Science.gov

Sample records for hit cells role

  1. Biological effects in hit and non-hit cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Geard, C. R.; Brenner, D. J.; Mitchell, S. A.

    It had long been considered axiomatic that heritable biological effects of radiation required direct damage to DNA. This is no longer the case. The bystander effect refers to the induction of biological effects in cells that are not directly traversed by a charged particle, but are close to cells that are. Experiments suggest that the effect is due to a molecule secreted by irradiated cells which is capable of transferring damage to distant cells. The magnitude of the effect is much larger if cells are in gap junction communication. In cell cultures, a bystander effect has been shown for cell lethality, chromosomal aberrations, mutation, oncogenic transformation and upregulation of gene expression. A similar effect has been observed in artificial 3-dimensional skin cultures. Bystander studies imply that the target for the biological effects of radiation is larger than the cell, and this has implications for biologically based models of carcinogenesis at low doses where not all cells receive a direct hit.

  2. Stimulatory effects of maitotoxin on insulin release in insulinoma HIT cells: Role of calcium uptake and phosphoinositide breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Soergel, D.G.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-12-01

    In hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, maitotoxin (MTX) induces a time-dependent and concentration-dependent release of insulin that requires the presence of extracellular calcium. The response is nearly completely blocked by cinnarizine and cadmium, but is not inhibited by the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine or by manganese. MTX induces 45Ca+ uptake in these cells in a dose-dependent mode, and the uptake is blocked with cinnarizine, nifedipine and cadmium, and is partially inhibited by manganese. MTX induces phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells, and the response is partially blocked by cadmium, but is not affected by nifedipine, cinnarizine or manganese. High concentrations of potassium ions also induce insulin release and calcium uptake in HIT cells. Both effects of potassium are blocked partially by nifedipine, cadmium and cinnarizine. High concentrations of potassium do not induce phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells. The results suggest that MTX-elicited release of insulin is attained by two mechanisms: (1) a nifedipine-sensitive action, which results from MTX-induced activation of L-type calcium channels, which can be mimicked with high potassium concentrations; and (2) a nifedipine-insensitive action, which may be initiated by the activation of phosphoinositide breakdown by MTX. Such an activation of phospholipase C would result in the formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate, a release of intracellular calcium and then release of insulin to the extracellular space. Cinnarizine is proposed to block both MTX-elicited mechanisms, the first by blockade of calcium channels and the second by blocking 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate-induced release of internal calcium. Either mechanism alone appears capable of eliciting release of insulin.

  3. Cell Phones and PDA's Hit K-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Richard; Mason, Christine Y.

    2005-01-01

    Although cell phones keep kids in touch with families and personal digital assistants (PDA's) help organize assignments and give Internet access, when they are added to the school climate, educators must reassess policies so technology does not interfere with instruction time. This article discusses the several effects of cell phones to K-6…

  4. Multiple cell hits by particle tracks in solid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, P.

    1992-08-01

    Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) and Quality Factor (Q) at extreme values of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In tissue end-point experiments each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV/μm in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point of interest to the investigator, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question must therefore be addressed: Do RBE's and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the increased probability of multiple-cell damage by HZE tracks? A model is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate the value of a multiplier of damage effectiveness on the basis of number of cells at risk, p3n, per track containing a hit cell, where n is the number of cells per track, based on tissue and organ geometry, and p3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point.

  5. The "first hit" toward alcohol reinforcement: role of ethanol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Israel, Yedy; Quintanilla, María Elena; Karahanian, Eduardo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario

    2015-05-01

    This review analyzes literature that describes the behavioral effects of 2 metabolites of ethanol (EtOH): acetaldehyde and salsolinol (a condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine) generated in the brain. These metabolites are self-administered into specific brain areas by animals, showing strong reinforcing effects. A wealth of evidence shows that EtOH, a drug consumed to attain millimolar concentrations, generates brain metabolites that are reinforcing at micromolar and nanomolar concentrations. Salsolinol administration leads to marked increases in voluntary EtOH intake, an effect inhibited by mu-opioid receptor blockers. In animals that have ingested EtOH chronically, the maintenance of alcohol intake is no longer influenced by EtOH metabolites, as intake is taken over by other brain systems. However, after EtOH withdrawal brain acetaldehyde has a major role in promoting binge-like drinking in the condition known as the "alcohol deprivation effect"; a condition seen in animals that have ingested alcohol chronically, are deprived of EtOH for extended periods, and are allowed EtOH re-access. The review also analyzes the behavioral effects of acetate, a metabolite that enters the brain and is responsible for motor incoordination at low doses of EtOH. Also discussed are the paradoxical effects of systemic acetaldehyde. Overall, evidence strongly suggests that brain-generated EtOH metabolites play a major role in the early ("first-hit") development of alcohol reinforcement and in the generation of relapse-like drinking.

  6. Estimated Radiation on Mars, Hits per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This global map of Mars shows estimates for amounts of high-energy-particle cosmic radiation reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.

    The estimates are based on cosmic-radiation measurements made on the way to Mars by the Mars radiation environment experiment, an instrument on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, plus information about Mars' surface elevations from the laser altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The areas of Mars expected to have least radiation are where elevation is lowest, because those areas have more atmosphere above them to block out some of the radiation. Earth's thick atmosphere shields us from most cosmic radiation, but Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than Earth does.

    Colors in the map refer to the estimated average number of times per year each cell nucleus in a human there would be hit by a high-energy cosmic ray particle. The range is generally from two hits (color-coded green), a moderate risk level, to eight hits (coded red), a high risk level.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. The Mars radiation environment experiment was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for Odyssey, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Hit-and-run, hit-and-stay, and commensal bacteria present different peptide content when viewed from the perspective of the T cell.

    PubMed

    He, Lu; De Groot, Anne S; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-11-27

    Different types of bacteria face different pressures from the immune system, with those that persist ("hit-and-stay") potentially having to adapt more in order to escape than those prone to short-lived infection ("hit-and-run"), and with commensal bacteria potentially different from both due to additional physical mechanisms for avoiding immune detection. The Janus Immunogenicity Score (JIS) was recently developed to assess the likelihood of T cell recognition of an antigen, using an analysis that considers both binding of a peptide within the antigen by major histocompatability complex (MHC) and recognition of the peptide:MHC complex by cognate T cell receptor (TCR). This score was shown to be predictive of T effector vs. T regulatory or null responses in experimental data, as well as to distinguish viruses representative of the hit-and-stay vs. hit-and-run phenotypes. Here, JIS-based analyses were conducted in order to characterize the extent to which the pressure to avoid T cell recognition is manifested in genomic differences among representative hit-and-run, hit-and-stay, and commensal bacteria. Overall, extracellular proteins were found to have different JIS profiles from cytoplasmic ones. Contrasting the bacterial groups, extracellular proteins were shown to be quite different across the groups, much more so than intracellular proteins. The differences were evident even at the level of corresponding peptides in homologous protein pairs from hit-and-run and hit-and-stay bacteria. The multi-level analysis of patterns of immunogenicity across different groups of bacteria provides a new way to approach questions of bacterial immune camouflage or escape, as well as to approach the selection and optimization of candidates for vaccine design.

  8. Fragment-Based Whole Cell Screen Delivers Hits against M. tuberculosis and Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Wilfried; Lim, Jia Jie; Yeo, Si Ying; Ramanujulu, Pondy M.; Dymock, Brian W.; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Reactive multi-target ‘fragment drugs’ represent critical components of current tuberculosis regimens. These compounds, such as pyrazinamide, are old synthetic antimycobacterials that are activated inside Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and are smaller than the usual drug-like, single-target molecules. Based on the success of small ‘dirty’ drugs in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, we suggested previously that fragment-based whole cell screens should be introduced in our current antimycobacterial drug discovery efforts. Here, we carried out such a screen and characterized bactericidal activity, selectivity and spectrum of hits we obtained. A library of 1725 fragments was tested at a single concentration for growth inhibitory activity against M. bovis BCG as screening strain and 38 of 116 primary hits were confirmed in dose response analyses to be active against virulent M. tuberculosis. Bacterial kill experiments showed that most hits displayed bactericidal activity at their minimal inhibitory concentration. Cytotoxicity assays established that a large proportion of hits displayed a favorable selectivity index for mammalian cells. Importantly, one third of M. tuberculosis active fragments were also active against M. abscessus and M. avium, two emerging non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pathogens, opening the opportunity to develop broad spectrum antimycobacterials. Activity determination against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, as well as fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans) showed only a small overlap indicating a generally narrow spectrum of these novel antimicrobial hits for mycobacteria. In conclusion, we carried out the first fragment-based whole cell screen against bacteria and identified a substantial number of hits with excellent physicochemical properties and dual activity against M. tuberculosis and NTM

  9. Fragment-Based Whole Cell Screen Delivers Hits against M. tuberculosis and Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Wilfried; Lim, Jia Jie; Yeo, Si Ying; Ramanujulu, Pondy M; Dymock, Brian W; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Reactive multi-target 'fragment drugs' represent critical components of current tuberculosis regimens. These compounds, such as pyrazinamide, are old synthetic antimycobacterials that are activated inside Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and are smaller than the usual drug-like, single-target molecules. Based on the success of small 'dirty' drugs in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, we suggested previously that fragment-based whole cell screens should be introduced in our current antimycobacterial drug discovery efforts. Here, we carried out such a screen and characterized bactericidal activity, selectivity and spectrum of hits we obtained. A library of 1725 fragments was tested at a single concentration for growth inhibitory activity against M. bovis BCG as screening strain and 38 of 116 primary hits were confirmed in dose response analyses to be active against virulent M. tuberculosis. Bacterial kill experiments showed that most hits displayed bactericidal activity at their minimal inhibitory concentration. Cytotoxicity assays established that a large proportion of hits displayed a favorable selectivity index for mammalian cells. Importantly, one third of M. tuberculosis active fragments were also active against M. abscessus and M. avium, two emerging non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pathogens, opening the opportunity to develop broad spectrum antimycobacterials. Activity determination against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, as well as fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans) showed only a small overlap indicating a generally narrow spectrum of these novel antimicrobial hits for mycobacteria. In conclusion, we carried out the first fragment-based whole cell screen against bacteria and identified a substantial number of hits with excellent physicochemical properties and dual activity against M. tuberculosis and NTM pathogens

  10. Fragment-Based Whole Cell Screen Delivers Hits against M. tuberculosis and Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Wilfried; Lim, Jia Jie; Yeo, Si Ying; Ramanujulu, Pondy M.; Dymock, Brian W.; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Reactive multi-target ‘fragment drugs’ represent critical components of current tuberculosis regimens. These compounds, such as pyrazinamide, are old synthetic antimycobacterials that are activated inside Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and are smaller than the usual drug-like, single-target molecules. Based on the success of small ‘dirty’ drugs in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, we suggested previously that fragment-based whole cell screens should be introduced in our current antimycobacterial drug discovery efforts. Here, we carried out such a screen and characterized bactericidal activity, selectivity and spectrum of hits we obtained. A library of 1725 fragments was tested at a single concentration for growth inhibitory activity against M. bovis BCG as screening strain and 38 of 116 primary hits were confirmed in dose response analyses to be active against virulent M. tuberculosis. Bacterial kill experiments showed that most hits displayed bactericidal activity at their minimal inhibitory concentration. Cytotoxicity assays established that a large proportion of hits displayed a favorable selectivity index for mammalian cells. Importantly, one third of M. tuberculosis active fragments were also active against M. abscessus and M. avium, two emerging non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pathogens, opening the opportunity to develop broad spectrum antimycobacterials. Activity determination against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, as well as fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans) showed only a small overlap indicating a generally narrow spectrum of these novel antimicrobial hits for mycobacteria. In conclusion, we carried out the first fragment-based whole cell screen against bacteria and identified a substantial number of hits with excellent physicochemical properties and dual activity against M. tuberculosis and NTM

  11. Hitting the right spot with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Le Blanc, Katarina; Keating, Armand; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have captured considerable scientific and public interest because of their potential to limit physical and immune injury, to produce bioactive molecules and to regenerate tissues. MSCs are phenotypically heterogeneous, and distinct subpopulations within MSC cultures are presumed to contribute to tissue repair and the modulation of allogeneic immune responses. As the first example of efficacy, clinical trials for prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cell transplantation show that MSCs can effectively treat human disease. The view of the mechanisms whereby MSCs function as immunomodulatory and reparative cells has evolved simultaneously. Initially, donor MSC were thought to replace damaged cells in injured tissues of the recipient. More recently, however, it has become increasingly clear that even transient MSC engraftment may exert favorable effects through the secretion of cytokines and other paracrine factors, which engage and recruit recipient cells in productive tissue repair. Thus, an important reason to investigate MSCs in mechanistic preclinical models and in clinical trials with well defined end-points and controls is to better understand the therapeutic potential of these multifunctional cells. Here, we review the controversies and recent insights into MSC biology, the regulation of alloresponses by MSCs in preclinical models, as well as clinical experience with MSC infusions and the challenges of manufacturing a ready supply of highly defined transplantable MSCs. PMID:20597105

  12. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  13. Concurrent inhibition of MYC and BCL2 is a potentially effective treatment strategy for double hit and triple hit B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Munevver; Rosenfelt, Fred; Rokhsar, Sepehr; Lopategui, Jean; Pillai, Raju; Cervania, Melissa; Pao, Andy; Cinar, Bekir; Alkan, Serhan

    2015-07-01

    Double hit lymphoma or triple hit lymphoma (DHL/THL) is a rare form of aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma. Overexpression of MYC, BCL2 or/and BCL6 due to genomic rearrangements are the key molecular features of DHL/THL. Patients with DHL/THL show very aggressive disease course and poor survival due to the lack of effective treatment modalities. Here, we established new THL cell model and assessed its in vitro growth characteristics along with the DHL cell line in response to potent MYC inhibitors, 10058-F4 and JQ-1, and a BCL2 inhibitor, ABT-199, with or without chemotherapeutic agent vincristine or doxorubicin. We found that 10058-F4, JQ-1 or ABT-199 exposure as a single agent inhibited the growth of DHL/THL cells in a dose-dependent manner. Combined exposure of 10058-F4 or JQ-1 and ABT-199 as well as vincristine or doxorubicin markedly suppressed the growth of DHL/THL cells compared with the single treatment. As assessed by multiple approaches, apoptosis induced by ABT-199, 10058-F4 or JQ-1 was underlying cause of the observed growth suppression. These findings suggest that co-inhibition of MYC and BCL2 signaling is a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with DHL/THL lymphomas.

  14. A "Hit and Run" Approach to Inducible Direct Reprogramming of Astrocytes to Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Poulou, Maria; Mandalos, Nikolaos P; Karnavas, Theodoros; Saridaki, Marannia; McKay, Ronald D G; Remboutsika, Eumorphia

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial control of gene expression can be achieved using an inducible system as a fundamental tool for regulated transcription in basic, applied and eventually in clinical research. We describe a novel "hit and run" inducible direct reprogramming approach. In a single step, 2 days post-transfection, transiently transfected Sox2(FLAG) under the Leu3p-αIPM inducible control (iSox2) triggers the activation of endogenous Sox2, redirecting primary astrocytes into abundant distinct nestin-positive radial glia cells. This technique introduces a unique novel tool for safe, rapid and efficient reprogramming amendable to regenerative medicine. PMID:27148066

  15. Hepatitis C and double-hit B cell lymphoma successfully treated by antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Giovanni; Rampa, Lorenzo; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Marino, Mirella; Pisani, Francesco; Cota, Carlo; Guidi, Alessandro; Picardi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    B cells lymphoma is one of the most challenging extra-hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Recently, a new kind of B-cell lymphoma, named double-hit B (DHL), was characterized with an aggressive clinical course whereas a potential association with HCV was not investigated. The new antiviral direct agents (DAAs) against HCV are effective and curative in the majority of HCV infections. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of DHL and HCV-infection successfully treated by new DAAs. According to our experience, a DHL must be suspected in case of HCV-related lymphoma, and an early diagnosis could direct towards a different hematological management because a worse prognosis might be expected. A possible effect of DAAs on DHL regression should be investigated, but eradicating HCV would avoid life-threatening reactivation of viral hepatitis during pharmacological immunosuppression in onco-haematological diseases. PMID:27803769

  16. Galactic cosmic rays and cell-hit frequencies outside the magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Letaw, J R

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of the exposure of space travelers to galactic cosmic radiation outside the earth's magnetosphere is made by calculating fluences of high-energy primary and secondary particles with various charges traversing a sphere of area 100 microns2. Calculations relating to two shielding configurations are presented: the center of a spherical aluminum shell of thickness 1 g/cm2, and the center of a 4 g/cm2 thick aluminum spherical shell within which there is a 30 g/cm2 diameter spherical water phantom with the point of interest 5 g/cm2 from the surface. The area of 100 microns2 was chosen to simulate the nucleus of a cell in the body. The frequencies as a function of charge component in both shielding configurations reflects the odd-even disparity of the incident particle abundances. For a three-year mission, 33% of the cells in the more heavily shielded configuration would be hit by at least one particle with Z greater than 10. Six percent would be hit by at least two such particles. This emphasizes the importance of studying single high-Z particle effects both on cells which might be "at risk" for cancer induction and on critical neural cells or networks which might be vulnerable to inactivation by heavy charged particle tracks. Synergistic effects with the more numerous high-energy protons and helium ions cannot be ruled out. In terms of more conventional radiation risk assessment, the dose equivalent decreased by a factor of 2.85 from free space to that in the more heavily shielded configuration. Roughly half of this was due to the decrease in energy deposition (absorbed dose) and half to the decrease in biological effectiveness (quality factor).

  17. Radial junction solar cells based on heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haoting

    The radial junction wire array structure was previously proposed as a solar cell geometry to separate the direction of carrier collection from the direction of light absorption, thereby circumventing the need to use high quality but expensive single crystal silicon (c-Si) material that has long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The Si radial junction structure can be realized by forming radial p-n junctions on Si pillar/wire arrays that have a diameter comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. With proper design, the Si pillar arrays are also able to enhance light trapping and thereby increase the light absorption. However, the larger junction area and surface area on the pillar arrays compared to traditional planar junction Si solar cells makes it challenging to fabricate high performance devices due an in increase in surface defects. Therefore, effective surface passivation strategies are essential for radial junction devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure has previously been demonstrated as a very effective surface passivation layer for planar c-Si solar cells. It is therefore of interest to use a-Si:H in a HIT layer structure for radial p-n junction c-Si pillar array solar cells. This poses several challenges, however, including the need to fabricate ultra-thin a-Si:H layers conformally on high aspect ratio Si pillars, control the crystallinity at the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to yield a low interface state density and optimize the layer thicknesses, doping and contacts to yield high performance devices. This research in this thesis was aimed at developing the processing technology required to apply the HIT structure to radial junction Si pillar array solar cell devices and to evaluate the device characteristics. Initial studies focused on understanding the effects of process conditions on the growth rate and

  18. Single-hit potentially lethal damage: evidence of its repair in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Hill, C.K.; Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.

    1981-09-01

    Following mid to large doses of X rays, or of fission spectrum neutrons, the repair of potentially lethal damage in V79 Chinese hamster cells can be inhibited by anisotonic phosphate-buffered saline or by medium containing 90% D/sub 2/O. The foregoing post-treatments do not affect the viability of unirradiated cells. Using single synchronized cells irradiated in late S-phase, the most resistant phase of the cell cycle, repair of potentially lethal damage in late S-phase, the most resistant phase of the cell cycle, repair of potentially lethal damage in the single-hit, initially exponential, or small-dose part of the survival curve was examined. The use of synchronized cells avoids misinterpretations due to population heterogeneity. The slope of the small-dose, exponential region of the neutron survival curve is much steeper than that of the x-ray survival curve. Even so, it is demonstrated with post-treatments consisting of hypertonic phosphate-buffered saline, medium containing D/sub 2/O,adiation is connected with their proliferation but not with the migration out from lymphoid organs.

  19. Radial junction solar cells based on heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haoting

    The radial junction wire array structure was previously proposed as a solar cell geometry to separate the direction of carrier collection from the direction of light absorption, thereby circumventing the need to use high quality but expensive single crystal silicon (c-Si) material that has long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The Si radial junction structure can be realized by forming radial p-n junctions on Si pillar/wire arrays that have a diameter comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. With proper design, the Si pillar arrays are also able to enhance light trapping and thereby increase the light absorption. However, the larger junction area and surface area on the pillar arrays compared to traditional planar junction Si solar cells makes it challenging to fabricate high performance devices due an in increase in surface defects. Therefore, effective surface passivation strategies are essential for radial junction devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure has previously been demonstrated as a very effective surface passivation layer for planar c-Si solar cells. It is therefore of interest to use a-Si:H in a HIT layer structure for radial p-n junction c-Si pillar array solar cells. This poses several challenges, however, including the need to fabricate ultra-thin a-Si:H layers conformally on high aspect ratio Si pillars, control the crystallinity at the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to yield a low interface state density and optimize the layer thicknesses, doping and contacts to yield high performance devices. This research in this thesis was aimed at developing the processing technology required to apply the HIT structure to radial junction Si pillar array solar cell devices and to evaluate the device characteristics. Initial studies focused on understanding the effects of process conditions on the growth rate and

  20. Probability of cell hits in selected organs and tissues by high-LET particles at the ISS orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuda, H.; Komiyama, T.; Fujitaka, K.; Badhwar, G. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The fluence of high-LET particles (HLP) with LET infinity H2O greater than 15 keV micrometers-1 in selected organs and tissues were measured with plastic nuclear track detectors using a life-size human phantom on the 9th Shuttle-Mir Mission (STS-91). The planar-track fluence of HLP during the 9.8-day mission ranged from 1.9 x 10(3) n cm-2 (bladder) to 5.1 x 10(3) n cm-2 (brain) by a factor of 2.7. Based on these data, a probability of HLP hits to a matured cell of each organ or tissue was roughly estimated for a 90-day ISS mission. In the calculation, all cells were assumed to be spheres with a geometric cross-sectional area of 500 micrometers2 and the cell-hit frequency from isotropic space radiation can be described by the Poisson-distribution function. As results, the probability of one or more than 1 hit to a single cell by HLP for 90 days ranged from 17% to 38%; that of two or more than 2 hits was estimated to be 1.3-8.2%. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of disruption of actin filaments by Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin on insulin secretion in HIT-T15 cells and pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Li, G; Rungger-Brändle, E; Just, I; Jonas, J C; Aktories, K; Wollheim, C B

    1994-01-01

    To examine their role in insulin secretion, actin filaments (AFs) were disrupted by Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin that ADP-ribosylates G-actin. Ribosylation also prevents polymerization of G-actin to F-actin and inhibits AF assembly by capping the fast-growing end of F-actin. Pretreatment of HIT-T15 cells with the toxin inhibited stimulated insulin secretion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The toxin did not affect cellular insulin content or nonstimulated secretion. In static incubation, toxin treatment caused 45-50% inhibition of secretion induced by nutrients alone (10 mM glucose + 5 mM glutamine + 5 mM leucine) or combined with bombesin (phospholipase C-activator) and 20% reduction of that potentiated by forskolin (stimulator of adenylyl cyclase). In perifusion, the stimulated secretion during the first phase was marginally diminished, whereas the second phase was inhibited by approximately 80%. Pretreatment of HIT cells with wartmannin, a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, caused a similar pattern of inhibition of the biphasic insulin release as C2 toxin. Nutrient metabolism and bombesin-evoked rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ were not affected by C2 toxin, indicating that nutrient recognition and the coupling between receptor activation and second messenger generation was not changed. In the toxin-treated cells, the AF web beneath the plasma membrane and the diffuse cytoplasmic F-actin fibers disappeared, as shown both by staining with an antibody against G- and F-actin and by staining F-actin with fluorescent phallacidin. C2 toxin dose-dependently reduced cellular F-actin content. Stimulation of insulin secretion was not associated with changes in F-actin content and organization. Treatment of cells with cytochalasin E and B, which shorten AFs, inhibited the stimulated insulin release by 30-50% although differing in their effects on F-actin content. In contrast to HIT-T15 cells, insulin secretion was potentiated in isolated rat islets after disruption of

  2. Mozambique Hit by a Flood Disaster, Again: What Role for the Scientific Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonse, A. H.; Zucula, P.

    2007-05-01

    The Lower Zambezi basin in Mozambique covers an area of approximately 225,000 km2 from the Cahora Bassa Reservoir to the Zambezi Delta, and supports more than 3.8 million people (25% of the total population of Mozambique). The Zambezi Delta is a broad, flat alluvial plain along the coast of central Mozambique. Some 800 Mozambicans died in floods caused by two cyclones in 2000 and 2001 in the Zambezi River Valley in central Mozambique. Recently, seven years later, the same Zambezi River Valley was hit by heavy rain which was followed by Cyclone Favio. This event triggered flash floods along the Zambezi River and its tributaries, washing away homes, bridges, livestock and crops, and killing at least 45 people. The country's national relief agency INGC established an emergency operation centre to coordinate relief operations. By February 25, 2007, 53,000 people have been moved to accommodation centers and an estimated 36,000 people have lost virtually all their possessions. Due to the extent of the flooded area, rescue and supply operations are very difficult, and conditioned upon the availability of helicopters. Temporary accommodation centres have faced problems of food and fuel shortages, and delays in the distribution of food and fresh water are raising concerns with malnutrition and the outbreak of waterborne diseases. One of the major problems in the region is water management and regulation. The main structure to regulate water discharge in the Zambezi River is the Mozambique's largest Hydro-electric dam, Cahora Bassa. Water regulation from this structure during floods is particularly difficult due to transnational inflows passing through the neighbouring countries of Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Since the flood disaster of 2000/2001 occurred, the need to improve and strengthen disaster prevention has been a high priority of the Mozambique Government and its donors. Mozambique's Action Plan for the reduction of Absolute Poverty identified vulnerability to such

  3. Φ-score: A cell-to-cell phenotypic scoring method for sensitive and selective hit discovery in cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Laurent; Lajaunie, Christian; Fer, Frédéric; Bhajun, Ricky; Sulpice, Eric; Pinna, Guillaume; Campalans, Anna; Radicella, J Pablo; Rouillier, Philippe; Mary, Mélissa; Combe, Stéphanie; Obeid, Patricia; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Gidrol, Xavier

    2015-09-18

    Phenotypic screening monitors phenotypic changes induced by perturbations, including those generated by drugs or RNA interference. Currently-used methods for scoring screen hits have proven to be problematic, particularly when applied to physiologically relevant conditions such as low cell numbers or inefficient transfection. Here, we describe the Φ-score, which is a novel scoring method for the identification of phenotypic modifiers or hits in cell-based screens. Φ-score performance was assessed with simulations, a validation experiment and its application to gene identification in a large-scale RNAi screen. Using robust statistics and a variance model, we demonstrated that the Φ-score showed better sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility compared to classical approaches. The improved performance of the Φ-score paves the way for cell-based screening of primary cells, which are often difficult to obtain from patients in sufficient numbers. We also describe a dedicated merging procedure to pool scores from small interfering RNAs targeting the same gene so as to provide improved visualization and hit selection.

  4. A screen against Leishmania intracellular amastigotes: comparison to a promastigote screen and identification of a host cell-specific hit.

    PubMed

    De Muylder, Geraldine; Ang, Kenny K H; Chen, Steven; Arkin, Michelle R; Engel, Juan C; McKerrow, James H

    2011-07-01

    The ability to screen compounds in a high-throughput manner is essential in the process of small molecule drug discovery. Critical to the success of screening strategies is the proper design of the assay, often implying a compromise between ease/speed and a biologically relevant setting. Leishmaniasis is a major neglected disease with limited therapeutic options. In order to streamline efforts for the design of productive drug screens against Leishmania, we compared the efficiency of two screening methods, one targeting the free living and easily cultured promastigote (insect-infective) stage, the other targeting the clinically relevant but more difficult to culture intra-macrophage amastigote (mammal-infective) stage. Screening of a 909-member library of bioactive compounds against Leishmania donovani revealed 59 hits in the promastigote primary screen and 27 in the intracellular amastigote screen, with 26 hits shared by both screens. This suggested that screening against the promastigote stage, although more suitable for automation, fails to identify all active compounds and leads to numerous false positive hits. Of particular interest was the identification of one compound specific to the infective amastigote stage of the parasite. This compound affects intracellular but not axenic parasites, suggesting a host cell-dependent mechanism of action, opening new avenues for anti-leishmanial chemotherapy. PMID:21811648

  5. "Hit the ground running": perspectives of new nurses and nurse managers on role transition and integration of new graduates.

    PubMed

    Chernomas, Wanda M; Care, W Dean; McKenzie, Jo-Ann Lapointe; Guse, Lorna; Currie, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The workplace for new graduates must be a constructive learning environment to facilitate their development. Nurse managers need new graduates who can "hit the ground running." Conflict between the needs of new nurses and the realities of the workplace often creates role confusion and tension in new graduates and threatens employers' ability to retain them. As part of a larger study that examined the effectiveness of a new strategy on new nurse retention and workplace integration, we conducted focus groups with new nurses and nurse managers. This paper discusses the perspectives of new nurses on their role transition from graduates to practising professionals and the perspectives of nurse managers on the workplace integration of new nurses. The thematic findings integrate new nurses' perspectives on their needs during role transition with the perspectives of nurse managers in meeting those needs. The discussion includes strategies to facilitate successful transition and integration of new nurses into the workplace within the context of recruitment and retention. PMID:20160525

  6. A “Hit and Run” Approach to Inducible Direct Reprogramming of Astrocytes to Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Maria; Mandalos, Nikolaos P.; Karnavas, Theodoros; Saridaki, Marannia; McKay, Ronald D. G.; Remboutsika, Eumorphia

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial control of gene expression can be achieved using an inducible system as a fundamental tool for regulated transcription in basic, applied and eventually in clinical research. We describe a novel “hit and run” inducible direct reprogramming approach. In a single step, 2 days post-transfection, transiently transfected Sox2FLAG under the Leu3p-αIPM inducible control (iSox2) triggers the activation of endogenous Sox2, redirecting primary astrocytes into abundant distinct nestin-positive radial glia cells. This technique introduces a unique novel tool for safe, rapid and efficient reprogramming amendable to regenerative medicine. PMID:27148066

  7. A role for dual viral hits in causation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A; Dales, Samuel; Tishon, Antoinette; Lewicki, Hanna; Martin, Lee

    2005-11-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disease associated with persistent infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by measles virus (MV), biased hypermutations of the viral genome affecting primarily the matrix (M) gene with the conversion of U to C and A to G bases, high titers of antibodies to MV, and infiltration of B cells and T cells into the CNS. Neither the precipitating event nor biology underlying the MV infection is understood, nor is their any satisfactory treatment. We report the creation of a transgenic mouse model that mimics the cardinal features of SSPE. This was achieved by initially infecting mice expressing the MV receptor with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus Cl 13, a virus that transiently suppressed their immune system. Infection by MV 10 days later resulted in persistent MV infection of neurons. Analysis of brains from infected mice showed the biased U to C hypermutations in the MV M gene and T and B lymphocyte infiltration. These sera contained high titers of antibodies to MV. Thus, a small animal model is now available to both molecularly probe the pathogenesis of SSPE and to test a variety of therapies to treat the disease. PMID:16260490

  8. A genome-wide CNV analysis of schizophrenia reveals a potential role for a multiple-hit model.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Danielle S; Axelsen, Michael; Epping, Eric A; Andreasen, Nancy C; Wassink, Thomas H

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe psychiatric disorder that is highly heritable. While both common and rare genetic variants contribute to disease risk, many questions still remain about disease etiology. We performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variants (CNVs) in 166 schizophrenia subjects and 52 psychiatrically healthy controls. First, overall CNV characteristics were compared between cases and controls. The only statistically significant finding was that deletions comprised a greater proportion of CNVs in cases. High interest CNVs were then identified as conservative using the following filtering criteria: (i) known deleterious CNVs; (ii) CNVs > 1 Mb that were novel (not found in a database of control individuals); and (iii) CNVs < 1 Mb that were novel and that overlapped the coding region of a gene of interest. Cases did not harbor a higher proportion of conservative CNVs in comparison to controls. However, similar to previous reports, cases had a slightly higher proportion of individuals with clinically significant CNVs (known deleterious or conservative CNVs > 1 Mb) or with multiple conservative CNVs. Two case individuals with the highest burden of conservative CNVs also share a recurrent 15q11.2 BP1-2 deletion, indicating a role for a potential multiple-hit CNV model for schizophrenia. In total, we report three 15q11.2 BP1-2 deletion individuals with schizophrenia, adding to a growing body of evidence that this CNV is involved in disease etiology.

  9. Transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma causing hypercalcemia in a 69-year-old female: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Sakshi; Levin, Miles B

    2014-01-01

    Double hit B-cell lymphomas are rare tumors that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint, mainly a t(14;18)(q32;q21) involving BCL2. These tumors mostly occur in adults and carry a very poor prognosis. Double hit lymphomas can occur de novo, or arise from transformation of follicular lymphoma. We report a case of a 69-year-old female with abdominal distention and progressively worsening weakness over six months. Patient presented with severe hypercalcemia and multiple intra-abdominal/pelvic masses. Histopathology results of the abdominal mass were compatible with a double hit B-cell lymphoma. However, bone marrow biopsy results showed a low grade follicular lymphoma, thus suggesting peripheral transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma. Patient was transferred to a tertiary care center and was started on combination chemotherapy (EPOCH: doxorubicin, etoposide, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone). Our paper highlights not only transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma and the challenges encountered in diagnosing and treating these aggressive tumors, but also the association of new onset/worsening hypercalcemia in such patients.

  10. Transformation of Follicular Lymphoma to Double Hit B-Cell Lymphoma Causing Hypercalcemia in a 69-Year-Old Female: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Double hit B-cell lymphomas are rare tumors that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint, mainly a t(14;18)(q32;q21) involving BCL2. These tumors mostly occur in adults and carry a very poor prognosis. Double hit lymphomas can occur de novo, or arise from transformation of follicular lymphoma. We report a case of a 69-year-old female with abdominal distention and progressively worsening weakness over six months. Patient presented with severe hypercalcemia and multiple intra-abdominal/pelvic masses. Histopathology results of the abdominal mass were compatible with a double hit B-cell lymphoma. However, bone marrow biopsy results showed a low grade follicular lymphoma, thus suggesting peripheral transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma. Patient was transferred to a tertiary care center and was started on combination chemotherapy (EPOCH: doxorubicin, etoposide, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone). Our paper highlights not only transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma and the challenges encountered in diagnosing and treating these aggressive tumors, but also the association of new onset/worsening hypercalcemia in such patients. PMID:25161781

  11. Novel Double-Hit Model of Radiation and Hyperoxia-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage Relevant to Space Travel

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Lehman, Stacey L.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Solomides, Pantelis; Koch, Cameron J.; Mishra, Om P.; Koumenis, Constantinos; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight occasionally requires multiple extravehicular activities (EVA) that potentially subject astronauts to repeated changes in ambient oxygen superimposed on those of space radiation exposure. We thus developed a novel in vitro model system to test lung cell damage following repeated exposure to radiation and hyperoxia. Non-tumorigenic murine alveolar type II epithelial cells (C10) were exposed to >95% O2 for 8 h only (O2), 0.25 Gy ionizing γ-radiation (IR) only, or a double-hit combination of both challenges (O2 + IR) followed by 16 h of normoxia (ambient air containing 21% O2 and 5% CO2) (1 cycle = 24 h, 2 cycles = 48 h). Cell survival, DNA damage, apoptosis, and indicators of oxidative stress were evaluated after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in cell survival across all challenge conditions along with an increase in DNA damage, determined by Comet analysis and H2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis, determined by Annexin-V staining, relative to cells unexposed to hyperoxia or radiation. DNA damage (GADD45α and cleaved-PARP), apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3 and BAX), and antioxidant (HO-1 and Nqo1) proteins were increased following radiation and hyperoxia exposure after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. Importantly, exposure to combination challenge O2 + IR exacerbated cell death and DNA damage compared to individual exposures O2 or IR alone. Additionally levels of cell cycle proteins phospho-p53 and p21 were significantly increased, while levels of CDK1 and Cyclin B1 were decreased at both time points for all exposure groups. Similarly, proteins involved in cell cycle arrest was more profoundly changed with the combination challenges as compared to each stressor alone. These results correlate with a significant 4- to 6-fold increase in the ratio of cells in G2/G1 after 2 cycles of exposure to hyperoxic conditions. We have characterized a novel in vitro model of double-hit, low-level radiation and hyperoxia exposure that

  12. Reconstitution of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells with somatostatin transcription factor-1 partially restores insulin promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Harmon, J S; Tanaka, Y; Olson, L K; Robertson, R P

    1998-06-01

    We have reported that chronic culture of HIT-T15 cells in medium containing supraphysiologic glucose concentrations (11.1 mmol/l) causes a decrease in insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin release. Furthermore, decreases in insulin gene transcription and binding activity of two essential beta-cell transcription factors, somatostatin transcription factor-1 (STF-1; also known as GSTF, IDX-1, IPF-1, PDX-1, and GSF) and RIPE-3b1 activator, are associated with this glucotoxic effect. In this study, we observed that the loss of RIPE-3b1 occurs much earlier (79% decrease at passage [p]81) than the loss of STF-1 (65% decrease at p104), with abolishment of both factors by p122. Since the STF-1, but not the RIPE-3b1 activator, gene has been cloned, we examined its restorative effects on insulin gene promoter activity after reconstitution with STF-1 cDNA. Basal insulin promoter activities normalized to early (p71-74) passage cells (1.000 +/- 0.069) were 0.4066 +/- 0.093 and 0.142 +/- 0.034 for intermediate (p102-106) and late (p118-122) passage cells, respectively. Early, intermediate, and late passage cells, all chronically cultured in medium containing 11.1 mmol/l glucose, were transfected with STF-1 alone or cotransfected with E2-5, an E-box factor known to be synergistically associated with STF-1. Compared with basal levels, we observed a trend toward an increase in insulin promoter activity in intermediate passage cells with STF-1 transfection (1.43-fold) that became a significant increase when E2-5 was cotransfected (1.78-fold). In late passage cells, transfection of STF-1 alone significantly stimulated a 2.2-fold increase in the insulin promoter activity. Cotransfection of STF-1 and E2-5 in late passage cells stimulated insulin promoter activity 2.8-fold, which was 40% of the activity observed in early passage cells. Control studies in glucotoxic betaTC-6 cells deficient in RIPE-3b1 activator but not STF-1 did not demonstrate an increase in insulin promoter

  13. Reconstitution of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells with somatostatin transcription factor-1 partially restores insulin promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Harmon, J S; Tanaka, Y; Olson, L K; Robertson, R P

    1998-06-01

    We have reported that chronic culture of HIT-T15 cells in medium containing supraphysiologic glucose concentrations (11.1 mmol/l) causes a decrease in insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin release. Furthermore, decreases in insulin gene transcription and binding activity of two essential beta-cell transcription factors, somatostatin transcription factor-1 (STF-1; also known as GSTF, IDX-1, IPF-1, PDX-1, and GSF) and RIPE-3b1 activator, are associated with this glucotoxic effect. In this study, we observed that the loss of RIPE-3b1 occurs much earlier (79% decrease at passage [p]81) than the loss of STF-1 (65% decrease at p104), with abolishment of both factors by p122. Since the STF-1, but not the RIPE-3b1 activator, gene has been cloned, we examined its restorative effects on insulin gene promoter activity after reconstitution with STF-1 cDNA. Basal insulin promoter activities normalized to early (p71-74) passage cells (1.000 +/- 0.069) were 0.4066 +/- 0.093 and 0.142 +/- 0.034 for intermediate (p102-106) and late (p118-122) passage cells, respectively. Early, intermediate, and late passage cells, all chronically cultured in medium containing 11.1 mmol/l glucose, were transfected with STF-1 alone or cotransfected with E2-5, an E-box factor known to be synergistically associated with STF-1. Compared with basal levels, we observed a trend toward an increase in insulin promoter activity in intermediate passage cells with STF-1 transfection (1.43-fold) that became a significant increase when E2-5 was cotransfected (1.78-fold). In late passage cells, transfection of STF-1 alone significantly stimulated a 2.2-fold increase in the insulin promoter activity. Cotransfection of STF-1 and E2-5 in late passage cells stimulated insulin promoter activity 2.8-fold, which was 40% of the activity observed in early passage cells. Control studies in glucotoxic betaTC-6 cells deficient in RIPE-3b1 activator but not STF-1 did not demonstrate an increase in insulin promoter

  14. Novel Double-Hit Model of Radiation and Hyperoxia-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage Relevant to Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Lehman, Stacey L; Arguiri, Evguenia; Solomides, Pantelis; Koch, Cameron J; Mishra, Om P; Koumenis, Constantinos; Goodwin, Thomas J; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-06-16

    Spaceflight occasionally requires multiple extravehicular activities (EVA) that potentially subject astronauts to repeated changes in ambient oxygen superimposed on those of space radiation exposure. We thus developed a novel in vitro model system to test lung cell damage following repeated exposure to radiation and hyperoxia. Non-tumorigenic murine alveolar type II epithelial cells (C10) were exposed to >95% O₂ for 8 h only (O₂), 0.25 Gy ionizing γ-radiation (IR) only, or a double-hit combination of both challenges (O₂ + IR) followed by 16 h of normoxia (ambient air containing 21% O₂ and 5% CO₂) (1 cycle = 24 h, 2 cycles = 48 h). Cell survival, DNA damage, apoptosis, and indicators of oxidative stress were evaluated after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in cell survival across all challenge conditions along with an increase in DNA damage, determined by Comet analysis and H2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis, determined by Annexin-V staining, relative to cells unexposed to hyperoxia or radiation. DNA damage (GADD45α and cleaved-PARP), apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3 and BAX), and antioxidant (HO-1 and Nqo1) proteins were increased following radiation and hyperoxia exposure after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. Importantly, exposure to combination challenge O₂ + IR exacerbated cell death and DNA damage compared to individual exposures O₂ or IR alone. Additionally levels of cell cycle proteins phospho-p53 and p21 were significantly increased, while levels of CDK1 and Cyclin B1 were decreased at both time points for all exposure groups. Similarly, proteins involved in cell cycle arrest was more profoundly changed with the combination challenges as compared to each stressor alone. These results correlate with a significant 4- to 6-fold increase in the ratio of cells in G2/G1 after 2 cycles of exposure to hyperoxic conditions. We have characterized a novel in vitro model of double-hit, low-level radiation and hyperoxia

  15. Novel Double-Hit Model of Radiation and Hyperoxia-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage Relevant to Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Lehman, Stacey L; Arguiri, Evguenia; Solomides, Pantelis; Koch, Cameron J; Mishra, Om P; Koumenis, Constantinos; Goodwin, Thomas J; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight occasionally requires multiple extravehicular activities (EVA) that potentially subject astronauts to repeated changes in ambient oxygen superimposed on those of space radiation exposure. We thus developed a novel in vitro model system to test lung cell damage following repeated exposure to radiation and hyperoxia. Non-tumorigenic murine alveolar type II epithelial cells (C10) were exposed to >95% O₂ for 8 h only (O₂), 0.25 Gy ionizing γ-radiation (IR) only, or a double-hit combination of both challenges (O₂ + IR) followed by 16 h of normoxia (ambient air containing 21% O₂ and 5% CO₂) (1 cycle = 24 h, 2 cycles = 48 h). Cell survival, DNA damage, apoptosis, and indicators of oxidative stress were evaluated after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in cell survival across all challenge conditions along with an increase in DNA damage, determined by Comet analysis and H2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis, determined by Annexin-V staining, relative to cells unexposed to hyperoxia or radiation. DNA damage (GADD45α and cleaved-PARP), apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3 and BAX), and antioxidant (HO-1 and Nqo1) proteins were increased following radiation and hyperoxia exposure after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. Importantly, exposure to combination challenge O₂ + IR exacerbated cell death and DNA damage compared to individual exposures O₂ or IR alone. Additionally levels of cell cycle proteins phospho-p53 and p21 were significantly increased, while levels of CDK1 and Cyclin B1 were decreased at both time points for all exposure groups. Similarly, proteins involved in cell cycle arrest was more profoundly changed with the combination challenges as compared to each stressor alone. These results correlate with a significant 4- to 6-fold increase in the ratio of cells in G2/G1 after 2 cycles of exposure to hyperoxic conditions. We have characterized a novel in vitro model of double-hit, low-level radiation and hyperoxia

  16. Determinants of glucose toxicity and its reversibility in the pancreatic islet beta-cell line, HIT-T15.

    PubMed

    Gleason, C E; Gonzalez, M; Harmon, J S; Robertson, R P

    2000-11-01

    HIT-T15 cells, a clonal beta-cell line, were cultured and passaged weekly for 6 mo in RPMI 1640 media containing various concentrations of glucose. Insulin content decreased in the intermediate- and late-passage cells as a continuous rather than a threshold glucose concentration effect. In a second series of experiments, cells were grown in media containing either 0.8 or 16.0 mM glucose from passages 76 through 105. Subcultures of passages 86, 92, and 99 that had been grown in media containing 16.0 mM glucose were switched to media containing 0.8 mM glucose and also carried forward to passage 105. Dramatic increases in insulin content and secretion and insulin gene expression were observed when the switches were made at passages 86 and 92 but not when the switch was made at passage 99. These findings suggest that glucose toxicity of insulin-secreting cells is a continuous rather than a threshold function of glucose concentration and that the shorter the period of antecedent glucose toxicity, the more likely that full recovery of cell function will occur. PMID:11052953

  17. Determinants of glucose toxicity and its reversibility in the pancreatic islet beta-cell line, HIT-T15.

    PubMed

    Gleason, C E; Gonzalez, M; Harmon, J S; Robertson, R P

    2000-11-01

    HIT-T15 cells, a clonal beta-cell line, were cultured and passaged weekly for 6 mo in RPMI 1640 media containing various concentrations of glucose. Insulin content decreased in the intermediate- and late-passage cells as a continuous rather than a threshold glucose concentration effect. In a second series of experiments, cells were grown in media containing either 0.8 or 16.0 mM glucose from passages 76 through 105. Subcultures of passages 86, 92, and 99 that had been grown in media containing 16.0 mM glucose were switched to media containing 0.8 mM glucose and also carried forward to passage 105. Dramatic increases in insulin content and secretion and insulin gene expression were observed when the switches were made at passages 86 and 92 but not when the switch was made at passage 99. These findings suggest that glucose toxicity of insulin-secreting cells is a continuous rather than a threshold function of glucose concentration and that the shorter the period of antecedent glucose toxicity, the more likely that full recovery of cell function will occur.

  18. Beyond Hit-and-Run: Stem Cells Leave a Lasting Memory.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kelvin S; Kuncewicz, Thomas M; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-10-01

    While mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are rapidly cleared from the body following systemic transplantation, their therapeutic benefits typically persist. In this issue, Liu et al. (2015) reveal that the ability of transplanted MSCs to alleviate osteoporosis in systemic lupus erythematosus is maintained through epigenetic changes conferred by secretory action of the MSCs.

  19. Cell death-independent functions of granzymes: hit viruses where it hurts.

    PubMed

    van Domselaar, Robert; Bovenschen, Niels

    2011-09-01

    Granule exocytosis by cytotoxic lymphocytes is the key mechanism of our immune response to eliminate virus-infected cells. These lytic granules contain the pore-forming protein perforin and a set of five serine proteases called granzymes (GrA, GrB, GrH, GrK, GrM) that display distinct substrate specificities. Granzymes have mostly been studied for their ability to induce cell death. However, viruses have evolved many inhibitors to effectively block apoptosis. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also use noncytotoxic strategies to inhibit viral replication and potential viral reactivation from latency. Granzymes directly cleave viral or host cell proteins that are required in the viral life cycle. Furthermore, granzymes induce a pro-inflammatory cytokine response to create an antiviral environment. In this review, we summarize and discuss these novel strategies by which the immune system counteracts viral infections, and we will address the potential therapeutic applications that could emerge from this intriguing mechanism. PMID:21714121

  20. Formulation of the Multi-Hit Model With a Non-Poisson Distribution of Hits

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We proposed a formulation of the multi-hit single-target model in which the Poisson distribution of hits was replaced by a combination of two distributions: one for the number of particles entering the target and one for the number of hits a particle entering the target produces. Such an approach reflects the fact that radiation damage is a result of two different random processes: particle emission by a radiation source and interaction of particles with matter inside the target. Methods and Materials: Poisson distribution is well justified for the first of the two processes. The second distribution depends on how a hit is defined. To test our approach, we assumed that the second distribution was also a Poisson distribution. The two distributions combined resulted in a non-Poisson distribution. We tested the proposed model by comparing it with previously reported data for DNA single- and double-strand breaks induced by protons and electrons, for survival of a range of cell lines, and variation of the initial slopes of survival curves with radiation quality for heavy-ion beams. Results: Analysis of cell survival equations for this new model showed that they had realistic properties overall, such as the initial and high-dose slopes of survival curves, the shoulder, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) In most cases tested, a better fit of survival curves was achieved with the new model than with the linear-quadratic model. The results also suggested that the proposed approach may extend the multi-hit model beyond its traditional role in analysis of survival curves to predicting effects of radiation quality and analysis of DNA strand breaks. Conclusions: Our model, although conceptually simple, performed well in all tests. The model was able to consistently fit data for both cell survival and DNA single- and double-strand breaks. It correctly predicted the dependence of radiation effects on parameters of radiation quality.

  1. B-cell lymphomas with concurrent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than translocations behave similarly to MYC/BCL2 double-hit lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Seegmiller, Adam C; Lin, Pei; Wang, Xuan J; Miranda, Roberto N; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Large B-cell lymphomas with IGH@BCL2 and MYC rearrangement, known as double-hit lymphoma (DHL), are clinically aggressive neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Some large B-cell lymphomas have concurrent abnormalities of MYC and BCL2 other than coexistent translocations. Little is known about patients with these lymphomas designated here as atypical DHL. We studied 40 patients of atypical DHL including 21 men and 19 women, with a median age of 60 years. Nine (23%) patients had a history of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There were 30 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma, and 3 DLBCL with coexistent follicular lymphoma. CD10, BCL2, and MYC were expressed in 28/39 (72%), 33/35 (94%), and 14/20 (70%) cases, respectively. Patients were treated with standard (n=14) or more aggressive chemotherapy regimens (n=17). We compared the atypical DHL group with 76 patients with DHLand 35 patients with DLBCL lacking MYC and BCL2 abnormalities. The clinicopathologic features and therapies were similar between patients with atypical and typical DHL. The overall survival of patients with atypical double-hit lymphoma was similar to that of patients with double-hit lymphoma (P=0.47) and significantly worse than that of patients with DLBCL with normal MYC and BCL2 (P=0.02). There were some minor differences. Cases of atypical double-hit lymphoma more often have DLBCL morphology (P<0.01), less frequently expressed CD10 (P<0.01), and patients less often had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P=0.01). In aggregate, these results support expanding the category of MYC/BCL2 DHL to include large B-cell lymphomas with coexistent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than concurrent translocations. PMID:25103070

  2. Development and characterization of an Fv-1-sensitive retrovirus-packaging system: single-hit titration kinetics observed in restrictive cells.

    PubMed

    Boone, L R; Innes, C L; Glover, P L; Linney, E

    1989-06-01

    We have constructed an RNA-packaging-deficient mutant of N-tropic murine leukemia virus WN1802N by removal of 330 nucleotides located between the upstream long terminal repeat and the start of the gag gene region. Transfection into mink CCL64 cells produced a cell line capable of packaging retrovirus vectors into ecotropic, Fv-1 N-tropic virions. Using retrovirus vectors that confer resistance to the antibiotic G418, we demonstrated that the magnitude of restriction in BALB/3T3 and SIM.R cells (both Fv-1b/b) and in RFM/3T3 cells (Fv-1nr/nr) is approximately 100-fold compared with that in AKR or NIH 3T3 cells (both Fv-1n/n). Furthermore, titration kinetics were single hit in restrictive cells. Colonies of antibiotic-resistant cells recovered after infection of genotypically restrictive cultures were phenotypically restrictive when reinfected, ruling out selection of stably nonrestrictive subpopulations. These results suggest that the ability to infect some fraction of cells in a genotypically restrictive culture does not require specific abrogation and that multihit kinetics may not be an essential feature of Fv-1 restriction.

