Science.gov

Sample records for hiv coreceptor switch

  1. Pace of Coreceptor Tropism Switch in HIV-1-Infected Individuals after Recent Infection.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad Shoaib; Hunter, James; Léda, Ana Rachel; Zukurov, Jean Paulo Lopes; Samer, Sadia; Camargo, Michelle; Galinskas, Juliana; Kallás, Esper Georges; Komninakis, Shirley Vasconcelos; Janini, Luiz Mario; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2017-10-01

    HIV-1 entry into target cells influences several aspects of HIV-1 pathogenesis, including viral tropism, HIV-1 transmission and disease progression, and response to entry inhibitors. The evolution from CCR5- to CXCR4-using strains in a given human host is still unpredictable. Here we analyzed timing and predictors for coreceptor evolution among recently HIV-1-infected individuals. Proviral DNA was longitudinally evaluated in 66 individuals using Geno2pheno[coreceptor] Demographics, viral load, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts, CCR5Δ32 polymorphisms, GB virus C (GBV-C) coinfection, and HLA profiles were also evaluated. Ultradeep sequencing was performed on initial samples from 11 selected individuals. A tropism switch from CCR5- to CXCR4-using strains was identified in 9/49 (18.4%) individuals. Only a low baseline false-positive rate (FPR) was found to be a significant tropism switch predictor. No minor CXCR4-using variants were identified in initial samples of 4 of 5 R5/non-R5 switchers. Logistic regression analysis showed that patients with an FPR of >40.6% at baseline presented a stable FPR over time whereas lower FPRs tend to progressively decay, leading to emergence of CXCR4-using strains, with a mean evolution time of 27.29 months (range, 8.90 to 64.62). An FPR threshold above 40.6% determined by logistic regression analysis may make it unnecessary to further determine tropism for prediction of disease progression related to emergence of X4 strains or use of CCR5 antagonists. The detection of variants with intermediate FPRs and progressive FPR decay over time not only strengthens the power of Geno2pheno in predicting HIV tropism but also indirectly confirms a continuous evolution from earlier R5 variants toward CXCR4-using strains.IMPORTANCE The introduction of CCR5 antagonists in the antiretroviral arsenal has sparked interest in coreceptors utilized by HIV-1. Despite concentrated efforts, viral and human host features predicting tropism switch are still

  2. High intrapatient HIV-1 evolutionary rate is associated with CCR5-to-CXCR4 coreceptor switch.

    PubMed

    Mild, Mattias; Gray, Rebecca R; Kvist, Anders; Lemey, Philippe; Goodenow, Maureen M; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Albert, Jan; Salemi, Marco; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Medstrand, Patrik

    2013-10-01

    In approximately 70% of individuals infected with HIV-1 subtype B, the virus switches coreceptor use from exclusively CCR5 use (R5 virus) to either inclusion of or exclusively CXCR4 use (X4 virus) during infection. This switch is associated with an accelerated loss of CD4(+) T-cells and a faster progression to AIDS. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms responsible for coreceptor switch remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated associations between viral evolutionary rate and selection pressure versus viral coreceptor use and rate of disease progression in eight patients with longitudinally sampled HIV-1 env V1-V3 sequences. By employing a Bayesian hierarchical phylogenetic model, we found that the HIV-1 evolutionary rate was more strongly associated with coreceptor switch than with rate of disease progression in terms of CD4(+)T-cell decline. Phylogenetic analyses showed that X4 variants evolved from R5 populations. In addition, coreceptor switch was associated with higher evolutionary rates on both the synonymous and non-synonymous substitution level, but not with dN/dS ratio rates. Our findings suggest that X4 viruses evolved from pre-existing R5 viral populations and that the evolution of coreceptor switch is governed by high replication rates rather than by selective pressure. Furthermore, the association of viral evolutionary rate was more strongly associated with coreceptor switch than disease progression. This adds to the understanding of the complex virus-host interplay that influences the evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 coreceptor use.

