl H; Yin, Shengyong; Zheng, Shusen

    2011-06-01

    A recent study has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) can affect the intracellular structures of melanoma within weeks. nsPEF is a non-drug, non-thermal treatment using ultrashort, intense pulsed electric fields with nanosecond durations. In the current study we followed up melanoma histopathology and metastasis with tissue micro-array 5 months post-nsPEF. After nsPEF treatment, tumor growth, tumor histology, metastasis, peri-tumor vessel and micro-vessel density were examined for the effect of nsPEF treatment on melanoma in vivo. The 17 nsPEF-treated mice were tumor-free for 169 days, significantly longer than those 19 control mice bearing melanoma without nsPEF. Histopathology follow-up showed that melanoma did not recur to the primary injection place after complete elimination. Compared with the control tumor, nsPEF-treated tumors present decreased micro-vessel density in a time-course manner in this survival study. Treatment with nsPEF caused continuous histopathological changes in melanomas, eliminated melanoma without recurrence at the primary site and prolonged animal survival time by inhibiting tumor blood supply and leading to tumor infarction. Thus, nsPEF could be applied in a non-ionizing therapeutic approach, without other agents, to locally treat tumors within a defined boundary.

  1. Multivariate classification of the infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.; Jones, H.D.; Thomas, E.V.

    1997-03-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy of biopsied canine lymph cells and tissue was performed to investigate the possibility of using IR spectra coupled with multivariate classification methods to classify the samples as normal, hyperplastic, or neoplastic (malignant). IR spectra were obtained in transmission mode through BaF{sub 2} windows and in reflection mode from samples prepared on gold-coated microscope slides. Cytology and histopathology samples were prepared by a variety of methods to identify the optimal methods of sample preparation. Cytospinning procedures that yielded a monolayer of cells on the BaF{sub 2} windows produced a limited set of IR transmission spectra. These transmission spectra were converted to absorbance and formed the basis for a classification rule that yielded 100{percent} correct classification in a cross-validated context. Classifications of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic cell sample spectra were achieved by using both partial least-squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) classification methods. Linear discriminant analysis applied to principal components obtained from the spectral data yielded a small number of misclassifications. PLS weight loading vectors yield valuable qualitative insight into the molecular changes that are responsible for the success of the infrared classification. These successful classification results show promise for assisting pathologists in the diagnosis of cell types and offer future potential for {ital in vivo} IR detection of some types of cancer. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  2. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G(∗) of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G(∗) agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José M A; Gromova, Irina

    2014-06-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis, and both prognosis and prediction of outcome of chemotherapy. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise what has been achieved to date using proteomic technologies and to bring forward novel strategies - based on the analysis of clinically relevant samples - that promise to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens.

  4. Histopathology of Incontinence-Associated Skin Lesions: Inner Tissue Damage Due to Invasion of Proteolytic Enzymes and Bacteria in Macerated Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Mugita, Yuko; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Nakagami, Gojiro; Kishi, Chihiro; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Nagase, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Taketoshi; Abe, Masatoshi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A common complication in patients with incontinence is perineal skin lesions, which are recognized as a form of dermatitis. In these patients, perineal skin is exposed to digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora, as well as excessive water. The relative contributions of digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora to skin lesion formation have not been fully shown. This study was conducted to reveal the process of histopathological changes caused by proteases and bacterial inoculation in skin maceration. For skin maceration, agarose gel containing proteases was applied to the dorsal skin of male Sprague-Dawley rats for 4 h, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculation for 30 min. Macroscopic changes, histological changes, bacterial distribution, inflammatory response, and keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation were examined. Proteases induced digestion in the prickle cell layer of the epidermis, and slight bleeding in the papillary dermis and around hair follicles in the macerated skin without macroscopic evidence of erosion. Bacterial inoculation of the skin macerated by proteolytic solution resulted in the formation of bacteria-rich clusters comprising numerous microorganisms and inflammatory cells within the papillary dermis, with remarkable tissue damage around the clusters. Tissue damage expanded by day 2. On day 3, the proliferative keratinocyte layer was elongated from the bulge region of the hair follicles. Application of proteases and P. aeruginosa induced skin lesion formation internally without macroscopic erosion of the overhydrated area, suggesting that the histopathology might be different from regular dermatitis. The healing process of this lesion is similar to transepidermal elimination. PMID:26407180

  5. Recommended tissue list for histopathologic examination in repeat-dose toxicity and carcinogenicity studies: a proposal of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP).

    PubMed

    Bregman, Carla L; Adler, Rick R; Morton, Daniel G; Regan, Karen S; Yano, Barry L

    2003-01-01

    The Executive Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) appointed an ad hoc task force to devise and recommend a standard list of tissues to be evaluated histopathologically in repeat-dose toxicity and carcinogenicity studies that are used to support the registration of new pharmaceutical products. The recommended tissue list is intended to be a minimum core list that can be used for all types of repeat-dose toxicity and carcinogenicity studies, regardless of route of administration, species or strain of mammalian laboratory animal, duration, or class of drug to be tested. The resulting recommendations of the task force, presented here, were subsequently reviewed by the STP membership and endorsed by the STP Executive Committee.

  6. Histopathological and biochemical effects of intraoperative interstitial radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia and intraoperative electron radiation, alone and in combination, on normal canine liver tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    Acute and chronic histopathologic and biochemical effects on normal canine liver tissue from a single intraoperative application of heat and radiation, heat alone, and radiation alone have been evaluated in 54 adult mongrel dogs. The tolerance of normal canine liver tissue to single doses of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) was evaluated at doses of 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. In addition, intraoperative interstitial hyperthermia (43{degree}C, 60 minutes, 500 kHz) was applied alone and in combination with a single intraoperative dose of 30 Gy from an 18 MeV electron beam. Blood flow at the center of the implantation site before, during and after hyperthermia treatments was also evaluated.

  7. Glypican 3 expression in human nonneoplastic, preneoplastic, and neoplastic tissues: a tissue microarray analysis of 4,387 tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Baumhoer, Daniel; Tornillo, Luigi; Stadlmann, Sylvia; Roncalli, Massimo; Diamantis, Eva Karamitopoulou; Terracciano, Luigi M

    2008-06-01

    Several studies have shown that glypican 3 (GPC3) could be a useful diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and for differentiating HCC from nonneoplastic and preneoplastic liver disease. To systematically investigate the epidemiology of GPC3 expression in the liver and in other organs and tissues, we used tissue microarray technology comprising 4,387 tissue samples from 139 tumor categories and 36 nonneoplastic and preneoplastic tissue types. The immunohistochemical expression of GPC3 was assessed semiquantitatively using a 10% cutoff score and was detected in 9.2% of nonneoplastic liver samples (11/119), 16% of preneoplastic nodular liver lesions (6/38), and 63.6% of HCCs (140/220), underlining the role of GPC3 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, several other tumors revealed consistent expression of GPC3, including squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (27/50 [54%]), testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (32/62 [52%]), and liposarcoma (15/29 [52%]).

  8. Oxidative stress induced by gibberellic acid on kidney tissue of female rats and their progeny: biochemical and histopathological studies.

    PubMed

    Troudi, Afef; Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Soudani, Nejla; Samet, Amira Mahjoubi; Zeghal, Najiba

    2011-09-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA(3)) is an endogenous plant growth regulator used worldwide in agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of GA(3) on the kidney function of adult rats and their pups. Female Wistar rats were given daily 200 ppm GA(3) in drinking water from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. GA(3) induced nephrotoxicity, as evidenced by a reduction in the 24-h urine volume and an increase in plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid levels. Nephrotoxicity was objectified by a significant increase of malondialdehyde level and a decrease of antioxidant enzyme activities like catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione content in kidneys of suckling pups and their mothers. Kidney histological studies confirmed biochemical parameters. We concluded that the exposure of rats to GA(3) induced oxidative stress and histopathological changes in kidneys of suckling rats and their mothers during late pregnancy and early postnatal periods.

  9. Characterization of different tissue changes in normal, betel chewers, potentially malignant lesions, conditions and oral squamous cell carcinoma using reflectance confocal microscopy: correlation with routine histopathology.

    PubMed

    Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Sherlin, Herald J; Anuja, N; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Chandrasekar, T

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the features of normal mucosa, mucosa in betel chewers and smokers, potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa using reflectance confocal microscopy. Oral cavity biopsies were acquired from 25 patients from College of Dental Surgery, Saveetha University who underwent screening for suspected lesions of Oral precancer and Oral cancer along with normal patients who underwent impaction. Biopsies were acquired from the clinically suspicious area and immediately placed in Dulbecco modified eagles growth medium (DMEM). Reflectance confocal images were obtained at multiple image plane depths from biopsies within 6h of excision. After imaging, biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and submitted for routine histopathological examination by an experienced oral and maxillofacial pathologist. Reflectance confocal images were compared with histological images from the same sample to determine the tissue features which contribute to early cellular changes, image contrast and early diagnosis. The confocal images were obtained to a depth of up to 150 microns on intact biopsy specimens and subsequent 3-dimensional images, keratin thickness measurements, cell measurements, cell density analysis and graphical representations were performed using Leica image analysis software. In normal mucosa keratin deposition were seen as alternating dark and bright stacks and in different cell layers the nuclei were seen as disks of varying intensities. In pre-cancerous lesions the keratin thickness and cell nuclear density were found to be increased when compared to normal controls. In OSMF cases confocal images of fibrosis show scattering from individual fibres as hyperdense areas. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cases demonstrated extensive variations in cell size, nuclear size and nuclear morphology. At cellular level, dysplastic features like increased nuclear density, increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, nuclear and cellular

  10. Sex identification of polar bears from blood and tissue samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Garner, G.W.; Cronin, M.A.; Patton, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) can be adversely affected by hunting and other human perturbations because of low population densities and low reproduction rates. The sustainable take of adult females may be as low as 1.5% of the population. Females and accompanying young are most vulnerable to hunting, and hunters have not consistently reported the sex composition of the harvest, therefore a method to confirm the sexes of polar bears harvested in Alaska is needed. Evidence of the sex of harvested animals is often not available, but blood or other tissue samples often are. We extracted DNA from tissue and blood samples, and amplified segments of zinc finger (ZFX and ZFY) genes from both X and Y chromosomes with the polymerase chain reaction. Digestion of amplified portions of the X chromosome with the restriction enzyme HaeIII resulted in subdivision of the original amplified segment into four smaller fragments. Digestion with HaeIII did not subdivide the original segment amplified from the Y chromosome. The differing fragment sizes produced patterns in gel electrophoresis that distinguished samples from male and female bears 100% of the time. This technique is applicable to the investigation of many wildlife management and research questions.

  11. Two histopathologic types of inflammatory vascular disease in MRL/Mp autoimmune mice. Model for human vasculitis in connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, E L; Moyer, C; Travlos, G S; Roths, J B; Murphy, E D

    1985-10-01

    We have recently described 2 histopathologic types of inflammatory vascular disease (IVD) in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS): neutrophilic IVD (NIVD) and mononuclear IVD (MIVD). Autoimmune MRL/Mp mice, which have many features of SS, spontaneously develop IVD which is histopathologically indistinguishable from that observed in human SS patients. Both MRL/Mp-+/+ and MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice develop MIVD which evolves into NIVD and results in decreased survival; the transition to NIVD is accelerated by the lpr gene. The presence of the lpr gene on other genetic backgrounds does not result in a similar acceleration of IVD and associated decreased survival. Thus, the spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation lpr appears to modulate the development of IVD in a strain of mice with an underlying propensity for vasculitis. Based on our observations on IVD in SS patients and MRL/Mp mice, we propose a new model which may enhance our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of IVD in connective tissue disease.

  12. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    PubMed

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysis caused by the fire. In addition to the medico-legal results this evidence allowed to draw conclusions as to whether the fire victim was still alive when the fire started.

  13. Mercury and histopathology of the vulnerable goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara, in U.S. waters: a multi-tissue approach.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas H; Sonne, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Goliath grouper have undergone significant global population declines with potential biological extinction for some subpopulations. Although overfishing and habitat loss are important drivers of these declines, the negative effects of contaminants may also play a role. The life history patterns of goliath grouper may make this species especially prone to exposure to contaminants and may exacerbate bioaccumulation of toxic substances, including mercury, which has documented detrimental health effects. Therefore, we analyzed mercury (in muscle, liver, kidney, gonad, and brain tissue) and the histology of key organs (liver, kidney and gill tissue) in 56 goliath groupers from U.S. waters. Total mercury concentration was greatest in liver tissue, followed by kidney, muscle, gonad, and brain. Maximum mercury concentration ranged from 22.68 μg/g in liver tissue to 0.89 μg/g in brain tissue. Mean mercury concentration ranged from 2.87 μg/g in liver tissue to 0.37 μg/g in brain tissue with a mean of 0.63 μg/g in muscle. Mean mercury concentrations observed in goliath grouper from U.S. waters were within the range known to cause direct health effects in fish after long-term exposure. The lesions and histological changes observed in the liver, kidney, and gills of goliath groupers were similar to those found in other fish following laboratory mercury-exposure trials and to those found in mercury-contaminated fish in wild populations carrying similar or even lower concentrations. We suggest that exposure to mercury and other environmental influences such as pathogens and reduced temperatures could be co-factors in the histological effects or anomalies observed in the present study, and resulting stresses may be involved in the observed population declines in the species.

  14. Biological and Histopathological Investigations of Moclobemide on Injured Ovarian Tissue Following Induction of Ischemia-Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ingec, Metin; Calik, Muhammet; Gundogdu, Cemal; Kurt, Ali; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Isaoglu, Unal; Salman, Suleyman; Akcay, Fatih; Suleyman, Halis

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effects of moclobemide on damaged ovarian tissue induced by ischemia- reperfusion and damaged contralateral ovarian tissue were investigated in rats, biochemically and histologically. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 rats were equally divided into four groups: 10 mg/kg moclobemide, 20 mg/kg moclobemide, ischemia/reperfusion control, and intact control groups. A 2-2.5-cm-long vertical incision was made in the lower abdomen of each rat in order to reach the ovaries, after which a vascular clip was placed on the lower side of the right ovary of each animal in the two treatment groups and the ischemia-reperfusion control group, but not in the healthy (intact control) animal group. The purpose of this procedure was to create ischemia over the course of three hours, then the clips were unclamped to provide reperfusion for the next two hours. At the end of the two hours of reperfusion, all the animals were killed by high-dose anaesthesia and their ovaries were taken and subjected to histological and biochemical (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, glutathione) studies. Results: The obtained results showed that moclobemide suppressed nitric oxide and malondialdehyde production in the ischemia-reperfusion damage area, and prevented the decrease in endogenous antioxidant levels (glutathione) in the rat ovarian tissue. Moclobemide also prevented infiltration of leukocytes to the ovarian tissue. These results showed that moclobemide protected ovarian tissue against ischemiareperfusion injury. Conclusion: This study shows that moclobemide represses malondialdehyde and nitric oxide production in the rat ovarian tissue subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury and keeps the endogenous antioxidant glutathione level from decreasing. Moclobemide also inhibits leukocytic migration into ovarian tissue following ischemia-reperfusion injury. From these results, it is suggested that moclobemide can be used in the treatment of ovarian ischemia

  15. Biological and histopathological investigations of moclobemide on injured ovarian tissue following induction of ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Ingec, Metin; Calik, Muhammet; Gundogdu, Cemal; Kurt, Ali; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Isaoglu, Unal; Salman, Suleyman; Akcay, Fatih; Suleyman, Halis

    2012-04-01

    The effects of moclobemide on damaged ovarian tissue induced by ischemia- reperfusion and damaged contralateral ovarian tissue were investigated in rats, biochemically and histologically. In this experimental study, 40 rats were equally divided into four groups: 10 mg/kg moclobemide, 20 mg/kg moclobemide, ischemia/reperfusion control, and intact control groups. A 2-2.5-cm-long vertical incision was made in the lower abdomen of each rat in order to reach the ovaries, after which a vascular clip was placed on the lower side of the right ovary of each animal in the two treatment groups and the ischemia-reperfusion control group, but not in the healthy (intact control) animal group. The purpose of this procedure was to create ischemia over the course of three hours, then the clips were unclamped to provide reperfusion for the next two hours. At the end of the two hours of reperfusion, all the animals were killed by high-dose anaesthesia and their ovaries were taken and subjected to histological and biochemical (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, glutathione) studies. The obtained results showed that moclobemide suppressed nitric oxide and malondialdehyde production in the ischemia-reperfusion damage area, and prevented the decrease in endogenous antioxidant levels (glutathione) in the rat ovarian tissue. Moclobemide also prevented infiltration of leukocytes to the ovarian tissue. These results showed that moclobemide protected ovarian tissue against ischemiareperfusion injury. This study shows that moclobemide represses malondialdehyde and nitric oxide production in the rat ovarian tissue subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury and keeps the endogenous antioxidant glutathione level from decreasing. Moclobemide also inhibits leukocytic migration into ovarian tissue following ischemia-reperfusion injury. From these results, it is suggested that moclobemide can be used in the treatment of ovarian ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  16. Research of electrosurgical ablation with antiadhesive functionalization on thermal and histopathological effects of brain tissues in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Wen-Tien; Kung, Chun-Ming; Chu, Jan-Show; Ou, Keng-Liang; Peng, Pei-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Thermal injury and tissue sticking are two major concerns in the electrosurgery. In the present study, the effect of lateral thermal injury caused by different electrosurgical electrodes on wound healing was investigated. An electrosurgical unit equipped with untreated (SS) and titanium oxide layer-coated (TiO2-coated) stainless steel needle-type electrodes was used to create lesions on the rat brain tissue. TiO2 layers were produced by radiofrequency plasma and magnetron sputtering in the form of amorphous (TO-SS-1), anatase (TO-SS-2), and rutile (TO-SS-3) phase. Animals were sacrificed for evaluations at 0, 2, 7, and 28 days postoperatively. TO-SS-3 electrodes generated lower levels of sticking tissue, and the thermographs showed that the recorded highest temperature in brain tissue from the TO-SS-3 electrode was significantly lower than in the SS electrode. The total injury area of brain tissue caused by TO-SS-1 and TO-SS-3 electrodes was significantly lower than that caused by SS electrodes at each time point. The results of the present study reveal that the plating of electrodes with a TiO2 film with rutile phases is an efficient method for improving the performance of electrosurgical units and should benefit wound healing.

  17. Segmentation of colon tissue sample images using multiple graphics accelerators.

    PubMed

    Szénási, Sándor

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, processing medical images is increasingly done through using digital imagery and custom software solutions. The distributed algorithm presented in this paper is used to detect special tissue parts, the nuclei on haematoxylin and eosin stained colon tissue sample images. The main aim of this work is the development of a new data-parallel region growing algorithm that can be implemented even in an environment using multiple video accelerators. This new method has three levels of parallelism: (a) the parallel region growing itself, (b) starting more region growing in the device, and (c) using more than one accelerator. We use the split-and-merge technique based on our already existing data-parallel cell nuclei segmentation algorithm extended with a fast, backtracking-based, non-overlapping cell filter method. This extension does not cause significant degradation of the accuracy; the results are practically the same as those of the original sequential region growing method. However, as expected, using more devices usually means that less time is needed to process the tissue image; in the case of the configuration of one central processing unit and two graphics cards, the average speed-up is about 4-6×. The implemented algorithm has the additional advantage of efficiently processing very large images with high memory requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The visual assessment of broth cultures for tissue bank samples.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2017-01-05

    The bioburden screening process of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received at the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services includes the routine use of solid agar and cooked meat (CM) broth media. CM has been routinely sub-cultured onto solid agar plates after aerobic incubation at 35 °C. This study will evaluate whether a visual assessment of CM can replace sub-culture by an in vitro inoculation and a prospective study. Eight challenge organisms were serially diluted and inoculated into CM. The average inoculum of 0.5-5.5 CFU produced visible turbidity of CM after 24-h incubation for 7 of the challenge organisms with one organism producing turbidity after 48-h incubation. The prospective study evaluated 222 CM of which 213 were visually clear and no-growth on sub-culture and 9 turbid CM which were culture positive. Broth cultures are an integral part of the bioburden screening process of allograft musculoskeletal tissue and swab samples and visual assessment of CM can replace sub-culture.

  19. Histopathological Findings of Endometrial Samples and its Correlation Between the Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Women in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Makaju, R; Shrestha, S; Shrestha, A

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is considered as one of the most common problems among women. The therapy is incomplete without knowing the underlying pathology. To determine the types and frequency of endometrial pathologies in patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding at Dhulikhel Hospital Kathmandu university Hospital. This is retrospective study total 100 cases were included over a period of one year of Abnormal Uterine bleeding. Out of 100 cases of Abnormal uterine bleeding, 61% were due to non-organic cause with a commonest histopathological findings proliferative endometrium. 27% cases were due to organic cause with pregnancy related condition as most common finding. 12% were reported as inadequate. The rate of postmenopausal bleeding declined with increasing age in the postmenopausal period and endometritis was the predominant finding. There is an age specific association of Abnormal uterine bleeding with increased incidence in perimenopausal age group. Postmenopausal bleeding declined with increasing with endometritis the most common finding. Dilation and curettage is helpful to exclude other organic pathology. It is useful for diagnosis and to know pathological incidence of organic lesions in cases of Abnormal uterine bleeding prior to surgery.

  20. Anatomic, histopathologic, and echocardiographic features in a dog with an atypical pulmonary valve stenosis with a fibrous band of tissue and a patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hakyoung; Kim, Jaehwan; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Kidong

    2017-07-11

    Congenital pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus are common congenital heart defects in dogs. However, concurrence of atypical pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus is uncommon. This report describes the anatomic, histopathologic, and echocardiographic features in a dog with concomitant pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus with atypical pulmonary valve dysplasia that included a fibrous band of tissue. A 1.5-year-old intact female Chihuahua dog weighing 3.3 kg presented with a continuous grade VI cardiac murmur, poor exercise tolerance, and an intermittent cough. Echocardiography indicated pulmonary valve stenosis, a thickened dysplastic valve without annular hypoplasia, and a type IIA patent ductus arteriosus. The pulmonary valve was thick line-shaped in systole and dome-shaped towards the right ventricular outflow tract in diastole. The dog suffered a fatal cardiac arrest during an attempted balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty. Necropsy revealed pulmonary valve dysplasia, commissural fusion, and incomplete opening and closing of the pulmonary valve because of a fibrous band of tissue causing adhesion between the right ventricular outflow tract and the dysplastic intermediate cusp of the valve. A fibrous band of tissue between the right ventricular outflow track and the pulmonary valve should be considered as a cause of pulmonary valve stenosis. Pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus can have conflicting effects on diastolic and systolic dysfunction, respectively. Therefore, beta-blockers should always be used carefully, particularly in patients with a heart defect where there is concern about left ventricular systolic function.

  1. Effective attenuation of atrazine-induced histopathological changes in testicular tissue by antioxidant N-phenyl-4-aryl-polyhydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Chandak, Navneet; Bhardwaj, Jitender K; Zheleva-Dimitrova, Dimitrina; Kitanov, Gerassim; Sharma, Rajnesh K; Sharma, Pawan K; Saso, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Some of the environmental toxicants acting as endocrine disruptors have been associated with health hazards in human and wildlife by modulating hormonal actions. Atrazine, a strong endocrine disruptor, induces detrimental effects on gonads in male and female, and causes impairment of fertility and developmental problems as well as sex alterations. Atrazine decreases the activities of antioxidant enzymes and thus responsible for oxidative stress. Natural antioxidants have shown ability to reduce/slow down the apoptotic effect of atrazine on testicular tissue. In the present study, some N-phenyl-4-aryl-polyhydroquinolines bearing phenolic or/and alkoxy group(s) (6a-6g) were synthesized and evaluated for antioxidant activity in four different assays. Three best compounds (6e-6g) were studied for their ameliorative effect on testicular tissue supplemented with atrazine in vitro.

  2. Comparison between two in situ methods for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis detection in tissue samples from infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Etchechoury, D; Gioffré, A; Paolicchi, F; Blanco Viera, F; Mundo, S; Romano, M I

    2009-03-02

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic infectious disorder caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map). The disease produces diarrhea and weight loss in cattle and other animal species, and it is characterized by granulomatous enteritis and lymphadenitis. Histopathology and in situ techniques can be used as a diagnostic test, but the performance of these methods was not previously compared. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the ability of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect Map in formalin-fixed tissue samples from infected cattle. Samples (ileum or ileocecal lymph node) from four animals that had positive Map culturing, lesions and detectable acid fast bacilli, as well as from two control animals, were tested by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Immunostaining and positive hybridization were observed in areas with lesions from infected animal samples, inside the cytoplasm of macrophages, epithelioid and giant cells. Immunostaining was intense in three samples and weak in one, while hybridization was weak in all cases. In situ hybridization was positive in negative areas of tissues analyzed by immunohistochemistry, which could be related to spheroplast detection as it was previously described for this method. Control samples resulted negative by these two methods. Both techniques were able to detect Map in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissues, however immunohistochemistry produced higher intensity staining and was easier to perform. Therefore, we believe that immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to be useful for the post-mortem diagnosis and research of Paratuberculosis.

  3. Immunohistochemical detection of Aspergillus species in pediatric tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Choi, John K; Mauger, Joanne; McGowan, Karin L

    2004-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis often requires tissue samples for histologic evidence of fungal infection and culture confirmation of Aspergillus species. However, the culture frequently fails to isolate Aspergillus species. Alternative approaches to confirm Aspergillus infection use polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemical analysis on paraffin-embedded sections. These approaches are well characterized in animals and adult patients but not pediatric patients. We studied the immunoreactivity of a commercially available monoclonal antibody, Mab-WF-AF-1 (DAKO, Carpinteria, CA), on paraffin-embedded sections from 16 pediatric cases with invasive aspergillosis, of which 12 were proven by culture. Optimal immunoreactivity required microwave antigen retrieval using high pH; 5 other antigen retrieval approaches were unsuccessful. With optimization, the monoclonal antibody was strongly immunoreactive in all cases with staining of the Aspergillus cell wall, septa, and cytoplasm. Background was minimal with no cross-reactivity to Candida albicans. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of the Mab-WF-AF-1 antibody in pediatric tissues suspected of invasive aspergillosis.

  4. Measurement of phthalates in small samples of mammalian tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Acott, P.D.; Murphy, M.G.; Ogborn, M.R.; Crocker, J.F.S.

    1987-03-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is a phthalic acid ester that is used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products, many of which have widespread medical application. DEHP has been shown to be leached from products used for storage and delivery of blood transfusions during procedures such as plasmaphoresis, hemodialysis and open heart surgery. Results of studies in this laboratory have suggested that there is an association between the absorption and deposition of DEHP (and/or related chemicals) in the kidney and the acquired renal cystic disease (ACD) frequently seen in patients who have undergone prolonged dialysis treatment. In order to determine the relationship between the two, it has been necessary to establish a method for extracting and accurately quantitating minute amounts of these chemicals in small tissue samples. The authors have now established such a method using kidneys from normal rats and from a rat model for ACD.

  5. Histopathological changes of renal tissue following sodium fluoride administration in two consecutive generations of mice. Correlation with the urinary elimination of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dimcevici Poesina, Nicoleta; Bălălău, Cristian; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Nimigean, Victor; Ion, Ion; Baconi, Daniela; Bârcă, Maria; Băran Poesina, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects (evaluated as histopathological changes) of sodium fluoride on the kidney in two consecutive generations of NMRI mice. An attempt to correlate the toxicity with the urinary elimination of fluoride has been made, as urinary fluoride excretion has been widely used as an indicator of fluoride intake and exposure. Six mixed (males and females) animal groups have been constituted by dividing the populations of mice derived from pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.5 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.5 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage and pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.25 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.25 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage; three types of sodium fluoride treatments were administrated: homeopathic, allopathic-homeopathic and allopathic. When the animals reached the adulthood, by randomization, they were selected in pairs for giving birth to the second generation of mice. No treatments were administrated to the second generation of mice; thus, the urinary elimination of fluoride in the second generation is attributed to exposure at sodium fluoride before birth. The administration of sodium fluoride to the first generation (F1) is realized until the mice reached the adulthood. For the first generation, the urine was collected at three times, every three weeks: at the age of four weeks, seven weeks and 11 weeks; single sampling urine, at the age of four weeks, has been conducted for the second generation. The urine samples have been analyzed using the ion selective electrode method for fluoride. For the histopathological examination, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation; the kidneys were collected in a 10% formalin solution. The preparation of samples for optical microscopy was realized with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The results indicate that the elimination of fluoride was similar (at the second evaluation, at 7-week-old of the first generation) for the both generations

  6. Histopathology of a mesoparasitic hatschekiid copepod in hospite: does Mihbaicola sakamakii (Copepoda: Siphonostomatoida: Hatschekiidae) fast within the host fish tissue?

    PubMed

    Hirose, Euichi; Uyeno, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    Mihbaicola sakamakii is a mesoparasitic copepod that infests the branchiostegal membranes of groupers (Perciformes: Serranidae). In this study, we observed M. sakamakii within host tissue. Histologically, copepods were found enclosed inside a pouch composed of the thickened epidermis of the host, tightly encased on all sides by the host epidermal pouch wall. There were no host blood cells or other food resources in the pouch lumen. Since the host epidermis was intact and continuous, even in the vicinity of the oral region of the parasite, the copepod would not have access to the host blood in this state. However, the stomach (ampullary part of the mid gut) was filled with granular components, the majority of which were crystalloids that likely originated from fish erythrocyte hemoglobin. We supposed that the parasite drinks blood exuded from the lesion in the fish caused by copepod entry into the host tissue. Invasion of the parasite may elicit immune responses in the host, but there were no traces on the copepod of any cellular immune reactions, such as encapsulation. The array of minute protuberances on the copepod cuticle surface may be involved in avoidance of cell adhesion. After the lesion has healed, the copepod is enclosed in a tough epidermal pouch, in which it gradually digests the contents of its stomach and continues egg production.

  7. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  8. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-10

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  9. Tissue tropism of Saint Louis encephalitis virus: Histopathology triggered by epidemic and non-epidemic strains isolated in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, María Elisa; Albrieu-Llinás, Guillermo; Pisano, María Belén; Tauro, Laura Beatriz; Gorosito-Serrán, Melisa; Beccaria, Cristian Gabriel; Díaz, Luis Adrián; Vázquez, Ana; Quaglia, Agustín; López, Cristina; Spinsanti, Lorena; Gruppi, Adriana; Contigiani, Marta Silvia

    2017-05-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) reemerged in South America, and caused encephalitis outbreaks at the beginning of the 21st century. To enhance our knowledge about SLEV virulence, we performed comparative pathogenesis studies in Swiss albino mice inoculated with two different variants, the epidemic strain CbaAr-4005 and the non-epidemic strain CorAn-9275. Only the infection of mice with SLEV strain CbaAr-4005 resulted in high viremia, invasion of peripheral tissues including the lungs, kidney, and spleen, and viral neuroinvasion. This was associated with inflammatory pathology in the lungs, spleen, and brain as well as morbidity and mortality. In contrast, neither signs of desease nor viral replication were observed in mice infected with strain CorAn-9275. Interestingly, important loss of B cells and development of altered germinal centers (GC) were detected in the spleen of mice infected with strain CbaAr-4005, whereas mice infected with SLEV CorAn-9275 developed prominent GC with conserved follicular architecture, and neutralizing antibodies.

  10. Histopathological findings in a highly invasive mouse mammary carcinoma transfected with human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1.

    PubMed

    Alonso, D F; Skilton, G; De Lorenzo, M S; Scursoni, A M; Yoshiji, H; Gomez, D E

    1998-01-01

    We have transfected a full-lenght cDNA-encoding human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) by lipofection in highly invasive F3II mouse mammary sarcomatoid carcinoma cells. In vitro, overexpression of TIMP-1 was associated with abrogation of metalloproteinase activity, extended doubling time, and a more flattened, epithelioid polyhedric morphology. Female Balb/c mice inoculated subcutaneously with TIMP-1 transfectant exhibited a prolonged tumor latency and tumor burden was significantly lower in early stages of tumor growth. Control F3II cells grew by invading the muscular and adipose layers of the subcutis, dermis, and dermal papillae. On the contrary, mammary carcinoma cells transfected with TIMP-1 grew without signs of active invasion of dermis. Tumors also revealed a decreased amount of necrosis and host inflammatory cell infiltrates. However, histological analysis did not demonstrate any change in vascular density. Animals bearing F3II tumors overexpressing TIMP-1 showed a significant reduction in the size of metastatic lung nodules. These data suggested that TIMP-1 overexpression may reduce local invasion and delay the progression of the metastatic disease in the present mammary tumor model.

  11. Incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain: estimate from feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, D A; Gaunt, C; Shaw, D J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain (GB). This was performed using the proxy measure of feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories in GB that were found to have histopathological changes typical of mycobacterial infection ('MYC'). Sixteen primary diagnostic laboratories were asked for information on the number of feline samples submitted in 2009, the number with MYC, the number undergoing Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining and, for comparison, the number diagnosed with lymphoma. Eight laboratories provided full data for the whole year: 11,782 samples; lymphoma 3.2% (mean, 95% CI: 2.89, 3.5), MYC 1.16% (0.98; 1.37) and ZN-positive 0.31% (0.22; 0.43). Data on 1569 samples from seven laboratories that provided partial data on samples for the whole year revealed similar results, although all changes were more frequent: lymphoma 5.42% (4.35; 6.66), MYC 2.36% (1.66; 3.23) and ZN-positive 0.77% (0.40; 1.33). One laboratory only provided data for part of the year (4.5 months), reporting all three types of histopathology less frequently: 18,232 samples; lymphoma 0.2% (0.18; 0.32), MYC 0.07% (0.04; 0.12) and ZN-positive 0.05% (0.02; 0.09). The reasons for low reporting rates in this high-throughput laboratory are unclear. In total, 187 samples were reported as having MYC. Five Reference laboratories were also contacted, reporting 174 feline tissue submissions in 2009, with mycobacteria being cultured from 90. The study shows that MYC are frequently reported in tissue samples from cats in GB, being reported in ~1% of samples, with confirmation as ZN-positive in ~0.3%. Lymphoma is recognized as a common disease in cats, being seen in ~3% of samples in this study. When compared against MYC, lymphoma was reported only twice as frequently. This confirms that far from being rare, clinically significant mycobacterial infections occur commonly in cats in GB. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Nail histopathology.

    PubMed

    Martin, B

    2013-09-01

    The structure of the nail unit is complex and many dermatologists and dermatopathologists have an incomplete understanding of it. Familiarity with the anatomy and histology of this unit, however, is a key factor in improving the diagnostic yield of nail biopsy. Inflammatory or infectious conditions that affect the nail can have a marked impact on a patient's quality of life. A wide-ranging variety of tumors can also develop in this region and they may be life-threatening or require surgery that will result in functional defects. The author reviews the anatomy and histology of the nail unit as well as the basic histopathologic findings in the most common conditions affecting the nails.

  13. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disaster victim identification (DVI) represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year of room temperature storage. Methods Fragments of human psoas muscle were exposed to three different environmental conditions for diverse time periods at room temperature. Storage conditions included: (a) a preserving medium consisting of solid sodium chloride (salt), (b) no additional substances and (c) garden soil. DNA was extracted with proteinase K/SDS followed by organic solvent treatment and concentration by centrifugal filter devices. Quantification was carried out by real-time PCR using commercial kits. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing profiles were analysed with 'expert software'. Results DNA quantities recovered from samples stored in salt were similar up to the complete storage time and underscored the effectiveness of the preservation method. It was possible to reliably and accurately type different genetic systems including autosomal STRs and mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups. Autosomal STR typing quality was evaluated by expert software, denoting high quality profiles from DNA samples obtained from corpse tissue stored in salt for up to 365 days. Conclusions The procedure proposed herein is a cost efficient alternative for storage of human remains in challenging environmental areas, such as mass disaster locations, mass graves and exhumations. This technique should be considered as an additional method for sample storage when preservation of DNA integrity is required for PCR-based DNA typing. PMID:21846338

  14. Quantitation of ranaviruses in cell culture and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Riikka; Honkanen, Jarno; Jensen, Britt Bang; Ariel, Ellen; Tapiovaara, Hannele

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) based on a standard curve was developed for detection and quantitation of ranaviruses. The target gene for the qPCR was viral DNA polymerase (DNApol). All ten ranavirus isolates studied (Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus, EHNV; European catfish virus, ECV; European sheatfish virus, ESV; Frog virus 3, FV3; Bohle iridovirus, BIV; Doctor fish virus, DFV; Guppy virus 6, GV6; Pike-perch iridovirus, PPIV; Rana esculenta virus Italy 282/I02, REV282/I02 and Short-finned eel ranavirus, SERV) were detected with the qPCR assay. In addition, two fish cell lines - epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) and bluegill fry (BF-2) - were infected with four of the isolates (EHNV, ECV, FV3 and DFV), and the viral quantity was determined from seven time points during the first three days after infection. The qPCR was also used to determine the viral load in tissue samples from pike (Esox lucius) fry challenged experimentally with EHNV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Histopathological Image Analysis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gurcan, Metin N.; Boucheron, Laura; Can, Ali; Madabhushi, Anant; Rajpoot, Nasir; Yener, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, dramatic increases in computational power and improvement in image analysis algorithms have allowed the development of powerful computer-assisted analytical approaches to radiological data. With the recent advent of whole slide digital scanners, tissue histopathology slides can now be digitized and stored in digital image form. Consequently, digitized tissue histopathology has now become amenable to the application of computerized image analysis and machine learning techniques. Analogous to the role of computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms in medical imaging to complement the opinion of a radiologist, CAD algorithms have begun to be developed for disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis prediction to complement to the opinion of the pathologist. In this paper, we review the recent state of the art CAD technology for digitized histopathology. This paper also briefly describes the development and application of novel image analysis technology for a few specific histopathology related problems being pursued in the United States and Europe. PMID:20671804

  16. Clinical and Histopathological Investigation of Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common epidermal tumors of the skin. However, only a few large-scale clinicohistopathological investigations have been conducted on SK or on the possible correlation between histopathological SK subtype and location. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and histopathological features of a relatively large number of cases of diagnosed SK. Methods Two hundred and seventy-one pathology slides of skin tissue from patients with clinically diagnosed SK and 206 cases of biopsy-proven SK were analyzed. The biopsy-proven cases of SK were assessed for histopathological subclassification. The demographic, clinical, and histopathological data of the patients were collected for analysis of associated factors. Results The most frequent histopathological subtype was the acanthotic type, followed by mixed, hyperkeratotic, melanoacanthoma, clonal, irritated, and adenoid types; an unexpectedly high percentage (9.2%) of the melanoacanthoma variant was observed. The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites than in sun-protected sites (p=0.028). Premalignant and malignant entities together represented almost one-quarter (24.2%) of the clinicopathological mismatch cases (i.e., mismatch between the clinical and histopathological diagnoses). Regarding the location of SK development, the frequency of mismatch for the sun-exposed areas was significantly higher than that for sun-protected areas (p=0.043). Conclusion The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites. Biopsy sampling should be performed for lesions situated in sun-exposed areas to exclude other premalignant or malignant diseases. PMID:27081260

  17. [Advantages of culture models utilizing substrata made of TOSHI (tissue/organ sections for histopathology) or collagen vitrigel membrane and their application concept for drug development researches].

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Tomoyo; Yanagihara, Kana; Nakazawa, Yukiko; Nitani, Aya; Terada, Satoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ueno, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    To create new in vitro culture models for extrapolating the cell response in vivo, we attempted to devise culture substrata of anchorage-dependent cells. The first substratum, tissue/organ sections for histopathology(TOSHI)-substratum was found to conserve both tissue composition and microarchitecture in an in vivo environment. Collagen vitrigel membrane, the second substratum investigated, possesses excellent strength and protein permeability. Both substrata were developed and utilized for the culture of various anchorage-dependent cells. TOSHI-substratum prepared from regenerative mouse livers after carbon tetrachloride intoxication efficiently induced the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. Also, the time-course cell behavior of two different cell lines on various TOSHI-substrata prepared from rat mature organs was successfully converted into a three-dimensional graph chart, i.e. a mathematical model. These data suggest that the analysis of interactions between different cell types and various TOSHI-substrata will play an important role for a novel approach to study both cellomics and histomics. Meanwhile, the collagen vitrigel membrane is easy to handle by forceps, resulting in double surface-culture of different cell types by the manipulation of two-dimensional cultures. In the crosstalk model between PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells and L929 fibroblasts, nerve growth factor secreted from L929 cells permeated the collagen vitrigel membrane and induced neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells via a paracrine effect. Futhermore, the function of rat primary hepatocytes was well maintained on the collagen vitrigel membrane. These data suggest that the collagen vitrigel membrane-substratum has many advantages for the reconstruction of culture models.

  18. Histopathology and bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Cr, Ni and Pb) in fish (Channa striatus and Heteropneustes fossilis) tissue: a study for toxicity and ecological impacts.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Mahino; Usmani, Nazura

    2013-05-01

    Abstract: The water samples were collected from the 22 km segment III of Yamuna River from Okhla barrage. This segment receives water from 17 sewage drains of Delhi, Western Yamuna Canal (WYC), upper Ganga canal via Najafgarh drain and Hindon cut canal. Hence, the water samples collected were used to determine the presence of Chromium, Nickel and Lead through Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. The concentration of these heavy metals were much above the maximum permissible limits set by WHO. This was bound to have its influence on the riverine flora and fauna. To evaluate this, two popularly consumed fish species such as Channa striatus and Heteropneustes fossilis were caught and the bioaccumulation of these heavy metals were estimated in different organs (liver, kidney, gill and muscle). It was found that Cr accumulated the most in these organs (gill being most influenced) in both the species. The accumulation of all these heavy metals were above MPL set by World Health Organisation (WHO) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Histopathology was also conducted where heavy damages were observed in both liver and kidney of both the species.

  19. Variation in glycogen concentrations within mantle and foot tissue in Amblema plicata plicata: Implications for tissue biopsy sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naimo, T.J.; Monroe, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    With the development of techniques to non-lethally biopsy tissue from unionids, a new method is available to measure changes in biochemical, contaminant, and genetic constituents in this imperiled faunal group. However, before its widespread application, information on the variability of biochemical components within and among tissues needs to be evaluated. We measured glycogen concentrations in foot and mantle tissue in Amblema plicata plicata (Say, 1817) to determine if glycogen was evenly distributed within and between tissues and to determine which tissue might be more responsive to the stress associated with relocating mussels. Glycogen was measured in two groups of mussels: those sampled from their native environment (undisturbed mussels) and quickly frozen for analysis and those relocated into an artificial pond (relocated mussels) for 24 months before analysis. In both undisturbed and relocated mussels, glycogen concentrations were evenly distributed within foot, but not within mantle tissue. In mantle tissue, concentrations of glycogen varied about 2-fold among sections. In addition, glycogen varied significantly between tissues in undisturbed mussels, but not in relocated mussels. Twenty-four months after relocation, glycogen concentrations had declined by 80% in mantle tissue and by 56% in foot tissue relative to the undisturbed mussels. These data indicate that representative biopsy samples can be obtained from foot tissue, but not mantle tissue. We hypothesize that mantle tissue could be more responsive to the stress of relocation due to its high metabolic activity associated with shell formation.