  3. LncRNA-HIT Functions as an Epigenetic Regulator of Chondrogenesis through Its Recruitment of p100/CBP Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hanqian L.; Quinn, Jeffrey J.; Yang, Yul W.; Thornburg, Chelsea K.; Chang, Howard Y.; Stadler, H. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression profiling in E 11 mouse embryos identified high expression of the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), LNCRNA-HIT in the undifferentiated limb mesenchyme, gut, and developing genital tubercle. In the limb mesenchyme, LncRNA-HIT was found to be retained in the nucleus, forming a complex with p100 and CBP. Analysis of the genome-wide distribution of LncRNA-HIT-p100/CBP complexes by ChIRP-seq revealed LncRNA-HIT associated peaks at multiple loci in the murine genome. Ontological analysis of the genes contacted by LncRNA-HIT-p100/CBP complexes indicate a primary role for these loci in chondrogenic differentiation. Functional analysis using siRNA-mediated reductions in LncRNA-HIT or p100 transcripts revealed a significant decrease in expression of many of the LncRNA-HIT-associated loci. LncRNA-HIT siRNA treatments also impacted the ability of the limb mesenchyme to form cartilage, reducing mesenchymal cell condensation and the formation of cartilage nodules. Mechanistically the LncRNA-HIT siRNA treatments impacted pro-chondrogenic gene expression by reducing H3K27ac or p100 activity, confirming that LncRNA-HIT is essential for chondrogenic differentiation in the limb mesenchyme. Taken together, these findings reveal a fundamental epigenetic mechanism functioning during early limb development, using LncRNA-HIT and its associated proteins to promote the expression of multiple genes whose products are necessary for the formation of cartilage. PMID:26633036

  4. Development of a single ion hit facility at the Pierre Sue Laboratory: a collimated microbeam to study radiological effects on targeted living cells.

    PubMed

    Daudin, L; Carrière, M; Gouget, B; Hoarau, J; Khodja, H

    2006-01-01

    A single ion hit facility is being developed at the Pierre Süe Laboratory (LPS) since 2004. This set-up will be dedicated to the study of ionising radiation effects on living cells, which will complete current research conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal and osteoblastic cells. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will allow us to distinguish radiological and chemical toxicities of uranium, with a special emphasis on the bystander effect at low doses. Designed and installed on the LPS Nuclear microprobe, up to now dedicated to ion beam microanalysis, this set-up will enable us to deliver an exact number of light ions accelerated by a 3.75 MV electrostatic accelerator. An 'in air' vertical beam permits the irradiation of cells in conditions compatible with cell culture techniques. Furthermore, cellular monolayer will be kept in controlled conditions of temperature and atmosphere in order to diminish stress. The beam is collimated with a fused silica capillary tubing to target pre-selected cells. Motorisation of the collimator with piezo-electric actuators should enable fast irradiation without moving the sample, thus avoiding mechanical stress. An automated epifluorescence microscope, mounted on an antivibration table, allows pre- and post-irradiation cell observation. An ultra thin silicon surface barrier detector has been developed and tested to be able to shoot a cell with a single alpha particle.

  5. But Can You Hit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    The author shares a story told to him by a colleague more than thirty years ago. The dean of a midsized American university was explaining the path to tenure to a roomful of newly appointed assistant professors. "We know you boys can all "field"," he declared. "Now we want to see if you can hit." A lot has changed over the intervening decades. If…

  6. Influence of different parameter profiles on the formation of aluminum back surface field (Al-BSF) using for HIT solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangbin; Zeng, Yu; AL-Naser, Qusay Assim Hanna; Zhou, Chunlan; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Qiankun; Yang, Yanyan; Liu, Luo

    2009-08-01

    The aluminum back surface field used in p-type substrate hetero-junction with intrinsic thin film (HIT) solar cell is studied in this paper. The enhancement of material quality and the decrease of wafer thickness will make it necessary to passivate the back surface. It simply states the principle and formation process of aluminum back surface field, and studies the evenness of back surface field because it is necessary for high efficiency solar cell. Screen-printing and rapid thermal annealing were used to make aluminum back surface field to gain low recombination on the backside of solar cells. In this experiment, we analyze Al-BSF formed by taking different times and temperatures in which the temperature varied in the range between 620°C and 940 °C step 80°C and the time varied from 60 seconds to 180 seconds with a step of 30 seconds. Minority carrier lifetime with the back surface field was measured by microwave photoconductive decay (μ-PCD) device, analyze and get the optimal parameters of forming Al-BSF and further improve conversion efficiency of silicon solar cell.

  7. The Xist RNA-PRC2 complex at 20-nm resolution reveals a low Xist stoichiometry and suggests a hit-and-run mechanism in mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Hongjae; Wu, John Y.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is initiated by the long noncoding RNA Xist, which coats the inactive X (Xi) and targets Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in cis. Epigenomic analyses have provided significant insight into Xist binding patterns and chromatin organization of the Xi. However, such epigenomic analyses are limited by averaging of population-wide dynamics and do not inform behavior of single cells. Here we view Xist RNA and the Xi at 20-nm resolution using STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) in mouse cells. We observe dynamics at the single-cell level not predicted by epigenomic analysis. Only ∼50 hubs of Xist RNA occur on the Xi in the maintenance phase, corresponding to 50–100 Xist molecules per Xi and contrasting with the chromosome-wide “coat” observed by deep sequencing and conventional microscopy. Likewise, only ∼50 hubs PRC2 are observed. PRC2 and Xist foci are not randomly distributed but showed statistically significant spatial association. Knock-off experiments enable visualization of the dynamics of dissociation and relocalization onto the Xi and support a functional tethering of Xist and PRC2. Our analysis reveals that Xist-PRC2 complexes are less numerous than expected and suggests methylation of nucleosomes in a hit-and-run model. PMID:26195790

  8. Computational Physics' Greatest Hits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bug, Amy

    2011-03-01

    The digital computer, has worked its way so effectively into our profession that now, roughly 65 years after its invention, it is virtually impossible to find a field of experimental or theoretical physics unaided by computational innovation. It is tough to think of another device about which one can make that claim. In the session ``What is computational physics?'' speakers will distinguish computation within the field of computational physics from this ubiquitous importance across all subfields of physics. This talk will recap the invited session ``Great Advances...Past, Present and Future'' in which five dramatic areas of discovery (five of our ``greatest hits'') are chronicled: The physics of many-boson systems via Path Integral Monte Carlo, the thermodynamic behavior of a huge number of diverse systems via Monte Carlo Methods, the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents via molecular dynamics, predictive simulations of global climate change via detailed, cross-disciplinary earth system models, and an understanding of the formation of the first structures in our universe via galaxy formation simulations. The talk will also identify ``greatest hits'' in our field from the teaching and research perspectives of other members of DCOMP, including its Executive Committee.

  9. Interleukin-9 (IL-9) and NPM-ALK each generate mast cell hyperplasia as single 'hit' and cooperate in producing a mastocytosis-like disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Merz, Hartmut; Kaehler, Christian; Hoefig, Kai P; Branke, Biggi; Uckert, Wolfgang; Nadrowitz, Roger; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Herrmann, Harald; Feller, Alfred C; Valent, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Mast cell neoplasms are characterized by abnormal growth and focal accumulation of mast cells (MC) in one or more organs. Although several cytokines, including stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin-9 (IL-9) have been implicated in growth of normal MC, little is known about pro-oncogenic molecules and conditions triggering differentiation and growth of MC far enough to lead to the histopathological picture of overt mastocytosis. The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has recently been implicated in growth of neoplastic cells in malignant lymphomas. Here, we describe that transplantation of NPM-ALK-transplanted mouse bone marrow progenitors into lethally irradiated IL-9 transgenic mice not only results in lymphoma-formation, but also in the development of a neoplastic disease exhibiting histopathological features of systemic mastocytosis, including multifocal dense MC-infiltrates, occasionally with devastating growth in visceral organs. Transplantation of NPM-ALK-transduced progenitors into normal mice or maintenance of IL-9-transgenic mice without NPM-ALK each resulted in MC hyperplasia, but not in mastocytosis. Neoplastic MC in mice not only displayed IL-9, but also the IL-9 receptor, and the same was found to hold true for human neoplastic MC. Together, our data show that neoplastic MC express IL-9 receptors, that IL-9 and NPM-ALK upregulate MC-production in vivo, and that both'hits' act in concert to induce a mastocytosis-like disease in mice. These data may have pathogenetic and clinical implications and fit well with the observation that neoplastic MC in advanced SM strongly express NPM and multiple "lymphoid" antigens including CD25 and CD30.

  10. Interleukin-9 (IL-9) and NPM-ALK each generate mast cell hyperplasia as single 'hit' and cooperate in producing a mastocytosis-like disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Merz, Hartmut; Kaehler, Christian; Hoefig, Kai P; Branke, Biggi; Uckert, Wolfgang; Nadrowitz, Roger; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Herrmann, Harald; Feller, Alfred C; Valent, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Mast cell neoplasms are characterized by abnormal growth and focal accumulation of mast cells (MC) in one or more organs. Although several cytokines, including stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin-9 (IL-9) have been implicated in growth of normal MC, little is known about pro-oncogenic molecules and conditions triggering differentiation and growth of MC far enough to lead to the histopathological picture of overt mastocytosis. The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has recently been implicated in growth of neoplastic cells in malignant lymphomas. Here, we describe that transplantation of NPM-ALK-transplanted mouse bone marrow progenitors into lethally irradiated IL-9 transgenic mice not only results in lymphoma-formation, but also in the development of a neoplastic disease exhibiting histopathological features of systemic mastocytosis, including multifocal dense MC-infiltrates, occasionally with devastating growth in visceral organs. Transplantation of NPM-ALK-transduced progenitors into normal mice or maintenance of IL-9-transgenic mice without NPM-ALK each resulted in MC hyperplasia, but not in mastocytosis. Neoplastic MC in mice not only displayed IL-9, but also the IL-9 receptor, and the same was found to hold true for human neoplastic MC. Together, our data show that neoplastic MC express IL-9 receptors, that IL-9 and NPM-ALK upregulate MC-production in vivo, and that both'hits' act in concert to induce a mastocytosis-like disease in mice. These data may have pathogenetic and clinical implications and fit well with the observation that neoplastic MC in advanced SM strongly express NPM and multiple "lymphoid" antigens including CD25 and CD30. PMID:21297223

  11. Hitting the Bull’s-Eye in Metastatic Cancers—NSAIDs Elevate ROS in Mitochondria, Inducing Malignant Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stephen John; Pritchard, Rhys; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ralph, Raymond Keith

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastases that impede the function of vital organs are a major cause of cancer related mortality. Mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by hypoxia, low nutrient levels, or other stresses, such as genotoxic events, act as key drivers of the malignant changes in primary tumors to enhance their progression to metastasis. Emerging evidence now indicates that mitochondrial modifications and mutations resulting from oxidative stress, and leading to OxPhos stimulation and/or enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, are essential for promoting and sustaining the highly metastatic phenotype. Moreover, the modified mitochondria in emerging or existing metastatic cancer cells, by their irreversible differences, provide opportunities for selectively targeting their mitochondrial functions with a one-two punch. The first blow would block their anti-oxidative defense, followed by the knockout blow—promoting production of excess ROS, capitulating the terminal stage—activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), specifically killing metastatic cancer cells or their precursors. This review links a wide area of research relevant to cellular mechanisms that affect mitochondria activity as a major source of ROS production driving the pro-oxidative state in metastatic cancer cells. Each of the important aspects affecting mitochondrial function are discussed including: hypoxia, HIFs and PGC1 induced metabolic changes, increased ROS production to induce a more pro-oxidative state with reduced antioxidant defenses. It then focuses on how the mitochondria, as a major source of ROS in metastatic cancer cells driving the pro-oxidative state of malignancy enables targeting drugs affecting many of these altered processes and why the NSAIDs are an excellent example of mitochondria-targeted agents that provide a one-two knockout activating the mPTP and their efficacy as selective anticancer metastasis drugs. PMID:25688484

  12. Cosmic ray hit frequencies in critical sites in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Vazquez, M. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Atwell, W.; Kim, M.; Capala, J.

    One outstanding question to be addressed in assessing the risk of exposure to space travelers from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) outside the geomagnetosphere is to ascertain the effects of single heavy-ion hits on cells in critical regions of the central nervous system (CNS). As a first step toward this end, it is important to determine how many ``hits'' might be received by a neural cell in several critical CNS areas during an extended mission outside the confines of the earth's magnetic field. Critical sites in the CNS: the macula, and an interior brain point (typical of the genu, thalamus, hippocampus and nucleus basalis of Meynert) were chosen for the calculation of hit frequencies from galactic cosmic rays for a mission to Mars during solar minimum (i.e., at maximum cosmic-ray intensity). The shielding at a given position inside the body was obtained using the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, and a radiation transport code which includes nuclear fragmentation was used to calculate yearly fluences at the point of interest. Since the final Mars spacecraft shielding configuration has not yet been determined, we considered the minimum amount of aluminum required for pressure vessel-wall requirements in the living quarters of a spacecraft, and a typical duty area as a pressure vessel plus necessary equipment. The conclusions are: (1) variation of the position of the ``target site'' within the head plays only a small role in varying hit frequencies; (2) the average number of hits depends linearly on the cross section of the critical portion of the cell assumed in the calculation; (3) for a three-year mission to Mars at solar minimum (i.e., assuming the 1977 spectrum of galactic cosmic rays), 2% or 13% of the ``critical sites'' of cells in the CNS would be directly hit at least once by iron ions, depending on whether 60 mum^2 or 471 mum^2 is assumed as the critical cross sectional area; and (4) roughly 6 million out of some 43 million hippocampal cells and 55

  13. Cosmic ray hit frequencies in critical sites in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Vazquez, M E; Wilson, J W; Atwell, W; Kim, M; Capala, J

    1998-01-01

    One outstanding question to be addressed in assessing the risk of exposure to space travelers from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) outside the geomagnetosphere is to ascertain the effects of single heavy-ion hits on cells in critical regions of the central nervous system (CNS). As a first step toward this end, it is important to determine how many "hits" might be received by a neural cell in several critical CNS areas during an extended mission outside the confines of the earth's magnetic field. Critical sites in the CNS: the macula, and an interior brain point (typical of the genu, thalamus, hippocampus and nucleus basalis of Meynert) were chosen for the calculation of hit frequencies from galactic cosmic rays for a mission to Mars during solar minimum (i.e., at maximum cosmic-ray intensity). The shielding at a given position inside the body was obtained using the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, and a radiation transport code which includes nuclear fragmentation was used to calculate yearly fluences at the point of interest. Since the final Mars spacecraft shielding configuration has not yet been determined, we considered the minimum amount of aluminum required for pressure vessel-wall requirements in the living quarters of a spacecraft, and a typical duty area as a pressure vessel plus necessary equipment. The conclusions are: (1) variation of the position of the "target site" within the head plays only a small role in varying hit frequencies; (2) the average number of hits depends linearly on the cross section of the critical portion of the cell assumed in the calculation; (3) for a three-year mission to Mars at solar minimum (i.e., assuming the 1977 spectrum of galactic cosmic rays), 2% or 13% of the "critical sites" of cells in the CNS would be directly hit at least once by iron ions, depending on whether 60 micrometers2 or 471 micrometers2 is assumed as the critical cross sectional area; and (4) roughly 6 million out of some 43 million hippocampal cells

  14. Cosmic ray hit frequencies in critical sites in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Vazquez, M E; Wilson, J W; Atwell, W; Kim, M; Capala, J

    1998-01-01

    One outstanding question to be addressed in assessing the risk of exposure to space travelers from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) outside the geomagnetosphere is to ascertain the effects of single heavy-ion hits on cells in critical regions of the central nervous system (CNS). As a first step toward this end, it is important to determine how many "hits" might be received by a neural cell in several critical CNS areas during an extended mission outside the confines of the earth's magnetic field. Critical sites in the CNS: the macula, and an interior brain point (typical of the genu, thalamus, hippocampus and nucleus basalis of Meynert) were chosen for the calculation of hit frequencies from galactic cosmic rays for a mission to Mars during solar minimum (i.e., at maximum cosmic-ray intensity). The shielding at a given position inside the body was obtained using the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, and a radiation transport code which includes nuclear fragmentation was used to calculate yearly fluences at the point of interest. Since the final Mars spacecraft shielding configuration has not yet been determined, we considered the minimum amount of aluminum required for pressure vessel-wall requirements in the living quarters of a spacecraft, and a typical duty area as a pressure vessel plus necessary equipment. The conclusions are: (1) variation of the position of the "target site" within the head plays only a small role in varying hit frequencies; (2) the average number of hits depends linearly on the cross section of the critical portion of the cell assumed in the calculation; (3) for a three-year mission to Mars at solar minimum (i.e., assuming the 1977 spectrum of galactic cosmic rays), 2% or 13% of the "critical sites" of cells in the CNS would be directly hit at least once by iron ions, depending on whether 60 micrometers2 or 471 micrometers2 is assumed as the critical cross sectional area; and (4) roughly 6 million out of some 43 million hippocampal cells

  15. Optoelectronic hit/miss transform for screening cervical smear slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanswamy, R.; Turner, R. M.; McKnight, D. J.; Johnson, K. M.; Sharpe, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    An optoelectronic morphological processor for detecting regions of interest (abnormal cells) on a cervical smear slide using the hit/miss transform is presented. Computer simulation of the algorithm tested on 184 Pap-smear images provided 95% detection and 5% false alarm. An optoelectronic implementation of the hit/miss transform is presented, along with preliminary experimental results.

  16. Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma With a MYC-IGH Rearrangement and Gain of BCL2: Expanding the Spectrum of MYC/BCL2 Double-Hit Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Testo, Natalia; Olson, Luke C; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Hanson, Ty; Magro, Cynthia M

    2016-10-01

    Aggressive extracutaneous B-cell lymphomas span the various stages of B-cell ontogeny and include B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas represent the most common histologic subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, comprising 30% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States. A distinctive form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the double-hit lymphoma, with most cases exhibiting a combined MYC and BCL2 rearrangement, leading some hematopathologists to propose the term MYC/BCL2 lymphoma. More recently, MYC rearrangement with multiple copies/gain of BCL2 or multiple copies/gain of MYC with a BCL2 rearrangement have been described and exhibit a very similar clinical course to conventional double-hit lymphomas. We report the seventh case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma exhibiting this distinct cytogenetic abnormality and the first reported case in the skin. The patient's clinical course was aggressive, succumbing to disease 18 months after his initial presentation. PMID:27391453

  17. Hit finding: towards 'smarter' approaches.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thierry; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bryant, Sharon; Lesur, Brigitte

    2009-10-01

    Drug discovery is complex and risky, and the chances of success are low. One starting point to discover a new drug is the selective screening of a collection of high value and good quality compounds. Selection of compounds for screening is one of the challenging initial steps in the drug discovery process and is crucial for the success of the project. Optimal selection will enhance the chances of successful hit finding with regard to both number and quality of hits. Several scenarios for compound selection can be envisaged, and are primarily driven by knowledge of the target. Deciding the most appropriate scenario is important and appropriate software packages and chemoinformatics tools are available for these purposes. After screening, researchers may face challenges in selecting the best hits for further optimization. Numerous chemoinformatics tools have emerged recently to address challenges in hit analysis, prioritization and optimization. PMID:19576852

  18. Postponed Is Not Canceled: Role of Craniospinal Radiation Therapy in the Management of Recurrent Infant Medulloblastoma—An Experience From the HIT-REZ 1997 and 2005 Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Klaus; Mynarek, Martin; Zwiener, Isabella; Siegler, Nele; Zimmermann, Martina; Christiansen, Hans; Budach, Wilfried; Henke, Guido; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Pietsch, Torsten; Hoff, Katja von; Bueren, Andre von; Bode, Udo; and others

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in the management of recurrent infant medulloblastoma after surgery and chemotherapy alone. Methods and Materials: Seventeen pediatric medulloblastoma patients registered in the HIT-REZ 1997 and 2005 studies underwent CSI as salvage treatment at first recurrence. All patients had achieved complete remission after first-line treatment consisting of surgery and chemotherapy. Eleven patients showed metastatic disease at relapse. Five patients underwent surgery prior to radiation therapy, which resulted in complete resection in 1 case. In 1 patient, complete resection of the residual tumor was performed after CSI. Eleven patients received chemotherapy prior, 6 patients during and 8 patients after CSI. All patients received CSI with a median total dose of 35.2 Gy, and all but 1 received a boost to the posterior fossa (median total dose, 55.0 Gy). Metastases were boosted with an individual radiation dose, depending on their location and extent. Results: During a median follow-up time of 6.2 years since recurrence, 11 patients showed progressive disease and died. Median progression-free (overall) survival was 2.9 ± 1.1 (3.8 ± 0.8) years. Progression-free survival (PFS) rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 88% ± 8%, 46% ± 12%, and 40% ± 12%, respectively. Overall survival (OS) rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 94% ± 6%, 58% ± 12%, and 39% ± 12%, respectively. For 11 patients with classic medulloblastoma, 3-year (and 5-year) PFS and OS were 62% ± 15% and 72% ± 14% (52% ± 16% and 51% ± 16%), respectively. On univariate analysis, metastatic disease was not associated with poorer progression-free and overall survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that salvage treatment of relapsed medulloblastomas consisting of CSI and chemotherapy offers a second chance for cure, even for patients with classic histological findings. Metastatic disease at relapse did not have an impact

  19. Beyond "Hitting the Books"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entress, Cole; Wagner, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    Scientists, science teachers, and serious students recognize that success in science classes requires consistent practice--including study at home. Whether balancing chemical equations, calculating angular momentum, or memorizing the steps of cell division, students must review material repeatedly to fully understand new ideas--and must practice…

  20. Car Hits Boy on Bicycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present the fascinating reconstruction of an accident where a car hit a boy riding his bicycle. The boy dramatically flew several metres through the air after the collision and was injured, but made a swift and complete recovery from the accident with no long-term after-effects. Students are challenged to determine the speed of…

  1. A Two-Hit Model of Autism: Adolescence as the Second Hit

    PubMed Central

    Picci, Giorgia; Scherf, K. Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence brings dramatic changes in behavior and neural organization. Unfortunately, for some 30% of individuals with autism, there is marked decline in adaptive functioning during adolescence. We propose a two-hit model of autism. First, early perturbations in neural development function as a “first hit” that sets up a neural system that is “built to fail” in the face of a second hit. Second, the confluence of pubertal hormones, neural reorganization, and increasing social demands during adolescence provides the “second hit” that interferes with the ability to transition into adult social roles and levels of adaptive functioning. In support of this model, we review evidence about adolescent-specific neural and behavioral development in autism. We conclude with predictions and recommendations for empirical investigation about several domains in which developmental trajectories for individuals with autism may be uniquely deterred in adolescence. PMID:26609500

  2. Roles of sucrose in guard cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Daloso, Danilo M; Dos Anjos, Leticia; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-08-01

    The control of stomatal aperture involves reversible changes in the concentration of osmolytes in guard cells. Sucrose has long been proposed to have an osmolytic role in guard cells. However, direct evidence for such a role is lacking. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that sucrose may perform additional roles in guard cells. Here, we provide an update covering the multiple roles of sucrose in guard cell regulation, highlighting the knowledge accumulated regarding spatiotemporal differences in the synthesis, accumulation, and degradation of sucrose as well as reviewing the role of sucrose as a metabolic connector between mesophyll and guard cells. Analysis of transcriptomic data from previous studies reveals that several genes encoding sucrose and hexose transporters and genes involved in gluconeogenesis, sucrose and trehalose metabolism are highly expressed in guard cells compared with mesophyll cells. Interestingly, this analysis also showed that guard cells have considerably higher expression of C4 -marker genes than mesophyll cells. We discuss the possible roles of these genes in guard cell function and the role of sucrose in stomatal opening and closure. Finally, we provide a perspective for future experiments which are required to fill gaps in our understanding of both guard cell metabolism and stomatal regulation.

  3. Hitting is contagious in baseball: evidence from long hitting streaks.

    PubMed

    Bock, Joel R; Maewal, Akhilesh; Gough, David A

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis is used to test the hypothesis that "hitting is contagious". A statistical model is described to study the effect of a hot hitter upon his teammates' batting during a consecutive game hitting streak. Box score data for entire seasons comprising [Formula: see text] streaks of length [Formula: see text] games, including a total [Formula: see text] observations were compiled. Treatment and control sample groups ([Formula: see text]) were constructed from core lineups of players on the streaking batter's team. The percentile method bootstrap was used to calculate [Formula: see text] confidence intervals for statistics representing differences in the mean distributions of two batting statistics between groups. Batters in the treatment group (hot streak active) showed statistically significant improvements in hitting performance, as compared against the control. Mean [Formula: see text] for the treatment group was found to be [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] percentage points higher during hot streaks (mean difference increased [Formula: see text] points), while the batting heat index [Formula: see text] introduced here was observed to increase by [Formula: see text] points. For each performance statistic, the null hypothesis was rejected at the [Formula: see text] significance level. We conclude that the evidence suggests the potential existence of a "statistical contagion effect". Psychological mechanisms essential to the empirical results are suggested, as several studies from the scientific literature lend credence to contagious phenomena in sports. Causal inference from these results is difficult, but we suggest and discuss several latent variables that may contribute to the observed results, and offer possible directions for future research. PMID:23251507

  4. Hitting is contagious in baseball: evidence from long hitting streaks.

    PubMed

    Bock, Joel R; Maewal, Akhilesh; Gough, David A

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis is used to test the hypothesis that "hitting is contagious". A statistical model is described to study the effect of a hot hitter upon his teammates' batting during a consecutive game hitting streak. Box score data for entire seasons comprising [Formula: see text] streaks of length [Formula: see text] games, including a total [Formula: see text] observations were compiled. Treatment and control sample groups ([Formula: see text]) were constructed from core lineups of players on the streaking batter's team. The percentile method bootstrap was used to calculate [Formula: see text] confidence intervals for statistics representing differences in the mean distributions of two batting statistics between groups. Batters in the treatment group (hot streak active) showed statistically significant improvements in hitting performance, as compared against the control. Mean [Formula: see text] for the treatment group was found to be [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] percentage points higher during hot streaks (mean difference increased [Formula: see text] points), while the batting heat index [Formula: see text] introduced here was observed to increase by [Formula: see text] points. For each performance statistic, the null hypothesis was rejected at the [Formula: see text] significance level. We conclude that the evidence suggests the potential existence of a "statistical contagion effect". Psychological mechanisms essential to the empirical results are suggested, as several studies from the scientific literature lend credence to contagious phenomena in sports. Causal inference from these results is difficult, but we suggest and discuss several latent variables that may contribute to the observed results, and offer possible directions for future research.

  5. Quantum walks with infinite hitting times

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2006-10-15

    Hitting times are the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given starting vertex. The hitting time for a classical random walk on a connected graph will always be finite. We show that, by contrast, quantum walks can have infinite hitting times for some initial states. We seek criteria to determine if a given walk on a graph will have infinite hitting times, and find a sufficient condition, which for discrete time quantum walks is that the degeneracy of the evolution operator be greater than the degree of the graph. The set of initial states which give an infinite hitting time form a subspace. The phenomenon of infinite hitting times is in general a consequence of the symmetry of the graph and its automorphism group. Using the irreducible representations of the automorphism group, we derive conditions such that quantum walks defined on this graph must have infinite hitting times for some initial states. In the case of the discrete walk, if this condition is satisfied the walk will have infinite hitting times for any choice of a coin operator, and we give a class of graphs with infinite hitting times for any choice of coin. Hitting times are not very well defined for continuous time quantum walks, but we show that the idea of infinite hitting-time walks naturally extends to the continuous time case as well.

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) based on its atypical immunological features].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shigeki; Maeda, Takuma

    2016-03-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a prothrombotic side effect of heparin therapy caused by HIT antibodies, i.e., anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin IgG with platelet-activating properties. For serological diagnosis, antigen immunoassays are commonly used worldwide. However, such assays do not indicate their platelet-activating properties, leading to low specificity for the HIT diagnosis. Therefore, over-diagnosis is currently the most serious problem associated with HIT. The detection of platelet-activating antibodies using a washed platelet activation assay is crucial for appropriate HIT diagnosis. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIT include it having several clinical features atypical for an immune-mediated disease. Heparin-naïve patients can develop IgG antibodies as early as day 4, as in a secondary immune response. Evidence for an anamnestic response on heparin re-exposure is lacking. In addition, HIT antibodies are relatively short-lived, unlike those in a secondary immune response. These lines of evidence suggest that the mechanisms underlying HIT antibody formation may be compatible with a non-T cell-dependent immune reaction. These atypical clinical and serological features should be carefully considered while endeavoring to accurately diagnose HIT, which leads to appropriate therapies such as immediate administration of an alternative anticoagulant to prevent thromboembolic events and re-administration of heparin during surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass when HIT antibodies are no longer detectable.

  7. Cutaneous presentation of Double Hit Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Khelfa, Yousef; Lebowicz, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), representing approximately 25% of diagnosed NHL. DLBCL is heterogeneous disease both clinically and genetically. The 3 most common chromosomal translocations in DLBCL involve the oncogenes BCL2, BCL6, and MYC. Double hit (DH) DLBCL is an aggressive form in which MYC rearrangement is associated with either BCL2 or BCL6 rearrangement. Patients typically present with a rapidly growing mass, often with B symptoms. Extranodal disease is often present. Though there is a paucity of prospective trials in this subtype, double hit lymphoma (DHL) has been linked to very poor outcomes when patients are treated with standard R-CHOP. There is, therefore, a lack of consensus regarding the standard treatment for DHL. Several retrospective analyses have been conducted to help guide treatment of this disease. These suggest that DA EPOCH-R may be the most promising regimen and that achievement of complete resolution predicts better long-term outcomes. PMID:27115017

  8. Keratinocyte cytoskeletal roles in cell sheet engineering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need to understand cell-cell interactions for cell and tissue engineering purposes, such as optimizing cell sheet constructs, as well as for examining adhesion defect diseases. For cell-sheet engineering, one major obstacle to sheet function is that cell sheets in suspension are fragile and, over time, will contract. While the role of the cytoskeleton in maintaining the structure and adhesion of cells cultured on a rigid substrate is well-characterized, a systematic examination of the role played by different components of the cytoskeleton in regulating cell sheet contraction and cohesion in the absence of a substrate has been lacking. Results In this study, keratinocytes were cultured until confluent and cell sheets were generated using dispase to remove the influence of the substrate. The effects of disrupting actin, microtubules or intermediate filaments on cell-cell interactions were assessed by measuring cell sheet cohesion and contraction. Keratin intermediate filament disruption caused comparable effects on cell sheet cohesion and contraction, when compared to actin or microtubule disruption. Interfering with actomyosin contraction demonstrated that interfering with cell contraction can also diminish cell cohesion. Conclusions All components of the cytoskeleton are involved in maintaining cell sheet cohesion and contraction, although not to the same extent. These findings demonstrate that substrate-free cell sheet biomechanical properties are dependent on the integrity of the cytoskeleton network. PMID:23442760

  9. Mitochondrial role in cell aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental studies on the mitochondria of insect and mammalian cells are examined with a view to an analysis of intrinsic mitochondrial senescence, and its relation to the age-related changes in other cell organelles. The fine structural and biochemical data support the concept that the mitochondria of fixed postmitotic cells may be the site of intrinsic aging because of the attack by free radicals and lipid peroxides originating in the organelles as a by-product of oxygen reduction during respiration. Although the cells have numerous mechanisms for counteracting lipid peroxidation injury, there is a slippage in the antioxidant protection. Intrinsic mitochondrial aging could thus be considered as a specific manifestation of oxygen toxicity. It is proposed that free radical injury renders an increasing number of the mitochondria unable to divide, probably because of damage to the lipids of the inner membrane and to mitochondrial DNA.

  10. HITS - The Navy's new DATPG system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosley, L.; Modi, M.

    A new digital automatic test program generation standard called HITS (Hierarchical Integrated Test Simulator), developed by the U.S. Navy as the answer to digital LSI/VLSI circuit technology is discussed. Three major areas of the HITS program which include system flow/unique capabilities, modeling language structures, and management of HITS are preseented. HITS contains the following major software modules: the primary model processor, the secondary model processor, the test language processor, the simulator, and the tester output generator. The functions performed by the individual system modules are described. A circuit description language, which provides user flexibility when describing complex circuit models, and its components are considered. The major areas of HITS management include: (1) HITS accessibility, distribution, and availability; (2) user support; (3) advanced development; and (4) Navy/DOD coordination and standardization.

  11. Studying the HIT-Complexity Interchange.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig E; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2016-01-01

    The design and implementation of health information technology (HIT) is challenging, particularly when it is being introduced into complex settings. While complex adaptive system (CASs) can be a valuable means of understanding relationships between users, HIT and tasks, much of the existing work using CASs is descriptive in nature. This paper addresses that issue by integrating a model for analyzing task complexity with approaches for HIT evaluation and systems analysis. The resulting framework classifies HIT-user tasks and issues as simple, complicated or complex, and provides insight on how to study them. PMID:27332158

  12. Role of mast cells in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Castellani, Maria L; Kempuraj, Durasamy; Salini, Vincenzo; Vecchiet, Jacopo; Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Perrella, Alessandro; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Tagen, Michael; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2007-01-01

    The growth of malignant tumors is determined in large part by the proliferative capacity of the tumor cells. Clinical observations and animal experiments have established that tumor cells elicit immune responses. Histopathologic studies show that many tumors are surrounded by mononuclear cell and mast cell infiltrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous in the body and are critical for allergic reactions. Increasing evidence indicates that mast cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines and are involved in neuro-inflammatory processes and cancer. Mast cells accumulate in the stroma surrounding certain tumors, especially mammary adenocarcinoma, and the molecules they secrete can benefit the tumor. However, mast cells can also increase at the site of tumor growth and participate in tumor rejection. Mast cells may be recruited by tumor-derived chemoattractants and selectively secrete molecules such as growth factors, histamine, heparin, VEGF, and IL-8, as well as proteases that permit the formation of new blood vessels and metastases. Tumor mast cell intersections play regulatory and modulatory roles affecting various aspects of tumor growth. Discovery of these new roles of mast cells further complicates the understanding of tumor growth. This review focuses on the strategic importance of mast cells to the progression of tumors, and proposes a revised immune effector mechanism of mast cell involvement in tumor growth. PMID:18000287

  13. Developing Health Information Technology (HIT) Programs and HIT Curriculum: The Southern Polytechnic State University Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Chi; Reichgelt, Han; Rutherfoord, Rebecca H.; Wang, Andy Ju An

    2014-01-01

    Health Information Technology (HIT) professionals are in increasing demand as healthcare providers need help in the adoption and meaningful use of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems while the HIT industry needs workforce skilled in HIT and EHR development. To respond to this increasing demand, the School of Computing and Software Engineering…

  14. Hitting Is Contagious: Experience and Action Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob; Beilock, Sian L.

    2011-01-01

    In baseball, it is believed that "hitting is contagious," that is, probability of success increases if the previous few batters get a hit. Could this effect be partially explained by action induction--that is, the tendency to perform an action related to one that has just been observed? A simulation was used to investigate the effect of inducing…

  15. Recognition of Hits in a Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerak, Vojtech; Drahansky, Martin

    This paper describes two possible ways of hit recognition in a target. First method is based on frame differencing with use of a stabilization algorithm to eliminate movements of a target. Second method uses flood fill with random seed point definition to find hits in the target scene.

  16. Antibacterial effects of quaternary bis-phosphonium and ammonium salts of pyridoxine on Staphylococcus aureus cells: A single base hitting two distinct targets?

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Elena V; Zeldi, Marina I; Pugachev, Mikhail V; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V; Shtyrlin, Nikita V; Kuznetsova, Svetlana V; Evtygin, Vladimir E; Bogachev, Mikhail I; Kayumov, Airat R; Shtyrlin, Yurii G

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effects of quaternary bis-phosphonium and bis-ammonium salts of pyridoxine with lipophilic substituents on the survival and morphology of Staphylococcus aureus cells. We found that, while originating from the same base, they exhibit considerably different antimicrobial mechanisms. In the presence of Ca(2+) ions the MIC and MBC values of ammonium salt increased 100-fold, suggesting that Ca(2+) ions can successfully impede the membrane Ca(2+) ions exchange required for ammonium salt incorporation. In contrast, in the presence of quaternary phosphonium salt, the artificial capsular-like material was formed around the cells and the filamentous and chain-like growth of the cells was observed suggesting the disruption of the cell division mechanisms. Altogether, both pyridoxine derivatives successfully inhibited the growth of gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis) and Escherichia coli considerably, while demonstrated nearly no effect against Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We suggest that due to their effects on distinct and likely complementary targets the derivatives of pyridoxine represent potentially perspective antibacterials with complicated adaptation and thus with lower risk of drug resistance development.

  17. Antibacterial effects of quaternary bis-phosphonium and ammonium salts of pyridoxine on Staphylococcus aureus cells: A single base hitting two distinct targets?

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Elena V; Zeldi, Marina I; Pugachev, Mikhail V; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V; Shtyrlin, Nikita V; Kuznetsova, Svetlana V; Evtygin, Vladimir E; Bogachev, Mikhail I; Kayumov, Airat R; Shtyrlin, Yurii G

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effects of quaternary bis-phosphonium and bis-ammonium salts of pyridoxine with lipophilic substituents on the survival and morphology of Staphylococcus aureus cells. We found that, while originating from the same base, they exhibit considerably different antimicrobial mechanisms. In the presence of Ca(2+) ions the MIC and MBC values of ammonium salt increased 100-fold, suggesting that Ca(2+) ions can successfully impede the membrane Ca(2+) ions exchange required for ammonium salt incorporation. In contrast, in the presence of quaternary phosphonium salt, the artificial capsular-like material was formed around the cells and the filamentous and chain-like growth of the cells was observed suggesting the disruption of the cell division mechanisms. Altogether, both pyridoxine derivatives successfully inhibited the growth of gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis) and Escherichia coli considerably, while demonstrated nearly no effect against Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We suggest that due to their effects on distinct and likely complementary targets the derivatives of pyridoxine represent potentially perspective antibacterials with complicated adaptation and thus with lower risk of drug resistance development. PMID:26712620

  18. The role of mast cells in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Thiago T.; Moura, Ivan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that accumulate in the tumors and their microenvironment during disease progression. Mast cells are armed with a wide array of receptors that sense environment modifications and, upon stimulation, they are able to secrete several biologically active factors involved in the modulation of tumor growth. For example, mast cells are able to secrete pro-angiogenic and growth factors but also pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have allowed substantial progress in understanding the role of mast cells in tumorigenesis/disease progression but further studies are necessary to completely elucidate their impact in the pathophysiology of cancer. Here we review observations suggesting that mast cells could modulate tumor growth in humans. We also discuss the drawbacks related to observations from mast cell-deficient mouse models, which could have consequences in the determination of a potential causative relationship between mast cells and cancer. We believe that the understanding of the precise role of mast cells in tumor development and progression will be of critical importance for the development of new targeted therapies in human cancers. PMID:25705392

  19. How I diagnose and manage HIT.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E

    2011-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a prothrombotic drug reaction caused by platelet-activating IgG antibodies that recognize platelet factor 4 (PF4)/polyanion complexes. Platelet activation assays, such as the serotonin-release assay, are superior to PF4-dependent immunoassays in discerning which heparin-induced antibodies are clinically relevant. When HIT is strongly suspected, standard practice includes substituting heparin with an alternative anticoagulant; the 2 US-approved agents are the direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) lepirudin and argatroban, which are "niche" agents used only to manage HIT. However, only ~ 10% of patients who undergo serological investigation for HIT actually have this diagnosis. Indeed, depending on the clinical setting, only 10%-50% of patients with positive PF4-dependent immunoassays have platelet-activating antibodies. Therefore, overdiagnosis of HIT can be minimized by insisting that a positive platelet activation assay be required for definitive diagnosis of HIT. For these reasons, a management strategy that considers the real possibility of non-HIT thrombocytopenia is warranted. One approach that I suggest is to administer an indirect, antithrombin (AT)-dependent factor Xa inhibitor (danaparoid or fondaparinux) based upon the following rationale: (1) effectiveness in treating and preventing HIT-associated thrombosis; (2) effectiveness in treating and preventing thrombosis in diverse non-HIT situations; (3) both prophylactic- and therapeutic-dose protocols exist, permitting dosing appropriate for the clinical situation; (4) body weight-adjusted dosing protocols and availability of specific anti-factor Xa monitoring reduce risk of under- or overdosing (as can occur with partial thromboplastin time [PTT]-adjusted DTI therapy); (5) their long half-lives reduce risk of rebound hypercoagulability; (6) easy coumarin overlap; and (7) relatively low cost. PMID:22160026

  20. Atherosclerosis and the role of immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Fulya; Kalkanli, Sevgi Tas

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease arising from lipids, specifically low-density lipoproteins, and leukocytes. Following the activation of endothelium with the expression of adhesion molecules and monocytes, inflammatory cytokines from macrophages, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, high levels of interferon (IFN)-α and β are generated upon the activation of toll-like receptor-9, and T-cells, especially the ones with Th1 profile, produce pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ and upregulate macrophages to adhere to the endothelium and migrate into the intima. This review presents an exhaustive account for the role of immune cells in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25879006

  1. A role for water in cell structure.

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, J G

    1987-01-01

    The question of a role for water in biochemical and cellular events is ignored by most workers (apart from its obvious role in hydrolysis reactions, which is not under discussion here). But much recent research has pointed to the importance of physical, as well as biochemical, processes of the cell, which focus attention on such straightforward elementary questions as position and relationship in space of cell components. In this communication these questions are examined in terms of a new model of water structure. A radically new feature of this model is that water clusters have long-term rather than flickering existence and are as large as the macromolecular components of the cell. These properties allow the clusters and other components to pack together spatially so giving rise to integrated, large-scale, subcellular structures. PMID:3435470

  2. Hitting the Highway? Keep Safety in Mind

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160238.html Hitting the Highway? Keep Safety in Mind Planning ahead is essential ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Traveler's Health Recent ...

  3. Optical spectrosopy of HiTS supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Forster, F.; Smith, C.; Vivas, K.; Pignata, G.; Olivares, F.; Hamuy, M.; Martin, J. San; Maureira, J. C.; Cabrera, G.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Galbany, L.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.

    2015-04-01

    We report optical wavelength spectroscopy obtained using the Goodman instrument mounted on the SOAR at CTIO on UT 2015-03-30, for two supernovae discovered by HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #7289, #7290).

  4. Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159853.html Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults To curb diabetes, researchers ... News) -- Among obese American adults, control of blood sugar is worsening, leading to more diabetes and heart ...

  5. Proteolytic Cleavage of Notch: “HIT and RUN”

    PubMed Central

    van Tetering, G.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Notch pathway is a highly conserved signaling pathway in multicellular eukaryotes essential in controlling spatial patterning, morphogenesis and homeostasis in embryonic and adult tissues. Notch proteins coordinate cell-cell communication through receptor-ligand interactions between adjacent cells. Notch signaling is frequently deregulated by oncogenic mutation or overexpression in many cancer types. Notch activity is controlled by three sequential cleavage steps leading to ectodomain shedding and transcriptional activation. Here we review the key regulatory steps in the activation of Notch, from receptor maturation to receptor activation (HIT) via a rate-limiting proteolytic cascade (RUN) in the context of species-specific differences. PMID:21506924

  6. Being selective at the plate: processing dependence between perceptual variables relates to hitting goals and performance.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2013-08-01

    Performance of a skill that involves acting on a goal object (e.g., a ball to be hit) can influence one's judgment of the size and speed of that object. The present study examined how these action-specific effects are affected when the goal of the actor is varied and they are free to choose between alternative actions. In Experiment 1, expert baseball players were asked to perform three different directional hitting tasks in a batting simulation and make interleaved perceptual judgments about three ball parameters (speed, plate crossing location, and size). Perceived ball size was largest (and perceived speed was slowest) when the ball crossing location was optimal for the particular hitting task the batter was performing (e.g., an "outside" pitch for opposite-field hitting). The magnitude of processing dependency between variables (speed vs. location and size vs. location) was positively correlated with batting performance. In Experiment 2, the action-specific effects observed in Experiment 1 were mimicked by systematically changing the ball diameter in the simulation as a function of plate crossing location. The number of swing initiations was greater when ball size was larger, and batters were more successful in the hitting task for which the larger pitches were optimal (e.g., greater number of pull hits than opposite-field hits when "inside" pitches were larger). These findings suggest attentional accentuation of goal-relevant targets underlies action-related changes in perception and are consistent with an action selection role for these effects.

  7. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei-Bo; Liu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the “cancer stem cell hypothesis”, which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells (liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future. PMID:25426254

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Dual roles for cholesterol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Rychnovsky, Scott D; Belani, Jitendra D; Hobbs, Helen H; Cohen, Jonathan C; Rawson, Robert B

    2005-10-11

    The structural features of sterols required to support mammalian cell growth have not been fully defined. Here, we use mutant CHO cells that synthesize only small amounts of cholesterol to test the capacity of various sterols to support growth. Sterols with minor modifications of the side chain (e.g., campesterol, beta-sitosterol, and desmosterol) supported long-term growth of mutant cells, but sterols with more complex modifications of the side chain, the sterol nucleus, or the 3-hydroxy group did not. After 60 days in culture, the exogenous sterol comprised >90% of cellular sterols. Inactivation of residual endogenous synthesis with the squalene epoxidase inhibitor NB-598 prevented growth in beta-sitosterol and greatly reduced growth in campesterol. Growth of cells cultured in beta-sitosterol and NB-598 was restored by adding small amounts of cholesterol to the medium. Surprisingly, enantiomeric cholesterol also supported cell growth, even in the presence of NB-598. Thus, sterols fulfill two roles in mammalian cells: (i) a bulk membrane requirement in which phytosterols can substitute for cholesterol and (ii) other processes that specifically require small amounts of cholesterol but are not enantioselective. PMID:16199524

  10. Hitting is contagious: experience and action induction.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob; Beilock, Sian L

    2011-03-01

    In baseball, it is believed that "hitting is contagious," that is, probability of success increases if the previous few batters get a hit. Could this effect be partially explained by action induction--that is, the tendency to perform an action related to one that has just been observed? A simulation was used to investigate the effect of inducing stimuli on batting performance for more-experienced (ME) and less-experienced (LE) baseball players. Three types of inducing stimuli were compared with a no-induction condition: action (a simulated ball traveling from home plate into left, right, or center field), outcome (a ball resting in either left, right, or center field), and verbal (the word "left", "center", or "right"). For both ME and LE players, fewer pitchers were required for a successful hit in the action condition. For ME players, there was a significant relationship between the inducing stimulus direction and hit direction for both the action and outcome prompts. For LE players, the prompt only had a significant effect on batting performance in the action condition, and the magnitude of the effect was significantly smaller than for ME. The effect of the inducing stimulus decreased as the delay (i.e., no. of pitches between prompt and hit) increased, with the effect being eliminated after roughly 4 pitches for ME and 2 pitches for LE. It is proposed that the differences in the magnitude and time course of action induction as a function of experience occurred because ME have more well-developed perceptual-motor representations for directional hitting. PMID:21443380

  11. Hitting is contagious: experience and action induction.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob; Beilock, Sian L

    2011-03-01

    In baseball, it is believed that "hitting is contagious," that is, probability of success increases if the previous few batters get a hit. Could this effect be partially explained by action induction--that is, the tendency to perform an action related to one that has just been observed? A simulation was used to investigate the effect of inducing stimuli on batting performance for more-experienced (ME) and less-experienced (LE) baseball players. Three types of inducing stimuli were compared with a no-induction condition: action (a simulated ball traveling from home plate into left, right, or center field), outcome (a ball resting in either left, right, or center field), and verbal (the word "left", "center", or "right"). For both ME and LE players, fewer pitchers were required for a successful hit in the action condition. For ME players, there was a significant relationship between the inducing stimulus direction and hit direction for both the action and outcome prompts. For LE players, the prompt only had a significant effect on batting performance in the action condition, and the magnitude of the effect was significantly smaller than for ME. The effect of the inducing stimulus decreased as the delay (i.e., no. of pitches between prompt and hit) increased, with the effect being eliminated after roughly 4 pitches for ME and 2 pitches for LE. It is proposed that the differences in the magnitude and time course of action induction as a function of experience occurred because ME have more well-developed perceptual-motor representations for directional hitting.

  12. Role of dendritic cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Cuihua

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent work has elucidated the DC life cycle, including several important stages such as maturation, migration and homeostasis, as well as DC classification and subsets/locations, which provided etiological insights on the role of DCs in disease processes. DCs have a close relationship to endothelial cells and they interact with each other to maintain immunity. DCs are deposited in the atherosclerotic plaque and contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the necrotic cardiac cells induced by ischemia activate DCs by Toll-like receptors, which initiate innate and adaptive immune responses to renal, hepatic and cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Furthermore, DCs are involved in the acute/chronic rejection of solid organ transplantation and mediate transplant tolerance as well. Advancing our knowledge of the biology of DCs will aid development of new approaches to treat many cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, cardiac IRI and transplantation. PMID:21179302

  13. Statistical properties and pre-hit dynamics of price limit hits in the Chinese stock markets.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu-Lei; Xie, Wen-Jie; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Xiong, Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Price limit trading rules are adopted in some stock markets (especially emerging markets) trying to cool off traders' short-term trading mania on individual stocks and increase market efficiency. Under such a microstructure, stocks may hit their up-limits and down-limits from time to time. However, the behaviors of price limit hits are not well studied partially due to the fact that main stock markets such as the US markets and most European markets do not set price limits. Here, we perform detailed analyses of the high-frequency data of all A-share common stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange from 2000 to 2011 to investigate the statistical properties of price limit hits and the dynamical evolution of several important financial variables before stock price hits its limits. We compare the properties of up-limit hits and down-limit hits. We also divide the whole period into three bullish periods and three bearish periods to unveil possible differences during bullish and bearish market states. To uncover the impacts of stock capitalization on price limit hits, we partition all stocks into six portfolios according to their capitalizations on different trading days. We find that the price limit trading rule has a cooling-off effect (object to the magnet effect), indicating that the rule takes effect in the Chinese stock markets. We find that price continuation is much more likely to occur than price reversal on the next trading day after a limit-hitting day, especially for down-limit hits, which has potential practical values for market practitioners.

  14. Statistical Properties and Pre-Hit Dynamics of Price Limit Hits in the Chinese Stock Markets

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yu-Lei; Xie, Wen-Jie; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Xiong, Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Price limit trading rules are adopted in some stock markets (especially emerging markets) trying to cool off traders’ short-term trading mania on individual stocks and increase market efficiency. Under such a microstructure, stocks may hit their up-limits and down-limits from time to time. However, the behaviors of price limit hits are not well studied partially due to the fact that main stock markets such as the US markets and most European markets do not set price limits. Here, we perform detailed analyses of the high-frequency data of all A-share common stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange from 2000 to 2011 to investigate the statistical properties of price limit hits and the dynamical evolution of several important financial variables before stock price hits its limits. We compare the properties of up-limit hits and down-limit hits. We also divide the whole period into three bullish periods and three bearish periods to unveil possible differences during bullish and bearish market states. To uncover the impacts of stock capitalization on price limit hits, we partition all stocks into six portfolios according to their capitalizations on different trading days. We find that the price limit trading rule has a cooling-off effect (object to the magnet effect), indicating that the rule takes effect in the Chinese stock markets. We find that price continuation is much more likely to occur than price reversal on the next trading day after a limit-hitting day, especially for down-limit hits, which has potential practical values for market practitioners. PMID:25874716

  15. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  16. Improvements of HITS Algorithms for Spam Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Yasuhito; Tezuka, Yu; Nishizeki, Takao

    The HITS algorithm proposed by Kleinberg is one of the representative methods of scoring Web pages by using hyperlinks. In the days when the algorithm was proposed, most of the pages given high score by the algorithm were really related to a given topic, and hence the algorithm could be used to find related pages. However, the algorithm and the variants including Bharat's improved HITS, abbreviated to BHITS, proposed by Bharat and Henzinger cannot be used to find related pages any more on today's Web, due to an increase of spam links. In this paper, we first propose three methods to find “linkfarms,” that is, sets of spam links forming a densely connected subgraph of a Web graph. We then present an algorithm, called a trust-score algorithm, to give high scores to pages which are not spam pages with a high probability. Combining the three methods and the trust-score algorithm with BHITS, we obtain several variants of the HITS algorithm. We ascertain by experiments that one of them, named TaN+BHITS using the trust-score algorithm and the method of finding linkfarms by employing name servers, is most suitable for finding related pages on today's Web. Our algorithms take time and memory no more than those required by the original HITS algorithm, and can be executed on a PC with a small amount of main memory.