  3. HIV coreceptor tropism determination and mutational pattern identification

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui-Shuang; Yin, Jason; Leng, Fei; Teng, Rui-Fang; Xu, Chao; Xia, Xia-Yu; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the early stages of infection, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) generally selects CCR5 as the primary coreceptor for entering the host cell. As infection progresses, the virus evolves and may exhibit a coreceptor-switch to CXCR4. Accurate determination coreceptor usage and identification key mutational patterns associated tropism switch are essential for selection of appropriate therapies and understanding mechanism of coreceptor change. We developed a classifier composed of two coreceptor-specific weight matrices (CMs) based on a full-scale dataset. For this classifier, we found an AUC of 0.97, an accuracy of 95.21% and an MCC of 0.885 (sensitivity 92.92%; specificity 95.54%) in a ten-fold cross-validation, outperforming all other methods on an independent dataset (13% higher MCC value than geno2pheno and 15% higher MCC value than PSSM). A web server (http://spg.med.tsinghua.edu.cn/CM.html) based on our classifier was provided. Patterns of genetic mutations that occur along with coreceptor transitions were further identified based on the score of each sequence. Six pairs of one-AA mutational patterns and three pairs of two-AA mutational patterns were identified to associate with increasing propensity for X4 tropism. These mutational patterns offered new insights into the mechanism of coreceptor switch and aided in monitoring coreceptor switch. PMID:26883082

  4. [Coreceptors of HIV infection and the development of HIV entry inhibitors: overview and targets].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2002-01-01

    In 1996 CXCR4 was identified as a coreceptor for HIV-1. This finding has lead to further identification of more than ten G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as coreceptors for HIV/SIV. Cell tropisms and coreceptor uses of HIV during the course of HIV infection are summarized. Promiscuous properties of correlations between chemokines and their chemokine receptor uses and also between variable amino acid sequences in the V3 region of HIV gp120 Env and HIV coreceptor uses are discussed. This promiscuous property of HIV-1 is claimed to be a possible cause of a difficulty in developing highly effective entry inhibitors and in addition to allow rapid appearance of immune escape HIV mutants. Representative agents that inhibit HIV entry with a special reference to inhibitors of coreceptor use and gp41 function are summarized. gp41 is discussed as a promising target for the development of effective entry inhibitors.

  5. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  6. A genotypic method for determining HIV-2 coreceptor usage enables epidemiological studies and clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Döring, Matthias; Borrego, Pedro; Büch, Joachim; Martins, Andreia; Friedrich, Georg; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge; Eberle, Josef; Kaiser, Rolf; Lengauer, Thomas; Taveira, Nuno; Pfeifer, Nico

    2016-12-20

    CCR5-coreceptor antagonists can be used for treating HIV-2 infected individuals. Before initiating treatment with coreceptor antagonists, viral coreceptor usage should be determined to ensure that the virus can use only the CCR5 coreceptor (R5) and cannot evade the drug by using the CXCR4 coreceptor (X4-capable). However, until now, no online tool for the genotypic identification of HIV-2 coreceptor usage had been available. Furthermore, there is a lack of knowledge on the determinants of HIV-2 coreceptor usage. Therefore, we developed a data-driven web service for the prediction of HIV-2 coreceptor usage from the V3 loop of the HIV-2 glycoprotein and used the tool to identify novel discriminatory features of X4-capable variants. Using 10 runs of tenfold cross validation, we selected a linear support vector machine (SVM) as the model for geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2], because it outperformed the other SVMs with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.95. We found that SVMs were highly accurate in identifying HIV-2 coreceptor usage, attaining sensitivities of 73.5% and specificities of 96% during tenfold nested cross validation. The predictive performance of SVMs was not significantly different (p value 0.37) from an existing rules-based approach. Moreover, geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2] achieved a predictive accuracy of 100% and outperformed the existing approach on an independent data set containing nine new isolates with corresponding phenotypic measurements of coreceptor usage. geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2] could not only reproduce the established markers of CXCR4-usage, but also revealed novel markers: the substitutions 27K, 15G, and 8S were significantly predictive of CXCR4 usage. Furthermore, SVMs trained on the amino-acid sequences of the V1 and V2 loops were also quite accurate in predicting coreceptor usage (AUCs of 0.84 and 0.65, respectively). In this study, we developed geno2pheno[coreceptor-hiv2], the first online tool for the prediction of HIV-2 coreceptor

  7. Structural and Functional Analysis of HIV-1 Coreceptors: Roles of Charged Residues and Posttranslational Modifications on Coreceptor Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    mature gag proteins. A host-derived lipid bilayer surrounds the icosahedral capsid. At each of the 72 capsid vertices (121) is a protruding oligomeric...envelope glycoprotein structure (Env) consisting of two noncovalently linked proteins, gp41, the transmembrane protein which is anchored in the lipid ...derivatives, proteins, nucleosides, lipids , phospholipids, multistructural odorants, or retinol. All of the discovered HIV-1 coreceptors except