  20. Evidence of presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovine tissue samples by multiplex PCR: possible relevance to reverse zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, M; Chakravarti, S; Sharma, V; Sanjeeth, B S; Churamani, C P; Kanwar, N S

    2014-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the most important zoonotic health concerns worldwide. The transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from humans to animals also occurs especially in countries where there is close interaction of humans with the animals. In the present study, thirty bovine lung tissue autopsy samples from an organized dairy farm located in North India were screened for the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by smear microscopy, histopathological findings and PCR. Differential diagnosis of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis was made based on the deletion of mce-3 operon in M. bovis. The present study found eight of these samples positive for M. tuberculosis by multiplex PCR. Sequencing was performed on two PCR-positive representative samples and on annotation, and BLAST analysis confirmed the presence of gene fragment specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The presence of M. tuberculosis in all the positive samples raises the possibility of human-to-cattle transmission and possible adaptation of this organism in bovine tissues. This study accentuates the importance of screening and differential diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in humans and livestock for adopting effective TB control and eradication programmes. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Studying Genes in Tissue Samples From Younger and Adolescent Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  2. Histopathological changes in tendinopathy--potential roles of BMPs?

    PubMed

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee

    2013-12-01

    The pathogenesis of tendinopathy remains unclear. Chondro-osteogenic BMPs such as BMP-2, BMP-4 and BMP-7 have been reported in clinical samples and animal models of tendinopathy. As chondrocyte-like cells and ossified deposits have been observed in both clinical samples and animal models of failed tendon healing tendinopathy, chondro-osteogenic BMPs might contribute to tissue metaplasia and other histopathological changes in tendinopathy. In this review I have summarized the current evidence supporting the roles of chondro-osteogenic BMPs in the histopathological changes of tendinopathy. The potential targets, effects and sources of these BMPs are discussed. I have also provided directions for future studies about the potential roles of BMPs in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Better understanding of the roles of these BMPs in the histopathological changes of tendinopathy could provide new options for the prevention and treatment of this disabling tendon disorder.

  3. Out-of-Sample Extrapolation utilizing Semi-Supervised Manifold Learning (OSE-SSL): Content Based Image Retrieval for Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rachel; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-06-06

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) retrieves database images most similar to the query image by (1) extracting quantitative image descriptors and (2) calculating similarity between database and query image descriptors. Recently, manifold learning (ML) has been used to perform CBIR in a low dimensional representation of the high dimensional image descriptor space to avoid the curse of dimensionality. ML schemes are computationally expensive, requiring an eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) for every new query image to learn its low dimensional representation. We present out-of-sample extrapolation utilizing semi-supervised ML (OSE-SSL) to learn the low dimensional representation without recomputing the EVD for each query image. OSE-SSL incorporates semantic information, partial class label, into a ML scheme such that the low dimensional representation co-localizes semantically similar images. In the context of prostate histopathology, gland morphology is an integral component of the Gleason score which enables discrimination between prostate cancer aggressiveness. Images are represented by shape features extracted from the prostate gland. CBIR with OSE-SSL for prostate histology obtained from 58 patient studies, yielded an area under the precision recall curve (AUPRC) of 0.53 ± 0.03 comparatively a CBIR with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to learn a low dimensional space yielded an AUPRC of 0.44 ± 0.01.

  4. Out-of-Sample Extrapolation utilizing Semi-Supervised Manifold Learning (OSE-SSL): Content Based Image Retrieval for Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Rachel; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) retrieves database images most similar to the query image by (1) extracting quantitative image descriptors and (2) calculating similarity between database and query image descriptors. Recently, manifold learning (ML) has been used to perform CBIR in a low dimensional representation of the high dimensional image descriptor space to avoid the curse of dimensionality. ML schemes are computationally expensive, requiring an eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) for every new query image to learn its low dimensional representation. We present out-of-sample extrapolation utilizing semi-supervised ML (OSE-SSL) to learn the low dimensional representation without recomputing the EVD for each query image. OSE-SSL incorporates semantic information, partial class label, into a ML scheme such that the low dimensional representation co-localizes semantically similar images. In the context of prostate histopathology, gland morphology is an integral component of the Gleason score which enables discrimination between prostate cancer aggressiveness. Images are represented by shape features extracted from the prostate gland. CBIR with OSE-SSL for prostate histology obtained from 58 patient studies, yielded an area under the precision recall curve (AUPRC) of 0.53 ± 0.03 comparatively a CBIR with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to learn a low dimensional space yielded an AUPRC of 0.44 ± 0.01. PMID:27264985

  5. Acid-free glyoxal as a substitute of formalin for structural and molecular preservation in tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, Gianni; Annaratone, Laura; Berrino, Enrico; Miglio, Umberto; Panero, Mara; Cupo, Marco; Gugliotta, Patrizia; Venesio, Tiziana; Sapino, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Tissue fixation in phosphate buffered formalin (PBF) remains the standard procedure in histopathology, since it results in an optimal structural, antigenic and molecular preservation that justifies the pivotal role presently played by diagnoses on PBF-fixed tissues in precision medicine. However, toxicity of formaldehyde causes an environmental concern and may demand substitution of this reagent. Having observed that the reported drawbacks of commercially available glyoxal substitutes of PBF (Prefer, Glyo-fix, Histo-Fix, Histo-CHOICE, and Safe-Fix II) are likely related to their acidity, we have devised a neutral fixative, obtained by removing acids from the dialdehyde glyoxal with an ion-exchange resin. The resulting glyoxal acid-free (GAF) fixative has been tested in a cohort of 30 specimens including colon (N = 25) and stomach (N = 5) cancers. Our results show that GAF fixation produces a tissue and cellular preservation similar to that produced by PBF. Comparable immuno-histochemical and molecular (DNA and RNA) analytical data were obtained. We observed a significant enrichment of longer DNA fragment size in GAF-fixed compared to PBF-fixed samples. Adoption of GAF as a non-toxic histological fixative of choice would require a process of validation, but the present data suggest that it represents a reliable candidate. PMID:28796828

  6. IHC Profiler: An Open Source Plugin for the Quantitative Evaluation and Automated Scoring of Immunohistochemistry Images of Human Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703) of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%). This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and further help in

  7. Histopathological features of equine superficial, nonhealing, corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Julie E; Clode, Alison B; Borst, Luke B; Gilger, Brian C

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate corneal changes associated with chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulcers in horses via common histopathological stains. Retrospective study. Twenty-four horses diagnosed with chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulceration. The medical records of horses evaluated at North Carolina State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital (NCSU-VTH) from 2005 to 2011, diagnosed with a chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulcer and treated with superficial keratectomy (SK) were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were superficial corneal ulceration, no cellular infiltration via slit-lamp biomicroscopy, no microorganisms evident on corneal cytology, and acquisition of samples for aerobic bacterial and common fungal cultures. Corneal tissue samples were evaluated histopathologically for the presence or absence of a nonadherent epithelial 'lip', epithelial dysmaturity, intraepithelial inflammatory cells, an acellular hyaline zone in the anterior stroma, and stromal inflammatory cells, fibrosis and vascularization. In the majority of analyzed samples, epithelial cells adjacent to the ulcerated site showed nonadherence to the basement membrane and dysmaturity. Intraepithelial inflammatory cell infiltration was uncommon. Histopathological features of an anterior stromal hyaline zone, intrastromal inflammation, fibrosis and vascularization were variably present. The most consistent histopathological characteristics of equine chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulcers include epithelial nonadherence, epithelial dysmaturity and mild to moderate stromal inflammation; however, one set of histopathological characteristics does not definitively define this syndrome in horses. Additionally, the anterior stromal acellular hyaline zone commonly cited in canine spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCED) is not a consistent finding in equine corneas. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  8. The protective role of vitamin E on gill and liver tissue histopathology and micronucleus frequencies in peripheral erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus exposed to deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yeter; Cengiz, Elif Ipek; Ugurlu, Pelin; Yanar, Mahmut

    2012-09-01

    Deltamethrin, is a commonly used pyrethroid pesticide. Vitamin E is a antioxidant that plays an important role in protecting cells against toxicity by inactivating free radicals generated following pesticides exposure. Therefore, it was evaluated whether deltamethrin induced histopathological changes and nuclear abnormalities using micronucleus test in Oreochromis niloticus, and the possible protective effect of vitamin E against deltamethrin inducing adverse effects in O. niloticus were investigated. Fish was fed with no pesticide+control diet, no pesticide+vitamin E-supplemented diet, 1.45μg/l deltamethrin+control diet, 1.45μg/l deltamethrin+vitamin E-supplemented diet for 30 days. Pesticide and diet quality made an impact on histopathological lesions. In treatments of deltamethrin, group fed with control diet showed much greater damage in comparison with group fed with vitamin E supplemented diet. Vitamin E decreased some histopathological changes induced by deltamethrin, but did not confer complete protection. Deltamethrin treatment has been shown to results in a significant increase in the frequency of micronucleus. However, coadministration of deltamethrin and vitamin E showed decrease in the frequency of micronucleus as compared to deltamethrin treated fish. Our results indicate that, the MN assay and histopathology can be used as bioassays for monitoring pollution in aquatic medium. On the other hand, it was observed that vitamin E decreased the genotoxicity and histopathological changes induced by deltamethrin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  10. Histopathology of oligofructose-induced acute laminitis in heifers.

    PubMed

    Thoefner, M B; Wattle, O; Pollitt, C C; French, K R; Nielsen, S S

    2005-08-01

    Histopathology of the dermo-epidermal junction in the lamellar region of front claws was examined in 6 dairy heifers given an alimentary oligofructose overload and compared with sections from a control group of 6 heifers. Four of the 6 heifers administered oligofructose developed clinical signs of acute laminitis before they were euthanized. Postmortem samples from front claws were processed for histology. Eleven histopathologic characteristics were selected from the existing literature and used in a blinded evaluation of sections. In total, 104 front claw samples, including 8 samples from 2 cows having spontaneously occurring acute laminitis, were evaluated histologically using hematoxylin and eosin as well as periodic acid-Schiff staining. The major morphological features associated with oligofructose-induced acute clinical laminitis were stretching of lamellae, dermal edema, hemorrhage, changes in basal cell morphology, presence of white blood cells in dermis, and signs of basement membrane detachment. Changes at the lamellar junction of claw tissue affected by oligofructose-induced clinical laminitis resembled tissue from the 2 cows suffering from spontaneous acute clinical laminitis, and generally were consistent with existing descriptions of laminitis histopathology. Important exceptions to existing descriptions in the literature were stretching of lamellae and basement membrane changes. Not previously described, we considered these early signs of acute laminitis. In conclusion, this study documents that oligofructose-induced clinical laminitis is associated with histopathological changes at the lamellar interface. A weakened dermo-epidermal junction is a possible intermediate stage in the pathophysiology of bovine sole ulceration at the typical site.

  11. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  12. Histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemic and diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the incidence of histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemia, gestational diabetes and overt diabetes at term and preterm gestation. Research design and methods One-hundred-and-thirty-one placental samples were collected from Diabetes mellitus (DM) positive screened patients. Two diagnostic tests, glycemic profile and 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in parallel identified 4 groups normoglycemic, mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH), gestational DM (GDM) or overt DM (DM). Placental tissue specimens and sections from 4 groups were obtained by uniform random sampling and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results Placentas from MGH group presented 17 types of histopathological change and higher rates of syncytial nodes and endarteritis. GDM placentas presented only nine types of histopathological change, high rates of dysmaturity, low rates of calcification and no syncytial nodes. Overt DM placentas showed 22 types of histopathological change, 21 of which were present in the preterm period. There were histopathological similarities between MGH and DM placentas, but the former exhibited a higher incidence of endarteritis, which has been described as a "post-mortem" phenomenon. Conclusion Our results confirmed that the distinct placental changes associated with DM and MGH depend on gestational period during which the diabetic insult occurs. It may reasonably be inferred that subclinical maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy, as showed in MGH group, is responsible for increased placental endarteritis, a postmortem lesion in the live fetus. PMID:21831283

  13. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  14. Monitoring the marine environment using marine mammal tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Hannah, D.J.; Day, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Marine environments, both inshore and open ocean, receive numerous inputs of anthropogenic chemicals. Cetaceans provide a valuable resource for monitoring the low level contamination of marine environments with persistent organic contaminants. Comparative studies using inshore and offshore southern ocean cetaceans have revealed significant differences in the types of contamination in these two environments. The polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) deposited in the southern oceans are characterized by an abundance of lower chlorinated congeners. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are not present at significant concentrations in cetaceans from the open southern ocean. In contrast significant concentrations of PCDD/F congeners are detected in the blubber of the inshore living Hector`s dolphin. This species lives close to the shore and has a very small home range (approximately 30 km) for a cetacean. Analysis of tissue PCDD/F and PCB profiles from different populations and their food sources will be presented. The data are being used to determine if there are local variations in the contamination of the New Zealand inshore marine environment.

  15. [Authorization of pathologists for the estimation of the tumor cell percentage on tissue sample for molecular analysis purpose].

    PubMed

    Luquain, Alexandra; Arbez-Gindre, Francine; Bedgedjian, Isabelle; Felix, Sophie; Harimenshi, Jean-Marie; Mihai, Ionela-Marcela; Monnien, Franck; Singeorzan, Cristina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2016-08-01

    Before molecular analysis is performed, morphological control with an estimation of the tumour cell percentage (%TC) could have a major impact on mutation detection. Accreditation according to NF EN ISO 15189 commands an authorization through evaluation of skills. The objective of this work was to validate the empowerment of pathologists to estimate %TC in tissue sample prior to molecular analysis. The accreditation technical guidance methods in Medical biology and histopathology were taken as references. %TC was the ratio of tumour cell nuclei on all nuclei within the area selected for the DNA extraction. External evaluations quality scores were used for accuracy. In order to assess the intermediate precision, 35 %TC estimation were performed 15 days apart in 4 samples (biopsies, transparietal biopsies or surgical specimen, either fixed or frozen) by 7 pathologists. Three other cases with interference (inflammation, mucus, necrosis) were evaluated. A result was satisfactory if %TC were within ±20 % of expected percentage obtained by the average of 35 estimates. The performances were satisfactory since no estimate was made more than 20 % of the expected percentage. Low interpathologists reproducibility has been reported in the literature and can have a consequence on molecular analysis in samples with low %TC, where the value reach the analytical sensitivity thresholds of molecular techniques. The current report is an example of a step of the accreditation process, which is a challenge for pathologists' activity in the future.

  16. Swab or biopsy samples for bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal tissue?

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2014-12-01

    Swab and biopsy samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue are most commonly collected by tissue banks for bacterial and fungal bioburden testing. An in vitro study was performed using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards standard 'Quality control of microbiological transport systems' (2003) to validate and evaluate the recovery of six challenge organisms from swab and biopsy samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue. On average, 8.4 to >100 and 7.2 to >100 % of the inoculum was recovered from swab and biopsy samples respectively. A retrospective review of donor episodes was also performed, consisting of paired swab and biopsy samples received in this laboratory during the period 2001-2012. Samples of allograft femoral heads were collected from living donors during hip operations. From the 3,859 donor episodes received, 21 paired swab and biopsy samples each recovered an isolate, 247 swab samples only and 79 biopsy samples only were culture positive. Low numbers of challenge organisms were recovered from inoculated swab and biopsy samples in the in vitro study and validated their use for bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal tissue. Skin commensals were the most common group of organisms isolated during a 12-year retrospective review of paired swab and biopsy samples from living donor allograft femoral heads. Paired swab and biopsy samples are a suitable representative sample of allograft musculoskeletal tissue for bioburden testing.

  17. Tissue targeted metabonomics: metabolic profiling by microdialysis sampling and microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Price, Kristin E; Vandaveer, Shannon S; Lunte, Craig E; Larive, Cynthia K

    2005-08-10

    The concentration of low molecular weight compounds in tissues can yield valuable information about the metabolic state of an organism. Studies of changes in the metabolic state or metabonomics can reflect disease pathways, drug action, or toxicity. This research aims to develop a new approach, tissue targeted metabonomics. Microdialysis sampling and microcoil NMR analysis are employed to compare basal and ischemic metabolic states of various tissues (blood, brain, and heart) of Sprague-Dawley rats. Microdialysis sampling is localized, making the metabolic profile tissue specific. Coupling to NMR analysis is highly advantageous, because a complete metabolic profile is obtained in a single spectrum. However, small sample volumes and low analyte concentrations make analysis of microdialysis samples challenging. Microcoil NMR uses low sample volumes and has improved mass sensitivity, relative to standard 5 mm probes. The coupling of these techniques is a potentially powerful tool for metabonomics analysis.

  18. Tissue Microarray Technology for Molecular Applications: Investigation of Cross-Contamination between Tissue Samples Obtained from the Same Punching Device.

    PubMed

    Vassella, Erik; Galván, José A; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-04-02

    Tissue microarray (TMA) technology allows rapid visualization of molecular markers by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In addition, TMA instrumentation has the potential to assist in other applications: punches taken from donor blocks can be placed directly into tubes and used for nucleic acid analysis by PCR approaches. However, the question of possible cross-contamination between samples punched with the same device has frequently been raised but never addressed. Two experiments were performed. (1) A block from mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) positive tissue and a second from an uninfected patient were aligned side-by-side in an automated tissue microarrayer. Four 0.6 mm punches were cored from each sample and placed inside their corresponding tube. Between coring of each donor block, a mechanical cleaning step was performed by insertion of the puncher into a paraffin block. This sequence of coring and cleaning was repeated three times, alternating between positive and negative blocks. A fragment from the 6110 insertion sequence specific for mycobacterium tuberculosis was analyzed; (2) Four 0.6 mm punches were cored from three KRAS mutated colorectal cancer blocks, alternating with three different wild-type tissues using the same TMA instrument (sequence of coring: G12D, WT, G12V, WT, G13D and WT). Mechanical cleaning of the device between each donor block was made. Mutation analysis by pyrosequencing was carried out. This sequence of coring was repeated manually without any cleaning step between blocks. In both analyses, all alternating samples showed the expected result (samples 1, 3 and 5: positive or mutated, samples 2, 4 and 6: negative or wild-type). Similar results were obtained without cleaning step. These findings suggest that no cross-contamination of tissue samples occurs when donor blocks are punched using the same device, however a cleaning step is nonetheless recommended. Our result supports the use of TMA technology as an accessory

  19. Analysis of the amount of tissue sample necessary for mitotic count and Ki-67 index in gastrointestinal stromal tumor sampling.

    PubMed

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Chiyo, Taiga; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Kato, Kiyohito; Kamada, Hideki; Fujita, Koji; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Iwama, Hisakazu; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    There are no established opinions concerning whether the amount of tissue affects the accuracy of histological analyses in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the appropriate amount of tissue sample needed for mitotic count based on the risk classification of GISTs and the Ki-67 index using the following three methods: endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA), a novel sampling method called tunneling bloc biopsy (TBB), and biopsy forceps followed by TBB (Bf). Forty-three samples (12 FNA, 17 TBB and 14 Bf) diagnosed as GISTs by immunohistological analysis were utilized. The major and minor axes and overlay area of one piece of specimen (OPS) from the three sampling methods were measured using digital imaging software and were analyzed comparatively regarding the acquisition of histological data. The mean major and minor axes (mm) and overlay areas (mm2) were in the order of TBB > Bf > FNA. The evaluable rates by mitotic count and Ki-67 were, respectively, 75% (9/12) and 83.3% (10/12) for FNA samples, 100% (17/17) and 100% (17/17) for TBB samples, and 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14) for Bf samples (P>0.05). Three FNA samples were judged unevaluable due to too small specimens in overall diagnosis including mitotic count and Ki-67, calculating the cut-off value for the overlay area of OPS as 0.17 mm2. Comparing the concordance rates between the pre- and post-operative samples, TBB samples was significantly better than FNA (P<0.05). Conclusively, while the amounts of tissues obtained by TBB and Bf are unnecessary for the histological assessment of mitotic count and Ki-67 index, developments of the FNA method are needed to minimize sample error. Considering the technical aspects, as well as the size of the specimens, could help to guide therapeutic planning and improve diagnostic yield for GI subepithelial tumors.

  20. Effect of addition of dried healthy or diseased parsnip root tissue to a modified AIN-76A diet on cell proliferation and histopathology in the liver, oesophagus and forestomach of male Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, R; Brassard, R; Cerkauskas, R; Chiba, M; Lok, E; Nera, E A; Jee, P; McMullen, E; Clayson, D B

    1994-03-01

    Umbelliferous crop plants, including the parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L.), elaborate enhanced levels of furocoumarins, including psoralens, when subjected to biotic or abiotic stress. These furocoumarins are recognized to lead to phototoxicity. In this study, the effect of these agents, which are present in diseased parsnip root tissue, on the liver and two tissues on the route of entry to the body (the oesophagus and forestomach) were investigated. Young male Swiss Webster mice were fed for approximately 30 days with modified AIN-76A diets containing 32.5% dried healthy, 32.5% apparently healthy or 32.5% fungicide-treated parsnip root tissue, and 8, 16 or 32.5% dried diseased (Phoma complanata-infected) parsnip root tissue. As controls, three modified AIN-76A diets differing in their edible starch-to-sucrose ratios (C1-C3) were administered for an equal time. Dried healthy parsnip root tissue, compared with controls, did not significantly affect any of the indices of cellular proliferation or histopathological parameters that were assessed. Histopathological examination of the oesophagus and forestomach demonstrated no significant changes as a result of feeding any of the diets containing parsnip tissue. In the liver, the highest level (but neither of the two lower levels) of dried diseased parsnip root tissue led to swelling of the cytoplasm in cells surrounding the central vein of hepatic lobules, with consequent compression of the peripheral cells. Using [3H]thymidine radioautography, a dose-related increase in cell labelling with the level of diseased parsnip root tissue was demonstrated in the liver. Compared with control diet C2 only, the extent of [3H]thymidine labelling in the liver was increased in mice receiving apparently healthy parsnip tissue; a slight, not statistically significant, increase was also noted with fungicide-treated parsnip tissue. Increased [3H]thymidine labelling with the feeding of diseased parsnip tissue was also found in the greater

  1. An efficient, reliable and inexpensive device for the rapid homogenization of multiple tissue samples by centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ilyin, S E; Plata-Salamán, C R

    2000-02-15

    Homogenization of tissue samples is a common first step in the majority of current protocols for RNA, DNA, and protein isolation. This report describes a simple device for centrifugation-mediated homogenization of tissue samples. The method presented is applicable to RNA, DNA, and protein isolation, and we show examples where high quality total cell RNA, DNA, and protein were obtained from brain and other tissue samples. The advantages of the approach presented include: (1) a significant reduction in time investment relative to hand-driven or individual motorized-driven pestle homogenization; (2) easy construction of the device from inexpensive parts available in any laboratory; (3) high replicability in the processing; and (4) the capacity for the parallel processing of multiple tissue samples, thus allowing higher efficiency, reliability, and standardization.

  2. How You Can Help Medical Research: Donating Your Blood, Tissue, and Other Samples

    MedlinePlus

    National Cancer Institute How You Can Help Medical Research U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Donating Your Blood, Tissue, and Other Samples You have the choice to ...

  3. Effects of Re-heating Tissue Samples to Core Body Temperature on High-Velocity Ballistic Projectile-tissue Interactions.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Henneberg, Maciej; Wachsberger, Christian; Maiden, Nicholas; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-02-23

    Damage produced by high-speed projectiles on organic tissue will depend on the physical properties of the tissues. Conditioning organic tissue samples to human core body temperature (37°C) prior to conducting ballistic experiments enables their behavior to closely mimic that of living tissues. To minimize autolytic changes after death, the tissues are refrigerated soon after their removal from the body and re-heated to 37°C prior to testing. This research investigates whether heating 50-mm-cube samples of porcine liver, kidney, and heart to 37°C for varying durations (maximum 7 h) can affect the penetration response of a high-speed, steel sphere projectile. Longer conditioning times for heart and liver resulted in a slight loss of velocity/energy of the projectile, but the reverse effect occurred for the kidney. Possible reasons for these trends include autolytic changes causing softening (heart and liver) and dehydration causing an increase in density (kidney). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Histopathologic variation between liver lobes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S D; Zimmerman, K L; Panciera, D L; Monroe, W E; Leib, M S

    2015-01-01

    Biopsy of the liver evaluates a small portion of tissue, with inferences made to the entire organ. The method and number of biopsies obtained are tempered by consideration of the risks and benefits. Recommendations often include biopsy of more than one liver lobe, although the consistency of histopathology among lobes in dogs is unknown. To describe the distribution of histopathologic abnormalities between liver lobes. We hypothesized that discordant results would be evenly distributed among all liver lobes. Seventy dogs undergoing necropsy. Prospective study. Liver samples were obtained from all lobes. A primary diagnosis was assigned to each liver sample based on the predominant histopathologic abnormality. In this population of dogs, biopsy of at least 2 liver lobes identified the predominant histologic abnormality in 98.6% of the cases. Ten (14%) of the dogs had ≤ 3 lobes in agreement and could not be assigned a predominant diagnosis. The same diagnosis was present in 6/6 lobes in 39 (56.5%) dogs, 5/6 lobes in 10 (14.5%) dogs, 4/6 lobes in 10 (14.5%) dogs, 3/6 lobes in 7 (10.1%) dogs, and 2/6 in 3 (4.3%) dogs. The number of discordant results did not differ between the liver lobes. The likelihood of obtaining a sample that is reflective of the predominant histologic abnormality in the liver is increased when multiple liver lobes are biopsied. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Experimental implementation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of cancerous and healthy breast tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2015-03-01

    A fast and accurate scatter imaging technique to differentiate cancerous and healthy breast tissue is introduced in this work. Such a technique would have wide-ranging clinical applications from intra-operative margin assessment to breast cancer screening. Coherent Scatter Computed Tomography (CSCT) has been shown to differentiate cancerous from healthy tissue, but the need to raster scan a pencil beam at a series of angles and slices in order to reconstruct 3D images makes it prohibitively time consuming. In this work we apply the coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging technique to reconstruct 3D images of breast tissue samples from experimental data taken without the rotation usually required in CSCT. We present our experimental implementation of coded aperture scatter imaging, the reconstructed images of the breast tissue samples and segmentations of the 3D images in order to identify the cancerous and healthy tissue inside of the samples. We find that coded aperture scatter imaging is able to reconstruct images of the samples and identify the distribution of cancerous and healthy tissues (i.e., fibroglandular, adipose, or a mix of the two) inside of them. Coded aperture scatter imaging has the potential to provide scatter images that automatically differentiate cancerous and healthy tissue inside of ex vivo samples within a time on the order of a minute.

  6. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of tissue samples for oral pathology follow-up monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino, I.; Camerlingo, C.; Zenone, F.; Perna, G.; Capozzi, V.; Cirillo, N.; Gaeta, G. M.; Lepore, M.

    2010-04-01

    An "in vitro" study of Raman spectra from oral human tissues is reported in order to the develop a diagnostic method suitable for "in vivo" oral pathology follow-up. The investigated pathology is Pemphigus Vulgaris (PV) for which new techniques for guiding and monitoring therapy would be particularly useful. Raman spectra were obtained in the wavenumber regions from 1000 to 1800 cm-1 and 2700 to 3200 cm-1 from tissues from patients at different stages of pathology (active PV, under therapy and in PV remission stage) as confirmed by histopathological and immunofluorescence analysis. Differences in the spectra depending on tissue illness stage arise in 1150-1250 cm-1 (amide III) and 1420-1450 cm-1 (CH3 deformation) regions and around 1650 cm-1 (amide I) and 2930 cm-1 (CH3 symmetric stretch). A wavelet deconvolution procedure was applied to the spectra for better discriminating among the three different stages of illness and a linear regression analysis was used to fully exploit the content of information of Raman spectra.

  7. Culture methods of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples in Australian bacteriology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue are cultured by bacteriology laboratories to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. In Australia, this testing is performed by 6 TGA-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories with samples received from 10 tissue banks. Culture methods of swab and tissue samples employ a combination of solid agar and/or broth media to enhance micro-organism growth and maximise recovery. All six Australian laboratories receive Amies transport swabs and, except for one laboratory, a corresponding biopsy sample for testing. Three of the 6 laboratories culture at least one allograft sample directly onto solid agar. Only one laboratory did not use a broth culture for any sample received. An international literature review found that a similar combination of musculoskeletal tissue samples were cultured onto solid agar and/or broth media. Although variations of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples, culture media and methods are used in Australian and international bacteriology laboratories, validation studies and method evaluations have challenged and supported their use in recovering fungi and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  8. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  9. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses from Archival Formalin-Fixed Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; McBride, Alison A

    2016-11-18

    Pathology departments routinely process and store formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for clinical diagnosis. These collections often contain decades' worth of samples and represent a treasure trove of specimens that can be analyzed for retrospective epidemiological studies, diagnostics, and pathogen discovery. Accurate amplification and sequencing of DNA from these samples is critical for the usability of these FFPE samples. Here we present a collection of protocols that describe extraction of DNA from FFPE tissues, PCR amplification of human papillomavirus DNA, and subsequent genotyping of the infecting virus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Bimodal Spectroscopy of Formalin Fixed Samples to Discriminate Dysplastic and Tumor Brain Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, S.; Cicchi, R.; Giordano, F.; Buccoliero, A. M.; Guerrini, R.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Biomedical spectroscopy has gained attention in the past few years for disease diagnosis. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies provide finger-print information related to biochemical and morphological alterations when tissues progress from the normal to a malignant stage. Usually, freshly excised tissue specimens are preferred for bio-spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues, sample availability and distance between the surgery room and the laboratory provide an impelling restriction for in-vitro spectroscopic studies using freshly excised samples. After surgical resection tissues are fixed in 4% formalin for histological studies under a light microscope. The process of fixation prevents degradation of tissues. In this study, we probe the use of formalin fixed sample for differentiating normal and dysplastic brain tissues using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that fluorescence spectral profile changes in the wavelength range from 550-750 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. Also, significant differences were found in the Raman spectral profiles of such samples. The results indicate a potential diagnostic application of spectroscopy in formalin fixed brain samples for differentiating dysplastic and tumor brain tissues.

  11. Qualification of serological infectious disease assays for the screening of samples from deceased tissue donors.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, A D; Newham, J A

    2011-05-01

    Whilst some of the assays used for serological screening of post-mortem blood samples from deceased tissue donors in some countries have been specifically validated by the manufacturer for this purpose, a significant number of those currently in use globally have not. Although specificity has previously been considered a problem in the screening of such samples, we believe that ensuring sensitivity is more important. The aim of this study was to validate a broader range of assays for the screening of post-mortem blood samples from deceased tissue donors. Six microplate immunoassays currently in use within National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) for the screening of blood, tissue and stem cell donations were included. Representative samples from confirmed positive donors were titrated in screen negative post-mortem samples in parallel with normal pooled negative serum to determine if there was any inhibition with the post-mortem samples. There were no significant differences seen (P < 0.005) between the dilution curves obtained for the positive samples diluted in post-mortem samples and normal pooled sera. Although small numbers of samples were studied, it can be surmised that the post-mortem blood samples from deceased tissue donors, collected according to United Kingdom guidelines, are a suitable substrate for the assays evaluated. No diminution of reactivity was seen when dilution with sera from deceased donors was compared to dilution using pooled serum from live donors. In the absence of genuine low titre positive post-mortem samples, the use of samples spiked with various levels of target material provides a means of qualifying serological screening assays used by NHSBT for the screening of post-mortem blood samples from deceased tissue donors.

  12. Investigation of reflectance sampling depth in biological tissues for various common illumination/collection configurations.

    PubMed

    Zonios, George

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of light penetration characteristics is very important in almost all studies in biomedical optics. In this work, the reflectance sampling depth in biological tissues was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations for various common illumination/collection configurations. The analysis shows that the average sampling depth can be described by two simple empirical analytical expressions over the entire typical ranges of absorption and scattering properties relevant to in vivo biological tissue, regardless of the specific illumination/collection configuration details. These results are promising and helpful for the quick, efficient, and accurate design of reflectance studies for various biological tissue applications.

  13. A laser microdissection-based workflow for FFPE tissue microproteomics: Important considerations for small sample processing.

    PubMed

    Longuespée, Rémi; Alberts, Deborah; Pottier, Charles; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Baiwir, Dominique; Kriegsmann, Mark; Herfs, Michael; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Delvenne, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-07-15

    Proteomic methods are today widely applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for several applications in research, especially in molecular pathology. To date, there is an unmet need for the analysis of small tissue samples, such as for early cancerous lesions. Indeed, no method has yet been proposed for the reproducible processing of small FFPE tissue samples to allow biomarker discovery. In this work, we tested several procedures to process laser microdissected tissue pieces bearing less than 3000 cells. Combined with appropriate settings for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, a citric acid antigen retrieval (CAAR)-based procedure was established, allowing to identify more than 1400 proteins from a single microdissected breast cancer tissue biopsy. This work demonstrates important considerations concerning the handling and processing of laser microdissected tissue samples of extremely limited size, in the process opening new perspectives in molecular pathology. A proof of the proposed method for biomarker discovery, with respect to these specific handling considerations, is illustrated using the differential proteomic analysis of invasive breast carcinoma of no special type and invasive lobular triple-negative breast cancer tissues. This work will be of utmost importance for early biomarker discovery or in support of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging for microproteomics from small regions of interest. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Simple quantification of multiplexed quantum dot staining in clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Matthew L; Moffitt, Richard A; Liu, Jian; Parry, R Mitchell; Sharma, Yachna; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method for the processing and quantification of multiplexed Quantum Dot (QD) labeled images of clinical cancer tissue samples. QDs provide several features which make them ideal for reliable quantification, including long-term signal stability, high signal-to-noise ratios, as well as narrow emission bandwidths. Deconvolution of QD spectra is accomplished in a batch mode in which unmixing parameters are preserved across samples to allow for quantitative and reproducible comparisons. After unmixing the QD images, we segment each one to exclude acellular regions. We use a simple average intensity to quantify the level of QD staining for each image. We illustrate the viability of this approach by testing it on 28 tissue samples using a tissue microarray. We show that using as few as two QD protein targets (MDM-2, and B-actin), the Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) samples are distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue samples. A simple linear discriminant results in 100% classification of 25 RCC samples and 3 normal samples. This suggests that multiplexed QDs can be used to properly diagnose RCC from otherwise healthy tissue. We expect to apply this work to larger panels of more robust QD biomarker targets to aid in clinical decision-making for the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases, such as cancer.

  15. Investigation of false positives associated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in archived tissue samples of captive felids.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Essa; Mtshali, Moses Sibusiso; Lane, Emily

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite that infects humans and many different animals, including felids. Many molecular and serologic tests have been developed for detection of T. gondii in a wide range of hosts. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a field-friendly technique that lacks the practical drawbacks of other molecular and serologic tests, and LAMP assays have been successfully developed for detection of T. gondii in fresh tissue samples. In the current study, both a previously published and a de-novo designed LAMP assay were compared to a quantitative real-time (q)PCR assay, for the detection of T. gondii in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from captive wildlife. The LAMP assays produced conflicting results, generating both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the LAMP assays were unable to positively identify samples with low levels of parasites as determined by qPCR and histopathology. Therefore, these LAMP assays may not be the most suitable assays for detection of T. gondii in archived FFPE and frozen tissue samples.

  16. High-throughput simultaneous analysis of RNA, protein, and lipid biomarkers in heterogeneous tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Vladimír; Smith, Ryan C; Xue, Jiyan; Kurtz, Marc M; Liu, Rong; Legrand, Cheryl; He, Xuanmin; Yu, Xiang; Wong, Peggy; Hinchcliffe, John S; Tanen, Michael R; Lazar, Gloria; Zieba, Renata; Ichetovkin, Marina; Chen, Zhu; O'Neill, Edward A; Tanaka, Wesley K; Marton, Matthew J; Liao, Jason; Morris, Mark; Hailman, Eric; Tokiwa, George Y; Plump, Andrew S

    2011-11-01

    With expanding biomarker discovery efforts and increasing costs of drug development, it is critical to maximize the value of mass-limited clinical samples. The main limitation of available methods is the inability to isolate and analyze, from a single sample, molecules requiring incompatible extraction methods. Thus, we developed a novel semiautomated method for tissue processing and tissue milling and division (TMAD). We used a SilverHawk atherectomy catheter to collect atherosclerotic plaques from patients requiring peripheral atherectomy. Tissue preservation by flash freezing was compared with immersion in RNAlater®, and tissue grinding by traditional mortar and pestle was compared with TMAD. Comparators were protein, RNA, and lipid yield and quality. Reproducibility of analyte yield from aliquots of the same tissue sample processed by TMAD was also measured. The quantity and quality of biomarkers extracted from tissue prepared by TMAD was at least as good as that extracted from tissue stored and prepared by traditional means. TMAD enabled parallel analysis of gene expression (quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, microarray), protein composition (ELISA), and lipid content (biochemical assay) from as little as 20 mg of tissue. The mean correlation was r = 0.97 in molecular composition (RNA, protein, or lipid) between aliquots of individual samples generated by TMAD. We also demonstrated that it is feasible to use TMAD in a large-scale clinical study setting. The TMAD methodology described here enables semiautomated, high-throughput sampling of small amounts of heterogeneous tissue specimens by multiple analytical techniques with generally improved quality of recovered biomolecules.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA from archived tissue samples kept in formalin for forensic odontology studies.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rahul; Mehrotra, Divya; Kowtal, Pradnya; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Sarin, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Samples used for DNA isolation to be used for forensic odontology studies are often limited. The possibility to use tissue samples stored in formalin for a prolonged period, which contains nucleic acids of questionable quality, opens exciting possibilities for genetic and molecular biology studies useful in speciality of forensic odontology. The present study defines substantial modification of existing protocols for total genomic isolation including mitochondrial DNA and proves the utility of such obtained mitochondrial DNA in microsatellite analyses. 50 dental tissue samples which were kept in neutral buffered formalin liquid bottles were taken for DNA isolation and subsequent analysis. For the isolation of total genomic DNA from tissue samples, a new protocol with substantial modifications from routine ones was adopted by us. Total genomic DNA from matched blood samples were extracted using standard phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase Chain Reaction and Sequencing of such extracted DNA samples for mitochondrial D loop region were successful and the results were comparable with DNA extracted from normal sources of samples. The present study reports for the first time that nucleic acids extracted from human dental tissue samples under prolonged formalin fixation times can be used for forensic odontology studies using the described methodology.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA from archived tissue samples kept in formalin for forensic odontology studies

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rahul; Mehrotra, Divya; Kowtal, Pradnya; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Sarin, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Background Samples used for DNA isolation to be used for forensic odontology studies are often limited. The possibility to use tissue samples stored in formalin for a prolonged period, which contains nucleic acids of questionable quality, opens exciting possibilities for genetic and molecular biology studies useful in speciality of forensic odontology. Aim The present study defines substantial modification of existing protocols for total genomic isolation including mitochondrial DNA and proves the utility of such obtained mitochondrial DNA in microsatellite analyses. Methods 50 dental tissue samples which were kept in neutral buffered formalin liquid bottles were taken for DNA isolation and subsequent analysis. For the isolation of total genomic DNA from tissue samples, a new protocol with substantial modifications from routine ones was adopted by us. Total genomic DNA from matched blood samples were extracted using standard phenol-chloroform extraction method. Results Polymerase Chain Reaction and Sequencing of such extracted DNA samples for mitochondrial D loop region were successful and the results were comparable with DNA extracted from normal sources of samples. Conclusion The present study reports for the first time that nucleic acids extracted from human dental tissue samples under prolonged formalin fixation times can be used for forensic odontology studies using the described methodology. PMID:25737927

  19. Efficient and scalable serial extraction of DNA and RNA from frozen tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Mathot, Lucy; Lindman, Monica; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2011-01-07

    Advances in cancer genomics have created a demand for scalable sample processing. We here present a process for serial extraction of nucleic acids from the same frozen tissue sample based on magnetic silica particles. The process is automation friendly with high recoveries of pure DNA and RNA suitable for analysis.

  20. Mantle biopsy: a technique for nondestructive tissue-sampling of freshwater mussels

    Treesearch

    David J. Berg; Wendell R. Haag; Sheldon I. Guttman; James B. Sickel

    1995-01-01

    Mantle biopsy is a means of obtaining tissue samples for genetic, physiological, and contaminant studies of bivalves; but the effects of this biopsy on survival have not been determined. We describe a simple technique for obtaining such samples from unionacean bivalves and how we compared survival among biopsied and control organisms in field experiments. Survival was...

  1. Haematology, blood biochemistry and tissue histopathology of lambs maintained on diets containing an insect controlling protein (Cry1Ac) in Bt-cottonseed.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, M K; Mondal, D; Somvanshi, R; Karim, S A

    2011-10-01

    This experiment assessed the effect of feeding genetically modified cottonseed (Bt) containing an insect controlling protein (Cry1Ac) on haematology, blood biochemistry and histopathology of lambs. Haemato-biochemicals were estimated at periodic intervals, and histopathology at termination of experiment. Thirty three weaner lambs were fed a composite feed mixture (CFM) ad libitum individually, in three groups for 123 days. The isonitrogenous CFM had roughage (Perl Millet Stover) and concentrate ratio of 350:650. Diet fed to control lambs contained groundnut oil meal as protein source while other two groups received diet containing either whole cottonseed (N-Bt) or Bt-cottonseed (Bt-CS). Daily feed intake and average daily gain were similar among lambs of three groups. Lambs fed N-Bt diet had higher (p < 0.05) serum protein and globulin compared to control and Bt diets, while albumin content was higher (p = 0.018) in Bt diet fed lambs. Serum urea and creatinin content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum glutamate pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) activities were not different among lamb groups, while urea and creatinin content and ALP activities increased linearly (p < 0.001) with increased feeding period. Blood haemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit (Hc), white blood cells (WBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) ranged from 11.1% to 11.2%, 31.8% to 32.8%, 7.0 to 8.3 (× 10(3) /μl), 19.1 to 22.5 fl and 33.2% to 35.5%, respectively, were similar among lamb groups. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (p = 0.008) and red blood cell counts (p = 0.006) were higher in Bt diet fed lambs. Control and N-Bt diet fed lambs had mild fatty infiltration in liver and/or micro-calculi in renal cortex, and such lesions were not seen in Bt diet fed lambs. Growth, haemato-biochemical and histopathology did not change by Bt-CS feeding in growing lamb. However, before recommending the use of Bt-CS in routine feed formulations prolonged feeding

  2. ADMINISTRATION OF H2 BLOCKERS IN NSAID INDUCED GASTROPATHY IN RATS: effect on histopathological changes in gastric, hepatic and renal tissues.