  17. HiTS additional supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Points, S.; Medina, G.; Munoz, R.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Galbany, L.; Pignata, G.; de Jaeger, Th.; Martinez, J.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-03-01

    HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #7099), reports the discovery of additional supernova candidates detected using an image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  18. CEOs: Gulf crisis hits hospitals' bottom line.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, J

    1990-12-01

    Hospital CEOs say the Persian Gulf crisis could hit them hard where it counts. In fact, hospitals are already seeing some adverse impact from events in the Middle East. From fundraising to plant management to strategic planning, the confrontations in the Gulf are having an impact on the hospital's bottom line.

  19. Precise timing when hitting falling balls

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  20. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball.

  1. Spirit Hits a Home Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This week, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit arrived at 'Home Plate,' a feature that, when seen from orbit, looks like the home plate of a baseball diamond. Home Plate is a roughly circular feature about 80 meters (260 feet) in diameter that might be an old impact crater or volcanic feature. The Spirit team has been eager to get to Home Plate and has been enjoying distant views of the feature and a curious 'bathtub ring' of light-colored materials along its edges. The team has pushed the rover hard to get here before the deep Martian winter sets in.

    After scientists had identified Home Plate from orbit, they had many theories about what it could be and what they might see. But when Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam) took this and other images, the science team was stunned. This Pancam image is of an outcrop nicknamed 'Barnhill' and surrounding rocks on the north side of Home Plate, showing the most spectacular layering that Spirit has seen.

    Pancam and microscopic imager views of the layers in the rocks reveal a range of grain sizes and textures that change from the lower to the upper part of the outcrop. This may help scientists figure out how the material was emplaced. Spirit is also conducting work with its arm instruments to figure out the chemistry and mineralogy of the rocks. Scientists have several hypotheses about what Home Plate could be, including features made by volcanoes and impact craters, and ways that water could have played a role. They are busy trying to figure out what the data from Spirit is really telling us.

    As Spirit works at Home Plate during February, the science team is choosing informal names for rocks from the great players and managers of the Negro Leagues of baseball. This outcrop, 'Barnhill,' is informally named for David Barnhill, the ace of the New York Cubans' pitching staff during the early 1940s. He compiled an 18-3 record in 1941 and defeated Satchel Paige in the 1942 East-West all-star game. Other rocks in

  2. 76 FR 25355 - HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Recommendations AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice..., clinical operations, implementation, and privacy and security. HIT Standards Committee's Schedule for...

  3. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  4. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  5. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  6. Probability of Brownian motion hitting an obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Knessl, C.; Keller, J.B.

    2000-02-01

    The probability p(x) that Brownian motion with drift, starting at x, hits an obstacle is analyzed. The obstacle {Omega} is a compact subset of R{sup n}. It is shown that p(x) is expressible in terms of the field U(x) scattered by {Omega} when it is hit by plane wave. Therefore results for U(x), and methods for finding U(x) can be used to determine p(x). The authors illustrate this by obtaining exact and asymptotic results for p(x) when {Omega} is a slit in R{sup 2}, and asymptotic results when {Omega} is a disc in R{sup 3}.

  7. Hitting and trapping times on branched structures.

    PubMed

    Agliari, Elena; Sartori, Fabio; Cattivelli, Luca; Cassi, Davide

    2015-05-01

    In this work we consider a simple random walk embedded in a generic branched structure and we find a close-form formula to calculate the hitting time H(i,f) between two arbitrary nodes i and j. We then use this formula to obtain the set of hitting times {H(i,f)} for combs and their expectation values, namely, the mean first-passage time, where the average is performed over the initial node while the final node f is given, and the global mean first-passage time, where the average is performed over both the initial and the final node. Finally, we discuss applications in the context of reaction-diffusion problems. PMID:26066144

  8. Visual factors in hitting and catching.

    PubMed

    Regan, D

    1997-12-01

    To hit or catch an approaching ball, it is necessary to move a bat or hand to the right place at the right time. The performance of top sports players is remarkable: positional errors of less than 5 cm and temporal errors of less than 2 or 3 ms are reliably maintained. There are three schools of thought about how this is achieved. One holds that predictive visual information about where the ball will be at some future instance (when) is used to achieve the hit or catch. The second holds that the bat or hand is moved to the correct position by exploiting some relation between visual information and the required movement. The third focuses on the use of prior knowledge to supplement inadequate visual information. For a rigid spherical ball travelling at constant speed along or close to the line of sight, the retinal images contain both binocular and monocular correlates of the ball's instantaneous direction of motion in depth. Also, the retinal images contain both binocular and monocular information about time of arrival. Humans can unconfound and use this visual information, but they are unable to estimate the absolute distance of the ball or its approach speed other than crudely. In cricket, this visual inadequacy allows a slow bowler to cause the batsman to misjudge where the ball will hit the ground. Such a bowler uses a three-pronged strategy: first, to deliver the ball in such a way as to prevent the batsman from obtaining the necessary visual information until it is too late to react; secondly, to force the batsman to rely entirely on inadequate retinal image information; thirdly, to allow the batsman to learn a particular relationship between the early part of the ball's flight and the point where the ball hits the ground, and then to change the relationship with such skill that the batsman does not detect the change. PMID:9486432

  9. Visual factors in hitting and catching.

    PubMed

    Regan, D

    1997-12-01

    To hit or catch an approaching ball, it is necessary to move a bat or hand to the right place at the right time. The performance of top sports players is remarkable: positional errors of less than 5 cm and temporal errors of less than 2 or 3 ms are reliably maintained. There are three schools of thought about how this is achieved. One holds that predictive visual information about where the ball will be at some future instance (when) is used to achieve the hit or catch. The second holds that the bat or hand is moved to the correct position by exploiting some relation between visual information and the required movement. The third focuses on the use of prior knowledge to supplement inadequate visual information. For a rigid spherical ball travelling at constant speed along or close to the line of sight, the retinal images contain both binocular and monocular correlates of the ball's instantaneous direction of motion in depth. Also, the retinal images contain both binocular and monocular information about time of arrival. Humans can unconfound and use this visual information, but they are unable to estimate the absolute distance of the ball or its approach speed other than crudely. In cricket, this visual inadequacy allows a slow bowler to cause the batsman to misjudge where the ball will hit the ground. Such a bowler uses a three-pronged strategy: first, to deliver the ball in such a way as to prevent the batsman from obtaining the necessary visual information until it is too late to react; secondly, to force the batsman to rely entirely on inadequate retinal image information; thirdly, to allow the batsman to learn a particular relationship between the early part of the ball's flight and the point where the ball hits the ground, and then to change the relationship with such skill that the batsman does not detect the change.

  10. Hitting a baseball: a biomechanical description.

    PubMed

    Welch, C M; Banks, S A; Cook, F F; Draovitch, P

    1995-11-01

    A tremendous amount of time and energy has been dedicated to the development of conditioning programs, mechanics drills, and rehabilitation protocols for the throwing athlete. In comparison, a significantly smaller amount has been spent on the needs of the hitting athlete. Before these needs can be addressed, an understanding of mechanics and the demands placed on the body during the swing must be developed. This study uses three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data to define and quantify biomechanics during the baseball swing. The results show that a hitter starts the swing with a weight shift toward the rear foot and the generation of trunk coil. As the hitter strides forward, force applied by the front foot equal to 123% of body weight promotes segment acceleration around the axis of the trunk. The hip segment rotates to a maximum speed of 714 degrees/sec followed by a maximum shoulder segment velocity of 937 degrees/sec. The product of this kinetic link is a maximum linear bat velocity of 31 m/sec. By quantifying the hitting motion, a more educated approach can be made in developing rehabilitation, strength, and conditioning programs for the hitting athlete. PMID:8580946

  11. Universal Hitting Time Statistics for Integrable Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Marklof, Jens; Strömbergsson, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The perceived randomness in the time evolution of "chaotic" dynamical systems can be characterized by universal probabilistic limit laws, which do not depend on the fine features of the individual system. One important example is the Poisson law for the times at which a particle with random initial data hits a small set. This was proved in various settings for dynamical systems with strong mixing properties. The key result of the present study is that, despite the absence of mixing, the hitting times of integrable flows also satisfy universal limit laws which are, however, not Poisson. We describe the limit distributions for "generic" integrable flows and a natural class of target sets, and illustrate our findings with two examples: the dynamics in central force fields and ellipse billiards. The convergence of the hitting time process follows from a new equidistribution theorem in the space of lattices, which is of independent interest. Its proof exploits Ratner's measure classification theorem for unipotent flows, and extends earlier work of Elkies and McMullen.

  12. Hitting a baseball: a biomechanical description.

    PubMed

    Welch, C M; Banks, S A; Cook, F F; Draovitch, P

    1995-11-01

    A tremendous amount of time and energy has been dedicated to the development of conditioning programs, mechanics drills, and rehabilitation protocols for the throwing athlete. In comparison, a significantly smaller amount has been spent on the needs of the hitting athlete. Before these needs can be addressed, an understanding of mechanics and the demands placed on the body during the swing must be developed. This study uses three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data to define and quantify biomechanics during the baseball swing. The results show that a hitter starts the swing with a weight shift toward the rear foot and the generation of trunk coil. As the hitter strides forward, force applied by the front foot equal to 123% of body weight promotes segment acceleration around the axis of the trunk. The hip segment rotates to a maximum speed of 714 degrees/sec followed by a maximum shoulder segment velocity of 937 degrees/sec. The product of this kinetic link is a maximum linear bat velocity of 31 m/sec. By quantifying the hitting motion, a more educated approach can be made in developing rehabilitation, strength, and conditioning programs for the hitting athlete.

  13. Stochastic, weighted hit size theory of cellular radiobiological action

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    A stochastic theory that appears to account well for the observed responses of cell populations exposed in radiation fields of different qualities and for different durations of exposure is described. The theory appears to explain well most cellular radiobiological phenomena observed in at least autonomous cell systems, argues for the use of fluence rate (phi) instead of absorbed dose for quantification of the amount of radiation involved in low level radiation exposure. With or without invoking the cell sensitivity function, the conceptual improvement would be substantial. The approach suggested also shows that the absorbed dose-cell response functions currently employed do not reflect the spectrum of cell sensitivities to increasing cell doses of a single agent, nor can RBE represent the potency ratio for different agents that can produce similar quantal responses. Thus, for accurate comparison of cell sensitivities among different cells in the same individual, or between the cells in different kinds of individuals, it is necessary to quantify cell sensitivity in terms of the hit size weighting or cell sensitivity function introduced here. Similarly, this function should be employed to evaluate the relative potency of radiation and other radiomimetic chemical or physical agents.

  14. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  15. Being selective at the plate: processing dependence between perceptual variables relates to hitting goals and performance.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2013-08-01

    Performance of a skill that involves acting on a goal object (e.g., a ball to be hit) can influence one's judgment of the size and speed of that object. The present study examined how these action-specific effects are affected when the goal of the actor is varied and they are free to choose between alternative actions. In Experiment 1, expert baseball players were asked to perform three different directional hitting tasks in a batting simulation and make interleaved perceptual judgments about three ball parameters (speed, plate crossing location, and size). Perceived ball size was largest (and perceived speed was slowest) when the ball crossing location was optimal for the particular hitting task the batter was performing (e.g., an "outside" pitch for opposite-field hitting). The magnitude of processing dependency between variables (speed vs. location and size vs. location) was positively correlated with batting performance. In Experiment 2, the action-specific effects observed in Experiment 1 were mimicked by systematically changing the ball diameter in the simulation as a function of plate crossing location. The number of swing initiations was greater when ball size was larger, and batters were more successful in the hitting task for which the larger pitches were optimal (e.g., greater number of pull hits than opposite-field hits when "inside" pitches were larger). These findings suggest attentional accentuation of goal-relevant targets underlies action-related changes in perception and are consistent with an action selection role for these effects. PMID:23163787

  16. Health Information Technology Knowledge and Skills Needed by HIT Employers

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, S.H.; Gongora-Ferraez, M.J.; Joost, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the health information technology (HIT) workforce knowledge and skills needed by HIT employers. Methods Statewide face-to-face and online focus groups of identified HIT employer groups in Austin, Brownsville, College Station, Dallas, El Paso, Houston, Lubbock, San Antonio, and webinars for rural health and nursing informatics. Results HIT employers reported needing an HIT workforce with diverse knowledge and skills ranging from basic to advanced, while covering information technology, privacy and security, clinical practice, needs assessment, contract negotiation, and many other areas. Consistent themes were that employees needed to be able to learn on the job and must possess the ability to think critically and problem solve. Many employers wanted persons with technical skills, yet also the knowledge and understanding of healthcare operations. Conclusion The HIT employer focus groups provided valuable insight into employee skills needed in this fast-growing field. Additionally, this information will be utilized to develop a statewide HIT workforce needs assessment survey. PMID:23646090

  17. Hit-to-Lead Studies for the Antimalarial Tetrahydroisoquinolone Carboxanilides.

    PubMed

    Floyd, David M; Stein, Philip; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jian; Castro, Steve; Clark, Julie A; Connelly, Michele; Zhu, Fangyi; Holbrook, Gloria; Matheny, Amy; Sigal, Martina S; Min, Jaeki; Dhinakaran, Rajkumar; Krishnan, Senthil; Bashyum, Sridevi; Knapp, Spencer; Guy, R Kiplin

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic whole-cell screening in erythrocytic cocultures of Plasmodium falciparum identified a series of dihydroisoquinolones that possessed potent antimalarial activity against multiple resistant strains of P. falciparum in vitro and show no cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. Systematic structure-activity studies revealed relationships between potency and modifications at N-2, C-3, and C-4. Careful structure-property relationship studies, coupled with studies of metabolism, addressed the poor aqueous solubility and metabolic vulnerability, as well as potential toxicological effects, inherent in the more potent primary screening hits such as 10b. Analogues 13h and 13i, with structural modifications at each site, were shown to possess excellent antimalarial activity in vivo. The (+)-(3S,4S) enantiomer of 13i and similar analogues were identified as the more potent. On the basis of these studies, we have selected (+)-13i for further study as a preclinical candidate. PMID:27505686

  18. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) causing portosplenic, superior mesenteric, and splenic vein thrombosis resulting in splenic rupture and pulmonary emboli formation.

    PubMed

    Lammering, Jeanne C; Wang, David S; Shin, Lewis K

    2012-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a life-threatening complication of heparin administration. Of the few reported cases of HIT-associated intra-abdominal thrombosis, none to our knowledge provide multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging findings or emphasize its utility in diagnosis. We describe a case of HIT with MDCT images demonstrating extensive intra-abdominal thrombosis and end-organ complications including splenic rupture and pulmonary emboli. This case emphasizes the potential role of MDCT in the rapid detection of HIT-related thromboembolic complications in patients with nonspecific abdominal pain.

  19. Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embroyonic Stem Cell Diffferentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. Abcg2 is a multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter whose activity may be considered a hallmark of stem cell plasticity. The role of Abcg2 during early embryogenesis, however, is unclear. Studies...

  20. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall. PMID:26539200

  1. Gorlin syndrome with an ovarian leiomyoma associated with a PTCH1 second hit.

    PubMed

    Akizawa, Yoshika; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Ryo; Nagata, Reiko; Aoki, Ryoko; Ishitani, Ken; Nagashima, Yoji; Matsui, Hideo; Saito, Kayoko

    2016-04-01

    We describe a Gorlin syndrome (GS) case with two different second hit mutations of PTCH1, one in a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and the other in an ovarian leiomyoma. GS is a rare genetic condition manifesting as multiple basal cell nevi associated with other features such as medulloblastomas, skeletal abnormalities, and ovarian fibromas. A 21-year-old Japanese woman with a history of two KCOTs was diagnosed with GS according to clinical criteria. A PTCH1 mutation, c.1427del T, was detected in peripheral blood. A novel PTCH1 mutation, c.264_265insAATA, had been found in the maxillary KCOT as a second hit mutation. More recently, the ovarian tumor was detected during a gynecological examination. Laparoscopic adnexectomy was performed, and the pathological diagnosis of the ovarian tumor was leiomyoma. Interestingly, another novel mutation, loss of heterozygosity spanning from 9q22.32 to 9q31.2, including PTCH1 and 89 other genes, was detected in this ovarian tumor, providing evidence of a second hit mutation. This is the first report describing a GS-associated ovarian tumor carrying a second hit in the PTCH1 region. We anticipate that accumulation of more cases will clarify the importance of second hit mutations in ovarian tumor formation in GS. PMID:26782978

  2. Atomic features of an autoantigen in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

    PubMed

    Cai, Zheng; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Greene, Mark I; Cines, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    Autoantigen development is poorly understood at the atomic level. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by antibodies to an antigen composed of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In solution, PF4 exists as an equilibrium among monomers, dimers and tetramers. Structural studies of these interacting components helped delineate a multi-step process involved in the pathogenesis of HIT. First, heparin binds to the 'closed' end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation; exposing the 'open' end. Second, PF4 arrays along heparin/GAG chains, which approximate tetramers, form large antigenic complexes that enhance antibody avidity. Third, pathogenic HIT antibodies bind to the 'open' end of stabilized PF4 tetramers to form an IgG/PF4/heparin ternary immune complex and also to propagate the formation of 'ultralarge immune complexes' (ULCs) that contain multiple IgG antibodies. Fourth, ULCs signal through FcγRIIA receptors, activating platelets and monocytes directly and generating thrombin, which transactivates hematopoietic and endothelial cells. A non-pathogenic anti-PF4 antibody prevents tetramer formation, binding of pathogenic antibody, platelet activation and thrombosis, providing a new approach to manage HIT. An improved understanding of the pathogenesis of HIT may lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics for this autoimmune disease.

  3. The role of the bi-compartmental stem cell niche in delaying cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriyari, Leili; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, by using modern imaging techniques, scientists have found evidence of collaboration between different types of stem cells (SCs), and proposed a bi-compartmental organization of the SC niche. Here we create a class of stochastic models to simulate the dynamics of such a heterogeneous SC niche. We consider two SC groups: the border compartment, S1, is in direct contact with transit-amplifying (TA) cells, and the central compartment, S2, is hierarchically upstream from S1. The S1 SCs differentiate or divide asymmetrically when the tissue needs TA cells. Both groups proliferate when the tissue requires SCs (thus maintaining homeostasis). There is an influx of S2 cells into the border compartment, either by migration, or by proliferation. We examine this model in the context of double-hit mutant generation, which is a rate-limiting step in the development of many cancers. We discover that this type of a cooperative pattern in the stem niche with two compartments leads to a significantly smaller rate of double-hit mutant production compared with a homogeneous, one-compartmental SC niche. Furthermore, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs, consistent with the literature. Finally, the optimal architecture (which minimizes the rate of double-hit mutant production) requires a large proliferation rate of S1 cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of S2 cells. This result is remarkably similar to the niche structure described recently by several authors, where one of the two SC compartments was found more actively engaged in tissue homeostasis and turnover, while the other was characterized by higher levels of quiescence (but contributed strongly to injury recovery). Both numerical and analytical results are presented.

  4. Statistical mechanics of the hitting set problem.

    PubMed

    Mézard, Marc; Tarzia, Marco

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we present a detailed study of the hitting set (HS) problem. This problem is a generalization of the standard vertex cover to hypergraphs: one seeks a configuration of particles with minimal density such that every hyperedge of the hypergraph contains at least one particle. It can also be used in important practical tasks, such as the group testing procedures where one wants to detect defective items in a large group by pool testing. Using a statistical mechanics approach based on the cavity method, we study the phase diagram of the HS problem, in the case of random regular hypergraphs. Depending on the values of the variables and tests degrees different situations can occur: The HS problem can be either in a replica symmetric phase, or in a one-step replica symmetry breaking one. In these two cases, we give explicit results on the minimal density of particles, and the structure of the phase space. These problems are thus in some sense simpler than the original vertex cover problem, where the need for a full replica symmetry breaking has prevented the derivation of exact results so far. Finally, we show that decimation procedures based on the belief propagation and the survey propagation algorithms provide very efficient strategies to solve large individual instances of the hitting set problem.

  5. Solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in protein FON

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Umehara, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The zinc finger HIT domain is a sequence motif found in many proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 3 (TRIP-3), which is possibly involved in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Novel zinc finger motifs are suggested to play important roles in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling. Here, we determined the high-resolution solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in ZNHIT2 (protein FON) from Homo sapiens, by an NMR method based on 567 upper distance limits derived from NOE intensities measured in three-dimensional NOESY spectra. The structure yielded a backbone RMSD to the mean coordinates of 0.19 Å for the structured residues 12–48. The fold consists of two consecutive antiparallel β-sheets and two short C-terminal helices packed against the second β-sheet, and binds two zinc ions. Both zinc ions are coordinated tetrahedrally via a CCCC-CCHC motif to the ligand residues of the zf-HIT domain in an interleaved manner. The tertiary structure of the zinc finger HIT domain closely resembles the folds of the B-box, RING finger, and PHD domains with a cross-brace zinc coordination mode, but is distinct from them. The unique three-dimensional structure of the zinc finger HIT domain revealed a novel zinc-binding fold, as a new member of the treble clef domain family. On the basis of the structural data, we discuss the possible functional roles of the zinc finger HIT domain. PMID:17656577

  6. Characterizations of new ΔE detectors for single-ion hit facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel, Naseem S.; Pallon, Jan; Ros, Linus; Borysiuk, Maciek; Elfman, Mikael; Kristiansson, Per; Nilsson, E. J. Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the performance evaluation of new ΔE detectors to be used as pre-cell hit detectors in living cell irradiation experiments at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis facility (LIBAF). Using these detectors with a thickness down to 4.15 μm fabricated at Lund University, an experiment was setup in which ΔE-detectors were used together with a stop E-detector in a telescope system under coincidence measurements. The characteristics of ΔE detectors were based on the optimal detection of the passage of 2.55 MeV protons. The results of these tests demonstrate that the detector telescope clearly separates the protons, this due to high signal-to-noise ratio and good energy resolution of the ΔE-detectors. The best performing detector was shown to have a detection efficiency of 95% at thickness of 9.7 μm. This type of high-performing detector is suitable for the planned role of the ΔE-detector in the future cell irradiation experiments.

  7. HitKeeper, a generic software package for hit list management

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Jörg; Muller, Michael; Pagni, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background The automated annotation of biological sequences (protein, DNA) relies on the computation of hits (predicted features) on the sequences using various algorithms. Public databases of biological sequences provide a wealth of biological "knowledge", for example manually validated annotations (features) that are located on the sequences, but mining the sequence annotations and especially the predicted and curated features requires dedicated tools. Due to the heterogeneity and diversity of the biological information, it is difficult to handle redundancy, frequent updates, taxonomic information and "private" data together with computational algorithms in a common workflow. Results We present HitKeeper, a software package that controls the fully automatic handling of multiple biological databases and of hit list calculations on a large scale. The software implements an asynchronous update system that introduces updates and computes hits as soon as new data become available. A query interface enables the user to search sequences by specifying constraints, such as retrieving sequences that contain specific motifs, or a defined arrangement of motifs ("metamotifs"), or filtering based on the taxonomic classification of a sequence. Conclusion The software provides a generic and modular framework to handle the redundancy and incremental updates of biological databases, and an original query language. It is published under the terms and conditions of version 2 of the GNU Public License and available at . PMID:17391514

  8. Double-hit and double-protein-expression lymphomas: aggressive and refractory lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) is a subgroup of aggressive lymphomas with both MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements, characterised by a rapidly progressing clinical course that is refractory to aggressive treatment and short survival. Over time, the definition was modified and now includes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with MYC translocation combined with an additional translocation involving BCL2 or BCL6. Some cases that have a similar clinical course with concomitant overexpression of MYC or BCL2 proteins were recently characterised as immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas (ie, double-protein-expression lymphomas [DPLs]). The clinical course of these DPLs is worse than so-called standard DLBCL but suggested by some studies to be slightly better than DHL, although there is overlap between the two categories. Present treatment does not allow cure or long-term survival in patients with genetic or immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas, but several new drugs are being developed. PMID:26545844

  9. Role of stem cells in tooth bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamleshwar; Mishra, Niraj; Kumar, Lakshya; Agarwal, Kaushal Kishore; Agarwal, Bhaskar

    2012-01-01

    The creation of teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin, and enamel. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro. The search was performed from 1970 to 2012 and was limited to English language papers. The keywords searched on medline were ‘stem cells and dentistry,’ ‘stem cells and odontoblast,’ ‘stem cells and dentin,’ and ‘stem cells and ameloblasts.’ PMID:25756031

  10. The role of fuel cells in NASA's space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The advances in fuel cell technology which have expanded the capabilities of the fuel cell from that of power generation to include energy storage also expanded its potential role in space power systems. This paper presents a brief evolutionary history of the fuel cell technology and compares this with NASA's increasing space power requirements. The role of fuel cells is put in perspective with other energy storage systems applicable for space using such criteria as type of mission, weight, reliability, costs, etc. Potential applications of space fuel cells with projected technology advances are examined.

  11. The role of fuel cells in NASA's space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A history of the fuel cell technology is presented and compared with NASA's increasing space power requirements. The role of fuel cells is discussed in perspective with other energy storage systems applicable for space using such criteria as type of mission, weight, reliability, costs, etc. Potential applications of space fuel cells with projected technology advances were examined.

  12. A protective role of mast cells in intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sinnamon, Mark J; Carter, Kathy J; Sims, Lauren P; Lafleur, Bonnie; Fingleton, Barbara; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2008-04-01

    Mast cells have been observed in numerous types of tumors; however, their role in carcinogenesis remains poorly understood. The majority of epidemiological evidence suggests a negative association between the presence of mast cells and tumor progression in breast, lung and colonic neoplasms. Intestinal adenomas in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min, APC(Min/+)) mouse displayed increased numbers of mast cells and increased abundance of mast cell-associated proteinases as determined by transcriptional profiling with the Hu/Mu ProtIn microarray. To examine the role of mast cells in intestinal tumorigenesis, a mutant mouse line deficient in mast cells, Sash mice (c-kit(W-sh/W-sh)), was crossed with the Min mouse, a genetic model of intestinal neoplasia. The resulting mast cell-deficient Min-Sash mice developed 50% more adenomas than littermate controls and the tumors were 33% larger in Min-Sash mice. Mast cell deficiency did not affect tumor cell proliferation; however, apoptosis was significantly inhibited in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cells have been shown to act as critical upstream regulators of numerous inflammatory cells. Neutrophil, macrophage and T cell populations were similar between Min and Min-Sash mice; however, eosinophils were significantly less abundant in tumors obtained from Min-Sash animals. These results indicate a protective, antitumor role of mast cells in a genetic model of early-stage intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:18258601

  13. Multiple sclerosis and the role of immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Høglund, Rune A; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with many different immune cells involved in its pathogenesis, and in particular T cells as the most recognized cell type. Recently, the innate immune system has also been researched for its effect on the disease. Hence, cells of the immune system play vital roles in either ameliorating or exacerbating the disease. The genetic and environmental factors, as well as the etiology and pathogenesis are of utmost importance for the development of MS. An insight into the roles play by T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells in MS and the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, will be presented. Understanding the mechanisms of action for current therapeutic modalities should help developing new therapeutic tools to treat this disease and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25254187

  14. Protective role of Th17 cells in pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Jitendra Singh; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-18

    Th17 cells are characterized as preferential producer of interleukins including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. Corresponding receptors of these cytokines are expressed on number of cell types found in the mucosa, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts which constitute the prime targets of the Th17-associated cytokines. Binding of IL-17 family members to their corresponding receptors lead to modulation of antimicrobial functions of target cells including alveolar epithelial cells. Stimulated alveolar epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides and are involved in granulepoesis, neutrophil recruitment and tissue repair. Mucosal immunity mediated by Th17 cells is protective against numerous pulmonary pathogens including extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. This review focuses on the protective role of Th17 cells during pulmonary infection, highlighting subset differentiation, effector cytokines production, followed by study of the binding of these cytokines to their corresponding receptors, the subsequent signaling pathway they engender and their effector role in host defense.

  15. Protective role of Th17 cells in pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Jitendra Singh; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-18

    Th17 cells are characterized as preferential producer of interleukins including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. Corresponding receptors of these cytokines are expressed on number of cell types found in the mucosa, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts which constitute the prime targets of the Th17-associated cytokines. Binding of IL-17 family members to their corresponding receptors lead to modulation of antimicrobial functions of target cells including alveolar epithelial cells. Stimulated alveolar epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides and are involved in granulepoesis, neutrophil recruitment and tissue repair. Mucosal immunity mediated by Th17 cells is protective against numerous pulmonary pathogens including extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. This review focuses on the protective role of Th17 cells during pulmonary infection, highlighting subset differentiation, effector cytokines production, followed by study of the binding of these cytokines to their corresponding receptors, the subsequent signaling pathway they engender and their effector role in host defense. PMID:26878294

  16. Hit-and-run planetary collisions.

    PubMed

    Asphaug, Erik; Agnor, Craig B; Williams, Quentin

    2006-01-12

    Terrestrial planet formation is believed to have concluded in our Solar System with about 10 million to 100 million years of giant impacts, where hundreds of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos acquired random velocities through gravitational encounters and resonances with one another and with Jupiter. This led to planet-crossing orbits and collisions that produced the four terrestrial planets, the Moon and asteroids. But here we show that colliding planets do not simply merge, as is commonly assumed. In many cases, the smaller planet escapes from the collision highly deformed, spun up, depressurized from equilibrium, stripped of its outer layers, and sometimes pulled apart into a chain of diverse objects. Remnants of these 'hit-and-run' collisions are predicted to be common among remnant planet-forming populations, and thus to be relevant to asteroid formation and meteorite petrogenesis.

  17. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions. PMID:26849195

  18. The role of anisotropy in cell morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Pomp, Wim; Merks, Roeland; Schmidt, Thomas; Giomi, Luca

    The shape of adhering cells is determined by the interplay between contractile forces, arising from the cytoskeleton, and the resistance of the underlying substrate. In particular, experiments with fibroblasts on an elastic micro-pillar array show that fibroblasts posess a high degree of orientational order of the actin stress fibers. This anisotropy causes the shape of the cell edge to deviate from the shape of cells with an isotropic cytoskeleton. We present a model that describes the contractility of the cytoskeleton as a combination of directed forces, in the direction of stress fibers, and isotropic forces. We found that cell morphology is described by an anisotropic generalization of the Young-Laplace law, which describes the cell edges as parts of an ellipse. Experiments on the shape of and adhesion forces on fibroblasts show good agreement with our model. Our work highlights the strong coupling between the organization of the internal cytoskeleton and the shapes and forces on the outside of the cell.

  19. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions.

  20. Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Stem Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guo-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response is well appreciated to induce the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps) in the cell. Numerous studies have demonstrated that Hsps function as molecular chaperones in the stabilization of intracellular proteins, repairing damaged proteins, and assisting in protein translocation. Various kinds of stem cells (embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells) have to maintain their stemness and, under certain circumstances, undergo stress. Therefore, Hsps should have an important influence on stem cells. Actually, numerous studies have indicated that some Hsps physically interact with a number of transcription factors as well as intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways. Importantly, alterations in Hsp expression have been demonstrated to affect stem cell behavior including self-renewal, differentiation, sensitivity to environmental stress, and aging. This chapter summarizes recent findings related to (1) the roles of Hsps in maintenance of stem cell dormancy, proliferation, and differentiation; (2) the expression signature of Hsps in embryonic/adult stem cells and differentiated stem cells; (3) the protective roles of Hsps in transplanted stem cells; and (4) the possible roles of Hsps in stem cell aging. PMID:22917237

  1. Multiple NSAID-induced hits injure the small intestine: underlying mechanisms and novel strategies.

    PubMed

    Boelsterli, Urs A; Redinbo, Matthew R; Saitta, Kyle S

    2013-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) injury including jejunal/ileal mucosal ulceration, bleeding, and even perforation in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but they are distinct from those related to gastric injury. Based on recent insights from experimental models, including genetics and pharmacology in rodents typically exposed to diclofenac, indomethacin, or naproxen, we propose a multiple-hit pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy. The multiple hits start with an initial pharmacokinetic determinant caused by vectorial hepatobiliary excretion and delivery of glucuronidated NSAID or oxidative metabolite conjugates to the distal small intestinal lumen, where bacterial β-glucuronidase produces critical aglycones. The released aglycones are then taken up by enterocytes and further metabolized by intestinal cytochrome P450s to potentially reactive intermediates. The "first hit" is caused by the NSAID and/or oxidative metabolites that induce severe endoplasmic reticulum stress or mitochondrial stress and lead to cell death. The "second hit" is created by the significant subsequent inflammatory response that would follow such a first-hit injury. Based on these putative mechanisms, strategies have been developed to protect the enterocytes from being exposed to the parent NSAID and/or oxidative metabolites. Among these, a novel strategy already demonstrated in a murine model is the selective disruption of bacteria-specific β-glucuronidases with a novel small molecule inhibitor that does not harm the bacteria and that alleviates NSAID-induced enteropathy. Such mechanism-based strategies require further investigation but provide potential avenues for the alleviation of the GI toxicity caused by multiple NSAID hits.

  2. Antiapoptotic Role for Lifeguard in T Cell Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Inder M.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic protein Lifeguard (LFG) is upregulated on T cells upon in vitro activation. To investigate its role in T cell immunity we infected wild type and LFG knockout bone marrow chimaeras mice with LCMV. We observed a decreased number of LFG KO activated CD8 and CD4 T cells throughout the infection and a marked decrease in LFG KO LCMV specific memory T cells. WT and KO T cells proliferated at the same rate, however, LFG KO CD44hi T cells showed increased cell death during the initial phase of the immune response. LFG KO and WT T cells were equally sensitive to the FAS antibody Jo-2 in ex vivo cultures, and blocking extrinsic pathways of cell death in vivo with Fas L or caspase 8 inhibitors did not rescue the increased apoptosis in LFG KO T cells. Our data suggest that LFG plays a role in T cell survival during the initial phase of anti-viral immune response by protecting pre-existing memory T cells and possibly newly activated T cells resulting in a diminished immune response and a decreased number of LCMV specific memory T cells. PMID:26565411

  3. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  4. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  5. Cell shrinkage and monovalent cation fluxes: role in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bortner, Carl D; Cidlowski, John A

    2007-06-15

    The loss of cell volume or cell shrinkage has been a morphological hallmark of the programmed cell death process known as apoptosis. This isotonic loss of cell volume has recently been term apoptotic volume decrease or AVD to distinguish it from inherent volume regulatory responses that occurs in cells under anisotonic conditions. Recent studies examining the intracellular signaling pathways that result in this unique cellular characteristic have determined that a fundamental movement of ions, particularly monovalent ions, underlie the AVD process and plays an important role on controlling the cell death process. An efflux of intracellular potassium was shown to be a critical aspect of the AVD process, as preventing this ion loss could protect cells from apoptosis. However, potassium plays a complex role as a loss of intracellular potassium has also been shown to be beneficial to the health of the cell. Additionally, the mechanisms that a cell employs to achieve this loss of intracellular potassium vary depending on the cell type and stimulus used to induce apoptosis, suggesting multiple ways exist to accomplish the same goal of AVD. Additionally, sodium and chloride have been shown to play a vital role during cell death in both the signaling and control of AVD in various apoptotic model systems. This review examines the relationship between this morphological change and intracellular monovalent ions during apoptosis. PMID:17321483

  6. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Juhi; Upadhyay, Ram B; Agrawal, Pankaj; Jaitley, Shweta; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2013-09-01

    Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks. PMID:24251267

  7. Combining Computational Methods for Hit to Lead Optimization in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S.; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, E. Lucile; Reynolds, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tuberculosis treatments need to be shorter and overcome drug resistance. Our previous large scale phenotypic high-throughput screening against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has identified 737 active compounds and thousands that are inactive. We have used this data for building computational models as an approach to minimize the number of compounds tested. Methods A cheminformatics clustering approach followed by Bayesian machine learning models (based on publicly available Mtb screening data) was used to illustrate that application of these models for screening set selections can enrich the hit rate. Results In order to explore chemical diversity around active cluster scaffolds of the dose-response hits obtained from our previous Mtb screens a set of 1924 commercially available molecules have been selected and evaluated for antitubercular activity and cytotoxicity using Vero, THP-1 and HepG2 cell lines with 4.3%, 4.2% and 2.7% hit rates, respectively. We demonstrate that models incorporating antitubercular and cytotoxicity data in Vero cells can significantly enrich the selection of non-toxic actives compared to random selection. Across all cell lines, the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) and cytotoxicity model identified ~10% of the hits in the top 1% screened (>10 fold enrichment). We also showed that seven out of nine Mtb active compounds from different academic published studies and eight out of eleven Mtb active compounds from a pharmaceutical screen (GSK) would have been identified by these Bayesian models. Conclusion Combining clustering and Bayesian models represents a useful strategy for compound prioritization and hit-to lead optimization of antitubercular agents. PMID:24132686

  8. Improved Curveball Hitting through the Enhancement of Visual Cues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Kurt; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of using visual cues to highlight the seams of baseballs, to improve the hitting of curveballs by five undergraduate varsity baseball team candidates. Results indicated that subjects hit a greater percentage of marked than unmarked balls. (Author/DB)

  9. Object Rotation Effects on the Timing of a Hitting Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Mark A.; van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.; Oudejans, Raoul R. D.; Davids, Keith

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigated how perturbing optical information affects the guidance of an unfolding hitting action. Using monocular and binocular vision, six participants were required to hit a rectangular foam object, released from two different heights, under four different approach conditions, two with object rotation (to perturb…

  10. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  11. The Role of MicroRNAs in Cardiac Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Nima; Bahn, Andrew; Katare, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are considered as the next generation drug treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease who are resistant to conventional treatment. Among several stem cells used in the clinical setting, cardiac stem cells (CSCs) which reside in the myocardium and epicardium of the heart have been shown to be an effective option for the source of stem cells. In normal circumstances, CSCs primarily function as a cell store to replace the physiologically depleted cardiovascular cells, while under the diseased condition they have been shown to experimentally regenerate the diseased myocardium. In spite of their major functional role, molecular mechanisms regulating the CSCs proliferation and differentiation are still unknown. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of miRs in regulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation, as well as other physiological and pathological processes related to stem cell function. This review summarises the current understanding of the role of miRs in CSCs. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms by which miRs regulate CSCs may lead to advances in the mode of stem cell therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25802528

  12. The role of dental stem cells in regeneration

    PubMed Central

    MAXIM, MONICA ANGELA; SORITAU, OLGA; BACIUT, MIHAELA; BRAN, SIMION; BACIUT, GRIGORE

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that have the capacity of rising multiple cell types. A rich source of mesenchymal stem cells is represented by the dental tissues: the periodontal ligament, the dental pulp, the apical papilla, the dental follicle and the deciduous teeth. The aim of this review is to characterize the main dental- derived mesenchymal stem cell population, and to show their important role in tissue regeneration based on their properties : the multi-potency, the high proliferation rate, the differentiation in multiple cell lineages, the high cell viability and the positive expression for mesenchymal cell markers. Tissue regeneration or de novo’ formation of craniofacial structures is the future of regenerative medicine, offering a solution for congenital malformations, traumas and other diseases. PMID:26733745

  13. HITS-CLIP yields genome-wide insights into brain alternative RNA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licatalosi, Donny D.; Mele, Aldo; Fak, John J.; Ule, Jernej; Kayikci, Melis; Chi, Sung Wook; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Blume, John E.; Wang, Xuning; Darnell, Jennifer C.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2008-11-01

    Protein-RNA interactions have critical roles in all aspects of gene expression. However, applying biochemical methods to understand such interactions in living tissues has been challenging. Here we develop a genome-wide means of mapping protein-RNA binding sites in vivo, by high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP). HITS-CLIP analysis of the neuron-specific splicing factor Nova revealed extremely reproducible RNA-binding maps in multiple mouse brains. These maps provide genome-wide in vivo biochemical footprints confirming the previous prediction that the position of Nova binding determines the outcome of alternative splicing; moreover, they are sufficiently powerful to predict Nova action de novo. HITS-CLIP revealed a large number of Nova-RNA interactions in 3' untranslated regions, leading to the discovery that Nova regulates alternative polyadenylation in the brain. HITS-CLIP, therefore, provides a robust, unbiased means to identify functional protein-RNA interactions in vivo.

  14. Role of adipose-derived stem cells in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waqar Ul; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing remains a challenge to date and causes debilitating effects with tremendous suffering. Recent advances in tissue engineering approaches in the area of cell therapy have provided promising treatment options to meet the challenges of impaired skin wound healing such as diabetic foot ulcers. Over the last few years, stem cell therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic approach for various diseases including wound repair and tissue regeneration. Several different types of stem cells have been studied in both preclinical and clinical settings such as bone marrow-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), circulating angiogenic cells (e.g., endothelial progenitor cells), human dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes for wound healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown an improved outcome in wound healing studies. ASCs are pluripotent stem cells with the ability to differentiate into different lineages and to secrete paracrine factors initiating tissue regeneration process. The abundant supply of fat tissue, ease of isolation, extensive proliferative capacities ex vivo, and their ability to secrete pro-angiogenic growth factors make them an ideal cell type to use in therapies for the treatment of nonhealing wounds. In this review, we look at the pathogenesis of chronic wounds, role of stem cells in wound healing, and more specifically look at the role of ASCs, their mechanism of action and their safety profile in wound repair and tissue regeneration.

  15. Antarctic ozone hole hits record depth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    A bad year for the ozone over Antarctica looked like a good bet this year. For the past 2 years, stratospheric ozone destruction has equaled the record set in 1987. Now things look even worse, with a record-setting ozone hole. In 1987, 1989, and 1990, the minimum amount of ozone over Antarctica early each October was 120 to 125 Dobson units compared to the typical level of 220 that prevailed before manmade Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) began eating into the ozone layer. The depletion allowed as much as twice the usual amount of biologically damaging ultraviolet light to reach the earth's surface. But researchers took some comfort in the fact that the hole seemed to have hit a barrier to further losses. Now that barrier may have been breached. On 6 October, the satellite-borne Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer detected an ozone minimum of 110 Dobson units. The region of the lower stratosphere where icy cloud particles and the chlorine of CFCs combine to destroy ozone - between 14 and 24 kilometers - looks much the same as it did in 1987.

  16. Nimodipine in traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage: a re-analysis of the HIT I and HIT II trials.

    PubMed

    Murray, G D; Teasdale, G M; Schmitz, H

    1996-01-01

    Two large randomised controlled trials have been performed to study the effect of the calcium antagonist nimodipine on the outcome of severe head injury, HIT I [1] amd HIT II [4]. Both trials showed a modest and statistically non-significant increase in the proportion of favourable outcomes in patients treated with nimodipine. A subgroup analysis of the HIT II trial [4, 5] suggested, however, that there could be a substantial protective effect of nimodipine in patients with traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). This report provides a re-analysis of the HIT I data to see whether it provides a re-analysis of the HIT I data to see whether in HIT II. This involved performing a central review of the CT scans for the HIT I patients, to identify those individuals with evidence of traumatic SAH. The sample size was small, but the HIT I data gave no support to the hypothesis that nimodipine is protective in the traumatic SAH subgroup, where 69% of patients had a poor outcome on placebo and 74% of patients had a poor outcome on nimodipine. The data do not exclude the possibility of a clinically relevant beneficial effect of nimodipine in the traumatic SAH subgroup, but further data are required to provide a definitive answer. In addition, we present a pooled analysis of the data from the two trials, which suggests that the overall benefit of treating unselected head injured patients with nimodipine is unlikely to be clinically relevant. PMID:8955434

  17. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  18. Sun exposure causes somatic second-hit mutations and angiofibroma development in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Tyburczy, Magdalena E; Wang, Ji-An; Li, Shaowei; Thangapazham, Rajesh; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Moss, Joel; Kwiatkowski, David J; Darling, Thomas N

    2014-04-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is characterized by the formation of tumors in multiple organs and is caused by germline mutation in one of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 and TSC2. As for other tumor suppressor gene syndromes, the mechanism of somatic second-hit events in TSC tumors is unknown. We grew fibroblast-like cells from 29 TSC skin tumors from 22 TSC subjects and identified germline and second-hit mutations in TSC1/TSC2 using next-generation sequencing. Eighteen of 22 (82%) subjects had a mutation identified, and 8 of the 18 (44%) subjects were mosaic with mutant allele frequencies of 0 to 19% in normal tissue DNA. Multiple tumors were available from four patients, and in each case, second-hit mutations in TSC2 were distinct indicating they arose independently. Most remarkably, 7 (50%) of the 14 somatic point mutations were CC>TT ultraviolet 'signature' mutations, never seen as a TSC germline mutation. These occurred exclusively in facial angiofibroma tumors from sun-exposed sites. These results implicate UV-induced DNA damage as a cause of second-hit mutations and development of TSC facial angiofibromas and suggest that measures to limit UV exposure in TSC children and adults should reduce the frequency and severity of these lesions.

  19. Organising cells into tissues: new roles for cell adhesion molecules in planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Saburi, Sakura; McNeill, Helen

    2005-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the coordinated organization of cells within the plane of the epithelium, first described in Drosophila. A Frizzled signalling pathway dedicated to PCP (the non-canonical Frizzled pathway) acts through Dishevelled and small G proteins, as does the classical Wnt pathway, but then diverges downstream of Dishevelled. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role for several atypical cadherin molecules (Fat, Dachsous and Flamingo) in controlling PCP signalling. Recent work has also indicated that the first sign of PCP during development is the polarized localization of PCP proteins (Frizzled, Flamingo, Dishevelled, etc). Exciting new data reveal that this PCP pathway is conserved to man.

  20. Signaling role of oligogalacturonides derived during cell wall degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vallarino, José G.; Osorio, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the role of the cell wall as a physical barrier against pathogens, some of its constituents, such as pectin-derived oligogalacturonides (OGAs) are essential components to trigger signaling pathways that induce rapid defense responses. Many pathogens directly penetrate the cell wall to access water and nutrients of the plant protoplast, and a rigid cell wall can fend off pathogen attack by forming an impenetrable physical barrier. Thus, cell wall integrity sensing is one mechanism by which plants may detect pathogen attack. Moreover, when the plant-pathogen interaction occurred, OGAs released during cell wall modification can trigger plant defense (e.g., production of reactive oxygen species, production of anti-microbial metabolites and synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins). This review documents and discusses studies suggesting that OGAs play a dual signaling role during pathogen attack by inducing defense responses and plant architecture adjustment. PMID:22918501

  1. Cell autonomous roles of Nedd4 in craniofacial bone formation.

    PubMed

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Harvey, Natasha; Schwarz, Quenten

    2016-02-01

    Nedd4 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that has an essential role in craniofacial development. However, how and when Nedd4 controls skull formation is ill defined. Here we have used a collection of complementary genetic mouse models to dissect the cell-autonomous roles of Nedd4 in the formation of neural crest cell derived cranial bone. Removal of Nedd4 specifically from neural crest cells leads to profound craniofacial defects with marked reduction of cranial bone that was preceded by hypoplasia of bone forming osteoblasts. Removal of Nedd4 after differentiation of neural crest cells into progenitors of chondrocytes and osteoblasts also led to profound deficiency of craniofacial bone in the absence of cartilage defects. Notably, these skull malformations were conserved when Nedd4 was specifically removed from the osteoblast lineage after specification of osteoblast precursors from mesenchymal skeletal progenitors. We further show that absence of Nedd4 in pre-osteoblasts results in decreased cell proliferation and altered osteogenic differentiation. Taken together our data demonstrate a novel cell-autonomous role for Nedd4 in promoting expansion of the osteoblast progenitor pool to control craniofacial development. Nedd4 mutant mice therefore represent a unique mouse model of craniofacial anomalies that provide an ideal resource to explore the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of neural crest cells in craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:26681395

  2. Gangliosides have a functional role during rotavirus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel Angel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Cell entry of rotaviruses is a complex process, which involves sequential interactions with several cell surface molecules. Among the molecules implicated are gangliosides, glycosphingolipids with one or more sialic acid (SA) residues. The role of gangliosides in rotavirus cell entry was studied by silencing the expression of two key enzymes involved in their biosynthesis--the UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG), which transfers a glucose molecule to ceramide to produce glucosylceramide GlcCer, and the lactosyl ceramide-α-2,3-sialyl transferase 5 (GM3-s), which adds the first SA to lactoceramide-producing ganglioside GM3. Silencing the expression of both enzymes resulted in decreased ganglioside levels (as judged by GM1a detection). Four rotavirus strains tested (human Wa, simian RRV, porcine TFR-41, and bovine UK) showed a decreased infectivity in cells with impaired ganglioside synthesis; however, their replication after bypassing the entry step was not affected, confirming the importance of gangliosides for cell entry of the viruses. Interestingly, viral binding to the cell surface was not affected in cells with inhibited ganglioside synthesis, but the infectivity of all strains tested was inhibited by preincubation of gangliosides with virus prior to infection. These data suggest that rotaviruses can attach to cell surface in the absence of gangliosides but require them for productive cell entry, confirming their functional role during rotavirus cell entry.

  3. DGCR8 HITS-CLIP reveals novel functions for the Microprocessor.

    PubMed

    Macias, Sara; Plass, Mireya; Stajuda, Agata; Michlewski, Gracjan; Eyras, Eduardo; Cáceres, Javier F

    2012-08-01

    The Drosha-DGCR8 complex (Microprocessor) is required for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as the endonuclease. Using high-throughput sequencing and cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) we identified RNA targets of DGCR8 in human cells. Unexpectedly, miRNAs were not the most abundant targets. DGCR8-bound RNAs also comprised several hundred mRNAs as well as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs. We found that the Microprocessor controlled the abundance of several mRNAs as well as of MALAT1. By contrast, DGCR8-mediated cleavage of snoRNAs was independent of Drosha, suggesting the involvement of DGCR8 in cellular complexes with other endonucleases. Binding of DGCR8 to cassette exons is a new mechanism for regulation of the relative abundance of alternatively spliced isoforms. These data provide insights in the complex role of DGCR8 in controlling the fate of several classes of RNAs.

  4. Role of Fas/Fas-L in vascular cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Stoneman, Victoria E A; Bennett, Martin R

    2009-02-01

    Apoptosis of vascular cells is observed in vivo in normal vessel development and a variety of vascular pathologies. Apoptosis occurs in all cell types within the vessel wall, the consequences of which depend on both cell type and the pathology under study. The death receptor Fas is expressed throughout the vessel wall, and increasingly Fas-Fas-L-induced killing has been recognized in the vasculature. This review outlines the current developments in understanding the role, regulation, and consequences of Fas-Fas-L-induced apoptosis in vascular cells.

  5. Role of Exosome Shuttle RNA in Cell-to-Cell Communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Peng, Peng; Shen, Keng

    2016-08-01

    There are several ways that transpire in cell-to-cell communication,with or without cell contact. Exosomes play an important role in cell-to-cell communication,which do not need cell contact,as that can result in a relatively long-distance influence. Exosome contains RNA components including mRNA and micro-RNA,which are protected by exosomes rigid membranes. This allows those components be passed long distance through the circulatory system. The mRNA components are far different from their donor cells,and the micro-RNA components may reflect the cell they originated. In this article we review the role of exosomes in cell-to-cell communication,with particular focus on their potentials in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:27594165

  6. Second hit in cervical carcinogenesis process: involvement of wnt/beta catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Alatorre-Tavera, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    The Human papillomavirus plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cervical cancer. However, it is a necessary but not sufficient cause to develop invasive carcinoma; hence, other factors are required in the pathogenesis of this malignancy. In this review we explore the hypothesis of the deregulation of wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as a "second hit" required to develop cervical cancer. PMID:18606007

  7. Ozone loss hits us where we live

    SciTech Connect

    Appenzeller, T.

    1991-11-01

    The news about Earth's ozone layer just keeps getting worse. Three weeks ago, NASA researchers reported that the ozone hole over the Antarctic hit a record depth this year. Now comes the United Nations Environment Program, together with the World Meteorological Organization, with an even more distressing assessment of the state of the ozone layer. For the first time, the 80-member UN panel said, measurements show the ozone shield is eroding over temperate latitudes in summer, exposing crops and people to a larger dose of ultraviolet light just when they are most vulnerable. For a small group of atmospheric modelers, though, the bad news is bittersweet. Four months ago researchers predicted summertime ozone losses of just the magnitude the UN panel has now reported: about 3% over the past decade for northern temperate latitudes. Ozone modelers are encouraged by the agreement, particularly because other models are now yielding the same result. The modeling effort was spurred by earlier measurements showing a serious erosion of ozone at midlatitudes, mainly in winter. In 1988, an analysis of data collected from the ground showed that ozone levels at the latitude of the US were dropping by about 1% to 3% per decade; last April, an analysis of measurements from the satellite-borne Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer boosted that figure to between 4% and 5%. Those findings raised the question: What mechanisms could be driving the midlatitude losses The fact that the losses seemed to be concentrated in winter suggested one possibility. The winter ozone losses at the poles are driven by chemical reactions taking place on the surface of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds. Such clouds don't form at temperate latitudes. But some researchers suggested that masses of air already depleted in ozone or enriched in reactive chlorine by the chemistry in the polar clouds might be escaping to temperate latitudes during the winter.