  8. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  9. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism by single and triplicate HIV-1 RNA and DNA sequencing in patients undergoing successful first-line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meini, Genny; Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Sighinolfi, Laura; Monno, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Rozera, Gabriella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P.E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Ammassari, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Maraviroc has been shown to be effective in patients harbouring CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While this CCR5 antagonist has initially been used in salvage therapy, its excellent safety profile makes it ideal for antiretroviral treatment simplification strategies in patients with suppressed plasma viraemia. The aim of this study was to compare HIV-1 tropism as detected in baseline plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA prior to first-line therapy and to analyse tropism evolution while on successful treatment. Methods HIV-1 tropism was determined using triplicate genotypic testing combined with geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis at a 10% false positive rate in 42 patients. Paired pre-treatment plasma RNA and PBMC DNA and two subsequent PBMC DNA samples (the first obtained after reaching undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA and the second after at least 2 years of suppression of plasma viraemia) were evaluated. Results Coreceptor tropism was completely concordant in paired pre-treatment RNA and DNA, with 26.2% of HIV-1 sequences predicted to be non-CCR5-tropic. During follow-up, coreceptor tropism switches were detected in 4 (9.5%) patients without any preferential direction. Although false positive rate discrepancies within triplicates were common, the rate of discordance of coreceptor tropism assignment among triplicate results in this mostly CCR5-tropic dataset was only 2.1%, questioning the added value of triplicate testing compared with single testing. Conclusions HIV-1 coreceptor tropism changes during virologically successful first-line treatment are infrequent. HIV-1 DNA analysis may thus support the choice of a CCR5 antagonist in treatment switch strategies; however, maraviroc treatment outcome data are required to confirm this option. PMID:24155059

  10. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism.

    PubMed

    Kieslich, Chris A; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/.

  11. HIV coreceptors: from discovery and designation to new paradigms and promise.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Ghalib; Berger, Edward A

    2007-10-15

    Just over a decade ago, the specific chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 were identified as the essential coreceptors that function along with CD4 to enable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into target cells. The coreceptor discoveries immediately provided a molecular explanation for the distinct tropisms of different HIV-1 isolates for different CD4-positive target cell types, and revealed fundamentally new insights into host and viral factors influencing HIV transmission and disease. The sequential 2-step mechanism by which the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) interacts first with CD4, then with coreceptor, revealed a major mechanism by which conserved Env epitopes are protected from antibody-mediated neutralization. The Env-coreceptor interaction has become a major target for the development of novel antiviral strategies to treat and prevent HIV infection.

  12. HIV-1 envelope, integrins and co-receptor use in mucosal transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Claudia; Arthos, James; Fauci, Anthony S

    2011-01-27

    It is well established that HIV-1 infection typically involves an interaction between the viral envelope protein gp120/41 and the CD4 molecule followed by a second interaction with a chemokine receptor, usually CCR5 or CXCR4. In the early stages of an HIV-1 infection CCR5 using viruses (R5 viruses) predominate. In some viral subtypes there is a propensity to switch to CXCR4 usage (X4 viruses). The receptor switch occurs in ~ 40% of the infected individuals and is associated with faster disease progression. This holds for subtypes B and D, but occurs less frequently in subtypes A and C. There are several hypotheses to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms that lead to switching of co-receptor usage; however, there is no definitive explanation for either. One important consideration regarding transmission is that signaling by R5 gp120 may facilitate transmission of R5 viruses by inducing a permissive environment for HIV replication. In the case of sexual transmission, infection by HIV requires the virus to breach the mucosal barrier to gain access to the immune cell targets that it infects; however, the immediate events that follow HIV exposure at genital mucosal sites are not well understood. Upon transmission, the HIV quasispecies that is replicating in an infected donor contracts through a "genetic bottleneck", and often infection results from a single infectious event. Many details surrounding this initial infection remain unresolved. In mucosal tissues, CD4(+) T cells express high levels of CCR5, and a subset of these CD4(+)/CCR5(high) cells express the integrin α₄β₇, the gut homing receptor. CD4(+)/CCR5(high)/ α4β7(high) T cells are highly susceptible to infection by HIV-1 and are ideal targets for an efficient productive infection at the point of transmission. In this context we have demonstrated that the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 binds to α₄β₇ on CD4(+) T cells. On CD4(+)/CCR5(high)/ α4β7(high) T cells,