    PubMed

    Manocha, Sachin; Lal, Dushyant; Venkataraman, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induces gastric mucosal lesions because of its acidic properties. Ranitidine, an H2 receptor antagonist, has proved beneficial in patients with gastric ulcers. The present study was performed to assess the effect of administering ranitidine in Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, nimesulide) induced gastropathy, and their effect on the histopathology of stomach, kidney and liver. Diclofenac, nimesulide, and ranitidine were administered in doses of 2, 4, and 6 mg/kg, p.o. once daily for 14 days, and their effect on gastric volume, acidity, mean ulcer number, and gastric pH. In addition, histopathological examination was also performed on sections of stomach, kidney and liver. Following the administration of diclofenac or nimesulide, all the gastric parameters were significantly altered as well as the histopathology of stomach, liver and kidney. In the control group, the renal sections showed normal glomeruli with no thickening of glomerular basement membrane, while in diclofenac alone, nimesulide alone, and ranitidine with nimesulide groups, the thickening of glomerular basement membrane was observed. These alterations were observed to be reversed in the ranitidine with diclofenac group. In the sections from the liver, the control group showed anastomosing plates and cords of cuboidal hepatocytes with round well stained nuclei and abundant cytoplasm. In the ranitidine with diclofenac, and ranitidine with nimesulide groups, mild dilatation of sinusoids is seen coupled with prominence of central vein. In the diclofenac alone and nimesulide alone groups, the proximal and distal convoluted tubules show mild focal tubular necrosis. In the gastric sections, the control group showed several folds forming villi, and the epithelial lining surface of the mucosa. In the ranitidine with diclofenac, and ranitidine with nimesulide groups, the duodenum showed scattered inflammatory cells composed predominantly of lymphocytes. In

  3. Coupled Analysis of In Vitro and Histology Tissue Samples to Quantify Structure-Function Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Evrim; Plopper, George E.; Yener, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    The structure/function relationship is fundamental to our understanding of biological systems at all levels, and drives most, if not all, techniques for detecting, diagnosing, and treating disease. However, at the tissue level of biological complexity we encounter a gap in the structure/function relationship: having accumulated an extraordinary amount of detailed information about biological tissues at the cellular and subcellular level, we cannot assemble it in a way that explains the correspondingly complex biological functions these structures perform. To help close this information gap we define here several quantitative temperospatial features that link tissue structure to its corresponding biological function. Both histological images of human tissue samples and fluorescence images of three-dimensional cultures of human cells are used to compare the accuracy of in vitro culture models with their corresponding human tissues. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior work on a quantitative comparison of histology and in vitro samples. Features are calculated from graph theoretical representations of tissue structures and the data are analyzed in the form of matrices and higher-order tensors using matrix and tensor factorization methods, with a goal of differentiating between cancerous and healthy states of brain, breast, and bone tissues. We also show that our techniques can differentiate between the structural organization of native tissues and their corresponding in vitro engineered cell culture models. PMID:22479315

  4. Terahertz spectroscopy and detection of brain tumor in rat fresh-tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Fukushi, Y.; Kubota, O.; Itsuji, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Ouchi, T.

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging of biomedical samples is expected to be an important application of THz analysis techniques. Identification and localization of tumor tissue, imaging of biological samples, and analysis of DNA by THz spectroscopy have been reported. THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is useful for obtaining the refractive index over a broad frequency range. However, THz-TDS spectra of fresh tissue samples are sensitive to procedures such as sample preparation, and a standardized measurement protocol is required. Therefore, in this work, we establish a protocol for measurements of THz spectra of fresh tissue and demonstrate reliable detection of rat brain tumor tissue. We use a reflection THz-TDS system to measure the refractive index spectra of the samples mounted on a quartz plate. The tissue samples were measured immediately after sectioning to avoid sample denaturalization during storage. Special care was taken in THz data processing to eliminate parasitic reflections and reduce noise. The error level in our refractive index measurements was as low as 0.02 in the frequency range 0.8-1.5 THz. With increasing frequency, the refractive index in the tumor and normal regions monotonically decreased, similarly to water, and it was 0.02 higher in the tumor regions. The spectral data suggest that the tumor regions have higher water content. Hematoxylin-eosin stained images showed that increased cell density was also responsible for the observed spectral features. A set of samples from 10 rats showed consistent results. Our results suggest that reliable tumor detection in fresh tissue without pretreatment is possible with THz spectroscopy measurements. THz spectroscopy has the potential to become a real-time in vivo diagnostic method.

  5. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites.

  6. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  7. Microwave-assisted tissue processing for same-day EM-diagnosis of potential bioterrorism and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josef A; Gelderblom, Hans R; Hauroeder, Baerbel; Schmetz, Christel; Milios, Jim; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the turnaround times, section and image quality of a number of more "difficult" specimens destined for rapid diagnostic electron microscopy (EM) after microwave-assisted processing. The results were assessed and compared with those of conventionally processed samples. A variety of infectious agents, some with a potential for bioterrorism, and liver biopsies serving as an example for routine histopathology samples were studied. The samples represented virus-producing cell cultures (such as SARS-coronavirus, West Nile virus, Orthopox virus), bacteria suspensions (cultures of Escherichia coli and genetically knockout apathogenic Bacillus anthracis), suspensions of parasites (malaria Plasmodium falciparum, Leishmania major, Microsporidia cuniculi, Caenorhabditis elegans), and whole Drosophila melanogaster flies infected with microsporidia. Fresh liver samples and infected flies were fixed in Karnovsky-fixative by microwaving (20 min), all other samples were fixed in buffered glutaraldehyde or Karnovsky-fixative overnight or longer. Subsequently, all samples were divided to evaluate alternative processing protocols: one part of the sample was OsO4-postfixed, ethanol-dehydrated, Epon-infiltrated (overnight) in an automated tissue processor (LYNX, Leica), and polymerized at 60 degrees C for 48 h; in parallel the other part was microwave-assisted processed in the bench microwave device (REM, Milestone), including post-osmication and the resin block polymerization. The microwave-assisted processing protocol required at minimum 3 h 20 min: the respective epon resin blocks were uniformly polymerized allowing an easy sectioning of semi- and ultrathin sections. Sections collected on non-coated 200 mesh grids were stable in the electron beam and showed an excellent preservation of the ultrastructure and high contrast, thus allowing an easy, unequivocal and rapid assessment of specimens. Compared with conventional routine methods

  8. Expression of proliferation genes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue from breast carcinomas. Feasibility and relevance for a routine histopathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Carla; Robinson, Cleo; Dessauvagie, Ben; Wood, Benjamin; Sterrett, Greg; Harvey, Jennet; Amanuel, Benhur

    2017-01-01

    Breast carcinoma proliferative activity, histological grade and commercial molecular tests are all important in prognostication and treatment. There is a particular need for improved, standardised techniques for subclassification of grade 2 breast cancers into low-risk and high-risk prognostic groups. In this study we investigated whether gene expression profiling of five proliferation genes was feasible using breast cancer tissue in a clinical setting and whether these profiles could enhance pathological assessment. Expression of five proliferation gene mRNAs; Ki-67, STK 15, CCNB1, CCND1 and MYBL2, was quantified in 27 breast carcinomas and compared with Ki-67 proliferation index (PI) and Nottingham mitotic score. Expression of Ki-67, STK15 and MYBL2 mRNA showed moderate Spearman's correlation with Ki-67 PI (p<0.01), but CCND1 and CCNB1 showed weak, non-significant correlation. Individual gene expression did not associate with mitotic score but combined mRNA expression correlated with both Ki-67 PI (p=0.018) and mitotic score (p=0.03; 0.007). This study confirms mRNA analysis in breast carcinoma formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples is feasible and suggests gene expression profiling, using a small set of five proliferation genes, has potential in aiding histological grading or assessment of proliferative activity of breast cancers. To fully evaluate the clinical applicability of this approach, a larger cohort study with long-term follow-up data is required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. A tissue fixative that protects macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and protein) and histomorphology in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Vincek, Vladimir; Nassiri, Mehdi; Nadji, Mehrdad; Morales, Azorides R

    2003-10-01

    Preservation of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) in tissue is traditionally achieved by immediate freezing of the sample. Although isolation of PCR-able RNA has been reported from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, the process has not been shown to be reproducible because high molecular weight RNA is usually degraded. We investigated the potential value of a new universal molecular fixative (UMFIX, Sakura Finetek USA, Inc., Torrance, California) in preservation of macromolecules in paraffin-embedded tissue. Mouse and human tissues were fixed in UMFIX from 1 hour to 8 weeks. They were then processed by a rapid tissue processing (RTP) system, embedded in paraffin, and evaluated for routine histology as well as for the quality and quantity of DNA, RNA, and proteins. Formalin-fixed tissues were processed by RTP and evaluated in a similar manner. Fresh-frozen samples were used as controls. The morphology of UMFIX-exposed tissue was comparable to that fixed in formalin. High molecular weight RNA was preserved in tissue that was immediately fixed in UMFIX and stored from 1 hour to 8 weeks at room temperature. There were no significant differences between UMFIX-exposed and frozen tissues on PCR, RT-PCR, real-time PCR, and expression microarrays. Similarly, physical and antigenic preservation of proteins in UMFIX tissue was similar to fresh state. Both RNA and proteins were substantially degraded in formalin-fixed and similarly processed specimens. We concluded that it is now possible to preserve histomorphology and intact macromolecules in the same archival paraffin-embedded tissue through the use of a novel fixative and a rapid processing system.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA levels in blood and tissue samples from breast cancer patients of different stages.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Wang, Hui-Juan; Geng, Ting-Ting; Xun, Xiao-Jie; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Jin, Tian-Bo; Chen, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We here evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic potential of mtDNA as a biomarker for breast cancer. Using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mtDNA levels in serum, buffy coat, tumor, and tumor-adjacent tissue samples from 50 breast cancer patients were determined and assessed for associations with clinicopathological features. To evaluate mtDNA as a biomarker for distinguishing between the four sample types, we created receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The mtDNA levels in buffy coat were significantly lower than in other sample types. Relative to tumor-adjacent tissue, reduced levels of mtDNA were identified in buffy coat and tumor tissue but not in serum. According to ROC curve analysis, mtDNA levels could be used to distinguish between buffy coat and tumor-adjacent tissue samples with good sensitivity (77%) and specificity (83%). Moreover, mtDNA levels in serum and tumor tissue were positively associated with cancer TMN stage. The mtDNA levels in blood samples may represent a promising, non-invasive biomarker in breast cancer patients. Additional, large-scale validation studies are required to establish the potential use of mtDNA levels in the early diagnosis and monitoring of breast cancer.

  11. Broth versus solid agar culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    As part of the donor assessment protocol, bioburden assessment must be performed on allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples collected at the time of tissue retrieval. Swab samples of musculoskeletal tissue allografts from cadaveric donors are received at the microbiology department of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (Australia) to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. This study will review the isolation rate of organisms from solid agar and broth culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swabs were inoculated onto horse blood agar (anaerobic, 35 °C) and chocolate agar (CO2, 35 °C) and then placed into a cooked meat broth (aerobic, 35 °C). A total of 1,912 swabs from 389 donors were received during the study period. 557 (29.1 %) swabs were culture positive with the isolation of 713 organisms, 249 (34.9 %) from solid agar culture and an additional 464 (65.1 %) from broth culture only. This study has shown that the broth culture of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal swab samples recovered a greater amount of organisms than solid agar culture. Isolates such as Clostridium species and Staphylococcus aureus would not have been isolated from solid agar culture alone. Broth culture is an essential part of the bioburden assessment protocol of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue in this laboratory.

  12. Comparison of EGFR mutation rates in lung adenocarcinoma tissue and pleural effusion samples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Y; Wang, Z J; Wang, L Q; Hua, D F; Liu, J

    2016-04-04

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the differences in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation rates in tumor tissue and pleural effusion specimens from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PCR amplification and gene sequencing were used to detect EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 in tumor tissue and pleural effusion samples from 50 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. The EGFR mutation rate was 34.0% in tissue samples from patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. There were 11 cases with exon 19 mutations and 6 cases with exon 21 mutations. The EGFR mutation rate was 30.0% in pleural effusion specimens, including 10 cases with exon 19 mutation and 5 cases with exon 21 mutations. Although the tissue samples had a slightly higher mutation rate compared to the pleural effusion samples, the difference was not statistically significant. These results indicate that the EGFR mutation rate detected in pleural effusion specimens from patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma is similar to that detected in tumor tissue samples. Therefore, pleural effusion specimens can potentially be used for EGFR mutation detection in advanced lung adenocarcinoma.

  13. Effect of repeated tissue sampling on growth rates of juvenile loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Bjorndal, Karen A; Reich, Kimberly J; Bolten, Alan B

    2010-02-17

    We evaluated the effect of repeated tissue sampling on growth rates of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta. Samples of blood, skin, and scute (keratinized epidermal layer covering the bony shell) were collected at 3 intervals over a 120 d period from 37 loggerheads; 8 control turtles were not sampled. No infections or scarring occurred at the sampling sites, and growth in mass of experimental and control turtles was not significantly different. The sampling regime did not affect the health or physiological status of the turtles.

  14. Measurement of the hyperelastic properties of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Joseph J.; Samani, Abbas

    2009-04-01

    The elastic and hyperelastic properties of biological soft tissues have been of interest to the medical community. There are several biomedical applications where parameters characterizing such properties are critical for a reliable clinical outcome. These applications include surgery planning, needle biopsy and brachtherapy where tissue biomechanical modeling is involved. Another important application is interpreting nonlinear elastography images. While there has been considerable research on the measurement of the linear elastic modulus of small tissue samples, little research has been conducted for measuring parameters that characterize the nonlinear elasticity of tissues included in tissue slice specimens. This work presents hyperelastic measurement results of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples. For each sample, five hyperelastic models have been used, including the Yeoh, N = 2 polynomial, N = 1 Ogden, Arruda-Boyce, and Veronda-Westmann models. Results show that the Yeoh, polynomial and Ogden models are the most accurate in terms of fitting experimental data. The results indicate that almost all of the parameters corresponding to the pathological tissues are between two times to over two orders of magnitude larger than those of normal tissues, with C11 showing the most significant difference. Furthermore, statistical analysis indicates that C02 of the Yeoh model, and C11 and C20 of the polynomial model have very good potential for cancer classification as they show statistically significant differences for various cancer types, especially for invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the potential for use in cancer classification, the presented data are very important for applications such as surgery planning and virtual reality based clinician training systems where accurate nonlinear tissue response modeling is required.

  15. Effects of formalin fixation on tissue optical properties of in-vitro brain samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Application of light spectroscopy based techniques for the detection of cancers have emerged as a promising approach for tumor diagnostics. In-vivo or freshly excised samples are normally used for point spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues related to in-vivo studies, rapid decay of surgically excised tissues and sample availability puts a limitation on in-vivo and in-vitro studies. There has been a few studies reported on the application of formalin fixed samples with good discrimination capability. Usually formalin fixation is performed to prevent degradation of tissues after surgical resection. Fixing tissues in formalin prevents cell death by forming cross-linkages with proteins. Previous investigations have revealed that washing tissues fixed in formalin using phosphate buffered saline is known to reduce the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. But this could not be the case with reflectance measurements. Hemoglobin is a principal absorbing medium in biological tissues in the visible range. Formalin fixation causes hemoglobin to seep out from red blood cells. Also, there could be alterations in the refractive index of tissues when fixed in formalin. In this study, we propose to investigate the changes in tissue optical properties between freshly excised and formalin fixed brain tissues. The results indicate a complete change in the spectral profile in the visible range where hemoglobin has its maximum absorption peaks. The characteristic bands of oxy-hemoglobin at 540, 580 nm and deoxy-hemoglobin at 555 nm disappear in the case of samples fixed in formalin. In addition, an increased spectral intensity was observed for the wavelengths greater than 650 nm where scattering phenomena are presumed to dominate.

  16. Comparison of organochlorine residues in human adipose tissue autopsy samples from two Ontario municipalities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.T.; LeBel, G.L.; Junkins, E.

    1984-01-01

    Human adipose tissue samples obtained during autopsies in a Canadian Great Lakes community, Kingston, Ontario, and a second community, Ottawa, Ontario, were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorobiphenyls, chlorobenzenes, and chlorophenols. Significantly different levels of Dichlorodiphenyl-dichlorethane, mirex, hexachlorobenzene, and 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol were found in Kingston adipose tissues compared to Ottawa tissues. Residue levels of oxychlordane, mirex, and polychlorinated biphenyls were significantly different in Kingston males versus Kingston females. The means and ranges of residue levels were contrasted with those reported in previous Canadian surveys.

  17. Ice-cap. A high-throughput method for capturing plant tissue samples for genotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Krysan, Patrick

    2004-07-01

    High-throughput genotype screening is rapidly becoming a standard research tool in the post-genomic era. A major bottleneck currently exists, however, that limits the utility of this approach in the plant sciences. The rate-limiting step in current high-throughput pipelines is that tissue samples from living plants must be collected manually, one plant at a time. In this article I describe a novel method for harvesting tissue samples from living seedlings that eliminates this bottleneck. The method has been named Ice-Cap to reflect the fact that ice is used to capture the tissue samples. The planting of seeds, growth of seedlings, and harvesting of tissue are all performed in a 96-well format. I demonstrate the utility of this system by using tissue harvested by Ice-Cap to genotype a population of Arabidopsis seedlings that is segregating a previously characterized mutation. Because the harvesting of tissue is performed in a nondestructive manner, plants with the desired genotype can be transferred to soil and grown to maturity. I also show that Ice-Cap can be used to analyze genomic DNA from rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings. It is expected that this method will be applicable to high-throughput screening with many different plant species, making it a useful technology for performing marker assisted selection.

  18. CT-guided irreversible electroporation in an acute porcine liver model: effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking on technical parameters, 3D computed tomographic rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Sommer, C M; Fritz, S; Vollherbst, D; Zelzer, S; Wachter, M F; Bellemann, N; Gockner, T; Mokry, T; Schmitz, A; Aulmann, S; Stampfl, U; Pereira, P; Kauczor, H U; Werner, J; Radeleff, B A

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance. After Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann-Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed. Mean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm(3), and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm(3), and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone. There is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  19. Quantitative mapping of collagen fiber alignment in thick tissue samples using transmission polarized-light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Dmitry D.; Shvachkina, Marina E.; Sherman, Maria M.; Spivak, Andrey V.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Yakovlev, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Immersion optical clearing makes it possible to use transmission polarized-light microscopy for characterization of thick (200 to 2000 μm) layers of biological tissues. We discuss polarization properties of thick samples in the context of the problem of characterization of collagen fiber alignment in connective tissues such as sclera and dermis. Optical chirality caused by azimuthal variations of the macroscopic (effective) optic axis of the medium across the sample thickness should be considered in polarization mapping of thick samples of these tissues. We experimentally evaluate to what extent the optical chirality affects the measurement results in typical situations and show under what conditions it can be easily taken into account and does not hinder, but rather helps, in characterization of collagen fiber alignment.

  20. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed.

  1. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Effect of sample geometry on the apparent biaxial mechanical behaviour of planar connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Stephen D; Lee, J Michael

    2005-12-01

    Mechanical testing methodologies developed for engineering materials may result in artifactual material properties if applied to soft planar connective tissues. The use of uniaxial tissue samples with high aspect ratios or biaxial samples with slender cruciform arms could lead to preferential loading of only the discrete subset of extracellular fibres that fully extend between the grips. To test this hypothesis, cruciform biaxial connective tissue samples that display distinctly different material properties (bovine pericardium, fish skin), as well as model textile laminates with predefined fibrous orientations, were repeatedly tested with decreasing sample arm lengths. With mechanical properties determined at the sample centre, results demonstrated that the materials appeared to become stiffer and less extensible with less slender sample geometries, suggesting that fibre recruitment increases with decreasing sample arm length. Alterations in the observed shear behaviour and rigid body rotation were also noted. The only truly reliable method to determine material properties is through in vivo testing, but this is not always convenient and is typically experimentally demanding. For the in vitro determination of the biaxial material properties, appropriate sample geometry should be employed in which all of the fibres contribute to the mechanical response.

  3. Trace element contamination in feather and tissue samples from Anna’s hummingbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikoni, Nicole A.; Poppenga, Robert H.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Foley, Janet E.; Hazlehurst, Jenny; Purdin, Güthrum; Aston, Linda; Hargrave, Sabine; Jelks, Karen; Tell, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Trace element contamination (17 elements; Be, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) of live (feather samples only) and deceased (feather and tissue samples) Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) was evaluated. Samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS; 17 elements) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Hg only). Mean plus one standard deviation (SD) was considered the benchmark, and concentrations above the mean + 1 SD were considered elevated above normal. Contour feathers were sampled from live birds of varying age, sex, and California locations. In order to reduce thermal impacts, minimal feathers were taken from live birds, therefore a novel method was developed for preparation of low mass feather samples for ICP-MS analysis. The study found that the novel feather preparation method enabled small mass feather samples to be analyzed for trace elements using ICP-MS. For feather samples from live birds, all trace elements, with the exception of beryllium, had concentrations above the mean + 1 SD. Important risk factors for elevated trace element concentrations in feathers of live birds were age for iron, zinc, and arsenic, and location for iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium. For samples from deceased birds, ICP-MS results from body and tail feathers were correlated for Fe, Zn, and Pb, and feather concentrations were correlated with renal (Fe, Zn, Pb) or hepatic (Hg) tissue concentrations. Results for AA spectrophotometry analyzed samples from deceased birds further supported the ICP-MS findings where a strong correlation between mercury concentrations in feather and tissue (pectoral muscle) samples was found. These study results support that sampling feathers from live free-ranging hummingbirds might be a useful, non-lethal sampling method for evaluating trace element exposure and provides a sampling alternative since their small body size limits traditional sampling of blood and tissues. The

  4. Plutonium in south-central Washington State autopsy tissue samples--1970-1975.

    PubMed

    Nelson, I C; Thomas, V W; Kathren, R L

    1993-10-01

    Results are presented of postmortem human tissue sampling and analysis for plutonium of Hanford Site workers, residents of the nearby Tri-Cities, and individuals residing farther away from the Hanford Site for the period 1970-1975. The majority of Hanford Site workers and nearby residents coming to autopsy had tissue concentrations of plutonium no larger than those who lived farther away from Hanford and whose likely source of plutonium was limited to nuclear weapons testing fallout. Thus, Hanford operations up to that time apparently had made no significant addition to plutonium in those individuals sampled postmortem.

  5. Impact of tissue sampling on accuracy of Ki67 immunohistochemistry evaluation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Besusparis, Justinas; Plancoulaine, Benoit; Rasmusson, Allan; Augulis, Renaldas; Green, Andrew R; Ellis, Ian O; Laurinaviciene, Aida; Herlin, Paulette; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2016-08-30

    Gene expression studies have identified molecular subtypes of breast cancer with implications to chemotherapy recommendations. For distinction of these types, a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) markers, including proliferative activity of tumor cells, estimated by Ki67 labeling index is used. Clinical studies are frequently based on IHC performed on tissue microarrays (TMA) with variable tissue sampling. This raises the need for evidence-based sampling criteria for individual IHC biomarker studies. We present a novel tissue sampling simulation model and demonstrate its application on Ki67 assessment in breast cancer tissue taking intratumoral heterogeneity into account. Whole slide images (WSI) of 297 breast cancer sections, immunohistochemically stained for Ki67, were subjected to digital image analysis (DIA). Percentage of tumor cells stained for Ki67 was computed for hexagonal tiles super-imposed on the WSI. From this, intratumoral Ki67 heterogeneity indicators (Haralick's entropy values) were extracted and used to dichotomize the tumors into homogeneous and heterogeneous subsets. Simulations with random selection of hexagons, equivalent to 0.75 mm circular diameter TMA cores, were performed. The tissue sampling requirements were investigated in relation to tumor heterogeneity using linear regression and extended error analysis. The sampling requirements were dependent on the heterogeneity of the biomarker expression. To achieve a coefficient error of 10 %, 5-6 cores were needed for homogeneous cases, 11-12 cores for heterogeneous cases; in mixed tumor population 8 TMA cores were required. Similarly, to achieve the same accuracy, approximately 4,000 nuclei must be counted when the intratumor heterogeneity is mixed/unknown. Tumors of low proliferative activity would require larger sampling (10-12 TMA cores, or 6,250 nuclei) to achieve the same error measurement results as for highly proliferative tumors. Our data show that optimal tissue sampling for

  6. Plutonium in south-central Washington State autopsy tissue samples--1970-1975

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, I.C.; Thomas, V.W. Jr.; Kathren, R.L. )

    1993-10-01

    Results are presented of postmortem human tissue sampling and analysis for plutonium of Hanford Site workers, residents of the nearby Tri-Cities, and individuals residing farther away from the Hanford Site for the period 1970-1975. The majority of Hanford Site workers and nearby residents coming to autopsy had tissue concentrations of plutonium no larger than those who lived farther away from Hanford and whose likely source of plutonium was limited to nuclear weapons testing fallout. Thus, Hanford operations up to that time apparently had made no significant addition to plutonium in those individuals sampled postmortem.

  7. Cancer Detection in Human Tissue Samples Using a Fiber-Tip pH Probe.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Erik P; Henderson, Matthew R; Purdey, Malcolm; Dhatrak, Deepak; Monro, Tanya M; Gill, P Grantley; Callen, David F

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative detection of tumorous tissue is an important unresolved issue for cancer surgery. Difficulty in differentiating between tissue types commonly results in the requirement for additional surgeries to excise unremoved cancer tissue or alternatively in the removal of excess amounts of healthy tissue. Although pathologic methods exist to determine tissue type during surgery, these methods can compromise postoperative pathology, have a lag of minutes to hours before the surgeon receives the results of the tissue analysis, and are restricted to excised tissue. In this work, we report the development of an optical fiber probe that could potentially find use as an aid for margin detection during surgery. A fluorophore-doped polymer coating is deposited on the tip of an optical fiber, which can then be used to record the pH by monitoring the emission spectra from this dye. By measuring the tissue pH and comparing with the values from regular tissue, the tissue type can be determined quickly and accurately. The use of a novel lift-and-measure technique allows for these measurements to be performed without influence from the inherent autofluorescence that commonly affects fluorescence-based measurements on biological samples. The probe developed here shows strong potential for use during surgery, as the probe design can be readily adapted to a low-cost portable configuration, which could find use in the operating theater. Use of this probe in surgery either on excised or in vivo tissue has the potential to improve success rates for complete removal of cancers. Cancer Res; 76(23); 6795-801. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  9. Histopathological lesions associated with equine periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Cox, Alistair; Dixon, Padraic; Smith, Sionagh

    2012-12-01

    Equine periodontal disease (EPD) is a common and painful condition, the aetiology and pathology of which are poorly understood. To characterise the histopathological lesions associated with EPD, the skulls of 22 horses were assessed grossly for the presence of periodontal disease, and a standard set of interdental tissues taken from each for histopathological examination. Histological features of EPD included ulceration and neutrophilic inflammation of the gingival epithelium. Mononuclear and eosinophilic inflammation of the gingival lamina propria and submucosa was commonly present irrespective of the presence or degree of periodontal disease. Gingival hyperplasia was present to some degree in all horses, and was only weakly associated with the degree of periodontal disease. In all horses dental plaque was present at the majority of sites examined and was often associated with histological evidence of peripheral cemental erosion. Bacteria (including spirochaetes in four horses) were identified in gingival samples by Gram and silver impregnation techniques and were significantly associated with the presence of periodontal disease. This is the first study to describe histological features of EPD, and the first to identify associated spirochaetes in some cases. Histological features were variable, and there was considerable overlap of some features between the normal and diseased gingiva. Further investigation into the potential role of bacteria in the pathogenesis and progression of EPD is warranted.

  10. Prospective Collection of Tissue Samples at Autopsy in Children with Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Broniscer, Alberto; Baker, Justin N.; Baker, Suzanne J.; Chi, Susan N.; Geyer, J. Russell; Morris, E. Brannon; Gajjar, Amar

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Brain tissue obtained at autopsy has been used in research for non-oncological disorders. However, this tool has never been systematically used in large investigational studies for cancer. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to assess the feasibility of tissue collection at autopsy and its suitability for molecular analyses in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. METHODS Tumor tissue was collected at diagnosis, if clinically indicated, or at autopsy. Normal brain tissue was also collected at autopsy. The integrity of DNA and RNA was evaluated in all samples. Logistical data about autopsies were recorded. The feasibility of tissue collection at autopsy was assessed for patients treated at a single institution over a 43-month period. RESULTS Tumor samples were collected at diagnosis (n=3) or at autopsy (n=38) at 29 centers across the US; samples were obtained at diagnosis and autopsy in two cases. The median interval from death to autopsy was 7.7 hours. DNA and RNA with minimal or partial degradation, which were suitable for genome-wide analysis, were obtained from 100% and 63% of tumor samples, respectively. At the coordinating institution, approximately 40% of parents consented to autopsy and 40% declined. During the study period, 12 autopsies were obtained from patients who did not receive therapy at the coordinating center. CONCLUSIONS Multicenter, biological studies based on tissue obtained at autopsy are feasible in children with brain cancer. Our experience established a new paradigm for brain tissue collection which may increase the potential for research studies in patients with cancer. PMID:20589749

  11. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  12. Automated MALDI matrix coating system for multiple tissue samples for imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mounfield, William P; Garrett, Timothy J

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  13. Postmortem tissue samples: an alternative to urine and blood for drug analysis in racehorses.

    PubMed

    Uboh, C E; Rudy, J A; Railing, F A; Enright, J M; Shoemaker, J M; Kahler, M C; Shellenberger, J M; Kemecsei, Z; Das, D N

    1995-09-01

    Although urine is the sample of choice for drug tests in racehorses, it is rarely obtained following the sudden death of a racehorse on the track while racing. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the significance of postmortem tissue samples as an alternative to urine and blood samples in equine drug analysis following the sudden death of a racehorse on the track while participating in a competitive race. Postmortem tissue samples were frozen (-80 degrees C) until analyzed. A 30-40-g portion of each organ was homogenized in a 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), deproteinized, hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase, extracted, and screened by thin-layer chromatography and immunoassay. Samples that initially tested positive for drug(s) were then extracted using high-flow, solid-phase extraction cartridges. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The presence of butorphanol in horses HB355 and CD387, pentobarbital in horse HO940, and ergotamine in horses HO940 and CD387 was detected and confirmed. Thus, in the absence of urine and blood samples following sudden death, postmortem tissue samples are equally useful for forensic toxicological investigations of racehorses.

  14. Ocular Histopathologic Features of Congenital Zika Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Maria P; Parra Saad, Edgar; Ospina Martinez, Martha; Corchuelo, Sheryl; Mercado Reyes, Marcela; Herrera, Maria Jose; Parra Saavedra, Miguel; Rico, Angelica; Fernandez, Angela M; Lee, Richard K; Ventura, Camila V; Berrocal, Audina M; Dubovy, Sander R

    2017-09-21

    Congenital Zika syndrome (CZS) is known to be associated with severe malformations in newborns. Although microcephaly is the hallmark of this disease, the ocular findings are important given the severe visual impairment that has been observed in these patients. Regardless of the increased number of CZS cases reported, to date, no studies have described the ocular histopathologic findings of this entity. To evaluate the presence of Zika virus (ZIKV) antigens and describe the associated ocular histopathologic features of 4 cases of CZS. In this observational case series performed from June 19, 2015, through April 30, 2017, ocular tissue samples from 4 deceased fetuses with a diagnosis of CZS from the National Institute of Health in Colombia were sent to the Florida Lions Ocular Pathology Laboratory for evaluation. The microscopic features of each specimen were described, and immunostaining was performed using a ZIKV NS2B protein antibody. Ocular tissue samples from the 4 deceased fetuses (2 female, 2 male) ranging from 21.5 to 29 weeks' gestation with a diagnosis of CZS were studied. The 4 eyes manifested with pupillary membranes, immature anterior chamber angles, loss of pigment and thinning of the retinal pigment epithelium, choroidal thinning, undifferentiated nuclear layers of the retina, and a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate within the choroid. The optic nerve, present in 2 of the eyes, demonstrated atrophy. Expression of ZIKV antigen was present in the iris in cases 1, 3, and 4; the neural retina and choroid in case 1; and in the optic nerve in case 4. Loss of retinal pigment epithelium, the presence of a thin choroid, a perivascular choroidal inflammatory infiltrate, and atrophic changes within the optic nerve were consistently present. These findings may be attributed to ZIKV infection and warrant further study.

  15. Assessing organic contaminants in fish: comparison of a nonlethal tissue sampling technique to mobile and stationary passive sampling devices.

    PubMed

    Heltsley, Rebecca M; Cope, W Gregory; Shea, Damian; Bringolf, Robert B; Kwak, Thomas J; Malindzak, Edward G

    2005-10-01

    As concerns mount over the human health risks associated with consumption of fish contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, there exists a need to better evaluate fish body burdens without lethally sampling many of the important commercial and sport species of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate two novel methods for estimating organic contaminants in fish that are a concern for both fish and human health. The removal of fish adipose fins, commonly done in mark-recapture studies with salmonid species, was evaluated as a nonlethal sampling technique to estimate concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris), relative to those found in muscle fillets of the same fish. We also assessed the efficacy of using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a mobile passive sampling device (PSD) attached directly to wild flathead catfish for assessing location-specific exposure of the fish to waterborne contaminants. The results of this study have demonstrated for the first time that organic contaminant concentrations in adipose fin were highly correlated (R2 = 0.87) with muscle fillet concentrations, indicating that the adipose fin of certain fishes may be used to accurately estimate tissue concentrations without the need for lethal sampling. Moreover, mobile PSDs attached directly to fish and used here for the first time accurately estimated ultratrace concentrations of waterborne PCBs and OCPs without any apparent harm to the fish, indicating that there are no practical or physical barriers to the use of mobile passive samplers attached to aquatic organisms. Among the many practical implications of this research, two potential priority items include the analysis of organic contaminants in farm-raised and sport fish intended for human consumption, without the economic and population losses associated with lethally sampling fish to obtain tissues, and identifying specific areas

  16. [Detection of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) in tissue samples of naturally and experimentally infected cattle].

    PubMed

    Teifke, Jens P; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    Enzootic bovine leukaemia (EBL) which is caused by the bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) still plays a remarkable role despite a significant success in sanitation programmes. In the Federal Republic of Germany it was not possible to eradicate the disease until today. Sporadically during slaughter or necropsy of cattle neoplastic lesions of the lymphatic tissues are observed that need to be clarified with regard to BLV as etiological agent. Due to the fact that in most instances no serological data are available from the respective animals and blood drawings from the original holdings are not easy to obtain the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) opens new avenues as supplementary diagnostic tool to test unfixed lymphatic tissues for the presence of BLV proviral DNA. Lymph node tissues from 10 naturally or experimentally BLV-infected cattle, which have been monitored virologically and serologically, and tissues from 4 negative animals were processed, DNA was extracted and subjected to PCR to amplify BLV env gene specific sequences. The results show that in cattle with BLV-induced leukosis as well as in cattle, which were clinically healthy and unsuspicious at slaughter or at post-mortem, either with persistent lymphocytosis (PL) or without, BLV proviral DNA could be detected easily in samples of lymphatic tissues and in high concordance with serological data. In this article data from the National and OIE reference laboratory for EBL at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI, Germany) are presented. Elaborated laboratory protocols for processing of tissue samples and performing of BLV-PCR are recommended.

  17. Semiquantitative determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in tissue samples by thin layer chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulhern, B.M.; Cromartie, E.; Reichel, W.L.; Belisle, A.A.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described for the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in tissue samples. Cleanup by hexane-aceto-nitrile partitioning and Florisil column chromatography are performed on samples before oxidative treatment to convert DDE to DCBP. PCB components are then determined semi-quantitatively by TLC. No prior separation of PCB from chlorinated pesticides is required. The lower limit of sensitivity is 0.2 ?g.

  18. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Rozhkova, Elena A.

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  19. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A; Noël, Peter B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  20. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results. PMID:26322638

  1. Molecular classification of cancer with the 92-gene assay in cytology and limited tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Brachtel, Elena F; Operaña, Theresa N; Sullivan, Peggy S; Kerr, Sarah E; Cherkis, Karen A; Schroeder, Brock E; Dry, Sarah M; Schnabel, Catherine A

    2016-05-10

    Detailed molecular evaluation of cytology and limited tissue samples is increasingly becoming the standard for cancer care. Reproducible and accurate diagnostic approaches with reduced demands on cellularity are an ongoing unmet need. This study evaluated the performance of a 92-gene assay for molecular diagnosis of tumor type/subtype in cytology and limited tissue samples. Clinical validation of accuracy for the 92-gene assay in limited tissue samples such as cytology cell blocks, core biopsies and small excisions was conducted in a blinded multi-institutional study (N = 109, 48% metastatic, 53% grade II and III). Analytical success rate and diagnostic utility were evaluated in a consecutive series of 644 cytology cases submitted for clinical testing. The 92-gene assay demonstrated 91% sensitivity (95% CI [0.84, 0.95]) for tumor classification, with high accuracy maintained irrespective of specimen type (100%, 92%, and 86% in FNA/cytology cell blocks, core biopsies, and small excisions, respectively; p = 0.26). The assay performed equally well for metastatic versus primary tumors (90% vs 93%, p = 0.73), and across histologic grades (100%, 90%, 89%, in grades I, II, and III, respectively; p = 0.75). In the clinical case series, a molecular diagnosis was reported in 87% of the 644 samples, identifying 23 different tumor types and allowing for additional mutational analysis in selected cases. These findings demonstrate high accuracy and analytical success rate of the 92-gene assay, supporting its utility in the molecular diagnosis of cancer for specimens with limited tissue.

  2. Standardization of a sample preparation and analytical workflow for proteomics of archival endometrial cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Alkhas, Addie; Hood, Brian L; Oliver, Kate; Teng, Pang-Ning; Oliver, Julie; Mitchell, David; Hamilton, Chad A; Maxwell, G Larry; Conrads, Thomas P

    2011-11-04

    The goal of the present study was to establish a standard operating procedure for mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis of laser microdissected (LMD) formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) uterine tissue. High resolution bioimage analysis of a large endometrial cancer tissue microarray immunostained for the breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein enabled precise counting of cells to establish that there is an average of 600 cells/nL of endometrial cancer tissue. We sought to characterize the peptide recovery from various volumes of tissue gathered by LMD and processed/digested using the present methodology. We observed a nearly linear increase in peptide recovery amount with increasing tissue volume dissected. There was little discernible difference in the peptide recovery from stromal versus malignant epithelium, and there was no apparent difference in the day-to-day recovery. This methodology reproducibly results in 100 ng of digested peptides per nL of endometrial tissue, or ∼25 pg peptides/endometrial cancer cell. Results from liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS experiments to assess the impact of total peptide load on column on the total number of peptides and proteins identified from FFPE tissue digests prepared with the present methodology indicate a demonstrable increase in the total number of peptides identified up to 1000 ng, beyond which diminishing returns were observed. Furthermore, we observed no impact on the peptide identification rates from analyses of equivalent peptide amounts derived from lower volume LMD samples. These results show that this single-tube collection-to-injection proteomics (CTIP) workflow represents a straightforward, scalable, and highly reliable methodology for sample preparation to enable high throughput LMD-MS analysis of tissues derived from biopsy or surgery.

  3. Histopathological standards for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal inflammation in endoscopic biopsy samples from the dog and cat: a report from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Gastrointestinal Standardization Group.

    PubMed

    Day, M J; Bilzer, T; Mansell, J; Wilcock, B; Hall, E J; Jergens, A; Minami, T; Willard, M; Washabau, R

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of inflammatory change in endoscopic biopsy samples of the gastrointestinal mucosa is an increasingly important component in the diagnosis and management of canine and feline gastrointestinal disease. Interpretation has hitherto been limited by the lack of standard criteria that define morphological and inflammatory features, and the absence of such standardization has made it difficult, if not impossible, to compare results of retrospective or prospective studies. The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Gastrointestinal Standardization Group was established, in part, to develop endoscopic and microscopical standards in small animal gastroenterology. This monograph presents a standardized pictorial and textual template of the major histopathological changes that occur in inflammatory disease of the canine and feline gastric body, gastric antrum, duodenum and colon. Additionally, a series of standard histopathological reporting forms is proposed, to encourage evaluation of biopsy samples in a systematic fashion. The Standardization Group believes that the international acceptance of these standard templates will advance the study of gastrointestinal disease in individual small companion animals as well as investigations that compare populations of animals.

  4. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  5. Histopathology of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronovirus (MERS-CoV) infection - clinicopathological and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Alsaad, Khaled O; Hajeer, Ali H; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Al Moaiqel, Mohammed; Al Oudah, Nourah; Al Ajlan, Abdulaziz; AlJohani, Sameera; Alsolamy, Sami; Gmati, Giamal E; Balkhy, Hanan; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan H; Baharoon, Salim A; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2017-08-31

    The pathogenesis, viral localization and histopathological features of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome - Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in human are not sufficiently described. The aims of this study were to explore and define the spectrum of histological and ultrastructural pathological changes affecting various organs in a patient with MERS-CoV infection and represent a base of MERS-CoV histopathology. We analyzed the postmortem histopathological findings and investigated viral particles localization in the pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tissue by transmission electron microscopic examination in a 33-year-old male patient of T-cell lymphoma, who acquired MERS-CoV infection. Tissue needle biopsies were obtained from brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. All samples were collected within 45 minutes from death to reduce tissue decomposition and artefact. Histopathological examination showed necrotizing pneumonia, pulmonary diffuse alveolar damage, acute kidney injury, portal and lobular hepatitis and myositis with muscle atrophic changes. The brain and heart were histologically unremarkable. Ultrastructurally, viral particles were localized in the pneumocytes, pulmonary macrophages, renal proximal tubular epithelial cells and macrophages infiltrating the skeletal muscles. The results highlight the pulmonary and extra-pulmonary pathological changes of MERS-CoV infection and provide the first evidence of the viral presence in human renal tissue, which suggests tissue tropism for MERS-CoV in kidney. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of metronidazole residues in water, sediment and fish tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wagil, Marta; Maszkowska, Joanna; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Caban, Magda; Stepnowski, Piotr; Kumirska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is an antibacterial and antiprotozoal drug used in veterinary and human medicine. Its continual entry into the environment and its biological properties may have significant, long-term effects on the stability of ecosystems because MNZ and its metabolites possess mutagenic, carcinogenic and toxic properties. For this reason, the application of MNZ in food-producing species is prohibited in the EU, the USA and other countries. To ensure human food safety and to protect the environment, robust and reliable screening and confirmatory tests capable of the low-level detection of MNZ residues are required. The development of methods for MNZ determination in biological and environmental samples is thus an important analytical task in environmental and food science. This work focuses on the evaluation of a method for determining MNZ in water, sediment and fish tissue samples using liquid chromatography--ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). MNZ was extracted from waters on Strata XC cartridges using solid phase extraction (SPE), and from sediments and fish tissues by solid-liquid extraction (sediment: 15 mL 0.1 M HCl (pH=0.6), 15 min; fish tissue: 15 mL 1% CH3COOH in ACN, 1 min; drying: 5 g MgSO4(anhyd.; 30 s) with SPE purification of the extracts (from sediment: Strata XC cartridge; from fish tissue: Supelco NH2 cartridge). The optimal procedure that we developed was validated in order to confirm its reliability and sensitivity. Matrix effects (ME) were established. Absolute recoveries ranged from 89.3% to 97.2%, and the method detection limits were 3.4 ng L(-1) (water samples), 0.4 ng g(-1) (sediment samples) and 0.3 ng g(-1) (tissue samples). These methods were used to determine MNZ in surface waters, sediments and fish tissues from the Polish River Gościcina; MNZ was found in all these matrices. The highest concentrations in water, sediment and tissue were 136.2 ng L(-1), 12.0 ng g(-1) and 1.5 ng g(-1) respectively. The results confirmed that

  7. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Samuel M.; Holmes, Bonnie J.; Pepperell, Julian G.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species. PMID:26376487

  8. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Williams, Samuel M; Holmes, Bonnie J; Pepperell, Julian G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species.