  8. The Role of TRP Proteins in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freichel, Marc; Almering, Julia; Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins form cation channels that are regulated through strikingly diverse mechanisms including multiple cell surface receptors, changes in temperature, in pH and osmolarity, in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and by phosphoinositides which makes them polymodal sensors for fine tuning of many cellular and systemic processes in the body. The 28 TRP proteins identified in mammals are classified into six subfamilies: TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPA, TRPML, and TRPP. When activated, they contribute to cell depolarization and Ca2+ entry. In mast cells, the increase of [Ca2+]i is fundamental for their biological activity, and several entry pathways for Ca2+ and other cations were described including Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Like in other non-excitable cells, TRP channels could directly contribute to Ca2+ influx via the plasma membrane as constituents of Ca2+ conducting channel complexes or indirectly by shifting the membrane potential and regulation of the driving force for Ca2+ entry through independent Ca2+ entry channels. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the expression of individual Trp genes with the majority of the 28 members being yet identified in different mast cell models, and we highlight mechanisms how they can regulate mast cell functions. Since specific agonists or blockers are still lacking for most members of the TRP family, studies to unravel their function and activation mode still rely on experiments using genetic approaches and transgenic animals. RNAi approaches suggest a functional role for TRPC1, TRPC5, and TRPM7 in mast cell derived cell lines or primary mast cells, and studies using Trp gene knock-out mice reveal a critical role for TRPM4 in mast cell activation and for mast cell mediated cutaneous anaphylaxis, whereas a direct role of cold- and menthol-activated TRPM8 channels seems to be unlikely for the development of cold urticaria at least in mice. PMID:22701456

  9. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak.

  10. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  11. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future.

  12. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. PMID:26945003

  13. Role for histone deacetylase 1 in human tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Senese, Silvia; Zaragoza, Katrin; Minardi, Simone; Muradore, Ivan; Ronzoni, Simona; Passafaro, Alfonso; Bernard, Loris; Draetta, Giulio F; Alcalay, Myriam; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2007-07-01

    Posttranslational modifications of core histones are central to the regulation of gene expression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) repress transcription by deacetylating histones, and class I HDACs have a crucial role in mouse, Xenopus laevis, zebra fish, and Caenorhabditis elegans development. The role of individual class I HDACs in tumor cell proliferation was investigated using RNA interference-mediated protein knockdown. We show here that in the absence of HDAC1 cells can arrest either at the G(1) phase of the cell cycle or at the G(2)/M transition, resulting in the loss of mitotic cells, cell growth inhibition, and an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. On the contrary, HDAC2 knockdown showed no effect on cell proliferation unless we concurrently knocked down HDAC1. Using gene expression profiling analysis, we found that inactivation of HDAC1 affected the transcription of specific target genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, HDAC2 downregulation did not cause significant changes compared to control cells, while inactivation of HDAC1, HDAC1 plus HDAC2, or HDAC3 resulted in more distinct clusters. Loss of these HDACs might impair cell cycle progression by affecting not only the transcription of specific target genes but also other biological processes. Our data support the idea that a drug targeting specific HDACs could be highly beneficial in the treatment of cancer.

  14. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  15. Collective behavior of brain tumor cells: The role of hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Hopkins, Scott; Szalad, Alexandra; Zheng, Xuguang; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2011-03-01

    We consider emergent collective behavior of a multicellular biological system. Specifically, we investigate the role of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) in migration of brain tumor cells. We performed two series of cell migration experiments. In the first set of experiments, cell migration away from a tumor spheroid was investigated. The second set of experiments was performed in a typical wound-healing geometry: Cells were placed on a substrate, a scratch was made, and cell migration into the gap was investigated. Experiments show a surprising result: Cells under normal and hypoxic conditions have migrated the same distance in the “spheroid” experiment, while in the “scratch” experiment cells under normal conditions migrated much faster than under hypoxic conditions. To explain this paradox, we formulate a discrete stochastic model for cell dynamics. The theoretical model explains our experimental observations and suggests that hypoxia decreases both the motility of cells and the strength of cell-cell adhesion. The theoretical predictions were further verified in independent experiments.

  16. Regulatory roles of B cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide essential mechanisms of protection against infectious diseases. The secretion of specific antibodies by long-lived plasma cells is thought to account for the improved resistance afforded by most successful vaccines against pathogens. Accordingly, a goal in vaccine development is to induce potent B cell responses in order to drive the efficient formation of long-lived antibody-secreting cells. However, the roles of activated B cells are complex in infectious diseases. It was recently observed that activated B cells could also negatively regulate host defence mechanisms, both during primary infection and, after vaccination, upon secondary challenge, via mechanisms involving their production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-35. Remarkably, the B cells expressing IL-10 and IL-35 in vivo were distinct subsets of IgMhiCD19+CD138hi antibody-secreting cells. A better understanding of the diverse roles of these distinct antibody-secreting cell subsets in immunity and immunological memory, as well as of the signals controlling their generation, might help the rational development of better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27586794

  17. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  18. The Chelyabinsk Meteorite Hits an Anomalous Zone in the Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2013-09-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is "strange" because it hits an area in the Urals where anomalous events are observed: shining skies, light balls, UFOs, electrphonic bolids. The area tectonically occurs at the intersection of two fold belts: Urals and Timan.

  19. Concussion Study Shows Player-To-Player Hits Most Damaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159936.html Concussion Study Shows Player-to-Player Hits Most Damaging ... American football continue to debate how to prevent concussions, a new study using data from devices inside ...

  20. Do pigeons prefer alternatives that include near-hit outcomes?

    PubMed

    Stagner, Jessica P; Case, Jacob P; Sticklen, Mary F; Duncan, Amanda K; Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-07-01

    Pigeons show suboptimal choice on a gambling-like task similar to that shown by humans. Humans also show a preference for gambles in which there are near hits (losses that come close to winning). In the present research, we asked if pigeons would show a preference for alternatives with near-hit-like trials. In Experiment 1, we included an alternative that presented a near hit, in which a stimulus associated with reinforcement (a presumed conditioned reinforcer) changed to a stimulus associated with the absence of reinforcement (a presumed conditioned inhibitor). The pigeons tended to avoid this alternative. In Experiment 2, we varied the duration of the presumed conditioned reinforcer (2 vs. 8 s) that changed to a presumed conditioned inhibitor (8 vs. 2 s) and found that the longer the conditioned reinforcer was presented, the more the pigeons avoided it. In Experiment 3, the near-hit alternative involved an ambiguous stimulus for 8 s that changed to a presumed conditioned reinforcer (or a presumed conditioned inhibitor) for 2 s, but the pigeons still avoided it. In Experiment 4, we controlled for the duration of the conditioned reinforcer by presenting it first for 2 s followed by the ambiguous stimulus for 8 s. Once again, the pigeons avoided the alternative with the near-hit trials. In all 4 experiments, the pigeons tended to avoid alternatives that provided near-hit-like trials. We concluded that humans may be attracted to near-hit trials because near-hit trials give them the illusion of control, whereas this does not appear to be a factor for pigeons.

  1. Thomson Scattering Measurements on HIT-SI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, C. J.; Morgan, K. D.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    A multi-point Thomson Scattering diagnostic has been implemented on HIT-SI3 (Helicity Injected Torus - Steady Inductive 3) to measure electron temperature. The HIT-SI3 experiment is a modification of the original HIT-SI apparatus that uses three injectors instead of two. This modification alters the configuration of magnetic fields and thus the plasma behavior in the device. The scientific aim of HIT-SI3 is to develop a deeper understanding of how injector behavior and interactions influence current drive and plasma performance in the spheromak. The Thomson Scattering system includes a 20 J (1 GW pulse) Ruby laser that provides the incident beam, and collection optics that are installed such that measurements can be taken at four spatial locations in HIT-SI3 plasmas. For each measurement point, a 3-channel polychromator is used to detect the relative level of scattering. These measurements allow for the presence of temperature gradients in the spheromak to be investigated. Preliminary HIT-SI3 temperature data are presented and can be compared to predictions from computational models. Work supported by the D.O.E.

  2. Verbs in the lexicon: Why is hitting easier than breaking?

    PubMed Central

    Mckoon, Gail; Love, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Adult speakers use verbs in syntactically appropriate ways. For example, they know implicitly that the boy hit at the fence is acceptable but the boy broke at the fence is not. We suggest that this knowledge is lexically encoded in semantic decompositions. The decomposition for break verbs (e.g. crack, smash) is hypothesized to be more complex than that for hit verbs (e.g. kick, kiss). Specifically, the decomposition of a break verb denotes that “an entity changes state as the result of some external force” whereas the decomposition for a hit verb denotes only that “an entity potentially comes in contact with another entity.” In this article, verbs of the two types were compared in a lexical decision experiment — Experiment 1 — and they were compared in sentence comprehension experiments with transitive sentences (e.g. the car hit the bicycle and the car broke the bicycle) — Experiments 2 and 3. In Experiment 1, processing times were shorter for the hit than the break verbs and in Experiments 2 and 3, processing times were shorter for the hit sentences than the break sentences, results that are in accord with the complexities of the postulated semantic decompositions. PMID:22649484

  3. Superfast Cosmic Jet "Hits the Wall"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    -288. The jet travelled quickly until its advance suddenly was stopped and the endpoint of the jet became brighter than the core. "This fast-moving material obviously hit something," Hjellming said. What did it it hit? "Probably a mixture of external material plus material from a previous jet ejection." Further studies of the collision could yield new information about the physics of cosmic jets. Such jets are believed to be powered by black holes into which material is being drawn. The exact mechanism by which the black hole's gravitational energy accelerates particles to nearly the speed of light is not well understood. There is even dispute about the types of particles ejected. Competing models call for either a mixture of electrons and protons or a mixture of electrons and positrons. Because protons are more than 1,800 times more massive than electrons or positrons (the positively-charged antiparticle of the electron), the electron-proton mixture would be much more massive than the electron-positron pair. Thus, an electron-proton jet is called a heavy jet and an electron-positron jet is called a light jet. A light jet would be much more easily slowed or stopped by tenuous interstellar material than a heavy jet, so the collision of XTE J1748-288's jet may indicate that it is a light jet. "There's still a lot more work to do before anyone can conclude that, but the collision offers the possibility of answering the light-heavy jet question," Hjellming said. A 1998 VLA study by John Wardle of Brandeis University and his colleagues indicated that the jet of a distant quasar is a light, electron-positron jet. Though the black holes in quasars are supermassive, usually millions of times more massive than the Sun, the physics of jet production in them is thought to be similar to the physics of jet production by smaller black holes, only a few times more massive than the sun, such as the one possibly in XTE J1748-288. The VLA is an instrument of the National Radio Astronomy

  4. Education Blogs Hit Our Elections next Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the role blogs will play in future campaigns and elections and how bloggers will affect the election of the next commander in chief. A necessary starting point in discussing the role of blogs in the presidential election of 2008 is to consider how similar blogs are, as a new medium or genre or venue, to…

  5. The role of root border cells in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Hawes, M C; Gunawardena, U; Miyasaka, S; Zhao, X

    2000-03-01

    The survival of a plant depends upon the capacity of root tips to sense and move towards water and other nutrients in the soil. Perhaps because of the root tip's vital role in plant health, it is ensheathed by large populations of detached somatic cells - root 'border' cells - which have the ability to engineer the chemical and physical properties of the external environment. Of particular significance, is the production by border cells of specific chemicals that can dramatically alter the behavior of populations of soilborne microflora. Molecular approaches are being used to identify and manipulate the expression of plant genes that control the production and the specialized properties of border cells in transgenic plants. Such plants can be used to test the hypothesis that these unusual cells act as a phalanx of biological 'goalies', which neutralize dangers to newly generated root tissue as the root tip makes its way through soil.

  6. Role of topology in complex functional networks of beta cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta; Gizzi, Alessio; Loppini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    The activity of pancreatic β cells can be described by biological networks of coupled nonlinear oscillators that, via electrochemical synchronization, release insulin in response to augmented glucose levels. In this work, we analyze the emergent behavior of regular and percolated β -cells clusters through a stochastic mathematical model where "functional" networks arise. We show that the emergence and robustness of the synchronized dynamics depend both on intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. In particular, cellular noise level, glucose concentration, network spatial architecture, and cell-to-cell coupling strength are the key factors for the generation of a rhythmic and robust activity. Their role in the functional network topology associated with β -cells clusters is analyzed and discussed.

  7. Role of stem cells in spondyloarthritis: Pathogenesis, treatment and complications.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca S Y

    2015-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a family of interrelated inflammatory arthritis that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease and undifferentiated SpA. The classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of SpA have been extensively reviewed in the published literature. Reviews on the use of stem cells in various autoimmune diseases in general are also common. However, a review on the role of stem cells in SpA is currently lacking. This review focuses on the involvement of stem cells in the pathogenesis of SpA and the application of different types of stem cells in the treatment of SpA. It also addresses some of the complications which may arise as a result of the use of stem cells in the treatment of SpA.

  8. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction. PMID:8786892

  9. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction.

  10. Roles and relevance of mast cells in infection and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In addition to their well-established role in allergy mast cells have been described as contributing to functional regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in host defense. Mast cells are of hematopoietic origin but typically complete their differentiation in tissues where they express immune regulatory functions by releasing diverse mediators and cytokines. Mast cells are abundant at mucosal tissues which are portals of entry for common infectious agents in addition to allergens. Here, we review the current understanding of the participation of mast cells in defense against infection. We also discuss possibilities of exploiting mast cell activation to provide adequate adjuvant activity that is needed in high-quality vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26565602

  11. The role of starburst amacrine cells in visual signal processing

    PubMed Central

    TAYLOR, W.R.; SMITH, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Starburst amacrine cells (SBACs) within the adult mammalian retina provide the critical inhibition that underlies the receptive field properties of direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). The SBACs generate direction-selective output of GABA that differentially inhibits the DSGCs. We review the biophysical mechanisms that produce directional GABA release from SBACs and test a network model that predicts the effects of reciprocal inhibition between adjacent SBACs. The results of the model simulations suggest that reciprocal inhibitory connections between closely spaced SBACs should be spatially selective, while connections between more widely spaced cells could be indiscriminate. SBACs were initially identified as cholinergic neurons and were subsequently shown to contain release both acetylcholine and GABA. While the role of the GABAergic transmission is well established, the role of the cholinergic transmission remains unclear. PMID:22310373

  12. The diverging roles of dendritic cells in kidney allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Cucchiari, David; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of antigen presenting cells that play a paramount role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity. In murine models several subtypes of DCs have been identified, including classical DCs, monocyte-derived DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs. Quiescent, immature DCs and some subtypes of plasmacytoid cells favor the expression of regulatory T cells, but in an inflammatory milieu DCs become mature and after intercepting the antigen migrate to lymphatic system where they present the antigen to naïve T cells. Transplant rejection largely depends on the phenotype and maturation of DCs. The ischemia-reperfusion injury causes the release of endogenous molecules that are recognized as danger signals by the pattern recognition receptor of the innate immunity with subsequent activation of inflammatory cells and mediators. In this environment DCs become mature and migrate to lymphonodes where they present the alloantigen to T cells and direct their differentiation towards Th1 and Th17 effector cells. On the other hand, manipulation of DCs may favor T cell differentiation towards tolerant Th2 and T regulators (Treg). Experimental studies in murine models showed the possibility of inducing an operational tolerance by injecting immature tolerogenic DCs. Recently, such a possibility has been also confirmed in primates. Although manipulation of DCs may represent an important step ahead in kidney transplantation, a number of technical and ethical issues should be solved before its clinical application.

  13. Role of CD61+ cells in thrombocytopenia of dengue patients.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2012-11-01

    Although hematological disorders with salient features of thrombocytopenia have been well documented in dengue patients, the role of CD61-expressing platelets and the megakaryocytic cell lineage in the pathogenesis of dengue virus (DENV) infection remains largely unexplored. A prospective observational study was performed using blood samples and PBMCs from dengue-confirmed patients, as well as from rhesus monkeys (RM) experimentally infected with DENV. Immunohistochemical staining and FACS techniques were applied to evaluate the frequencies of CD61(+) cells that contained DENV antigen. Highly enriched population of CD61(+) cells was also isolated from acute DENV-infected RM and assayed for DENV RNA by quantitative RT-PCR. Results revealed that DENV antigen was found in small vesicles of varying size, and more frequently in anucleated cells associated with platelets in dengue patients. The DENV antigen-containing cells were CD61(+) and appeared to share characteristics of megakaryocytes. Kinetic profiles of CD61(+) cells from DENV-infected RM revealed a transient increase in CD61(+)CD62P(+) cells early after DENV infection. DENV RNA in a highly enriched population of CD61(+) cells from the infected RM was observed during acute stage. Our results indicate that virus containing CD61(+) cells may be directly linked to the platelet dysfunction and low platelet count characteristics of dengue patients.

  14. A role for intrathymic B cells in the generation of natural regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Walters, Stacey N; Webster, Kylie E; Daley, Stephen; Grey, Shane T

    2014-07-01

    B cells inhabit the normal human thymus, suggesting a role in T cell selection. In this study, we report that B cells can modulate thymic production of CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]). Mice with transgenic expression of BAFF (BAFF-Tg) harbor increased numbers of Helios+ Foxp3+ thymic Tregs and, similar to some human autoimmune conditions, also exhibit increased numbers of B cells colonizing the thymus. Distinct intrathymic B cell subpopulations were identified, namely B220+, IgM+, CD23(hi), CD21(int) cells; B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(lo) cells; and a population of B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(hi) cells. Anatomically, CD19+ B cells accumulated in the thymic medulla region juxtaposed to Foxp3+ T cells. These intrathymic B cells engender Tregs. Indeed, thymic Treg development was diminished in both B cell-deficient BAFF-Tg chimeras, but also B cell-deficient wild-type chimeras. B cell Ag capture and presentation are critical in vivo events for Treg development. In the absence of B cell surface MHC class II expression, thymic expansion of BAFF-Tg Tregs was lost. Further to this, expansion of Tregs did not occur in BAFF-Tg/Ig hen egg lysozyme BCR chimeras, demonstrating a requirement for Ag specificity. Thus, we present a mechanism whereby intrathymic B cells, through the provision of cognate help, contribute to the shaping of the Treg repertoire.

  15. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investigate the role of VFL on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells. Methods Human bladder epithelial tumour cell lines HT1376, 5637, SW780, T24 and UMUC3 were used to analyse cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions under VFL treatment. VFL effect on growth inhibition was measured by using a MTT colorimetric cell viability assay. Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed to assess the roles of VFL effect on cell-cell adhesions, epithelial-to-mesenchymal markers and apoptosis. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-cell adhesion was studied using the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Results We show that VFL induces cell death in bladder cancer cells and activates epithelial differentiation of the remaining living cells, leading to an increase of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion and a reduction of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin or vimentin. Moreover, while E-cadherin is increased, the levels of Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin-ligase for E-cadherin, were significantly reduced in presence of VFL. In 5637, this reduction on Hakai expression was blocked by MG132 proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the proteasome pathway could be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in its degradation. Conclusions Our findings underscore a critical function for VFL in cell-cell adhesions of epithelial bladder tumour cells, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism by which VFL may impact upon EMT and metastasis. PMID:25012153

  16. Role of ubiquitin ligases in neural stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Naujokat, Cord

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases are central components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the major machinery for regulated proteolysis in eukaryotic cells. Proteins essential for regulating development, differentiation, proliferation, cell cycling, apoptosis, gene transcription, and signal transduction undergo posttranslational processing via selection by ubiquitin ligases and subsequent controlled proteolysis by the 26S proteasome, the proteolytic unit of the UPS. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are self-renewing multipotent cells of the embryonic and adult mammalian central nervous system. In the last few years, NSCs have generated considerable interest because of their potential to repair neurological damage in preclinical models of stroke, spinal cord injury, and neurodegenerative disease. Recent evidence reveals a central role of ubiquitin ligases in controlling the development, survival, differentiation, and programming of neural stem and progenitor cells. Here the current knowledge of the role and function of ubiquitin ligases in neural stem and progenitor cells is reviewed and insight into an important mechanism of NSC homeostasis by regulated proteolysis is provided. PMID:19479207

  17. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. PMID:26125600

  18. Hit-to-lead evaluation of a novel class of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dinges, Jurgen; Harris, Christopher M; Wallace, Grier A; Argiriadi, Maria A; Queeney, Kara L; Perron, Denise C; Dominguez, Eric; Kebede, Tegest; Desino, Kelly E; Patel, Hetal; Vasudevan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase has recently been proposed as a potential treatment option for inflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In this report we describe our hit-to-lead evaluation of the isoxazolecarboxamide 6, a high-throughput screening hit (in vitro IC50=1.0 μM, cell IC50=1.8 μM), as a novel S1P lyase inhibitor. We were able to establish basic structure-activity relationships around 6 and succeeded in obtaining X-ray structural information which enabled structure-based design. With the discovery of 28, enzyme activity was quickly improved to IC50=120 nM and cell potency to IC50=230 nM. The main liability in the established isoxazolecarboxamide hit series was determined to be metabolic stability. In particular we identified that future lead-optimization efforts to overcome this problem should focus on blocking the N-dealkylation on the secondary amine. PMID:27020302

  19. Antimicrobial combinations: Bliss independence and Loewe additivity derived from mechanistic multi-hit models.

    PubMed

    Baeder, Desiree Y; Yu, Guozhi; Hozé, Nathanaël; Rolff, Jens; Regoes, Roland R

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics reduce the net growth rate of bacterial populations they target. It is relevant to understand if effects of multiple antimicrobials are synergistic or antagonistic, in particular for AMP responses, because naturally occurring responses involve multiple AMPs. There are several competing proposals describing how multiple types of antimicrobials add up when applied in combination, such as Loewe additivity or Bliss independence. These additivity terms are defined ad hoc from abstract principles explaining the supposed interaction between the antimicrobials. Here, we link these ad hoc combination terms to a mathematical model that represents the dynamics of antimicrobial molecules hitting targets on bacterial cells. In this multi-hit model, bacteria are killed when a certain number of targets are hit by antimicrobials. Using this bottom-up approach reveals that Bliss independence should be the model of choice if no interaction between antimicrobial molecules is expected. Loewe additivity, on the other hand, describes scenarios in which antimicrobials affect the same components of the cell, i.e. are not acting independently. While our approach idealizes the dynamics of antimicrobials, it provides a conceptual underpinning of the additivity terms. The choice of the additivity term is essential to determine synergy or antagonism of antimicrobials.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160596

  20. Cell-based medicinal chemistry optimization of high-throughput screening (HTS) hits for orally active antimalarials. Part 1: challenges in potency and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion/pharmacokinetics (ADME/PK).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arnab K

    2013-10-24

    Malaria represents a significant health issue, and novel and effective drugs are needed to address parasite resistance that has emerged to the current drug arsenal. Antimalarial drug discovery has historically benefited from a whole-cell (phenotypic) screening approach to identify lead molecules. This approach has been utilized by several groups to optimize weakly active antimalarial pharmacophores, such as the quinolone scaffold, to yield potent and highly efficacious compounds that are now poised to enter clinical trials. More recently, GNF/Novartis, GSK, and others have employed the same approach in high-throughput screening (HTS) of large compound libraries to find novel scaffolds that have also been optimized to clinical candidates by GNF/Novartis. This perspective outlines some of the inherent challenges in cell-based medicinal chemistry optimization, including optimization of oral exposure and hERG activity.

  1. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  2. Role of leptin receptors in granulosa cells during ovulation.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Lisa; Schuermann, Yasmin; Cohen, Tamara; Siddappa, Dayananda; Kalaiselvanraja, Anitha; Pansera, Melissa; Bordignon, Vilceu; Duggavathi, Raj

    2014-02-01

    Leptin is an important hormone influencing reproductive function. However, the mechanisms underpinning the role of leptin in the regulation of reproduction remain to be completely deciphered. In this study, our objective is to understand the mechanisms regulating the expression of leptin receptor (Lepr) and its role in ovarian granulosa cells during ovulation. First, granulosa cells were collected from superovulated mice to profile mRNA expression of Lepr isoforms (LeprA and LeprB) throughout follicular development. Expression of LeprA and LeprB was dramatically induced in the granulosa cells of ovulating follicles at 4 h after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) treatment. Relative abundance of both mRNA and protein of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpβ) increased in granulosa cells from 1 to 7 h post-hCG. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the recruitment of Cebpβ to Lepr promoter. Thus, hCG-induced transcription of Lepr appears to be regulated by Cebpβ, which led us to hypothesise that Lepr may play a role during ovulation. To test this hypothesis, we used a recently developed pegylated superactive mouse leptin antagonist (PEG-SMLA) to inhibit Lepr signalling during ovulation. I.p. administration of PEG-SMLA (10 μg/g) to superovulated mice reduced ovulation rate by 65% compared with control treatment. Although the maturation stage of the ovulated oocytes remained unaltered, ovulation genes Ptgs2 and Has2 were downregulated in PEG-SMLA-treated mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that Lepr is dramatically induced in the granulosa cells of ovulating follicles and this induction of Lepr expression requires the transcription factor Cebpβ. Lepr plays a critical role in the process of ovulation by regulating, at least in part, the expression of the important genes involved in the preovulatory maturation of follicles. PMID:24256641

  3. Current challenges and novel treatment strategies in double hit lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Tsui, Alpha; Wall, Meaghan; Huang, David C. S.; Roberts, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade B-cell lymphomas with recurrent chromosomal break points have been termed ‘double hit lymphoma’ (DHL). The most commonly seen DHL is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with t(14;18) and t(8;14) or t(8;22) resulting in overexpression of BCL2 and MYC, respectively. The increased proliferation due to MYC overexpression, without the ability for an apoptotic brake as a result of BCL2 overexpression, results in ‘the perfect storm of oncogenesis’. Thus this disease presents a number of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for the hematologist. The first and foremost challenge is to recognize the DHL. As different morphological entities can be affected it is incumbent on pathologists and clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion especially in disease that appears unusually aggressive or refractory to therapy. Diagnosis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and specific method for detection of the disease but is time-consuming and expensive. While detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is sensitive and correlates with survival, standardized methods for this are not widely agreed upon. The second and equally important challenge in DHL is optimizing clinical outcome in a group of patients for whom the prognosis is widely regarded as poor. While improvements have been achieved by dose escalating standard chemotherapeutic regimens, many patients continue to do badly. Furthermore as a disease of aging many patients are unsuitable for dose-intensive chemotherapy regimens. There are now multiple novel targeted agents in various stages of clinical development that offer hope for better outcomes without undue toxicity. Among the most exciting of these developments include specific inhibitors of both BCL2 and MYC. PMID:26834954

  4. Double hit lymphoma: the MD Anderson Cancer Center clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Oki, Yasuhiro; Noorani, Mansoor; Lin, Pei; Davis, Richard E; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ma, Long; Ahmed, Mohamed; Rodriguez, Maria Alma; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Fowler, Nathan; Wang, Michael; Fanale, Michelle A; Nastoupil, Loretta; Samaniego, Felipe; Lee, Hun J; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Pinnix, Chelsea C; Medeiros, Leonard J; Nieto, Yago; Khouri, Issa; Kwak, Larry W; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge E; Fayad, Luis E; Westin, Jason R

    2014-09-01

    We report our experience with 129 cases of double hit lymphoma (DHL), defined as B-cell lymphoma with translocations and/or extra signals involving MYC plus BCL2 and/or BCL6. All cases were reviewed for histopathological classification. Median age was 62 years (range, 18-85), 84% of patients had advanced-stage disease, and 87% had an International Prognostic Index score ≥2. Fourteen patients (11%) had a history of low-grade follicular lymphoma. MYC translocation was present in 81%, and extra signals of MYC in 25% of patients. IGH-BCL2 translocation was present in 84% and extra signals of BCL2 in 12% of patients. Two-year event-free survival (EFS) rates in all patients and patients who received R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone), R-EPOCH (rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin), and R-HyperCVAD/MA (rituximab, hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone, alternating with cytarabine plus methotrexate) were 33%, 25%, 67% and 32%, respectively. In patients achieving complete response with initial therapy (n = 71), 2-year EFS rates in patients who did (n = 23) or did not (n = 48) receive frontline stem cell transplantation were 68% and 53%, respectively (P = 0·155). The cumulative incidence of central nervous system involvement was 13% at 3 years. Multivariate analysis identified performance status ≥2 and bone marrow involvement as independent adverse prognostic factors for EFS and OS. Further research is needed to identify predictive and/or targetable biological markers and novel therapeutic approaches for DHL patients.

  5. A role for antizyme inhibitor in cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tania M; Cirenajwis, Helena; Wallace, Heather M; Oredsson, Stina; Persson, Lo

    2015-07-01

    The polyamines are important for a variety of cellular functions, including cell growth. Their intracellular concentrations are controlled by a complex network of regulatory mechanisms, in which antizyme (Az) has a key role. Az reduces the cellular polyamine content by down-regulating both the enzyme catalysing polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and the uptake of polyamines. The activity of Az is repressed by the binding of a protein, named Az inhibitor (AzI), which is an enzymatically inactive homologue of ODC. Two forms of AzI have been described: AzI1, which is ubiquitous, and AzI2 which is expressed in brain and testis. In the present study, we have investigated the role of AzI1 in polyamine homeostasis and cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. The results obtained showed that the cellular content of AzI increased transiently after induction of cell proliferation by diluting cells in fresh medium. Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis induced an even larger increase in the cellular AzI content, which remained significantly elevated during the 7-day experimental period. However, this increase was not a consequence of changes in cell cycle progression, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. Instead, the increase appeared to correlate with the cellular depletion of polyamines. Moreover, induced overexpression of AzI resulted in an increased cell proliferation with a concomitant increase in ODC activity and putrescine content. During mitosis, AzI1 was localised in a pattern that resembled that of the two centrosomes, confirming earlier observations. Taken together, the results indicate that AzI fulfils an essential regulatory function in polyamine homeostasis and cell proliferation. PMID:25813938

  6. Inhibitory Role of Pentraxin-3 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Zong, Ye; Zhu, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Li, Peng; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is a member of the PTX superfamily. Here, we investigated the role of PTX3 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: The effect of PTX3 on ESCC cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion was investigated using cell viability assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, and migration and invasion assays. The effect of PTX3 on the tumorigenicity of ESCC in vivo was investigated with xenograft studies in nude mice. Results: PTX3 overexpression in ESCC cells reduced cellular proliferation and colony formation (P < 0.05) and increased the rate of apoptosis (P < 0.05). PTX3 expression had no significant effect on the migratory or invasive potential of ESCC cells. In our mouse model of human ESCC, we achieved 100% successful tumor establishment. Compared with the control and empty vector-expressing groups, the PTX3-expressing group formed significantly smaller tumors (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study indicates that PTX3 might play an inhibitory role in ESCC. PMID:27625097

  7. The role of palladin in actin organization and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Arneman, Daniel; Otey, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Palladin is a widely expressed protein found in stress fibers, focal adhesions, growth cones, Z-discs, and other actin-based subcellular structures. It belongs to a small gene family that includes the Z-disc proteins myopalladin and myotilin, all of which share similar Ig-like domains. Recent advances have shown that palladin shares with myotilin the ability to bind directly to F-actin, and to crosslink actin filaments into bundles, in vitro. Studies in a variety of cultured cells suggest that the actin-organizing activity of palladin plays a central role in promoting cell motility. Correlative evidence also supports this hypothesis, as palladin levels are typically upregulated in cells that are actively migrating: in developing vertebrate embryos, in cells along a wound edge, and in metastatic cancer cells. Recently, a mutation in the human palladin gene was implicated in an unusually penetrant form of inherited pancreatic cancer, which has stimulated new ideas about the role of palladin in invasive cancer. PMID:18342394

  8. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ima N

    2015-02-01

    High-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been the standard frontline consolidative therapy for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) for > 2 decades. This approach has resulted in higher complete response (CR) rates and increased event-free survival and overall survival (OS) compared with conventional chemotherapy. The emergence of novel agent-based therapy combined with ASCT has revolutionized MM therapy by improving the CR rates and OS, raising questions concerning the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this setting.

  9. Role of Metabolism in the Immunobiology of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Mario; De Rosa, Veronica; La Cava, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular metabolism is central to cell activity and function. CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) that express the transcription factor FOXP3 play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune tolerance to self. Recent studies showed that the metabolism and function of Tregs are influenced significantly by local environmental conditions and the availability of certain metabolites. It also was reported that defined metabolic programs associate with Treg differentiation, expression of FOXP3, and phenotype stabilization. This article reviews how metabolism modulates FOXP3 expression and Treg function, what environmental factors are involved, and how metabolic manipulation could alter Treg frequency and function in physiopathologic conditions. PMID:27638939

  10. Microdosimetry of astatine-211 single-cell irradiation: role of daughter polonium-211 diffusion.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Humm, John L; Rundqvist, Robert; Jacobsson, Lars

    2004-02-01

    A microdosimetric analysis of previously published data on 211At-albumin, free 211At, and 211At-C215 irradiation of Colo-205 cells in a slowly rotating single-cell suspension is presented. A custom-built computer program based on the Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the irradiation and the energy deposition in individual cell nuclei. Separate simulations were made for the assumption that the 211Po atom stays in the position where it is created, and that it diffuses away. The mean event number at which 37% of all cells survived, n37, and the frequency mean specific energy per event, zF, were estimated. The Poisson distribution of events and simulated single and multievent distributions of specific energy were used to find the single-cell specific energy at which the probability of survival is reduced to 37%, z37. The calculated single-cell radiosensitivity values show that 211Po atoms, created on a cell surface by the decay of 211At atoms, will diffuse from the cell during its life-span. The increasing distance to the cell nucleus will drastically decrease the probability of the emitted alpha particle to hit the nucleus. This will result in fewer alpha-particle events in the cell nucleus. For dispersed cells, the diffusion of 211Po atoms will reduce the total dose from cell-bound 211At by a factor of 2.

  11. Microdosimetry of astatine-211 single-cell irradiation: role of daughter polonium-211 diffusion.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Humm, John L; Rundqvist, Robert; Jacobsson, Lars

    2004-02-01

    A microdosimetric analysis of previously published data on 211At-albumin, free 211At, and 211At-C215 irradiation of Colo-205 cells in a slowly rotating single-cell suspension is presented. A custom-built computer program based on the Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the irradiation and the energy deposition in individual cell nuclei. Separate simulations were made for the assumption that the 211Po atom stays in the position where it is created, and that it diffuses away. The mean event number at which 37% of all cells survived, n37, and the frequency mean specific energy per event, zF, were estimated. The Poisson distribution of events and simulated single and multievent distributions of specific energy were used to find the single-cell specific energy at which the probability of survival is reduced to 37%, z37. The calculated single-cell radiosensitivity values show that 211Po atoms, created on a cell surface by the decay of 211At atoms, will diffuse from the cell during its life-span. The increasing distance to the cell nucleus will drastically decrease the probability of the emitted alpha particle to hit the nucleus. This will result in fewer alpha-particle events in the cell nucleus. For dispersed cells, the diffusion of 211Po atoms will reduce the total dose from cell-bound 211At by a factor of 2. PMID:15000607

  12. Cholera Toxin and Cell Growth: Role of Membrane Gangliosides

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, Morley D.; Fishman, Peter H.; Bennett, Vann; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1974-01-01

    The binding of cholera toxin to three transformed mouse cell lines derived from the same parent strain, and the effects of the toxin on DNA synthesis and adenylate cyclase activity, vary in parallel with the ganglioside composition of the cells. TAL/N cells of early passage, which contain large quantities of gangliosides GM3, GM2, GM1, and GDla, as well as the glycosyltransferases necessary for the synthesis of these gangliosides, bind the most cholera toxin and are the most sensitive to its action. TAL/N cells of later passage, which lack chemically detectable GM1 and GDla and which have no UDP-Gal:GM2 galactosyltransferase activity, are intermediate in binding and response to the toxin. SVS AL/N cells, which lack GM2 in addition to GM1 and GDla and which have little detectable UDP-GalNAc:GM3N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity, bind the least amount of toxin. The SVS AL/N cells are the least responsive to inhibition of DNA synthesis and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin. Gangliosides (especially GM1), which appear to be the natural membrane receptors for cholera toxin, may normally have important roles in the regulation of cell growth and cAMP-mediated responses. PMID:4530298

  13. The role of B-1 cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Monowar; Holodick, Nichol E; Rothstein, Thomas L; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    B-1 lymphocytes exhibit unique phenotypic, ontogenic, and functional characteristics that differ from the conventional B-2 cells. B-1 cells spontaneously secrete germline-like, repertoire-skewed polyreactive natural antibody, which acts as a first line of defense by neutralizing a wide range of pathogens before launching of the adaptive immune response. Immunomodulatory molecules such as interleukin-10, adenosine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, and interleukin-35 are also produced by B-1 cells in the presence or absence of stimulation, which regulate acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Considerable progress has been made during the past three decades since the discovery of B-1 cells, which has improved not only our understanding of their phenotypic and ontogenic uniqueness but also their role in various inflammatory diseases including influenza, pneumonia, sepsis, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Recent identification of human B-1 cells widens the scope of this field, leading to novel innovations that can be implemented from bench to bedside. Among the vast number of studies on B-1 cells, we have carried out a literature review highlighting current trends in the study of B-1 cell involvement during inflammation, which may result in a paradigm shift toward sustainable therapeutics in various inflammatory diseases.

  14. Role of Endothelial Cells in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Arun K.; Symons, J. David; Boudina, Sihem; Jaishy, Bharat; Shiu, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury has broad clinical implications and is a critical mediator of cardiac surgical outcomes. “Ischemic injury” results from a restriction in blood supply leading to a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand of a sufficient intensity and/or duration that leads to cell necrosis, whereas ischemia-reperfusion injury occurs when blood supply is restored after a period of ischemia and is usually associated with apoptosis (i.e. programmed cell death). Compared to vascular endothelial cells, cardiac myocytes are more sensitive to ischemic injury and have received the most attention in preventing myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Many comprehensive reviews exist on various aspects of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of vascular endothelial cells in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and to stimulate further research in this exciting and clinically relevant area. Two specific areas that are addressed include: 1) data suggesting that coronary endothelial cells are critical mediators of myocardial dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury; and 2) the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in endothelial cell death as a result of an ischemia-reperfusion insult. Elucidating the cellular signaling pathway(s) that leads to endothelial cell injury and/or death in response to ischemia-reperfusion is a key component to developing clinically applicable strategies that might minimize myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25558187

  15. The role of B-1 cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Monowar; Holodick, Nichol E; Rothstein, Thomas L; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    B-1 lymphocytes exhibit unique phenotypic, ontogenic, and functional characteristics that differ from the conventional B-2 cells. B-1 cells spontaneously secrete germline-like, repertoire-skewed polyreactive natural antibody, which acts as a first line of defense by neutralizing a wide range of pathogens before launching of the adaptive immune response. Immunomodulatory molecules such as interleukin-10, adenosine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, and interleukin-35 are also produced by B-1 cells in the presence or absence of stimulation, which regulate acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Considerable progress has been made during the past three decades since the discovery of B-1 cells, which has improved not only our understanding of their phenotypic and ontogenic uniqueness but also their role in various inflammatory diseases including influenza, pneumonia, sepsis, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Recent identification of human B-1 cells widens the scope of this field, leading to novel innovations that can be implemented from bench to bedside. Among the vast number of studies on B-1 cells, we have carried out a literature review highlighting current trends in the study of B-1 cell involvement during inflammation, which may result in a paradigm shift toward sustainable therapeutics in various inflammatory diseases. PMID:26427372

  16. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Misbah; Qazi, Aamer; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Parveen, Gulshan; Waquar, Sulayman; Ashraf, Abdul Basit; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds. PMID:26998418

  17. HIT: a new approach for hiding multimedia information in text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kwae, Essam A.; Cheng, Li

    2002-04-01

    A new technique for hiding multimedia data in text, called the Hiding in Text (HIT) technique, is introduced. The HIT technique can transform any type of media represented by a long binary string into innocuous text that follows correct grammatical rules. This technique divides English words into types where each word can appear in any number of types. For each type, there is a dictionary, which maps words to binary codes. Marker types are special types whose words do not repeat in any other type. Each generated sentence must include at least one word from the marker type. In the hiding phase, a binary string is input to the HIT encoding algorithm, which then selects sentence templates at random. The output is a set of English sentences according to the selected templates and the dictionaries of types. In the retrieving phase, the HIT technique uses the position of the marker word to identify the template used to build each sentence. The proposed technique greatly improves the efficiency and the security features of previous solutions. Examples for hiding text and image information in a cover text are given to illustrate the HIT technique.

  18. Don't Hit that "Delete" Button!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Charlene

    2009-01-01

    On Dec. 1, 2006, the once ambiguous role of e-mails in court cases became much more clear. On that day, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP), which govern federal civil litigation, were amended to establish standards for the discovery of electronically stored information, now known as e-discovery. Many corporations began moving quickly to…

  19. Hitting the Road: Safe Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labriola, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the importance of school administrators' taking an active role in selecting motor coach carriers for their school trips. School administrators must be able to prove due diligence in selecting safe motor carriers. If not, they risk significant liability exposure for neglecting this critical responsibility. The article…

  20. A role for kit receptor signaling in Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Gerson; Sottas, Chantal M; Kissel, Holger; Agosti, Valter; Manova, Katia; Hardy, Matthew P; Besmer, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Kit and its ligand, Kitl, function in hematopoiesis, melanogenesis, and gametogenesis. In the testis, Kitl is expressed by Sertoli cells and Kit is expressed by spermatogonia and Leydig cells. Kit functions are mediated by receptor autophosphorylation and subsequent association with signaling molecules, including phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. We previously characterized the reproductive consequences of blocking Kit-mediated PI 3-kinase activation in KitY(719F)/Kit(Y719F) knockin mutant male mice. Only gametogenesis was affected in these mice, and males are sterile because of a block in spermatogenesis during the spermatogonial stages. In the present study, we investigated effects of the Kit(Y719F) mutation on Leydig cell development and steroidogenic function. Although the seminiferous tubules in testes of mutant animals are depleted of germ cells, the testes contain normal numbers of Leydig cells and the Leydig cells in these animals appear to have undergone normal differentiation. Evaluation of steroidogenesis in mutant animals indicates that testosterone levels are not significantly reduced in the periphery but that LH levels are increased 5-fold, implying an impairment of steroidogenesis in the mutant animals. Therefore, a role for Kit signaling in steroidogenesis in Leydig cells was sought in vitro. Purified Leydig cells from C57Bl6/J male mice were incubated with Kitl, and testosterone production was measured. Kitl-stimulated testosterone production was 2-fold higher than that in untreated controls. The Kitl-mediated testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells is PI 3-kinase dependent. In vitro, Leydig cells from mutant mice were steroidogenically more competent in response to LH than were normal Leydig cells. In contrast, Kitl-mediated testosterone production in these cells was comparable to that in normal cells. Because LH levels in mutant males are elevated and LH is known to stimulate testosterone biosynthesis, we proposed a model in which serum

  1. GSK-3β: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Keith M.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Thotala, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer's disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development. PMID:22675363

  2. Role of medullary progenitor cells in epithelial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yuning; Park, Chanyoung; Al-Omari, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing medullary interstitial progenitor cells and to examine their capacity to induce tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. We have isolated a progenitor cell side population from a primary medullary interstitial cell line. We show that the medullary progenitor cells (MPCs) express CD24, CD44, CXCR7, CXCR4, nestin, and PAX7. MPCs are CD34 negative, which indicates that they are not bone marrow-derived stem cells. MPCs survive >50 passages, and when grown in epithelial differentiation medium develop phenotypic characteristics of epithelial cells. Inner medulla collecting duct (IMCD3) cells treated with conditioned medium from MPCs show significantly accelerated cell proliferation and migration. Conditioned medium from PGE2-treated MPCs induce tubule formation in IMCD3 cells grown in 3D Matrigel. Moreover, most of the MPCs express the pericyte marker PDGFR-b. Our study shows that the medullary interstitium harbors a side population of progenitor cells that can differentiate to epithelial cells and can stimulate tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. The findings of this study suggest that medullary pericyte/progenitor cells may play a critical role in collecting duct cell injury repair. PMID:24808539

  3. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  4. Role of Geminin in cell fate determination of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Ohno, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Naoto; Zhang, Bo; Suzuki-Takedachi, Kyoko; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Geminin exerts two distinct molecular roles. Geminin negatively regulates DNA replication licensing through the direct interaction with Cdt1 to prevent re-replication in proliferating cells. Geminin also regulates chromatin remodeling through the direct interaction with Brahma/Brg1 to maintain undifferentiated states of stem cells. We previously uncovered that Polycomb-group complex 1 and Hoxb4/Hoxa9, well-known intrinsic factors that are essential for maintaining the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, alternatively act as ubiquitin-proteasome systems for Geminin protein to reduce the protein expression level, and sustain the HSC activity. Thus, Geminin is presumed to play an important role in determining cell fate, i.e., turning on and off cellular quiescence and proliferation/differentiation, in HSCs. We recently generated recombinant cell-penetrating Geminin (CP-Geminin), enabling rapid incorporation and withdraw of Geminin protein in cells. CP-Geminin may be useful in regulating the cell cycle and chromatin configuration. In this article, we summarize current information on the molecular functions of Geminin and the regulatory system for Geminin protein expression, and argue for the molecular role of Geminin in cell fate determination of HSCs, and future perspective of a new technology for manipulating the activities of HSCs and cancer stem cells (CSCs). PMID:27422432

  5. mRNAs Hit a Sticky Wicket.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    Drosophila germ cell specification depends on localization of mRNAs required for patterning to the posterior of the oocyte during oogenesis. In a recent issue of Nature, Vourekas et al. (2016) suggest that Aubergine in complex with piRNAs may provide a low-specificity anchoring mechanism for posterior mRNAs. PMID:27046827

  6. Cosmic Ray Hits in the Central Nervous System at Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Vazquez, M. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M.-H. Y.

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that a manned mission to Mars be launched at solar maximum rather than at solar minimum to minimize the radiation exposure to galactic cosmic rays. It is true that the number of hits from highly ionizing particles to critical regions in the brain will be less at solar maximum, and it is of some interest to estimate how much less. We present here calculations for several sites within the brain from iron ions (z = 26) and from particles with charge, z, greater than or equal to 15. The same shielding configurations and sites in the brain used in an earlier paper for solar minimum are employed so that direct comparison of results between the two solar activity conditions can be made. A simple pressure-vessel wall and an equipment room onboard a spacecraft are chosen as shielding examples. In the equipment room, typical results for the thalamus (100 mm2 area) are that the probability of any given cell nucleus being hit decreases from 10 percent at solar minimum to 6 percent at solar maximum for particles with z greater than or equal to 15 and from 2.3 percent to 1.3 percent for iron ions. We conclude that this modest decrease in hit frequency (less than a factor of two) is not a compelling reason to avoid solar minimum for a manned mission to Mars.

  7. Improved curveball hitting through the enhancement of visual cues.

    PubMed

    Osborne, K; Rudrud, E; Zezoney, F

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of using visual cues to highlight the seams of baseballs to improve the hitting of curveballs. Five undergraduate varsity baseball team candidates served as subjects. Behavior change was assessed through an alternating treatments design involving unmarked balls and two treatment conditions that included baseballs with 1/4-in. and 1/8-in. orange stripes marking the seams of the baseballs. Results indicated that subjects hit a greater percentage of marked than unmarked balls. These results suggest that the addition of visual cues may be a significant and beneficial technique to enhance hitting performance. Further research is suggested regarding the training procedures, effect of feedback, rate of fading cues, generalization to live pitching, and generalization to other types of pitches.

  8. Improved curveball hitting through the enhancement of visual cues.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, K; Rudrud, E; Zezoney, F

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of using visual cues to highlight the seams of baseballs to improve the hitting of curveballs. Five undergraduate varsity baseball team candidates served as subjects. Behavior change was assessed through an alternating treatments design involving unmarked balls and two treatment conditions that included baseballs with 1/4-in. and 1/8-in. orange stripes marking the seams of the baseballs. Results indicated that subjects hit a greater percentage of marked than unmarked balls. These results suggest that the addition of visual cues may be a significant and beneficial technique to enhance hitting performance. Further research is suggested regarding the training procedures, effect of feedback, rate of fading cues, generalization to live pitching, and generalization to other types of pitches. PMID:2249972

  9. Cardiac stem cells and their roles in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingying; Wang, Lingyun; Jiang, Jieyu; Zhou, Changqing; Guo, Tianzhu; Zheng, Shaoxin; Wang, Tong

    2013-06-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodeling and eventually deterioration of heart function. Over the past decade, stem cell therapy has emerged as a novel strategy for patients with ischemic heart disease and its beneficial effects have been demonstrated by substantial preclinical and clinical studies. Efficacy of several types of stem cells in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases has already been evaluated. However, repair of injured myocardium through stem cell transplantation is restricted by critical safety issues and ethic concerns. Recently, the discovery of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) that reside in the heart itself brings new prospects for myocardial regeneration and reconstitution of cardiac tissues. CSCs are positive for various stem cell markers and have the potential of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. They play a pivotal role in the maintenance of heart homeostasis and cardiac repair. Elucidation of their biological characteristics and functions they exert in myocardial infarction are very crucial to further investigations on them. This review will focus on the field of cardiac stem cells and discuss technical and practical issues that may involve in their clinical applications in myocardial infarction.

  10. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants.

  11. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators.

  12. Multiple NSAID-Induced Hits Injure the Small Intestine: Underlying Mechanisms and Novel Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) injury including jejunal/ileal mucosal ulceration, bleeding, and even perforation in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but they are distinct from those related to gastric injury. Based on recent insights from experimental models, including genetics and pharmacology in rodents typically exposed to diclofenac, indomethacin, or naproxen, we propose a multiple-hit pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy. The multiple hits start with an initial pharmacokinetic determinant caused by vectorial hepatobiliary excretion and delivery of glucuronidated NSAID or oxidative metabolite conjugates to the distal small intestinal lumen, where bacterial β-glucuronidase produces critical aglycones. The released aglycones are then taken up by enterocytes and further metabolized by intestinal cytochrome P450s to potentially reactive intermediates. The “first hit” is caused by the NSAID and/or oxidative metabolites that induce severe endoplasmic reticulum stress or mitochondrial stress and lead to cell death. The “second hit” is created by the significant subsequent inflammatory response that would follow such a first-hit injury. Based on these putative mechanisms, strategies have been developed to protect the enterocytes from being exposed to the parent NSAID and/or oxidative metabolites. Among these, a novel strategy already demonstrated in a murine model is the selective disruption of bacteria-specific β-glucuronidases with a novel small molecule inhibitor that does not harm the bacteria and that alleviates NSAID-induced enteropathy. Such mechanism-based strategies require further investigation but provide potential avenues for the alleviation of the GI toxicity caused by multiple NSAID hits. PMID:23091168

  13. Applications of Biophysics in High-Throughput Screening Hit Validation.

    PubMed

    Genick, Christine Clougherty; Barlier, Danielle; Monna, Dominique; Brunner, Reto; Bé, Céline; Scheufler, Clemens; Ottl, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    For approximately a decade, biophysical methods have been used to validate positive hits selected from high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns with the goal to verify binding interactions using label-free assays. By applying label-free readouts, screen artifacts created by compound interference and fluorescence are discovered, enabling further characterization of the hits for their target specificity and selectivity. The use of several biophysical methods to extract this type of high-content information is required to prevent the promotion of false positives to the next level of hit validation and to select the best candidates for further chemical optimization. The typical technologies applied in this arena include dynamic light scattering, turbidometry, resonance waveguide, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning fluorimetry, mass spectrometry, and others. Each technology can provide different types of information to enable the characterization of the binding interaction. Thus, these technologies can be incorporated in a hit-validation strategy not only according to the profile of chemical matter that is desired by the medicinal chemists, but also in a manner that is in agreement with the target protein's amenability to the screening format. Here, we present the results of screening strategies using biophysics with the objective to evaluate the approaches, discuss the advantages and challenges, and summarize the benefits in reference to lead discovery. In summary, the biophysics screens presented here demonstrated various hit rates from a list of ~2000 preselected, IC50-validated hits from HTS (an IC50 is the inhibitor concentration at which 50% inhibition of activity is observed). There are several lessons learned from these biophysical screens, which will be discussed in this article.