  13. Mucosal transmissibility, disease induction and coreceptor switching of R5 SHIVSF162P3N molecular clones in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucosally transmissible and pathogenic CCR5 (R5)-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) molecular clones are useful reagents to identity neutralization escape in HIV-1 vaccine experiments and to study the envelope evolutionary process and mechanistic basis for coreceptor switch during the course of natural infection. Results We observed progression to AIDS in rhesus macaques infected intrarectally with molecular clones of the pathogenic R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate. Expansion to CXCR4 usage was documented in one diseased macaque that mounted a neutralizing antibody response and in another that failed to do so, with the latter displaying a rapid progressor phenotype. V3 loop envelop glycoprotein gp120 sequence changes that are predictive of a CXCR4 (X4)-using phenotype in HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates, specifically basic amino acid substations at positions 11 (S11R), 24 (G24R) and 25 (D25K) of the loop were detected in the two infected macaques. Functional assays showed that envelopes with V3 S11R or D25K mutation were dual-tropic, infecting CD4+ target cells that expressed either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor. And, consistent with findings of coreceptor switching in macaques infected with the pathogenic isolate, CXCR4-using variant was first detected in the lymph node of the chronically infected rhesus monkey several weeks prior to its presence in peripheral blood. Moreover, X4 emergence in this macaque coincided with persistent peripheral CD4+ T cell loss and a decline in neutralizing antibody titer that are suggestive of immune deterioration, with macrophages as the major virus-producing cells at the end-stage of disease. Conclusions The data showed that molecular clones derived from the R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate are mucosally transmissible and induced disease in a manner similar to that observed in HIV-1 infected individuals, providing a relevant and useful animal infection model for in-depth analyses of host selection pressures and the env

  14. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  15. HIV biological variability unveiled: frequent isolations and chimeric receptors reveal unprecedented variation of coreceptor use.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Antonsson, Liselotte; Shi, Yu; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Leitner, Thomas; Olde, Björn; Owman, Christer; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2003-12-05

    To follow the evolution of coreceptor use in HIV-1-infected individuals with varying rates of disease progression. The coreceptor use of 278 sequential HIV-1 isolates from 23 individuals was tested by infection of two human cell lines, U87.CD4 and GHOST(3), expressing CD4 and CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR4, CXCR6 or BOB. Differences in coreceptor use were further dissected by testing chimeric coreceptors constructed by exchanging successively larger parts of CCR5 for corresponding regions of CXCR4. Three patterns of coreceptor use were distinguished: no evolution, evolution to CXCR4 use, and fluctuation. No evolution with stable CCR5 use (R5 phenotype) was linked to slow progression over 8-10 years in four patients. CXCR4-using virus was present from the onset (five patients) or appeared during clinical progression in all other patients, while taking zidovudine or didanosine monotherapy. The fluctuating pattern of coreceptor use, defined as reappearance of virus with R5 phenotype, was observed in five patients and, interestingly, followed initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy in three of these. Monotropic R5 or X4 viruses were more selective in chimeric receptor use than R5X4 or multitropic viruses. Most importantly, the efficiency of chimeric receptor use increased over time. The increase in efficiency of chimeric receptor use allows a new interpretation of evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use. Evolution could be a continuous process that may lead to changes in the way a coreceptor is used, with the potential of profound alteration in signalling at that receptor.

  16. HIV co-receptor tropism prediction remains stable over time in treatment-naïve patients.

    PubMed

    Philip, Keir Ej; Macartney, Malcolm J; Conibear, Tim Cr; Smith, Colette J; Marshall, Neal; Johnson, Margaret A; Haque, Tanzina; Webster, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    HIV co-receptor tropism determination is essential before prescribing the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. British HIV Association guidelines suggest tropism testing may remain valid for only 90 days in antiretroviral-naïve patients. We aimed to determine the accuracy of this figure. Tropism was assessed in 26 antiretroviral-naïve patients with ongoing viral replication, sampled yearly from first clinic visit. The V3 region of HIV-1 was sequenced in triplicate, then tropism predicted using the Geno2Pheno system. Baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 52 months (range 7-81). For 19/26 individuals baseline tropism remained unchanged throughout a median of 54 months follow-up; 18 R5 tropic and 1 X4 tropic. In seven patients (27%) baseline tropism switched at least once (range 1-4 switches) during follow-up; however, their baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 45 months. Co-receptor tropism in treatment-naïve patients with ongoing viral replication appears highly stable over time, suggesting that baseline genotypic tropism prediction may be valid for a longer duration in patients delaying ART initiation. In this study, baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 52 months, suggesting current guidelines recommending repeat testing after 90 days may be excessively conservative in their assessment of tropism stability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y.; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R.; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  18. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R; Heider, Dominik