  9. Preservation and rapid purification of DNA from decomposing human tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Amy; Rahman, Elizabeth; Canela, Cassandra; Gangitano, David; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2016-11-01

    One of the key features to be considered in a mass disaster is victim identification. However, the recovery and identification of human remains are sometimes complicated by harsh environmental conditions, limited facilities, loss of electricity and lack of refrigeration. If human remains cannot be collected, stored, or identified immediately, bodies decompose and DNA degrades making genotyping more difficult and ultimately decreasing DNA profiling success. In order to prevent further DNA damage and degradation after collection, tissue preservatives may be used. The goal of this study was to evaluate three customized (modified TENT, DESS, LST) and two commercial DNA preservatives (RNAlater and DNAgard(®)) on fresh and decomposed human skin and muscle samples stored in hot (35°C) and humid (60-70% relative humidity) conditions for up to three months. Skin and muscle samples were harvested from the thigh of three human cadavers placed outdoors for up to two weeks. In addition, the possibility of purifying DNA directly from the preservative solutions ("free DNA") was investigated in order to eliminate lengthy tissue digestion processes and increase throughput. The efficiency of each preservative was evaluated based on the quantity of DNA recovered from both the "free DNA" in solution and the tissue sample itself in conjunction with the quality and completeness of downstream STR profiles. As expected, DNA quantity and STR success decreased with time of decomposition. However, a marked decrease in DNA quantity and STR quality was observed in all samples after the bodies entered the bloat stage (approximately six days of decomposition in this study). Similar amounts of DNA were retrieved from skin and muscle samples over time, but slightly more complete STR profiles were obtained from muscle tissue. Although higher amounts of DNA were recovered from tissue samples than from the surrounding preservative, the average number of reportable alleles from the "free DNA" was

  10. Quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis of laser microdissected tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Heidi S.; Albert, Paul S.; Gillespie, John W.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Linehan, W. Marston; Pinto, Peter A.; Chuaqui, Rodrigo F.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a valuable tool for measuring gene expression in biological samples. However, unique challenges are encountered when studies are performed on cells microdissected from tissues derived from animal models or the clinic, including specimen related issues, variability of RNA template quality and quantity, and normalization. qRT-PCR using small amounts of mRNA derived from dissected cell populations requires adaptation of standard methods to allow meaningful comparisons across sample sets. The protocol described here presents the rationale, technical steps, normalization strategy, and data analysis necessary to generate reliable gene expression measurements of transcripts from dissected samples. The entire protocol from tissue microdissection through qRT-PCR analysis requires approximately 16 hours. PMID:19478806

  11. Non-lethal sampling of walleye for stable isotope analysis: a comparison of three tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fishes is often performed using muscle or organ tissues that require sacrificing animals. Non-lethal sampling provides an alternative for evaluating isotopic composition for species of concern or individuals of exceptional value. Stable isotope values of white muscle (lethal) were compared with those from fins and scales (non-lethal) in walleye, Sander vitreus (Mitchill), from multiple systems, size classes and across a range of isotopic values. Isotopic variability was also compared among populations to determine the potential of non-lethal tissues for diet-variability analyses. Muscle-derived isotope values were enriched compared with fins and depleted relative to scales. A split-sample validation technique and linear regression found that isotopic composition of walleye fins and scales was significantly related to that in muscle tissue for both δ13C and δ15N (r2 = 0.79–0.93). However, isotopic variability was significantly different between tissue types in two of six populations for δ15N and three of six populations for δ13C. Although species and population specific, these findings indicate that isotopic measures obtained from non-lethal tissues are indicative of those obtained from muscle.

  12. Metabolite Profiling of Preneoplastic and Neoplastic Lesions of Oral Cavity Tissue Samples Revealed a Biomarker Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Shahid, Najia; Naqvi, Syed Muhammad Ali; Saleem, Mahwish; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Ali, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health challenge in the Indian subcontinent and a dreadful form of cancers worldwide. The current study is focused on the identification of distinguished metabolites of oral cancer tissue samples in comparison with precancerous and control tissue samples using gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry and chemometric analyses. Metabolites obtained were identified through National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral (Wiley registry) library. Mass Profiler Professional (MPP) software was used for the alignment and for all the statistical analysis. 31 compounds out of 735 found distinguishing among oral cancer, precancerous and control group samples using p-value ≤ 0.05. Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) model was generated using statistically significant metabolites gave an overall accuracy of 90.2%. Down-regulated amino acid levels appear to be the result of enhanced energy metabolism or up-regulation of the appropriate biosynthetic pathways, and required cell proliferation in cancer tissues. These results suggest that tissue metabolic profiles have great potential in detecting oral cancer and may aid in understanding its underlying mechanisms. PMID:27958349

  13. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    DOE PAGES

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; ...

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissuemore » specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.« less

  14. Facial soft tissue thickness in a sample of Sudanese adults with different occlusions.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sama; Abuaffan, Amal H

    2016-09-01

    Facial soft tissue thickness is essential to orthodontists and plastic surgeons for treatment planning, and to forensic anthropologists for facial reconstruction, a process combining science and art to recreate a recognizable face from an unidentified skull. The facial profile, together with the age and sex of a person, is related to facial soft tissue thickness, which is required for accurate facial reconstruction and recognition. Skeletal occlusions in orthodontics are classified according to the basic human facial profiles: straight, convex, and concave or skeletal class I, II, and III, respectively. In the present study, the facial soft tissue thickness of 233 Sudanese subjects (105 men and 128 women), ranging in age from 18 to 35 years, with different facial profiles at 20 landmarks was measured (10 soft tissue and 10 dentoskeletal). Sexual dimorphism was noted, with males having thicker facial soft tissue at all measured points. The facial soft tissue thickness varied among different occlusions. Individuals with skeletal class II occlusion had the thickest lower lip, and class III individuals had the thickest upper lip. In general, the Sudanese sample had a unique spectrum of measurements, with thick upper and lower lips, compared with African and Caucasoid subjects, pointing to the need for ethnic-specific data.

  15. Spatially-Resolved Proteomics: Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Alveolar Tissue Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clair, Geremy; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicola, Teodora; Kitzmiller, Joseph A.; Huang, Eric L.; Zink, Erika M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Carson, James P.; Smith, Richard D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Corley, Richard A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Ansong, Charles

    2016-12-22

    Global proteomics approaches allow characterization of whole tissue lysates to an impressive depth. However, it is now increasingly recognized that to better understand the complexity of multicellular organisms, global protein profiling of specific spatially defined regions/substructures of tissues (i.e. spatially-resolved proteomics) is essential. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables microscopic isolation of defined regions of tissues preserving crucial spatial information. However, current proteomics workflows entail several manual sample preparation steps and are challenged by the microscopic mass-limited samples generated by LCM, and that impact measurement robustness, quantification, and throughput. Here, we coupled LCM with a fully automated sample preparation workflow that with a single manual step allows: protein extraction, tryptic digestion, peptide cleanup and LC-MS/MS analysis of proteomes from microdissected tissues. Benchmarking against the current state of the art in ultrasensitive global proteomic analysis, our approach demonstrated significant improvements in quantification and throughput. Using our LCM-SNaPP proteomics approach, we characterized to a depth of more than 3,400 proteins, the ontogeny of protein changes during normal lung development in laser capture microdissected alveolar tissue containing ~4,000 cells per sample. Importantly, the data revealed quantitative changes for 350 low abundance transcription factors and signaling molecules, confirming earlier transcript-level observations and defining seven modules of coordinated transcription factor/signaling molecule expression patterns, suggesting that a complex network of temporal regulatory control directs normal lung development with epigenetic regulation fine-tuning pre-natal developmental processes. Our LCM-proteomics approach facilitates efficient, spatially-resolved, ultrasensitive global proteomics analyses in high-throughput that will be enabling for several clinical and

  16. MicroRNA Stability in FFPE Tissue Samples: Dependence on GC Content

    PubMed Central

    Kakimoto, Yu; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Eriko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs responsible for fine-tuning of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The alterations in miRNA expression levels profoundly affect human health and often lead to the development of severe diseases. Currently, high throughput analyses, such as microarray and deep sequencing, are performed in order to identify miRNA biomarkers, using archival patient tissue samples. MiRNAs are more robust than longer RNAs, and resistant to extreme temperatures, pH, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedding (FFPE) process. Here, we have compared the stability of miRNAs in FFPE cardiac tissues using next-generation sequencing. The mode read length in FFPE samples was 11 nucleotides (nt), while that in the matched frozen samples was 22 nt. Although the read counts were increased 1.7-fold in FFPE samples, compared with those in the frozen samples, the average miRNA mapping rate decreased from 32.0% to 9.4%. These results indicate that, in addition to the fragmentation of longer RNAs, miRNAs are to some extent degraded in FFPE tissues as well. The expression profiles of total miRNAs in two groups were highly correlated (0.88 tissues instead of miR-1, which was predominant before fixation. Subsequent quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed that miRNAs with GC content of less than 40% are more degraded than GC-rich miRNAs (p<0.0001). We showed that deep sequencing data obtained using FFPE samples cannot be directly compared with that of fresh frozen samples. The combination of miRNA deep sequencing and other quantitative analyses, such as qPCR, may improve the utility of archival FFPE tissue samples. PMID:27649415

  17. Postradiation changes in tissues: evaluation by imaging studies with emphasis on fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography and correlation with histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Domachevsky, Liran; Jacene, Heather A; Sakellis, Christopher G; Kim, Chun K

    2014-04-01

    Efforts have been made to minimize the damage to adjacent normal tissues during radiotherapy, primarily by shifting from the use of conventional radiotherapy to more advanced techniques. Reviewing the overall pattern on combined anatomic and functional imaging can enhance diagnostic accuracy. Several radiotracers can be used; [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose is the most common. Familiarity with the type and timing of previous radiation therapy, the spectrum of imaging findings after radiation injury, and the appropriate use of the different radiotracers can be crucial. This article summarizes postradiation histologic findings and multimodality imaging findings, with emphasis on PET/computed tomography.

  18. Screening of Viral Pathogens from Pediatric Ileal Tissue Samples after Vaccination

    DOE PAGES

    Hewitson, Laura; Thissen, James B.; Gardner, Shea N.; ...

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, researchers reported that the two US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contained DNA or DNA fragments from porcine circovirus (PCV). Although PCV, a common virus among pigs, is not thought to cause illness in humans, these findings raised several safety concerns. In this study, we sought to determine whether viruses, including PCV, could be detected in ileal tissue samples of children vaccinated with one of the two rotavirus vaccines. A broad spectrum, novel DNA detection technology, the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA), was utilized, and confirmation of viral pathogens using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted. The LLMDAmore » technology was recently used to identify PCV from one rotavirus vaccine. Ileal tissue samples were analyzed from 21 subjects, aged 15–62 months. PCV was not detected in any ileal tissue samples by the LLMDA or PCR. LLMDA identified a human rotavirus A from one of the vaccinated subjects, which is likely due to a recent infection from a wild type rotavirus. LLMDA also identified human parechovirus, a common gastroenteritis viral infection, from two subjects. Additionally, LLMDA detected common gastrointestinal bacterial organisms from the Enterobacteriaceae , Bacteroidaceae , and Streptococcaceae families from several subjects. This study provides a survey of viral and bacterial pathogens from pediatric ileal samples, and may shed light on future studies to identify pathogen associations with pediatric vaccinations.« less

  19. Screening of Viral Pathogens from Pediatric Ileal Tissue Samples after Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Thissen, James B.; Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Glausser, Margaret K.; Jaing, Crystal J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, researchers reported that the two US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contained DNA or DNA fragments from porcine circovirus (PCV). Although PCV, a common virus among pigs, is not thought to cause illness in humans, these findings raised several safety concerns. In this study, we sought to determine whether viruses, including PCV, could be detected in ileal tissue samples of children vaccinated with one of the two rotavirus vaccines. A broad spectrum, novel DNA detection technology, the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA), was utilized, and confirmation of viral pathogens using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted. The LLMDA technology was recently used to identify PCV from one rotavirus vaccine. Ileal tissue samples were analyzed from 21 subjects, aged 15–62 months. PCV was not detected in any ileal tissue samples by the LLMDA or PCR. LLMDA identified a human rotavirus A from one of the vaccinated subjects, which is likely due to a recent infection from a wild type rotavirus. LLMDA also identified human parechovirus, a common gastroenteritis viral infection, from two subjects. Additionally, LLMDA detected common gastrointestinal bacterial organisms from the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroidaceae, and Streptococcaceae families from several subjects. This study provides a survey of viral and bacterial pathogens from pediatric ileal samples, and may shed light on future studies to identify pathogen associations with pediatric vaccinations. PMID:24778651

  20. Combined micro-XRF and TXRF methodology for quantitative elemental imaging of tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Paweł M; Bała, Sławomir; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Golasik, Magdalena; Librowski, Tadeusz; Ostachowicz, Beata; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Surówka, Artur; Lankosz, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Local differences in structural properties of biological specimens pose a major limitation to quantitative X-ray fluorescence imaging. This is because both the various tissue compartments of different density and variation in the sample thickness upon frequently used freeze-drying come up with the different values of the sample mass per unit area to be taken into account. Even though several solutions to tackle this problem based on the home-made standards for quantification in terms of thickness- and density-independent elemental mass fractions have been proposed, this issue is not addressed enough due to the samples' heterogeneity. In our recent study, we propose a calculation scheme based on combined external-standard micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) imaging and internal-standard total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis to determine the corrected elemental mass fraction distributions in commonly analysed rat tissues: kidney, liver and spleen. The results of TXRF analysis of digested large tissue sections together with the mean values of elemental masses per unit area obtained with micro-XRF were employed to determine the average masses per unit area of the samples. The correction for variation of the tissue thickness and density was done through with the use of Compton intensities. Importantly, by its versatility, our novel approach can be used to produce elemental contrast in a variety of biological specimens where local variations in either the sample density or thickness are no longer the issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes.

  2. Quantitative PIXE and PIGME analysis of milligram samples of biomineralized tissue in the limpet Patella vulgata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-S.; Webb, J.; Macey, D. J.; Cohen, D. D.

    1987-03-01

    Procedures have been developed to determine, by thick target PIXE and PIGME, the quantitative elemental composition of biological samples with a mass of approximately 1 mg. Systems of particular interest are the biomineralized tissues of chitons and limpets, marine invertebrates of global distribution whose radula teeth and associated tissue contain, variously, inorganic components at different stages of mineralization, e.g. Fe, Ca, P, F, Si, Cu. For the biomineralized teeth and tissue in the limpet Patella vulgata the content of Fe, Ca and P increases rapidly at an early stage of mineralization, while the Si content increases somewhat later. In fully mineralized teeth, the Fe and Si contents are comparable. These data are compared with previous results (Trends Biochem. Sci. 10 (1985) 6) obtained using the Oxford scanning proton microprobe.

  3. Comparison of different biopsy forceps models for tissue sampling in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Christian; Schoepfer, Alain M; Safroneeva, Ekaterina; Haas, Nadine; Godat, Sébastien; Sempoux, Christine; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Straumann, Alex

    2016-12-01

    Background and aims: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a mixed inflammatory and fibrostenotic disease. Unlike superficial inflammatory changes, subepithelial fibrosis is not routinely sampled in esophageal biopsies. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of deep esophageal sampling with four different types of biopsy forceps. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, esophageal biopsies were taken in 30 adult patients by one expert endoscopist. Biopsies sampled from distal esophagus using a static jaw forceps (Olympus, FB-11K-1) were compared with proximal biopsies sampled with static jaw (Olympus, FB-45Q-1), alligator jaw (Olympus, FB-210K), and large-capacity forceps (Boston Scientific, Radial Jaw 4). One pathologist calculated the surface area of epithelial and subepithelial layers in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained biopsies. Results: Subepithelial tissue was acquired in 97 % (static jaw FB-11K-1), 93 % (static jaw FB-45Q-1), 80 % (alligator jaw), and 55 % (large-capacity) of samples. Median (interquartile [IQR]) ratios of surface area of epithelial to subepithelial tissue were: static jaw FB-45Q-1, 1.07 (0.65 - 4.465); static jaw FB-11K-1, 1.184 (0.608 - 2.545); alligator jaw, 2.353 (1.312 - 4.465); and large-capacity, 2.71 (1.611 - 4.858). The static jaw models obtained a larger surface area of subepithelial tissue compared with the alligator jaw (P < 0.001 and P = 0.037, for FB-11K-1 and FB-45Q-1, respectively) and the large-capacity forceps (P < 0.001, for both static jaw models). No esophageal perforations occurred. Conclusions: The static jaw forceps models allowed sampling of subepithelial tissue in > 90 % of biopsies and appear to be superior to alligator or large-capacity forceps in sampling larger amounts of subepithelial tissue. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The influence of cancer tissue sampling on the identification of cancer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Xin; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Mengmeng; Qi, Lishuang; Li, Yang; Chen, Libin; Gu, Yunyan; Guo, Zheng; Zhao, Wenyuan

    2015-10-22

    Cancer tissue sampling affects the identification of cancer characteristics. We aimed to clarify the source of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in macro-dissected cancer tissue and develop a robust prognostic signature against the effects of tissue sampling. For estrogen receptor (ER)+ breast cancer patients, we identified DEGs in macro-dissected cancer tissues, malignant epithelial cells and stromal cells, defined as Macro-Dissected-DEGs, Epithelial-DEGs and Stromal-DEGs, respectively. Comparing Epithelial-DEGs to Stromal-DEGs (false discovery rate (FDR) < 10%), 86% of the overlapping genes exhibited consistent dysregulation (defined as Consistent-DEGs), and the other 14% of genes were dysregulated inconsistently (defined as Inconsistent-DEGs). The consistency score of dysregulation directions between Macro-Dissected-DEGs and Consistent-DEGs was 91% (P-value < 2.2 × 10(-16), binomial test), whereas the score was only 52% between Macro-Dissected-DEGs and Inconsistent-DEGs (P-value = 0.9, binomial test). Among the gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched in Macro-Dissected-DEGs (FDR < 10%), 18 immune-related terms were enriched in Inconsistent-DEGs. DEGs associated with proliferation could reflect common changes of malignant epithelial and stromal cells; DEGs associated with immune functions are sensitive to the percentage of malignant epithelial cells in macro-dissected tissues. A prognostic signature which was insensitive to the cellular composition of macro-dissected tissues was developed and validated for ER+ breast patients.

  5. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Fritz, S.; Vollherbst, D.; Zelzer, S.; Wachter, M. F. Bellemann, N. Gockner, T. Mokry, T. Schmitz, A.; Aulmann, S.; Stampfl, U.; Pereira, P.; Kauczor, H. U.; Werner, J.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  6. Simultaneous Sampling of Tissue Oxygenation and Oxygen Consumption in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, William H.; Song, Bjorn K.; Pittman, Roland N.; Golub, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120–130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5 s compression followed by 15 s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100cm3 min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. PMID:26683232

  7. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic utility of immunohistochemistry in distinguishing trichoepithelioma and basal cell carcinoma: evaluation using tissue microarray samples.

    PubMed

    Tebcherani, Antonio José; de Andrade, Heitor Franco; Sotto, Mirian N

    2012-10-01

    Trichoepithelioma is a benign neoplasm that shares both clinical and histological features with basal cell carcinoma. It is important to distinguish these neoplasms because they require different clinical behavior and therapeutic planning. Many studies have addressed the use of immunohistochemistry to improve the differential diagnosis of these tumors. These studies present conflicting results when addressing the same markers, probably owing to the small number of basaloid tumors that comprised their studies, which generally did not exceed 50 cases. We built a tissue microarray with 162 trichoepithelioma and 328 basal cell carcinoma biopsies and tested a panel of immune markers composed of CD34, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, Bcl-2, cytokeratins 15 and 20 and D2-40. The results were analyzed using multiple linear and logistic regression models. This analysis revealed a model that could differentiate trichoepithelioma from basal cell carcinoma in 36% of the cases. The panel of immunohistochemical markers required to differentiate between these tumors was composed of CD10, cytokeratin 15, cytokeratin 20 and D2-40. The results obtained in this work were generated from a large number of biopsies and resulted in the confirmation of overlapping epithelial and stromal immunohistochemical profiles from these basaloid tumors. The results also corroborate the point of view that trichoepithelioma and basal cell carcinoma tumors represent two different points in the differentiation of a single cell type. Despite the use of panels of immune markers, histopathological criteria associated with clinical data certainly remain the best guideline for the differential diagnosis of trichoepithelioma and basal cell carcinoma.

  9. Identification of organ tissue types and skin from forensic samples by microRNA expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Eva; Extra, Antje; Cachée, Philipp; Courts, Cornelius

    2017-05-01

    The identification of organ tissues in traces recovered from scenes and objects with regard to violent crimes involving serious injuries can be of considerable relevance in forensic investigations. Molecular genetic approaches are provably superior to histological and immunological assays in characterizing organ tissues, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs), due to their cell type specific expression patterns and stability against degradation, emerged as a promising molecular species for forensic analyses, with a range of tried and tested indicative markers. Thus, herein we present the first miRNA based approach for the forensic identification of organ tissues. Using quantitative PCR employing an empirically derived strategy for data normalization and unbiased statistical decision making, we assessed the differential expression of 15 preselected miRNAs in tissues of brain, kidney, lung, liver, heart muscle, skeletal muscle and skin. We show that not only can miRNA expression profiling be used to reliably differentiate between organ tissues but also that this method, which is compatible with and complementary to forensic DNA analysis, is applicable to realistic forensic samples e.g. mixtures, aged and degraded material as well as traces generated by mock stabbings and experimental shootings at ballistic models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of sample preparation on the optical properties of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of biological tissue should be determined in vivo whenever possible. However, for those instances when in vivo studies are impractical, too expensive or inappropriate, and when blood flow is not an issue, the ability to perform in vitro studies then becomes invaluable. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows that it may be possible to obtain meaningful information about the optical properties of human breast tissue from in vitro samples if strict preparation and measuring protocols are used. That a strict protocol for storing and handling tissue is critical can be seen from our observations of changes in the optical absorption spectra that occur in response to formalin fixation, the passage of time, application of stains and dyes, and storage in growth medium of the excised tissue. In vivo optical absorption spectroscopy measurements have been made on human breast cancer xenografts and compared with in vitro measurements on breast biopsies prepared according to precise collection and treatment protocols. There is a 'window of opportunity' before time dependent changes in the UV optical absorption spectra of the excised tissue specimens occur. This time window of opportunity widens at longer wavelengths with the least changes occurring in the optical spectra in the NIR.

  11. Molecular classification of cancer with the 92-gene assay in cytology and limited tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Brachtel, Elena F.; Operaña, Theresa N.; Sullivan, Peggy S.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Cherkis, Karen A.; Schroeder, Brock E.; Dry, Sarah M.; Schnabel, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed molecular evaluation of cytology and limited tissue samples is increasingly becoming the standard for cancer care. Reproducible and accurate diagnostic approaches with reduced demands on cellularity are an ongoing unmet need. This study evaluated the performance of a 92-gene assay for molecular diagnosis of tumor type/subtype in cytology and limited tissue samples. Methods Clinical validation of accuracy for the 92-gene assay in limited tissue samples such as cytology cell blocks, core biopsies and small excisions was conducted in a blinded multi-institutional study (N = 109, 48% metastatic, 53% grade II and III). Analytical success rate and diagnostic utility were evaluated in a consecutive series of 644 cytology cases submitted for clinical testing. Results The 92-gene assay demonstrated 91% sensitivity (95% CI [0.84, 0.95]) for tumor classification, with high accuracy maintained irrespective of specimen type (100%, 92%, and 86% in FNA/cytology cell blocks, core biopsies, and small excisions, respectively; p = 0.26). The assay performed equally well for metastatic versus primary tumors (90% vs 93%, p = 0.73), and across histologic grades (100%, 90%, 89%, in grades I, II, and III, respectively; p = 0.75). In the clinical case series, a molecular diagnosis was reported in 87% of the 644 samples, identifying 23 different tumor types and allowing for additional mutational analysis in selected cases. Conclusions These findings demonstrate high accuracy and analytical success rate of the 92-gene assay, supporting its utility in the molecular diagnosis of cancer for specimens with limited tissue. PMID:27034010

  12. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  13. Analysis of dissected tissues with digital holographic microscopy: quantification of inflammation mediated tissue alteration, influence of sample preparation, and reliability of numerical autofocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) allows label-free imaging of tissue sections and quantification of the spatial refractive index distribution, which is of interest for applications in digital pathology. We show that DHM allows quantitative imaging of different layers in unstained tissue samples by detection of refractive index changes. In addition, we evaluate the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on dissected tissues and could achieve highly reproducible holographic autofocusing for unstained and moderately stained samples. Finally, it is demonstrated that in human ulcerative colitis patients the average tissue refractive index is reduced significantly in all parts of the inflamed colonic wall in comparison to patients in remission.

  14. Matrixlysis, an improved sample preparation method for recovery of Mycobacteria from animal tissue material

    PubMed Central

    Varadharajan, Ashok; Mester, Patrick; Fischaleck, Marlis; Rossmanith, Peter; Schmoll, Friedrich; Fink, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium caprae, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, is the main causative agent of bovine tuberculosis in alpine regions. Bacterial culture is the gold standard in bovine tuberculosis diagnostic but takes up to twelve weeks. This increases the time and costs for stocks affected with bovine tuberculosis. Hence this study focused on the implementation of a fast and precise mycobacterial detection method and compared it with currently used methods. Matrix lysis is a chemical lysis using high concentrations of urea to solubilize bovine and red deer tissue and was used to detect even smallest amounts or non-visible lesions of mycobacteria. A total of 64 samples collected from 44 animals (37 red deer and 7 cattle) were tested by Matrix lysis. Forty-three of these samples were used for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex detection by quantitative PCR and other 21 for subtyping the genetically different variants of M. caprae. Furthermore, three Matrix lysis samples were used for Next Generation Sequencing. Our results confirm that Matrix lysis is a fast and precise method for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in native tissue samples. However, at the moment it reaches its limits when the samples were analyzed by Next Generation Sequencing and RD4 subtyping. PMID:28723969

  15. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  16. Marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue with prominent plasma cell differentiation affecting the palatine tonsil: histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlos Bregni, Román; Nuyens, Michel; Vassallo, José; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Romañach, Mário José; León, Jorge Esquiche; Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2012-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of the oral cavity and oropharynx constitute 13% of all primary extranodal NHLs. Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) in the palatine tonsil is rare, corresponding to 6% of the NHLs of the Waldeyer ring. Some cases of MALT lymphoma can present prominent plasma cell differentiation, and less commonly, monoclonal gammopathy. The differential diagnosis of these cases from other NHLs with plasmacytic differentiation or plasma cell neoplasms is very difficult. In this article, we describe a rare case of MALT lymphoma in a 34-year-old man presenting as a swelling of the palatine tonsil. The tumor mass was diagnosed as MALT lymphoma with prominent plasma cell differentiation. Systemic evaluation was noncontributory. This is the first report of MALT lymphoma showing extensive plasmacytic differentiation of the palatine tonsil, and reinforces a possible relationship between extramedullary plasmacytoma and MALT lymphoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitive PCR analysis of animal tissue samples for fragments of endogenous and transgenic plant DNA.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Anne; Wurz, Andreas; Artim, Lori; Charlton, Stacy; Dana, Greg; Glenn, Kevin; Hunst, Penny; Jennings, James; Shilito, Ray; Song, Ping

    2004-10-06

    An optimized DNA extraction protocol for animal tissues coupled with sensitive PCR methods was used to determine whether trace levels of feed-derived DNA fragments, plant and/or transgenic, are detectable in animal tissue samples including dairy milk and samples of muscle (meat) from chickens, swine, and beef steers. Assays were developed to detect DNA fragments of both the high copy number chloroplast-encoded maize rubisco gene (rbcL) and single copy nuclear-encoded transgenic elements (p35S and a MON 810-specific gene fragment). The specificities of the two rbcL PCR assays and two transgenic DNA PCR assays were established by testing against a range of conventional plant species and genetically modified maize crops. The sensitivities of the two rbcL PCR assays (resulting in 173 and 500 bp amplicons) were similar, detecting as little as 0.08 and 0.02 genomic equivalents, respectively. The sensitivities of the p35S and MON 810 PCR assays were approximately 5 and 10 genomic equivalents for 123 bp and 149 bp amplicons, respectively, which were considerably less than the sensitivity of the rbcL assays in terms of plant cell equivalents, but approximately similar when the higher numbers of copies of the chloroplast genome per cell are taken into account. The 173 bp rbcL assay detected the target plant chloroplast DNA fragment in 5%, 15%, and 53% of the muscle samples from beef steers, broiler chickens, and swine, respectively, and in 86% of the milk samples from dairy cows. Reanalysis of new aliquots of 31 of the pork samples that were positive in the 173 bp rbcL PCR showed that 58% of these samples were reproducibly positive in this same PCR assay. The 500 bp rbcL assay detected DNA fragments in 43% of the swine muscle samples and 79% of the milk samples. By comparison, no statistically significant detections of transgenic DNA fragments by the p35S PCR assay occurred with any of these animal tissue samples.

  18. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue.

    PubMed

    Hitt, Nathaniel P; Smith, David R

    2015-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4 to 8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and Type I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of eight fish could detect an increase of approximately 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α=0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of approximately 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2, this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of approximately 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated for by increased precision of composites

  19. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4 to 8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and Type I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of eight fish could detect an increase of approximately 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α = 0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of approximately 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2, this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of approximately 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated for by increased

  20. Stability of ethyl glucuronide in urine, post-mortem tissue and blood samples.

    PubMed

    Schloegl, Haiko; Dresen, Sebastian; Spaczynski, Karin; Stoertzel, Mylène; Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    The stability of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) under conditions of degradation was examined in urine samples of nine volunteers and in post-mortem tissue (liver, skeletal muscle) and blood taken from seven corpses at autopsies. Analysis was performed via LC-MS/MS. EtG concentrations in urine samples ranged from 2.5 to 296.5 mg/l. When stored at 4 degrees C in airtight test tubes, EtG concentrations remained relatively constant; when stored at room temperature (RT) for 5 weeks in ventilated vials, variations of EtG concentrations ranged from a 30% decrease to an 80% increase, with an average of 37.5% increase. Liver and skeletal muscle tissue of three corpses with positive blood alcohol concentrations (BAC; ranging from 0.106 to 0.183 g%) were stored for 4 weeks and analysed periodically. EtG concentrations decreased 27.7% on average in 4 weeks storage at RT but EtG was still detectable in all samples with initial EtG concentrations higher than 1 mug/g. Blood and liver samples of four corpses with negative BACs were stored at RT after addition of 0.1 g% ethanol, and no new formation of EtG was observed.

  1. The relationship between decorrelation time and sample thickness in acute rat brain tissue slices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    The optical opacity of biological tissue has long been a challenge in biomedical optics due to the strong scattering nature of tissue in the optical regime. While most conventional optical techniques attempt to gate out multiply scattered light and use only unscattered light, new approaches in the field of wavefront shaping exploit the time reversible symmetry of optical scattering in order to focus light inside or through scattering media. While these approaches have been demonstrated effectively on static samples, it has proven difficult to apply them to dynamic biological samples since even small changes in the relative positions of the scatterers within will cause the time symmetry that wavefront shaping relies upon to decorrelate. In this paper we investigate the decorrelation curves of acute rat brain slices for thicknesses in the range 1-3 mm (1/e decorrelation time on the order of seconds) using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) and compare the results with theoretical predictions. The results of this study demonstrate that the 1/L^2 relationship between decorrelation time and thickness predicted by diffusing wave spectroscopy provides a good rule of thumb for estimating how the decorrelation of a sample will change with increasing thickness. Understanding this relationship will provide insight to guide the future development of biophotonic wavefront shaping tools by giving an estimate of how fast wavefront shaping systems need to operate to overcome the dynamic nature of biological samples.

  2. Application of a battery of biomarkers in mussel digestive gland to assess long-term effects of the Prestige oil spill in Galicia and Bay of Biscay: tissue-level biomarkers and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Larraitz; Soto, Manu; Vicario, Unai; Kim, Yungkul; Cajaraville, Miren P; Marigómez, Ionan

    2011-04-01

    In order to assess the biological effects of the Prestige oil spill (POS), mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, were collected in 22 localities along the North coast of the Iberian Peninsula over 3 years (April 2003-April 2006). Different tissue-level biomarkers including cell type composition (volume density of basophilic cells, Vv(BAS)) in digestive gland epithelium, structural changes of digestive alveoli (mean luminal radius to mean epithelial thickness, MLR/MET) and histopathological alterations (prevalence and intensity) of the digestive gland were analysed. Severe alterations in the general condition of the digestive gland tissue were observed all over the study area up to 2004-2005. High Vv(BAS) values were recorded mainly in Galicia but also to a lesser extent in the Bay of Biscay in 2003-2004. Atrophy of the digestive alveoli, measured in terms of MLR/MET, was detected all along the studied area up to 2006. Inflammatory responses cannot be related to pollution due to the POS: (a) prevalence and intensity of focal hemocytic infiltration were higher in the Bay of Biscay than in Galicia but they did not show a clear temporal trend; (b) high intensities of brown cell aggregates were only sporadically recorded; and (c) granulocytomas were more frequently recorded in the Bay of Biscay than in Galicia and especially in localities (i.e. Arrigunaga) subjected to chronic pollution. Likewise, Marteilia, trematodes, intracellular ciliates, unidentified eosinophilic bodies, R/CLO and Mytilicola did not follow any recognisable pattern that could be associated to the POS. In contrast, high Nematopsis intensities recorded in several localities in 2003 might suggest some response of local interest after the POS (i.e., in combination with particular factors/conditions). More data at a regional scale are needed before histopathology may provide a reliable ecosystem health assessment but the present results suggest that the approach is worthwhile. Overall, although Vv

  3. Infrared spectral histopathology for cancer diagnosis: a novel approach for automated pattern recognition of colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Gobinet, Cyril; Bouché, Olivier; Sockalingum, Ganesh Dhruvananda; Piot, Olivier; Manfait, Michel

    2014-08-21

    Histopathology remains the gold standard method for colon cancer diagnosis. Novel complementary approaches for molecular level diagnosis of the disease are need of the hour. Infrared (IR) imaging could be a promising candidate method as it probes the intrinsic chemical bonds present in a tissue, and provides a "spectral fingerprint" of the biochemical composition. To this end, IR spectral histopathology, which combines IR imaging and data processing techniques, was employed on seventy seven paraffinized colon tissue samples (48 tumoral and 29 non-tumoral) in the form of tissue arrays. To avoid chemical deparaffinization, a digital neutralization of the spectral interference of paraffin was implemented. Clustering analysis was used to partition the spectra and construct pseudo-colored images, for assigning spectral clusters to various tissue structures (normal epithelium, malignant epithelium, connective tissue etc.). Based on the clustering results, linear discriminant analysis was then used to construct a stringent prediction model which was applied on samples without a priori histopathological information. The predicted spectral images not only revealed common features representative of the colonic tissue biochemical make-up, but also highlighted additional features like tumor budding and tumor-stroma association in a label-free manner. This novel approach of IR spectral imaging on paraffinized tissues showed 100% sensitivity and allowed detection and differentiation of normal and malignant colonic features based purely on their intrinsic biochemical features. This non-destructive methodology combined with multivariate statistical image analysis appears as a promising tool for colon cancer diagnosis and opens up the way to the concept of numerical spectral histopathology.

  4. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Rank, Fritz; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera; Moreira, José M A

    2008-12-01

    Cancer, being a major healthcare concern worldwide, is one of the main targets for the application of emerging proteomic technologies and these tools promise to revolutionize the way cancer will be diagnosed and treated in the near future. Today, as a result of the unprecedented advances that have taken place in molecular biology, cell biology and genomics there is a pressing need to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications. This need, compounded by mounting evidence that cellular model systems are unable to fully recapitulate all biological aspects of human dissease, is driving scientists to increasingly use clinically relevant samples for biomarker and target discovery. Tissues are heterogeneous and as a result optimization of sample preparation is critical for generating accurate, representative, and highly reproducible quantitative data. Although a large number of protocols for preparation of tissue lysates has been published, so far no single recipe is able to provide a "one-size fits all" solubilization procedure that can be used to analyse the same lysate using different proteomics technologies. Here we present evidence showing that cell lysis buffer 1 (CLB1), a lysis solution commercialized by Zeptosens [a division of Bayer (Schweiz) AG], provides excellent sample solubilization and very high 2D PAGE protein resolution both when using carrier ampholytes and immobilized pH gradient strips. Moreover, this buffer can also be used for array-based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis of a number of technically demanding specimens such as breast carcinoma core needle biopsies and problematic tissues such as brain cortex, cerebellum, skeletal muscle, kidney cortex and

  5. Impact of Freezing Delay Time on Tissue Samples for Metabolomic Studies.

    PubMed

    Haukaas, Tonje H; Moestue, Siver A; Vettukattil, Riyas; Sitter, Beathe; Lamichhane, Santosh; Segura, Remedios; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic profiling of intact tumor tissue by high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS) MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides important biological information possibly useful for clinical diagnosis and development of novel treatment strategies. However, generation of high-quality data requires that sample handling from surgical resection until analysis is performed using systematically validated procedures. In this study, we investigated the effect of postsurgical freezing delay time on global metabolic profiles and stability of individual metabolites in intact tumor tissue. Tumor tissue samples collected from two patient-derived breast cancer xenograft models (n = 3 for each model) were divided into pieces that were snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen at 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after surgical removal. In addition, one sample was analyzed immediately, representing the metabolic profile of fresh tissue exposed neither to liquid nitrogen nor to room temperature. We also evaluated the metabolic effect of prolonged spinning during the HR MAS experiments in biopsies from breast cancer patients (n = 14). All samples were analyzed by proton HR MAS MRS on a Bruker Avance DRX600 spectrometer, and changes in metabolic profiles were evaluated using multivariate analysis and linear mixed modeling. Multivariate analysis showed that the metabolic differences between the two breast cancer models were more prominent than variation caused by freezing delay time. No significant changes in levels of individual metabolites were observed in samples frozen within 30 min of resection. After this time point, levels of choline increased, whereas ascorbate, creatine, and glutathione (GS) levels decreased. Freezing had a significant effect on several metabolites but is an essential procedure for research and biobank purposes. Furthermore, four metabolites (glucose, glycine, glycerophosphocholine, and choline) were affected by prolonged HR MAS experiment time possibly caused by

  6. Non-protein-bound iron detection in small samples of biological fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Paffetti, Patrizia; Perrone, Serafina; Longini, Mariangela; Ferrari, Antonio; Tanganelli, Donatella; Marzocchi, Barbara; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Interest in the pro-oxidative nature of non-protein-bound-iron (NPBI) led to the development of an assay for its detection. The aim was to set up a reliable method of detecting NPBI in small samples of biological fluids and tissue. The method was based on preferential chelation of NPBI by a large excess of the low-affinity ligand nitrilotriacetic acid. To separate NPBI, a two-step filtration procedure was used. All glassware and plasticware were treated to minimize iron contamination. Measurements were performed in plasma, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage, and brain tissues. The analytic system detected iron as ferric nitrate standard down to a concentration of 0.01 microM. The 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-pyridone-Fe(DHP-Fe) complex eluted with a retention time of about 2.6 min. The standard curve for the DHP-Fe complex was linear between 0.01 and 400 microMin water as well as in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage, brain tissue, and amniotic fluid. The detection limit was 0.01 muM for all biological fluids and brain tissue. The data show that reliable measurements of NPBI are possible in studies on oxidative stress under experimental and clinical conditions. The possibility of investigating NPBI involvement in free-radical injury might be useful in all human diseases in which oxidative stress occur.

  7. Determination of optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue samples using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative bleaching changes of human teeth induced changes in the optical properties of dental tissue. We introduced 1310 nm wavelengths of optical coherence tomography (OCT) attenuation coefficient method which is a relatively novel and rarely reported methodology to measure the correlation coefficient during the teeth oxidative bleaching procedure. And the quantitative parameters of enamel optical thickness and disruption of the entrance signal (DES) were extracted from the OCT images. The attenuation coefficient of the bleached tissue is 6.2 mm-1 which is significant (p < 0.001) higher than that unbleached sample is 1.4 mm-1. But attenuation coefficient varied significantly (p < 0.001) between 5.9 and 1.5 mm-1 in dentine which is downtrend. Furthermore, the persistence of bleaching oxidation in 35% hydrogen peroxide-induced optical thickness of enamel is similar with unbleached tissue which may indicate the refractive index of enamel is unchanged. Moreover, disruption of the entrance signal (DES) analysis showed that remarkable difference was appeared at enamel surface. The results indicate that optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue can be determined by attenuation coefficient using OCT system.

  8. Spatially-Resolved Proteomics: Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Alveolar Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Clair, Geremy; Piehowski, Paul D; Nicola, Teodora; Kitzmiller, Joseph A; Huang, Eric L; Zink, Erika M; Sontag, Ryan L; Orton, Daniel J; Moore, Ronald J; Carson, James P; Smith, Richard D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Corley, Richard A; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Ansong, Charles

    2016-12-22

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM)-enabled region-specific tissue analyses are critical to better understand complex multicellular processes. However, current proteomics workflows entail several manual sample preparation steps and are challenged by the microscopic mass-limited samples generated by LCM, impacting measurement robustness, quantification and throughput. Here, we coupled LCM with a proteomics workflow that provides fully automated analysis of proteomes from microdissected tissues. Benchmarking against the current state-of-the-art in ultrasensitive global proteomics (FASP workflow), our approach demonstrated significant improvements in quantification (~2-fold lower variance) and throughput (>5 times faster). Using our approach we for the first time characterized, to a depth of >3,400 proteins, the ontogeny of protein changes during normal lung development in microdissected alveolar tissue containing only 4,000 cells. Our analysis revealed seven defined modules of coordinated transcription factor-signaling molecule expression patterns, suggesting a complex network of temporal regulatory control directs normal lung development with epigenetic regulation fine-tuning pre-natal developmental processes.

  9. Spatially-Resolved Proteomics: Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Alveolar Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Clair, Geremy; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicola, Teodora; Kitzmiller, Joseph A.; Huang, Eric L.; Zink, Erika M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Carson, James P.; Smith, Richard D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Corley, Richard A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Ansong, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM)-enabled region-specific tissue analyses are critical to better understand complex multicellular processes. However, current proteomics workflows entail several manual sample preparation steps and are challenged by the microscopic mass-limited samples generated by LCM, impacting measurement robustness, quantification and throughput. Here, we coupled LCM with a proteomics workflow that provides fully automated analysis of proteomes from microdissected tissues. Benchmarking against the current state-of-the-art in ultrasensitive global proteomics (FASP workflow), our approach demonstrated significant improvements in quantification (~2-fold lower variance) and throughput (>5 times faster). Using our approach we for the first time characterized, to a depth of >3,400 proteins, the ontogeny of protein changes during normal lung development in microdissected alveolar tissue containing only 4,000 cells. Our analysis revealed seven defined modules of coordinated transcription factor-signaling molecule expression patterns, suggesting a complex network of temporal regulatory control directs normal lung development with epigenetic regulation fine-tuning pre-natal developmental processes. PMID:28004771

  10. Expression of Wnt pathway mediators in metaplasic tissue in animal model and clinical samples of tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa; Wong, Yin Mei; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dai, Kerong; Rolf, Christer Gustav

    2013-09-01

    Tissue metaplasia is observed in both ossified failed healing animal model and clinical samples of tendinopathy. The Wnt signalling pathway plays a vital role in pathological calcification. We hypothesized that the Wnt signalling pathway might contribute to tissue metaplasia and failed healing in tendinopathy. This study aimed to examine the spatial-temporal expression of Wnt pathway mediators in an ossified failed tendon healing animal model and clinical samples of tendinopathy. The effect of Wnt3a on the osteogenic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) was also examined. Ossified failed tendon healing was induced by the injection of collagenase into the patellar tendon of rats. At various times the tendons were harvested for immunohistochemical staining of Wnt3a, β-catenin, Lrp5 and Tcf1. Patellar tendon samples were obtained from 13 patients with patellar tendinopathy (11 unossified and 2 ossified) and 10 controls. Immunohistochemical staining of Wnt3a, β-catenin, Lrp5 and Tcf1 was similarly performed. Rat patellar TDSCs were treated with Wnt3a. The osteogenic differentiation of TDSCs was examined by ALP activity, alizarin red S staining and mRNA expression of osteogenic markers. There was increased expression of Wnt3a, β-catenin, Lrp5 and Tcf1 in the healing fibroblast-like cells, chondrocyte-like cells and ossified deposits in the animal model and in some clinical samples of tendinopathy. Wnt3a increased ALP activity, calcium nodule formation and expression of osteogenic markers in TDSCs. Activation of the Wnt signalling pathway and its effect on TDSCs might contribute to tissue metaplasia and failed healing in some cases of tendinopathy.