  14. Hit parade: the future of the sports concussion crisis.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    While concussions have long been linked to brain and central nervous system issues, a new study suggests that repeated hits to the head-mild or otherwise-can lead to memory loss, depression, and dementia. This postmortem brain study, conducted at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, provides new and troubling evidence about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a long-term degenerative and incurable brain disease. Although military personnel and others are vulnerable to the disease, the highest risk is among athletes involved in contact sports in which hits to the head are considered "part of the game."

  15. Interval Throwing and Hitting Programs in Baseball: Biomechanics and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward S; Bishop, Meghan E; Baker, Dylan; West, Robin V

    2016-01-01

    Baseball injuries from throwing and hitting generally occur as a consequence of the repetitive and high-energy motions inherent to the sport. Biomechanical studies have contributed to understanding the pathomechanics leading to injury and to the development of rehabilitation programs. Interval-based throwing and hitting programs are designed to return an athlete to competition through a gradual progression of sport-specific exercises. Proper warm-up and strict adherence to the program allows the athlete to return as quickly and safely as possible.

  16. Direct determination of the hit locations from experimental HPGe pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désesquelles, P.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Dimmock, M. R.; Lazarus, I. H.; Ljungvall, J.; Nelson, L.; Nga, D.-T.; Nolan, P. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Simpson, J.; Van-Oanh, N.-T.

    2013-11-01

    The gamma-tracking technique optimises the determination of the energy and emission angle of gamma-rays detected by modern segmented HPGe detectors. This entails the determination, using the delivered pulse shapes, of the interaction points of the gamma-ray within the crystal. The direct method presented here allows the localisation of the hits using only a large sample of pulses detected in the actual operating conditions. No external crystal scanning system or pulse shape simulation code is needed. In order to validate this method, it is applied to sets of pulses obtained using the University of Liverpool scanning system. The hit locations are determined by the method with good precision.

  17. Interval Throwing and Hitting Programs in Baseball: Biomechanics and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward S; Bishop, Meghan E; Baker, Dylan; West, Robin V

    2016-01-01

    Baseball injuries from throwing and hitting generally occur as a consequence of the repetitive and high-energy motions inherent to the sport. Biomechanical studies have contributed to understanding the pathomechanics leading to injury and to the development of rehabilitation programs. Interval-based throwing and hitting programs are designed to return an athlete to competition through a gradual progression of sport-specific exercises. Proper warm-up and strict adherence to the program allows the athlete to return as quickly and safely as possible. PMID:26991569

  18. An Essential Role for Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells during the Intrathymic Development of Invariant NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrea J.; Jenkinson, William E.; Cowan, Jennifer E.; Parnell, Sonia M.; Bacon, Andrea; Jones, Nick D.; Jenkinson, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    In the thymus, interactions with both cortical and medullary microenvironments regulate the development of self-tolerant conventional CD4+ and CD8+ αβT cells expressing a wide range of αβTCR specificities. Additionally, the cortex is also required for the development of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells, a specialized subset of T cells that expresses a restricted αβTCR repertoire and is linked to the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Although the role of the cortex in this process is to enable recognition of CD1d molecules expressed by CD4+CD8+ thymocyte precursors, the requirements for additional thymus microenvironments during iNKT cell development are unknown. In this study, we reveal a role for medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) during iNKT cell development in the mouse thymus. This requirement for mTECs correlates with their expression of genes required for IL-15 trans-presentation, and we show that soluble IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes restore iNKT cell development in the absence of mTECs. Furthermore, mTEC development is abnormal in iNKT cell–deficient mice, and early stages in iNKT cell development trigger receptor activator for NF-κB ligand–mediated mTEC development. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that intrathymic iNKT cell development requires stepwise interactions with both the cortex and the medulla, emphasizing the importance of thymus compartmentalization in the generation of both diverse and invariant αβT cells. Moreover, the identification of a novel requirement for iNKT cells in thymus medulla development further highlights the role of both innate and adaptive immune cells in thymus medulla formation. PMID:24510964

  19. Dual hit lipopolysaccharide & oleic acid combination induced rat model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hagawane, T.N.; Gaikwad, R.V.; Kshirsagar, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite advances in therapy and overall medical care, acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) management remains a problem. Hence the objective of this study was to develop a rat model that mimics human ALI/ARDS. Methods: Four groups of Wistar rats, 48 per group were treated with (i) intratracheal (IT) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) dissolved in normal saline (NS), (ii) intravenous (iv) oleic acid (OA) (250 μl/kg) suspension in bovine serum albumin (BSA), (iii) dual hit: IT LPS (2 mg/kg) dissolved in NS and iv OA (100 μl/kg) and (iv) control group: IT NS and iv BSA. From each group at set periods of time various investigations like chest X-rays, respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), total cell count, differential cell count, total protein count and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological examination were done. Results: It was noted that the respiratory rate, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher at 4 h in the dual hit group as compared to LPS, OA and control groups. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were significantly higher in the dual hit group as compared to LPS at 8 and 24 h, OA at 8 h and control (at all time intervals) group. IL-1β levels were significantly higher in LPS and dual hit groups at all time intervals, but not in OA and control groups. The injury induced in dual hit group was earlier and more sustained as compared to LPS and OA alone. Interpretation & conclusions: The lung pathology and changes in respiration functions produced by the dual hit model were closer to the diagnostic criteria of ALI/ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury and the injury persisted longer as compared to LPS and OA single hit model. Therefore, the ARDS model produced by the dual hit method was closer to the diagnostic criteria of ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury. PMID

  20. The role and importance of club cells (Clara cells) in the pathogenesis of some respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rokicki, Marek; Wojtacha, Jacek; Dżeljijli, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The report presents the cellular structure of the respiratory system as well as the history of club cells (Clara cells), their ultrastructure, and location in the airways and human organs. The authors discuss the biochemical structure of proteins secreted by these cells and their importance for the integrity and regeneration of the airway epithelium. Their role as progenitor cells for the airway epithelium and their involvement in the biotransformation of toxic xenobiotics introduced into the lungs during breathing is emphasized. This is followed by a discussion of the clinical aspects associated with club cells, demonstrating that tracking the serum concentration of club cell-secreted proteins is helpful in the diagnosis of a number of lung tissue diseases. Finally, suggestions are provided regarding the possible use of proteins secreted by club cells in the treatment of serious respiratory conditions. PMID:27212975

  1. Role of endodermal cell vacuoles in shoot gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takehide; Morita, Miyo Terao; Tasaka, Masao

    2002-06-01

    In higher plants, shoots and roots show negative and positive gravitropism, respectively. Data from surgical ablation experiments and analysis of starch deficient mutants have led to the suggestion that columella cells in the root cap function as gravity perception cells. On the other hand, endodermal cells are believed to be the statocytes (that is, gravity perceiving cells) of shoots. Statocytes in shoots and roots commonly contain amyloplasts which sediment under gravity. Through genetic research with Arabidopsis shoot gravitropism mutants, sgr1/scr and sgr7/shr, it was determined that endodermal cells are essential for shoot gravitropism. Moreover, some starch biosynthesis genes and EAL1 are important for the formation and maturation of amyloplasts in shoot endodermis. Thus, amyloplasts in the shoot endodermis would function as statoliths, just as in roots. The study of the sgr2 and zig/sgr4 mutants provides new insights into the early steps of shoot gravitropism, which still remains unclear. SGR2 and ZIG/SGR4 genes encode a phospholipase-like and a v-SNARE protein, respectively. Moreover, these genes are involved in vacuolar formation or function. Thus, the vacuole must play an important role in amyloplast sedimentation because the sgr2 and zig/sgr4 mutants display abnormal amyloplast sedimentation.

  2. Concise review: role of mesenchymal stem cells in wound repair.

    PubMed

    Maxson, Scott; Lopez, Erasmo A; Yoo, Dana; Danilkovitch-Miagkova, Alla; Leroux, Michelle A

    2012-02-01

    Wound healing requires a coordinated interplay among cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins. Central to this process is the endogenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), which coordinates the repair response by recruiting other host cells and secreting growth factors and matrix proteins. MSCs are self-renewing multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into various lineages of mesenchymal origin such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and fat. In addition to multilineage differentiation capacity, MSCs regulate immune response and inflammation and possess powerful tissue protective and reparative mechanisms, making these cells attractive for treatment of different diseases. The beneficial effect of exogenous MSCs on wound healing was observed in a variety of animal models and in reported clinical cases. Specifically, they have been successfully used to treat chronic wounds and stimulate stalled healing processes. Recent studies revealed that human placental membranes are a rich source of MSCs for tissue regeneration and repair. This review provides a concise summary of current knowledge of biological properties of MSCs and describes the use of MSCs for wound healing. In particular, the scope of this review focuses on the role MSCs have in each phase of the wound-healing process. In addition, characterization of MSCs containing skin substitutes is described, demonstrating the presence of key growth factors and cytokines uniquely suited to aid in wound repair.

  3. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  4. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  5. Functional role of regulatory T cells in B cell lymphoma and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wan, Jun; Xia, Ruixiang; Huang, Zhenqi; Ni, Jing; Yang, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphoma (BCL) has a higher degree of malignancy and complicated pathogenic mechanism. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are known to exert certain immune suppression functions, in addition to immune mediating effects. Recent studies have revealed the role of Treg cells in pathogenesis and progression of multiple malignant tumors. This study therefore investigated the functional role and related mechanism of Treg cells in BCL. A cohort of thirty patients who were diagnosed with BCL in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2014. Another thirty healthy individuals were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated and analyzed for the ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells. The mRNA expression levels of Foxp3, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 genes were quantified by real-time PCR, while their serum levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Meanwhile all laboratory indexes for patients were monitored during the complete remission (CR) stage. BCL patients significantly elevated ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells, which were decreased at CR stage. mRNA levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10, in addition to protein levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 were potentiated in lymphoma patients but decreased in CR patients (P<0.05 in all cases). CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells exert immune suppressing functions in BCL via regulating cytokines, thereby facilitating the pathogenesis and progression of lymphoma. PMID:26464657

  6. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27629855

  7. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Role of stem cells during diabetic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ying; Garner, Jessica; Wu, Nan; Phillip, Levine; Han, Yuyan; McDaniel, Kelly; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Huang, Qiaobing; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most severe endocrine metabolic disorders in the world that has serious medical consequences with substantial impacts on the quality of life. Type 2 diabetes is one of the main causes of diabetic liver diseases with the most common being non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Several factors that may explain the mechanisms related to pathological and functional changes of diabetic liver injury include: insulin resistance, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The realization that these factors are important in hepatocyte damage and lack of donor livers has led to studies concentrating on the role of stem cells (SCs) in the prevention and treatment of liver injury. Possible avenues that the application of SCs may improve liver injury include but are not limited to: the ability to differentiate into pancreatic β-cells (insulin producing cells), the contribution for hepatocyte regeneration, regulation of lipogenesis, glucogenesis and anti-inflammatory actions. Once further studies are performed to explore the underlying protective mechanisms of SCs and the advantages and disadvantages of its application, there will be a greater understand of the mechanism and therapeutic potential. In this review, we summarize the findings regarding the role of SCs in diabetic liver diseases. PMID:26645107

  9. Oncogenic role of epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 in lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongyi; Wang, Xiaoshan; Yang, Xiaogang; Li, Haitao; Liu, Ben; Pan, Pinhua

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, which is the most common non-small cell lung cancer, is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. Epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 (ECT2) is frequently upregulated and acts as an oncogene in various human cancers. In addition, ECT2 was reported to be upregulated in early stage lung adenocarcinoma. However, the detailed role of ECT2 in mediating the malignant phenotypes of lung adenocarcinoma cells has not previously been elucidated. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to examine ECT2 mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. MTT, wound healing and Transwell assays were conducted to determine cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, respectively. In the present study, ECT2 was significantly upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (H650, EKVX, HCC4006, HCC827, HCC2935, Hop62 and A549), as compared with a normal lung epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). Moreover, knockdown of ECT2, induced by transfection with ECT2 siRNA, significantly inhibited the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, whereas overexpression of ECT2 enhanced A549 cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of ECT2 expression suppressed the migration and invasion of A549 cells, whereas overexpression of ECT2 enhanced the migration and invasion abilities of A549 cells. Notably, inhibition of ECT2 also suppressed the expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas it enhanced the expression level of E-cadherin, indicating that ECT2 is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells. On the contrary, overexpression of ECT2 enhanced the expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas it reduced the expression level of E-cadherin in A549 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that ECT2 has an oncogenic role in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Therefore, ECT2 may be a potential novel target for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  10. Hit Identification and Optimization in Virtual Screening: Practical Recommendations Based Upon a Critical Literature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tian; Cao, Shuyi; Su, Pin-Chih; Patel, Ram; Shah, Darshan; Chokshi, Heta B.; Szukala, Richard; Johnson, Michael E.; Hevener, Kirk E.

    2013-01-01

    A critical analysis of virtual screening results published between 2007 and 2011 was performed. The activity of reported hit compounds from over 400 studies was compared to their hit identification criteria. Hit rates and ligand efficiencies were calculated to assist in these analyses and the results were compared with factors such as the size of the virtual library and the number of compounds tested. A series of promiscuity, drug-like, and ADMET filters were applied to the reported hits to assess the quality of compounds reported and a careful analysis of a subset of the studies which presented hit optimization was performed. This data allowed us to make several practical recommendations with respect to selection of compounds for experimental testing, defining hit identification criteria, and general virtual screening hit criteria to allow for realistic hit optimization. A key recommendation is the use of size-targeted ligand efficiency values as hit identification criteria. PMID:23688234

  11. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  12. U.S. Teen Births Hit Another Record Low: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161207.html U.S. Teen Births Hit Another Record Low: CDC Less sex, ... Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Births to U.S. teens reached a record low last year, continuing a ...

  13. Madoff Debacle Hits Colleges and Raises Questions about Trustee Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Several colleges and universities lost millions in the alleged $50-billion Ponzi scheme run by the Wall Street trader Bernard L. Madoff. The losses include institutions' endowment holdings in hedge funds that were invested with Madoff as well as hits taken by supporting foundations and donors. Several foundations that have been active in higher…

  14. Appreciating an Old Favorite: Sousa's All-Time Hit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Outryve, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents John Philip Sousa's all time hit, "The Stars and Stripes Forever". It is one of the most recognizable pieces of American music. Wherever John Philip Sousa and his band appeared, this march was likely to be played. According to American poet and educator Eli Siegel (1902-78), who first articulated the philosophy…

  15. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Medina, G.; Pignata, G.; Galbany, L.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Jaeger, Th. de; Martinez, J.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115, #7122, #7131, #7132), reports the discovery of 5 additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  16. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Pignata, G.; Martinez, J.; Medina, G.; Galbany, L.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-02-01

    Body: HiTS: The High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115) reports the discovery of 9 additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  17. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Galbany, L.; de Jaeger, Th.; Martinez, J.; Cabrera, G.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; Medina, G.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS: The High Cadence Transient Survey (ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099) reports the discovery of one additional supernova candidate detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  18. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Pignata, G.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Medina, G.; Martinez, J.; Galbany, L.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Jaeger, Th. de; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS: The High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115, #7122, #7131) reports the discovery of 9 additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  19. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Pignata, G.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Medina, G.; Martinez, J.; Galbany, Â. L.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Jaeger, Th. de; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS: The High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115, #7122) reports the discovery of 9 additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  20. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Medina, G.; Galbany, L.; Martinez, J.; San Martin, J.; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; de Jaeger, Th.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.; Points, S.

    2015-03-01

    HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115, #7122, #7131, #7146, #7148, #7149), reports the discovery of additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  1. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Galbany, L.; De Jaeger, Th.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Martinez, J.; Cabrera, G.; San Martin, J.; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.,; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; Medina, G.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS: The High Cadence Transient Survey (ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099) reports the discovery of 4 additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  2. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Medina, G.; Galbany, L.; Martinez, J.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; Jaeger, Th. de; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115, #7122, #7131, #7146, #7148), reports the discovery of additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  3. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Medina, G.; Galbany, L.; Martinez, J.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; Jaeger, Th. de; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #5956, #7099, #7108, #7115, #7122, #7131, #7146), reports the discovery of additional supernova candidates detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  4. HiTS real-time supernova detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Galbany, L.; De Jaeger, Th.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Martinez, J.; Cabrera, G.; San Martin, J.; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Pignata, G.; Medina, G.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.

    2015-02-01

    HiTS: The High Cadence Transient Survey (ATELs #5949, #5956) reports the discovery of 4 possible supernova explosions detected using a novel real-time high-cadence image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  5. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Hit All-Time High: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_161565.html Sexually Transmitted Diseases Hit All-Time High: CDC More prevention efforts needed, agency ... Oct. 19, 2016 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights reserved. News stories are provided by HealthDay ...

  6. Assessing the lipophilicity of fragments and early hits.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, Paul N; Murray, Christopher W

    2011-07-01

    A key challenge in many drug discovery programs is to accurately assess the potential value of screening hits. This is particularly true in fragment-based drug design (FBDD), where the hits often bind relatively weakly, but are correspondingly small. Ligand efficiency (LE) considers both the potency and the size of the molecule, and enables us to estimate whether or not an initial hit is likely to be optimisable to a potent, druglike lead. While size is a key property that needs to be controlled in a small molecule drug, there are a number of additional properties that should also be considered. Lipophilicity is amongst the most important of these additional properties, and here we present a new efficiency index (LLE(AT)) that combines lipophilicity, size and potency. The index is intuitively defined, and has been designed to have the same target value and dynamic range as LE, making it easily interpretable by medicinal chemists. Monitoring both LE and LLE(AT) should help both in the selection of more promising fragment hits, and controlling molecular weight and lipophilicity during optimisation. PMID:21614595

  7. New mouse model of acute adult T-cell leukemia generated by transplantation of AKT, BCLxL, and HBZ-transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Kasugai, Yumiko; Yoshida, Noriaki; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Tsuzuki, Shinobu

    2016-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) carriers. Although the HTLV-1-encoded HBZ gene is critically involved, HBZ alone is insufficient and additional, cooperative "hits" are required for the development of ATL. Candidate cooperative hits are being defined, but methods to rapidly explore their roles in ATL development in collaboration with HBZ are lacking. Here, we present a new mouse model of acute type ATL that can be generated rapidly by transplanting in vitro-induced T cells that have been retrovirally transduced with HBZ and two cooperative genes, BCLxL and AKT, into mice. Co-transduction of HBZ and BCLxL/AKT allowed these T cells to grow in vitro in the absence of cytokines (Flt3-ligand and interleukin-7), which did not occur with any two-gene combination. Although transplanted T cells were a mixture of cells transduced with different combinations of the genes, tumors that developed in mice were composed of HBZ/BCLxL/AKT triply transduced T cells, showing the synergistic effect of the three genes. The genetic/epigenetic landscape of ATL has only recently been elucidated, and the roles of additional "hits" in ATL pathogenesis remain to be explored. Our model provides a versatile tool to examine the roles of these hits, in collaboration with HBZ, in the development of acute ATL. PMID:27223899

  8. Role of cell wall deconstructing enzymes in the proanthocyanidin-cell wall adsorption-desorption phenomena.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Ortega-Regules, Ana; Lozada, Daniel; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén

    2016-04-01

    The transference of proanthocyanidins from grapes to wine is quite low. This could be due, among other causes, to proanthocyanidins being bound to grape cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations in the must. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from grapes will depend on the ability to disrupt these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the behavior of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions when commercial maceration enzymes are present in the solution. The results showed that cell wall polysaccharides adsorbed a high amount of proanthocyanidins and only a limited quantity of proanthocyanidins could be desorbed from the cell walls after washing with a model solution. The presence of enzymes in the solution reduced the proanthocyanidin-cell wall interaction, probably through the elimination of pectins from the cell wall network.

  9. The role of cell-mediated immunity in typhoid.

    PubMed

    Mabel, T J; Paniker, C K

    1979-06-01

    The cell-mediated immunity in typhoid was assessed by the leukocyte migration inhibition test and delayed hypersensitivity skin test in 60 clinical typhoid patients. The property of leukocyte migration inhibition appeared first and was positive in 28 of 60 (46.7%) patients on admission and 45 of 60 (75%) at the time of discharge. This difference was definitely more in blood culture positive patients. The delayed hypersensitivity appeared later and was positive in 18 of 60 (30%) on admission and 31 of 60 (51.7%) at the time of discharge. Patients with positive cellular-immune response against typhoid antigen did not develop relapse. On the whole cell-mediated immunity seems to play an important role in typoid. The control groups--the medical and surgical patients, doctors, clinical students and preclinical students--showed positive cellular immune response of 43.3 81.3, 40.7 and 25% respectively. The significance of these results is discussed.

  10. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Kelly N. S.; Chagas, Daniele C. G.; Sulczewski, Fernando B.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation. PMID:27110574

  11. The role of stem cells in limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zielins, Elizabeth R.; Ransom, Ryan C.; Leavitt, Tripp E.; Longaker, Michael T.; Wan, Derrick C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Limb regeneration is a complex yet fascinating process observed to some extent in many animal species, though seen in its entirety in urodele amphibians. Accomplished by formation of a morphologically uniform intermediate, the blastema, scientists have long attempted to define the cellular constituents that enable regrowth of a functional appendage. Today, we know that the blastema consists of a variety of multipotent progenitor cells originating from a variety of tissues, and which contribute to limb tissue regeneration in a lineage-restricted manner. By continuing to dissect the role of stem cells in limb regeneration, we can hope to one day modulate the human response to limb amputation and facilitate regrowth of a working replacement. PMID:27008101

  12. The role of stem cells in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zielins, Elizabeth R; Ransom, Ryan C; Leavitt, Tripp E; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2016-01-01

    Limb regeneration is a complex yet fascinating process observed to some extent in many animal species, though seen in its entirety in urodele amphibians. Accomplished by formation of a morphologically uniform intermediate, the blastema, scientists have long attempted to define the cellular constituents that enable regrowth of a functional appendage. Today, we know that the blastema consists of a variety of multipotent progenitor cells originating from a variety of tissues, and which contribute to limb tissue regeneration in a lineage-restricted manner. By continuing to dissect the role of stem cells in limb regeneration, we can hope to one day modulate the human response to limb amputation and facilitate regrowth of a working replacement. PMID:27008101

  13. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J; Stubley, Paul G; Hawreliak, James A; Ciricosta, Orlando; Comley, Andrew J; Collins, Gilbert W; Eggert, Jon H; Foster, John M; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  14. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J.; Stubley, Paul G.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.; Comley, Andrew J.; Foster, John M.

    2015-05-15

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  15. A comparison of age level on baseball hitting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; DeRenne, Coop; Taylor, Marcus K; Moorman, Claude T; Imamura, Rodney; Barakatt, Edward; Andrews, James R

    2009-08-01

    We propose that learning proper hitting kinematics should be encouraged at a young age during youth baseball because this may help reinforce proper hitting kinematics as a player progresses to higher levels of baseball in their adult years. To enhance our understanding between youth and adult baseball hitting, kinematic and temporal analyses of baseball hitting were evaluated with a high-speed motion analysis system between 12 skilled youth and 12 skilled adult baseball players. There were only a small number of temporal differences between youth and adult hitters, with adult hitters taking significantly greater time than youth hitters during the stride phase and during the swing. Compared with youth hitters, adult hitters a) had significantly greater (p < .01) lead knee flexion when the hands started to move forward; b) flexed the lead knee over a greater range of motion during the transition phase (31 degrees versus 13 degrees); c) extended the lead knee over a greater range of motion during the bat acceleration phase (59 degrees versus 32 degrees); d) maintained a more open pelvis position at lead foot off ground; and e) maintained a more open upper torso position when the hands started to move forward and a more closed upper torso position at bat-ball contact. Moreover, adult hitters had greater peak upper torso angular velocity (857 degrees/s versus 717 degrees/s), peak left elbow extension angular velocity (752 degrees/s versus 598 degrees/s), peak left knee extension angular velocity (386 degrees/s versus 303 degrees/s), and bat linear velocity at bat-ball contact (30 m/s versus 25 m/s). The numerous differences in kinematic and temporal parameters between youth and adult hitters suggest that hitting mechanics are different between these two groups. PMID:19827470

  16. One-hit models of carcinogenesis: conservative or not

    SciTech Connect

    Bailar, J.C. III; Crouch, E.A.C.; Shaikh, R.; Spiegelman, D.

    1988-12-01

    One-hit formulas are widely believed to be conservative when used to analyze carcinogenesis bioassays, in the sense that they will rarely underestimate risks of cancer at low exposures. Such formulas are generally applied to the lifetime incidence of cancer at a specific site, with risks estimated from animal data at zero dose (control), and two or more additional doses that are appreciable fractions of a maximum tolerated dose. No empirical study has demonstrated that the one-hit formula is conservative in the sense described. The Carcinogenesis Bioassay Database System contains data on 1212 separate bioassays of 308 chemical substances tested at exactly three evaluable doses. These provided sufficient data to examine 8432 specific combination of cancer site with sex, species, and chemical. For each of these they fitted a one-hit formula to the zero and maximum dose data points, then examined the relation of the fitted curve to the incidence rate observed at the mid-dose, with and without adjustment for intercurrent mortality. Both underestimates and overestimates of risk at mid-dose occurred substantially more often than expected by chance. They cannot tell whether such underestimates would occur at lower doses, but offer six biological reasons why underestimates might be expected. In a high percentage of animal bioassays, the one-hit formula is not conservative when applied in the usual way to animal data. It remains possible that the one-hit formula may indeed be conservative at sufficiently low doses (below the observational range), but the usual procedure, applied to the usual dose range, can be nonconservative in estimating the slope of the formula at such low doses. Risk assessments for regulation of carcinogens should incorporate some measure of additional uncertainty.

  17. A comparison of age level on baseball hitting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; DeRenne, Coop; Taylor, Marcus K; Moorman, Claude T; Imamura, Rodney; Barakatt, Edward; Andrews, James R

    2009-08-01

    We propose that learning proper hitting kinematics should be encouraged at a young age during youth baseball because this may help reinforce proper hitting kinematics as a player progresses to higher levels of baseball in their adult years. To enhance our understanding between youth and adult baseball hitting, kinematic and temporal analyses of baseball hitting were evaluated with a high-speed motion analysis system between 12 skilled youth and 12 skilled adult baseball players. There were only a small number of temporal differences between youth and adult hitters, with adult hitters taking significantly greater time than youth hitters during the stride phase and during the swing. Compared with youth hitters, adult hitters a) had significantly greater (p < .01) lead knee flexion when the hands started to move forward; b) flexed the lead knee over a greater range of motion during the transition phase (31 degrees versus 13 degrees); c) extended the lead knee over a greater range of motion during the bat acceleration phase (59 degrees versus 32 degrees); d) maintained a more open pelvis position at lead foot off ground; and e) maintained a more open upper torso position when the hands started to move forward and a more closed upper torso position at bat-ball contact. Moreover, adult hitters had greater peak upper torso angular velocity (857 degrees/s versus 717 degrees/s), peak left elbow extension angular velocity (752 degrees/s versus 598 degrees/s), peak left knee extension angular velocity (386 degrees/s versus 303 degrees/s), and bat linear velocity at bat-ball contact (30 m/s versus 25 m/s). The numerous differences in kinematic and temporal parameters between youth and adult hitters suggest that hitting mechanics are different between these two groups.

  18. Multifaceted role of prohibitin in cell survival and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ping; Ouyang, Ruo-Yun; Song, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Human eukaryotic prohibitin (prohibitin-1 and prohibitin-2) is a membrane protein with different cellular localizations. It is involved in multiple cellular functions, including energy metabolism, proliferation, apoptosis, and senescence. The subcellular localization of prohibitin may determine its functions. Membrane prohibitin regulate the cellular signaling of membrane transport, nuclear prohibitin control transcription activation and the cell cycle, and mitochondrial prohibitin complex stabilize the mitochondrial genome and modulate mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial biogenesis, and the mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, prohibitin can translocates into the nucleus or the mitochondria under apoptotic signals and the subcellular shuttling of prohibitin is necessary for apoptosis process. Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death that is important for the maintenance of normal physiological functions. Consequently, any alteration in the content, post-transcriptional modification (i.e. phosphorylation) or the nuclear or mitochondrial translocation of prohibitin may influence cell fate. Understanding the mechanisms of the expression and regulation of prohibitin may be useful for future research. This review provides an overview of the multifaceted and essential roles played by prohibitin in the regulation of cell survival and apoptosis.

  19. Resolving the Role of Actoymyosin Contractility in Cell Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Christopher M.; Sun, Sean X.; Wirtz, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's original description of Brownian motion established a direct relationship between thermally-excited random forces and the transport properties of a submicron particle in a viscous liquid. Recent work based on reconstituted actin filament networks suggests that nonthermal forces driven by the motor protein myosin II can induce large non-equilibrium fluctuations that dominate the motion of particles in cytoskeletal networks. Here, using high-resolution particle tracking, we find that thermal forces, not myosin-induced fluctuating forces, drive the motion of submicron particles embedded in the cytoskeleton of living cells. These results resolve the roles of myosin II and contractile actomyosin structures in the motion of nanoparticles lodged in the cytoplasm, reveal the biphasic mechanical architecture of adherent cells—stiff contractile stress fibers interdigitating in a network at the cell cortex and a soft actin meshwork in the body of the cell, validate the method of particle tracking-microrheology, and reconcile seemingly disparate atomic force microscopy (AFM) and particle-tracking microrheology measurements of living cells. PMID:19756147

  20. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptors in astrocytic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Luquin, Sonia; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    There are two well-defined neurogenic regions in the adult brain, the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles and, the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the dentate gyrus at the hippocampus. Within these neurogenic regions, there are neural stem cells with astrocytic characteristics, which actively respond to the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF2 or FGF-β) by increasing their proliferation, survival and differentiation, both in vivo and in vitro. FGF2 binds to fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 to 4 (FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR4). Interestingly, these receptors are differentially expressed in neurogenic progenitors. During development, FGFR-1 and FGFR-2 drive oligodendrocytes and motor neuron specification. In particular, FGFR-1 determines oligodendroglial and neuronal cell fate, whereas FGFR-2 is related to oligodendrocyte specification. In the adult SVZ, FGF-2 promotes oligodendrogliogenesis and myelination. FGF-2 deficient mice show a reduction in the number of new neurons in the SGZ, which suggests that FGFR-1 is important for neuronal cell fate in the adult hippocampus. In human brain, FGF-2 appears to be an important component in the anti-depressive effect of drugs. In summary, FGF2 is an important modulator of the cell fate of neural precursor and, promotes oligodendrogenesis. In this review, we describe the expression pattern of FGFR2 and its role in neural precursors derived from the SVZ and the SGZ. PMID:22347841

  1. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL.

  2. Cell therapy for ischaemic heart disease: focus on the role of resident cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, S A J; Vrijsen, K R; Rokosh, D G; Tang, X L; Piek, J J; Bolli, R

    2009-05-01

    Myocardial infarction results in loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodelling, and eventually heart failure. In recent years, cell therapy has emerged as a potential new strategy for patients with ischaemic heart disease. This includes embryonic and bone marrow derived stem cells. Recent clinical studies showed ostensibly conflicting results of intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with acute or chronic myocardial infarction. Anyway, these results have stimulated additional clinical and pre-clinical studies to further enhance the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy. Recently, the existence of cardiac stem cells that reside in the heart itself was demonstrated. Their discovery has sparked intense hope for myocardial regeneration with cells that are obtained from the heart itself and are thereby inherently programmed to reconstitute cardiac tissue. These cells can be detected by several surface markers (e.g. c-kit, Sca-1, MDR1, Isl-1). Both in vitro and in vivo differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated, and animal studies showed promising results on improvement of left ventricular function. This review will discuss current views regarding the feasibility of cardiac repair, and focus on the potential role of the resident cardiac stem and progenitor cells. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:199-207.).

  3. Nuclear phosphoinositides and their roles in cell biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Alberto M; Ognibene, Andrea; Buontempo, Francesca; Fini, Milena; Bressanin, Daniela; Goto, Kaoru; McCubrey, James A; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla

    2011-10-01

    Since the late 1980s, a growing body of evidence has documented that phosphoinositides and their metabolizing enzymes, which regulate a large variety of cellular functions both in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane, are present also within the nucleus, where they are involved in processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Remarkably, nuclear phosphoinositide metabolism operates independently from that present elsewhere in the cell. Although nuclear phosphoinositides generate second messengers such as diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate, it is becoming increasingly clear that they may act by themselves to influence chromatin structure, gene expression, DNA repair, and mRNA export. The understanding of the biological roles played by phosphoinositides is supported by the recent acquisitions demonstrating the presence in the nuclear compartment of several proteins harboring phosphoinositide-binding domains. Some of these proteins have functional roles in RNA splicing/processing and chromatin assembly. Moreover, recent evidence shows that nuclear phospholipase Cβ1 (a key phosphoinositide metabolizing enzyme) could somehow be involved in the myelodysplastic syndrome, i.e. a hematopoietic disorder that frequently evolves into an acute leukemia. This review aims to highlight the most significant and updated findings about phosphoinositide metabolism in the nucleus under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  4. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  5. The Role of Dendritic Cells in S. pneumoniae Transport to Follicular Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Heesters, Balthasar A; Carroll, Michael C

    2016-09-20

    Affinity-mature B cells require cognate antigen, retained by follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), for clonal selection within germinal centers. Studies on how FDCs in lymphoid tissues acquire antigen have relied primarily on model protein antigens. To examine delivery of intact bacteria to FDCs, we used inactivated Streptococcus pneumonia (SP). We found that both medullary macrophages and a subset of SIGN-R1-positive dendritic cells (DCs) in the lymph node capture SP from the draining afferent lymphatics. The presence of DCs is required for initial complement activation, opsonization of the bacteria, and efficient transport of SP to FDCs. Moreover, we observed a major role for transport of bacteria to FDCs by naive B cells via a CD21-dependent pathway. We propose a mechanism by which efficient transport of SP to FDCs is dependent on DCs for initial binding and activation of complement and either direct transport to FDCs or transfer to naive B cells. PMID:27653679

  6. Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Immune Cells; Emerging Role in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bene, Nicholas C.; Alcaide, Pilar; Wortis, Henry H.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans. As such, MR antagonists improve cardiovascular outcomes but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The actions of the MR in the kidney to increase blood pressure are well known, but the recent identification of MRs in immune cells has led to novel discoveries in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease that are reviewed here. MR regulates macrophage activation to the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype and this process contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular fibrosis in response to hypertension and to outcomes in mouse models of stroke. T lymphocytes have recently been implicated in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular fibrosis in mouse models. MR activation in vivo promotes T lymphocyte differentiation to the pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 subsets while decreasing the number of anti-inflammatory T regulatory lymphocytes. The mechanism likely involves activation of MR in antigen presenting dendritic cells that subsequently regulate Th1/Th17 polarization by production of cytokines. Alteration of the balance between T helper and T regulatory lymphocytes contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis and the associated complications. B lymphocytes also express the MR and specific B lymphocyte-derived antibodies modulate the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the role of MR in B lymphocyte function remains to be explored. Overall, recent studies of MR in immune cells have identified new mechanisms by which MR activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of organ damage in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Conversely, inhibition of leukocyte MR may contribute to the protective effects of MR antagonist drugs in cardiovascular patients. Further understanding of the role of MR in leukocyte function could yield novel drug targets for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24769248

  7. The role of cell surface receptors in the activation of human B cells by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Reich, C F; Pisetsky, D S; Lipsky, P E

    2000-08-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (sODN) containing the CpG motif or TCG repeats induce T cell-independent polyclonal activation of human B cells. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, the role of cell surface receptors was investigated. Sepharose beads coated with stimulatory but not nonstimulatory sODNs induced B cell proliferation comparably with soluble sODNs. The B cell stimulatory activity of Sepharose-bound sODN did not result from free sODN released from the beads since media incubated with coated beads were inactive. Using FITC-labeled sODNs as probes, binding to human B cells could be detected by flow cytometry. Binding was rapid, saturable, initially temperature independent, but with a rapid off-rate. Competition studies indicated that both stimulatory sODNs and minimally stimulatory sODNs bound to the same receptor. By contrast, phosphodiester oligonucleotides with the same nucleotide sequence as sODNs and bacterial DNA inhibited the binding of sODNs to B cells minimally. Charge appeared to contribute to the binding of sODNs to B cells since binding of sODNs was competitively inhibited by negatively charged molecules, including fucoidan, poly I, and polyvinyl sulfate. These data indicate that human B cells bind sODNs by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is necessary but not sufficient for polyclonal activation.

  8. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  9. Role of Rho small GTPases in meniscus cells.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tomoko; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Matsumoto-Ogawa, Emi; Maehara, Ami; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported that mechanical stretch regulates Sry-type HMG box (SOX) 9-dependent α1(II) collagen (COL2A1) expression in inner meniscus cells. This study examined the role of the small Rho guanosine 5' triphosphatase Rac1 and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) in the regulation of stretch-induced SOX9 gene expression in cultured human inner meniscus cells. COL2A1 and SOX9 gene expression was assessed by real-time PCR after application of uni-axial cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in the presence or absence of ROCK and Rac1 inhibitors. The subcellular localization of SOX9 and the Rac1 effector cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), the phosphorylation state of SOX9, Rac1 activation, and the binding of CREB to the SOX9 promoter were assessed. CTS increased the expression of COL2A1 and SOX9, which was suppressed by inhibition of Rac1. ROCK inhibition enhanced COL2A1 and SOX9 gene expression in the absence of CTS. CTS stimulated the nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of SOX9, and increased Rac1 activation. CTS also increased the binding of CREB to the SOX9 promoter. The results suggest that mechanical stretch-dependent upregulation of SOX9 by CREB in inner meniscus cells depends on the antagonistic activities of ROCK and Rac1. PMID:25130858

  10. Role of complement and NK cells in antibody mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takurin; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Alessandrini, Alessandro; Chase, Catherine M; Farkash, Evan A; Neal Smith, R; Madsen, Joren C; Russell, Paul S; Colvin, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Despite extensive research on T cells and potent immunosuppressive regimens that target cellular mediated rejection, few regimens have been proved to be effective on antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), particularly in the chronic setting. C4d deposition in the graft has been proved to be a useful marker for AMR; however, there is an imperfect association between C4d and AMR. While complement has been considered as the main player in acute AMR, the effector mechanisms in chronic AMR are still debated. Recent studies support the role of NK cells and direct effects of antibody on endothelium cells in a mechanism suggesting the presence of a complement-independent pathway. Here, we review the history, currently available systems and progress in experimental animal research. Although there are consistent findings from human and animal research, transposing the experimental results from rodent to human has been hampered by the differences in endothelial functions between species. We briefly describe the findings from patients and compare them with results from animals, to propose a combined perspective.

  11. Unifying roles for regulatory T cells and inflammation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Rao, Varada P.; Olipitz, Werner; Taylor, Christie L.; Jackson, Erin A.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Lee, Chung-Wei; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Fox, James G.; Ge, Zhongming; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Activities of CD4+ regulatory (TREG) cells restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. Roles for TREG cells in inflammation-associated cancers, however, are paradoxical. It is widely believed that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer responses. However, we demonstrate here that TREG cells also function to reduce cancer risk throughout the body by efficiently downregulating inflammation arising from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Building on a “hygiene hypothesis” model in which GI infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce immune-mediated diseases, here we show that gut bacteria-triggered TREG may function to inhibit cancer even in extraintestinal sites. Ability of bacteria-stimulated TREG to suppress cancer depends on interleukin (IL)-10, which serves to maintain immune homeostasis within bowel and support a protective antiinflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under proinflammatory conditions, TREG may fail to provide antiinflammatory protection and instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process; a cancer state that is reversible by downregulation of inflammation. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10 and TREG-mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated IL-6 and IL-17 and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data unify seemingly divergent disease processes such as autoimmunity and cancer and help explain the paradox of TREG and inflammation in cancer. Enhancing protective TREG functions may promote healthful longevity and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:19795459

  12. Role of intermediate progenitor cells in cerebral cortex development.

    PubMed

    Pontious, Adria; Kowalczyk, Tom; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are a type of neurogenic transient amplifying cells in the developing cerebral cortex. IPCs divide symmetrically at basal (abventricular) positions in the neuroepithelium to produce pairs of new neurons or, in amplifying divisions, pairs of new IPCs. In contrast, radial unit progenitors (neuroepithelial cells and radial glia) divide at the apical (ventricular) surface and produce only single neurons or single IPCs by asymmetric division, or self-amplify by symmetric division. Histologically, IPCs are most prominent during the middle and late stages of neurogenesis, when they accumulate in the subventricular zone, a progenitor compartment linked to the genesis of upper neocortical layers (II-IV). Nevertheless, IPCs are present throughout cortical neurogenesis and produce neurons for all layers. In mice, changes in the abundance of IPCs caused by mutations of Pax6, Ngn2, Id4 and other genes are associated with parallel changes in cortical thickness but not surface area. In gyrencephalic brains, IPCs may play broader roles in determining not only laminar thickness, but also cortical surface area and gyral patterns. We propose that regulation of IPC genesis and amplification across developmental stages and regional subdivisions modulates laminar neurogenesis and contributes to the cytoarchitectonic differentiation of cortical areas. PMID:18075251

  13. Current role of surgery in small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koletsis, Efstratios N; Prokakis, Christos; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Small cell lung carcinoma represents 15–20% of lung cancer. Is is characterized by rapid growth and early disseminated disease with poor outcome. For many years surgery was considered a contraindication in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) since radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy were found to be more efficient in the management of these patients. Never the less some surgeons continue to be in favor of surgery as part of a combined modality treatment in patients with SCLC. The revaluation of the role of surgery in this group of patients is based on clinical data indicating a much better prognosis in selected patients with limited disease (T1-2, N0, M0), the high rate of local recurrence after chemoradiotherapy with surgery considered eventually more efficient in the local control of the disease and the fact that surgery is the most accurate tool to access the response to chemotherapy, identify carcinoids misdiagnosed as SCLC and treat the Non Small Cell Lung Cancer component of mixed tumors. Performing surgery for local disease SCLC requires a complete preoperative assessment to exclude the presence of nodal involvement. In stage I surgery must always be followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, while in stage II and III surgery must be planned only in the context of clinical trials and after a pathologic response to induction chemoradiotherapy has been confirmed. Prophylactic cranial irradiation should be used to reduce the incidence of brain metastasis PMID:19589150

  14. T helper cells in cytotoxic T lymphocyte development: role of L3T4(+)-dependent and -independent T helper cell pathways in virus-specific and alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Ciavarra, R P

    1990-02-01

    I have compared the requirements for T helper (Th) cell function during the generation of virus-specific and alloreactive cytotoxic thymus (T)-derived lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Restimulation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-immune T cells (VSV memory CTLs) with VSV-infected stimulators resulted in the generation of class I-restricted, VSV-specific CTLs. Progression of VSV memory CTLs (Lyt-1-2+) into VSV-specific CTLs required inductive signals derived from VSV-induced, Lyt-1+2- Th cells because: (i) cultures depleted by negative selection of Lyt-1+ T cells failed to generate CTLs; (ii) titration of VSV memory CTLs into a limiting dilution (LD) microculture system depleted of Th cells generated curves which were not consistent with a single limiting cell type; (iii) LD analysis of VSV memory CTLs did produce single-hit curves in the presence of Lyt-1+2- T cells sensitized against VSV; and (iv) monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody completely abrogated CTL generation against VSV. Similar results were also obtained with Sendai virus (SV), a member of the paramyxovirus family. The notion that a class II-restricted, L3T4+ Th cell plays an obligatory role in the generation of CTLs against these viruses is also supported by the observation that purified T cell lymphoblasts (class II antigen negative) failed to function as antigen-presenting cells for CTL responses against VSV and SV. T cell lymphoblasts were efficiently lysed by class I-restricted, anti-VSV and -SV CTLs, indicating that activated T cells expressed the appropriate viral peptides for CTL recognition. Furthermore, heterogeneity in the VSV-induced Th cell population was detected by LD analysis, suggesting that at least two types of Th cells were required for the generation of an anti-VSV CTL response. VSV-induced Th cell function could not simply be replaced by exogenous IL-2 because this lymphokine induced cytotoxic cells that had the characteristics of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and not anti

  15. The critical role of quercetin in autophagy and apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Zhu, Dingjun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the effects of quercetin on autophagy and apoptosis of cancer cells have been widely reported, while effects on HeLa cells are still unclear. Here, HeLa cells were subjected to quercetin treatment, and then proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy were evaluated using MTT, flow cytometry, and MDC staining, respectively. The LC3-I/II, Beclin 1, active caspase-3, and S6K1 phosphorylation were detected using Western blot assay. The ultrastructure of HeLa was observed via transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our findings showed that quercetin can dose-dependently inhibit the growth of HeLa cells. The MDC fluorescence was enhanced with increased concentration of quercetin and hit a plateau at 50 μmol/l. Western blot assay revealed that LC3-I/II ratio, Beclin 1, and active caspase-3 protein were enforced in a dose-dependent method. However, the phosphorylation of S6K1 gradually decreased, concomitant with an increase of autophagy. In addition, TEM revealed that the number of autophagic vacuoles was peaked at 50 μmol/l of quercetin. Besides, interference of autophagy with 3-MA led to proliferation inhibition and increased apoptosis in HeLa cells, accompanied by the decreased LC3-I/II conversion and the increased active caspase-3. In conclusion, quercetin can inhibit HeLa cell proliferation and induce protective autophagy at low concentrations; thus, 3-MA plus quercetin would suppress autophagy and effectively increased apoptosis.

  16. 77 FR 66617 - HIT Policy and Standards Committees; Workgroup Application Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy and Standards Committees; Workgroup Application Database AGENCY: Office of the... Application Database. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has launched a new Health Information Technology Federal Advisory Committee Workgroup Application Database. Name of Committees: HIT...

  17. 75 FR 62399 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... from the HIT Policy Committee regarding health information technology standards, implementation... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT...

  18. 75 FR 32472 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards... Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS... Information Technology (ONC). Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the...

  19. Syntrophin proteins as Santa Claus: role(s) in cell signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hina F; Adams, Marvin E; Khanday, Firdous A

    2013-07-01

    Syntrophins are a family of cytoplasmic membrane-associated adaptor proteins, characterized by the presence of a unique domain organization comprised of a C-terminal syntrophin unique (SU) domain and an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that is split by insertion of a PDZ domain. Syntrophins have been recognized as an important component of many signaling events, and they seem to function more like the cell's own personal 'Santa Claus' that serves to 'gift' various signaling complexes with precise proteins that they 'wish for', and at the same time care enough for the spatial, temporal control of these signaling events, maintaining overall smooth functioning and general happiness of the cell. Syntrophins not only associate various ion channels and signaling proteins to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), via a direct interaction with dystrophin protein but also serve as a link between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular downstream targets and cell cytoskeleton by interacting with F-actin. They play an important role in regulating the postsynaptic signal transduction, sarcolemmal localization of nNOS, EphA4 signaling at the neuromuscular junction, and G-protein mediated signaling. In our previous work, we reported a differential expression pattern of alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) protein in esophageal and breast carcinomas. Implicated in several other pathologies, like cardiac dys-functioning, muscular dystrophies, diabetes, etc., these proteins provide a lot of scope for further studies. The present review focuses on the role of syntrophins in membrane targeting and regulation of cellular proteins, while highlighting their relevance in possible development and/or progression of pathologies including cancer which we have recently demonstrated. PMID:23263165

  20. Manual laterality and hitting performance in major league baseball.

    PubMed

    Grondin, S; Guiard, Y; Ivry, R B; Koren, S

    1999-06-01

    Asymmetrical hand function was examined in the context of expert sports performance: hitting in professional baseball. An archival study was conducted to examine the batting performance of all Major League Baseball players from 1871 to 1992, focusing on those who batted left (n = 1,059) to neutralize the game asymmetry. Among them, left-handers (n = 421) were more likely to hit with power and to strike out than right-handers (n = 638). One possible account, based on the idea of hand dominance and an analogy to tennis, is that batting left involves a double-handed forehand for left-handers and a weaker and more reliable double-handed backhand for right-handers. The results are also interpretable in the light of Y. Guiard's (1987) kinematic chain model of a between-hands asymmetrical division of labor, which provides a detailed account of why left batting is optimal for left-handers. PMID:10385985

  1. A memory model for internet hits after media exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chessa, Antonio G.; Murre, Jaap M. J.

    2004-02-01

    We present a cognitive model, based on the mathematical theory of point processes, which extends the results of two studies by Johansen (Physica A 276 (2000) 338; Physica A 296 (2001) 539) on download relaxation dynamics. Responses from subjects are considered as single events, which are received from original listeners or readers and from a network of social contacts, through which a message may propagate further. We collected data on the number of daily visits at our web site after a radio interview with the second author, in which the name of the web site was mentioned. A model based on an exponential hit time distribution and a homogeneous point process for regular visitors fits our data and Johansen's very well and is superior to both the power law and the logarithmic function. The fits suggest that hit data from different sources share the same cognitive mechanism, which are controlled merely by the encoding and retrieval of the target information memorised.

  2. Manual laterality and hitting performance in major league baseball.

    PubMed

    Grondin, S; Guiard, Y; Ivry, R B; Koren, S

    1999-06-01

    Asymmetrical hand function was examined in the context of expert sports performance: hitting in professional baseball. An archival study was conducted to examine the batting performance of all Major League Baseball players from 1871 to 1992, focusing on those who batted left (n = 1,059) to neutralize the game asymmetry. Among them, left-handers (n = 421) were more likely to hit with power and to strike out than right-handers (n = 638). One possible account, based on the idea of hand dominance and an analogy to tennis, is that batting left involves a double-handed forehand for left-handers and a weaker and more reliable double-handed backhand for right-handers. The results are also interpretable in the light of Y. Guiard's (1987) kinematic chain model of a between-hands asymmetrical division of labor, which provides a detailed account of why left batting is optimal for left-handers.

  3. Emerging role of cancer stem cells in the biology and treatment of ovarian cancer: basic knowledge and therapeutic possibilities for an innovative approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In 2013 there will be an estimated 22,240 new diagnoses and 14,030 deaths from ovarian cancer in the United States. Despite the improved surgical approach and the novel active drugs that are available today in clinical practice, about 80% of women presenting with late-stage disease have a 5-year survival rate of only 30%. In the last years a growing scientific knowledge about the molecular pathways involved in ovarian carcinogenesis has led to the discovery and evaluation of several novel molecular targeted agents, with the aim to test alternative models of treatment in order to overcome the clinical problem of resistance. Cancer stem cells tend to be more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents and radiation than more differentiated cellular subtypes from the same tissue. In this context the study of ovarian cancer stem cells is taking on an increasingly important strategic role, mostly for the potential therapeutic application in the next future. In our review, we focused our attention on the molecular characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells, in particular on possible targets to hit with targeted therapies. PMID:23902592

  4. Emerging role of cancer stem cells in the biology and treatment of ovarian cancer: basic knowledge and therapeutic possibilities for an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Tomao, Federica; Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Strudel, Martina; Vici, Patrizia; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Tomao, Silverio

    2013-08-01

    In 2013 there will be an estimated 22,240 new diagnoses and 14,030 deaths from ovarian cancer in the United States. Despite the improved surgical approach and the novel active drugs that are available today in clinical practice, about 80% of women presenting with late-stage disease have a 5-year survival rate of only 30%. In the last years a growing scientific knowledge about the molecular pathways involved in ovarian carcinogenesis has led to the discovery and evaluation of several novel molecular targeted agents, with the aim to test alternative models of treatment in order to overcome the clinical problem of resistance. Cancer stem cells tend to be more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents and radiation than more differentiated cellular subtypes from the same tissue. In this context the study of ovarian cancer stem cells is taking on an increasingly important strategic role, mostly for the potential therapeutic application in the next future. In our review, we focused our attention on the molecular characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells, in particular on possible targets to hit with targeted therapies.