    2016-04-29

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients.

  19. A novel approach to block HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 in non-toxic manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Jieqiong; Pan, Ji-An; Mabiala, Prudence; Guo, Deyin

    2014-10-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is one of the major coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and considered as an important therapeutic target. Knockdown of CXCR4 by RNA interference has emerged as a promising strategy for combating HIV-1 infection. However, there is a potential drawback to this strategy as undesired side effects may occur due to the loss of natural function of CXCR4. In this study, we developed a novel approach using a single lentiviral vector to express simultaneously CXCR4 dual-shRNAs and an shRNA-resistant CXCR4 mutant possessing the most possible natural functions of CXCR4 and reduced HIV-1 coreceptor activity. Via this approach we achieved the replacement of endogenous CXCR4 by CXCR4 mutant P191A that could compensate the functional loss of endogenous CXCR4 and significant reduction of HIV-1 replication by 59.2 %. Besides, we demonstrated that construction of recombinant lentiviral vector using 2A peptide-based strategy has significant advantages over using additional promoter-based strategy, including increase of lentivirus titer and avoidance of promoter competition. Therefore, the novel approach to block HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 without impairing its normal function provides a new strategy for CXCR4-targeted therapeutics for HIV-1 infection and potential universal applications to knock down a cellular protein in non-toxic manner.

  20. Peptide and protein-based inhibitors of HIV-1 co-receptors

    PubMed Central

    von Recum, Horst A; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) afflicts an estimated 30 million people globally, making it a continuing pandemic. Despite major research efforts, the rate of new infections has remained relatively static over time. This article reviews an emerging strategy for the treatment of HIV, the inhibition of the co-receptors necessary for HIV entry, CCR5 and CXCR4. The aim of this article is to highlight potential therapeutics derived from peptides and proteins that show particular promise in HIV treatment. Molecules that act on CCR5, CXCR4 or on both receptors will be discussed herein. PMID:23856897

  1. Improving HIV coreceptor usage prediction in the clinic using hints from next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Nico; Lengauer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Due to the high mutation rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), drug-resistant-variants emerge frequently. Therefore, researchers are constantly searching for new ways to attack the virus. One new class of anti-HIV drugs is the class of coreceptor antagonists that block cell entry by occupying a coreceptor on CD4 cells. This type of drug just has an effect on the subset of HIVs that use the inhibited coreceptor. A good prediction of whether the viral population inside a patient is susceptible to the treatment is hence very important for therapy decisions and pre-requisite to administering the respective drug. The first prediction models were based on data from Sanger sequencing of the V3 loop of HIV. Recently, a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) data was introduced that predicts labels for each read separately and decides on the patient label through a percentage threshold for the resistant viral minority. Results: We model the prediction problem on the patient level taking the information of all reads from NGS data jointly into account. This enables us to improve prediction performance for NGS data, but we can also use the trained model to improve predictions based on Sanger sequencing data. Therefore, also laboratories without NGS capabilities can benefit from the improvements. Furthermore, we show which amino acids at which position are important for prediction success, giving clues on how the interaction mechanism between the V3 loop and the particular coreceptors might be influenced. Availability: A webserver is available at http://coreceptor.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de. Contact: nico.pfeifer@mpi-inf.mpg.de PMID:22962486