  11. Comparison of Picrosirius Red Staining With Second Harmonic Generation Imaging for the Quantification of Clinically Relevant Collagen Fiber Features in Histopathology Samples.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Mathewson, Kara; Mehta, Guneet; Keikhosravi, Adib; Liu, Yuming; Lemancik, Stephanie; Ricke, William A; Weber, Sharon M; Kao, W John; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2016-09-01

    Stromal collagen alignment has been shown to have clinical significance in a variety of cancers and in other diseases accompanied by fibrosis. While much of the biological and clinical importance of collagen changes has been demonstrated using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging in experimental settings, implementation into routine clinical pathology practice is currently prohibitive. To translate the assessment of collagen organization into routine pathology workflow, a surrogate visualization method needs to be examined. The objective of the present study was to quantitatively compare collagen metrics generated from SHG microscopy and commonly available picrosirius red stain with standard polarization microscopy (PSR-POL). Each technique was quantitatively compared with established image segmentation and fiber tracking algorithms using human pancreatic cancer as a model, which is characterized by a pronounced stroma with reorganized collagen fibers. Importantly, PSR-POL produced similar quantitative trends for most collagen metrics in benign and cancerous tissues as measured by SHG. We found it notable that PSR-POL detects higher fiber counts, alignment, length, straightness, and width compared with SHG imaging but still correlates well with SHG results. PSR-POL may provide sufficient and additional information in a conventional clinical pathology laboratory for certain types of collagen quantification. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  12. Comparison of Picrosirius Red Staining With Second Harmonic Generation Imaging for the Quantification of Clinically Relevant Collagen Fiber Features in Histopathology Samples

    PubMed Central

    Drifka, Cole R.; Loeffler, Agnes G.; Mathewson, Kara; Mehta, Guneet; Keikhosravi, Adib; Liu, Yuming; Lemancik, Stephanie; Ricke, William A.; Weber, Sharon M.; Kao, W. John; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal collagen alignment has been shown to have clinical significance in a variety of cancers and in other diseases accompanied by fibrosis. While much of the biological and clinical importance of collagen changes has been demonstrated using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging in experimental settings, implementation into routine clinical pathology practice is currently prohibitive. To translate the assessment of collagen organization into routine pathology workflow, a surrogate visualization method needs to be examined. The objective of the present study was to quantitatively compare collagen metrics generated from SHG microscopy and commonly available picrosirius red stain with standard polarization microscopy (PSR-POL). Each technique was quantitatively compared with established image segmentation and fiber tracking algorithms using human pancreatic cancer as a model, which is characterized by a pronounced stroma with reorganized collagen fibers. Importantly, PSR-POL produced similar quantitative trends for most collagen metrics in benign and cancerous tissues as measured by SHG. We found it notable that PSR-POL detects higher fiber counts, alignment, length, straightness, and width compared with SHG imaging but still correlates well with SHG results. PSR-POL may provide sufficient and additional information in a conventional clinical pathology laboratory for certain types of collagen quantification. PMID:27449741

  13. Molecular strain identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in archival tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Zink, A R; Nerlich, A G

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the use of different molecular analyses that can identify distinct strains of human pathogenic mycobacteria in formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded archival tissue samples to see whether it is possible to differentiate between the members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (M tuberculosis, M bovis, M africanum, M microti, or M canettii) and/or substrains in a high number of samples. This would be of interest for identifying individual infection traits and superinfection by different mycobacterial strains. Methods: Forty nine archival tissue samples with clinically and/or histologically suspected tuberculosis infection were subjected to molecular DNA analysis. Results: The molecular analysis revealed the presence of M tuberculosis complex DNA in 20 samples, whereas acid fast bacilli could be detected by Ziehl-Neelsen staining in only eight samples. All IS6110 positive samples were further characterised by spoligotyping and seven cases provided M tuberculosis specific signatures, whereas M bovis specific signatures were obtained in four cases. The analysis of mtp40, oxyR, and pncA partial gene sequences confirmed the presence of M tuberculosis in six cases and M bovis in one case. The amplification and sequencing of four further genetic regions (katG, gyrA, TbD1, RD9) characterised six “modern” M tuberculosis strains belonging to genetic groups 2 or 3. Conclusion: This study provides clear evidence that archival paraffin wax embedded material can be used for further studies on the strain identification of M tuberculosis complex strains and can therefore unequivocally be used for the study of the epidemiology and evolution of tuberculosis pathogens. PMID:15509681

  14. Risk for molecular contamination of tissue samples evaluated for targeted anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Einav; Fahoum, Ibrahim; Sabo, Edmond; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Hershkovitz, Dov

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing usage of sensitive PCR technology for pharmacogenetics, cross contamination becomes a significant concern. Researchers employed techniques which basically include replacing laboratory equipment after each sample preparation; however, there are no recommended guidelines. In the present work we wanted to evaluate the risk of cross contamination during tissue processing using the routine precaution measures. Twenty-one surgical samples of lung adenocarcinoma were used, of which 7 contained EGFR exon 19 mutation, 7 contained EGFR exon 21 mutation (p.L858R) and 7 were EGFR wild-type. The samples were ordered by alternating the mutation group to maximize the potential for cross contamination and underwent tissue sectioning and de-paraffinization. The entire process was performed using the same tools. Following DNA extraction all samples underwent PCR amplification and were scrutinized for small fractions of EGFR mutation using deep sequencing with the Ion torrent PGM technology. Twenty samples yielded results. The fraction of mutated copies was 41 ± 23% (range 11–66) for the cases with known exon 19 mutation and 48±24% (range 0–65) for the cases with known exon 21 mutations. No in-frame exon 19 deletion mutations were identified in the wild-type (WT) and exon 21 groups. The fraction of EGFR exon 21 (codon 858) mutations was 0.018±0.014% (range 0–0.05%) in the WT and exon 19 groups, which was not statistically different than the background sequencing artifact noise for the same base-pair alteration (p = 0.21). Our results suggest that standard precautions are sufficient for molecular pathology diagnosis of surgical samples and are not associated with increased risk of cross contamination. PMID:28288198

  15. Indonesia: statistical sampling technique in validation of radiation sterilisation dose of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Hilmy, N; Basril, A; Febrida, A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work is to find the best solution for statistical sampling technique in validation of radiation sterilization dose (RSD) for biological tissues, according to ISO standard. As a model for sampling are biological tissues retrieved from one cadaver donor which consist of frozen bone grafts (18 packets), lyophilized allografts (68 packets) and demineralized bone powder grafts (40 packets). The size and type of products vary from long bones, cancellous chips to bone powders, tendons and facia lata, that make the number of bioburden per product could not be treated equally. Frozen samples could not be considered as the same production batch with lyophilized samples, because of different processing and irradiation temperature. The minimum number of uniformed samples needed for validation per production batch size, according to ISO 13409, is from 20 to 79 and 20 of them will be used for the test sample size, i.e. 10 for bio-burden determination and the remaining 10 for verification dose. Based on the number of uniformed grafts, statistical sampling can be carried out on lyophilized and demineralized bone grafts, but not on frozen bone grafts. Bioburden determinations were carried out and validated according to ISO 11737-1. Results of average bioburden determination (cfu/per packet), using sample item portion (SIP) = 1, are 5 cfu/packet for lyophilized bone grafts and 4 cfu/packet for demineralized bone powder grafts. Verification doses obtained were 2.40 kGy for lyophilized grafts and 2.24 kGy for demineralized bone powder grafts. The results of verification dose were accepted and the RSD of 25 kGy is substantiated It can be concluded that a statistical sampling technique can be applied if all the grafts produced in the same process such as lyophilized, demineralized as well as frozen are assumed to be in one production batch regardless of sample uniformity such as size, type and weight; for this ISO 13409 can be applied for the validation of RSD.

  16. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; ...

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatialmore » distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.« less

  17. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatial distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.

  18. A workflow to preserve genome-quality tissue samples from plants in botanical gardens and arboreta1

    PubMed Central

    Gostel, Morgan R.; Kelloff, Carol; Wallick, Kyle; Funk, Vicki A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Internationally, gardens hold diverse living collections that can be preserved for genomic research. Workflows have been developed for genomic tissue sampling in other taxa (e.g., vertebrates), but are inadequate for plants. We outline a workflow for tissue sampling intended for two audiences: botanists interested in genomics research and garden staff who plan to voucher living collections. Methods and Results: Standard herbarium methods are used to collect vouchers, label information and images are entered into a publicly accessible database, and leaf tissue is preserved in silica and liquid nitrogen. A five-step approach for genomic tissue sampling is presented for sampling from living collections according to current best practices. Conclusions: Collecting genome-quality samples from gardens is an economical and rapid way to make available for scientific research tissue from the diversity of plants on Earth. The Global Genome Initiative will facilitate and lead this endeavor through international partnerships. PMID:27672517

  19. Evaluation of sample holders designed for long-lasting X-ray micro-tomographic scans of ex-vivo soft tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudak, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Krejci, F.; Karch, J.; Patzelt, M.; Zach, P.; Sykora, V.; Mrzilkova, J.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray microradiography and microtomography are imaging techniques with increasing applicability in the field of biomedical and preclinical research. Application of hybrid pixel detector Timepix enables to obtain very high contrast of low attenuating materials such as soft biological tissue. However X-ray imaging of ex-vivo soft tissue samples is a difficult task due to its structural instability. Ex-vivo biological tissue is prone to fast drying-out which is connected with undesired changes of sample size and shape producing later on artefacts within the tomographic reconstruction. In this work we present the optimization of our Timepix equipped micro-CT system aiming to maintain soft tissue sample in stable condition. Thanks to the suggested approach higher contrast of tomographic reconstructions can be achieved while also large samples that require detector scanning can be easily measured.

  20. Normalization of gene expression measurement of tissue samples obtained by transurethral resection of bladder tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Laura A; Pileczki, Valentina; Cojocneanu-Petric, Roxana M; Petrut, Bogdan; Braicu, Cornelia; Jurj, Ancuta M; Buiga, Rares; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Background Sample processing is a crucial step for all types of genomic studies. A major challenge for researchers is to understand and predict how RNA quality affects the identification of transcriptional differences (by introducing either false-positive or false-negative errors). Nanotechnologies help improve the quality and quantity control for gene expression studies. Patients and methods The study was performed on 14 tumor and matched normal pairs of tissue from patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas. We assessed the RNA quantity by using the NanoDrop spectrophotometer and the quality by nano-microfluidic capillary electrophoresis technology provided by Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. We evaluated the amplification status of three housekeeping genes and one small nuclear RNA gene using the ViiA 7 platform, with specific primers. Results Every step of the sample handling protocol, which begins with sample harvest and ends with the data analysis, is of utmost importance due to the fact that it is time consuming, labor intensive, and highly expensive. High temperature of the surgical procedure does not affect the small nucleic acid sequences in comparison with the mRNA. Conclusion Gene expression is clearly affected by the RNA quality, but less affected in the case of small nuclear RNAs. We proved that the high-temperature, highly invasive transurethral resection of bladder tumor procedure damages the tissue and affects the integrity of the RNA from biological specimens. PMID:27330317

  1. Report filing in histopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Blenkinsopp, W K

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of alternative methods of filing histopathology report forms in alphabetical order showed that orthodox card index filing is satisfactory up to about 100000 reports but, because of the need for long-term retrieval, when the reports filed exceed this number they should be copied on jacketed microfilm and a new card index file begun. PMID:591645

  2. A novel method for measuring aromatase activity in tissue samples by determining estradiol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tinwell, H; Rascle, J B; Colombel, S; Al Khansa, I; Freyberger, A; Bars, R

    2011-07-01

    Increasing scrutiny of endocrine disrupters has led to changes to European pesticide and biocide legislation and to the introduction of the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program by the US EPA. One element of endocrine disrupter identification is to determine its effects on aromatase, but most available assays are limited as they depend on tritiated water production to indicate enzyme activity. Whilst acceptable for determining aromatase effects using a cell-free approach, this method is unreliable for cell or tissue-based investigations as other cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme activities can similarly produce tritiated water and consequently confound interpretation of the aromatase data. To address this lack of specificity an assay directly measuring the final estrogen product by incubating rat tissue protein with testosterone and measuring the resultant estradiol concentration was developed. Using this approach we demonstrated marked increases in enzyme activity in pregnant rat ovary samples and dose-related inhibitions when incubating non-pregnant rat ovary samples with known aromatase inhibitors. Hepatic aromatase activity was investigated using our method and by tritiated water production with microsomes from rats dosed with the antiandrogen 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4 chlorophenyl)ethane. Additional cytochrome P-450s were also measured. Treatment-related increased tritiated water production and general hepatic enzyme activity were recorded but estradiol was not increased, indicating that the increased tritiated water was due to general enzyme activity and not aromatase activity. A simple and specific method has been developed that can detect aromatase inhibition and induction, which when applied to tissue samples, provides a means of generating relevant animal data concerning chemical effects on the aromatase enzyme.

  3. Microscopy and elemental analysis in tissue samples using computed microtomography with synchrotron x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The initial development shows that CMT using synchrotron x-rays can be developed to ..mu..m spatial resolution and perhaps even better. This creates a new microscopy technique which is of special interest in morphological studies of tissues, since no chemical preparation or slicing of the sample is necessary. The combination of CMT with spatial resolution in the ..mu..m range and elemental mapping with sensitivity in the ppM range results in a new tool for elemental mapping at the cellular level. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Cytokine assays: an assessment of the preparation and treatment of blood and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Keustermans, Genoveva C E; Hoeks, Sanne B E; Meerding, Jenny M; Prakken, Berent J; de Jager, Wilco

    2013-05-15

    Cytokines are key components of the innate and adaptive immune system. As pivotal players in the progression or regression of a pathological process, these molecules provide a window through which diseases can be monitored and can thus act as biomarkers. In order to measure cytokine levels, a plethora of protocols can be applied. These methods include bioassays, protein microarrays, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) electrochemiluminescence and bead based multiplex immunoassays (MIA). Due to the interaction and activity of cytokines, multiplex immunoassays are at the forefront of cytokine analysis by allowing multiple cytokines to be measured in parallel. However, even with optimized protocols, sample standardization needs to occur before these proteins can optimally act as biomarkers. This review describes various factors influencing the levels of cytokines measured in plasma, serum, dried blood spots and tissue biopsies, focusing on sample collection and handling, long term storage and the repetitive use of samples. By analyzing how each of these factors influences protein levels, it is concluded that samples should be stored at low temperatures in order to maintain cytokine stability. In addition, within a study, sample manipulations should be kept the same, with measurement protocols being chosen for their compatibility with the research in question. By having a clear understanding of what factors influence cytokine levels and how to overcome these technical issues, minimally confounded data can be obtained and cytokines can achieve optimal biomarker activity.

  5. Postmortem interval alters the water relaxation and diffusion properties of rat nervous tissue--implications for MRI studies of human autopsy samples.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Timothy M; Flint, Jeremy J; Thelwall, Peter E; Stanisz, Greg J; Mareci, Thomas H; Yachnis, Anthony T; Blackband, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution imaging of human autopsy tissues may improve our understanding of in vivo MRI findings, but interpretation is complicated because samples are obtained by immersion fixation following a postmortem interval (PMI). This study tested the hypotheses that immersion fixation and PMI's from 0-24 h would alter the water relaxation and diffusion properties in rat cortical slice and spinal cord models of human nervous tissue. Diffusion data collected from rat cortical slices at multiple diffusion times (10-60 ms) and b-values (7-15,000 s/mm(2)) were analyzed using a two-compartment model with exchange. Rat spinal cords were characterized with standard diffusion tensor imaging (21 directions, b=1250 s/mm(2)). Switching from perfusion- to immersion-fixation at 0 h PMI altered most MRI properties of rat cortical slices and spinal cords, including a 22% decrease in fractional anisotropy (P<0.001). After 4 h PMI, cortical slice T(1) and T(2) increased 22% and 65% respectively (P<0.001), transmembrane water exchange decreased 23% (P<0.001) and intracellular proton fraction increased 25% (P=0.002). After 6 h PMI, spinal cord white matter fractional anisotropy had decreased 38% (P<0.001). MRI property changes were observed for PMIs up to 24 h. The MRI changes correlated with protease activity and histopathological signs of autolysis. Thus, immersion fixation and/or even short PMIs (4-6 h) altered the MRI properties of rat nervous tissue. This suggests comparisons between in vivo clinical MRI and MRI data from human autopsy tissues should be interpreted with caution.

  6. Metal levels in fodder, milk, dairy products, and tissues sampled in ovine farms of Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Rosa; Sabia, Serena; D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Macchiato, Maria; Anastasio, Aniello; Ragosta, Maria; Paino, Salvatore

    2005-09-01

    We measured Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, and Pb levels in samples of fodder, milk, dairy products, and tissues collected from 12 ovine farms in the regions of Campania and Calabria (Southern Italy). The areas in which the farms are located show different levels of anthropogenic pressure. The main purpose of this study is the identification and the analysis of relationships among metal concentrations observed in samples representative of different links in the food chain. Particularly, we apply univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques to identify the correlation structure of our data set and to evaluate the influence of anthropogenic activity. We discuss the results, focusing the analysis on the spatial and the temporal patterns of metal concentrations.

  7. High-pressure freezing and low-temperature processing of plant tissue samples for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karahara, Ichirou; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Use of electron tomography methods improves image resolution of transmission electron microscopy especially in the z-direction, enabling determination of complicated 3D structures of organelles and cytoskeleton arrays. The increase in resolution necessitates preservation of cellular structures close to the native states with minimum artifacts. High-pressure freezing (HPF) that immobilizes molecules in the cell instantaneously has been used to avoid damages caused by convention chemical fixation. Despite the advantages of HPF, cells could still be damaged during dissection prior to HPF. Therefore, it is critical to isolate cells/tissues of interest quickly and carefully. The samples frozen by HPF are often processed by freeze substitution (FS), and FS should be carried out under appropriate conditions. Here we describe dissection, HPF, and FS methods that we have utilized to prepare plant samples for electron tomography/immuno-electron microscopy.

  8. Rapid microarray-based genotyping of Chlamydia spp. strains from clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Konrad; Ruettger, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Chlamydia (C.) psittaci and C. trachomatis strains can be genotyped based on variations in the ompA genomic locus. In the present chapter, we describe rapid genotyping assays for both chlamydial agents using the ArrayStrip™ (AS) microarray platform. The test is targeting multiple discriminatory sites in the variable domains of the ompA gene by using 35 (C. psittaci) and 61 (C. trachomatis) oligonucleotide probes representing genotype-specific polymorphisms. In addition to discrimination among the established genotypes, this approach allows identification of atypical strains that were not accessible to typing using previously established techniques, such as PCR-RFLP or serotyping. The present DNA microarray assay can be conducted directly on clinical tissue samples and is suitable for tracing epidemiological chains and exploring the dissemination of particular genotypes. The procedure is easy to handle and economically affordable, and it allows genotyping of up to 32 clinical samples per day, thus lending itself for routine diagnosis as well.

  9. Methods for using 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking in biaxial mechanical testing of biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2015-04-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making the full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation.

  10. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  11. Regional variation in histopathologic features of tumor specimens from treatment-naive glioblastoma correlates with anatomic and physiologic MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Parvataneni, Rupa; Molinaro, Annette; Essock-Burns, Emma; Bourne, Gabriela; Parsa, Andrew T.; Aghi, Manish K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Cha, Soonmee; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at initial diagnosis is typically performed on tissue obtained from regions of contrast enhancement (CE) as depicted on gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted images. The non-enhancing (NE) portion of the lesion, which contains both reactive edema and infiltrative tumor, is only partially removed due to concerns about damaging functioning brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate histopathologic and physiologic MRI features of image-guided tissue specimens from CE and NE regions to investigate correlations between imaging and histopathologic parameters. One hundred nineteen tissue specimens (93 CE and 26 NE regions) were acquired from 51 patients with newly diagnosed GBM by utilizing stereotactic image-guided sampling. Variables of anatomic, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic susceptibility–weighted, contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging (DSC) from each tissue sample location were obtained and compared with histopathologic features such as tumor score, cell density, proliferation, architectural disruption, hypoxia, and microvascular hyperplasia. Tissue samples from CE regions had increased tumor score, cellular density, proliferation, and architectural disruption compared with NE regions. DSC variables such as relative cerebral blood volume, peak height, and recovery factor were significantly higher, and the percentage of signal intensity recovery was significantly lower in the CE compared with the NE regions. DWI variables were correlated with histopathologic features of GBM within NE regions. Image-guided tissue acquisition and assessment of residual tumor from treatment-naive GBM should be guided by DSC in CE regions and by DWI in NE regions. PMID:22711606

  12. Assessment of bioburden on human and animal tissues: part 2--results of testing of human tissue and qualification of a composite sample for routine bioburden determination.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, John B; Merritt, Karen; Gocke, David; Osborne, Joel

    2012-08-01

    A quantitative method was developed and validated to assess bioburden on tissue from human donors and to compare bioburden determination results to swab culture results from the same donor. An initial study with allograft tissue from 101 donors showed a wide range of bioburden levels; values from no colony-forming units (CFU) detected to >28,000 CFU were observed. Tissues from donors that had swab cultures negative for objectionable microorganisms generally had lower bioburden than tissues from donors where objectionable microorganisms were recovered by swab culturing. In a follow-up study with 1,445 donors, a wide range of bioburden levels was again observed on tissues from donors that were swab culture negative for objectionable microorganisms. Tissues from 885 (61%) of these donors had no recoverable bioburden (<2 CFU). Importantly, tissues from 560 (39%) of the donors had recoverable bioburden which ranged from 1 to >24,000 CFU. Identification of bioburden isolates showed a diversity of genera and species. In compliance with the recent revision of the American Association of Tissue Banks K2.210 Standard, the quantitative bioburden determination method was validated with a composite tissue sample that contains bone and soft tissue sections tested together in one extraction vessel. A recovery efficiency of 68% was validated and the composite sample was shown to be representative of all of the tissues recovered from a donor. The use of the composite sample in conjunction with the quantitative bioburden determination method will facilitate an accurate assessment of the numbers and types of contaminating microorganisms on allografts prior to disinfection/sterilization. This information will ensure that disinfection/sterilization processes are properly validated and the capability of the overall allograft process is understood on a donor by donor basis.

  13. Biomarker discovery in heterogeneous tissue samples -taking the in-silico deconfounding approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For heterogeneous tissues, such as blood, measurements of gene expression are confounded by relative proportions of cell types involved. Conclusions have to rely on estimation of gene expression signals for homogeneous cell populations, e.g. by applying micro-dissection, fluorescence activated cell sorting, or in-silico deconfounding. We studied feasibility and validity of a non-negative matrix decomposition algorithm using experimental gene expression data for blood and sorted cells from the same donor samples. Our objective was to optimize the algorithm regarding detection of differentially expressed genes and to enable its use for classification in the difficult scenario of reversely regulated genes. This would be of importance for the identification of candidate biomarkers in heterogeneous tissues. Results Experimental data and simulation studies involving noise parameters estimated from these data revealed that for valid detection of differential gene expression, quantile normalization and use of non-log data are optimal. We demonstrate the feasibility of predicting proportions of constituting cell types from gene expression data of single samples, as a prerequisite for a deconfounding-based classification approach. Classification cross-validation errors with and without using deconfounding results are reported as well as sample-size dependencies. Implementation of the algorithm, simulation and analysis scripts are available. Conclusions The deconfounding algorithm without decorrelation using quantile normalization on non-log data is proposed for biomarkers that are difficult to detect, and for cases where confounding by varying proportions of cell types is the suspected reason. In this case, a deconfounding ranking approach can be used as a powerful alternative to, or complement of, other statistical learning approaches to define candidate biomarkers for molecular diagnosis and prediction in biomedicine, in realistically noisy conditions and with

  14. Umbilical Arterial Blood Sampling Alters Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Jonathan P; Parvez, Boriana; La Gamma, Edmund F

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the magnitude, consistency, and natural history of reductions in cerebral regional tissue oxygenation (CrSO2) during umbilical arterial (UA) blood sampling in very low birth weight neonates. Data were collected during a prospective observational near-infrared spectroscopy survey conducted on a convenience sample of 500-1250 g neonates during the first 10 postnatal days. A before-after analysis of UA blood sampling effects on CrSO2 absolute values and variability was performed. The present analysis was not designed a priori and was conducted following the bedside observation of CrSO2 decrements contiguous with UA blood draws. Fifteen very low birth weight neonates had 201 UA blood draws. Baseline CrSO2 (mean ± SEM) decreased following UA blood sampling, from 70 ± 1% to a nadir of 63 ± 1% (P < .001) occurring 4 ± 3 (range 2-24) minutes following blood draws. CrSO2 subsequently increased to 70 ± 1% (P < .001 compared with nadir) at 10 ± 4 (range 4-28) minutes following UA blood sampling. Coefficients of variation (mean ± SEM) increased from 0.02 ± 0.001 at baseline to 0.05 ± 0.004 (P < .001), followed by a decrease to 0.03 ± 0.003 (P < .001 for all comparisons), thus denoting increased CrSO2 variability following UA blood sampling. UA blood sampling is associated with significant CrSO2 decrements with increased variability over clinically significant intervals. Whether these changes impact complications of prematurity, including intraventricular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia, remain unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  16. Evaluating real-time immunohistochemistry on multiple tissue samples, multiple targets and multiple antibody labeling methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a well-established method for the analysis of protein expression in tissue specimens and constitutes one of the most common methods performed in pathology laboratories worldwide. However, IHC is a multi-layered method based on subjective estimations and differences in staining and interpretation has been observed between facilities, suggesting that the analysis of proteins on tissue would benefit from protocol optimization and standardization. Here we describe how the emerging and operator independent tool of real-time immunohistochemistry (RT-IHC) reveals a time resolved description of antibody interacting with target protein in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue. The aim was to understand the technical aspects of RT-IHC, regarding generalization of the concept and to what extent it can be considered a quantitative method. Results Three different antibodies labeled with fluorescent or radioactive labels were applied on nine different tissue samples from either human or mouse, and the results for all RT-IHC analyses distinctly show that the method is generally applicable. The collected binding curves showed that the majority of the antibody-antigen interactions did not reach equilibrium within 3 hours, suggesting that standardized protocols for immunohistochemistry are sometimes inadequately optimized. The impact of tissue size and thickness as well as the position of the section on the glass petri dish was assessed in order for practical details to be further elucidated for this emerging technique. Size and location was found to affect signal magnitude to a larger extent than thickness, but the signal from all measurements were still sufficient to trace the curvature. The curvature, representing the kinetics of the interaction, was independent of thickness, size and position and may be a promising parameter for the evaluation of e.g. biopsy sections of different sizes. Conclusions It was found that RT-IHC can be used

  17. Evaluating real-time immunohistochemistry on multiple tissue samples, multiple targets and multiple antibody labeling methods.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Louise; Andersson, Karl; Asplund, Anna; Björkelund, Hanna

    2013-12-18

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a well-established method for the analysis of protein expression in tissue specimens and constitutes one of the most common methods performed in pathology laboratories worldwide. However, IHC is a multi-layered method based on subjective estimations and differences in staining and interpretation has been observed between facilities, suggesting that the analysis of proteins on tissue would benefit from protocol optimization and standardization. Here we describe how the emerging and operator independent tool of real-time immunohistochemistry (RT-IHC) reveals a time resolved description of antibody interacting with target protein in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue. The aim was to understand the technical aspects of RT-IHC, regarding generalization of the concept and to what extent it can be considered a quantitative method. Three different antibodies labeled with fluorescent or radioactive labels were applied on nine different tissue samples from either human or mouse, and the results for all RT-IHC analyses distinctly show that the method is generally applicable. The collected binding curves showed that the majority of the antibody-antigen interactions did not reach equilibrium within 3 hours, suggesting that standardized protocols for immunohistochemistry are sometimes inadequately optimized. The impact of tissue size and thickness as well as the position of the section on the glass petri dish was assessed in order for practical details to be further elucidated for this emerging technique. Size and location was found to affect signal magnitude to a larger extent than thickness, but the signal from all measurements were still sufficient to trace the curvature. The curvature, representing the kinetics of the interaction, was independent of thickness, size and position and may be a promising parameter for the evaluation of e.g. biopsy sections of different sizes. It was found that RT-IHC can be used for the evaluation of a number

  18. Evaluation of convenient pretreatment protocols for RNA virus metagenomics in serum and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rosseel, Toon; Ozhelvaci, Orkun; Freimanis, Graham; Van Borm, Steven

    2015-09-15

    Viral metagenomic approaches are increasingly being used for viral discovery. Various strategies are applied to enrich viral sequences, but there is often a lack of knowledge about their effective influence on the viral discovery sensitivity. We evaluate some convenient and widely used approaches for RNA virus discovery in clinical samples in order to reveal their sensitivity and potential bias introduced by the enrichment or amplifications steps. An RNA virus was artificially spiked at a fixed titer in serum and lung tissue, respectively, low and high nucleic acid content matrices. For serum, a simple DNase treatment on the RNA extract gave the maximum gain in proportion of viral sequences (83×), and a subsequent ribosomal RNA removal nearly doubled once more the proportion of viral sequences. For lung tissue, a ribosomal RNA depletion step on the RNA extract had the biggest gain in proportion of viral sequences (32×). We show also that direct sequencing of cDNA is recommended above an extra random PCR amplification step, and a that the virion enrichment strategy (filtration and nuclease treatment) has a beneficial effect for sequencing-based virus discovery. Our findings provide sample-dependent guidelines for targeted virus discovery strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of direct digital sampling for diffuse optical frequency domain spectroscopy in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Warren, Robert V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-04-01

    Frequency domain optical spectroscopy in the diffusive regime is currently being investigated for biomedical applications including tumor detection, therapy monitoring, exercise metabolism and others. Analog homodyne or heterodyne detection of sinusoidally modulated signals has been the predominant method for measuring phase and amplitude of photon density waves that have traversed through tissue. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing direct digital sampling of modulated signals using a 3.6 gigasample/second 12 bit analog to digital converter. Digitally synthesized modulated signals between 50 MHz and 400 MHz were measured on tissue-simulating phantoms at six near-infrared wavelengths. An amplitude and phase precision of 1% and 0.6° were achieved during drift tests. Amplitude, phase, scattering and absorption values were compared with a well-characterized network analyzer-based diffuse optical device. Optical properties measured with both systems were within 3.6% for absorption and 2.8% for scattering over a range of biologically relevant values. Direct digital sampling represents a viable method for frequency domain diffuse optical spectroscopy and has the potential to reduce system complexity, size and cost.

  20. Reliability of office-based narrow-band imaging-guided flexible laryngoscopic tissue samplings.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine; Lin, Wan-Ni; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lee, Li-Ang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Fang, Tuan-Jen

    2016-12-01

    Direct suspension laryngoscopic biopsy performed under general anesthesia is the conventional management for obtaining pathological diagnosis for neoplasms of the larynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. Since the development of distal chip laryngoscopy and digital imaging systems, transnasal flexible laryngoscopy tissue sampling has gained popularity as an office-based procedure. Additional assessment with narrow-band imaging (NBI) can help to increase the diagnostic yield. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of a novel diagnostic tool: office-based NBI (OB-NBI) flexible laryngoscopic tissue sampling. Retrospective chart review performed in a tertiary referral medical center in Taiwan. From January 2010 to February 2013, 90 consecutive patients received OB-NBI biopsies. The accuracies of the OB-NBI biopsies were compared among locations, tumor sizes, head and neck cancer histories, and other factors. All patients had completed the procedure without life-threatening complications. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 97.2% and 100%, respectively, with a diagnostic accuracy of 98.9%. Accuracy was not affected by tumor size, location, learning curves, or previous head and neck cancer history. We present an integrated technique that merges the safety and versatility of flexible laryngoscopy with the diagnostic power of NBI to produce a promising method of high accuracy and minimal morbidity. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2764-2769, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. A percutaneous needle biopsy technique for sampling the supraclavicular brown adipose tissue depot of humans.

    PubMed

    Chondronikola, M; Annamalai, P; Chao, T; Porter, C; Saraf, M K; Cesani, F; Sidossis, L S

    2015-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as a potential target tissue against obesity and its related metabolic complications. Although the molecular and functional characteristics of BAT have been intensively studied in rodents, only a few studies have used human BAT specimens due to the difficulty of sampling human BAT deposits. We established a novel positron emission tomography and computed tomography-guided Bergström needle biopsy technique to acquire human BAT specimens from the supraclavicular area in human subjects. Forty-three biopsies were performed on 23 participants. The procedure was tolerated well by the majority of participants. No major complications were noted. Numbness (9.6%) and hematoma (2.3%) were the two minor complications noted, which fully resolved. Thus, the proposed biopsy technique can be considered safe with only minimal risk of adverse events. Adoption of the proposed method is expected to increase the sampling of the supraclavicular BAT depot for research purposes so as to augment the scientific knowledge of the biology of human BAT.

  2. A percutaneous needle biopsy technique for sampling the supraclavicular brown adipose tissue depot of humans

    PubMed Central

    Annamalai, Palam; Chondronikola, Maria; Chao, Tony; Porter, Craig; Saraf, Manish K.; Cesani, Fernardo; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as a potential target tissue against obesity and its related metabolic complications. Although the molecular and functional characteristics of BAT have been intensively studied in rodents, only a small number of studies have used human BAT specimens due to the difficulty of sampling human BAT deposits. We established a novel positron emission tomography and computed tomography-guided Bergström needle biopsy technique to acquire human BAT specimens from the supraclavicular area in human subjects. Forty-three biopsies were performed on 23 participants. The procedure was tolerated well by the majority of participants. No major complications were noted. Numbness (9.6%) and hematoma (2.3%) were the two minor complications noted, which fully resolved. Thus, the proposed biopsy technique can be considered safe with only minimal risk of adverse events. Adoption of the proposed method is expected to increase the sampling of the supraclavicular BAT depot for research purposes so as to augment the scientific knowledge of the biology of human BAT. PMID:25920777

  3. EPA Office of Water (OW): Fish Consumption Advisories and Fish Tissue Sampling Stations NHDPlus Indexed Datasets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Fish Consumption Advisories dataset contains information on Fish Advisory events that have been indexed to the EPA Office of Water NHDPlus v2.1 hydrology and stored in the Reach Addressing Database (RAD). NHDPlus is a database that interconnects and uniquely identifies the millions of stream segments or reaches that comprise the Nations' surface water drainage system. NHDPlus provides a national framework for assigning reach addresses to water quality related entities, such as fish advisories locations. Reach addresses establish the locations of these entities relative to one another within the NHD surface water drainage network in a manner similar to street addresses. The assignment of reach addresses is accomplished through a process known as reach indexing. Fish consumption advisories and fish tissue sampling stations are reported to EPA by the states. Sampling stations are the locations where a state has collected fish tissue data for use in advisory determinations. Fish consumption advisory locations are coded onto NHDPlus flowline features to create point and linear events. Fish consumption advisory locations are also coded onto NHDPlus waterbody features to create area events. In addition to NHDPlus-reach indexed data, there may also be custom events (point, line, or area) that are not associated with NHDPlus. Although these Fish consumption advisories are not represented in NHDPlus, the data created for them are in an EPA standard format that is co

  4. Feasibility of Direct Digital Sampling for Diffuse Optical Frequency Domain Spectroscopy in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Roblyer, Darren; O'Sullivan, Thomas D; Warren, Robert V; Tromberg, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Frequency domain optical spectroscopy in the diffusive regime is currently being investigated for biomedical applications including tumor detection, therapy monitoring, exercise metabolism, and others. Analog homodyne or heterodyne detection of sinusoidally modulated signals have been the predominant method for measuring phase and amplitude of photon density waves that have traversed through tissue. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing direct digital sampling of modulated signals using a 3.6 Gigasample/second 12 bit Analog to Digital Converter. Digitally synthesized modulated signals between 50MHz and 400MHz were measured on tissue simulating phantoms at six near-infrared wavelengths. An amplitude and phase precision of 1% and 0.6 degrees were achieved during drift tests. Amplitude, phase, scattering and absorption values were compared with a well-characterized network analyzer based diffuse optical device. Measured optical properties measured with both systems were within 3.6% for absorption and 2.8% for scattering over a range of biologically relevant values. Direct digital sampling represents a viable method for frequency domain diffuse optical spectroscopy and has the potential to reduce system complexity, size, and cost.

  5. On the thermal effect induced in tissue samples exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Racuciu, M; Miclaus, S; Creanga, D

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electromagnetic exposure on mammalian tissues was approached as a public health issue aiming to reveal the putative side effect of 50 Hz industrial and domestic supply source (i) during aliments storage near such sources; (ii) in people staying couple of hours in the proximity of conducting wires. Fluorescence emission based thermal sensor was used to emphasize temperature dynamics of fresh meat samples during controlled electromagnetic exposure in Helmholtz coils adjusted to deliver 50 Hz / (4÷10) mT electromagnetic field in their inner volume. Fluoroptic temperature probe with 0.1 °C accuracy measurement and data acquisition software allowed reading temperature every second, in the tissue volume during exposure. The temperature dynamics curves of ex-vivo porcine tissues like liver, kidney, brain, muscle, lung, and bone, were comparatively analyzed - the choosing of the mammalian species being justified by metabolic and physiological similarities with human body. The curve slopes appear to be the same for the range of initial temperatures chosen to perform the tests (20.0 ± 0.1 °C), the temperature increase reaching around 2.0 °C for the magnetic flux density of 10 mT. Quantitative dependence was evidenced between the thermal effect and the magnetic flux density. The technical interpretation is based on heating effect, on bioimpedance increasing and on water vaporization during wet sample exposure. The biomedical aspects derive from the degrading effects of food heating as well as from possible in vivo effects of living body exposure.

  6. Comparison of histopathology and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fistula-in-ano.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj

    2017-07-01

    Histopathology is commonly used to diagnose tuberculosis in fistula-in-ano. The aim was to compare the sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction and histopathology in detecting tuberculosis in fistula-in-ano. The histopathology and polymerase chain-reaction of tissue (fistula tract) was done in all the consecutive operated cases. When pus sample was also available, polymerase chain reaction-pus was also done RESULTS: Three hundred forty seven samples (179 patients) were tested over 2 years (median 6.5 months). The mean age was 38.8 ± 10.7 years, and male/female was 170/9. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction of tissue (fistula tract) was done in 152 and 165 patients, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (pus) could be done in 30 patients. Overall, tuberculosis was detected in 20/179 (11.2%) patients. Of these, tuberculosis was detected by histopathology (tissue) in 1/152 (0.7%) and by polymerase chain reaction (tissue) in 14/165 (8.5%) patients. In pus, polymerase chain reaction detected tuberculosis in 6/30 (20%) patients. Both polymerase chain reaction of tissue and pus were positive in one patient. Polymerase chain reaction (tissue) and polymerase chain reaction (pus) were significantly more sensitive than histopathology (tissue) for detecting tuberculosis [histopathology 1/152 vs. polymerase chain reaction (tissue) 14/165, p = 0.0009] [histopathology 1/152 vs. polymerase chain reaction (pus) 6/30, p < 0.0001]. In 20 patients detected to have tuberculosis, four drug anti-tubercular therapy was recommended for 6 months. The therapy was completed in 13 patients and 12/13 (92.3%) were cured. The therapy is continuing in 3/20 patients. Four patients did not take the therapy. None of them was cured. Polymerase chain reaction was significantly more sensitive than histopathology in detecting tuberculosis in fistula-in-ano. Histopathology might be missing out tuberculosis in many patients leading to recurrence of the fistula.

  7. Histopathology of a wavy medaka

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Kota; Kuroda, Yusuke; Mimori, Norihiko; Hayashi, Seigo; Abe, Masayoshi; Tsuji, Naho; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wavy medakas are medakas that exhibit spinal curvature characterized by dorsoventrally curved vertebrae. We found a spontaneous wavy medaka in our experimental stock and subjected it to a histopathological examination. Macroscopically, the wavy medaka’s spine formed an M shape, and its vertebrae displayed a dorsoventral curvature that started at the third vertebral bone. Microscopically, the vertebral cavities were filled with fibrous tissue, which was similar to that seen in the central parts of the intervertebral discs of a normal medaka. The vertebral joints were composed of vacuolated notochord cells without intervertebral disc formation. These changes were also observed in the caudal region, which exhibited less curvature. In the normal medaka, the intervertebral discs form via the regression of the notochord that plays a key role in the development of vertebrae and disc formation. We concluded that notochordal subinvolution had induced intervertebral disc dysplasia, leading to lordokyphosis, in the wavy medaka. PMID:27182116

  8. KRAS mutation: comparison of testing methods and tissue sampling techniques in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing.

  9. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety. PMID:24574660

  10. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-09-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety.