  5. The Effects of Pain Cues on Hitting Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubanoski, Richard A.; Kong, Colleen

    This study investigates the effects of pain and non-pain consequences on groups of 22 high- and 22 low-aggression boys, as determined by a peer rating scale. The boys, who had a mean age of 10 years, 8 months, were instructed to hit a punching apparatus. Through earphones, half of each group heard pain cues, i.e., "ouch", while the other half…

  6. Hitting moving targets with a continuously changing temporal window.

    PubMed

    de la Malla, Cristina; López-Moliner, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Hitting a moving target requires that we do not miss the target when it is around the aimed position. The time available for us not to miss the target when it is at the position of interest is usually called the time window and depends on target's speed and size. These variables, among others, have been manipulated in previous studies but kept constant within the same trial or session. Here, we present results of a hitting task in which targets underwent simple harmonic motion, which is defined by a sinusoidal function. Target velocity changes continuously in this motion and so does the time window which is shorter in the centre (peak velocity) and longer at the turning points (lowest velocity) within a single trial. We studied two different conditions in which the target moved with a reliable (across trials) amplitude displacement or reliable peak velocity, respectively, and subjects were free to decide where and when to hit it. Results show that subjects made a compromise between maximum and minimum target's speed, so that they did hit the target at intermediate speed values. Interestingly, the reliability of target peak velocity (or displacement) modulated the point of interception. When target's peak velocity was more reliable, subjects intercepted the target at positions with smaller temporal windows and the reverse was true when displacement was reliable. Subjects adapted the interceptive behaviour to the underlying statistical structure of the targets. Finally, in a control condition in which the temporal window also depended on the instant size and not only on speed, subjects intercepted the target when it moved at similar speeds than when the size was constant. This finding suggests that velocity rather than the temporal window contributed more to controlling the interceptive movements.

  7. Quantitative cell biology: the essential role of theory.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jonathon

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative biology is a hot area, as evidenced by the recent establishment of institutes, graduate programs, and conferences with that name. But what is quantitative biology? What should it be? And how can it contribute to solving the big questions in biology? The past decade has seen very rapid development of quantitative experimental techniques, especially at the single-molecule and single-cell levels. In this essay, I argue that quantitative biology is much more than just the quantitation of these experimental results. Instead, it should be the application of the scientific method by which measurement is directed toward testing theories. In this view, quantitative biology is the recognition that theory and models play critical roles in biology, as they do in physics and engineering. By tying together experiment and theory, quantitative biology promises a deeper understanding of underlying mechanisms, when the theory works, or to new discoveries, when it does not.

  8. Effective progression of nuclear magnetic resonance-detected fragment hits.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Hugh L; Wyss, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become increasingly popular over the last decade as an alternate lead generation tool to HTS approaches. Several compounds have now progressed into the clinic which originated from a fragment-based approach, demonstrating the utility of this emerging field. While fragment hit identification has become much more routine and may involve different screening approaches, the efficient progression of fragment hits into quality lead series may still present a major bottleneck for the broadly successful application of FBDD. In our laboratory, we have extensive experience in fragment-based NMR screening (SbN) and the subsequent iterative progression of fragment hits using structure-assisted chemistry. To maximize impact, we have applied this approach strategically to early- and high-priority targets, and those struggling for leads. Its application has yielded a clinical candidate for BACE1 and lead series in about one third of the SbN/FBDD projects. In this chapter, we will give an overview of our strategy and focus our discussion on NMR-based FBDD approaches. PMID:21371601

  9. 42 CFR 495.332 - State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State Medicaid health information technology (HIT... HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.332 State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements. Each State Medicaid HIT plan must...

  10. Teachers' Perspectives on Hitting Back in School: Between Inexcusable Violence and Self-Defense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischmann, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Israeli schools expressly forbid a student to hit back after being attacked. In semistructured interviews, 71 Israeli educators were asked for their views on the hitting-back tactic. The interviews compared their attitude toward hitting back as teachers with their take on the matter as parents. The results, analyzed using grounded theory, show…

  11. Emerging roles for platelets as immune and inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Craig N; Aggrey, Angela A; Chapman, Lesley M; Modjeski, Kristina L

    2014-05-01

    Despite their small size and anucleate status, platelets have diverse roles in vascular biology. Not only are platelets the cellular mediator of thrombosis, but platelets are also immune cells that initiate and accelerate many vascular inflammatory conditions. Platelets are linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, malaria infection, transplant rejection, and rheumatoid arthritis. In some contexts, platelet immune functions are protective, whereas in others platelets contribute to adverse inflammatory outcomes. In this review, we will discuss platelet and platelet-derived mediator interactions with the innate and acquired arms of the immune system and platelet-vessel wall interactions that drive inflammatory disease. There have been many recent publications indicating both important protective and adverse roles for platelets in infectious disease. Because of this new accumulating data, and the fact that infectious disease continues to be a leading cause of death globally, we will also focus on new and emerging concepts related to platelet immune and inflammatory functions in the context of infectious disease.

  12. A Novel Role of Cab45-G in Mediating Cell Migration in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Judong; Li, Zengpeng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Chenying; Zheng, Weibin; He, Yan; Song, Jianyuan; Wang, Wenjie; Zhou, Xifa; Lu, Xujing; Zhang, Shuyu; Chen, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-binding protein of 45 kDa (Cab45), a CREC family member, is reported to be associated with Ca2+-dependent secretory pathways and involved in multiple diseases including cancers. Cab45-G, a Cab45 isoform protein, plays an important role in protein sorting and secretion at Golgi complex. However, its role in cancer cell migration remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Cab45-G exhibited an increased expression in cell lines with higher metastatic potential and promoted cell migration in multiple types of cancer cells. Overexpression of Cab45-G resulted in an altered expression of the molecular mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is a critical step in the tumor metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that overexpression of Cab45-G increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -7 (MMP-2 and MMP-7). Conversely, knock-down of Cab45-G reduced the expression of the above MMPs. Moreover, forced expression of Cab45-G upregulated the level of phosphorylated ERK and modulated the secretion of extracellular proteins fibronectin and fibulin. Furthermore, in human cervical and esophageal cancer tissues, the expression of Cab45-G was found to be significantly correlated with that of MMP-2, further supporting the importance of Cab45-G on regulating cancer metastasis. Taken together, these results suggest that Cab45-G could regulate cancer cell migration through various molecular mechanisms, which may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27194945

  13. A Novel Role of Cab45-G in Mediating Cell Migration in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Judong; Li, Zengpeng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Chenying; Zheng, Weibin; He, Yan; Song, Jianyuan; Wang, Wenjie; Zhou, Xifa; Lu, Xujing; Zhang, Shuyu; Chen, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-binding protein of 45 kDa (Cab45), a CREC family member, is reported to be associated with Ca(2+)-dependent secretory pathways and involved in multiple diseases including cancers. Cab45-G, a Cab45 isoform protein, plays an important role in protein sorting and secretion at Golgi complex. However, its role in cancer cell migration remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Cab45-G exhibited an increased expression in cell lines with higher metastatic potential and promoted cell migration in multiple types of cancer cells. Overexpression of Cab45-G resulted in an altered expression of the molecular mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is a critical step in the tumor metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that overexpression of Cab45-G increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -7 (MMP-2 and MMP-7). Conversely, knock-down of Cab45-G reduced the expression of the above MMPs. Moreover, forced expression of Cab45-G upregulated the level of phosphorylated ERK and modulated the secretion of extracellular proteins fibronectin and fibulin. Furthermore, in human cervical and esophageal cancer tissues, the expression of Cab45-G was found to be significantly correlated with that of MMP-2, further supporting the importance of Cab45-G on regulating cancer metastasis. Taken together, these results suggest that Cab45-G could regulate cancer cell migration through various molecular mechanisms, which may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27194945

  14. The Hedgehog pathway: role in cell differentiation, polarity and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanfei; Wang, Yunshan; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-02-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is first described as a genetic mutation that has "spiked" phenotype in the cuticles of Drosophila in later 1970s. Since then, Hh signaling has been implicated in regulation of differentiation, proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell population and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through discovery of genetic mutations of Hh receptor gene PTCH1 being responsible for Gorlin syndrome in 1996. It was later shown that Hh signaling is associated with many types of cancer, including skin, leukemia, lung, brain and gastrointestinal cancers. Another important milestone for the Hh research field is the FDA approval for the clinical use of Hh inhibitor Erivedge/Vismodegib for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinomas. However, recent clinical trials of Hh signaling inhibitors in pancreatic, colon and ovarian cancer all failed, indicating a real need for further understanding of Hh signaling in cancer. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in the Hh signaling mechanism and its role in human cancer. PMID:25559776

  15. Roles for Inflammation and Regulatory T Cells in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Risk for developing cancer rises substantially as a result of poorly regulated inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacterial infections. Anti-inflammatory CD4+ regulatory cells (TREG) function to restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. It seems logical that TREG cells would function to reduce risk of inflammation-associated cancer in the bowel by down-regulating inflammation. It is widely believed, however, that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer inflammatory responses. Thus roles for inflammation, TREG cells, and gut bacteria in cancer are paradoxical and are the subject of controversy. Our accumulated data build upon the “hygiene hypothesis” model in which gastrointestinal (GI) infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce inflammation-associated diseases. Ability of TREG to inhibit or suppress cancer depends upon gut bacteria and IL-10, which serve to maintain immune balance and a protective anti-inflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under poorly regulated pro-inflammatory conditions, TREG fail to inhibit and may instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process, a cancer state that is reversible by down-regulation of inflammation and interleukin (IL)-6. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10– and TREG–mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated inflammation and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data help explain the paradox of inflammation and TREG in cancer and indicate that targeted stimulation of TREG may promote health and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:20019355

  16. Role of inorganic polyphosphate in mammalian cells: from signal transduction and mitochondrial metabolism to cell death.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Baev, Artyom Y; Berezhnov, Alexey V; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a polymer compromised of linearly arranged orthophosphate units that are linked through high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds. The chain length of this polymer varies from five to several thousand orthophosphates. PolyP is distributed in the most of the living organisms and plays multiple functions in mammalian cells, it is important for blood coagulation, cancer, calcium precipitation, immune response and many others. Essential role of polyP is shown for mitochondria, from implication into energy metabolism and mitochondrial calcium handling to activation of permeability transition pore (PTP) and cell death. PolyP is a gliotransmitter which transmits the signal in astrocytes via activation of P2Y1 receptors and stimulation of phospholipase C. PolyP-induced calcium signal in astrocytes can be stimulated by different lengths of this polymer but only long chain polyP induces mitochondrial depolarization by inhibition of respiration and opening of the PTP. It leads to induction of astrocytic cell death which can be prevented by inhibition of PTP with cyclosporine A. Thus, medium- and short-length polyP plays role in signal transduction and mitochondrial metabolism of astrocytes and long chain of this polymer can be toxic for the cells. PMID:26862186

  17. An Analytic Model for the Success Rate of a Robotic Actuator System in Hitting Random Targets.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Stuart

    2015-11-20

    Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of applications such as precision agriculture, medicine, and the military. These systems have common features which often includes an action by an "actuator" interacting with a target. While simulations and measurements exist for the success rate of hitting targets by some systems, there is a dearth of analytic models which can give insight into, and guidance on optimization, of new robotic systems. The present paper develops a simple model for estimation of the success rate for hitting random targets from a moving platform. The model has two main dimensionless parameters: the ratio of actuator spacing to target diameter; and the ratio of platform distance moved (between actuator "firings") to the target diameter. It is found that regions of parameter space having specified high success are described by simple equations, providing guidance on design. The role of a "cost function" is introduced which, when minimized, provides optimization of design, operating, and risk mitigation costs.

  18. An Analytic Model for the Success Rate of a Robotic Actuator System in Hitting Random Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of applications such as precision agriculture, medicine, and the military. These systems have common features which often includes an action by an “actuator” interacting with a target. While simulations and measurements exist for the success rate of hitting targets by some systems, there is a dearth of analytic models which can give insight into, and guidance on optimization, of new robotic systems. The present paper develops a simple model for estimation of the success rate for hitting random targets from a moving platform. The model has two main dimensionless parameters: the ratio of actuator spacing to target diameter; and the ratio of platform distance moved (between actuator “firings”) to the target diameter. It is found that regions of parameter space having specified high success are described by simple equations, providing guidance on design. The role of a “cost function” is introduced which, when minimized, provides optimization of design, operating, and risk mitigation costs. PMID:26610500

  19. The Head Tracks and Gaze Predicts: How the World’s Best Batters Hit a Ball

    PubMed Central

    Mann, David L.; Spratford, Wayne; Abernethy, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Hitters in fast ball-sports do not align their gaze with the ball throughout ball-flight; rather, they use predictive eye movement strategies that contribute towards their level of interceptive skill. Existing studies claim that (i) baseball and cricket batters cannot track the ball because it moves too quickly to be tracked by the eyes, and that consequently (ii) batters do not – and possibly cannot – watch the ball at the moment they hit it. However, to date no studies have examined the gaze of truly elite batters. We examined the eye and head movements of two of the world’s best cricket batters and found both claims do not apply to these batters. Remarkably, the batters coupled the rotation of their head to the movement of the ball, ensuring the ball remained in a consistent direction relative to their head. To this end, the ball could be followed if the batters simply moved their head and kept their eyes still. Instead of doing so, we show the elite batters used distinctive eye movement strategies, usually relying on two predictive saccades to anticipate (i) the location of ball-bounce, and (ii) the location of bat-ball contact, ensuring they could direct their gaze towards the ball as they hit it. These specific head and eye movement strategies play important functional roles in contributing towards interceptive expertise. PMID:23516460

  20. The head tracks and gaze predicts: how the world's best batters hit a ball.

    PubMed

    Mann, David L; Spratford, Wayne; Abernethy, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Hitters in fast ball-sports do not align their gaze with the ball throughout ball-flight; rather, they use predictive eye movement strategies that contribute towards their level of interceptive skill. Existing studies claim that (i) baseball and cricket batters cannot track the ball because it moves too quickly to be tracked by the eyes, and that consequently (ii) batters do not - and possibly cannot - watch the ball at the moment they hit it. However, to date no studies have examined the gaze of truly elite batters. We examined the eye and head movements of two of the world's best cricket batters and found both claims do not apply to these batters. Remarkably, the batters coupled the rotation of their head to the movement of the ball, ensuring the ball remained in a consistent direction relative to their head. To this end, the ball could be followed if the batters simply moved their head and kept their eyes still. Instead of doing so, we show the elite batters used distinctive eye movement strategies, usually relying on two predictive saccades to anticipate (i) the location of ball-bounce, and (ii) the location of bat-ball contact, ensuring they could direct their gaze towards the ball as they hit it. These specific head and eye movement strategies play important functional roles in contributing towards interceptive expertise.

  1. Cell biology of diabetic nephropathy: Roles of endothelial cells, tubulointerstitial cells and podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Yoshiro; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal failure throughout the world in both developed and developing countries. Diabetes affects all cell types of the kidney, including endothelial cells, tubulointerstitial cells, podocytes and mesangial cells. During the past decade, the importance of podocyte injury in the formation and progression of diabetic nephropathy has been established and emphasized. However, recent findings provide additional perspectives on pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular endothelial damage is already present in the normoalbuminuric stage of the disease when podocyte injury starts. Genetic targeting of mice that cause endothelial injury leads to accelerated diabetic nephropathy. Tubulointerstitial damage, previously considered to be a secondary effect of glomerular protein leakage, was shown to have a primary significance in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Emerging evidence suggests that the glomerular filtration barrier and tubulointerstitial compartment is a composite, dynamic entity where any injury of one cell type spreads to other cell types, and leads to the dysfunction of the whole apparatus. Accumulation of novel knowledge would provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, and might lead to a development of a new therapeutic strategy for the disease. PMID:25621126

  2. The Role of B Cells for in Vivo T Cell Responses to a Friend Virus-Induced Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Kirk R.; Klarnet, Jay P.; Gieni, Randall S.; Hayglass, Kent T.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1990-08-01

    B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells and accessory cells for T cell responses. This study evaluated the role of B cells in the induction of protective T cell immunity to a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced leukemia (FBL). B cell-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor-specific CD4^+ helper and CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell responses after priming with FBL or a recombinant vaccinia virus containing F-MuLV antigens. Moreover, these mice had diminished T cell responses to the vaccinia viral antigens. Tumor-primed T cells transferred into B cell-deficient mice effectively eradicated disseminated FBL. Thus, B cells appear necessary for efficient priming but not expression of tumor and viral T cell immunity.

  3. The evolving roles of memory immune cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M.; Li, Xian C.

    2015-01-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance. PMID:26102615

  4. [Double-Hit Follicular Lymphoma with BCL2 and MYC Translocations].

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Mirei; Fuseya, Hoyuri; Tsutsumi, Minako; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Hagihara, Kiyoyuki; Kanashima, Hiroshi; Nakao, Takafumi; Fukushima, Yuko; Inoue, Takeshi; Yamane, Takahisa

    2016-09-01

    Double-hit lymphomas are rare tumors that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint, mainly a t(14; 18)(q32;q21)involving BCL2. We report a case of a 38-yearold woman with a 2-month history of abdominaldistention. 18F-FDG PET showed multiple positive systemic lymph nodes, positive peritoneum, and multiple positive intra-abdominal masses. Histopathology results of the cervical lymph node were compatible with double-hit follicular lymphoma(Grade 3A)because fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH)demonstrated both MYC rearrangement and BCL2 gene fusion. She was initially started on R-CHOP(rituximab and doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone), but after one course the regimen was changed to dose-adjusted EPOCH-R(rituximab and doxorubicin, etoposide, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone). However, she showed no response to this chemotherapy regimen or haploidentical stem cell transplantation. The treatment strategy included salvage chemothera- py. An autologous and/or allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation is important for non-responders to DA-EPOCH-R. PMID:27628560

  5. The unconventional expression of IL-15 and its role in NK cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Nicholas D

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the founding members of the innate lymphoid cell family and contribute to the rapid production of inflammatory mediators upon pathogen detection. The evolution of receptors for self major histocompatibility complex-I and stress-induced ligands also bestows upon NK cells an important effector role in the clearance of virus-infected and transformed cells. NK cells are dependent on the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 for their development, differentiation and optimal function. Here I review the regulation of IL-15 in vivo, its role in driving NK cell differentiation and discuss the function of NK cell diversification with regard to innate immunity.

  6. Test-retest reliability for hitting accuracy tennis test.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Estevam; Foster, Ernest B; Pascoe, David D

    2011-12-01

    Strecker, E, Foster, EB, and Pascoe, DD. Test-retest reliability for hitting accuracy tennis test. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3501-3505, 2011-The purpose of this investigation was to assess a test-retest reliability of the hitting accuracy tennis test (HATT). Twelve National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) division I tennis players (4 men and 8 women) volunteered to participate in this investigation. Skill tests consisted of 15 consecutive ground strokes in all 4 directions (forehand [FH] and backhand [BH]; crosscourt and up the line) with not >1 minute between directions. The court was divided into 12 areas, and each area was assigned a value according to a grid system based on offensive, defensive, and neutral shots ranging from 1 point to 6 points. Total score, unforced errors, and shot index (total number of shots that landed on optimal performance areas 5 and 6 minus total number of unforced errors) were used for statistical analysis. The order of shot direction was randomized between participants and trials. The analysis of variance with repeated measures (p value ≤ 0.05) of this investigation showed no statistical difference between trials on any of the measurements. The results also suggest that division I level tennis players have the ability to hit accurately specific targets on a tennis court using either FH or BH with minimal daily variation. Therefore, we conclude that the HATT for trained tennis athletes is a simple, reliable, and accurate assessment tool to measure tennis skill performance based on accuracy. The HATT is also an easy, inexpensive training device that coaches can use to monitor players development.

  7. The role of hematopoietic cell transplantation as therapy for myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2011-12-01

    A recent American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) position paper concluded that allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is recommended for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-2 at diagnosis who have a suitable donor and meet the transplant center's eligibility criteria and for selected patients at low risk at diagnosis who have poor prognostic features not included in the IPSS. While the ASBMT position is generally reasonable, given available data, physicians caring for MDS patients should be aware of the limitations of these conclusions. The position of the ASBMT is largely based on studies relying on the IPSS, which is imprecise, only applies to patients at diagnosis, ignores the impact of recent therapeutic advances, excludes patients with treatment-related MDS and certain subtypes of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and does not consider the influence of age and comorbidities on the decision-making process. The development of a revised IPSS for MDS provides us with an opportunity to reconsider the role of HCT in the treatment of MDS.

  8. The double-edge role of B cells in mediating antitumor T-cell immunity: Pharmacological strategies for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence reveals the controversial role of B cells in antitumor immunity, but the underlying mechanisms have to be explored. Three latest articles published in the issue 521 of Nature in 2015 reconfirmed the puzzling topic and put forward some explanations of how B cells regulate antitumor T-cell responses both positively and negatively. This paper attempts to demonstrate that different B-cell subpopulations have distinct immunological properties and that they are involved in either antitumor responses or immunosuppression. Recent studies supporting the positive and negative roles of B cells in tumor development were summarized comprehensively. Several specific B-cell subpopulations, such as IgG(+), IgA(+), IL-10(+), and regulatory B cells, were described in detail. The mechanisms underlying the controversial B-cell effects were mainly attributed to different B-cell subpopulations, different B-cell-derived cytokines, direct B cell-T cell interaction, different cancer categories, and different malignant stages, and the immunological interaction between B cells and T cells is mediated by dendritic cells. Promising B-cell-based antitumor strategies were proposed and novel B-cell regulators were summarized to present interesting therapeutic targets. Future investigations are needed to make sure that B-cell-based pharmacological strategies benefit cancer immunotherapy substantially.

  9. Dynamic stereoacuity: a test for hitting a baseball?

    PubMed

    Solomon, H; Zinn, W J; Vacroux, A

    1988-07-01

    Vision is a critical ingredient in professional sports such as baseball. It would, therefore, be logical to assume that vision testing should be able to discriminate between good and bad performance. Past attempts to establish this vision/performance relationship have not been successful. We believe the fault is anchored in the fact that all routine vision testing is static and unable to measure motion parameters. Using an instrument of our design to test dynamic stereoacuity, we have been able to detect subtle differences among individuals. The data show a segregation between major league hitters and pitchers. Such information could be used as one clue to predict hitting performance. PMID:3403900

  10. The groin hit: complications of intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Roszler, M H; McCarroll, K A; Donovan, K R; Rashid, T; Kling, G A

    1989-05-01

    We are seeing an increased number of complications in intravenous drug abusers who resort to injecting the groin for vascular access (the "groin hit"). Vascular complications include venous thrombosis, arteriovenous fistula, mycotic aneurysm, ruptured pseudoaneurysm, and dissecting hematoma. Soft tissue complications include cellulitis and abscess. The latter may dissect into the extraperitoneal space. Skeletal complications include osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. This paper illustrates the radiographic spectrum of these complications. An algorithm will illustrate the radiographic evaluation of a groin mass in a drug addict. PMID:2727357

  11. Hit efficiency study of CMS prototype forward pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the measurement of the hit efficiency of a prototype pixel device for the CMS forward pixel detector. These pixel detectors were FM type sensors with PSI46V1 chip readout. The data were taken with the 120 GeV proton beam at Fermilab during the period of December 2004 to February 2005. The detectors proved to be highly efficient (99.27 {+-} 0.02%). The inefficiency was primarily located near the corners of the individual pixels.

  12. Dynamic stereoacuity: a test for hitting a baseball?

    PubMed

    Solomon, H; Zinn, W J; Vacroux, A

    1988-07-01

    Vision is a critical ingredient in professional sports such as baseball. It would, therefore, be logical to assume that vision testing should be able to discriminate between good and bad performance. Past attempts to establish this vision/performance relationship have not been successful. We believe the fault is anchored in the fact that all routine vision testing is static and unable to measure motion parameters. Using an instrument of our design to test dynamic stereoacuity, we have been able to detect subtle differences among individuals. The data show a segregation between major league hitters and pitchers. Such information could be used as one clue to predict hitting performance.

  13. On the role of PDZ domain-encoding genes in Drosophila border cell migration.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Kudlaty, Elizabeth; Longworth, Michelle S; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2012-11-01

    Cells often move as collective groups during normal embryonic development and wound healing, although the mechanisms governing this type of migration are poorly understood. The Drosophila melanogaster border cells migrate as a cluster during late oogenesis and serve as a powerful in vivo genetic model for collective cell migration. To discover new genes that participate in border cell migration, 64 out of 66 genes that encode PDZ domain-containing proteins were systematically targeted by in vivo RNAi knockdown. The PDZ domain is one of the largest families of protein-protein interaction domains found in eukaryotes. Proteins that contain PDZ domains participate in a variety of biological processes, including signal transduction and establishment of epithelial apical-basal polarity. Targeting PDZ proteins effectively assesses a larger number of genes via the protein complexes and pathways through which these proteins function. par-6, a known regulator of border cell migration, was a positive hit and thus validated the approach. Knockdown of 14 PDZ domain genes disrupted migration with multiple RNAi lines. The candidate genes have diverse predicted cellular functions and are anticipated to provide new insights into the mechanisms that control border cell movement. As a test of this concept, two genes that disrupted migration were characterized in more detail: big bang and the Dlg5 homolog CG6509. We present evidence that Big bang regulates JAK/STAT signaling, whereas Dlg5/CG6509 maintains cluster cohesion. Moreover, these results demonstrate that targeting a selected class of genes by RNAi can uncover novel regulators of collective cell migration. PMID:23173089

  14. Drug screening strategy for human membrane proteins: from NMR protein backbone structure to in silica- and NMR-screened hits

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Steffen; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Chiu, Ellis; Pierce, Levi C; McCammon, J. Andrew; Choe, Senyon

    2015-01-01

    About 8,000 genes encode membrane proteins in the human genome. The information about their druggability will be very useful to facilitate drug discovery and development. The main problem, however, consists of limited structural and functional information about these proteins because they are difficult to produce biochemically and to study. In this paper we describe the strategy that combines Cell-free protein expression, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular DYnamics simulation (CNDY) techniques. Results of a pilot CNDY experiment provide us with a guiding light towards expedited identification of the hit compounds against a new uncharacterized membrane protein as a potentially druggable target. These hits can then be further characterized and optimized to develop the initial lead compound quicker. We illustrate such “omics” approach for drug discovery with the CNDY strategy applied to two example proteins: hypoxia-induced genes HIGD1A and HIGD1B. PMID:24525125

  15. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang Yeob; Hien, Tran Thi; Lim, Sung Chul; Kang, Keon Wook

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. {yields} UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. {yields} UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation ({lambda} = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  16. In vivo identity of tendon stem cells and the roles of stem cells in tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qi; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution of stem cells in tendons and the roles of stem cells in early tendon repair. The relationship between tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) isolated in vitro and tendon stem cells in vivo was also explored. Iododeoxyuridine (IdU) label-retaining method was used for labeling stem cells in rat patellar tendons with and without injury. Co-localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs) with different markers was done by immunofluorescent staining. TDSCs were isolated from patellar tendon mid-substance after IdU pulsing, and the expression of different markers in fresh and expanded cells was done by immunofluorescent staining. More LRCs were found at the peritenon and tendon-bone junction compared with the mid-substance. Some LRCs at the peritenon were located at the perivascular niche. The LRC number and the expression of proliferative, tendon-related, pluripotency, and pericyte-related markers in LRCs in the window wound increased. Most of the freshly isolated TDSCs expressed IdU, and some TDSCs expressed pericyte-related markers, which were lost during expansion. Both freshly isolated and subcultured TDSCs expressed pluripotency markers, which were absent in LRCs in intact tendons. In conclusion, we identified LRCs at the peritenon, mid-substance, and tendon-bone junction. There were both vascular and non-vascular sources of LRCs at the peritenon, while the source of LRCs at the mid-substance was non-vascular. LRCs participated in tendon repair via migration, proliferation, activation for tenogenesis, and increased pluripotency. Some LRCs in the window wound were pericyte like. Most of the mid-substance TDSCs were LRCs. The pluripotency markers and pericyte-related marker in LRCs might be important for function after injury.

  17. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents – real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate µM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H2O2 generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H2O2-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H2O2 in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H2O2 as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds which can generate intracellular H2O2 by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; critical resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs. PMID:21075044

  18. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents--real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate μM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H(2)O(2) generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine, or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H(2)O(2)-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H(2)O(2) in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H(2)O(2) as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds that can generate intracellular H(2)O(2) by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; crucial resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs.

  19. Biological Role of Dystroglycan in Schwann Cell Function and Its Implications in Peripheral Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Toshihiro; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Dystroglycan is a central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) that links extracellular matrix with cytoskeleton, expressed in a variety of fetal and adult tissues. Dystroglycan plays diverse roles in development and homeostasis including basement membrane formation, epithelial morphogenesis, membrane stability, cell polarization, and cell migration. In this paper, we will focus on biological role of dystroglycan in Schwann cell function, especially myelination. First, we review the molecular architecture of DGC in Schwann cell abaxonal membrane. Then, we will review the loss-of-function studies using targeted mutagenesis, which have revealed biological functions of each component of DGC in Schwann cells. Based on these findings, roles of dystroglycan in Schwann cell function, in myelination in particular, and its implications in diseases will be discussed in detail. Finally, in view of the fact that understanding the role of dystroglycan in Schwann cells is just beginning, future perspectives will be discussed. PMID:20625412

  20. Oral multispecies biofilm development and the key role of cell-cell distance.

    PubMed

    Kolenbrander, Paul E; Palmer, Robert J; Periasamy, Saravanan; Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2010-07-01

    Growth of oral bacteria in situ requires adhesion to a surface because the constant flow of host secretions thwarts the ability of planktonic cells to grow before they are swallowed. Therefore, oral bacteria evolved to form biofilms on hard tooth surfaces and on soft epithelial tissues, which often contain multiple bacterial species. Because these biofilms are easy to study, they have become the paradigm of multispecies biofilms. In this Review we describe the factors involved in the formation of these biofilms, including the initial adherence to the oral tissues and teeth, cooperation between bacterial species in the biofilm, signalling between the bacteria and its role in pathogenesis, and the transfer of DNA between bacteria. In all these aspects distance between cells of different species is integral for oral biofilm growth.

  1. Role of Calcium in Phosphatidylserine Externalisation in Red Blood Cells from Sickle Cell Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Erwin; Rees, David Charles; Gibson, John Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure occurs in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients and is increased by deoxygenation. The mechanisms responsible remain unclear. RBCs from SCD patients also have elevated cation permeability, and, in particular, a deoxygenation-induced cation conductance which mediates Ca2+ entry, providing an obvious link with phosphatidylserine exposure. The role of Ca2+ was investigated using FITC-labelled annexin. Results confirmed high phosphatidylserine exposure in RBCs from SCD patients increasing upon deoxygenation. When deoxygenated, phosphatidylserine exposure was further elevated as extracellular [Ca2+] was increased. This effect was inhibited by dipyridamole, intracellular Ca2+ chelation, and Gardos channel inhibition. Phosphatidylserine exposure was reduced in high K+ saline. Ca2+ levels required to elicit phosphatidylserine exposure were in the low micromolar range. Findings are consistent with Ca2+ entry through the deoxygenation-induced pathway (Psickle), activating the Gardos channel. [Ca2+] required for phosphatidylserine scrambling are in the range achievable in vivo. PMID:21490763

  2. A Hit or Miss History of Statistics at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, Kathleen V.

    1999-08-04

    The Statistics and Human Factors Department at SNL has evolved as the Labs' mission has evolved from engineering designs for the non-nuclear parts of nuclear weapons, including the safety and security components, to a multi-program lab focusing on national security. Twenty years ago their client base was the engineers, scientists, and managers of the nuclear weapon stockpile program, at Sandia and other facilities within the DOE complex. Client relationships developed over years of association. Components and systems were assigned to statisticians so that they could develop a knowledge base in that area. Because of the many different component types and system designs in the stockpile, they typically juggled five or six statistical projects at a time. project participation other than statistical consulting was limited. They rarely had the time to lead project teams, and any skills or inclinations in that direction were often undeveloped. This paper describes a (hit-or-miss) selection of some early and recent efforts. This paper also presents their self-assessment metrics and their external assessment metrics. These metrics were selected to track the business aspects of the department; they are systematic (not hit-or-miss). These two types of histories should allow them to judge whether we're doing the right things, and also doing things right.

  3. Adiabatic condition and the quantum hitting time of Markov chains

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jeremie

    2010-08-15

    We present an adiabatic quantum algorithm for the abstract problem of searching marked vertices in a graph, or spatial search. Given a random walk (or Markov chain) P on a graph with a set of unknown marked vertices, one can define a related absorbing walk P{sup '} where outgoing transitions from marked vertices are replaced by self-loops. We build a Hamiltonian H(s) from the interpolated Markov chain P(s)=(1-s)P+sP{sup '} and use it in an adiabatic quantum algorithm to drive an initial superposition over all vertices to a superposition over marked vertices. The adiabatic condition implies that, for any reversible Markov chain and any set of marked vertices, the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is given by the square root of the classical hitting time. This algorithm therefore demonstrates a novel connection between the adiabatic condition and the classical notion of hitting time of a random walk. It also significantly extends the scope of previous quantum algorithms for this problem, which could only obtain a full quadratic speedup for state-transitive reversible Markov chains with a unique marked vertex.

  4. Promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles (PrATs): a frequent hitting scaffold.

    PubMed

    Devine, Shane M; Mulcair, Mark D; Debono, Cael O; Leung, Eleanor W W; Nissink, J Willem M; Lim, San Sui; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Vazirani, Mansha; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Simpson, Jamie S; Baell, Jonathan B; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S; Scanlon, Martin J

    2015-02-12

    We have identified a class of molecules, known as 2-aminothiazoles (2-ATs), as frequent-hitting fragments in biophysical binding assays. This was exemplified by 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine being identified as a hit in 14/14 screens against a diverse range of protein targets, suggesting that this scaffold is a poor starting point for fragment-based drug discovery. This prompted us to analyze this scaffold in the context of an academic fragment library used for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) and two larger compound libraries used for high-throughput screening (HTS). This analysis revealed that such "promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles" (PrATs) behaved as frequent hitters under both FBDD and HTS settings, although the problem was more pronounced in the fragment-based studies. As 2-ATs are present in known drugs, they cannot necessarily be deemed undesirable, but the combination of their promiscuity and difficulties associated with optimizing them into a lead compound makes them, in our opinion, poor scaffolds for fragment libraries. PMID:25559643

  5. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  6. Essential role for autophagy during invariant NKT cell development

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Puleston, Daniel J.; Mathan, Till S. M.; Shepherd, Dawn; Stranks, Amanda J.; Adamopoulou, Eleni; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hollander, Georg A.; Simon, Anna Katharina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular homeostatic pathway essential for development, immunity, and cell death. Although autophagy modulates MHC antigen presentation, it remains unclear whether autophagy defects impact on CD1d lipid loading and presentation to invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and on iNKT cell differentiation in the thymus. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether iNKT and conventional T cells have similar autophagy requirements for differentiation, survival, and/or activation. We report that, in mice with a conditional deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the T-cell compartment (CD4 Cre-Atg7−/−), thymic iNKT cell development—unlike conventional T-cell development—is blocked at an early stage and mature iNKT cells are absent in peripheral lymphoid organs. The defect is not due to altered loading of intracellular iNKT cell agonists; rather, it is T-cell–intrinsic, resulting in enhanced susceptibility of iNKT cells to apoptosis. We show that autophagy increases during iNKT cell thymic differentiation and that it developmentally regulates mitochondrial content through mitophagy in the thymus of mice and humans. Autophagy defects result in the intracellular accumulation of mitochondrial superoxide species and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Although autophagy-deficient conventional T cells develop normally, they show impaired peripheral survival, particularly memory CD8+ T cells. Because iNKT cells, unlike conventional T cells, differentiate into memory cells while in the thymus, our results highlight a unique autophagy-dependent metabolic regulation of adaptive and innate T cells, which is required for transition to a quiescent state after population expansion. PMID:25512546

  7. Role of Cell Block in Guided FNAC of Abdominal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Nandini; Shivajirao, Prathima; Manjunath; Jothady, Sunila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) of space occupying lesions in superficial or deep anatomic sites is an increasingly common procedure, providing rapid and safe diagnosis. However, sometimes FNA does not yield sufficient information for a precise diagnosis and the risk of false negatives and indeterminate diagnosis is always present. Therefore, we attempted to obtain additional information via the preparation of Cell Block (CB) from the residual material of aspirates and thus enhance the diagnostic accuracy. Aim This study was carried out to evaluate the role of CB as a useful adjunct to smears for establishing a more definitive cytopathologic diagnosis and for its utility in special staining and Immuno-histochemistry (IHC). Materials and Methods A total of 66 cases of image-guided FNA of abdominal masses were studied. In addition to the routine smears, CBs were prepared from the residual tissues for all possible cases and its diagnostic efficacy was analysed. Further, the use of CBs for special staining and IHC was also established. Results This study included a total of 66 patients with abdominal masses who were referred for guided FNA cytology. Out of these cases, adequate material was obtained on FNAC in 64 cases (96.96%) and on CB in 45 cases (68.18%) and the diagnosis was provided. There was a good agreement between the FNA smear diagnosis and CB diagnosis. The histopathology of CB sections further helped in precise final cytopathological diagnosis. Two FNA smears were unsatisfactory for evaluation and hence the diagnosis was done on CB sections alone. With FNA cytology and CB in combination, a cytopathological diagnosis was given for all the 66 cases. The sensitivity of FNA in comparison to the histopathology of CB was 91.6% and specificity was 88.8%. The diagnostic accuracy was 62% and the discordance was 6%. Conclusions CB in addition to the routine FNA is a simple, reliable and cost-effective technique that further contributes to the final

  8. Stratification of yeast cells during chronological aging by size points to the role of trehalose in cell vitality.

    PubMed

    Svenkrtova, Andrea; Belicova, Lenka; Volejnikova, Andrea; Sigler, Karel; Jazwinski, S Michal; Pichova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a process akin to differentiation during prolonged culture without medium replenishment. Various methods have been used to separate and determine the potential role and fate of the different cell species. We have stratified chronologically-aged yeast cultures into cells of different sizes, using centrifugal elutriation, and characterized these subpopulations physiologically. We distinguish two extreme cell types, very small (XS) and very large (L) cells. L cells display higher viability based on two separate criteria. They respire much more actively, but produce lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). L cells are capable of dividing, albeit slowly, giving rise to XS cells which do not divide. L cells are more resistant to osmotic stress and they have higher trehalose content, a storage carbohydrate often connected to stress resistance. Depletion of trehalose by deletion of TPS2 does not affect the vital characteristics of L cells, but it improves some of these characteristics in XS cells. Therefore, we propose that the response of L and XS cells to the trehalose produced in the former differs in a way that lowers the vitality of the latter. We compare our XS- and L-fraction cell characteristics with those of cells isolated from stationary cultures by others based on density. This comparison suggests that the cells have some similarities but also differences that may prove useful in addressing whether it is the segregation or the response to trehalose that may play the predominant role in cell division from stationary culture.

  9. The immunoregulatory role of type I and type II NKT cells in cancer and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2014-01-01

    NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that recognize lipid antigens. They also have been shown to play critical roles in the regulation of immune responses. In the immune responses against tumors, two subsets of NKT cells, type I and type II, play opposing roles and cross-regulate each other. As members of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, which form a network of multiple components, they also interact with other immune components. Here we discuss the function of NKT cells in tumor immunity and their interaction with other regulatory cells, especially CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. PMID:24384834

  10. Understanding the Regulatory Roles of Natural Killer T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis: T Helper Cell Differentiation Dependent or Independent?

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yang, J; Qiao, Y; Li, X

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic systemic autoimmune disease. This disease is thought to be caused by pathogenic T cells. Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RA. These Th cells differentiate from CD4+ T cells primarily due to the effects of cytokines. Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a distinct subset of lymphocytes that can rapidly secrete massive amount of cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-12 and IFN-γ. Numerous studies showed that NKT cells can influence the differentiation of CD4+ T cells via cytokines in vitro. These findings suggest that NKT cells play an important role in RA by polarizing Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells. In view of the complexity of RA, we discussed whether NKT cells really influence the development of RA through regulating the differentiation of Th cells. PMID:27384545

  11. [The roles of microtubule in internodal cell elongation (Nitellopsis obtusa)].

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Yuan, Ming; Zhu, Guo Li; Wang, Xue Chen

    2004-04-01

    The relationship between cell elongation and microtubules (MTs) was investigated in characean internodal cells (Nitellops obtusa). First, we examined the immunofluorescent localization of MTs in different living stages under confocal laser scanning microscope. In young, rapidly elongating cells, MTs were predominantly transverse to the long axis of the cell. As the relative growth rate fell, transverse MTs gradually decreased, and in non-growing cells, longitudinally oriented cortical MTs became most pronounced. Moreover, cells in different living stages responded to the treatment of oryzalin (microtubule-disrupting agent) differently, young active internodal cells seemed to be more sensitive. After 40 min incubation of 10 micromol/L oryzalin, nearly all cortical MTs in the elongating cells depolymerized. However, in the old, non-growing cells, some MT fragments still remained after 3 h treatment of oryzalin. Second, we measured the cell growth rates with and without the treatment of oryzalin. In young growing cells treated with 10 micromol/L oryzalin, the elongation rates were inhibited obviously. When the oryzalin was removed, the elongation rates could be recovered to some extent. Interestingly, a time-gap existed between microtubule disassembly (40 min) and cessation of cell elongation (100 min). Our data confirmed the evidence that MTs are involved in cell elongation.

  12. Roles and regulation of plant cell walls surrounding plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin

    2014-12-01

    In plants, the intercellular transport of simple and complex molecules can occur symplastically through plasmodesmata. These are membranous channels embedded in cell walls that connect neighbouring cells. The properties of the cell walls surrounding plasmodesmata determine their transport capacity and permeability. These cell wall micro-domains are enriched in callose and have a characteristic pectin distribution. Cell wall modifications, leading to changes in plasmodesmata structure, have been reported to occur during development and in response to environmental signals. Cell wall remodelling enzymes target plasmodesmata to rapidly control intercellular communication in situ. Here we describe current knowledge on the composition of cell walls at plasmodesmata sites and on the proteins and signals that modify cell walls to regulate plasmodesmata aperture.

  13. Reconciling the IPC and Two-Hit Models: Dissecting the Underlying Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Two Seemingly Opposing Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Carlos F. M.; Tahir, Muhammad; Arshid, Samina; Castro, Mariana S.; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cascades and mechanisms are ubiquitous during host responses to various types of insult. Biological models and interventional strategies have been devised as an effort to better understand and modulate inflammation-driven injuries. Amongst those the two-hit model stands as a plausible and intuitive framework that explains some of the most frequent clinical outcomes seen in injuries like trauma and sepsis. This model states that a first hit serves as a priming event upon which sequential insults can build on, culminating on maladaptive inflammatory responses. On a different front, ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has risen to light as a readily applicable tool for modulating the inflammatory response to ischemia and reperfusion. The idea is that mild ischemic insults, either remote or local, can cause organs and tissues to be more resilient to further ischemic insults. This seemingly contradictory role that the two models attribute to a first inflammatory hit, as priming in the former and protective in the latter, has set these two theories on opposing corners of the literature. The present review tries to reconcile both models by showing that, rather than debunking each other, each framework offers unique insights in understanding and modulating inflammation-related injuries. PMID:26770993

  14. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  15. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  16. The role of Tec family kinases in the regulation of T-helper-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Boucheron, Nicole; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the Tec kinase family (Tec, Btk, Itk, Rlk, and Bmx) play an important role during innate and adaptive immune responses, and mutations in Tec family kinases are linked with immunodeficiencies in humans and mice. Three members of the Tec kinase family are expressed in T cells (Tec, Itk, and Rlk), and biochemical and genetic studies have revealed important roles for Tec family kinases during T-cell development and in the control of T-cell function. Here the authors review the role of Tec family kinases in the regulation of T-helper-cell differentiation. PMID:22449074

  17. The Role of Lymphatic Niches in T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Tara; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Long-term immunity to many viral and bacterial pathogens requires CD8+ memory T cell development, and the induction of long-lasting CD8+ memory T cells from a naïve, undifferentiated state is a major goal of vaccine design. Formation of the memory CD8+ T cell compartment is highly dependent on the early activation cues received by naïve CD8+ T cells during primary infection. This review aims to highlight the cellularity of various niches within the lymph node and emphasize recent evidence suggesting that distinct types of T cell activation and differentiation occur within different immune contexts in lymphoid organs. PMID:27306645

  18. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  19. Revisiting hippocampal sclerosis in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy according to the "two-hit" hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, S; Depaulis, A

    2015-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common neuropathological pattern observed in pharmacoresistant epilepsy and represents a critical feature in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy syndrome. However, its pathophysiological mechanisms and neuropathological consequences on seizures remain mostly unresolved. The new international classification of hippocampal sclerosis aims at standardizing its description to allow comparisons between different clinical studies. However, several aspects are not considered in this classification (granule cell dispersion, sprouting, glial modifications…). In this chapter, we discuss these different features associated with hippocampal sclerosis in perspective with the "two-hit" hypothesis and propose mechanisms that could be involved in the modulation of some specific neuropathological aspects like early life stress, hyperthermic seizures, brain lesions or hormonal modifications.

  20. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  1. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  2. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  3. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  4. Effects of epidermal Langerhans cell's conditioned medium on keratinocytes: a role of Langerhans cells in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Y; Sasaki, H; Abramson, M; Huang, C C

    1991-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known to play an important role in the immunosurveillance system. In this study, as in others, numerous LCs were detected in the epithelial layer of acquired cholesteatoma by immunohistochemical staining. This finding suggests that cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by LCs in cholesteatoma; however, documentation concerning the microenvironment of LCs-keratinocytes in cholesteatoma is limited. Therefore, we investigated the effects of LCs on keratinocytes in vitro. To study these effects it was necessary to isolate and purify LCs. Our present study revealed that good enrichment and a high degree of purity (95%) of LCs could be obtained from neonatal rat skin using the immunomagnetic beads (Dynabeads M-450) sorting technique. These isolated LCs have the biologic activity of LCs, and Langerhans cells' conditioned medium (LCCM) stimulates DNA synthesis in thymocytes. The effect of LCCM on keratinocytes was then studied. We found that (1) LCCM stimulated DNA synthesis in keratinocytes was then studied. We found that (1) LCCM stimulated DNA synthesis in keratinocytes, but not protein synthesis, and (2) LCCM stimulated the incorporation of 3H-putrescine into keratinocytes by the activation of transglutaminase. Transglutaminase is a known marker of terminal differentiation in keratinocytes. By Western blot analysis, we identified a 17-kd immunoreactive mouse interleukin-1 alpha in LCCM. Our results imply that LCs found in cholesteatoma tissue may play an important role in stimulating both hyper-proliferation and cornification of keratinocytes; two characteristic features of cholesteatoma formation. These stimulatory effects may be due to the release of interleukin-1 or other factors by LCs.

  5. The role of constitutive and inducible processes in the response of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    The inherent radiation sensitivity of the cells within a tumor is thought to contribute to the success or failure of radiation therapy. In vitro studies have shown that radiation sensitivity differences in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines reflect alterations in DNA repair. These alterations result from constitutive changes in chromosome organization, not radiation-inducible processes. While inducible responses may play some role in the radiation response of tumor cells, there is no evidence for their involvement in inherent tumor cell radiosensitivity differences or in the success or failure of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas.

  6. The role of constitutive and inducible processes in the response of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The inherent radiation sensitivity of the cells within a tumor is thought to contribute to the success or failure of radiation therapy. In vitro studies have shown that radiation sensitivity differences in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines reflect alterations in DNA repair. These alterations result from constitutive changes in chromosome organization, not radiation-inducible processes. While inducible responses may play some role in the radiation response of tumor cells, there is no evidence for their involvement in inherent tumor cell radiosensitivity differences or in the success or failure of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas.

  7. A role for adherons in neural retina cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Embryonic chick neural retina cells release glycoprotein complexes, termed adherons, into their culture medium. When absorbed onto the surface of petri dishes, neural retina adherons increase the initial rate of neural retina cell adhesion; they also stimulate the rate of cell-cell aggregation. Adheron-stimulated adhesion is tissue specific, and the spontaneous aggregation of neural retina cells is inhibited by monovalent Fab' fragments prepared from an antiserum against neural retina adherons. Therefore cell surface antigenic determinants shared with adherons are involved in normal cell-cell adhesions. The particles from the heterogeneous neural retina population contain many proteins and several glycosaminoglycans. The adherons migrate as a symmetrical 12S peak on sucrose gradients and are predominantly 15-nm spheres when examined by electron microscopy. Finally, the specific activity of neural retina adherons increases from embryonic days 7 through 12 and then declines. These results suggest that glycoprotein particles may be involved in some of the adhesive interactions between neural retina cells and between the cells and their environment. PMID:6187755

  8. 76 FR 46297 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... access only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's Workgroups: Clinical Operations, Vocabulary... issues related to their specific subject matter, e.g., clinical operations vocabulary standards,...

  9. 76 FR 14975 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... access only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's Workgroups: Clinical Operations, Vocabulary... specific subject matter, e.g., clinical operations vocabulary standards, clinical quality,...

  10. 42 CFR 495.338 - Health information technology implementation advance planning document requirements (HIT IAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... statement setting forth the security and interface requirements to be employed for all State HIT systems, and related systems, and the system failure and disaster recovery procedures available....

  11. Lack of appreciation of the role of osmotically unresponsive water in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ivan L; Fullerton, Gary D

    2014-05-01

    The osmotic responsiveness of cell water has been re-evaluated of reports on the osmotic behaviour of cells. In seven animal cell types, the osmotically unresponsive water (OUR) fraction values ranged from 0.75 to 2.41 g water/g dry mass (g/g), and from 25 to 92% of the total cell water. Protein confirmation, aggregation and crowding play a major, but under-recognised, role in determining the extent of OUR and the regulation of cell volume. Volume regulation studies that do not take into account the role of OUR must be judged incomplete. PMID:24375657

  12. Lack of appreciation of the role of osmotically unresponsive water in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ivan L; Fullerton, Gary D

    2014-05-01

    The osmotic responsiveness of cell water has been re-evaluated of reports on the osmotic behaviour of cells. In seven animal cell types, the osmotically unresponsive water (OUR) fraction values ranged from 0.75 to 2.41 g water/g dry mass (g/g), and from 25 to 92% of the total cell water. Protein confirmation, aggregation and crowding play a major, but under-recognised, role in determining the extent of OUR and the regulation of cell volume. Volume regulation studies that do not take into account the role of OUR must be judged incomplete.

  13. Rational Prediction with Molecular Dynamics for Hit Identification

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara E; Swift, Robert V; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Although the motions of proteins are fundamental for their function, for pragmatic reasons, the consideration of protein elasticity has traditionally been neglected in drug discovery and design. This review details protein motion, its relevance to biomolecular interactions and how it can be sampled using molecular dynamics simulations. Within this context, two major areas of research in structure-based prediction that can benefit from considering protein flexibility, binding site detection and molecular docking, are discussed. Basic classification metrics and statistical analysis techniques, which can facilitate performance analysis, are also reviewed. With hardware and software advances, molecular dynamics in combination with traditional structure-based prediction methods can potentially reduce the time and costs involved in the hit identification pipeline. PMID:23110535

  14. Inflammation and the Two-Hit Hypothesis of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Feigenson, Keith A.; Kusnecov, Alex W.; Silverstein, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The high societal and individual cost of schizophrenia necessitates finding better, more effective treatment, diagnosis, and prevention strategies. One of the obstacles in this endeavor is the diverse set of etiologies that comprises schizophrenia. A substantial body of evidence has grown over the last few decades to suggest that schizophrenia is a heterogeneous syndrome with overlapping symptoms and etiologies. At the same time, an increasing number of clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have shown links between schizophrenia and inflammatory conditions. In this review, we analyze the literature on inflammation and schizophrenia, with a particular focus on comorbidity, biomarkers, and environmental insults. We then identify several mechanisms by which inflammation could influence the development of schizophrenia via the two-hit hypothesis. Lastly, we note the relevance of these findings to clinical applications in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:24247023

  15. Pathomechanisms Underlying X-Adrenoleukodystrophy: A Three-Hit Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Inderjit; Pujol, Aurora

    2011-01-01

    X-adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex disease where inactivation of ABCD1 gene results in clinically diverse phenotypes, the fatal disorder of cerebral ALD (cALD) or a milder disorder of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN). Loss of ABCD1 function results in defective beta oxidation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) resulting in excessive accumulation of VLCFA, the biochemical “hall mark” of X-ALD. At present, the ABCD1-mediated mechanisms that determine the different phenotype of X-ALD are not well understood. The studies reviewed here suggest for a “three-hit hypothesis” for neuropathology of cALD. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with these three phases of cALD disease should facilitate the development of effective pharmacological therapeutics for X-ALD. PMID:20626745

  16. Ozone hits low levels over Antarctica, U. S

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.