  11. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Koeplinger, Kenneth A.; Vavek, Marissa; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  12. Mapping international practice patterns in EUS-guided tissue sampling: outcome of a global survey

    PubMed Central

    van Riet, Priscilla A.; Cahen, Djuna L.; Poley, Jan-Werner; Bruno, Marco J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Although Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue sampling is widely used, the optimal sampling strategy remains subject of debate. We evaluated practice patterns within the international endosonographic community. Patients and methods: An online questionnaire was sent to 400 endosonographers from the United States, Europe, and Asia. Results: A total of 186 (47 %) endosonographers participated: United States 54 (29 %), Europe 85 (46 %), and Asia 47 (25 %). European (75 %) and Asian (84 %) respondents routinely check coagulation status, whereas US respondents only check on indication (64 %, P = 0.007). While propofol sedation is standard in the United States (83 %), conscious sedation is still widely used in Europe (52 %) and Asia (84 %, P < 0.001). Overall, the 22-gauge needle is most commonly used (52 %). For fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of solid pancreatic lesions, 22-gauge (45 %) and 25-gauge (49 %) needles are used equally. For fine-needle biopsy (FNB) of solid masses, the 25-gauge device is less favored than the 22-gauge FNA device (49 % versus 21 %). The 19-gauge needle is generally used for FNB of submucosal masses (62 %). Rapid on-site pathological evaluation (ROSE) is utilized more often by US (98 %) than by European and Asian respondents (51 %, P < 0.001). Cytolyt (52 %), formalin (15 %) and alcohol (15 %) are used for FNA specimen preservation in the United States and Europe, while saline (27 %) and alcohol (38 %) are widely used in Asia (P < 0.001). Conclusions: EUS-guided tissue sampling practices vary substantially within the international endosonographic community and differ considerably from recommendations expressed in guidelines. Because the clinical relevance of these variations is largely unknown, the outcome of this survey suggests a need for further studies. PMID:27227103

  13. Reporting Tumor Molecular Heterogeneity in Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mafficini, Andrea; Amato, Eliana; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Antonello, Davide; Vicentini, Caterina; Scardoni, Maria; Bersani, Samantha; Gottardi, Marisa; Rusev, Borislav; Malpeli, Giorgio; Corbo, Vincenzo; Barbi, Stefano; Sikora, Katarzyna O.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Tortora, Giampaolo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of molecular tumor heterogeneity has become of paramount importance with the advent of targeted therapies. Analysis for detection should be comprehensive, timely and based on routinely available tumor samples. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic potential of targeted multigene next-generation sequencing (TM-NGS) in characterizing gastrointestinal cancer molecular heterogeneity. Methods 35 gastrointestinal tract tumors, five of each intestinal type gastric carcinomas, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, ampulla of Vater carcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocarcinomas, pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumors were assessed for mutations in 46 cancer-associated genes, using Ion Torrent semiconductor-based TM-NGS. One ampulla of Vater carcinoma cell line and one hepatic carcinosarcoma served to assess assay sensitivity. TP53, PIK3CA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations were validated by conventional Sanger sequencing. Results TM-NGS yielded overlapping results on matched fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, with a mutation detection limit of 1% for fresh-frozen high molecular weight DNA and 2% for FFPE partially degraded DNA. At least one somatic mutation was observed in all tumors tested; multiple alterations were detected in 20/35 (57%) tumors. Seven cancers displayed significant differences in allelic frequencies for distinct mutations, indicating the presence of intratumor molecular heterogeneity; this was confirmed on selected samples by immunohistochemistry of p53 and Smad4, showing concordance with mutational analysis. Conclusions TM-NGS is able to detect and quantitate multiple gene alterations from limited amounts of DNA, moving one step closer to a next-generation histopathologic diagnosis that integrates morphologic, immunophenotypic, and multigene mutational analysis on routinely processed tissues, essential for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25127237

  14. Attitudes towards transfers of human tissue samples across borders: An international survey of researchers and policy makers in five countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sharing of tissue samples for research and disease surveillance purposes has become increasingly important. While it is clear that this is an area of intense, international controversy, there is an absence of data about what researchers themselves and those involved in the transfer of samples think about these issues, particularly in developing countries. Methods A survey was carried out in a number of Asian countries and in Egypt to explore what researchers and others involved in research, storage and transfer of human tissue samples thought about some of the issues related to sharing of such samples. Results The results demonstrated broad agreement with the positions taken by developing countries in the current debate, favoring quite severe restrictions on the use of samples by developed countries. Conclusions It is recommended that an international agreement is developed on what conditions should be attached to any sharing of human tissue samples across borders. PMID:20843366

  15. One-step labeling of degenerative neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples using Fluoro-Jade C.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Schmued, Larry C; Sarkar, Sumit; Paule, Merle G; Raymick, Bryan

    2012-06-30

    Neurodegeneration is the underlying cause of a vast majority of neurological disorders and often a result of brain trauma, stroke, or neurotoxic insult. Here we describe a simple method for labeling degenerating neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples. This method could provide a new avenue for identifying and harvesting degenerative neurons from unfixed brain tissues for subsequent molecular analyses.

  16. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  17. Sources of technical variability in quantitative LC-MS proteomics: human brain tissue sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Piehowski, Paul D; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Orton, Daniel J; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J; Ramirez-Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P; Albin, Roger L; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Myers, Amanda J

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE cleanup (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) > instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  18. A Fast Carrier Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Method Applicable to Microdissected Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haiping; Liu, Hester; Gonye, Gregory; Schwaber, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation studies of CNS neurons are complicated by both cellular diversity and plasticity. Microdissection of specific functionally related populations of neurons can greatly reduce these issues, but typically excludes the use of many technologies due to tissue requirements, such as Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a powerful tool for studying in vivo protein-DNA interactions. We have developed a fast carrier ChIP (Fast CChIP) method for analyzing specific in vivo transcription factor-DNA interactions in as little as 0.2 mm3 brain tissue. Using an antibody against phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB) protein, we confirmed phospho-CREB (pCREB) binding at the c-fos gene promoter. Then we further demonstrated the applicability of Fast CChIP in determining hypertension-induced pCREB binding at the c-fos gene promoter in the rat nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), confirming CREB’s role in mediating hypertension-induced c-fos expression. This method will be broadly applicable to individual brain nucleus and biopsy/surgical samples. PMID:18502516

  19. Accumulation levels and characteristics of some pesticides in human adipose tissue samples from Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Shi, Lili; Kong, Deyang; Cai, Daoji; Cao, Yanzhong; Liu, Yongming; Pang, Guofang; Yu, Rongbin

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of pesticide levels and bio-accumulation characteristics in human adipose tissues among residents of Southeast China. A large number of adipose samples (n=633) were selected for 58 pesticides and were analyzed by high sensitive Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The results showed that POPs pesticides were frequently detected, including 2,4'-DDD, 2,4'-DDE, 2,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDD, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDT, α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, δ-HCH, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and mirex. Other detected pesticide species were dicofol, methamidophos and chlordimeform, which have rarely been reported. Comparing to different countries, the concentrations of total DDT and HCH in these three Chinese southeastern sites were in the middle range, whereas the HCB and mirex were in the lower end. A significant correlation was observed between region as well as age and POPs pesticide levels. Some pesticide residue levels were also found significantly correlated to occupation. However, there was no significant correlation between gender and pesticides. Meanwhile, it is interesting to find that mortality of malignant tumors tends to associate with the pesticides levels in human adipose tissue. More importantly, the measured data presented in this study provide realistic information which is useful for assessing human exposure to pesticides in the general population of Southeast China. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cellulase activity screening using pure carboxymethylcellulose: application to soluble cellulolytic samples and to plant tissue prints.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hanne R; Krause, Kirsten

    2014-01-09

    Reliable, rapid and inexpensive detection of cellulolytic enzymes that can be used for a wide variety of biological and environmental samples are currently in high demand. Here, a new cellulase detection protocol is described that circumvents problems observed with popular agar-based methods by exploiting the ability of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to form gel-like surfaces on its own. These pure CMC-layers are sensitive to cellulolytic degradation and stainable by Gram's iodine without showing unwelcome reactions with other enzymes. The staining intensity negatively correlates with the enzyme activity and can be used for quantification. Cellulase activities are not obstructed by high sugar contents (e.g., in plant material) which limit the applicability of other quantification methods, making our new method particularly attractive for screening of plant extracts. A useful variant of this new method is its applicability to plant tissue prints for spatial mapping of the cellulolytic activity in a zymogram-like fashion.

  1. Cellulase Activity Screening Using Pure Carboxymethylcellulose: Application to Soluble Cellulolytic Samples and to Plant Tissue Prints

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Hanne R.; Krause, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Reliable, rapid and inexpensive detection of cellulolytic enzymes that can be used for a wide variety of biological and environmental samples are currently in high demand. Here, a new cellulase detection protocol is described that circumvents problems observed with popular agar-based methods by exploiting the ability of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to form gel-like surfaces on its own. These pure CMC-layers are sensitive to cellulolytic degradation and stainable by Gram’s iodine without showing unwelcome reactions with other enzymes. The staining intensity negatively correlates with the enzyme activity and can be used for quantification. Cellulase activities are not obstructed by high sugar contents (e.g., in plant material) which limit the applicability of other quantification methods, making our new method particularly attractive for screening of plant extracts. A useful variant of this new method is its applicability to plant tissue prints for spatial mapping of the cellulolytic activity in a zymogram-like fashion. PMID:24413752

  2. Histopathology of chromoblastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F; Zuluaga, A I; Leon, W; Restrepo, A

    1989-01-01

    A study aimed at determining the histopathologic appearance of chromoblastomycotic lesions was undertaken. Biopsies from 26 patients with the disease were examined. It was found that 23 cases (88.46%) exhibited the organized mixed mycotic granuloma - OMMA -, a granuloma modified by the presence polymorphonuclear neutrophils - PMN's. An equal proportion of cases exhibited pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, with the epithelium playing an important role in the transepidermic elimination of the fungus. Healing of the lesions took place by fibrosis which was observed in 21 (80.77%) patients; this type of reaction was more common in the deeper areas of the dermis.

  3. Histopathological lesions in 15 cats with leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J A; Sánchez, J; Peñafiel-Verdú, C; Buendía, A J; Altimira, J; Vilafranca, M

    2010-11-01

    Recent research into the prevalence of Leishmania infantum infection in the Mediterranean basin points to the involvement of cats as a reservoir host, but only sporadic cases of feline leishmaniosis have been reported. Feline leishmaniosis presents primarily as cutaneous disease and diagnosis is based on the demonstration of the parasite by skin biopsy. The present report describes the microscopical changes in tissue biopsies from 15 cats with leishmaniosis. The biopsies were derived from the skin, ocular tissue and mucocutaneous junctions. The most common histopathological feature was diffuse granulomatous inflammation with macrophages containing numerous amastigotes. Other patterns included granulomatous perifolliculitis and lichenoid interface dermatitis, where there were fewer parasitized macrophages. The presence of amastigotes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in each case. The results of the study confirm the value of histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques for the diagnosis of feline leishmaniosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project: Sample inventory and results of analyses of selected samples for organic compounds and trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Schantz, M.M.; Koster, B.J.; Zeisler, R.

    1992-02-01

    In 1987, the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP) was established as part of the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).The purpose of the AMMTAP was to establish a representative collection of Alaska marine mammal tissues for future contaminant analyses and documentation of long-term trends in environmental quality. Since 1987, specimens have been collected from 65 animals (seven species) from six different sites. The report contains the current sample inventory and the results of the analysis of selected samples for the measurement of inorganic and organic compounds.

  5. A random sampling approach for robust estimation of tissue-to-plasma ratio from extremely sparse data.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hui-May; Ette, Ene I

    2005-09-02

    his study was performed to develop a new nonparametric approach for the estimation of robust tissue-to-plasma ratio from extremely sparsely sampled paired data (ie, one sample each from plasma and tissue per subject). Tissue-to-plasma ratio was estimated from paired/unpaired experimental data using independent time points approach, area under the curve (AUC) values calculated with the naïve data averaging approach, and AUC values calculated using sampling based approaches (eg, the pseudoprofile-based bootstrap [PpbB] approach and the random sampling approach [our proposed approach]). The random sampling approach involves the use of a 2-phase algorithm. The convergence of the sampling/resampling approaches was investigated, as well as the robustness of the estimates produced by different approaches. To evaluate the latter, new data sets were generated by introducing outlier(s) into the real data set. One to 2 concentration values were inflated by 10% to 40% from their original values to produce the outliers. Tissue-to-plasma ratios computed using the independent time points approach varied between 0 and 50 across time points. The ratio obtained from AUC values acquired using the naive data averaging approach was not associated with any measure of uncertainty or variability. Calculating the ratio without regard to pairing yielded poorer estimates. The random sampling and pseudoprofile-based bootstrap approaches yielded tissue-to-plasma ratios with uncertainty and variability. However, the random sampling approach, because of the 2-phase nature of its algorithm, yielded more robust estimates and required fewer replications. Therefore, a 2-phase random sampling approach is proposed for the robust estimation of tissue-to-plasma ratio from extremely sparsely sampled data.

  6. Optimizing EUS-guided liver biopsy sampling: comprehensive assessment of needle types and tissue acquisition techniques.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Allison R; Thompson, Christopher C; Odze, Robert; Chan, Walter W; Ryou, Marvin

    2017-02-01

    EUS-guided liver biopsy sampling using FNA and, more recently, fine-needle biopsy (FNB) needles has been reported with discrepant diagnostic accuracy, in part due to differences in methodology. We aimed to compare liver histologic yields of 4 EUS-based needles and 2 percutaneous needles to identify optimal number of needle passes and suction. Six needle types were tested on human cadaveric tissue: one 19G FNA needle, one existing 19G FNB needle, one novel 19G FNB needle, one 22G FNB needle, and two 18G percutaneous needles (18G1 and 18G2). Two needle excursion patterns (1 vs 3 fanning passes) were performed on all EUS needles. Primary outcome was number of portal tracts. Secondary outcomes were degree of fragmentation and specimen adequacy. Pairwise comparisons were performed using t tests, with a 2-sided P < .05 considered to be significant. Multivariable regression analysis was performed. In total, 288 liver biopsy samplings (48 per needle type) were performed. The novel 19G FNB needle had significantly increased mean portal tracts compared with all needle types. The 22G FNB needle had significantly increased portal tracts compared with the 18G1 needle (3.8 vs 2.5, P < .001) and was not statistically different from the 18G2 needle (3.8 vs 3.5, P = .68). FNB needles (P < .001) and 3 fanning passes (P ≤ .001) were independent predictors of the number of portal tracts. A novel 19G EUS-guided liver biopsy needle provides superior histologic yield compared with 18G percutaneous needles and existing 19G FNA and core needles. Moreover, the 22G FNB needle may be adequate for liver biopsy sampling. Investigations are underway to determine whether these results can be replicated in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Learning semantic histopathological representation for basal cell carcinoma classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Rueda, Andrea; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of a histopathology glass slide is a complex process that involves accurate recognition of several structures, their function in the tissue and their relation with other structures. The way in which the pathologist represents the image content and the relations between those objects yields a better and accurate diagnoses. Therefore, an appropriate semantic representation of the image content will be useful in several analysis tasks such as cancer classification, tissue retrieval and histopahological image analysis, among others. Nevertheless, to automatically recognize those structures and extract their inner semantic meaning are still very challenging tasks. In this paper we introduce a new semantic representation that allows to describe histopathological concepts suitable for classification. The approach herein identify local concepts using a dictionary learning approach, i.e., the algorithm learns the most representative atoms from a set of random sampled patches, and then models the spatial relations among them by counting the co-occurrence between atoms, while penalizing the spatial distance. The proposed approach was compared with a bag-of-features representation in a tissue classification task. For this purpose, 240 histological microscopical fields of view, 24 per tissue class, were collected. Those images fed a Support Vector Machine classifier per class, using 120 images as train set and the remaining ones for testing, maintaining the same proportion of each concept in the train and test sets. The obtained classification results, averaged from 100 random partitions of training and test sets, shows that our approach is more sensitive in average than the bag-of-features representation in almost 6%.

  8. Preservation of nucleic acids and tissue morphology in paraffin-embedded clinical samples: comparison of five molecular fixatives.

    PubMed

    Staff, Synnöve; Kujala, Paula; Karhu, Ritva; Rökman, Annika; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Kares, Saara; Isola, Jorma

    2013-09-01

    Formalin fixation preserves tissue morphology at the expense of macromolecule integrity. Freshly frozen samples are the golden standard for DNA and RNA analyses but require laborious deep-freezing and frozen sectioning for morphological studies. Alternative tissue stabilisation methods are therefore needed. We analysed the preservation of nucleic acids, immunohistochemical staining properties and tissue morphology in paraffin-embedded clinical tissue samples fixed with Z7, RCL2, PAXgene, Allprotect and RNAlater. Formalin-fixed and deep-frozen samples were used as controls. Immunohistochemical analyses showed good preservation of antigenicity in all except Allprotect and RNAlater-fixed samples. RNA quality, based on RNA integrity number value by Bioanalyzer, was comparable with freshly frozen samples only in PAXgene-fixed samples. According to quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses, RNA from PAXgene samples yielded results similar to freshly frozen samples. No difference between fixatives was seen in DNA analyses (PCR and real-time PCR). In conclusion, PAXgene seems to be superior to other molecular fixatives and formaldehyde.

  9. Design and implementation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of cancerous and healthy breast tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Greenberg, Joel A; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2016-01-01

    A scatter imaging technique for the differentiation of cancerous and healthy breast tissue in a heterogeneous sample is introduced in this work. Such a technique has potential utility in intraoperative margin assessment during lumpectomy procedures. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of the imaging method for tumor classification using Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments. The coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging technique was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) images of breast tissue samples acquired through a single-position snapshot acquisition, without rotation as is required in coherent scatter computed tomography. We perform a quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the cancerous voxel classification using Monte Carlo simulations of the imaging system; describe our experimental implementation of coded aperture scatter imaging; show the reconstructed images of the breast tissue samples; and present segmentations of the 3-D images in order to identify the cancerous and healthy tissue in the samples. From the Monte Carlo simulations, we find that coded aperture scatter imaging is able to reconstruct images of the samples and identify the distribution of cancerous and healthy tissues (i.e., fibroglandular, adipose, or a mix of the two) inside them with a cancerous voxel identification sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. From the experimental results, we find that the technique is able to identify cancerous and healthy tissue samples and reconstruct differential coherent scatter cross sections that are highly correlated with those measured by other groups using x-ray diffraction. Coded aperture scatter imaging has the potential to provide scatter images that automatically differentiate cancerous and healthy tissue inside samples within a time on the order of a minute per slice.

  10. Design and implementation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of cancerous and healthy breast tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. A scatter imaging technique for the differentiation of cancerous and healthy breast tissue in a heterogeneous sample is introduced in this work. Such a technique has potential utility in intraoperative margin assessment during lumpectomy procedures. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of the imaging method for tumor classification using Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments. The coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging technique was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) images of breast tissue samples acquired through a single-position snapshot acquisition, without rotation as is required in coherent scatter computed tomography. We perform a quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the cancerous voxel classification using Monte Carlo simulations of the imaging system; describe our experimental implementation of coded aperture scatter imaging; show the reconstructed images of the breast tissue samples; and present segmentations of the 3-D images in order to identify the cancerous and healthy tissue in the samples. From the Monte Carlo simulations, we find that coded aperture scatter imaging is able to reconstruct images of the samples and identify the distribution of cancerous and healthy tissues (i.e., fibroglandular, adipose, or a mix of the two) inside them with a cancerous voxel identification sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. From the experimental results, we find that the technique is able to identify cancerous and healthy tissue samples and reconstruct differential coherent scatter cross sections that are highly correlated with those measured by other groups using x-ray diffraction. Coded aperture scatter imaging has the potential to provide scatter images that automatically differentiate cancerous and healthy tissue inside samples within a time on the order of a minute per slice. PMID:26962543

  11. Hybrid-Cut: An Improved Sectioning Method for Recalcitrant Plant Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Su-Chiung; Lien, Yi-Chen; Yang, Ting-Ting; Ko, Swee-Suak

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining plant section integrity is essential for studying detailed anatomical structures at the cellular, tissue, or even organ level. However, some plant cells have rigid cell walls, tough fibers and crystals(calcium oxalate, silica, etc.), and high water content that often disrupt tissue integrity during plant tissue sectioning. This study establishes a simple Hybrid-Cut tissue sectioning method. This protocol modifies a paraffin-based sectioning technique and improves the integrity of tissue sections from different plants. Plant tissues were embedded in paraffin before sectioning in a cryostat at -16 °C. Sectioning under low temperature hardened the paraffin blocks, reduced tearing and scratching, and improved tissue integrity significantly. This protocol was successfully applied to calcium oxalate-rich Phalaenopsis orchid tissues as well as recalcitrant tissues such as reproductive organs and leaves of rice, maize, and wheat. In addition, the high quality of tissue sections from Hybrid-Cut could be used in combination with in situ hybridization (ISH) to provide spatial expression patterns of genes of interest. In conclusion, this protocol is particularly useful for recalcitrant plant tissue containing high crystal or silica content. Good quality tissue sections enable morphological and other biological studies. PMID:27911377

  12. Histopathology Image Analysis in Two Long-Term Animal Experiments with Helical Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Wotke, Jiri; Homolka, Pavel; Vasku, Jaromír; Dobsak, Petr; Palanova, Petra; Mrkvicova, Veronika; Konecny, Petr; Soska, Vladimir; Pohanka, Michal; Novakova, Marie; Yurimoto, Terumi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-12-01

    Histopathological analysis can provide important information in long-term experiments with total artificial heart (TAH). Recently, a new type of blood pump, the helical flow total artificial heart (HF-TAH) was developed. This study aimed to investigate the changes in selected vital organs in animal experiments with implanted HF-TAH. Samples from lung, liver, and kidneys from two female goats (No. 1301 and No. 1304) with implanted HF-TAH were analyzed. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% formaldehyde and 4 µm thick transverse sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). Additional staining was done for detection of connective tissue (Masson-Goldner stain) and for detection of iron (hemosiderin) deposits (Perls stain). Sections were scanned at 100× and 500× magnification with a light microscope. Experiment no. 1301 survived 100 days (cause of termination was heavy damage of the right pump); experimental goat no.1304 survived 68 days and was sacrificed due to severe right hydrodynamic bearing malfunction. Histopathological analysis of liver samples proved signs of chronic venostasis with limited focal necrotic zones. Dilated tubules, proteinaceous material in tubular lumen, and hemosiderin deposits were detected in kidney samples. Contamination of the organs by embolized micro-particles was suspected at the autopsy after discovery of visible damage (scratches) of the pump impeller surface (made from titanium alloy) in both experiments. Sporadic deposits of foreign micro-particles (presumably titanium) were observed in most of the analyzed parenchymal organs. However, the described deposits were not in direct connection with inflammatory reactions in the analyzed tissues. Histopathological analysis showed the presence of minimal contamination of the lung, kidney, and liver tissue samples by foreign material (titanium very likely). The analysis showed only limited pathological changes, especially in liver and kidneys, which might be attributed to the influence of

  13. A DNA sequence capture extraction method for detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in feces and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Vansnick, Elke; de Rijk, Pim; Vercammen, Francis; Rigouts, Leen; Portaels, Françoise; Geysen, Dirk

    2007-05-16

    Culturing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) remains difficult and is time consuming. An alternative for the rapid detection of Map in samples is PCR. We have developed a sensitive DNA-extraction method based on sequence capture for the rapid detection of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis by PCR in fecal and tissue samples. The method detected 10(2)Map/g feces using spiked samples, and reached a diagnostic sensitivity of 33,7% compared to 22% for culture. Analysis of tissue samples gave 65 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive (42.2%) and 49 culture-positive samples (31.8%). Therefore, the detection limit of the DNA-extraction is the same as previously reported for culture, the PCR assay could detect more positive samples than the culture method.

  14. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-10-30

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics.

  15. Gene expression profiling of human breast tissue samples using SAGE-Seq.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua Jeremy; Meyer, Clifford A; Choudhury, Sibgat; Shipitsin, Michail; Maruyama, Reo; Bessarabova, Marina; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Sukumar, Saraswati; Schwartzman, Armin; Liu, Jun S; Polyak, Kornelia; Liu, X Shirley

    2010-12-01

    We present a powerful application of ultra high-throughput sequencing, SAGE-Seq, for the accurate quantification of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cell transcriptomes. We develop data analysis pipelines that allow the mapping of sense and antisense strands of mitochondrial and RefSeq genes, the normalization between libraries, and the identification of differentially expressed genes. We find that the diversity of cancer transcriptomes is significantly higher than that of normal cells. Our analysis indicates that transcript discovery plateaus at 10 million reads/sample, and suggests a minimum desired sequencing depth around five million reads. Comparison of SAGE-Seq and traditional SAGE on normal and cancerous breast tissues reveals higher sensitivity of SAGE-Seq to detect less-abundant genes, including those encoding for known breast cancer-related transcription factors and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). SAGE-Seq is able to identify genes and pathways abnormally activated in breast cancer that traditional SAGE failed to call. SAGE-Seq is a powerful method for the identification of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human disease.

  16. Apicomplexa primers amplify Proteromonas (Stramenopiles, Slopalinida, Proteromonadidae) in tissue and blood samples from lizards.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P M C; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Harris, D James

    2012-12-01

    Microscopy has traditionally been the most common method in parasitological studies, but in recent years molecular screening has become increasingly frequent to detect protozoan parasites in a wide range of vertebrate hosts and vectors. During routine molecular screening of apicomplexan parasites in reptiles using the 18S rRNA gene, we have amplified and sequenced Proteromonas parasites from three lizard hosts (less than 1% prevalence). We conducted phylogenetic analysis to confirm the taxonomic position and infer their relationships with other stramenopiles. Although our phylogeny is limited due to scarcity of molecular data on these protists, our results confirm they are closely related to Proteromonas lacertae. Our findings show that unexpected parasites can be amplified from host samples (blood and tissue) using general procedures to detect hemoparasites, and stress that positive PCR amplifications alone should not be considered as definitive proof of infection by particular parasites. Further validation by sequence confirmation and thorough phylogenetic assessment will not only avoid false positives and biased prevalence estimates but also provide valuable information on the biodiversity and phylogenetic relationships of other parasitic organisms. More generally, our results illustrate the perils of general diagnosis protocols in parasitological studies and the need of cross-validation procedures.

  17. Stable isotope analysis of 1987-1991 zooplankton samples and bowhead whale tissues. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    Stable isotope analyses of bowhead whale tissue samples and bowhead whale prey organisms collected over the years 1987 to 1991 were used to provide detail on the isotope ratio gradients evident in the arctic Alaskan zooplankton and to verify previous findings regarding the growth rates and age determination techniques developed for bowhead whales. Zooplankton of the Bering and Chukchi seas are enriched in (13)C relative to the eastern Beaufort Sea. The analysis of baleen from bowhead whales taken between 1987 to 1990 indicate that the whales are slow-growing and the young animals between year one and about six to seven years of age, undergo a period of little or no linear growth. The authors estimate that bowheads require 16-18 years to reach the length of sexual maturity, i.e., 13-14 m. From baleen Delta(13C) cycles, a 20 year record of the isotope ratios in the phytoplankton of the northern Bering and Chukchi seas was constructed. The long-term record has been compared with the temperature anomalies in surface waters of the Bering Sea. The Delta(13C) of the zooplankton is inversely correlated with temperature and refutes current models attempting to relate ocean temperature, and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels with the Delta(13C) of ocean sediment organic matter.

  18. A comparison of sample preparation strategies for biological tissues and subsequent trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Bonta, Maximilian; Török, Szilvia; Hegedus, Balazs; Döme, Balazs; Limbeck, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is one of the most commonly applied methods for lateral trace element distribution analysis in medical studies. Many improvements of the technique regarding quantification and achievable lateral resolution have been achieved in the last years. Nevertheless, sample preparation is also of major importance and the optimal sample preparation strategy still has not been defined. While conventional histology knows a number of sample pre-treatment strategies, little is known about the effect of these approaches on the lateral distributions of elements and/or their quantities in tissues. The technique of formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) has emerged as the gold standard in tissue preparation. However, the potential use for elemental distribution studies is questionable due to a large number of sample preparation steps. In this work, LA-ICP-MS was used to examine the applicability of the FFPE sample preparation approach for elemental distribution studies. Qualitative elemental distributions as well as quantitative concentrations in cryo-cut tissues as well as FFPE samples were compared. Results showed that some metals (especially Na and K) are severely affected by the FFPE process, whereas others (e.g., Mn, Ni) are less influenced. Based on these results, a general recommendation can be given: FFPE samples are completely unsuitable for the analysis of alkaline metals. When analyzing transition metals, FFPE samples can give comparable results to snap-frozen tissues. Graphical abstract Sample preparation strategies for biological tissues are compared with regard to the elemental distributions and average trace element concentrations.

  19. Tissue imaging for cancer detection using NIR autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Staggs, Michael C.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Ramsamooj, Rajen; White, Ralph de Vere

    2002-05-01

    Near IR imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation. A set of images of each tissue sample is recorded. These images are then compared with the histopathology of the tissue sample to reveal the optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection. The experimental results indicate that the above approaches can help image and differentiate cancer form normal tissue.

  20. Grinding and polishing instead of sectioning for the tissue samples with a graft: Implications for light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Sevostyanova, Victoria V; Shishkova, Daria K; Nokhrin, Andrey V; Sidorova, Olga D; Kutikhin, Anton G

    2016-06-01

    A broad use of the graft replacement requires a detailed investigation of the host-graft interaction, including both histological examination and electron microscopy. A high quality sectioning of the host tissue with a graft seems to be complicated; in addition, it is difficult to examine the same tissue area by both of the mentioned microscopy techniques. To solve these problems, we developed a new technique of epoxy resin embedding with the further grinding, polishing, and staining. Graft-containing tissues prepared by grinding and polishing preserved their structure; however, sectioning frequently required the explantation of the graft and led to tissue disintegration. Moreover, stained samples prepared by grinding and polishing may then be assessed by both light microscopy and backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, grinding and polishing outperform sectioning when applied to the tissues with a graft.

  1. Discordant assessment of tumor biomarkers by histopathological and molecular assays in the EORTC randomized controlled 10041/BIG 03-04 MINDACT trial breast cancer : Intratumoral heterogeneity and DCIS or normal tissue components are unlikely to be the cause of discordance.

    PubMed

    Viale, Giuseppe; Slaets, Leen; de Snoo, Femke A; Bogaerts, Jan; Russo, Leila; van't Veer, Laura; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J; Stork-Sloots, Lisette; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Glas, Annuska M; Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-02-01

    Accurate identification of breast cancer patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant systemic therapies is crucial. Better understanding of differences between methods can lead to an improved ER, PgR, and HER-2 assessment. The purpose of this preplanned translational research is to investigate the correlation of central IHC/FISH assessments with microarray mRNA readouts of ER, PgR, and HER-2 status in the MINDACT trial and to determine if any discordance could be attributed to intratumoral heterogeneity or the DCIS and normal tissue components in the specimens. MINDACT is an international, prospective, randomized, phase III trial investigating the clinical utility of MammaPrint in selecting patients with early breast cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 6694 patients). Gene-expression data were obtained by TargetPrint; IHC and/or FISH were assessed centrally (n = 5788; 86 %). Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of centrally submitted FFPE blocks identified 1427 cases for which the very same sample was submitted for gene-expression analysis. TargetPrint ER had a positive agreement of 98 %, and a negative agreement of 95 % with central pathology. Corresponding figures for PgR were 85 and 94 % and for HER-2 72 and 99 %. Agreement of mRNA versus central protein was not different when the same or a different portion of the tumor tissue was analyzed or when DCIS and/or normal tissue was included in the sample subjected to mRNA assays. This is the first large analysis to assess the discordance rate between protein and mRNA analysis of breast cancer markers, and to look into intratumoral heterogeneity, DCIS, or normal tissue components as a potential cause of discordance. The observed difference between mRNA and protein assessment for PgR and HER-2 needs further research; the present analysis does not support intratumoral heterogeneity or the DCIS and normal tissue components being likely causes of the discordance.

  2. Possible migration and histopathological analysis of injections of polymethylmethacrylate in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Neves, Rodrigo d'Eça; Herdt, Marcello Alberton; Wohlgemuth, Felipe Barbieri; Ely, Jorge Bins; de Vasconcellos, Zulmar Antonio Accioli; Bastos, José Caldeira Ferreira; d'Acampora, Armando José

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the possible migration of polymethylmethacrylate after injections in various corporal compartments of Wistar rats. Methods. The experimental work consisted in the injection of PMMA in corporal compartments for later histopathological analysis of the locations of implants and of distant filtering organs. The dose applied in each implant was of 0.2 mL. The animals were divided into groups according to the location of the implant realized: group GB had intradermic injections in the glabella. Group SD had subdermal injections in dorsal subcutaneous tissue cells. Group IP had intraperitoneal injections in the abdomen. Group PD had intramuscular injections in the right rear leg. The rats were sacrificed 30 days after realization of the implants and tissue samples from the lung, liver, spleen, and kidney, and locations of implantation were removed for histopathological analysis. Results. Characteristic microspheres that were compatible with the presence of PMMA in any of the histological slides analyzed were not observed. One animal had an amorphous exogenous substance, with a histiocytic reaction. Twelve of the 16 lungs analyzed had locations of intraalveolar hemorrhaging. Two animals had nonspecific spleen alterations. Conclusion. The histopathological analysis of this study found no PMMA microspheres in any of the tissues analyzed.

  3. Sample processing, protocol, and statistical analysis of the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of protein, cell, and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Goncalo; Soininen, Antti; Sillat, Tarvo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kaivosoja, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is increasingly being used in analysis of biological samples. For example, it has been applied to distinguish healthy and osteoarthritic human cartilage. This chapter discusses ToF-SIMS principle and instrumentation including the three modes of analysis in ToF-SIMS. ToF-SIMS sets certain requirements for the samples to be analyzed; for example, the samples have to be vacuum compatible. Accordingly, sample processing steps for different biological samples, i.e., proteins, cells, frozen and paraffin-embedded tissues and extracellular matrix for the ToF-SIMS are presented. Multivariate analysis of the ToF-SIMS data and the necessary data preprocessing steps (peak selection, data normalization, mean-centering, and scaling and transformation) are discussed in this chapter.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy studies of formalin-fixed cervix tissues.

    PubMed

    Krishna, C M; Sockalingum, G D; Vadhiraja, B M; Maheedhar, K; Rao, A C K; Rao, L; Venteo, L; Pluot, M; Fernandes, D J; Vidyasagar, M S; Kartha, V B; Manfait, M

    2007-02-15

    Optical histopathology is fast emerging as a potential tool in cancer diagnosis. Fresh tissues in saline are ideal samples for optical histopathology. However, evaluation of suitability of ex vivo handled tissues is necessitated because of severe constraints in sample procurement, handling, and other associated problems with fresh tissues. Among these methods, formalin-fixed samples are shown to be suitable for optical histopathology. However, it is necessary to further evaluate this method from the point of view discriminating tissues with minute biochemical variations. A pilot Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic studies of formalin-fixed tissues normal, malignant, and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from the same malignant cervix subjects were carried out, with an aim to explore the feasibility of discriminating these tissues, especially the tissues after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from other two groups. Raman and FTIR spectra exhibit large differences for normal and malignant tissues and subtle differences are seen between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and it provided good discrimination of normal and malignant tissues. PCA of data of three tissues, normal, malignant, and 2-fractions after radiotherapy, gave two clusters corresponding to normal and malignant + after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. A second step of PCA was required to achieve discrimination between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Hence, this study not only further supports the use of formalin-fixed tissues in optical histopathology, especially from Raman spectroscopy point of view, it also indicates feasibility of discriminating tissues with minute biochemical differences such as malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy.

  5. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P.; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples. Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland–Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers. Although the Bland–Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs. Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder

  6. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M

    2016-08-01

    Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples.Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland-Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers.Although the Bland-Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs.Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder urothelial

  7. Epigenome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in paired samples of adipose tissue and blood

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Chu, Su; Loucks, Eric B.; Lin, Chien-Ling; Eaton, Charles B.; Buka, Stephen L.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many epigenetic association studies have attempted to identify DNA methylation markers in blood that are able to mirror those in target tissues. Although some have suggested potential utility of surrogate epigenetic markers in blood, few studies have collected data to directly compare DNA methylation across tissues from the same individuals. Here, epigenomic data were collected from adipose tissue and blood in 143 subjects using Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. The top axis of epigenome-wide variation differentiates adipose tissue from blood, which is confirmed internally using cross-validation and externally with independent data from the two tissues. We identified 1,285 discordant genes and 1,961 concordant genes between blood and adipose tissue. RNA expression data of the two classes of genes show consistent patterns with those observed in DNA methylation. The discordant genes are enriched in biological functions related to immune response, leukocyte activation or differentiation, and blood coagulation. We distinguish the CpG-specific correlation from the within-subject correlation and emphasize that the magnitude of within-subject correlation does not guarantee the utility of surrogate epigenetic markers. The study reinforces the critical role of DNA methylation in regulating gene expression and cellular phenotypes across tissues, and highlights the caveats of using methylation markers in blood to mirror the corresponding profile in the target tissue. PMID:26891033

  8. Epigenome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in paired samples of adipose tissue and blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Chu, Su; Loucks, Eric B; Lin, Chien-Ling; Eaton, Charles B; Buka, Stephen L; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-03-03

    Many epigenetic association studies have attempted to identify DNA methylation markers in blood that are able to mirror those in target tissues. Although some have suggested potential utility of surrogate epigenetic markers in blood, few studies have collected data to directly compare DNA methylation across tissues from the same individuals. Here, epigenomic data were collected from adipose tissue and blood in 143 subjects using Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. The top axis of epigenome-wide variation differentiates adipose tissue from blood, which is confirmed internally using cross-validation and externally with independent data from the two tissues. We identified 1,285 discordant genes and 1,961 concordant genes between blood and adipose tissue. RNA expression data of the two classes of genes show consistent patterns with those observed in DNA methylation. The discordant genes are enriched in biological functions related to immune response, leukocyte activation or differentiation, and blood coagulation. We distinguish the CpG-specific correlation from the within-subject correlation and emphasize that the magnitude of within-subject correlation does not guarantee the utility of surrogate epigenetic markers. The study reinforces the critical role of DNA methylation in regulating gene expression and cellular phenotypes across tissues, and highlights the caveats of using methylation markers in blood to mirror the corresponding profile in the target tissue.

  9. Evaluation of lethal and non-lethal sampling methods for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus infection in white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus (Richardson).

    PubMed

    Drennan, J D; Lapatra, S E; Samson, C A; Ireland, S; Eversman, K F; Cain, K D

    2007-06-01

    Pectoral fin tissue of white sturgeon was investigated as a potential non-lethal sample source for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus (WSIV) infection. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results using fin tissue were compared with the standard lethal histopathology sampling method that utilizes head tissue. Tissues for each of the three sampling methods were collected weekly for 8 weeks from individual sturgeon undergoing an experimental cohabitation challenge with fish infected with the Abernathy isolate of WSIV. Non-lethal fin histopathological evaluation did not reveal infection during the first 3 weeks of sampling, while non-lethal PCR and the lethal method were variable. However, all three sampling methods were equally capable of identifying infection from 4 to 8 weeks post-exposure. Of the survivors tested, all were negative by PCR and the lethal method, and only one fish was identified as being positive by non-lethal fin histopathology. In another experiment, all three sampling methods were applied to asymptomatic WSIV carriers in a case study conducted at the Kootenai Tribal Sturgeon Conservation Hatchery. Results showed that both lethal and non-lethal fin histopathology were equally effective in detecting infection, but PCR was unable to identify this strain of WSIV. Depending on the virus isolate, these results suggest that non-lethal sampling of fin tissue (histopathology or PCR) is comparable with the lethal sampling method at identifying WSIV infection once infection is established, and under certain circumstances may provide an alternative to lethal sampling.

  10. Molecular histopathology by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-07-01

    A rapid label-free approach for molecular histopathology is presented and reviewed. Broadband vibrational spectra are generated by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging (NIVI), a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)- based technique that uses interferometry and signal processing approaches to acquire Raman-like profiles with suppression of the non-resonant background. This allows for the generation of images that provide contrast based on quantitative chemical composition with high spatial and spectral resolution. Algorithms are demonstrated for reducing the diagnostic spectral information into color-coded composite images for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in skin, as well as differentiating normal from abnormal tissue in a pre-clinical tumor model for human breast cancer. This technology and methodology could result in an alternative method to the traditional histological staining and subjective interpretation procedure currently used in the diagnosis of disease, and has the potential for future in vivo molecular histopathology.

  11. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-08-01

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections, using a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectrometric detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this method and data obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis), and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH-secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH-secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared with non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis, as expected. This work reveals that a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS-MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, including AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity, and specificity of this method support the potential of this basic technology, with further advancement, for assisting surgical decision-making. Graphical Abstract Mass spectrometry based profiling of hormones in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections.

  12. High-resolution cell cycle and DNA ploidy analysis in tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Christina; Speidel, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    This unit describes an easy, rapid, and universal procedure to process fresh and nitrogen-frozen tissue specimens for high-resolution cell cycle and DNA ploidy analysis. Unlike other protocols, this procedure does not require treating tissues with enzymes, detergents, or other plasma membrane-lysing chemicals, but it achieves tissue dispersion by a simple two-step mechanical process that can be performed in ∼5 min. Resulting single-cell suspensions are fixed with ethanol, stained with propidium iodide, and subjected to flow cytometric DNA content analysis. The method can be applied without any alterations to all tissue types (except bones) derived from several species and results in highly reproducible cell cycle profiles of excellent resolution. The described protocol can be used to reliably and accurately detect subtle cell cycle and ploidy alterations in tissue specimens, including cell cycle arrest, aneuploidy, and apoptosis/necrosis-associated DNA fragmentation.

  13. Genomic DNA isolation of Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae) from leaf and stipe tissue samples for PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Lanes, E C M; Nick, C; Kuki, K N; Freitas, R D; Motoike, S Y

    2013-09-23

    Macaw palm, Acrocomia aculeata is an oleaginous species of the Arecaceae family; it has been identified as one of the most promising plants for sustainable production of renewable energy, especially biodiesel. We developed an efficient protocol of genomic DNA extraction for A. aculeata using leaf and stipe tissues, based on the cationic hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide method, and we evaluated the quantity, purity, and integrity of the resultant DNA. We also determined whether these procedures interfere with PCR amplification using SSR molecular markers. The lowest concentration of DNA was obtained from stipe tissues (135 ng/μL), while fresh leaf tissues provided the highest concentration of DNA (650 ng/μL). Good quality DNA was obtained from fresh leaf, lyophilized leaf, and stipe tissues (relative purity, 1.79-1.89 nm). Differences in quantity and quality of DNA extracted from different tissues did not interfere with general patterns of PCR amplification based on SSR markers.

  14. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples.

    PubMed

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W H; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C; Yang, Victor X D

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus.

  15. Rapid sample preparation for determination of iron in tissue by closed-vessel digestion and microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Van Wyck, D B; Schifman, R B; Stivelman, J C; Ruiz, J; Martin, D

    1988-06-01

    We developed a rapid acid-digestion method for preparing tissue samples for iron determination. Specimens were digested in nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide under high temperature and pressure in closed Teflon vessels, with microwave energy. Analysis for iron in 25- to 250-mg portions of digested bovine liver powder (National Bureau of Standards Certified Reference Material no. 1577a) showed excellent linearity ([predicted] = 1.007[actual] - 0.166 micrograms per sample) and analytical recovery (98%). Precision (CV) was 5.4% when iron content was 10 micrograms per sample. Assaying split samples of mouse tissues, we found a close correlation between iron concentrations obtained with closed vs open vessels ([closed] = 0.878[open] + 68 micrograms/g, r = 0.994, range 400-4600 micrograms/g dry weight). In contrast to time-consuming conventional procedures for tissue dissolution, closed-vessel digestion with microwave energy dramatically shortens time for tissue preparation, minimizes use of caustic acid, reduces risk of sample loss or contamination, and yields accurate and reproducible results.

  16. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  17. Equine deep stromal abscesses (51 cases - 2004-2009)--Part 2: the histopathology and immunohistochemical aspect with attention to the histopathologic diagnosis, vascular response, and infectious agents.