    1993-10-04

    This year's Antarctic ozone hole is as deep as any ever observed and is approaching the record geographical extent of 1992, according to preliminary satellite data. In addition, both groundbased and satellite observations indicate that ozone concentrations over the U.S. hit record lows earlier this year. For more than a decade, almost all the ozone at certain altitudes over Antarctica has been destroyed as the Sun returns to the polar region in September. This dramatic photochemical depletion, catalyzed by chlorine and bromine from man-made compounds, reaches its nadir in early October. Ozone levels return to near normal later in the season, when the circular pattern of winds that isolates air over Antarctica breaks down, and ozone-rich air pours in from the north.

  17. From eye movements to actions: how batsmen hit the ball.

    PubMed

    Land, M F; McLeod, P

    2000-12-01

    In cricket, a batsman watches a fast bowler's ball come toward him at a high and unpredictable speed, bouncing off ground of uncertain hardness. Although he views the trajectory for little more than half a second, he can accurately judge where and when the ball will reach him. Batsmen's eye movements monitor the moment when the ball is released, make a predictive saccade to the place where they expect it to hit the ground, wait for it to bounce, and follow its trajectory for 100-200 ms after the bounce. We show how information provided by these fixations may allow precise prediction of the ball's timing and placement. Comparing players with different skill levels, we found that a short latency for the first saccade distinguished good from poor batsmen, and that a cricket player's eye movement strategy contributes to his skill in the game.

  18. Regulatory Roles of Fluctuation-Driven Mechanotransduction in Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2016-09-01

    Cells in the body are exposed to irregular mechanical stimuli. Here, we review the so-called fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction in which stresses stretching cells vary on a cycle-by-cycle basis. We argue that such mechanotransduction is an emergent network phenomenon and offer several potential mechanisms of how it regulates cell function. Several examples from the vasculature, the lung, and tissue engineering are discussed. We conclude with a list of important open questions. PMID:27511461

  19. The role of copper in HL-60 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, B.; Percival, S.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper deficiency in humans has been shown to result in neutropenia. This research asks what is copper's function in the development of neutrophils HL-60 cells, a promyelocyte cell line, was induced to differentiate towards the granulocytic lineage with 1 {mu}M retinoic acid for 5 days. Both noninduced and induced cells were incubated in either complete medium or in medium supplemented with 8 {mu}M copper. Intracellular copper levels, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase activity and the respiratory burst (RB) activity of the cells were measured. The respiratory burst of neutrophils is a measure of cellular function and degree of differentiation. Induced cells, as expected, showed greater RB activity than the non-induced cells. Copper supplementation, however, had no effect on this activity. Differentiated HL-60 cells had two times more intracellular copper but ten times less Cu/Zn-SOD activity. Copper supplementation enhanced Cu/Zn-SOD activity in both noninduced and induced cells. This suggests that the availability of intracellular copper is important in expressing Cu/ZN-SOD activity and that differentiated cells, although they have more intracellular copper under basal conditions, cannot utilize that copper for Cu/Zn-SOD enzyme activity. When supplemental copper was provided during differentiation, Cu/Zn-SOD activity was maintained.

  20. Genetic and Functional Analyses of SHANK2 Mutations Suggest a Multiple Hit Model of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leblond, Claire S.; Heinrich, Jutta; Delorme, Richard; Proepper, Christian; Betancur, Catalina; Huguet, Guillaume; Konyukh, Marina; Chaste, Pauline; Ey, Elodie; Rastam, Maria; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Nygren, Gudrun; Gillberg, I. Carina; Melke, Jonas; Toro, Roberto; Regnault, Beatrice; Fauchereau, Fabien; Mercati, Oriane; Lemière, Nathalie; Skuse, David; Poot, Martin; Holt, Richard; Monaco, Anthony P.; Järvelä, Irma; Kantojärvi, Katri; Vanhala, Raija; Curran, Sarah; Collier, David A.; Bolton, Patrick; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Klauck, Sabine M.; Poustka, Fritz; Freitag, Christine M.; Waltes, Regina; Kopp, Marnie; Duketis, Eftichia; Bacchelli, Elena; Minopoli, Fiorella; Ruta, Liliana; Battaglia, Agatino; Mazzone, Luigi; Maestrini, Elena; Sequeira, Ana F.; Oliveira, Barbara; Vicente, Astrid; Oliveira, Guiomar; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W.; Zelenika, Diana; Delepine, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Bonneau, Dominique; Guinchat, Vincent; Devillard, Françoise; Assouline, Brigitte; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a complex inheritance pattern. While many rare variants in synaptic proteins have been identified in patients with ASD, little is known about their effects at the synapse and their interactions with other genetic variations. Here, following the discovery of two de novo SHANK2 deletions by the Autism Genome Project, we identified a novel 421 kb de novo SHANK2 deletion in a patient with autism. We then sequenced SHANK2 in 455 patients with ASD and 431 controls and integrated these results with those reported by Berkel et al. 2010 (n = 396 patients and n = 659 controls). We observed a significant enrichment of variants affecting conserved amino acids in 29 of 851 (3.4%) patients and in 16 of 1,090 (1.5%) controls (P = 0.004, OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.23–4.70). In neuronal cell cultures, the variants identified in patients were associated with a reduced synaptic density at dendrites compared to the variants only detected in controls (P = 0.0013). Interestingly, the three patients with de novo SHANK2 deletions also carried inherited CNVs at 15q11–q13 previously associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. In two cases, the nicotinic receptor CHRNA7 was duplicated and in one case the synaptic translation repressor CYFIP1 was deleted. These results strengthen the role of synaptic gene dysfunction in ASD but also highlight the presence of putative modifier genes, which is in keeping with the “multiple hit model” for ASD. A better knowledge of these genetic interactions will be necessary to understand the complex inheritance pattern of ASD. PMID:22346768

  1. Sex-specific disruptions in spatial memory and anhedonia in a "two hit" rat model correspond with alterations in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and signaling.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rachel A; Klug, Maren; Kiss Von Soly, Szerenke; Binder, Michele D; Hannan, Anthony J; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2014-10-01

    Post-mortem studies have demonstrated reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of schizophrenia and major depression patients. The "two hit" hypothesis proposes that two or more major disruptions at specific time points during development are involved in the pathophysiology of these mental illnesses. However, the role of BDNF in these "two hit" effects is unclear. Our aim was to behaviorally characterize a "two hit" rat model of developmental stress accompanied by an in-depth assessment of BDNF expression and signalling. Wistar rats were exposed to neonatal maternal separation (MS) stress and/or adolescent/young-adult corticosterone (CORT) treatment. In adulthood, models of cognitive and negative symptoms of mental illness were analyzed. The hippocampus was then dissected into dorsal (DHP) and ventral (VHP) regions and analyzed by qPCR for exon-specific BDNF gene expression or by Western blot for BDNF protein expression and downstream signaling. Male "two hit" rats showed marked disruptions in short-term spatial memory (Y-maze) which were absent in females. However, female "two hit" rats showed signs of anhedonia (sucrose preference test), which were absent in males. Novel object recognition and anxiety (elevated plus maze) were unchanged by either of the two "hits". In the DHP, MS caused a male-specific increase in BDNF Exons I, II, IV, VII, and IX mRNA but a decrease in mature BDNF and phosphorylated TrkB (pTrkB) protein expression in adulthood. In the VHP, BDNF transcript expression was unchanged; however, in female rats only, MS significantly decreased mature BDNF and pTrkB protein expression in adulthood. These data demonstrate that MS causes region-specific and sex-specific long-term effects on BDNF expression and signaling and, importantly, mRNA expression does not always infer protein expression. Alterations to BDNF signaling may mediate the sex-specific effects of developmental stress on anhedonic behaviors.

  2. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  3. The Role of Cell Compartmentalization and Cell Differentiation in Cyanobacterial Excavation of Miineral Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Guida, B. S.; Couradeau, E.

    2015-12-01

    The bioerosion of coastal limestones and biogenic carbonates by boring filamentous or pseudo-filamentous cyanobacteria is not only a geomicrobial phenomenon of global proportions, but also plays an important role in the demise of coral reefs, and affects significantly human enterprises like bivalve fisheries. In spite of its importance, the mechanism by which cyanobacteria excavate carbonates constitutes an apparent paradox, in that their metabolism will tend to precipitate carbonates, not dissolved them. We have previously advanced, and obtained evidence for, a mechanism of excavation that relies on the uptake of Ca2+ by cells at the boring front, its trans-cellular transport along the filaments, and its eventual active excretion at the solid/liquid interface. It was postulated that the mechanism involved the strategically organized deployment of Ca2+ transport enzymes like P-type Ca2+ ATPases and Ca2+ channels. Here we present evidence that confirms this basic mechanism, but also reveals that it is based on an unexpected level of cellular complexity. The model organism Mastigocoleus testarum BC008, transports Ca2+ from the mineral to the external medium using a repetitive, polar arrangement of Ca2+ ATPases, localized preferentially on one cellular pole, in a ring conformation on the cell membrane adjacent to the trans-cellular septum, pumping Ca2+ locally towards the periplasmic space, from which it passively enters the next cell. This strain also develops specialized groups of cells, which we named calcicytes, often but not exclusively located at the ends of filaments, that accumulate large concentrations of Ca2+, some 40-fold higher than typical in microbes, and seem to act as sinks or capacitors in the trans-cellular Ca2+ transport. Calcicytes are also characterized by a lack of photosynthetic pigments, and a very high intracellular pH. These cellular adaptations can also be found in evolutionary distant euendoliths such as the pseudofilamentous Hyella sp.

  4. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  5. Role of Proteome Physical Chemistry in Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kingshuk; de Graff, Adam M R; Sawle, Lucas; Dill, Ken A

    2016-09-15

    We review how major cell behaviors, such as bacterial growth laws, are derived from the physical chemistry of the cell's proteins. On one hand, cell actions depend on the individual biological functionalities of their many genes and proteins. On the other hand, the common physics among proteins can be as important as the unique biology that distinguishes them. For example, bacterial growth rates depend strongly on temperature. This dependence can be explained by the folding stabilities across a cell's proteome. Such modeling explains how thermophilic and mesophilic organisms differ, and how oxidative damage of highly charged proteins can lead to unfolding and aggregation in aging cells. Cells have characteristic time scales. For example, E. coli can duplicate as fast as 2-3 times per hour. These time scales can be explained by protein dynamics (the rates of synthesis and degradation, folding, and diffusional transport). It rationalizes how bacterial growth is slowed down by added salt. In the same way that the behaviors of inanimate materials can be expressed in terms of the statistical distributions of atoms and molecules, some cell behaviors can be expressed in terms of distributions of protein properties, giving insights into the microscopic basis of growth laws in simple cells. PMID:27513457

  6. Proapoptotic Role of Potassium Ions in Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhenglin; Huang, Xusen; Chen, Kaiyun; Wang, Hanning; Xiao, Jinfeng; He, Ke; Huang, Rui; Duan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Jinqian; Xiang, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels are transmembrane proteins that selectively promote the infiltration of potassium ions. The significance of these channels for tumor biology has become obvious. However, the effects of potassium ions on the tumor or normal cells have seldom been studied. To address this problem, we studied the biological effects of L02 and HepG2 cells with ectogenous potassium ions. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate were analyzed. Our results indicated that potassium ions inhibited proliferation of L02 and HepG2 cells and promoted their apoptosis. Potassium ions induced apoptosis through regulating Bcl-2 family members and depolarized the mitochondrial membrane, especially for HepG2 cell. These biological effects were associated with channel protein HERG. By facilitating expression of channel protein HERG, potassium ions may prevent it from being shunted to procancerous pathways by inducing apoptosis. These results demonstrated that potassium ions may be a key regulator of liver cell function. Thus, our findings suggest that potassium ions could inhibit tumorigenesis through inducing apoptosis of hepatoma cells by upregulating potassium ions transport channel proteins HERG and VDAC1. PMID:27069917

  7. Bluetongue virus mammalian cell surface receptors: Role of glycosaminologycans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binding and infection rates of bluetongue virus (BTV) on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and glucosaminoglycan deficient and wild type CHO cell lines and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were determined in the presence or absence of GAG and sialic acid antagonists. Data showed that virus binding ...

  8. Transplantation of ocular stem cells: the role of injury in incorporation and differentiation of grafted cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Chacko, David M; Das, Ani V; Zhao, Xing; James, Jackson; Bhattacharya, Sumitra; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2003-04-01

    The incorporation of transplanted cells into the host retina is one of the prerequisites for successful cell replacement therapy to treat retinal degeneration. To test the hypothesis that injury promotes cell incorporation, stem cells/progenitors were isolated from the retina, ciliary epithelium or limbal epithelium and transplanted into the eyes of rats with retinal injury. Different stem cell/progenitor populations incorporated into traumatized or diseased retina but not into the normal retina. The proportion of cells incorporated into the inner retina was consistently higher than in the outer retina. The transplanted cells expressed markers specific to cells of the lamina into which they were incorporated suggesting that cues for specific differentiation are localized within the inner and outer retina. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced cues play a significant role in promoting the incorporation of ocular stem cells/progenitors regardless of their origin or their differentiation along specific retinal sublineage. PMID:12668063

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells: mechanisms and role in bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Guan, Junjie; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Stimulating bone growth and regeneration, especially in patients with delayed union or non-union of bone, is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Treatments employed for bone regeneration are based on the use of cells, biomaterials and factors. Among these therapies, cell treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a number of advantages as MSCs: (1) are multipotent cells that can migrate to sites of injury; (2) are capable of suppressing the local immune response; and (3) are available in large quantities from the patients themselves. MSC therapies have been used for stimulating bone regeneration in animal models and in patients. Methods of application range from direct MSC injection, seeding MSCs on synthetic scaffolds, the use of gene-modified MSCs, and hetero-MSCs application. However, only a small number of these cell-based strategies are in clinical use, and none of these treatments has become the gold standard treatment for delayed or non-union of bone. PMID:25335795

  10. Root Border Cells and Their Role in Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn; Turgeon, B Gillian; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Minh Tran, Tuan; Huskey, David A; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2016-08-01

    Root border cells separate from plant root tips and disperse into the soil environment. In most species, each root tip can produce thousands of metabolically active cells daily, with specialized patterns of gene expression. Their function has been an enduring mystery. Recent studies suggest that border cells operate in a manner similar to mammalian neutrophils: Both cell types export a complex of extracellular DNA (exDNA) and antimicrobial proteins that neutralize threats by trapping pathogens and thereby preventing invasion of host tissues. Extracellular DNases (exDNases) of pathogens promote virulence and systemic spread of the microbes. In plants, adding DNase I to root tips eliminates border cell extracellular traps and abolishes root tip resistance to infection. Mutation of genes encoding exDNase activity in plant-pathogenic bacteria (Ralstonia solanacearum) and fungi (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) results in reduced virulence. The study of exDNase activities in plant pathogens may yield new targets for disease control. PMID:27215971

  11. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  12. Root Border Cells and Their Role in Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn; Turgeon, B Gillian; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Minh Tran, Tuan; Huskey, David A; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2016-08-01

    Root border cells separate from plant root tips and disperse into the soil environment. In most species, each root tip can produce thousands of metabolically active cells daily, with specialized patterns of gene expression. Their function has been an enduring mystery. Recent studies suggest that border cells operate in a manner similar to mammalian neutrophils: Both cell types export a complex of extracellular DNA (exDNA) and antimicrobial proteins that neutralize threats by trapping pathogens and thereby preventing invasion of host tissues. Extracellular DNases (exDNases) of pathogens promote virulence and systemic spread of the microbes. In plants, adding DNase I to root tips eliminates border cell extracellular traps and abolishes root tip resistance to infection. Mutation of genes encoding exDNase activity in plant-pathogenic bacteria (Ralstonia solanacearum) and fungi (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) results in reduced virulence. The study of exDNase activities in plant pathogens may yield new targets for disease control.

  13. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses. PMID:19327344

  14. Role of interleukin in human natural killer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    London, L.; Perussia, B.; Trinchieri, G.

    1986-03-01

    Human NK cells, defined by the antibody B73.1, can be induced to proliferate in vitro in the presence of an IL-2 containing conditioned medium (CM) and an irradiated lymphoblastoid line, Daudi. Proliferating NK cells maintain phenotypic and functional characteristics of resting NK cells while newly expressing surface activation antigens (HLA-DR, transferrin receptor, and IL-2 receptor recognized by anti-TAC antibody). A goat anti-IL-2 antiserum and the anti-TAC monoclonal antibody completely block /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation in NK cells stimulated with CM alone or with irradiated Daudi cells. Inhibition is also observed when the antibodies are added up to day 4 of culture, indicating that IL-2 is required for both initiation and maintenance of proliferation. Human recombinant IL-2, either alone or with irradiated lymphoblastoid cells, replaces the CM in initiating /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation. In limiting dilution analysis the frequency of B73.1 (+) cells responding to rIL-2 is approximately 1/2000 and it is increased ten to thirty fold with the addition of irradiated Daudi cells to the cultures. Cultures stimulated with rIL-2 in the presence of colchicine, show a significant proportion of B73.1 + cells entering cycle each day during the first 3 days. These data show that a significant proportion of resting NK cells are capable of responding to IL-2 and that this response can occur over a period of several days after initiation of cultures.

  15. Role of proline in cell wall synthesis and plant development and its implications in plant ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Hima Kumari, P; Sunita, M S L; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2015-01-01

    Proline is a proteogenic amino acid and accumulates both under stress and non-stress conditions as a beneficial solute in plants. Recent discoveries point out that proline plays an important role in plant growth and differentiation across life cycle. It is a key determinant of many cell wall proteins that plays important roles in plant development. The role of extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and hydroxyproline- and proline-rich proteins as important components of cell wall proteins that play pivotal roles in cell wall signal transduction cascades, plant development and stress tolerance is discussed in this review. Molecular insights are also provided here into the plausible roles of proline transporters modulating key events in plant development. In addition, the roles of proline during seed developmental transitions including storage protein synthesis are discussed. PMID:26257754

  16. Role of proline in cell wall synthesis and plant development and its implications in plant ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B.; Hima Kumari, P.; Sunita, M. S. L.; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2015-01-01

    Proline is a proteogenic amino acid and accumulates both under stress and non-stress conditions as a beneficial solute in plants. Recent discoveries point out that proline plays an important role in plant growth and differentiation across life cycle. It is a key determinant of many cell wall proteins that plays important roles in plant development. The role of extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and hydroxyproline- and proline-rich proteins as important components of cell wall proteins that play pivotal roles in cell wall signal transduction cascades, plant development and stress tolerance is discussed in this review. Molecular insights are also provided here into the plausible roles of proline transporters modulating key events in plant development. In addition, the roles of proline during seed developmental transitions including storage protein synthesis are discussed. PMID:26257754

  17. The role of exportin 6 in cytoskeletal-mediated cell death and cell adhesion in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells following doxorubicin treatment.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Magdalena; Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Dariusz; Halas, Marta; Grzanka, Alina

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in various cellular processes. The different forms ofactin (G-actin and F-actin) participate in the organization of nuclear structure and its functions. The structure of the actin cytoskeleton is controlled by proteins involved in the translocation of actin between cytoplasm and the nucleus. In this study, we used siRNA method to investigate the role of exportin 6 in the switching between nuclear and cytoplasmic F-actin pools in H1299 cells treated with no, 1.0 or 2.5 μM doxorubicin. We showed that silencing of exportin 6 expression changed the response of H1299 to doxorubicin. Here, we observed increased population of cells affected by doxorubicin-induced necrotic cell death. Furthermore, fluorescence studies showed that downregulation of exportin 6 exerted profound DOX-induced changes in the F-actin cytoskeleton architecture. The F-actin cytoskeleton was seen in the form of small fibers or aggregates after doxorubicin treatment. Additionally, some cells lost cell adhesion properties. Downregulation of exportin 6 influenced also transcriptional activity of the cells. In cells transfected with nontargeting siRNA, we observed a higher level of 5'-fluorouridine fluorescence than in cells with silenced export in 6 expression. In conclusion, we showed that downregulation of exportin 6 induced necrotic cell death. Moreover, the observed alterations of cell adhesion suggest the key role of cytoplasmic F-actin in maintaining intercellular junctional complexes and/or focal adhesion properties and the importance of the balance between nuclear and cytoplasmic F-actin pools.

  18. A role for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Squillace, Raphaëlle; Le Menn, Gwenaëlle; Rekima, Akila; Larbret, Frederic; Pelé, Juline; Verhasselt, Valérie; Grimaldi, Paul A.; Neels, Jaap G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in T cell biology and changes in metabolism drive T cell differentiation and fate. Most research on the role of metabolism in T lymphocytes focuses on mature T cells while only few studies have investigated the role of metabolism in T cell development. In this study, we report that activation or overexpression of the transcription factor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β (PPARβ) increases fatty acid oxidation in T cells. Furthermore, using both in vivo and in vitro models, we demonstrate that PPARβ activation/overexpression inhibits thymic T cell development by decreasing proliferation of CD4−CD8− double-negative stage 4 (DN4) thymocytes. These results support a model where PPARβ activation/overexpression favours fatty acid- instead of glucose-oxidation in developing T cells, thereby hampering the proliferative burst normally occurring at the DN4 stage of T cell development. As a consequence, the αβ T cells that are derived from DN4 thymocytes are dramatically decreased in peripheral lymphoid tissues, while the γδ T cell population remains untouched. This is the first report of a direct role for a member of the PPAR family of nuclear receptors in the development of T cells. PMID:27680392

  19. Human cytomegalovirus encoded microRNAs: hitting targets.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kiat Rui; Li, Jordan Y Z; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is of particular concern in immunodeficient individuals notably transplant recipients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. HCMV is predicted to encode multiple microRNAs (miRNAs) and several have been characterized in vitro. Furthermore, these miRNAs have been shown to target human and viral mRNAs. Pathways involved in human cellular targets have key roles in vesicle trafficking, immune evasion and cell cycle control. This demonstration of viral miRNA targets provides novel insights into viral pathogenesis. This review details the evidence for the existence of HCMV-encoded miRNA and their targets. HCMV miRNA in blood and other tissues is a potential diagnostic tool and blocking the effects of specific HCMV-encoded miRNA with sequence specific antagomirs is a potential new therapy.

  20. Calcium signalling in pancreatic stellate cells: Mechanisms and potential roles.

    PubMed

    Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Petersen, Ole H

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic and pancreatic stellate cells may or may not be regarded as stem cells, but they are capable of remarkable transformations. There is less information about stellate cells in the pancreas than in the liver, where they were discovered much earlier and therefore have been studied longer and more intensively than in the pancreas. Most of the work on pancreatic stellate cells has been carried out in studies on cell cultures, but in this review we focus attention on Ca(2+) signalling in stellate cells in their real pancreatic environment. We review current knowledge on patho-physiologically relevant Ca(2+) signalling events and their underlying mechanisms. We focus on the effects of bradykinin in the initial stages of acute pancreatitis, an often fatal disease in which the pancreas digests itself and its surroundings. Ca(2+) signals, elicited in the stellate cells by the action of bradykinin, may have a negative effect on the outcome of the acute disease process and promote the development of chronic pancreatitis. The bradykinin-elicited Ca(2+) signals can be inhibited by blockade of type 2 receptors and also by blockade of Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels. The potential benefits of such pharmacological inhibition for the treatment of pancreatitis are reviewed. PMID:26960936

  1. Lead generation and examples opinion regarding how to follow up hits.

    PubMed

    Orita, Masaya; Ohno, Kazuki; Warizaya, Masaichi; Amano, Yasushi; Niimi, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    In fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), not only identifying the starting fragment hit to be developed but also generating a drug lead from that starting fragment hit is important. Converting fragment hits to leads is generally similar to a high-throughput screening (HTS) hits-to-leads approach in that properties associated with activity for a target protein, such as selectivity against other targets and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/Tox), and physicochemical properties should be taken into account. However, enhancing the potency of the fragment hit is a key requirement in FBDD, unlike HTS, because initial fragment hits are generally weak. This enhancement is presently achieved by adding additional chemical groups which bind to additional parts of the target protein or by joining or combining two or more hit fragments; however, strategies for effecting greater improvements in effective activity are needed. X-ray analysis is a key technology attractive for converting fragments to drug leads. This method makes it clear whether a fragment hit can act as an anchor and provides insight regarding introduction of functional groups to improve fragment activity. Data on follow-up chemical synthesis of fragment hits has allowed for the differentiation of four different strategies: fragment optimization, fragment linking, fragment self-assembly, and fragment evolution. Here, we discuss our opinion regarding how to follow up on fragment hits, with a focus on the importance of fragment hits as an anchor moiety to so-called hot spots in the target protein using crystallographic data. PMID:21371599

  2. Determination of apical membrane polarity in mammary epithelial cell cultures: The role of cell-cell, cell-substratum, and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Beck, J.C.; Moss, L.; Bartley, J. ); Ojakian, G.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The membrane glycoprotein, PAS-O, is a major differentiation antigen on mammary epithelial cells and is located exclusively in the apical domain of the plasma membrane. The authors have used 734B cultured human mammary carcinoma cells as a model system to study the role of tight junctions, cell-substratum contacts, and submembranous cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O to the apical membrane. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectronmicroscopy experiments demonstrated that while tight junctions demarcate PAS-O distribution in confluent cultures, apical polarity could be established at low culture densities when cells could not form tight junctions with neighboring cells. They suggest, then, that interactions between vitronectin and its receptor, are responsible for establishment of membrane domains in the absence of tight junctions. The role of cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O distribution was examined by treating cultures with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or acrylamide. Cytochalasin D led to a redistribution of PAS0O while colchicine and acrylamide did not. They hypothesize that PAS-O is restricted to the apical membrane by interactions with a microfilament network and that the cytoskeletal organization is dependent upon cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions.

  3. The essential role of evasion from cell death in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Gemma; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The link between evasion of apoptosis and the development of cellular hyperplasia and ultimately cancer is implicitly clear if one considers how many cells are produced each day and, hence, how many cells must die to make room for the new ones (reviewed in (Raff, 1996)). Furthermore, cells are frequently experiencing noxious stimuli that can cause lesions in their DNA and faults in DNA replication can occur during cellular proliferation. Such DNA damage needs to be repaired efficiently or cells with irreparable damage must be killed to prevent subsequent division of aberrant cells that may fuel tumorigenesis (reviewed in (Weinberg, 2007)). The detection of genetic lesions in human cancers that activate pro-survival genes or disable pro-apoptotic genes have provided the first evidence that defects in programmed cell death can cause cancer (Tagawa et al., 2005; Tsujimoto et al., 1984; Vaux et al., 1988) and this concept was proven by studies with genetically modified mice (Egle et al., 2004b; Strasser et al., 1990a). It is therefore now widely accepted that evasion of apoptosis is a requirement for both neoplastic transformation and sustained growth of cancer cells (reviewed in (Cory and Adams, 2002; Hanahan and Weinberg, 2000; Weinberg, 2007)). Importantly, apoptosis is also a major contributor to anti-cancer therapy induced killing of tumor cells (reviewed in (Cory and Adams, 2002; Cragg et al., 2009)). Consequently, a detailed understanding of apoptotic cell death will help to better comprehend the complexities of tumorigenesis and should assist with the development of improved targeted therapies for cancer based on the direct activation of the apoptotic machinery (reviewed in (Lessene et al., 2008)). PMID:21704830

  4. The role of the cell–cell interactions in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Kamińska, Katarzyna; Szczylik, Cezary; Bielecka, Zofia F; Bartnik, Ewa; Porta, Camillo; Lian, Fei; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    In the field of cancer research, scientific investigations are based on analysing differences in the secretome, the proteome, the transcriptome, the expression of cell surface molecules, and the deregulation of signal transduction pathways between neoplastic and normal cells. Accumulating evidence indicates a crucial role in carcinogenesis concerning not only stromal cells but also normal cells from target organs and tissue where tumours emerge. The tumour microenvironment (TME) definitively plays an important role in regulating neighbouring cell behaviour. To date, limited attention has been focused upon interactions between cancer cells and normal cells. This review concentrates on the interactions between stromal and healthy cells from the TME in cancer development. In the article, the authors also describe mutations, genes and proteins expression pattern that are involved in tumour development in target organ. PMID:25598217

  5. The Role of Stem Cells in the Etiology and Pathophysiology of Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, Demetra; Li, Fei; Cosar, Emine; Krikun, Graciela; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-09-01

    Human endometrium is a dynamic organ that normally undergoes repetitive cyclic regeneration. To enable this rapid regeneration, it is not surprising that the endometrium contains a reservoir of progenitor stem cells. However, this pool of cells that allows the growth of the endometrium also allows for unrestrained growth that can reach beyond the endometrium. In this review, we will address the role of stem cells in endometriosis. Recent characterization of stem cell populations within human endometrium has opened the possibility of understanding their physiologic as well as their pathologic roles. While stem cells are critical to the cyclic regeneration of a healthy endometrium, we have shown that both endometrium-derived and bone marrow-derived stem cells can migrate to ectopic sites and contribute to the development of endometriosis. Furthermore, endometriosis interferes with the normal stem cell trafficking to the uterus that is necessary for endometrial growth and repair. Altered stem cell mobility and engraftment characterize this disease. PMID:26375413

  6. The Role of Stem Cells in the Etiology and Pathophysiology of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, Demetra; Li, Fei; Cosar, Emine; Krikun, Graciela; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Human endometrium is a dynamic organ that normally undergoes repetitive cyclic regeneration. To enable this rapid regeneration, it is not surprising that the endometrium contains a reservoir of progenitor stem cells. However, this pool of cells that allows the growth of the endometrium also allows for unrestrained growth that can reach beyond the endometrium. In this review, we will address the role of stem cells in endometriosis. Recent characterization of stem cell populations within human endometrium has opened the possibility of understanding their physiologic as well as their pathologic roles. While stem cells are critical to the cyclic regeneration of a healthy endometrium, we have shown that both endometrium-derived and bone marrow-derived stem cells can migrate to ectopic sites and contribute to the development of endometriosis. Furthermore, endometriosis interferes with the normal stem cell trafficking to the uterus that is necessary for endometrial growth and repair. Altered stem cell mobility and engraftment characterize this disease. PMID:26375413

  7. A role for SIRT1 in cell growth and chemoresistance in prostate cancer PC3 and DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Keitaro; Ohhashi, Riyako; Fujita, Yasunori; Hamada, Nanako; Akao, Yukihiro; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2008-08-29

    SIRT1, which belongs to the family of type III histone deacetylase, is implicated in diverse cellular processes. We have determined the expression levels of SIRT1 in human prostate cancer cell lines and have examined the roles of SIRT1 in cell growth and chemoresistance. SIRT1 expression was markedly up-regulated in androgen-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells compared with androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells and its expression level was correlated with cell growth in PC3 cells. Treatment with a SIRT1 inhibitor, sirtinol, inhibited cell growth and increased sensitivity to camptothecin and cisplatin. Silencing of SIRT1 expression by siRNA also suppressed cell proliferation and reduced camptothecin resistance in PC3 cells, mimicking the chemosensitizing effect caused by sirtinol. Also in DU145 cells, sirtinol treatment enhanced sensitivity to camptothecin and cisplatin. These results suggest that up-regulation of SIRT1 expression may play an important role in promoting cell growth and chemoresistance in androgen-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells.

  8. Approaches for Analyzing the Roles of Mast Cells and Their Proteases In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.; Tsai, Mindy; Marichal, Thomas; Tchougounova, Elena; Reber, Laurent L.; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The roles of mast cells in health and disease remain incompletely understood. While the evidence that mast cells are critical effector cells in IgE-dependent anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions seems unassailable, studies employing various mice deficient in mast cells or mast cell-associated proteases have yielded divergent conclusions about the roles of mast cells or their proteases in certain other immunological responses. Such “controversial” results call into question the relative utility of various older versus newer approaches to ascertain the roles of mast cells and mast cell proteases in vivo. This review discusses how both older and more recent mouse models have been used to investigate the functions of mast cells and their proteases in health and disease. We particularly focus on settings in which divergent conclusions about the importance of mast cells and their proteases have been supported by studies that employed different models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency. We think that two major conclusions can be drawn from such findings: (1) no matter which models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency one employs, the conclusions drawn from the experiments always should take into account the potential limitations of the models (particularly abnormalities affecting cell types other than mast cells) and (2) even when analyzing a biological response using a single model of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency, details of experimental design are critical in efforts to define those conditions under which important contributions of mast cells or their proteases can be identified. PMID:25727288

  9. Role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells in antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Giuliana; Cerutti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) constitute a heterogeneous family of effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system that mediate lymphoid organogenesis, tissue repair, immunity and inflammation. The initial view that ILCs exert their protective functions solely during the innate phase of an immune response has been recently challenged by evidence indicating that ILCs shape adaptive immunity by establishing both contact-dependent and contact-independent interactions with multiple hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, including B cells. Some of these interactions enhance antibody responses both systemically and at mucosal sites of entry. PMID:25621842

  10. Essential roles of mgcRacGAP in multilineage differentiation and survival of murine hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takayuki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Hikida, Masaki

    2008-08-08

    MgcRacGAP, a negative regulator for Rho family GTPases, has been shown to play important roles in cytokinesis using several cell lines. However, the physiological role of mgcRacGAP in multilineage hematopoietic development remains unclear. Here, we conditionally ablated mgcRacGAP in vivo to clarify this issue. As the result, we found that normal hematopoietic development including proliferation and survival requires mgcRacGAP. We also found that depletion of mgcRacGAP in hematopoietic cells results in a marked decrease in c-Kit{sup +}Sca-1{sup +}Lin{sup -} cells, suggesting that mgcRacGAP is required for the maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, B cells in which mgcRacGAP had been selectively ablated showed proliferation failure and fell into apoptosis. Taken together, mgcRacGAP is now shown to play a indispensable role in the development of hematopoietic cells in vivo.

  11. The Role of γδ T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Yang, Jinhua; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Junwei

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the overproduction of autoantibodies against an array of nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens and affects multiple organs, such as the skin, joints, kidneys, and neuronal tissues. T cells have been recognized as important players in the development of SLE due to their functions in cytokine secretion, antigen presentation, and supporting B cells for antibody production. γδ T cells are a minor population of T cells that play important roles in infection and tumor-associated disease. In recent years, the role of γδ T cells in autoimmune diseases has been investigated. In this review, we discussed the role of γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26981547

  12. The Role of γδ T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; Yang, Jinhua; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Junwei

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the overproduction of autoantibodies against an array of nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens and affects multiple organs, such as the skin, joints, kidneys, and neuronal tissues. T cells have been recognized as important players in the development of SLE due to their functions in cytokine secretion, antigen presentation, and supporting B cells for antibody production. γδ T cells are a minor population of T cells that play important roles in infection and tumor-associated disease. In recent years, the role of γδ T cells in autoimmune diseases has been investigated. In this review, we discussed the role of γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26981547

  13. Non-neuronal Cells in ALS: Role of Glial, Immune cells and Blood-CNS Barriers.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Fabiola; Malaspina, Andrea; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Neurological dysfunction and motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is strongly associated with neuroinflammation reflected by activated microglia and astrocytes in the CNS. In ALS endogenous triggers in the CNS such as aggregated protein and misfolded proteins activate a pathogenic response by innate immune cells. However, there is also strong evidence for a neuroprotective immune response in ALS. Emerging evidence also reveals changes in the peripheral adaptive immune responses as well as alterations in the blood brain barrier that may aid traffic of lymphocytes and antibodies into the CNS. Understanding the triggers of neuroinflammation is key to controlling neuronal loss. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the roles of non-neuronal cells as well as the innate and adaptive immune responses in ALS. Existing ALS animal models, in particular genetic rodent models, are very useful to study the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. We also discuss the approaches used to target the pathogenic immune responses and boost the neuroprotective immune pathways as novel immunotherapies for ALS.

  14. Non-neuronal Cells in ALS: Role of Glial, Immune cells and Blood-CNS Barriers.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Fabiola; Malaspina, Andrea; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Neurological dysfunction and motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is strongly associated with neuroinflammation reflected by activated microglia and astrocytes in the CNS. In ALS endogenous triggers in the CNS such as aggregated protein and misfolded proteins activate a pathogenic response by innate immune cells. However, there is also strong evidence for a neuroprotective immune response in ALS. Emerging evidence also reveals changes in the peripheral adaptive immune responses as well as alterations in the blood brain barrier that may aid traffic of lymphocytes and antibodies into the CNS. Understanding the triggers of neuroinflammation is key to controlling neuronal loss. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the roles of non-neuronal cells as well as the innate and adaptive immune responses in ALS. Existing ALS animal models, in particular genetic rodent models, are very useful to study the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. We also discuss the approaches used to target the pathogenic immune responses and boost the neuroprotective immune pathways as novel immunotherapies for ALS. PMID:26780491

  15. A role for novel cell-cycle proteins in podocyte biology.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M

    2010-04-01

    Cell-cycle proteins influence almost all aspects of embryogenesis and differentiation. In adults, these proteins control cell division and regeneration after injury. During the past several years, their roles in controlling reaction to stress have been demonstrated in several organ systems. In the kidney, the cell types affected include both tubular and glomerular compartments. Now a novel cell cycle-related protein is shown to influence podocyte biology.

  16. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S; Nichols, Kim E

    2013-04-25

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase-mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell-mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA-mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS.

  17. Roles of M cells in infection and mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system plays a crucial part in the control of infection. Exposure of humans and animals to potential pathogens generally occurs through mucosal surfaces, thus, strategies that target the mucosa seem rational and efficient vaccination measures. Vaccination through the mucosal immune system can induce effective systemic immune responses simultaneously with mucosal immunity compared with parenteral vaccination. M cells are capable of transporting luminal antigens to the underlying lymphoid tissues and can be exploited by pathogens as an entry portal to invade the host. Therefore, targeting M-cell-specific molecules might enhance antigen entry, initiate the immune response, and induce protection against mucosal pathogens. Here, we outline our understanding of the distribution and function of M cells, and summarize the advances in mucosal vaccine strategies that target M cells. PMID:25483705

  18. Important roles of platelets as immune cells in the skin.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa

    2015-02-01

    Platelets work as immune cells by initiating and modulating inflammatory and immune responses, in addition to having prominent functions in hemostasis and thrombosis. They store a multitude of immune-associated molecules in their granules. Upon activation in response to various factors such as thrombin, chemokines, and microbial toxins, platelets express adhesive and immune receptors such as P-selectin, CD40 ligand, and Toll-like receptors on their surface, and release soluble mediators such as chemokines, cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides. In this way, platelets interact with endothelial cells and leukocytes including dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, neutrophils, monocytes, and natural killer cells, both directly by cell to cell contact and indirectly via secretion of soluble mediators. In cutaneous inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, platelets circulate in an activated state, and the degree of platelet activation correlates with disease severity. Platelets are closely linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and psoriasis, via several pathomechanisms, e.g. increasing leukocyte rolling on the endothelium via formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes, recruiting leukocytes into inflamed skin via release of inflammatory mediators including chemokines, inhibiting monocytic apoptosis, inducing neutrophil phagocytosis, promoting allergic sensitization, provoking pruritus, and regulating inflammation. Platelets can also recognize bacterial pathogens through interactions via Toll-like receptors, leading to subsequent elimination of the bacteria by release of antimicrobial peptides or by aggregation of platelets around the bacteria. Thus, platelets are deeply involved in the innate and acquired immune responses in the skin via interactions with leukocytes and the endothelium.

  19. Novel Cancer Chemotherapy Hits by Molecular Topology: Dual Akt and Beta-Catenin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves; Recio-Iglesias, Maria Carmen; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Colorectal and prostate cancers are two of the most common types and cause of a high rate of deaths worldwide. Therefore, any strategy to stop or at least slacken the development and progression of malignant cells is an important therapeutic choice. The aim of the present work is the identification of novel cancer chemotherapy agents. Nowadays, many different drug discovery approaches are available, but this paper focuses on Molecular Topology, which has already demonstrated its extraordinary efficacy in this field, particularly in the identification of new hit and lead compounds against cancer. This methodology uses the graph theoretical formalism to numerically characterize molecular structures through the so called topological indices. Once obtained a specific framework, it allows the construction of complex mathematical models that can be used to predict physical, chemical or biological properties of compounds. In addition, Molecular Topology is highly efficient in selecting and designing new hit and lead drugs. According to the aforementioned, Molecular Topology has been applied here for the construction of specific Akt/mTOR and β-catenin inhibition mathematical models in order to identify and select novel antitumor agents. Experimental Approach Based on the results obtained by the selected mathematical models, six novel potential inhibitors of the Akt/mTOR and β-catenin pathways were identified. These compounds were then tested in vitro to confirm their biological activity. Conclusion and Implications Five of the selected compounds, CAS n° 256378-54-8 (Inhibitor n°1), 663203-38-1 (Inhibitor n°2), 247079-73-8 (Inhibitor n°3), 689769-86-6 (Inhibitor n°4) and 431925-096 (Inhibitor n°6) gave positive responses and resulted to be active for Akt/mTOR and/or β-catenin inhibition. This study confirms once again the Molecular Topology’s reliability and efficacy to find out novel drugs in the field of cancer. PMID:25910265

  20. Roles nrf2 plays in myeloid cells and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eri; Suzuki, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system protects animals from oxidative and electrophilic stresses. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces the expression of genes essential for detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytotoxic electrophiles. Keap1 is a stress sensor protein that binds to and ubiquitinates Nrf2 under unstressed conditions, leading to the rapid proteasomal degradation of Nrf2. Upon exposure to stress, Keap1 is modified and inactivated, which allows Nrf2 to accumulate and activate the transcription of a battery of cytoprotective genes. Antioxidative and detoxification activities are important for many types of cells to avoid DNA damage and cell death. Accumulating lines of recent evidence suggest that Nrf2 is also required for the primary functions of myeloid cells, which include phagocytosis, inflammation regulation, and ROS generation for bactericidal activities. In fact, results from several mouse models have shown that Nrf2 expression in myeloid cells is required for the proper regulation of inflammation, antitumor immunity, and atherosclerosis. Moreover, several molecules generated upon inflammation activate Nrf2. Although ROS detoxification mediated by Nrf2 is assumed to be required for anti-inflammation, the entire picture of the Nrf2-mediated regulation of myeloid cell primary functions has yet to be elucidated. In this review, we describe the Nrf2 inducers characteristic of myeloid cells and the contributions of Nrf2 to diseases.

  1. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: development, functions, and role in atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specialized subset of DCs that links innate and adaptive immunity. They sense viral and bacterial pathogens and release high levels of Type I interferons (IFN-I) in response to infection. pDCs were shown to contribute to inflammatory responses in the steady state and in pathology. In atherosclerosis, pDCs are involved in priming vascular inflammation and atherogenesis through production of IFN-I and chemokines that attract inflammatory cells to inflamed sites. pDCs also contribute to the proinflammatory activation of effector T cells, cytotoxic T cells, and conventional DCs. However, tolerogenic populations of pDCs are found that suppress atherosclerosis-associated inflammation through down-regulation of function and proliferation of proinflammatory T cell subsets and induction of regulatory T cells with potent immunomodulatory properties. Notably, atheroprotective tolerogenic DCs could be induced by certain self-antigens or bacterial antigens that suggests for great therapeutic potential of these DCs for development of DC-based anti-atherogenic vaccines. PMID:25120492

  2. The role of BMPs in endothelial cell function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Laura A; Pi, Xinchun; Patterson, Cam

    2014-09-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of proteins has a multitude of roles throughout the body. In embryonic development, BMPs promote endothelial specification and subsequent venous differentiation. The BMP pathway also plays important roles in the adult vascular endothelium, promoting angiogenesis and mediating shear and oxidative stress. The canonical BMP pathway functions through the Smad transcription factors; however, other intracellular signaling cascades can be activated, and receptor complexes beyond the traditional type I and type II receptors add additional layers of regulation. Dysregulated BMP signaling has been linked to vascular diseases including pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. This review addresses recent advances in the roles of BMP signaling in the endothelium and how BMPs affect endothelial dysfunction and human disease. PMID:24908616

  3. One-hit effects in cancer: Altered proteome of morphologically normal colon crypts in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anthony T.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Li, Xin-Ming; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Coudry, Renata A.; Cooper, Harry S.; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Boman, Bruce M.; Zhang, Tao; Litwin, Samuel; Ross, Eric A.; Conrad, Peggy; Crowell, James A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Knudson, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    We studied patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), because they are virtually certain to develop colon cancer, and because much is known about the causative APC gene. We hypothesized that the inherited heterozygous mutation itself leads to changes in the proteome of morphologically normal crypts and the proteins that changed may represent targets for preventive and therapeutic agents. We determined the differential protein expression of morphologically normal colon crypts of FAP patients versus those of individuals without the mutation, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and validation by 2D gel Western blotting. Approximately 13% of 1,695 identified proteins were abnormally expressed in the morphologically normal crypts of APC mutation carriers, indicating that a colon crypt cell under the one-hit state is already abnormal. Many of the expression changes affect pathways consistent with the function of the APC protein, including apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and biogenesis, mitosis, transcription and oxidative stress response. Thus, heterozygosity for a mutant APC tumor suppressor gene alters the proteome of normal-appearing crypt cells in a gene-specific manner, consistent with a detectable one-hit event. These changes may represent the earliest biomarkers of colorectal cancer development, potentially leading to the identification of molecular targets for cancer prevention. PMID:18794146

  4. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  5. Regulatory roles for NKT cell ligands in environmentally induced autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Vas, Jaya; Mattner, Jochen; Richardson, Stewart; Ndonye, Rachel; Gaughan, John P; Howell, Amy; Monestier, Marc

    2008-11-15

    The development of autoimmune diseases is frequently linked to exposure to environmental factors such as chemicals, drugs, or infections. In the experimental model of metal-induced autoimmunity, administration of subtoxic doses of mercury (a common environmental pollutant) to genetically susceptible mice induces an autoimmune syndrome with rapid anti-nucleolar Ab production and immune system activation. Regulatory components of the innate immune system such as NKT cells and TLRs can also modulate the autoimmune process. We examined the interplay among environmental chemicals and NKT cells in the regulation of autoimmunity. Additionally, we studied NKT and TLR ligands in a tolerance model in which preadministration of a low dose of mercury in the steady state renders animals tolerant to metal-induced autoimmunity. We also studied the effect of Sphingomonas capsulata, a bacterial strain that carries both NKT cell and TLR ligands, on metal-induced autoimmunity. Overall, NKT cell activation by synthetic ligands enhanced the manifestations of metal-induced autoimmunity. Exposure to S. capsulata exacerbated autoimmunity elicited by mercury. Although the synthetic NKT cell ligands that we used are reportedly similar in their ability to activate NKT cells, they displayed pronounced differences when coinjected with environmental agents or TLR ligands. Individual NKT ligands differed in their ability to prevent or break tolerance induced by low-dose mercury treatment. Likewise, different NKT ligands either dramatically potentiated or inhibited the ability of TLR9 agonistic oligonucleotides to disrupt tolerance to mercury. Our data suggest that these differences could be mediated by the modification of cytokine profiles and regulatory T cell numbers.

  6. 75 FR 21629 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Workgroup, the Certification/Adoption Workgroup, the NHIN Workgroup, the Privacy & Security Policy Workgroup... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the...

  7. Visual Illusions and the Control of Ball Placement in Goal-Directed Hitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caljouw, Simone R.; Van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    When hitting, kicking, or throwing balls at targets, online control in the target area is impossible. We assumed this lack of late corrections in the target area would induce an effect of a single-winged Muller-Lyer illusion on ball placement. After extensive practice in hitting balls to different landing locations, participants (N = 9) had to hit…

  8. 75 FR 17744 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of change of location for meetings. This notice references forthcoming... Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee;...

  9. Hit to lead SAR study on benzoxazole derivatives for an NPY Y5 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Omori, Naoki; Kouyama, Naoki; Yukimasa, Akira; Watanabe, Kana; Yokota, Yasunori; Tanioka, Hideki; Nambu, Hirohide; Yukioka, Hideo; Sato, Norihito; Tanaka, Yukari; Sekiguchi, Kazutaka; Okuno, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    We report a hit to lead study on a novel benzoxazole NPY Y5 antagonist. Starting from HTS hit 1, structure-activity relationships were developed. Compound 12 showed reduction of food intake and a tendency to suppress body weight gain over the 21-day experimental period.

  10. The expression of SPARC in human tumors is consistent with its role during cell competition

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Evgeniya

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, the elimination of viable but suboptimal cells is mediated by cell competition, ensuring that these cells do not accumulate during development. In addition, certain genes such as the Drosophila homologue of human c-myc (dmyc) are able to transform cells into supercompetitors, which eliminate neighboring wild-type cells by apoptosis and overproliferate leaving total cell numbers unchanged. We have recently identified Drosophila SPARC as an early marker transcriptionally upregulated in loser cells that provides a transient protection by inhibiting caspase activation in outcompeted cells. Here, we explore whether the expression of SPARC in human tumors is consistent with a role for cell competition during human cancer and find that, consistent with the existence of competitive interactions between cancer and normal cells, SPARC is upregulated at the tumor-host boundaries in several types of human cancer. PMID:21655431

  11. Treating arthritis by immunomodulation: is there a role for regulatory T cells?

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Femke; Roord, Sarah T.; Albani, Salvatore; Prakken, Berent J.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory T cells almost 15 years ago initiated a new and exciting research area. The growing evidence for a critical role of these cells in controlling autoimmune responses has raised expectations for therapeutic application of regulatory T cells in patients with autoimmune arthritis. Here, we review recent studies investigating the presence, phenotype and function of these cells in patients with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and consider their therapeutic potential. Both direct and indirect methods to target these cells will be discussed. Arguably, a therapeutic approach that combines multiple regulatory T-cell-enhancing strategies could be most successful for clinical application. PMID:20463189

  12. Does the mast cell have an intrinsic role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis?

    PubMed

    Frenz, A M; Christmas, T J; Pearce, F L

    1994-06-01

    In order to examine the role of mast cells in the inflammatory bladder disease interstitial cystitis, mast cells isolated from the human bladder of normal and diseased tissue were challenged with a range of secretagogues. Calcium ionophore A23187 and anti-IgE caused histamine release from all bladder mast cells in a dose-related manner. Mast cells from the diseased tissue were far more responsive than those from the normal tissue. Mast cells from the muscle of normal bladder were responsive towards substance P and compound 48/80. However, mast cells from interstitial cystitis bladder did not release significant amounts of histamine with these two secretagogues.

  13. Stratification of yeast cells during chronological aging by size points to the role of trehalose in cell vitality.

    PubMed

    Svenkrtova, Andrea; Belicova, Lenka; Volejnikova, Andrea; Sigler, Karel; Jazwinski, S Michal; Pichova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a process akin to differentiation during prolonged culture without medium replenishment. Various methods have been used to separate and determine the potential role and fate of the different cell species. We have stratified chronologically-aged yeast cultures into cells of different sizes, using centrifugal elutriation, and characterized these subpopulations physiologically. We distinguish two extreme cell types, very small (XS) and very large (L) cells. L cells display higher viability based on two separate criteria. They respire much more actively, but produce lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). L cells are capable of dividing, albeit slowly, giving rise to XS cells which do not divide. L cells are more resistant to osmotic stress and they have higher trehalose content, a storage carbohydrate often connected to stress resistance. Depletion of trehalose by deletion of TPS2 does not affect the vital characteristics of L cells, but it improves some of these characteristics in XS cells. Therefore, we propose that the response of L and XS cells to the trehalose produced in the former differs in a way that lowers the vitality of the latter. We compare our XS- and L-fraction cell characteristics with those of cells isolated from stationary cultures by others based on density. This comparison suggests that the cells have some similarities but also differences that may prove useful in addressing whether it is the segregation or the response to trehalose that may play the predominant role in cell division from stationary culture. PMID:26614086

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals a Role for Endothelial Cell ICAM-1 Expression in Bladder Cancer Cell Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Valérie M.; Duperray, Alain; Sundar Rajan, Vinoth; Verdier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is a complex process involving cell-cell interactions mediated by cell adhesive molecules. In this study we determine the adhesion strength between an endothelial cell monolayer and tumor cells of different metastatic potentials using Atomic Force Microscopy. We show that the rupture forces of receptor-ligand bonds increase with retraction speed and range between 20 and 70 pN. It is shown that the most invasive cell lines (T24, J82) form the strongest bonds with endothelial cells. Using ICAM-1 coated substrates and a monoclonal antibody specific for ICAM-1, we demonstrate that ICAM-1 serves as a key receptor on endothelial cells and that its interactions with ligands expressed by tumor cells are correlated with the rupture forces obtained with the most invasive cancer cells (T24, J82). For the less invasive cancer cells (RT112), endothelial ICAM-1 does not seem to play any role in the adhesion process. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the distribution of rupture forces suggests that ICAM-1 interacts preferentially with one ligand on T24 cancer cells and with two ligands on J82 cancer cells. Possible counter receptors for these interactions are CD43 and MUC1, two known ligands for ICAM-1 which are expressed by these cancer cells. PMID:24857933

  15. Licensed and Unlicensed NK Cells: Differential Roles in Cancer and Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Megan M.; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known for their well characterized ability to control viral infections and eliminate tumor cells. Through their repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are able to survey different potential target cells for various surface markers, such as MHC-I – which signals to the NK cell that the target is healthy – as well as stress ligands or viral proteins, which alert the NK cell to the aberrant state of the target and initiate a response. According to the “licensing” hypothesis, interactions between self-specific MHC-I receptors – Ly49 in mice and KIR in humans – and self-MHC-I molecules during NK cell development is crucial for NK cell functionality. However, there also exists a large proportion of NK cells in mice and humans, which lack self-specific MHC-I receptors and are consequentially “unlicensed.” While the licensed NK cell subset plays a major role in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, this review will go on to highlight the important role of the unlicensed NK cell subset in the control of MHC-I-expressing tumors, as well as in viral control. Unlike the licensed NK cells, unlicensed NK cells seem to benefit from the lack of self-specific inhibitory receptors, which could otherwise be exploited by some aberrant cells for immunoevasion by upregulating the expression of ligands or mimic ligands for these receptors. PMID:27199990

  16. Role of Dendritic Cells in the Pathogenesis of Whipple's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schinnerling, Katina; Geelhaar-Karsch, Anika; Allers, Kristina; Friebel, Julian; Conrad, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A.; Erben, Ulrike; Ignatius, Ralf; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Tropheryma whipplei-stuffed macrophages in the duodenum, impaired T. whipplei-specific Th1 responses, and weak secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12) are hallmarks of classical Whipple's disease (CWD). This study addresses dendritic cell (DC) functionality during CWD. We documented composition, distribution, and functionality of DC ex vivo or after in vitro maturation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and by immunohistochemistry in situ. A decrease in peripheral DC of untreated CWD patients compared to healthy donors was due to reduced CD11chigh myeloid DC (M-DC). Decreased maturation markers CD83, CD86, and CCR7, as well as low IL-12 production in response to stimulation, disclosed an immature M-DC phenotype. In vitro-generated monocyte-derived DC from CWD patients showed normal maturation and T cell-stimulatory capacity under proinflammatory conditions but produced less IL-12 and failed to activate T. whipplei-specific Th1 cells. In duodenal and lymphoid tissues, T. whipplei was found within immature DC-SIGN+ DC. DC and proliferating lymphocytes were reduced in lymph nodes of CWD patients compared to levels in controls. Our results indicate that dysfunctional IL-12 production by DC provides suboptimal conditions for priming of T. whipplei-specific T cells during CWD and that immature DC carrying T. whipplei contribute to the dissemination of the bacterium. PMID:25385798

  17. The role of colloidal plasmonic nanostructures in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, C R; Honold, T; Gujar, T P; Retsch, M; Fery, A; Karg, M; Thelakkat, M

    2016-08-17

    Plasmonic particles can contribute via multiple processes to the light absorption process in solar cells. These particles are commonly introduced into organic solar cells via deposition techniques such as spin-coating or dip-coating. However, such techniques are inherently challenging to achieve homogenous surface coatings as they lack control of inter-particle spacing and particle density on larger areas. Here we introduce interface assisted colloidal self-assembly as a concept for the fabrication of well-defined macroscopic 2-dimensional monolayers of hydrogel encapsulated plasmonic gold nanoparticles. The monolayers showed a pronounced extinction in the visible wavelength range due to localized surface plasmon resonance with excellent optical homogeneity. Moreover this strategy allowed for the investigation of the potential of plasmonic monolayers at different interfaces of P3HT:PCBM based inverted organic solar cells. In general, for monolayers located anywhere underneath the active layer, the solar cell performance decreased due to parasitic absorption. However with thick active layers, where low hole mobility limited the charge transport to the top electrode, the plasmonic monolayer near that electrode spatially redistributed the light and charge generation close to the electrode led to an improved performance. This work systematically highlights the trade-offs that need to be critically considered for designing an efficient plasmonically enhanced organic solar cell.

  18. Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2007-10-01

    A number of studies have recently addressed the correlationship between diabetic pregnancy/macrosomia and differentiation of T-cells into Th1 and Th2 subsets. Diabetic pregnancy has been found to be associated with a decreased Th1 phenotype and IL-4 mRNA expression. In macrosomic offspring, high expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA, but not of Th2 cytokines is observed, indicating that the Th1 phenotype is upregulated during macrosomia. T-cells of gestational diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring seem to present a defect in signal transduction. Indeed, the recruitment of free intracellular calcium concentrations from intracellular pool in T-cells of these animals is altered. The phenotype of regulatory T-cells (T-Reg) is upregulated in diabetic pregnancy and their infants. T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomic obese offspring are in vivo activated. Adipokines and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) also seem to modulate the pro-inflammatory cytokines in these pathologies. Hence, activation of the immune system might be considered as one of the regulatory pathways including metabolic abnormalities in these two pathologies.

  19. Cell Competition and Its Role in the Regulation of Cell Fitness from Development to Cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Gregorio, Aida; Bowling, Sarah; Rodriguez, Tristan Argeo

    2016-09-26

    Cell competition is a cell fitness-sensing mechanism conserved from insects to mammals that eliminates those cells that, although viable, are less fit than their neighbors. An important implication of cell competition is that cellular fitness is not only a cell-intrinsic property but is also determined relative to the fitness of neighboring cells: a cell that is of suboptimal fitness in one context may be "super-fit" in the context of a different cell population. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which cell competition measures and communicates cell fitness levels and the implications of this mechanism for development, regeneration, and tumor progression. PMID:27676435

  20. Role of polarized cell divisions in zebrafish neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jon

    2009-04-01

    Development of epithelial cell polarity and morphogenesis of a central lumen are essential prerequisites for the formation of the vertebrate neural tube. In teleost fish embryos this first involves the formation of a solid neural rod structure that then undergoes a process of cavitation to form a lumen. This process is initiated from a neural plate that has a distinct organization compared to other vertebrates, and involves complex cell intercalations and rearrangements. A key element is a mode of polarized cell division that generates daughters with mirror-image apico-basal polarity. These mirror-symmetric divisions have powerful morphogenetic influence because when they occur in ectopic locations they orchestrate the development of ectopic apical and basal specializations and the development of ectopic neural tubes.

  1. The role of tissue resident cells in neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nancy D.; Luster, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are first responders of the immune system, rapidly migrating into affected tissues in response to injury or infection. To effectively call in this first line of defense, strategically placed cells within the vasculature and tissue respond to noxious stimuli by sending out coordinated signals that recruit neutrophils. Regulation of organ-specific neutrophil entry occurs at two levels. First, the vasculature supplying the organ provides cues for neutrophil egress out of the bloodstream in a manner dependent upon its unique cellular composition and architectural features. Second, resident immune cells and stromal cells within the organ send coordinated signals that guide neutrophils to their final destination. Here, we review recent findings that highlight the importance of these tissue-specific responses in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment and the initiation and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26297103

  2. Role of Actin Polymerization in Cell Locomotion: Molecules and Models

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, E. L.

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments forming at the anterior margin of a migrating cell are essential for the formation of filopodia, lamellipodia, and pseudopodia, the “feet” that the cell extends before it. These structures in turn are required for cell locomotion. Yet the molecular nature of the “nucleator” that seeds the polymerization of actin at the leading edge is unknown. Recent advances, including video microscopy of actin dynamics, discovery of proteins unique to the leading edge such as ponticulin, the Mab 2E4 antigen, and ABP 120, and novel experimental models of actin polymerization such as the actin-based movements of intracellular parasites, promise to shed light on this problem in the near future. PMID:8323743

  3. Caerulomycin A inhibits Th2 cell activity: a possible role in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Weshely; Gurram, Rama Krishna; Haleem, Nazia; Maurya, Sudeep K.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Caerulomycin A induces regulatory T cells differentiation by suppressing Th1 cells activity. The role of regulatory T cells is well established in suppressing the function of Th2 cells. Th2 cells are known to inflict the induction of the activation of asthma. Consequently, in the present study, we monitored the influence of Caerulomycin A in inhibiting the activity of Th2 cells and its impact in recuperating asthma symptoms. Interestingly, we observed that Caerulomycin A significantly suppressed the differentiation of Th2 cells, as evidenced by downregulation in the GATA-3 expression. Further, decline in the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines and IgE was noted in the animals suffering from asthma. Furthermore, we noticed substantial suppression in the inflammatory response and number of eosinophils in the lungs. In essence, this study signifies an important therapeutic role of Caerulomycin A in asthma. PMID:26481184

  4. KRT14 marks a subpopulation of bladder basal cells with pivotal role in regeneration and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papafotiou, George; Paraskevopoulou, Varvara; Vasilaki, Eleni; Kanaki, Zoi; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Klinakis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The urothelium is a specialized epithelium that lines the urinary tract. It consists of three different cell types, namely, basal, intermediate and superficial cells arranged in relatively distinct cell layers. Normally, quiescent, it regenerates fast upon injury, but the regeneration process is not fully understood. Although several reports have indicated the existence of progenitors, their identity and exact topology, as well as their role in key processes such as tissue regeneration and carcinogenesis have not been clarified. Here we show that a minor subpopulation of basal cells, characterized by the expression of keratin 14, possesses self-renewal capacity and also gives rise to all cell types of the urothelium during natural and injury-induced regeneration. Moreover, these cells represent cells of origin of urothelial cancer. Our findings support the hypothesis of basally located progenitors with profound roles in urothelial homoeostasis. PMID:27320313

  5. Construction of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, P. E.; Gu, P.; Hamp, W. T.; Izzo, V. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Rogers, J. A.

    2001-10-01

    HIT-SI is a ``bow tie'' spheromak designed to implement Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI). The engineering requirements of SIHI lead to several unique design features, including a multiply connected electrically insulating o-ring seal and a close-fitting passive flux conserver that is electrically insulated from the plasma. Prototype tests have been performed to verify the performance of the o-ring seal and the plasma sprayed zirconia insulation. An engineering test of the new HIT-SI front end will be done before it replaces the present HIT-II front end on HIT. Startup and one millisecond of sustainment will be done to test breakdown and verify power supply requirements. The power supplies and external coils are designed to provide 20 MW at 5 kHz to 50 kHz for 1 ms to the helicity injection circuits for this test. Progress in the construction and assembly of HIT-SI will be presented.

  6. PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

    2001-10-01

    Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

  7. Treatment of systemic sclerosis: potential role for stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wen; Derk, Chris T

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may “reset” the immune reconstitution and induce self tolerance of autoreactive lymphocytes, and has been explored in the treatments for systemic sclerosis. Phase I/II trials have shown a satisfactory risk benefit ratio. The true benefit will be identified by two ongoing prospective, randomized phase III trials. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and immunosuppressive properties. The use of MSCs has showed successful responses in patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft versus host disease in phase II trials, and may be a potentially promising option for patients with systemic sclerosis. PMID:24198505

  8. SHIELD-HIT12A - a Monte Carlo particle transport program for ion therapy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassler, N.; Hansen, D. C.; Lühr, A.; Thomsen, B.; Petersen, J. B.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT simulates the transport of ions through matter. Since SHIELD-HIT08 we added numerous features that improves speed, usability and underlying physics and thereby the user experience. The "-A" fork of SHIELD-HIT also aims to attach SHIELD-HIT to a heavy ion dose optimization algorithm to provide MC-optimized treatment plans that include radiobiology. Methods: SHIELD-HIT12A is written in FORTRAN and carefully retains platform independence. A powerful scoring engine is implemented scoring relevant quantities such as dose and track-average LET. It supports native formats compatible with the heavy ion treatment planning system TRiP. Stopping power files follow ICRU standard and are generated using the libdEdx library, which allows the user to choose from a multitude of stopping power tables. Results: SHIELD-HIT12A runs on Linux and Windows platforms. We experienced that new users quickly learn to use SHIELD-HIT12A and setup new geometries. Contrary to previous versions of SHIELD-HIT, the 12A distribution comes along with easy-to-use example files and an English manual. A new implementation of Vavilov straggling resulted in a massive reduction of computation time. Scheduled for later release are CT import and photon-electron transport. Conclusions: SHIELD-HIT12A is an interesting alternative ion transport engine. Apart from being a flexible particle therapy research tool, it can also serve as a back end for a MC ion treatment planning system. More information about SHIELD-HIT12A and a demo version can be found on http://www.shieldhit.org.

  9. The emerging role of senescent cells in tissue homeostasis and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of permanent growth arrest and is thought to play a pivotal role in tumor suppression. Cellular senescence may play an important role in tumor suppression, wound healing, and protection against tissue fibrosis in physiological conditions in vivo. However, accumulating evidence that senescent cells may have harmful effects in vivo and may contribute to tissue remodeling, organismal aging, and many age-related diseases also exists. Cellular senescence can be induced by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Both p53/p21 and p16/RB pathways are important for irreversible growth arrest in senescent cells. Senescent cells secret numerous biologically active factors. This specific secretion phenotype by senescent cells may largely contribute to physiological and pathological consequences in organisms. Here I review the molecular basis of cell cycle arrest and the specific secretion phenotype in cellular senescence. I also summarize the current knowledge of the role of cellular senescence in vivo in physiological and pathological settings. PMID:25994420

  10. The emerging role of senescent cells in tissue homeostasis and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of permanent growth arrest and is thought to play a pivotal role in tumor suppression. Cellular senescence may play an important role in tumor suppression, wound healing, and protection against tissue fibrosis in physiological conditions in vivo. However, accumulating evidence that senescent cells may have harmful effects in vivo and may contribute to tissue remodeling, organismal aging, and many age-related diseases also exists. Cellular senescence can be induced by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Both p53/p21 and p16/RB pathways are important for irreversible growth arrest in senescent cells. Senescent cells secret numerous biologically active factors. This specific secretion phenotype by senescent cells may largely contribute to physiological and pathological consequences in organisms. Here I review the molecular basis of cell cycle arrest and the specific secretion phenotype in cellular senescence. I also summarize the current knowledge of the role of cellular senescence in vivo in physiological and pathological settings. PMID:25994420

  11. Crucial role of PDX-1 in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and induction of surrogate beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kato, Ken; Fujitani, Yoshio; Matsuoka, Taka-aki

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. At an early stage of embryonic development, PDX-1 is initially expressed in the gut region when the foregut endoderm becomes committed to common pancreatic precursor cells. During pancreas development, PDX-1 expression is maintained in precursor cells, and later it becomes restricted to beta-cells. In mature beta-cells, PDX-1 transactivates the insulin gene and other genes involved in glucose sensing and metabolism, such as GLUT2 and glucokinase. MafA is a recently isolated beta-cell-specific transcription factor which functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription. During pancreas development, MafA expression is first detected at the beginning of the principal phase of insulin-producing cell production. Furthermore, these transcription factors play a crucial role in inducing surrogate beta-cells from non-beta-cells and thus could be therapeutic targets for diabetes.

  12. Roles of cell wall peroxidases in plant development.

    PubMed

    Francoz, Edith; Ranocha, Philippe; Nguyen-Kim, Huan; Jamet, Elisabeth; Burlat, Vincent; Dunand, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Class III peroxidases (CIII Prxs) are plant specific proteins. Based on in silico prediction and experimental evidence, they are mainly considered as cell wall localized proteins. Thanks to their dual hydroxylic and peroxidative cycles, they can produce ROS as well as oxidize cell wall aromatic compounds within proteins and phenolics that are either free or linked to polysaccharides. Thus, they are tightly associated to cell wall loosening and stiffening. They are members of large multigenic families, mostly due to an elevated rate of gene duplication in higher plants, resulting in a high risk of functional redundancy between them. However, proteomic and (micro)transcriptomic analyses have shown that CIII Prx expression profiles are highly specific. Based on these omic analyses, several reverse genetic studies have demonstrated the importance of the spatio-temporal regulation of their expression and ability to interact with cell wall microdomains in order to achieve specific activity in vivo. Each CIII Prx isoform could have specific functions in muro and this could explain the conservation of a high number of genes in plant genomes.

  13. A new role for GABA: inhibition of tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Arturo

    2003-04-01

    GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, participates outside the CNS in diverse functions such as platelet aggregation and the acrosomal reaction in spermatozoa. A recent study now demonstrates that GABA inhibits the migration of colon carcinoma cells, paving the way to the development of specific pharmacological agents that delay or inhibit invasion and metastasis of various cancer types.

  14. Roles of cell volume in molecular and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Extracellular tonicity and volume regulation control a great number of molecular and cellular functions including: cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, hormone and neuromediator release, gene expression, ion channel and transporter activity and metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe these effects and to determine if they are direct or are secondarily the result of the activity of second messengers. PMID:22192789

  15. The role of ion shifts in cell injury.

    PubMed

    Trump, B F; Berezesky, I K; Chang, S H; Pendergrass, R E; Mergner, W J

    1979-01-01

    The present paper reviews studies which utilize x-ray microanalysis to determine intracellular ion shifts following several types of cell injury. New data from our own laboratory on several cell injury systems are discussed. Concentration estimates are made by comparison of data from tissues with a series of standards prepared in 20% albumin followed by cryosectioning. Hemorrhagic shock in rats is followed by rapid changes of ions in both muscle and liver. These include increased levels of sodium and chlorine and decreased levels of potassium which can be correlated with deficits in the energy charge. Measurements made over hepatocellular carcinomas in the mouse, induced by safrole show marked changes in comparison with non-transformed cells. These include striking increases in sodium and chloride and decreases in potassium and phosphorus which may be related to growth control. Studies on ischemia produced by arterial clamping in the rat kidney and the dog heart show somewhat similar changes. Moreover, in these models much interest is directed at early increases of cytoplasmic calcium with decreased mitochondrial calcium levels at later intervals. Following reflow, there is a prominent increase of calcium in the cytosol. These changes in calcium may be related to activation of phospholipases producing permeability changes which may contribute to further ion shifts as well as ultimately to cell death. The paper also comments on the use of cryostat sections for some types of routine pathological analysis.

  16. Mechanics in Mechanosensitivity of Cell Adhesion and its Roles in Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; He, Shijie; Ji, Baohua

    2012-12-01

    Cells sense and respond to external stimuli and properties of their environment through focal adhesion complexes (FACs) to regulate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including cell migration. Currently, the basic principles in mechanics of the mechanosensitivity of cell adhesion and migration have not been fully understood. In this paper, an FEM-based mechano-chemical coupling model is proposed for studying the cell migration behaviors in which the dynamics of stability of FACs and the effect of cell shape on cell traction force distribution are considered. We find that the driving force of cell migration is produced by the competition of stability of cell adhesion between the cell front and cell rear, which consequently controls the speed of cell migration. We show that the rigidity gradient of matrix can bias this competition which allows cell to exhibit a durotaxis behavior, i.e. the larger the gradient, the higher the cell speed.

  17. Adaptation to alkalosis induces cell cycle delay and apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells: role of Aquaporin-2.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, Valeria; Flamenco, Pilar; Melamud, Luciana; Galizia, Luciano; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2010-08-01

    Collecting ducts (CD) not only constitute the final site for regulating urine concentration by increasing apical membrane Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression, but are also essential for the control of acid-base status. The aim of this work was to examine, in renal cells, the effects of chronic alkalosis on cell growth/death as well as to define whether AQP2 expression plays any role during this adaptation. Two CD cell lines were used: WT- (not expressing AQPs) and AQP2-RCCD(1) (expressing apical AQP2). Our results showed that AQP2 expression per se accelerates cell proliferation by an increase in cell cycle progression. Chronic alkalosis induced, in both cells lines, a time-dependent reduction in cell growth. Even more, cell cycle movement, assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase and propidium iodide analyses, revealed a G2/M phase cell accumulation associated with longer S- and G2/M-transit times. This G2/M arrest is paralleled with changes consistent with apoptosis. All these effects appeared 24 h before and were always more pronounced in cells expressing AQP2. Moreover, in AQP2-expressing cells, part of the observed alkalosis cell growth decrease is explained by AQP2 protein down-regulation. We conclude that in CD cells alkalosis causes a reduction in cell growth by cell cycle delay that triggers apoptosis as an adaptive reaction to this environment stress. Since cell volume changes are prerequisite for the initiation of cell proliferation or apoptosis, we propose that AQP2 expression facilitates cell swelling or shrinkage leading to the activation of channels necessary to the control of these processes. PMID:20432437

  18. The effect of fastball backspin rate on baseball hitting accuracy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takatoshi; Morohoshi, Jun; Nagami, Tomoyuki; Nakata, Hiroki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of fastballs of equivalent speed can differ; for example, one element of this difference could be due to the effect of rate and orientation of ball spin on launched ball trajectory. In the present experiment, baseball batters' accuracy in hitting fastballs with different backspin rates at a constant ball velocity of 36 m/s was examined. Thirteen skilled baseball players (professionals, semiprofessionals, and college varsity players) participated in the study. The movements of bat and ball were recorded using two synchronized high-speed video cameras. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) was calculated and used to analyze the relationship between ball backspin rate and the vertical distance between ball center and sweet spot at the moment of ball-bat impact. Ball backspin rate was positively correlated with increases in the distance from the optimal contact point of the swung bat (sweet spot) to the actual point of contact (r = .38, P < .001). Batters were most effective at the usual backspin rate for the ball velocity used. The decrease in accuracy of the batter's swing that was observed when the fastball's backspin deviated from the usual rate likely occurred because experienced batters predict ball trajectory from perceived ball speed. PMID:22923374

  19. Scientific impact: the story of your big hit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinatra, Roberta; Wang, Dashun; Deville, Pierre; Song, Chaoming; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    A gradual increase in performance through learning and practice characterize most trades, from sport to music or engineering, and common sense suggests this to be true in science as well. This prompts us to ask: what are the precise patterns that lead to scientific excellence? Does performance indeed improve throughout a scientific career? Are there quantifiable signs of an impending scientific hit? Using citation-based measures as a proxy of impact, we show that (i) major discoveries are not preceded by works of increasing impact, nor are followed by work of higher impact, (ii) the precise time ranking of the highest impact work in a scientist's career is uniformly random, with the higher probability to have a major discovery in the middle of scientific careers being due only to changes in productivity, (iii) there is a strong correlation between the highest impact work and average impact of a scientist's work. These findings suggest that the impact of a paper is drawn randomly from an impact distribution that is unique for each scientist. We present a model which allows to reconstruct the individual impact distribution, making possible to create synthetic careers that exhibit the same properties of the real data and to define a ranking based on the overall impact of a scientist. RS acknowledges support from the James McDonnell Foundation.

  20. The effect of fastball backspin rate on baseball hitting accuracy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takatoshi; Morohoshi, Jun; Nagami, Tomoyuki; Nakata, Hiroki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of fastballs of equivalent speed can differ; for example, one element of this difference could be due to the effect of rate and orientation of ball spin on launched ball trajectory. In the present experiment, baseball batters' accuracy in hitting fastballs with different backspin rates at a constant ball velocity of 36 m/s was examined. Thirteen skilled baseball players (professionals, semiprofessionals, and college varsity players) participated in the study. The movements of bat and ball were recorded using two synchronized high-speed video cameras. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) was calculated and used to analyze the relationship between ball backspin rate and the vertical distance between ball center and sweet spot at the moment of ball-bat impact. Ball backspin rate was positively correlated with increases in the distance from the optimal contact point of the swung bat (sweet spot) to the actual point of contact (r = .38, P < .001). Batters were most effective at the usual backspin rate for the ball velocity used. The decrease in accuracy of the batter's swing that was observed when the fastball's backspin deviated from the usual rate likely occurred because experienced batters predict ball trajectory from perceived ball speed.

  1. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  2. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J.; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M.; Hughes, Andrew D.; Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Nakao, A.; Shufesky, William J.; Williams, Amanda L.; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A.; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  3. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection.

  4. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  5. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  6. Novel Processed Form of Syndecan-1 Shed from SCC-9 Cells Plays a Role in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Simabuco, Fernando M.; Zanetti, Mariana R.; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Pauletti, Bianca A.; Gonçalves, Anderson; Agostini, Michelle; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Fox, Jay W.; Leme, Adriana F. Paes

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular milieu is comprised in part by products of cellular secretion and cell surface shedding. The presence of such molecules of the sheddome and secretome in the context of the extracellular milieu may have important clinical implications. In cancer they have been hypothesized to play a role in tumor growth and metastasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the sheddome/secretome from two cell lines could be correlated with their potential for tumor development. Two epithelial cell lines, HaCaT and SCC-9, were chosen based on their differing abilities to form tumors in animal models of tumorigenesis. These cell lines when stimulated with phorbol-ester (PMA) showed different characteristics as assessed by cell migration, adhesion and higher gelatinase activity. Proteomic analysis of the media from these treated cells identified interesting, functionally relevant differences in their sheddome/secretome. Among the shed proteins, soluble syndecan-1 was found only in media from stimulated tumorigenic cells (SCC-9) and its fragments were observed in higher amount in the stimulated tumorigenic cells than stimulated non-tumorigenic cells (HaCaT). The increase in soluble syndecan-1 was associated with a decrease in membrane-bound syndecan-1 of SCC-9 cells after PMA stimuli. To support a functional role for soluble syndecan-1 fragments we demonstrated that the synthetic syndecan-1 peptide was able to induce cell migration in both cell lines. Taken together, these results suggested that PMA stimulation alters the sheddome/secretome of the tumorigenic cell line SCC-9 and one such component, the syndecan-1 peptide identified in this study, was revealed to promote migration in these epithelial cell lines. PMID:22905270

  7. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  8. Role of iNOS in Bystander Signaling Between Macrophages and Lymphoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath; Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Krishna, Malini

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The present report describes the bystander effects of radiation between similar and dissimilar cells and the role of iNOS in such communication. Materials and Methods: EL-4 and RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to 5 Gy {gamma}-irradiation. The medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated cells. Results: Irradiated EL-4 cells as well as those cultured in the presence of medium from {gamma}-irradiated EL-4 cells showed an upregulation of NF-{kappa}B, iNOS, p53, and p21/waf1 genes. The directly irradiated and the bystander EL-4 cells showed an increase in DNA damage, apoptosis, and NO production. Bystander signaling was also found to exist between RAW 264.7 (macrophage) and EL-4 (lymphoma) cells. Unstimulated or irradiated RAW 264.7 cells did not induce bystander effect in unirradiated EL-4 cells, but LPS stimulated and irradiated RAW 264.7 cells induced an upregulation of NF-{kappa}B and iNOS genes and increased the DNA damage in bystander EL-4 cells. Treatment of EL-4 or RAW 264.7 cells with L-NAME significantly reduced the induction of gene expression and DNA damage in the bystander EL-4 cells, whereas treatment with cPTIO only partially reduced the induction of gene expression and DNA damage in the bystander EL-4 cells. Conclusions: It was concluded that active iNOS in the irradiated cells was essential for bystander response.

  9. A role for TLR signaling during B cell activation in antiretroviral-treated HIV individuals.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART(+)). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART(+) and HIV(-) subjects. However, B cells of HIVART(+) subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART(+) individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV(-) subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV(-) subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART(+) individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV(-) subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART(+) subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART(+) subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  10. A Role for TLR Signaling During B Cell Activation in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART+). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART+ and HIV− subjects. However, B cells of HIVART+ subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART+ individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV− subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV− subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART+ individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV− subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART+ subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART+ subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  11. Role of catch bonds in actomyosin mechanics and cell mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vernerey, Franck J; Akalp, Umut

    2016-07-01

    We propose a mechanism of adherent cell mechanosensing, based on the idea that the contractile actomyosin machinery behaves as a catch bond. For this, we construct a simplified model of the actomyosin structure that constitutes the building block of stress fibers and express the stability of cross bridges in terms of the force-dependent bonding energy of the actomyosin bond. Consistent with experimental measurements, we then consider that the energy barrier of the actomyosin bond increases for tension and show that this response is enough to explain the force-induced stabilization of a stress fiber. Further numerical simulations at the cellular level show that the catch-bond hypothesis can help in understanding and predict the sensitivity of adherent cells to substrate stiffness. PMID:27575160

  12. Role of catch bonds in actomyosin mechanics and cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Akalp, Umut

    2016-07-01

    We propose a mechanism of adherent cell mechanosensing, based on the idea that the contractile actomyosin machinery behaves as a catch bond. For this, we construct a simplified model of the actomyosin structure that constitutes the building block of stress fibers and express the stability of cross bridges in terms of the force-dependent bonding energy of the actomyosin bond. Consistent with experimental measurements, we then consider that the energy barrier of the actomyosin bond increases for tension and show that this response is enough to explain the force-induced stabilization of a stress fiber. Further numerical simulations at the cellular level show that the catch-bond hypothesis can help in understanding and predict the sensitivity of adherent cells to substrate stiffness.

  13. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells: the role of wall slip.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K; Marenduzzo, D; Cates, M E

    2012-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study, via lattice Boltzmann simulations, of a microscopic model for cytoplasmic streaming in algal cells such as those of Chara corallina. We modelled myosin motors tracking along actin lanes as spheres undergoing directed motion along fixed lines. The sphere dimension takes into account the fact that motors drag vesicles or other organelles, and, unlike previous work, we model the boundary close to which the motors move as walls with a finite slip layer. By using realistic parameter values for actin lane and myosin density, as well as for endoplasmic and vacuole viscosity and the slip layer close to the wall, we find that this simplified view, which does not rely on any coupling between motors, cytoplasm and vacuole other than that provided by viscous Stokes flow, is enough to account for the observed magnitude of streaming velocities in intracellular fluid in living plant cells.

  14. Mps1 kinase regulates tumor cell viability via its novel role in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Ling, Y; Guo, Y; Bai, Y; Shi, X; Gong, F; Tan, P; Zhang, Y; Wei, C; He, X; Ramirez, A; Liu, X; Cao, C; Zhong, H; Xu, Q; Ma, R Z

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mitotic kinase monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) for tumor therapy has been investigated for many years. Although it was suggested that Mps1 regulates cell viability through its role in spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), the underlying mechanism remains less defined. In an endeavor to reveal the role of high levels of mitotic kinase Mps1 in the development of colon cancer, we unexpectedly found the amount of Mps1 required for cell survival far exceeds that of maintaining SAC in aneuploid cell lines. This suggests that other functions of Mps1 besides SAC are also employed to maintain cell viability. Mps1 regulates cell viability independent of its role in cytokinesis as the genetic depletion of Mps1 spanning from metaphase to cytokinesis affects neither cytokinesis nor cell viability. Furthermore, we developed a single-cycle inhibition strategy that allows disruption of Mps1 function only in mitosis. Using this strategy, we found the functions of Mps1 in mitosis are vital for cell viability as short-term treatment of mitotic colon cancer cell lines with Mps1 inhibitors is sufficient to cause cell death. Interestingly, Mps1 inhibitors synergize with microtubule depolymerizing drug in promoting polyploidization but not in tumor cell growth inhibition. Finally, we found that Mps1 can be recruited to mitochondria by binding to voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) via its C-terminal fragment. This interaction is essential for cell viability as Mps1 mutant defective for interaction fails to main cell viability, causing the release of cytochrome c. Meanwhile, deprivation of VDAC1 can make tumor cells refractory to loss of Mps1-induced cell death. Collectively, we conclude that inhibition of the novel mitochondrial function Mps1 is sufficient to kill tumor cells. PMID:27383047

  15. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in breast cancer bone dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have been observed as breast cancer disseminates to the bone. The selective depletion of pDC in mice led to a total abrogation of bone metastasis as well as to an increase in TH1 antitumor response, suggesting that pDC may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23526329

  16. The fundamental role of endothelial cells in hantavirus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hepojoki, Jussi; Vaheri, Antti; Strandin, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae, is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in man, often with severe consequences. Vascular leakage is evident in severe hantavirus infections, and increased permeability contributes to the pathogenesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on hantavirus interactions with hematopoietic and endothelial cells, and their effects on the increased vascular permeability. PMID:25566236

  17. The emerging roles of inositol pyrophosphates in eukaryotic cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Thota, Swarna Gowri; Bhandari, Rashna

    2015-09-01

    Inositol pyrophosphates are water soluble derivatives of inositol that contain pyrophosphate or diphosphate moieties in addition to monophosphates. The best characterised inositol pyrophosphates, are IP7 (diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate or PP-IP5), and IP8 (bisdiphosphoinositol tetrakisphosphate or (PP)2-IP4). These energy-rich small molecules are present in all eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, and are involved in a wide range of cellular functions including apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, DNA repair, osmoregulation, phosphate homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, immune signalling, cell cycle regulation, and ribosome synthesis. Identified more than 20 years ago, there is still only a rudimentary understanding of the mechanisms by which inositol pyrophosphates participate in these myriad pathways governing cell physiology and homeostasis. The unique stereochemical and bioenergetic properties these molecules possess as a consequence of the presence of one or two pyrophosphate moieties in the vicinity of densely packed monophosphates are likely to form the molecular basis for their participation in multiple signalling and metabolic pathways. The aim of this review is to provide first time researchers in this area with an introduction to inositol pyrophosphates and a comprehensive overview on their cellular functions.

  18. Therapeutic Roles of Tendon Stem/Progenitor Cells in Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Lin, Yu-cheng; Rui, Yun-feng; Xu, Hong-liang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Chen; Teng, Gao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a tendon disorder characterized by activity-related pain, local edema, focal tenderness to palpation, and decreased strength in the affected area. Tendinopathy is prevalent in both athletes and the general population, highlighting the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of this disorder. Current treatments of tendinopathy are both conservative and symptomatic. The discovery of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) and erroneous differentiation of TSPCs have provided new insights into the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. In this review, we firstly present the histopathological characteristics of tendinopathy and explore the cellular and molecular cues in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Current evidence of the depletion of the stem cell pool and altered TSPCs fate in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy has been presented. The potential regulatory factors for either tenogenic or nontenogenic differentiation of TSPCs are also summarized. The regulation of endogenous TSPCs or supplementation with exogenous TSPCs as therapeutic targets for the treatment of tendinopathy is proposed. Therefore, inhibiting the erroneous differentiation of TSPCs and regulating the differentiation of TSPCs into tendon cells might be important areas of future research and could provide new clinical treatments for tendinopathy. The current evidence suggests that TSPCs are promising therapeutic targets for the management of tendinopathy. PMID:27195010

  19. Solar cell arcing: The role of outgassing and contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Green, B. D.; Upschulte, B. L.; Weyl, G.; Hastings, D.; Aifer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of outgassing, venting, and thruster firing events on spacecraft system performance has been a long standing issue. Recent laboratory measurements on negatively biased high voltage solar cells at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) suggest that some currently designed and certainly future space power systems must address/re-evaluate this issue. Our observations show that exposing these cells to moderate levels (10 exp -3 torr-min) of H2O vapor enhances the arcing frequency, while heating to 85 C to remove water vapor significantly reduces the arc frequency. The interaction of the adhesive used to attach the cover glass to the solar cell with ambient water vapor is the key factor in determining arcing rates. Elimination of adhesive exposed to the environmental plasma reduces the arc frequency more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminates any sensitivity to H2O exposure. The adhesive may also become a source of spacecraft contamination. Macroscopic amounts were observed to blow off some arc events, and (we assume) electrostatically precipitate at other negatively biased locations. Data, analysis, and potential impact for future space platforms are discussed.

  20. The role of CD4 on mechanical properties of live cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Chien; Nguyen, Thi-Huong

    2016-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in the characterization and identification of CD4 functions, its role in mechanical properties of cell membrane remains largely unknown. Here an atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the roles of CD4 in the elasticity of the leukemic human Jurkat (clone E6-1) cell membranes. Analysis of the approach force curves with Hertz model for a completely elastic soft sample measured on the selected CD4+ and CD4- cells showed that CD4+ cell membrane was softer than CD4- one. To confirm that CD4 plays a role in altering cell elasticity, human embryonic kidney 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (wt) CD4 plasmid before being used in AFM nanoindentation experiments. The results also demonstrated CD4- membrane was stiffer than CD4+ one suggesting that CD4 integrated into plasma membrane and altered its mechanical properties. The study gives insights into the role of CD4 on cell membrane mechanical characteristics and might be helpful for development of cell biology and medicine. PMID:26362701

  1. Experiments With the Role of Lipids in Cell-Membrane Permeability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, O. Roger

    1970-01-01

    Reviews research into the composition and structure of cell membranes. Describes four experiments, suitable for high school students, on the role of lipids in regulating diffusion across cell boundaries. Gives purpose and procedures for each experiment, laboratory data sheets, and the results of classroom trials of the experiments. (EB)

  2. The role of CD4 on mechanical properties of live cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Chien; Nguyen, Thi-Huong

    2016-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in the characterization and identification of CD4 functions, its role in mechanical properties of cell membrane remains largely unknown. Here an atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the roles of CD4 in the elasticity of the leukemic human Jurkat (clone E6-1) cell membranes. Analysis of the approach force curves with Hertz model for a completely elastic soft sample measured on the selected CD4+ and CD4- cells showed that CD4+ cell membrane was softer than CD4- one. To confirm that CD4 plays a role in altering cell elasticity, human embryonic kidney 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (wt) CD4 plasmid before being used in AFM nanoindentation experiments. The results also demonstrated CD4- membrane was stiffer than CD4+ one suggesting that CD4 integrated into plasma membrane and altered its mechanical properties. The study gives insights into the role of CD4 on cell membrane mechanical characteristics and might be helpful for development of cell biology and medicine.

  3. A Critical Role for the TLR4/TRIF Pathway in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Rejection by Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Ziqiang; Hussain, Lala-Rukh; Huang, Yiming; Ding, Chuanlin; Bozulic, Larry D.; Wen, Yujie; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2013-01-01

    We show for the first time that signaling through the TLR4/TRIF pathway plays a critical role in allogeneic bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection. This appears to be unique to BMC as organ allografts are rejected mainly via MyD88 signaling. Using T or T/B cell-deficient mice, we found that BMC allorejection occurred early before T cell activation and was T and B cell-independent, suggesting an effector role for innate immune cells in BMC rejection. We further demonstrated the innate immune signaling in BMC allorejection by showing superior engraftment in mice deficient in TRIF or TLR4 but not MyD88 or TLR3. The restored cytotoxicity in TRIF deficient recipients transferred with wildtype F4/80+ or NK1.1+ cells suggests TRIF signaling dependence on macrophages or NK cells in early BMC rejection. Production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TRIF relevant chemokine MCP-1 was significantly increased early after bone marrow transplantation. In vivo specific depletion of macrophages or NK innate immune cells in combination with anti-CD154/rapamycin resulted in additive-enhanced allogeneic engraftment. The requirement for irradiation was completely eliminated when both macrophages and NK cells were depleted in combination with anti-CD154/rapamycin to target T and B cells, supporting the hypothesis that two barriers involving innate and adaptive immunity exist in mediating rejection of allogeneic BMC. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for innate immunity in BMC allorejection via signaling through a unique MyD88-independent TLR4/TRIF mechanism. These findings may have direct clinical impact on strategies for conditioning recipients for stem cell transplantation. PMID:23146386

  4. G Protein Coupled Receptors in Embryonic Stem Cells: A Role for Gs-Alpha Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Layden, Brian T.; Newman, Marsha; Chen, Fei; Fisher, Amanda; Lowe, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of receptor mediated signaling pathways in embryonic stem (ES) cells is needed to facilitate strategies for cell replacement using ES cells. One large receptor family, largely uninvestigated in ES cells, is G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). An important role for these receptors in embryonic development has been described, but little is known about GPCR expression in ES cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have examined the expression profile of 343 different GPCRs in mouse ES cells demonstrating for the first time that a large number of GPCRs are expressed in undifferentiated and differentiating ES cells, and in many cases at high levels. To begin to define a role for GPCR signaling in ES cells, the impact of activating Gs-alpha, one of the major alpha subunits that couples to GPCRs, was investigated. Gs-alpha activation resulted in larger embryoid bodies (EBs), due, in part, to increased cell proliferation and prevented the time-related decline in expression of transcription factors important for maintaining ES cell pluripotency. Significance/Conclusions These studies suggest that Gs-alpha signaling contributes to ES cell proliferation and pluripotency and provide a framework for further investigation of GPCRs in ES cells. PMID:20161705

  5. Post-mitotic role of nucleostemin as a promoter of skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Romanova, Liudmila; Kellner, Steven; Verma, Mayank; Rayner, Samuel; Asakura, Atsushi; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2010-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is a nucleolar protein abundantly expressed in a variety of proliferating cells and undifferentiated cells. Its known functions include cell cycle regulation and the control of pre-rRNA processing. It also has been proposed that NS has an additional role in undifferentiated cells due to its downregulation during stem cell differentiation and its upregulation during tissue regeneration. Here, however, we demonstrate that skeletal muscle cell differentiation has a unique expression profile of NS in that it is continuously expressed during differentiation. NS was expressed at similar levels in non-proliferating muscle stem cells (satellite cells), rapidly proliferating precursor cells (myoblasts) and post-mitotic terminally differentiated cells (myotubes and myofibers). The sustained expression of NS during terminal differentiation is necessary to support increased protein synthesis during this process. Downregulation of NS inhibited differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes, accompanied by striking downregulation of key myogenic transcription factors, such as myogenin and MyoD. In contrast, upregulation of NS inhibited proliferation and promoted muscle differentiation in a p53-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that NS has an unexpected role in post-mitotic terminal differentiation. Importantly, these findings also indicate that, contrary to suggestions in the literature, the expression of NS cannot always be used as a reliable indicator for undifferentiated cells or proliferating cells.

  6. Role of satellite glial cells in gastrointestinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hanani, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pain is a common clinical problem, for which effective therapy is quite limited. Sensations from the GI tract, including pain, are mediated largely by neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and to a smaller extent by vagal afferents emerging from neurons in the nodose/jugular ganglia. Neurons in rodent DRG become hyperexcitable in models of GI pain (e.g., gastric or colonic inflammation), and can serve as a source for chronic pain. Glial cells are another element in the pain signaling pathways, and there is evidence that spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) undergo activation (gliosis) in various pain models and contribute to pain. Recently it was found that satellite glial cells (SGCs), the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia, might also contribute to chronic pain in rodent models. Most of that work focused on somatic pain, but in several studies GI pain was also investigated, and these are discussed in the present review. We have shown that colonic inflammation induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice leads to the activation of SGCs in DRG and increases gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells. This coupling appears to contribute to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons that innervate the colon. Blocking gap junctions (GJ) in vitro reduced neuronal hyperexcitability induced by inflammation, suggesting that glial GJ participate in SGC-neuron interactions. Moreover, blocking GJ by carbenoxolone and other agents reduces pain behavior. Similar changes in SGCs were also found in the mouse nodose ganglia (NG), which provide sensory innervation to most of the GI tract. Following systemic inflammation, SGCs in these ganglia were activated, and displayed augmented coupling and greater sensitivity to the pain mediator ATP. The contribution of these changes to visceral pain remains to be determined. These results indicate that although visceral pain is unique, it shares basic mechanisms with somatic pain

  7. The multitasking mast cell: positive and negative roles in the progression of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Christy, Alison L; Brown, Melissa A

    2007-09-01

    Among the potential outcomes of an aberrantly functioning immune system are allergic disease and autoimmunity. Although it has been assumed that the underlying mechanisms mediating these conditions are completely different, recent evidence shows that mast cells provide a common link. Mast cells reside in most tissues, are particularly prevalent at sites of Ag entry, and act as sentinel cells of the immune system. They express many inflammatory mediators that affect both innate and adaptive cellular function. They contribute to pathologic allergic inflammation but also serve an important protective role in bacterial and parasite infections. Given the proinflammatory nature of autoimmune responses, it is not surprising that studies using murine models of autoimmunity clearly implicate mast cells in the initiation and/or progression of autoimmune disease. In this review, we discuss the defined and hypothesized mechanisms of mast cell influence on autoimmune diseases, including their surprising and newly discovered role as anti-inflammatory cells.

  8. Assembly of the flagellum and its role in cell morphogenesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sue

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic flagella are microtubule-based structures required for a variety of functions including cell motility and sensory perception. Most eukaryotic flagella grow out from a cell into the surrounding medium, but when the flagellum of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei exits the cell via the flagellar pocket, it is attached along the length of the cell body by a cytoskeletal structure called the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). The exact reasons for flagellum attachment have remained elusive, but evidence is emerging that the attached flagellum plays a major role in cell morphogenesis in this organism. In this review we discuss evidence published in the past four years that is unravelling the role of the flagellum in organelle segregation, inheritance of cell shape and cytokinesis. PMID:20541452

  9. Th17 Cells in Type 1 Diabetes: Role in the Pathogenesis and Regulation by Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yangyang; Liu, Yu; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by progressive destruction of insulin producing pancreatic islet β cells. The risk of developing T1D is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. A growing body of evidence supports an important role of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells along with impaired T regulatory (Treg) cells in the development of T1D in animal models and humans. Alteration of gut microbiota has been implicated to be responsible for the imbalance between Th17 and Treg cells. However, there is controversy concerning a pathogenic versus protective role of Th17 cells in murine models of diabetes in the context of influence of gut microbiota. In this review we will summarize current knowledge about Th17 cells and gut microbiota involved in T1D and propose Th17 targeted therapy in children with islet autoimmunity to prevent progression to overt diabetes. PMID:26843788

  10. Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke: The Role of Leukocytes and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Park, Joohyun; Chang, Ji Young; Kim, Sa-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The immune response after stroke is known to play a major role in ischemic brain pathobiology. The inflammatory signals released by immune mediators activated by brain injury sets off a complex series of biochemical and molecular events which have been increasingly recognized as a key contributor to neuronal cell death. The primary immune mediators involved are glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocyte. After ischemic stroke, activation of glial cells and subsequent release of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals are important for modulating both neuronal cell damage and wound healing. Infiltrated leukocytes release inflammatory mediators into the site of the lesion, thereby exacerbating brain injury. This review describes how the roles of glial cells and circulating leukocytes are a double-edged sword for neuroinflammation by focusing on their detrimental and protective effects in ischemic stroke. Here, we will focus on underlying characterize of glial cells and leukocytes under inflammation after ischemic stroke. PMID:27790058

  11. Unexpected Roles for Core Promoter Recognition Factors in Cell-type Specific Transcription and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, the eukaryotic core promoter recognition complex was generally thought to play an essential but passive role in the regulation of gene expression. However, recent evidence indicates that core-promoter recognition complexes in conjunction with “non-prototypic” subunits may play a critical regulatory role in driving cell specific programs of transcription during development. Furthermore, new roles for components of these complexes have been identified beyond development, for example in mediating interactions with chromatin and in maintaining active gene expression across cell divisions. PMID:20628347

  12. Role of dendritic cells in immunopathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, D; Fauci, A S

    1997-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease has been a subject of considerable interest for several years. Initial studies focused on the infection, dysfunction, and depletion of DC in HIV-infected individuals. More recent studies have begun to identify the functional role of DC in the initiation and propagation of viral replication in T cells in HIV-infected individuals. This review discusses recent data regarding the role of DC in HIV disease with the aim of delineating basic immunopathogenic principles of infection and the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:9105759

  13. The Role of Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Metastasis and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Popov, Vladimir M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess the capacity to self-renew and to generate heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise tumors. A substantial body of evidence supports a model in which CSCs play a major role in the initiation, maintenance, and clinical outcome of cancers. In contrast, analysis of the role of CSCs in metastasis has been mainly conceptual and speculative. This review summarizes recent data that support the theory of CSCs as the source of metastatic lesions in breast cancer, with a focus on the key role of the microenvironment in the stemness-metastasis link. PMID:21640330

  14. Characteristics of HLA-E Restricted T-Cell Responses and Their Role in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human HLA-E can, in addition to self-antigens, also present pathogen-derived sequences, which elicit specific T-cell responses. T-cells recognize their antigen presented by HLA-E highly specifically and have unique functional and phenotypical properties. Pathogen specific HLA-E restricted CD8+ T-cells are an interesting new player in the field of immunology. Future work should address their exact roles and relative contributions in the immune response against infectious diseases.

  15. Coexistent loss of INI1 and BRG1 expression in a rhabdoid renal cell carcinoma (RCC): implications for a possible role of SWI/SNF complex in the pathogenesis of RCC.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qiu; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Shen, Qin; Shi, Shan-Shan; Tu, Pin; Shi, Qun-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the immunohistochemical and molecular profiles of an unusual RCC showed coexistent absence of INI1 and BRG1 expression, rhabdoid morphology, and poor prognosis. Histologically, the tumor had rhabdoid features, which were demonstrated by large round to polygonal cells with eccentric nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm varying from abundant to scanty. Immunohistochemically, the tumor were positive for BRM, PBRM1, ARID1A, CD10, CKpan, Vimentin, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX), and P504S (AMACR) but negative for INI1, BRG1, HMB45, melan A, CK7, CD117, Ksp-cadherin, TFEB, TFE3, and Cathepsin K. We detected all three exons status of the VHL gene of the tumor and observed 1 somatic mutations in 1st exon. Chromosome 3p deletion, coupled with polysomy of chromosome 3 was also found. Based on these findings, it is further indicated that in some cases, rhabdoid RCC may arise from clear cell RCC. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex may be an attractive candidate for being the "second hit" in RCCs and may play an important role during tumor progression. The role of SWI/SNF complex in rhabdoid RCC should be further studied on a larger number of cases.

  16. Coexistent loss of INI1 and BRG1 expression in a rhabdoid renal cell carcinoma (RCC): implications for a possible role of SWI/SNF complex in the pathogenesis of RCC.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qiu; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Shen, Qin; Shi, Shan-Shan; Tu, Pin; Shi, Qun-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the immunohistochemical and molecular profiles of an unusual RCC showed coexistent absence of INI1 and BRG1 expression, rhabdoid morphology, and poor prognosis. Histologically, the tumor had rhabdoid features, which were demonstrated by large round to polygonal cells with eccentric nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm varying from abundant to scanty. Immunohistochemically, the tumor were positive for BRM, PBRM1, ARID1A, CD10, CKpan, Vimentin, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX), and P504S (AMACR) but negative for INI1, BRG1, HMB45, melan A, CK7, CD117, Ksp-cadherin, TFEB, TFE3, and Cathepsin K. We detected all three exons status of the VHL gene of the tumor and observed 1 somatic mutations in 1st exon. Chromosome 3p deletion, coupled with polysomy of chromosome 3 was also found. Based on these findings, it is further indicated that in some cases, rhabdoid RCC may arise from clear cell RCC. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex may be an attractive candidate for being the "second hit" in RCCs and may play an important role during tumor progression. The role of SWI/SNF complex in rhabdoid RCC should be further studied on a larger number of cases. PMID:24817979

  17. The role of protein kinase C in cell surface signal transduction and tumour promotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, Yasutomi

    1984-04-01

    Protein kinase C has a crucial role in signal transduction for a variety of biologically active substances which activate cellular functions and proliferation. When cells are stimulated, protein kinase C is transiently activated by diacylglycerol which is produced in the membrane during the signal-induced turnover of inositol phospholipids. Tumour-promoting phorbol esters, when intercalated into the cell membrane, may substitute for diacylglycerol and permanently activate protein kinase C. The enzyme probably serves as a receptor for the tumour promoters. Further exploration of the roles of this enzyme may provide clues for understanding the mechanism of cell growth and differentiation.

  18. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  19. Heavy metals in the cell nucleus - role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sas-Nowosielska, Hanna; Pawlas, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    People are exposed to heavy metals both in an occupational and natural environment. The most pronounced effects of heavy metals result from their interaction with cellular genetic material packed in form of chromatin. Heavy metals influence chromatin, mimicking and substituting natural microelements in various processes taking place in the cell, or interacting chemically with nuclear components: nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. This paper is a review of current knowledge on the effects of heavy metals on chromatin, exerted at the level of various nuclear components.

  20. The Emerging Role of Nanotechnology in Cell and Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tasciotti, Ennio; Cabrera, Fernando J; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O; Thekkedath, Usha R; Kloc, Malgorzata; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation is often the only choice many patients have when suffering from end-stage organ failure. Although the quality of life improves after transplantation, challenges, such as organ shortages, necessary immunosuppression with associated complications, and chronic graft rejection, limit its wide clinical application. Nanotechnology has emerged in the past 2 decades as a field with the potential to satisfy clinical needs in the area of targeted and sustained drug delivery, noninvasive imaging, and tissue engineering. In this article, we provide an overview of popular nanotechnologies and a summary of the current and potential uses of nanotechnology in cell and organ transplantation. PMID:27257995