    PubMed

    de Linde Henriksen, Michala; Andersen, Pia Haubro; Mietelka, Kristy; Farina, Lisa; Thomsen, Preben D; Plummer, Caryn E; Mangan, Brendan G; Heegaard, Steffen; Coleman, James K; Toft, Nils; Brooks, Dennis E

    2014-07-01

    To investigate histopathologic and immunohistochemical aspects of equine deep stromal abscesses (DSA) with a focus on the histopathologic diagnosis, presumptive etiology, and the immunohistochemical expression of three angiogenesis-related factors: vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Paraffin-embedded biopsy samples from 51 DSA. The biopsies were collected from full-thickness penetrating keratoplasty or split-thickness lamellar keratoplasty surgeries at the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center in the period from 2004 to 2009. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings were tested for association between each other. Prevalence calculation and test for association with qualitative data analysis was used for data evaluation. Fungal hyphae were found histologically in 47.1% (n = 24) of the DSA cases. Histopathologically, most fungal DSA showed suppurative keratitis (n = 34; 66.7%) and little to no stromal vascularization infiltrating the abscess (negative association, P = 0.005). All three angiogenesis-related factors were expressed to some degree in DSA tissue. A negative association between VEGF-A and PEDF when compared to the presence of fungal hyphae (P < 0.001, P = 0.023) indicated that cases positive for these two factors will most probably not have fungal hyphae present. Abnormally decreased VEGF-A expression is suggested as the reason for the slow vascularization and delayed resolution of fungal DSA, whereas PEDF and IL-ra did not seem to have any influence on the vascularization process. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics of DSA make it possible to suggest an etiology for an equine DSA with an unknown etiology. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. An Unsupervised MVA Method to Compare Specific Regions in Human Breast Tumor Tissue Samples Using ToF-SIMS

    PubMed Central

    Bluestein, Blake M.; Morrish, Fionnuala; Graham, Daniel J.; Guenthoer, Jamie; Hockenbery, David; Porter, Peggy; Gamble, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to investigate two sets of pre- and post-chemotherapy human breast tumor tissue sections to characterize lipids associated with tumor metabolic flexibility and response to treatment. The micron spatial resolution imaging capability of ToF-SIMS provides a powerful approach to attain spatially-resolved molecular and cellular data from cancerous tissues not available with conventional imaging techniques. Three ca. 1 mm2 areas per tissue section were analyzed by stitching together 200 μm × 200 μm raster area scans. A method to isolate and analyze specific tissue regions of interest by utilizing PCA of ToF-SIMS images is presented, which allowed separation of cellularized areas from stromal areas. These PCA-generated regions of interest were then used as masks to reconstruct representative spectra from specifically stromal or cellular regions. The advantage of this unsupervised selection method is a reduction in scatter in the spectral PCA results when compared to analyzing all tissue areas or analyzing areas highlighted by a pathologist. Utilizing this method, stromal and cellular regions of breast tissue biopsies taken pre- versus post-chemotherapy demonstrate chemical separation using negatively-charged ion species. In this sample set, the cellular regions were predominantly all cancer cells. Fatty acids (i.e. palmitic, oleic, and stearic), monoacylglycerols, diacylglycerols and vitamin E profiles were distinctively different between the pre- and post-therapy tissues. These results validate a new unsupervised method to isolate and interpret biochemically distinct regions in cancer tissues using imaging ToF-SIMS data. In addition, the method developed here can provide a framework to compare a variety of tissue samples using imaging ToF-SIMS, especially where there is section-to-section variability that makes it difficult to use a serial hematoxylin and

  19. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in rabbits: Serological screening and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Maestrini, Giovanni; Ricci, Emanuele; Cantile, Carlo; Mannella, Riccardo; Mancianti, Francesca; Paci, Gisella; D'Ascenzi, Carlo; Perrucci, Stefania

    2017-02-01

    Serological prevalence of E. cuniculi infection was assessed in 183 rabbits from central Italy. In seropositive deceased rabbits, histopathological lesions were also evaluated. Sera from 118 rabbits from 6 intensive farms, 10 rabbits from 6 family farms, 16 rabbits from a zoo, 30 rabbits from 5 research laboratories and 9 pet rabbits from 9 different owners, were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were statistically analysed. Tissue samples from brain and kidney of 10 deceased rabbits were formalin-fixed and subsequently analysed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Anti-E. cuniculi antibodies were found in 129/183 (70.5%) analysed sera. At statistical analysis, E. cuniculi seropositivity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in industrial and zoo rabbits. At histology, different degrees of pathological lesions were found in serological positive (9) deceased animals. In three rabbits deceased after showing neurological signs, the severity of the lesions was interpreted as a likely cause for their death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Histopathological meniscus diagnostic].

    PubMed

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, A; Müller, K-M

    2009-06-01

    Menisci fulfill many functions within the complex biomechanics of the knee joint. In the case of meniscus lesions, sparing arthroscopic resections and operative refixation are the treatments of choice. With regard to diagnostics, this means that in general terms, the histopathologic diagnostics are carried out on detached meniscus fragments of between 5 mm and 2 cm in size. An experienced pathologist's knowledge of physiologically possible cellular and fibrous histological meniscus damage, as opposed to nonphysiological change regarded as normal with respect to age, is essential during a diagnostic meniscus evaluation. The clinician expects clear statements from the pathologist regarding the severity of previous or secondary degenerative meniscus damage, the age and type of traumatic tears, and appraisal of the relationship between trauma and meniscus damage from an insurance point of view. Close cooperation between the clinician and the pathologist allows for fast and unambiguous correlation of anamnesis, the clinical picture, and morphological reporting so that cases involving insurance problems - which are numerous, often long-term, and often unsatisfactory - can be clarified quickly.

  1. Histopathology of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlageter, Manuel; Terracciano, Luigi Maria; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the sixth most common type of cancer with a high mortality rate and an increasing incidence worldwide. Its etiology is usually linked to environmental, dietary or life-style factors. HCC most commonly arises in a cirrhotic liver but interestingly an increasing proportion of HCCs develop in the non-fibrotic or minimal fibrotic liver and a shift in the underlying etiology can be observed. Although this process is yet to be completely understood, this changing scenario also has impact on the material seen by pathologists, presenting them with new diagnostic dilemmas. Histopathologic criteria for diagnosing classical, progressed HCC are well established and known, but with an increase in detection of small and early HCCs due to routine screening programs, the diagnosis of these small lesions in core needle biopsies poses a difficult challenge. These lesions can be far more difficult to distinguish from one another than progressed HCC, which is usually a clear cut hematoxylin and eosin diagnosis. Furthermore lesions thought to derive from progenitor cells have recently been reclassified in the WHO. This review summarizes recent developments and tries to put new HCC biomarkers in context with the WHOs reclassification. Furthermore it also addresses the group of tumors known as combined hepatocellular-cholangiocellular carcinomas. PMID:25473149

  2. Correlation of histopathologic characteristics to protein expression and function in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Charlotte; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Szasz, A Marcell; Yakovleva, Maria; Sugihara, Yutaka; Malm, Johan; Jönsson, Göran; Ingvar, Christian; Lundgren, Lotta; Baldetorp, Bo; Olsson, Håkan; Rezeli, Melinda; Laurell, Thomas; Wieslander, Elisabet; Marko-Varga, György

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is still one of the most prevalent skin cancers, which upon progression has neither a prognostic marker nor a specific and lasting treatment. Proteomic analysis is a versatile approach with high throughput data and results that can be used for characterizing tissue samples. However, such analysis is hampered by the complexity of the disease, heterogeneity of patients, tumors, and samples themselves. With the long term aim of quest for better diagnostics biomarkers, as well as predictive and prognostic markers, we focused on relating high resolution proteomics data to careful histopathological evaluation of the tumor samples and patient survival information. Regional lymph node metastases obtained from ten patients with metastatic melanoma (stage III) were analyzed by histopathology and proteomics using mass spectrometry. Out of the ten patients, six had clinical follow-up data. The protein deep mining mass spectrometry data was related to the histopathology tumor tissue sections adjacent to the area used for deep-mining. Clinical follow-up data provided information on disease progression which could be linked to protein expression aiming to identify tissue-based specific protein markers for metastatic melanoma and prognostic factors for prediction of progression of stage III disease. In this feasibility study, several proteins were identified that positively correlated to tumor tissue content including IF6, ARF4, MUC18, UBC12, CSPG4, PCNA, PMEL and MAGD2. The study also identified MYC, HNF4A and TGFB1 as top upstream regulators correlating to tumor tissue content. Other proteins were inversely correlated to tumor tissue content, the most significant being; TENX, EHD2, ZA2G, AOC3, FETUA and THRB. A number of proteins were significantly related to clinical outcome, among these, HEXB, PKM and GPNMB stood out, as hallmarks of processes involved in progression from stage III to stage IV disease and poor survival. In this feasibility study, promising

  3. Suitability of faeces and tissue samples as a basis for non-invasive sampling for African swine fever in wild boar.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Ferreira, H C; Weesendorp, E; Quak, S; Stegeman, J A; Loeffen, W L A

    2014-08-27

    A challenging aspect of ASFV control in wild boar populations is the design and implementation of effective surveillance and monitoring programmes, both for early warning, and to determine the ongoing epidemiological situation in an infected population. Testing blood samples requires invasive sampling strategies like hunting or capture of wild boar. Besides being biased towards healthy animals, such strategies are also linked to further spread of the virus. Non-invasive sampling strategies would increase the reliability of surveillance of ASFV in wild boar populations, without the negative side effects. This study evaluates the potential of faeces and tissue samples as a basis for non-invasive sampling strategies for ASFV in wild boar. In the acute phase (0-21 days after infection), in comparison with virus detection in blood, virus can be detected in faeces 50-80% of the time. This percentage decreases to below 10% for the subacute/chronic phase. ASFV DNA is quite stable in faeces. Half-lives range from more than 2 years at temperature up to 12°C, to roughly 15 days at temperatures of 30°C. In tissue samples, stored at 20°C, half-lives mostly range from 1.7 to 7.4 days. The sample of preference is the spleen, where the highest titres and highest half-life of ASFV DNA are observed. The level and duration of excretion of ASFV in the faeces, combined with the stability of the DNA, suggest that sampling of faeces could be the basis for a non-invasive sampling strategy to monitor ASFV in wild boar.

  4. Radiometric solvent-partitioning assay for screening cocaine hydrolases and measuring cocaine levels in milligram tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Brimijoin, Stephen; Shen, Maryann L; Sun, Hong

    2002-10-15

    To permit rapid screening and characterization of novel cocaine hydrolases, as well as accurate measurement of cocaine levels in small samples of tissue, a radiometric assay was developed. The assay is based on selective, organic solvent partition of [3H]benzene-labeled cocaine or of [3H]benzoic acid liberated during enzymatic hydrolysis. With dilute samples the assay can be conducted entirely in scintillation vials and quantitated by addition of appropriate aqueous buffer and toluene-based fluor, making phase separation unnecessary. In this way, several hundred samples can be assayed in an afternoon, nanogram quantities of enzyme can be characterized without prior purification, and cocaine concentrations can be accurately measured in milligram samples of tissue after administration of [3H]cocaine in vivo.

  5. Development of laboratory control samples for the ICP-ES determination of nutrient elements in rat tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolnik, Karen A.; Rader, Jeanne I.; Gaston, Cynthia M.; Fricke, Fred L.

    Laboratory control samples have been prepared from rabbit bones and duodenum and from bovine kidney and spleen for use in quality control and development of methodology for the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES) determination of 9 elements in weanling rat tissues. Analysis by ICP-ES following wet acid digestion was used to characterize these control samples with respect to mineral content and homogeneity. Results of the investigation of alternative pretreatment techniques are included.

  6. Development and application of specific cytokine assays in tissue samples from a bottlenose dolphin with hyperinsulinemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in humans. Postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue from a 46-year old geriatric male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with insulin resistance (chronic hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia) , chronic = inflamma...

  7. A total extract dot blot hybridization procedure for mRNA quantitation in small samples of tissues or cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Grimes, A; McArdle, H J; Mercer, J F

    1988-08-01

    A simple method for the estimation of specific mRNA concentrations in small tissue samples (as little as 1 mg) or cultured cells (lower limit 10(5) cells) is described. Guanidine hydrochloride extracts of whole cells or tissues are applied directly onto nitrocellulose and hybridized with the appropriate nick-translated probe. Loading according to DNA content allows expression of the result as concentration per cell. Hybridizing with a ribosomal RNA probe allows expression of results relative to rRNA and estimation of the RNA/DNA ratio in the sample. We describe the application of this procedure to the measurement of ceruloplasmin mRNA in tissues and cultured hepatocytes.

  8. Single-pixel hyperspectral imaging for real-time cancer detection: detecting damage in ex vivo porcine tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peller, Joseph; Farahi, Faramarz; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a single-pixel hyperspectral imaging system based on compressive sensing that acquires spatial and spectral information simultaneously. Our spectral imaging system uses autofluorescencent emission from collagen (400 nm) and NAD(P)H (475 nm), as well as, differences in the optical reflectance spectra as diagnostics for differentiating between healthy and diseased tissue. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of our imaging system to discriminate between healthy and damaged porcine epidermal tissue. Healthy porcine epidermal tissue samples (n=11) were imaged ex vivo using our hyperspectral system. The amount of NAD(P)H emission and the reflectance properties were approximately constant across the surface of healthy tissue samples. The tissue samples were then thermally damaged using an 1850 nm thulium fiber laser and re-imaged after laser irradiation. The damaged regions were clearly visible in the hyperspectral images as the thermal damage altered the fluorescent emission of NAD(P)H and changed the scattering properties of the tissue. The extent of the damaged regions was determined based on the hyperspectral images and these estimates were compared to damage extents measured in white light images acquired with a traditional camera. The extent of damage determined via hyperspectral imaging was in good agreement with estimates based on white light imaging indicating that our system is capable of differentiating between healthy and damaged tissue. Possible applications of our single pixel hyperspectral imaging system range from real-time determination of tumor margins during surgery to the use of this technique in the pathology lab to aid with cancer diagnosis and staging.

  9. Comparative evaluation of specific methods for labeling of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Habenbacher, Bettina; Klang, Andrea; Fragner, Karin; Dinhopl, Nora; Künzel, Frank; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    Detection of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi in tissue samples is considered difficult. The aim of the current study was to determine whether immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) represent reliable methods for the detection of E. cuniculi in postmortem tissue samples of rabbits. Paraffin-embedded tissue sections of brain and kidneys of 48 naturally infected pet rabbits, 10 negative controls, and the eyes of 3 further rabbits were used for all investigations. By IHC in 19 animals (37.3%), spores could be clearly detected and were all equally stained. By ISH using a digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe, only 6 animals (11.8%) proved undoubtedly positive. In these cases, many parasite-like objects revealed strong typical purple-black positive signals. However, several of the examined samples showed only partial staining of the pathogen or unclear results. Thus, in order to find an explanation for these inconsistent ISH results and to take a more detailed look at the different developmental stages of the organism, electron microscopy was applied. Empty spores, which had already discharged their polar filaments, prevailed in total number. Taken together, both techniques are rather insensitive, but under the condition that sufficient numbers of microsporidia are present, IHC can be recommended for specific identification of E. cuniculi in tissue samples. In contrast, ISH failed to detect some developmental stages of the organism, and, as such, ISH is therefore considered an inappropriate diagnostic method.

  10. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; ...

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland.more » AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.« less

  11. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.

  12. A critical evaluation of sample extraction techniques for enhanced proteomic analysis of recalcitrant plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Ramu S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2004-09-01

    Most published proteomics studies of bulk plant tissues use a procedure in which proteins are precipitated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and acetone (TCA-A), but few attempts have been made to contrast this approach in a systematic way with alternative methods against a spectrum of tissues. To address this, TCA-A was compared with another acetone-based protocol (TCA-B) or a phenol (Phe)-based method, targeting a range of tomato tissues and three species of fruits that contain high levels of contaminating compounds: banana, avocado and orange. The Phe method gave a higher protein yield and typically greater resolution and spot intensity, particularly with extracts from tissues containing high levels of soluble polysaccharides. The methods also generated remarkably different two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) protein spot patterns. Peptide mass fingerprinting was used to identify polypeptides that were common to multiple extracts or uniquely present in one extract type. While no clear pattern emerged to explain the basis for the differential protein extraction, it was noted that the Phe method showed enhanced extraction of glycoproteins. These results suggest that the Phe protocol is highly effective with more recalcitrant tissues and that a combination of TCA-A and Phe methods provides enhanced 2-DE based proteomic analyses of most plant tissues.

  13. A comparison of liver sampling techniques in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S D; Zimmerman, K L; Panciera, D L; Monroe, W E; Leib, M S; Lanz, O I

    2015-01-01

    The liver sampling technique in dogs that consistently provides samples adequate for accurate histopathologic interpretation is not known. To compare histopathologic results of liver samples obtained by punch, cup, and 14 gauge needle to large wedge samples collected at necropsy. Seventy dogs undergoing necropsy. Prospective study. Liver specimens were obtained from the left lateral liver lobe with an 8 mm punch, a 5 mm cup, and a 14 gauge needle. After sample acquisition, two larger tissue samples were collected near the center of the left lateral lobe to be used as a histologic standard for comparison. Histopathologic features and numbers of portal triads in each sample were recorded. The mean number of portal triads obtained by each sampling method were 2.9 in needle samples, 3.4 in cup samples, 12 in punch samples, and 30.7 in the necropsy samples. The diagnoses in 66% of needle samples, 60% of cup samples, and 69% of punch samples were in agreement with the necropsy samples, and these proportions were not significantly different from each other. The corresponding kappa coefficients were 0.59 for needle biopsies, 0.52 for cup biopsies, and 0.62 for punch biopsies. The histopathologic interpretation of a liver sample in the dog is unlikely to vary if the liver biopsy specimen contains at least 3-12 portal triads. However, in comparison large necropsy samples, the accuracy of all tested methods was relatively low. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  15. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-07

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from (12)C (4.44 MeV) and (16)O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 10(7) oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from (16)O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring (16)O PG emission.

  16. Simultaneous determination of perfluorinated compounds and their potential precursors in mussel tissue and fish muscle tissue and liver samples by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, I; Bizkarguenaga, E; Prieto, A; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, M; Fernández, L A; Zuloaga, O

    2015-03-27

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination in fish liver and muscle tissue and mussel samples of 14 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), including three perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFSAs), seven perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), three perfluorophosphonic acids (PFPAs) and perfluorooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA), and 10 potential precursors, including four polyfluoroalkyl phosphates (PAPs), four fluorotelomer saturated acids (FTCAs) and two fluorotelomer unsaturated acids (FTUCAs), was developed in the present work. Different clean-up strategies by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a mix-mode weak anion exchanger (WAX), reverse phase Envi-Carb or a combination of them was optimized and evaluated for the clean-up of focused ultrasonic solid-liquid (FUSLE) extracts before the analysis by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Mix-mode WAX coupled in-line to Envi-Carb was finally selected since it rendered the cleanest extracts and minimum matrix effect. The FUSLE-SPE-LC-MS/MS methodology was validated in terms of recovery, precision and method detection limits (MDLs). Apparent recovery values in the 65-116%, 59-119% and 67-126% range and MDLs in the 0.1-2.7 ng/g, 0.1-3.8 ng/g and 0.2-3.1ng/g range were obtained for liver, mussel and fish muscle tissue samples, respectively. The method developed was applied to the analysis of grey mullet liver (Chelon labrosus) and mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) samples from the Basque Coast (North of Spain) and Yellowfin tuna muscle tissue (Thunnus albacares) samples from the Indian Ocean. To the best of our knowledge this is the first method that describes the simultaneous determination of 14 PFCs and 10 potential precursors in fish liver, fish muscle tissue and mussel samples. Besides, this is the first time that 8:2 monosubstituted polyfluorodecyl phosphate (8:2 monoPAP) and 8:2 disubstituted polyfluorodecyl phosphate (8:2 diPAP) were detected in mussel and tuna samples

  17. Gross signs and histopathology of Ostrea puelchana infected by a Bonamia exitiosa-like parasite (Haplosporidia).

    PubMed

    Kroeck, Marina A

    2010-04-09

    Haplosporidian microcells belonging to the genus Bonamia parasitise various species of oysters around the world. In Argentina, Bonamia sp. was the causative agent of mass mortality among Ostrea puelchana cultured in San Antonio Bay (San Matías Gulf), and it was detected in natural beds inside San Matías Gulf. In order to describe the gross and histopathological signs caused by Bonamia sp. in O. puelchana, cultured and wild oysters were sampled and analysed by traditional techniques including heart imprints and histology. Cells of Bonamia sp. were observed in connective tissue, free or within haemocytes, in gills and around the digestive gland, stomach, intestine and gonad. Gross signs, histopathological alterations in O. puelchana, and Bonamia sp. cytological morphology resemble those reported for B. exitiosa. However, I propose to treat the Argentinean species as B. exitiosa-like until more molecular and ultrastructural studies are conducted to determine the correct taxonomy.

  18. A novel device to stretch multiple tissue samples with variable patterns: application for mRNA regulation in tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Imsirovic, Jasmin; Derricks, Kelsey; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Rich, Celeste B; Nugent, Matthew A; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    A broad range of cells are subjected to irregular time varying mechanical stimuli within the body, particularly in the respiratory and circulatory systems. Mechanical stretch is an important factor in determining cell function; however, the effects of variable stretch remain unexplored. In order to investigate the effects of variable stretch, we designed, built and tested a uniaxial stretching device that can stretch three-dimensional tissue constructs while varying the strain amplitude from cycle to cycle. The device is the first to apply variable stretching signals to cells in tissues or three dimensional tissue constructs. Following device validation, we applied 20% uniaxial strain to Gelfoam samples seeded with neonatal rat lung fibroblasts with different levels of variability (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%). RT-PCR was then performed to measure the effects of variable stretch on key molecules involved in cell-matrix interactions including: collagen 1α, lysyl oxidase, α-actin, β1 integrin, β3 integrin, syndecan-4, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Adding variability to the stretching signal upregulated, downregulated or had no effect on mRNA production depending on the molecule and the amount of variability. In particular, syndecan-4 showed a statistically significant peak at 25% variability, suggesting that an optimal variability of strain may exist for production of this molecule. We conclude that cycle-by-cycle variability in strain influences the expression of molecules related to cell-matrix interactions and hence may be used to selectively tune the composition of tissue constructs.

  19. Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jung-Mo; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Yong-In; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Sun Hee; Paik, Young-Ki; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) was recently initiated as an international collaborative effort. Our team adopted chromosome 9 (Chr 9) and performed a bioinformatics and proteogenomic analysis to catalog Chr 9-encoded proteins from normal tissues, lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. Approximately 74.7% of the Chr 9 genes of the human genome were identified, which included approximately 28% of missing proteins (46 of 162) on Chr 9 compared with the list of missing proteins from the neXtProt master table (2013-09). In addition, we performed a comparative proteomics analysis between normal lung and lung cancer tissues. Based on the data analysis, 15 proteins from Chr 9 were detected only in lung cancer tissues. Finally, we conducted a proteogenomic analysis to discover Chr 9-residing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and mutations described in the COSMIC cancer mutation database. We identified 21 SNPs and 4 mutations containing peptides on Chr 9 from normal human cells/tissues and lung cancer cell lines, respectively. In summary, this study provides valuable information of the human proteome for the scientific community as part of C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD. PMID:24274035

  20. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  1. Comparing citrated native, kaolin-activated, and tissue factor-activated samples and determining intraindividual variability for feline thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amrita; Blois, Shauna L; Wood, R Darren

    2011-11-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) is a point-of-care whole blood test of hemostasis. While TEG is becoming more widely used in veterinary medicine, few studies describe the use of TEG in cats. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) document the range of TEG variables produced in healthy cats using 3 sample types (citrated native, kaolin-activated, and tissue factor-activated), and 2) determine if there was a significant difference between 2 separate samples obtained from individual healthy cats on the same day. Jugular venipuncture was performed in 20 cats, and citrated blood collected for TEG. TEG analysis was performed on citrated native, kaolin-activated, and tissue factor-activated blood for each sample. Two hours later, the procedure was repeated from the opposite jugular vein, yielding a total of 120 analyses. Reaction time (R), alpha angle (α), kappa value (κ), and maximum amplitude (MA) were recorded from each tracing. No significant differences were found between TEG tracings from the first and second venipuncture samples. Significant differences were found between sample types for R, α, κ, and MA. Means for citrated native/kaolin-activated/tissue factor-activated methods were R = 4.1/3.7/0.6 min; κ = 2.5/1.8/2.2 min; α = 59.9/65.1/70.4 degrees; MA = 47.4/49.9/44.7 mm. A limitation of this study was the small number of cats used. Thromboelastography analysis may be a suitable method of evaluating hemostasis in cats.

  2. Reconstruction of enhancer-target networks in 935 samples of human primary cells, tissues and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qin; Anyansi, Christine; Hu, Xihao; Xu, Liangliang; Xiong, Lei; Tang, Wenshu; Mok, Myth T S; Cheng, Chao; Fan, Xiaodan; Gerstein, Mark; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yip, Kevin Y

    2017-10-01

    We propose a new method for determining the target genes of transcriptional enhancers in specific cells and tissues. It combines global trends across many samples and sample-specific information, and considers the joint effect of multiple enhancers. Our method outperforms existing methods when predicting the target genes of enhancers in unseen samples, as evaluated by independent experimental data. Requiring few types of input data, we are able to apply our method to reconstruct the enhancer-target networks in 935 samples of human primary cells, tissues and cell lines, which constitute by far the largest set of enhancer-target networks. The similarity of these networks from different samples closely follows their cell and tissue lineages. We discover three major co-regulation modes of enhancers and find defense-related genes often simultaneously regulated by multiple enhancers bound by different transcription factors. We also identify differentially methylated enhancers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and experimentally confirm their altered regulation of HCC-related genes.

  3. Detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus infected cattle--testing tissue samples derived from ear tagging using an Erns capture ELISA.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, S; Schroeder, C; Holmquist, G; Wolf, G; Horner, S; Brem, G; Ballagi, A

    2005-08-01

    A new diagnostic approach testing tissue samples derived from cattle ear tagging for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) antigen in a commercially available antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACE) was developed. To validate this method, 99 positive and 469 negative samples were tested. With those samples the assay yielded a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of >or=99.6%. Serum and ear tissue samples from 11 persistently infected (PI) BVDV calves were tested. While serum samples were negative after intake of colostrum, the ear tissue samples could be detected positive for BVDV all the time. Testing multiple samples derived from the same ear from PI cattle yielded positive results and low variation. Using cattle ear tags combining the ear tag application with sampling of a small ear tissue plug and testing those tissue samples with an ACE could be a reliable and economic way of BVDV testing.

  4. Quantification of Toxoplasma gondii in tissue samples of experimentally infected goats by magnetic capture and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Juránková, Jana; Opsteegh, Marieke; Neumayerová, Helena; Kovařčík, Kamil; Frencová, Anita; Baláž, Vojtěch; Volf, Jiří; Koudela, Břetislav

    2013-03-31

    Undercooked meat containing tissue cysts is one of the most common sources of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans. Goats are very susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis, and especially kids are common food animals, thereby representing a risk for human infection. A sequence-specific magnetic capture method was used for isolation of T. gondii DNA from tissue samples from experimentally infected goat-kids and real-time PCR for the 529 bp repeat element allowed quantification of T. gondii DNA. The contamination level in different types of tissue and in two groups of goats euthanized 30 and 90 dpi was compared. The highest concentration of T. gondii DNA in both groups of goats was found in lung tissue, but only the higher parasite count in lung tissue compared to other organs in group A (euthanized 30 dpi) was statistically significant. T. gondii concentrations were higher in liver and dorsal muscle samples from goats euthanized 90 dpi than in goats euthanized at 30 dpi, while the T. gondii concentration in hearts decreased. This study describes for the first time distribution of T. gondii parasites in post-weaned goat kids. New information about T. gondii predilection sites in goats and about the progression of infection between 30 and 90 dpi was achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Histopathologic criteria to confirm white-nose syndrome in bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Buckles, E.L.; Blehert, D.S.; Hicks, A.C.; Green, D.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Thomas, N.J.; Gargas, A.; Behr, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal disease of hibernating bats associated with a novel Geomyces sp. fungus. Currently, confirmation of WNS requires histopathologic examination. Invasion of living tissue distinguishes this fungal infection from those caused by conventional transmissible dermatophytes. Although fungal hyphae penetrate the connective tissue of glabrous skin and muzzle, there is typically no cellular inflammatory response in hibernating bats. Preferred tissue samples to diagnose this fungal infection are rostral muzzle with nose and wing membrane fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. To optimize detection, the muzzle is trimmed longitudinally, the wing membrane is rolled, and multiple cross-sections are embedded to increase the surface area examined. Periodic acid-Schiff stain is essential to discriminate the nonpigmented fungal hyphae and conidia. Fungal hyphae form cup-like epidermal erosions and ulcers in the wing membrane and pinna with involvement of underlying connective tissue. In addition, fungal hyphae are present in hair follicles and in sebaceous and apocrine glands of the muzzle with invasion of tissue surrounding adnexa. Fungal hyphae in tissues are branching and septate, but the diameter and shape of the hyphae may vary from parallel walls measuring 2 ??m in diameter to irregular walls measuring 3-5 ??m in diameter. When present on short aerial hyphae, curved conidia are approximately 2.5 ??m wide and 7.5 ??m in curved length. Conidia have a more deeply basophilic center, and one or both ends are usually blunt. Although WNS is a disease of hibernating bats, severe wing damage due to fungal hyphae may be seen in bats that have recently emerged from hibernation. These recently emerged bats also have a robust suppurative inflammatory response.

  6. Histopathologic criteria to confirm white-nose syndrome in bats.

    PubMed

    Meteyer, Carol Uphoff; Buckles, Elizabeth L; Blehert, David S; Hicks, Alan C; Green, D Earl; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Thomas, Nancy J; Gargas, Andrea; Behr, Melissa J

    2009-07-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal disease of hibernating bats associated with a novel Geomyces sp. fungus. Currently, confirmation of WNS requires histopathologic examination. Invasion of living tissue distinguishes this fungal infection from those caused by conventional transmissible dermatophytes. Although fungal hyphae penetrate the connective tissue of glabrous skin and muzzle, there is typically no cellular inflammatory response in hibernating bats. Preferred tissue samples to diagnose this fungal infection are rostral muzzle with nose and wing membrane fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. To optimize detection, the muzzle is trimmed longitudinally, the wing membrane is rolled, and multiple cross-sections are embedded to increase the surface area examined. Periodic acid-Schiff stain is essential to discriminate the nonpigmented fungal hyphae and conidia. Fungal hyphae form cup-like epidermal erosions and ulcers in the wing membrane and pinna with involvement of underlying connective tissue. In addition, fungal hyphae are present in hair follicles and in sebaceous and apocrine glands of the muzzle with invasion of tissue surrounding adnexa. Fungal hyphae in tissues are branching and septate, but the diameter and shape of the hyphae may vary from parallel walls measuring 2 microm in diameter to irregular walls measuring 3-5 microm in diameter. When present on short aerial hyphae, curved conidia are approximately 2.5 microm wide and 7.5 microm in curved length. Conidia have a more deeply basophilic center, and one or both ends are usually blunt. Although WNS is a disease of hibernating bats, severe wing damage due to fungal hyphae may be seen in bats that have recently emerged from hibernation. These recently emerged bats also have a robust suppurative inflammatory response.

  7. Translational intracerebral hemorrhage: a need for transparent descriptions of fresh tissue sampling and preclinical model quality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Feng; Cai, Li; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    For years, strategies have been proposed to improve translational success in stroke research by improving the quality of animal studies. However, articles that report preclinical intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) studies continue to lack adequate qualitative and quantitative descriptions of fresh brain tissue collection. They also tend to lack transparency about animal model quality. We conducted a systematic review of 82 ICH research articles to determine the level of detail reported for brain tissue collection. We found that only 24 (29 %) reported the volume, weight, or thickness of tissue collected and a specific description of the anatomical location. Thus, up to 71 % of preclinical ICH research articles did not properly define how fresh specimens were collected for biochemical measurements. Such omissions may impede reproducibility of results between laboratories. Although existing criteria have improved the quality of preclinical stroke studies, ICH researchers need to identify specific guidelines and strategies to avoid pitfalls, minimize bias, and increase reproducibility in this field.

  8. Translational Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Need for Transparent Descriptions of Fresh Tissue Sampling and Preclinical Model Quality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Feng; Cai, Li; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    For years, strategies have been proposed to improve translational success in stroke research by improving the quality of animal studies. However, articles that report preclinical intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) studies continue to lack adequate qualitative and quantitative descriptions of fresh brain tissue collection. They also tend to lack transparency about animal model quality. We conducted a systematic review of 82 ICH research articles to determine the level of detail reported for brain tissue collection. We found that only 24 (29%) reported the volume, weight, or thickness of tissue collected and a specific description of the anatomical location. Thus, up to 71% of preclinical ICH research articles did not properly define how fresh specimens were collected for biochemical measurements. Such omissions may impede reproducibility of results between laboratories. Although existing criteria have improved the quality of preclinical stroke studies, ICH researchers need to identify specific guidelines and strategies to avoid pitfalls, minimize bias, and increase reproducibility in this field. PMID:25907620

  9. Optical parameter measurement of highly diffusive tissue body phantoms with specifically designed sample holder for photo diagnostic and PDT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, A.; Rehman, K.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of optical properties (absorption coefficients, scattering Coefficients, and anisotropy) is necessary for understanding light tissue interactions. Optical parameters define the behavior of light in the tissues. Intralipid and Indian ink are well-established tissue body phantoms. Quantitative characterization of biological tissues in terms of optical properties is achieved with integrating sphere. However, samples having significantly higher scattering and absorption coefficients such as malignant tissues potentially reduce the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and accuracy of integrating sphere. We have measured the diffuse reflection and transmission of these phantoms by placing them in integrating sphere at 632.8 nm and then applied IAD method to determine the optical properties tissue phantoms composed of Indian ink (1.0%) and Intralipid (20%). We have fabricated a special sample holder with thin microscopic cover slips which can be used to measure signal from highly concentrated intralipid and Indian ink solutions. Experiments conducted with various phantoms reveal significant improvement of SNR for a wide range of optical properties. This approach opens up a field for potential applications in measurement of optical properties of highly diffusive biological tissues. For 20% intralipid μa =0.112+/-0.046 cm-1 and μs =392.299+/-10.090 cm-1 at 632.8 nm and for 1.0% Indian ink μa =9.808+/-0.490 cm-1 and μs =1.258+/-0.063 cm-1 at same wavelength. System shows good repeatability and reproducibility within 4.9% error. Work may have important biomedical applications in photo-diagnosis and Photodynamic therapy.

  10. Analysis of CT Numbers and Relative Proton Stopping Powers for Real Tissue Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ryazantsev, Oleg; Karpunin, Vladimir; Haibullin, Vadim; Matusova, Tatiana

    2010-01-05

    The accuracy of computer planning of clinical proton dose distribution is partly determined by the precision of the conversion of CT Hounsfield Units to relative proton stopping powers. The calibration curves from three different sources were compared. We have found about 5% differences between proton stopping power values in the range from -700 HU to 0 HU. Calibration data for several soft tissues and phantom materials were also experimentally measured. The data for the tissues are in a good agreement with the calibration curves however data for phantom materials have significant deviations.

  11. Real time monitoring of pulsatile change in hemoglobin concentrations of cerebral tissue by a portable tissue oximeter with a 10-Hz sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Toshikazu; Chihara, Eiichi; Tanabe, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    1997-12-01

    A portable CW tissue oximeter of a 10-Hz sampling rate was developed for examination of pulsatile components of the output signals as a mean of checking the signal reliability during long-term monitoring. Feasible studies were performed on a healthy subject. Changes in Hb and HbO2 signals of cerebral tissue were continuously measured by placing a photoprobe on the forehead during 6-hour sleep. Pulsatile changes in Hb and HbO2 were steadily observed over a whole period of the recording. The phase relation of pulsation in Hb and HbO2 was almost inverse. Not only information for reliable monitoring but also physiological parameters with respect to cerebral circulation and metabolism could be obtained by measuring the pulsatile components.

  12. Real time monitoring of pulsatile change in hemoglobin concentrations of cerebral tissue by a portable tissue oximeter with a 10-Hz sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Toshikazu; Chihara, Eiichi; Tanabe, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    1998-01-01

    A portable CW tissue oximeter of a 10-Hz sampling rate was developed for examination of pulsatile components of the output signals as a mean of checking the signal reliability during long-term monitoring. Feasible studies were performed on a healthy subject. Changes in Hb and HbO2 signals of cerebral tissue were continuously measured by placing a photoprobe on the forehead during 6-hour sleep. Pulsatile changes in Hb and HbO2 were steadily observed over a whole period of the recording. The phase relation of pulsation in Hb and HbO2 was almost inverse. Not only information for reliable monitoring but also physiological parameters with respect to cerebral circulation and metabolism could be obtained by measuring the pulsatile components.

  13. Measurement of intravenously administered γ-Fe2O3 particle amount in mice tissues using vibrating sample magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Mikio; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohara, Yusuke; Yanagihara, Hideto; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Kita, Eiji

    2014-12-01

    Dispersions of platelet γ-Fe2O3 particles 30-50nm in size were intravenously administered to mice and the amount of particles accumulated in each tissue was obtained by magnetization measurement using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Background noise was greatly reduced by measuring dried tissues under a magnetic field of 500 Oe so that the effect of diamagnetism was slight. Remarkable particle accumulation was observed in the liver and spleen. Considerable particle accumulation was observed in the lung when a large quantity of γ-Fe2 O3 particles was administered. There was no significant particle accumulation in the kidney and heart.

  14. Optimising the quantification of cytokines present at low concentrations in small human mucosal tissue samples using Luminex assays☆

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Emily; Ingram, Richard James Michael; Atherton, John Christopher; Robinson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive measurement of multiple cytokine profiles from small mucosal tissue biopsies, for example human gastric biopsies obtained through an endoscope, is technically challenging. Multiplex methods such as Luminex assays offer an attractive solution but standard protocols are not available for tissue samples. We assessed the utility of three commercial Luminex kits (VersaMAP, Bio-Plex and MILLIPLEX) to measure interleukin-17A (IL-17) and interferon-gamma (IFNγ) concentrations in human gastric biopsies and we optimised preparation of mucosal samples for this application. First, we assessed the technical performance, limits of sensitivity and linear dynamic ranges for each kit. Next we spiked human gastric biopsies with recombinant IL-17 and IFNγ at a range of concentrations (1.5 to 1000 pg/mL) and assessed kit accuracy for spiked cytokine recovery and intra-assay precision. We also evaluated the impact of different tissue processing methods and extraction buffers on our results. Finally we assessed recovery of endogenous cytokines in unspiked samples. In terms of sensitivity, all of the kits performed well within the manufacturers' recommended standard curve ranges but the MILLIPLEX kit provided most consistent sensitivity for low cytokine concentrations. In the spiking experiments, the MILLIPLEX kit performed most consistently over the widest range of concentrations. For tissue processing, manual disruption provided significantly improved cytokine recovery over automated methods. Our selected kit and optimised protocol were further validated by measurement of relative cytokine levels in inflamed and uninflamed gastric mucosa using Luminex and real-time polymerase chain reaction. In summary, with proper optimisation Luminex kits (and for IL-17 and IFNγ the MILLIPLEX kit in particular) can be used for the sensitive detection of cytokines in mucosal biopsies. Our results should help other researchers seeking to quantify multiple low concentration cytokines in

  15. Experimental evaluation and computational modeling of tissue damage from low-flow push-pull perfusion sampling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, David E; Hains, Leah; Li, David; Bull, Joseph; Lentz, Stephen I; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-03-15

    Neurochemical monitoring via sampling probes is valuable for deciphering neurotransmission in vivo. Microdialysis is commonly used; however, the spatial resolution is poor. Recently push-pull perfusion at low flow rates (50nL/min) has been proposed as a method for in vivo sampling from the central nervous system. Tissue damage from such probes has not been investigated in detail. In this work, we evaluated acute tissue response to low-flow push-pull perfusion by infusing the nuclear stains Sytox Orange and Hoechst 33342 through probes implanted in the striatum for 200min, to label damaged and total cells, respectively, in situ. Using the damaged/total labeled cell ratio as a measure of tissue damage, we found that 33±8% were damaged within the dye region around a microdialysis probe. We found that low-flow push-pull perfusion probes damaged 24±4% of cells in the sampling area. Flow had no effect on the number of damaged cells for low-flow push-pull perfusion. Modeling revealed that shear stress and pressure gradients generated by the flow were lower than thresholds expected to cause damage. Comparison with existing methods.Push-pull perfusion caused less tissue damage but yielded 1500-fold better spatial resolution. Push-pull perfusion at low flow rates is a viable method for sampling from the brain with potential for high temporal and spatial resolution. Tissue damage is mostly caused by probe insertion. Smaller probes may yield even lower damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental Evaluation and Computational Modeling of Tissue Damage from Low-Flow Push-Pull Perfusion Sampling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, David E.; Hains, Leah; Li, David; Bull, Joseph; Lentz, Stephen I.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurochemical monitoring via sampling probes is valuable for deciphering neurotransmission in vivo. Microdialysis is commonly used; however, the spatial resolution is poor. New Method Recently push-pull perfusion at low flow rates (50 nL/min) has been proposed as a method for in vivo sampling from the central nervous system. Tissue damage from such probes has not been investigated in detail. In this work, we evaluated acute tissue response to low-flow push-pull perfusion by infusing the nuclear stains Sytox Orange and Hoechst 33342 through probes implanted in the striatum for 200 min, to label damaged and total cells, respectively, in situ. Results Using the damaged/total labeled cell ratio as a measure of tissue damage, we found that 33 ± 8% were damaged within the dye region around a microdialysis probe. We found that low-flow push-pull perfusion probes damaged 24 ± 4% of cells in the sampling area. Flow had no effect on the number of damaged cells for low-flow push-pull perfusion. Modeling revealed that shear stress and pressure gradients generated by the flow were lower than thresholds expected to cause damage. Comparison with existing methods Push-pull perfusion caused less tissue damage but yielded 1500-fold better spatial resolution. Conclusions Push-pull perfusion at low flow rates is a viable method for sampling from the brain with potential for high temporal and spatial resolution. Tissue damage is mostly caused by probe insertion. Smaller probes may yield even lower damage. PMID:25614385

  17. Evaluation of a novel tagging and tissue preservation system for potential use in forensic sample collection.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, Martin; Stein, Christina; Hanslik, Stefan; Hochmeister, Manfred

    2005-07-16

    The authors describe a new, easy-to-use barcode-based tissue collection, preservation and body tracking system, which might prove instrumental in the containment of mass fatalities such as aircraft accidents, war related accidents, environmental disasters (e.g. earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods) terrorist bombings or mass murders.

  18. Histopathological study and F1L gene sequence analysis of contagious ecthyma in small ruminants of Shiraz suburb, Iran.

    PubMed

    Davari, S A; Sayyari, M; Mohammadi, A

    2015-06-01

    Contagious ecthyma, also known as Orf, is a common viral skin disease of sheep and goats caused by a Parapoxvirus. This research was conducted with the aims of histopathological study and genetic analysis of Orf virus with PCR technique based on F1L gene in 50 sheep and goats suspicious of contagious ecthyma in affected areas of Shiraz suburb. All 50 contagious ecthyma-like tissue samples were maintained in 10% buffered formalin, embedded in paraffin, sectioned into 5μm slices and dyed with hematoxylin-eosine. The histopathological examination showed 100% positivity. Epidermal hyperplasia with prominent rete ridges, hydropic degeneration of the necrotic keratinocytes, eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in vacuolated cells and subcorneal pustules were the main hallmarks of this disease. For molecular analysis, after DNA extraction, all samples were amplified by PCR method and the outcome demonstrated positivity in 25 specimens (50%). Of these, 10 definitely positive specimens were analyzed for nucleotide sequencing. Thus, a strain named Orf-059-Shiraz was recorded in the GeneBank and subsequently underwent phylogenetic analysis. The outcome of the molecular study approved half of the positive ecthyma specimens in histopathological method. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis based on 059 gene showed that this gene is highly conserved. Utilization of histopathology and clinical signs can assist with rapid and low-cost diagnosis of infectious ecthyma whereas PCR is able to dissociate from similar diseases among clinical samples of endemic regions.

  19. Histopathology of Conjunctivochalasis Compared to Normal Conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Hesam; Mahbod, Mirgholamreza; Amoli, Fahimeh A.; Kiarudi, Mohammad Y.; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Kheirkhah, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the histopathologic changes in the conjunctiva of patients with conjunctivochalasis (CCh) compared to age-matched controls. Methods: This cross-sectional, controlled study included 27 eyes of 27 patients with CCh and 16 eyes of 16 age-matched controls. A biopsy of the bulbar conjunctiva was performed along the temporal lower lid margin before cataract surgery in both groups. Histopathologic evaluation of the specimens was done with light microscopy using staining with hematoxylin/eosin, periodic acid Schiff, and van Gieson elastic stain. Various histopathologic features of the conjunctival epithelium and stroma were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of patients was 62.4 ± 6.9 years in the CCh group and 65.1 ± 6.3 years in the control group (P = 0.54). No significant differences were noted between the two groups in terms of conjunctival epithelial changes including papillomatosis, epithelial clefts, epithelial goblet cells, or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Mean thickness of the conjunctival stroma was 0.21 ± 0.08 mm in the CCh group and 0.26 ± 0.21 mm in the control group (P = 0.10). For the conjunctival stroma, there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of elastosis, fibrosis, lymphangiectasia, or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Conclusion: No noticeable differences were found in the histopathologic features by light microscopy between eyes with CCh and those of age-matched controls. Therefore, the primary pathology of CCh may not be within the conjunctiva itself. Instead, loose attachment of the conjunctiva to the underlying tissue may be the reason for the redundant folds in the bulbar conjunctiva. PMID:27994801

  20. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Yu Jin; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Kyung Soo; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing. PMID:26641479

  1. Bisulfite-Based DNA Methylation Analysis from Recent and Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin Embedded Colorectal Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Hollósi, Péter; Wichmann, Barnabás; Bodor, András; Patai, Árpád V; Schöller, Andrea; Krenács, Tibor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to test the applicability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for gene specific DNA methylation analysis after using two commercially available DNA isolation kits. Genomic DNA was isolated from 5 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal adjacent tissues from "recent", collected within 6 months, and "archived", collected more than 5 years ago, FFPE tissues using either High Pure FFPET DNA Isolation kit or QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit. DNA methylation analysis of MAL, SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes, known to be hypermethylated in CRC, was performed using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and sequencing. QIAamp (Q) method resulted in slightly higher recovery in archived (HP: 1.22 ± 3.18 μg DNA; Q: 3.00 ± 4.04 μg DNA) and significantly (p < 0.05) higher recovery in recent samples compared to High Pure method (HP) (HP: 4.10 ± 2.91 μg DNA; Q: 11.51 ± 7.50 μg DNA). Both OD260/280 and OD260/230 ratios were lower, but still high in the High Pure isolated archived and recent samples compared to those isolated with QIAamp. Identical DNA methylation patterns were detected for all 3 genes tested by MS-HRM with both isolation kits in the recent group. However, despite of higher DNA recovery in QIAamp slightly more reproducible methylation results were obtained from High Pure isolated archived samples. Sequencing confirmed DNA hypermethylation in CRCs. In conclusion, reproducible DNA methylation patterns were obtained from recent samples using both isolation kits. However, long term storage may affect the reliability of the results leading to moderate differences between the efficiency of isolation kits.

  2. Identification of immune cell infiltration in hematoxylin-eosin stained breast cancer samples: texture-based classification of tissue morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Kovanen, Panu E.; Pellinen, Teijo; Lundin, Johan

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment of breast cancer capture clinically important information. Despite the heterogeneity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, it has been shown that the degree of infiltration assessed by visual evaluation of hematoxylin-eosin (H and E) stained samples has prognostic and possibly predictive value. However, quantification of the infiltration in H and E-stained tissue samples is currently dependent on visual scoring by an expert. Computer vision enables automated characterization of the components of the tumor microenvironment, and texture-based methods have successfully been used to discriminate between different tissue morphologies and cell phenotypes. In this study, we evaluate whether local binary pattern texture features with superpixel segmentation and classification with support vector machine can be utilized to identify immune cell infiltration in H and E-stained breast cancer samples. Guided with the pan-leukocyte CD45 marker, we annotated training and test sets from 20 primary breast cancer samples. In the training set of arbitrary sized image regions (n=1,116) a 3-fold cross-validation resulted in 98% accuracy and an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.98 to discriminate between immune cell -rich and - poor areas. In the test set (n=204), we achieved an accuracy of 96% and AUC of 0.99 to label cropped tissue regions correctly into immune cell -rich and -poor categories. The obtained results demonstrate strong discrimination between immune cell -rich and -poor tissue morphologies. The proposed method can provide a quantitative measurement of the degree of immune cell infiltration and applied to digitally scanned H and E-stained breast cancer samples for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Enrichment of single neurons and defined brain regions from human brain tissue samples for subsequent proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina, Mariana; Steinbach, Simone; Park, Young Mok; Yun, Su Yeong; Di Lorenzo Alho, Ana Tereza; Heinsen, Helmut; Grinberg, Lea T; Marcus, Katrin; Leite, Renata E Paraizo; May, Caroline

    2015-07-01

    Brain function in normal aging and neurological diseases has long been a subject of interest. With current technology, it is possible to go beyond descriptive analyses to characterize brain cell populations at the molecular level. However, the brain comprises over 100 billion highly specialized cells, and it is a challenge to discriminate different cell groups for analyses. Isolating intact neurons is not feasible with traditional methods, such as tissue homogenization techniques. The advent of laser microdissection techniques promises to overcome previous limitations in the isolation of specific cells. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for isolating and analyzing neurons from postmortem human brain tissue samples. We describe a workflow for successfully freezing, sectioning and staining tissue for laser microdissection. This protocol was validated by mass spectrometric analysis. Isolated neurons can also be employed for western blotting or PCR. This protocol will enable further examinations of brain cell-specific molecular pathways and aid in elucidating distinct brain functions.

  4. Lack of mutation-histopathology correlation in a patient with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Meggie E; Bloomhardt, Hadley M; Moroz, Krzysztof; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2016-06-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is characterized by progressive, disproportionate, segmental overgrowth, and tumor susceptibility caused by a somatic mosaic AKT1 activating mutation. Each individual has unique manifestations making this disorder extremely heterogeneous. We correlated three variables in 38 tissue samples from a patient who died with PS: the gross affection status, the microscopic affection status, and the mutation level. The AKT1 mutation was measured using a PCR-based RFLP assay. Thirteen samples were grossly normal; six had detectable mutation (2-29%) although four of these six were histopathologically normal. Of the seven grossly normal samples that had no mutation, only four were histologically normal. The mutation level in the grossly abnormal samples was 3-35% and all but the right and left kidneys, skull, and left knee bone, with mutation levels of 19%, 15%, 26%, and 17%, respectively, had abnormal histopathology. The highest mutation level was in a toe bone sample whereas the lowest levels were in the soft tissue surrounding that toe, and an omental fat nodule. We also show here that PS overgrowth can be caused by cellular proliferation or by extracellular matrix expansion. Additionally, papillary thyroid carcinoma was identified, a tumor not previously associated with PS. We conclude that gross pathology and histopathology correlate poorly with mutation levels in PS, that overgrowth can be mediated by cellular proliferation or extracellular matrix expansion, and that papillary thyroid carcinoma is part of the tumor susceptibility of PS. New methods need to be developed to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlation in mosaic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Revised histopathological consensus classification of joint implant related pathology.

    PubMed

    Krenn, V; Morawietz, L; Perino, G; Kienapfel, H; Ascherl, R; Hassenpflug, G J; Thomsen, M; Thomas, P; Huber, M; Kendoff, D; Baumhoer, D; Krukemeyer, M G; Natu, S; Boettner, F; Zustin, J; Kölbel, B; Rüther, W; Kretzer, J P; Tiemann, A; Trampuz, A; Frommelt, L; Tichilow, R; Söder, S; Müller, S; Parvizi, J; Illgner, U; Gehrke, T

    2014-12-01

    This extended classification of joint implant related pathology is a practical histopathologic classification based on defined morphological criteria covering the complete spectrum of pathohistologic changes in periprosthetic tissues. These changes may occur as a consequence of endoprosthetic replacement of large joints and may lead to a reduction in the prosthesis survival rate. We describe the established consensus classification of the periprosthetic membrane, in which aseptic and septic prosthetic loosening can be subdivided into four histological types, as well as histopathological criteria for additional significant pathologies including endoprosthetic-associated arthrofibrosis, particle-induced immunological, inflammatory and toxic mechanisms (adverse reactions), and bone tissue pathologies. These characteristic tissue alterations and their relationships are summarized in the extended classification. Since particle heterogeneity in periprosthetic tissue is high and particle identification is a necessary part of diagnosis, the identification of different types of particles is described in the histopathological particle algorithm. The morphological qualities of prosthetic material particles and the demarcation between abrasion and non-abrasion endogenous particles are also summarized. This feasible classification which is based on low cost standard tissue processing and examination and on well-defined diagnostic criteria is a solid platform for the histological diagnosis of implant associated pathologies providing a stable and reproducible tool for the surgical pathologist. Since this classification is suitable for standardized histopathological diagnostics, it might also provide a useful data set for joint arthroplasty registers, particularly for registers based on so-called routine data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Limit of Detection in X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Tissue Equivalent Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.; Speller, R.

    2015-09-01

    There is a suggestion of a new approach to mammography whereby following a conventional mammogram, the radiologist could interrogate suspicious regions using X-ray diffraction whilst the patient is still present and to establish the true extent of disease. A starting point for this work is to quantify the minimum detectable amount of breast cancer within a realistic thickness phantom. Perspex has a similar diffraction pattern to healthy breast tissue whilst water is similar to breast tumour, hence these two materials are used as tissue equivalent test objects for X-ray diffraction measurements. The preliminary results show linear agreement between the ratio of Perspex to water and the ratio of the diffraction peak intensities at 0.7 nm-1 and 1.5 nm-1. The minimum detectable limit for a component of the two ‘tissue’ mix was found to be 4.1%. This suggests that X-ray diffraction can be used to quantify tissue like mixtures down to the 4.1% / 95.9% mix level and hence has a strong potential for delineating the extent of infiltration disease.

  7. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of Caspase-Activated DNase (ICAD) in Renal Cell Carcinoma – Tissue Microarray of Human Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Razack, Azad H. A.; Ng, Keng Lim

    2016-01-01

    Although primary localised tumours of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be treated relatively successfully with surgery, metastatic RCC has poor prognosis because of late diagnosis and resistance to therapies. In the present study, we were interested in profiling the protein expression of “inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase” (ICAD), an apoptosis inhibitor, in kidney cancer and its paired normal kidney. Immunohistochemistry with automated batch staining and morphometry using digital pathology were used to compare ICAD in 121 RCC specimens with their paired normal kidney tissue. Tissue microarray of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used. Intensity and localisation of ICAD were compared between normal and cancer samples, and against grading within the cancers. The results demonstrated that, in this cohort, ICAD was highly expressed in the proximal tubular epithelium of normal kidney, and significantly decreased in clear cell RCC tissue (p < 0.05) as well as other subtypes of RCC (p < 0.01) compared with normal kidney. There was a tendency towards nuclear localisation of ICAD in clear cell RCC, but not in other subtypes of RCC. No significant association was found between ICAD intensity and grade of RCC. In summary, down-regulation of ICAD occurs in RCC. ICAD normally inhibits DNA fragmentation and apoptosis; thus, its down-regulation was unexpected in a cancer known for its resistance to apoptosis. However, these RCC samples were from primary, not metastatic, RCC sites, and down-regulated ICAD may be part of a progressive pathway that promotes RCC metastasis.

  8. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of Caspase-Activated DNase (ICAD) in Renal Cell Carcinoma - Tissue Microarray of Human Samples.

    PubMed

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Razack, Azad H A; Ng, Keng Lim; Gobe, Glenda C

    2016-01-01

    Although primary localised tumours of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be treated relatively successfully with surgery, metastatic RCC has poor prognosis because of late diagnosis and resistance to therapies. In the present study, we were interested in profiling the protein expression of "inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase" (ICAD), an apoptosis inhibitor, in kidney cancer and its paired normal kidney. Immunohistochemistry with automated batch staining and morphometry using digital pathology were used to compare ICAD in 121 RCC specimens with their paired normal kidney tissue. Tissue microarray of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used. Intensity and localisation of ICAD were compared between normal and cancer samples, and against grading within the cancers. The results demonstrated that, in this cohort, ICAD was highly expressed in the proximal tubular epithelium of normal kidney, and significantly decreased in clear cell RCC tissue (p < 0.05) as well as other subtypes of RCC (p < 0.01) compared with normal kidney. There was a tendency towards nuclear localisation of ICAD in clear cell RCC, but not in other subtypes of RCC. No significant association was found between ICAD intensity and grade of RCC. In summary, down-regulation of ICAD occurs in RCC. ICAD normally inhibits DNA fragmentation and apoptosis; thus, its down-regulation was unexpected in a cancer known for its resistance to apoptosis. However, these RCC samples were from primary, not metastatic, RCC sites, and down-regulated ICAD may be part of a progressive pathway that promotes RCC metastasis.

  9. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms.

    PubMed

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources or remote field sites. Moreover, shipping samples over long distances can cause loss of DNA quality e.g. by thawing or leaking of preservation liquid. In this study we use earthworms, a key organism in soil research, to compare three different DNA preservation methods - freezing at -20 °C, storing in 75% ethanol, and freeze drying. Samples were shipped from the United States of America to Austria. The DNA of the samples was extracted using two different extraction methods, peqGOLD™ and Chelex(®) 100. The DNA amplification success was determined by amplifying four DNA fragments of different length. The PCR amplification success is significantly influenced by preservation method and extraction method and differed significantly depending on the length of the DNA fragment. Freeze drying samples was the best preservation method when samples were extracted using the silica based extraction method peqGOLD™. For samples that were extracted with Chelex(®) 100, storage in ethanol was the best preservation method. However, the overall amplification success was significantly lower for the extraction procedure based on Chelex(®) 100. The detection of the small DNA fragments was higher and independent from the extraction method, while the amplification success was significantly reduced for the longer DNA fragments. We recommend freeze drying of DNA samples, especially when they have to be shipped for longer distances. No special packaging or declaration is needed for freeze dried

  10. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms☆

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources or remote field sites. Moreover, shipping samples over long distances can cause loss of DNA quality e.g. by thawing or leaking of preservation liquid. In this study we use earthworms, a key organism in soil research, to compare three different DNA preservation methods – freezing at −20 °C, storing in 75% ethanol, and freeze drying. Samples were shipped from the United States of America to Austria. The DNA of the samples was extracted using two different extraction methods, peqGOLD™ and Chelex® 100. The DNA amplification success was determined by amplifying four DNA fragments of different length. The PCR amplification success is significantly influenced by preservation method and extraction method and differed significantly depending on the length of the DNA fragment. Freeze drying samples was the best preservation method when samples were extracted using the silica based extraction method peqGOLD™. For samples that were extracted with Chelex® 100, storage in ethanol was the best preservation method. However, the overall amplification success was significantly lower for the extraction procedure based on Chelex® 100. The detection of the small DNA fragments was higher and independent from the extraction method, while the amplification success was significantly reduced for the longer DNA fragments. We recommend freeze drying of DNA samples, especially when they have to be shipped for longer distances. No special packaging or declaration is needed for freeze dried

  11. Automated labelling of cancer textures in colorectal histopathology slides using quasi-supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Onder, Devrim; Sarioglu, Sulen; Karacali, Bilge

    2013-04-01

    Quasi-supervised learning is a statistical learning algorithm that contrasts two datasets by computing estimate for the posterior probability of each sample in either dataset. This method has not been applied to histopathological images before. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the method to identify colorectal tissues with or without adenocarcinoma. Light microscopic digital images from histopathological sections were obtained from 30 colorectal radical surgery materials including adenocarcinoma and non-neoplastic regions. The texture features were extracted by using local histograms and co-occurrence matrices. The quasi-supervised learning algorithm operates on two datasets, one containing samples of normal tissues labelled only indirectly, and the other containing an unlabeled collection of samples of both normal and cancer tissues. As such, the algorithm eliminates the need for manually labelled samples of normal and cancer tissues for conventional supervised learning and significantly reduces the expert intervention. Several texture feature vector datasets corresponding to different extraction parameters were tested within the proposed framework. The Independent Component Analysis dimensionality reduction approach was also identified as the one improving the labelling performance evaluated in this series. In this series, the proposed method was applied to the dataset of 22,080 vectors with reduced dimensionality 119 from 132. Regions containing cancer tissue could be identified accurately having false and true positive rates up to 19% and 88% respectively without using manually labelled ground-truth datasets in a quasi-supervised strategy. The resulting labelling performances were compared to that of a conventional powerful supervised classifier using manually labelled ground-truth data. The supervised classifier results were calculated as 3.5% and 95% for the same case. The results in this series in comparison with the benchmark

  12. Biofilm formation by Haemophilus influenzae isolated from adeno-tonsil tissue samples, and its role in recurrent adenotonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, J; Calò, L; Ardito, F; Imperiali, M; Bassotti, E; Fadda, G; Paludetti, G

    2007-01-01

    Summary Aim of the present study was to identify bacterial biofilms in tissue samples obtained from paediatric patients undergoing surgical treatment, for chronic and recurrent adeno-tonsillitis, not responding to repeated cycles of selective medical antibiotic and anti-inflammatory treatment and to assay the ability of Haemophilus influenzae strains, most frequently identified in the culture examinations, to grow as biofilm in vitro. Overall, 25 surgical specimens (15 adenoids, 10 tonsils) were examined from the upper respiratory tract, from 15 paediatric patients (mean age 6 years). All patients were affected by recurrent and/or chronic adenoiditis and adenotonsillitis unresponsive to selective antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy. Tissues were cultured using conventional methods and subjected to scanning electron microscopy for detection of biofilm. Haemophilus influenzae strains, were cultured on 96-sterile well polystyrene microtitre plates (CELLSTAR-greiner bio-one) and stained with 1% crystal violet to quantify biofilm production. Bacterial cocci attached to the tissue surface and organized in colonies, with a morphology consistent with bacterial coccoid biofilms, were observed in all adenoid (15/15) and in 6/10 tonsil samples. Haemophilus influenzae isolates from 12/25 (48%) of our tissue samples scored a percent transmittance (%Tbloc) > 50, displaying a high capacity to form biofilms (level 4). In conclusion identification of bacterial biofilms in chronic and/or recurrent paediatric upper airway inflammatory processes and the capacity to produce biofilm in vitro, demonstrated by Haemophilus influenzae (the most frequently identified bacteria in our samples), could be related to the aetiopathogenic role of biofilms in chronic inflammatory mucosal reactions and to the resistance of these infections to selective antibiotic therapy. PMID:17883191

  13. Aspergillus PCR-Based Investigation of Fresh Tissue and Effusion Samples in Patients with Suspected Invasive Aspergillosis Enhances Diagnostic Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, M.; Spiess, B.; Heinz, W. J.; Heussel, C. P.; Bertz, H.; Cornely, O. A.; Hahn, J.; Lehrnbecher, T.; Kiehl, M.; Laws, H. J.; Wolf, H. H.; Schwerdtfeger, R.; Schultheis, B.; Burchardt, A.; Klein, M.; Dürken, M.; Claus, B.; Schlegel, F.; Hummel, M.; Hofmann, W.-K.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is a severe complication in immunocompromised patients, diagnosing invasive fungal disease (IFD), especially invasive aspergillosis (IA), remains difficult. In certain clinical scenarios, examining tissue samples for identification of the infectious organism becomes important. As culture-based methods rarely yield results, the performance of an Aspergillus-specific nested PCR in fresh tissue or pleural effusion samples was evaluated. Fresh tissue (n = 59) and effusion (n = 47) specimens from 79 immunocompromised patients were subjected to an Aspergillus-specific PCR assay. Twenty-six patients had proven (n = 20) or probable (n = 6) IFD, according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria, while the remaining patients were classified as having either possible IFD (n = 30) or no IFD (n = 23). IA was identified as the underlying IFD in 21/26 proven/probable cases. PCR positivity was observed for 18/21 proven/probable and 6 possible IA cases; cases classified as no IA did not show positive signals. Patients with proven IFD (n = 5) with cultures positive for non-Aspergillus molds also had negative Aspergillus PCR results. Aspergillus PCR performance analysis yielded sensitivity and specificity values of 86% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65% to 95%) and 100% (95% CI, 86% to 100%), respectively, thus leading to a diagnostic odds ratio of >200. In this analysis, good diagnostic performance of the PCR assay for detection of IA was observed for tissue samples, while effusion samples showed lower sensitivity rates. PCR testing represents a complementary tool; a positive PCR result strengthens the likelihood of IA, whereas IA seems unlikely in cases with negative results but findings could indicate non-Aspergillus IFD. Thus, PCR testing of these specimens enhances the diagnostic capabilities. PMID

  14. Three-dimensional digital breast histopathology imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, G. M.; Peressotti, C.; Mawdsley, G. E.; Eidt, S.; Ge, M.; Morgan, T.; Zubovits, J. T.; Yaffe, M. J.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a digital histology imaging system that has the potential to improve the accuracy of surgical margin assessment in the treatment of breast cancer by providing finer sampling and 3D visualization. The system is capable of producing a 3D representation of histopathology from an entire lumpectomy specimen. We acquire digital photomicrographs of a stack of large (120 x 170 mm) histology slides cut serially through the entire specimen. The images are then registered and displayed in 2D and 3D. This approach dramatically improves sampling and can improve visualization of tissue structures compared to current, small-format histology. The system consists of a brightfield microscope, adapted with a freeze-frame digital video camera and a large, motorized translation stage. The image of each slide is acquired as a mosaic of adjacent tiles, each tile representing one field-of-view of the microscope, and the mosaic is assembled into a seamless composite image. The assembly is done by a program developed to build image sets at six different levels within a multiresolution pyramid. A database-linked viewing program has been created to efficiently register and display the animated stack of images, which occupies about 80 GB of disk space per lumpectomy at full resolution, on a high-resolution (3840 x 2400 pixels) colour monitor. The scanning or tiling approach to digitization is inherently susceptible to two artefacts which disrupt the composite image, and which impose more stringent requirements on system performance. Although non-uniform illumination across any one isolated tile may not be discernible, the eye readily detects this non-uniformity when the entire assembly of tiles is viewed. The pattern is caused by deficiencies in optical alignment, spectrum of the light source, or camera corrections. The imaging task requires that features as small as 3.2 &mum in extent be seamlessly preserved. However, inadequate accuracy in positioning of the translation

  15. Histopathologic and histomorphometric studies and determination of IL-8 in patients with periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Koss, Myriam A.; Castro, Cecilia E.; Carino, Silvia; López, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone resorption. Objective: The aim of this study was to make a quantitative evaluation of the gingival tissue components in biopsies from patients with different clinical states of periodontal disease and to determine the relationship between the presence of interleukin-8 and the tissue destruction. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 33 biopsies from adult subjects. A total of 25 periodontal patients were sub-classified on the basis of the clinical and radiographic criteria in mild, moderate and advanced periodontitis. Gingival samples were obtained from patients in the course of basic periodontal surgeries as a muco-periostic collate. Data were analyzed by the SPSS system. Results: Collagen fibres decreased as non-specific chronic states increased. A lymphocyte inflammatory infiltrate changed to a lymphoplasmocytary form. Reactivity to interleukin-8 was detected with the severity of the histopathologic diagnoses; however there was no association with the clinical diagnoses. Conclusions: Histopathology and histomorphometry of gingival tissue changed with the degree of inflammation. No evidence of interleukin-8 as a biomarker for clinical diagnoses of periodontitis was obtained. PMID:24872619

  16. Gill oxidative stress and histopathological biomarkers of pollution impacts in Nile tilapia from Lake Mariut and Lake Edku, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M; El-Saad, Ahmed M Abu; Hussein, Hussein K; Dekinesh, Samir I

    2012-09-01

    Various oxidative stress and histopathological biomarkers in gill tissues of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus were investigated. Fish were collected from four sites that differ in their extent of pollution load, including heavy metals: the southeast basin (SEB), main basin (MB), and northwest basin (NWB) of Lake Mariut; and Boughaz El-Maadiya, a channel in Lake Edku. The oxidative stress biomarkers that were analyzed included lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione redox cycle enzymes (glutathione peroxidase [GPx] and glutathione reductase [GR]). Levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were also evaluated. Gill morphology was analyzed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Gill LPO was significantly higher in gill tissues of fish collected from the more heavily contaminated MB (40.0%) and NWB (51.4%) sites than in gill samples from the less-contaminated (reference) site, the SEB. Gill LPO in fish from Lake Edku was intermediate but was not significantly higher (17.1%) than the reference. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the redox-sensitive thiol compound GSH were significantly lower in gill samples from the disturbed sites than in samples from the reference site. Specifically, SOD in MB, NWB, and Lake Edku samples; CAT and GPx in NWB samples; and GR activity and GSH content in MB and NWB samples were lower than those in SEB samples. In most cases, gill tissues from Lake Edku fish had intermediate levels of antioxidants. The main histopathological alterations observed in gills were epithelial lifting, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the respiratory epithelium, lamellar fusion, and aneurysms. In addition, SEM results demonstrated transformation of the surface structure of epithelial pavement cells. Pathological reactions in the gills of Nile tilapia were most severe at the MB and NWB sites. Our findings suggest that Nile tilapia responded differently according to the environmental stress index

  17. A new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of parabens in human placental tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, I; Vela-Soria, F; Zafra-Gómez, A; Navalón, A; Ballesteros, O; Navea, N; Fernández, M F; Olea, N; Vílchez, J L

    2011-05-15

    Endocrine disruptors are a group of organic compounds widely used, which are ubiquitous in the environment and in biological samples. The main effect of these compounds is associated with their ability to mimic or block the action of natural hormones in living organisms, including humans. Parabens (esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) belong to this group of compounds. In this work, we propose a new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to asses the presence of parabens most commonly used in industrial applications (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butyl-paraben) in samples of human placental tissue. The method involves the extraction of the analytes from the samples using ethyl acetate, followed by a clean-up step using centrifugation prior to their quantification by LC-MS/MS using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface in the negative mode. Deuterated bisphenol A (BPA-d(16)) was used as surrogate. Found detection limits (LOD) ranged from 0.03 to 0.06 ng g(-1) and quantification limits (LOQ) from 0.1 to 0.2 ng g(-1), while inter- and intra-day variability was under 13.8%. The method was validated using standard addition calibration and a spike recovery assay. Recovery rates for spiked samples ranged from 82% to 108%. This method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of parabens in 50 placental tissue samples collected from women who live in the province of Granada (Spain).

  18. The inter-sample structural variability of regular tissue-engineered scaffolds significantly affects the micromechanical local cell environment

    PubMed Central

    Campos Marin, A.; Lacroix, D.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping techniques have been widely used in tissue engineering to fabricate scaffolds with controlled architecture. Despite the ability of these techniques to fabricate regular structures, the consistency with which these regular structures are produced throughout the scaffold and from one scaffold to another needs to be quantified. Small variations at the pore level can affect the local mechanical stimuli sensed by the cells thereby affecting the final tissue properties. Most studies assume rapid prototyping scaffolds as regular structures without quantifying the local mechanical stimuli at the cell level. In this study, a computational method using a micro-computed tomography-based scaffold geometry was developed to characterize the mechanical stimuli within a real scaffold at the pore level. Five samples from a commercial polycaprolactone scaffold were analysed and computational fluid dynamics analyses were created to compare local velocity and shear stress values at the same scaffold location. The five samples did not replicate the computer-aided design (CAD) scaffold and velocity and shear stress values were up to five times higher than the ones calculated in the CAD scaffold. In addition high variability among samples was found: at the same location velocity and shear stress values could be up to two times higher from sample to sample. This study shows that regular scaffolds need to be thoroughly analysed in order to quantify real cell mechanical stimuli so inspection methods should be included as part of the fabrication process. PMID:25844157

  19. Clinical Use of Fungal PCR from Deep Tissue Samples in the Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Diseases - A Retrospective, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Ala-Houhala, Mari; Koukila-Kähkölä, Pirkko; Antikainen, Jenni; Valve, Jaana; Kirveskari, Juha; Anttila, Veli-Jukka

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical use of panfungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs). We focused on the deep tissue samples. We first described the design of panfungal PCR, which is in clinical use at Helsinki University Hospital. Secondly, we retrospectively evaluated the results of 307 fungal PCR tests performed from 2013-2015. Samples were taken from normally sterile tissues and fluids. The patient population was non-selected. We classified the likelihood of IFD according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG), compering the fungal PCR results to the likelihood of IFD along with the culture and microscopy results. There were 48 (16%) positive and 259 (84%) negative PCR results. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for diagnosing invasive fungal disease were 60.5% and 91.7%, respectively, while the NPV and PPV were 93.4% and 54.2%, respectively. The concordance between the PCR and the culture results was 86% and 87% between PCR and microscopy, respectively. Of the 48 patients with positive PCR results 23 had a proven or probable IFD. Fungal PCR can be useful for diagnosing IFDs in deep tissue samples. It is beneficial to combine fungal PCR with culture and microscopy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Prescribing antibiotics in diabetic foot infection: what is the role of initial microscopy and culture of tissue samples?()

    PubMed

    Chisman, Robin; Lowry, Danielle; Saeed, Mujahid A; Tiwari, Alok; David, Miruna D

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microscopy, Gram stain and the culture of tissue samples in the antibiotic treatment of patients with diabetic foot infection. A retrospective review of patients with a diabetic foot infection was undertaken. Data analysed included the severity of infection, antibiotic prescribing patterns, microscopy and culture results. A total of 71 patients were included, from whom 114 tissue samples were collected. Gram stain results were in agreement with final culture results in 45·8% (n = 54) of samples. Overall sensitivity and specificity of the Gram stains were low (74·5% and 69·8%, respectively), although the specificity for Gram-negative rods was high (98·5%). The presence or absence of 'pus cells' on microscopy was a poor predictor of culture results. Empirical prescribing of antibiotics was in accordance with local policy in 31·1% of patients, improving to 86·8 % following culture results. Microscopy, a skilled laboratory procedure, was generally a poor predictor of tissue culture results. However, the presence of Gram-negative rods was suggestive of isolation in the culture of such organisms and could allow the early broadening of antibiotic treatment. Despite initial poor compliance of empirical antibiotic treatment regimens, prescribing was adjusted in light of culture results, suggesting these were important for clinicians. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Multimodal optical analysis of meningioma and comparison with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Marc; Poulon, Fanny; Varlet, Pascale; Chretien, Fabrice; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Pages, Mélanie; Ibrahim, Ali; Pallud, Johan; Dezamis, Edouard; Abi-Lahoud, Georges; Nataf, François; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Abi-Haidar, Darine

    2017-02-01

    Meningioma is the most frequent primary central nervous system tumor. The risk of recurrence and the prognosis are correlated with the extent of the resection that ideally encompasses the infiltrated dura mater and, if required, the infiltrated bone. No device can deliver real-time intraoperative histopathological information on the tumor environment to help the neurosurgeon to achieve a gross total removal. This study assessed the abilities of nonlinear microscopy to provide relevant and real-time data to help resection of meningiomas. Nine human meningioma samples (four World Health Organization Grade I, five Grade II) were analyzed using different optical modalities: spectral analysis and imaging, lifetime measurements, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, fluorescence emitted under one- and two-photon excitation and the second-harmonic generation signal imaging using a multimodal setup. Nonlinear microscopy produced images close to histopathology as a gold standard. The second-harmonic generation signal delineated the collagen background and two-photon fluorescence underlined cell cytoplasm. The matching between fluorescence images and Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was possible in all cases. Grade I meningioma emitted less autofluorescence than Grade II meningioma and Grade II meningioma exhibited a distinct lifetime value. Autofluorescence was correlated with the proliferation rates and seemed to explain the observed differences between Grade I and II meningiomas. This preliminary multimodal study focused on human meningioma samples confirms the potential of tissue autofluorescence analysis and nonlinear microscopy in helping intraoperatively neurosurgeons to reach the actual boundaries of the tumor infiltration. Correspondence between H&E staining (top pictures) and the two-photon fluorescence imaging (bottom pictures).

  2. Histopathological characterization of a Cameron lesion.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jordan; Brar, Sonia; Sidhu, Jagmohan S

    2012-10-01

    Cameron lesions are linear erosions located at the neck of a hiatal hernia (HH) in patients with a large HH. The prevalence has been seen in up to 5% of patients with HH who undergo esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and they can be associated with overt gastrointestinal bleeding or anemia. These lesions occur due to vascular compression by the diaphragm in a large sliding HH. Histopathologic changes seen in the biopsy tissue of a Cameron lesion are due to ischemia, but this ischemia is reversible with treatment of HH. The existence of this entity and the histopathologic picture of a Cameron lesion is not well known to pathologists, and therefore, a microscopic picture of a Cameron lesion can be easily confused with ischemic gastritis. Ischemic gastritis is the result of atherosclerosis, usually seen in older people, unrelated to HH, and is not easily reversible. The authors received a gastric biopsy of a hiatal hernia without any associated clinical diagnosis of a Cameron lesion conveyed to the pathologist. This biopsy tissue showed ischemic changes in the gastric mucosa on microscopic examination. Diagnosis of ischemic gastritis was considered but ruled out after the case was discussed with the gastroenterologist. The correct diagnosis was made once the clinical diagnosis of HH with Cameron lesion (ie, a vertical red erosion) was made known to the pathologist. By reporting this case, the authors aim to increase awareness of Cameron lesion among pathologists so that they ask about the presence of a Cameron lesion before making the diagnosis of ischemic gastritis.

  3. Fatal methanol poisoning: features of liver histopathology.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Maryam; Panahianpour, Mohammad Hadi; Bazmi, Elham; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar; Mahdavi, Amirhosein; Nazari, Saeed Hashemi

    2013-03-01

    Methanol poisoning has become a considerable problem in Iran. Liver can show some features of poisoning after methanol ingestion. Therefore, our concern was to examine liver tissue histopathology in fatal methanol poisoning cases in Iranian population. In this study, 44 cases of fatal methanol poisoning were identified in a year. The histological changes of the liver were reviewed. The most striking features of liver damage by light microscopy were micro-vesicular steatosis, macro-vesicular steatosis, focal hepatocyte necrosis, mild intra-hepatocyte bile stasis, feathery degeneration and hydropic degeneration. Blood and vitreous humor methanol concentrations were examined to confirm the proposed history of methanol poisoning. The majority of cases were men (86.36%). In conclusion, methanol poisoning can cause histological changes in liver tissues. Most importantly in cases with mean blood and vitreous humor methanol levels greater than 127 ± 38.9 mg/dL more than one pathologic features were detected.

  4. Molecular and histopathological detection of Hepatozoon canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Luís; Cortes, Helder C E; Eyal, Osnat; Reis, Antónia; Lopes, Ana Patrícia; Vila-Viçosa, Maria João; Rodrigues, Paula A; Baneth, Gad

    2014-03-24

    Hepatozoon canis is a protozoan tick-borne pathogen of dogs and wild canids. Hepatozoon spp. have been reported to infect foxes in different continents and recent studies have mostly used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection and characterization of the infecting species. Surveying red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) may contribute to better understanding the epidemiology of canine vector-borne diseases, including hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis in domestic dogs. The present study investigated the prevalence of Hepatozoon spp. by means of histopathology and molecular analysis of different tissues in red foxes from different parts of Portugal. Blood and tissues including bone marrow, heart, hind leg muscle, jejunum, kidney, liver, lung, popliteal or axillary lymph nodes, spleen and/or tongue were collected from 91 red foxes from eight districts in northern, central and southern Portugal. Tissues were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified a ~650 bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of Hepatozoon spp. and the DNA products were sequenced. Hepatozoon canis was detected in 68 out of 90 foxes (75.6%) from all the sampled areas by PCR and sequencing. Histopathology revealed H. canis meronts similar in shape to those found in dogs in the bone marrow of 11 (23.4%) and in the spleen of two (4.3%) out of 47 foxes (p = 0.007). All the 11 foxes found positive by histopathology were also positive by PCR of bone marrow and/or blood. Positivity by PCR (83.0%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than by histopathological examination (23.4%) in paired bone marrow samples from the same 47 foxes. Sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of H. canis were 98-99% identical to those in GenBank. Hepatozoon canis was found to be highly prevalent in red fox populations from northern, central and southern Portugal. Detection of the parasite by histopathology was significantly less sensitive than by PCR. Red foxes are

  5. Molecular and histopathological detection of Hepatozoon canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatozoon canis is a protozoan tick-borne pathogen of dogs and wild canids. Hepatozoon spp. have been reported to infect foxes in different continents and recent studies have mostly used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection and characterization of the infecting species. Surveying red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) may contribute to better understanding the epidemiology of canine vector-borne diseases, including hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis in domestic dogs. The present study investigated the prevalence of Hepatozoon spp. by means of histopathology and molecular analysis of different tissues in red foxes from different parts of Portugal. Methods Blood and tissues including bone marrow, heart, hind leg muscle, jejunum, kidney, liver, lung, popliteal or axillary lymph nodes, spleen and/or tongue were collected from 91 red foxes from eight districts in northern, central and southern Portugal. Tissues were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified a ~650 bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of Hepatozoon spp. and the DNA products were sequenced. Results Hepatozoon canis was detected in 68 out of 90 foxes (75.6%) from all the sampled areas by PCR and sequencing. Histopathology revealed H. canis meronts similar in shape to those found in dogs in the bone marrow of 11 (23.4%) and in the spleen of two (4.3%) out of 47 foxes (p = 0.007). All the 11 foxes found positive by histopathology were also positive by PCR of bone marrow and/or blood. Positivity by PCR (83.0%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than by histopathological examination (23.4%) in paired bone marrow samples from the same 47 foxes. Sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of H. canis were 98–99% identical to those in GenBank. Conclusions Hepatozoon canis was found to be highly prevalent in red fox populations from northern, central and southern Portugal. Detection of the parasite by histopathology was

  6. Comparing paraffined and deparaffinized breast cancer tissue samples and an analysis of Raman spectroscopy and infrared methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depciuch, J.; Kaznowska, E.; Szmuc, K.; Zawlik, I.; Cholewa, M.; Heraud, P.; Cebulski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer makes up a quarter of all cancer in women, which is why research into new diagnostic methods and sample preparations need to be developed at an accelerated pace. Researchers are looking for diagnostic tools to detect when an individual has cancer cells and use that information to see what measurements and approaches can be used to take further diagnostic steps. The most common method of sample preparation is the imbibing of tumor tissue in paraffin, which can produce a background for spectroscopic measurements in the range of 500-3500 cm-1. In this study we demonstrated that proper preparation of paraffin-embedded specimens and the measurement methodology can eliminate paraffin vibration, as was done in the work Depciuch et al. 2015. Thanks to this spectroscopic technique there may become a reliable and accurate method of diagnosing breast cancer based on the evidence found from the prepared samples. The study compared the results obtained through Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) measurements of healthy and cancerous breast tissues that were either embedded in paraffin or deparaffinized. The resulting spectrum and accurate analysis led to the conclusion that the appropriate measurement of the background and the elimination of peaks from the paraffin had the greatest impact on the reliability of results. Furthermore, after the accurate, detailed studies FTIR and Raman spectroscopy on samples of breast tissue that were deparaffinized or embedded in paraffin, including a complete analysis of the peak after transformation Kramers-Kröning (KK), it was found that sample preparation did not affect the result obtained by measuring the reflectance in the mid-infrared range, and that this only had a minimal effect relating to the intensity obtained by the measurement of the Raman peak. Only in special cases, when Raman spectroscopic methods are used for research to find the peculiarities of the spectra, are deparaffinization recommended

  7. Histopathological baseline levels and confounding factors in common sole (Solea solea) for marine environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, N; Zorita, I; Costa, P M; Larreta, J; Franco, J

    2015-09-01

    Liver and gonad histopathology, biometric parameters and hepatic metal bioaccumulation were assessed monthly over a one-year period in common soles from the Basque continental shelf, in order to determine baseline levels and confounding factors within biomonitoring studies. Biometric parameters and hepatic metal bioaccumulation varied according to season and gender. Accordingly, hepatic histopathological traits presented seasonal variations related to the reproductive cycle. However, the hepatic histopathological index showed that seasonality and gender were not significant confounding factors. Conversely, the gonad histopathological index was modulated by season and gender. As for organ comparison, the liver endured more severe histopathological damage than the gonad. In brief, the sampling period and gender may not affect the estimation of hepatic histopathological indices for biomonitoring purposes. Nonetheless, due to different sensitivities to environmental 'noise' variables, the sampling period and gender differentiation should be thoroughly considered for the assessment of gonad histopathology, biometrics and metal bioaccumulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Attitudes towards biomedical use of tissue sample collections, consent, and biobanks among Finns.

    PubMed

    Tupasela, Aaro; Sihvo, Sinikka; Snell, Karolna; Jallinoja, Pa; Aro, Arja R; Hemminki, Elina

    2010-02-01

    To ascertain the attitudes towards the use of existing diagnostic and research samples, the setting up of a national biobank, and different types of informed consent among Finns. A population survey of 2,400 randomly selected Finns aged 24-65 was conducted at the beginning of 2007. A total of 1,195 responses (50%) were received after one reminder. Of the respondents, 83% said that they had little or no knowledge of what biobanks were. Despite this, 77% regarded the setting up of a national biobank in a positive light. One third (34%) would not attach any conditions on their consent, while 42% said that it was important to regain consent when the new study contains diverging steps. One third (30%) wanted consent to be regained for every new research project, and 44% would like to decide what type of research their samples would be used for if they were included in a national biobank. One third of both men and women approved of the use of their samples in research involving private enterprises. In general, Finns were positive toward the setting up of a national biobank, as well as public-private partnerships, even though they considered their knowledge of biobanking to be limited. This, however, did not mean that they were indifferent to the use of their samples, but most wanted the ability to control how their samples are used.

  9. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Alexiou, Christoph; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XμCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-μCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XμCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration.

  10. Expression of guanylyl cyclase C in tissue samples and the circulation of rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Cheng, Guoping; Qian, Jun; Ju, HaiXing; Zhu, YuPing; Stefano, Meucci; Keilholz, Ulrich; Li, DeChuan

    2017-06-13

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) is a transmembrane surface receptor restricted to intestinal epithelial cells, from the duodenum to the rectum. We compared GCC expression in tumors and normal rectal tissues, and investigated the relation between GCC expression and metastasis and long-term survival of rectal cancer patients. Based on the UICC classification, 42 rectal cancer patients in this study were classified as stage I, 48 patients as stage II, and 90 patients as stage III. Overexpression of GCC was observed in 80 rectal tumors as compared to matched normal tissues, where no strong staining of GCC was observed. An association between GCC mRNA in the circulation and tumor emboli in vessels, CK20 mRNA, distant organ metastasis, and survival status was observed in 100 rectal cancer patients. Univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that tumor emboli in vessels, lymph node metastasis, mesenteric root lymph node