  2. Use of four next-generation sequencing platforms to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Archer, John; Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard; Lee, Lawrence; Paxinos, Ellen; Arts, Eric J; Robertson, David L; Mimms, Larry; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences) and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms) assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences), Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies). Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels) and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used), compared to Trofile (80%) and population sequencing (70%). In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  3. Prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage (tropism) by sequence analysis using a genotypic approach.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Saleta; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine; Thielen, Alexander; Schuelter, Eugen; Heger, Eva; Däumer, Martin; Reuter, Stefan; Esser, Stefan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Pfister, Herbert; Oette, Mark; Lengauer, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is the first licensed antiretroviral drug from the class of coreceptor antagonists. It binds to the host coreceptor CCR5, which is used by the majority of HIV strains in order to infect the human immune cells (Fig. 1). Other HIV isolates use a different coreceptor, the CXCR4. Which receptor is used, is determined in the virus by the Env protein (Fig. 2). Depending on the coreceptor used, the viruses are classified as R5 or X4, respectively. MVC binds to the CCR5 receptor inhibiting the entry of R5 viruses into the target cell. During the course of disease, X4 viruses may emerge and outgrow the R5 viruses. Determination of coreceptor usage (also called tropism) is therefore mandatory prior to administration of MVC, as demanded by EMA and FDA. The studies for MVC efficiency MOTIVATE, MERIT and 1029 have been performed with the Trofile assay from Monogram, San Francisco, U.S.A. This is a high quality assay based on sophisticated recombinant tests. The acceptance for this test for daily routine is rather low outside of the U.S.A., since the European physicians rather tend to work with decentralized expert laboratories, which also provide concomitant resistance testing. These laboratories have undergone several quality assurance evaluations, the last one being presented in 2011. For several years now, we have performed tropism determinations based on sequence analysis from the HIV env-V3 gene region (V3). This region carries enough information to perform a reliable prediction. The genotypic determination of coreceptor usage presents advantages such as: shorter turnover time (equivalent to resistance testing), lower costs, possibility to adapt the results to the patients' needs and possibility of analysing clinical samples with very low or even undetectable viral load (VL), particularly since the number of samples analysed with VL < 1000 copies/μl roughly increased in the last years (Fig. 3). The main steps for tropism testing (Fig. 4) demonstrated in

  4. Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage (Tropism) by Sequence Analysis using a Genotypic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Saleta; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine; Thielen, Alexander; Schuelter, Eugen; Heger, Eva; Däumer, Martin; Reuter, Stefan; Esser, Stefan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Pfister, Herbert; Oette, Mark; Lengauer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is the first licensed antiretroviral drug from the class of coreceptor antagonists. It binds to the host coreceptor CCR5, which is used by the majority of HIV strains in order to infect the human immune cells (Fig. 1). Other HIV isolates use a different coreceptor, the CXCR4. Which receptor is used, is determined in the virus by the Env protein (Fig. 2). Depending on the coreceptor used, the viruses are classified as R5 or X4, respectively. MVC binds to the CCR5 receptor inhibiting the entry of R5 viruses into the target cell. During the course of disease, X4 viruses may emerge and outgrow the R5 viruses. Determination of coreceptor usage (also called tropism) is therefore mandatory prior to administration of MVC, as demanded by EMA and FDA. The studies for MVC efficiency MOTIVATE, MERIT and 1029 have been performed with the Trofile assay from Monogram, San Francisco, U.S.A. This is a high quality assay based on sophisticated recombinant tests. The acceptance for this test for daily routine is rather low outside of the U.S.A., since the European physicians rather tend to work with decentralized expert laboratories, which also provide concomitant resistance testing. These laboratories have undergone several quality assurance evaluations, the last one being presented in 20111. For several years now, we have performed tropism determinations based on sequence analysis from the HIV env-V3 gene region (V3)2. This region carries enough information to perform a reliable prediction. The genotypic determination of coreceptor usage presents advantages such as: shorter turnover time (equivalent to resistance testing), lower costs, possibility to adapt the results to the patients' needs and possibility of analysing clinical samples with very low or even undetectable viral load (VL), particularly since the number of samples analysed with VL<1000 copies/μl roughly increased in the last years (Fig. 3). The main steps for tropism testing (Fig. 4) demonstrated in

  5. Dual-mixed HIV-1 Coreceptor Tropism and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Sheldon R.; Woods, Steven Paul; Deutsch, Reena; Little, Susan J.; Wagner, Gabriel; Morgan, Erin E.; Heaton, Robert K.; Letendre, Scott L.; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV coreceptor usage of CXCR4 (X4) is associated with decreased CD4+ T-cell counts and accelerated disease progression, but the role of X4 tropism in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) has not previously been described. Methods This longitudinal study evaluated data on 197 visits from 72 recently HIV-infected persons who had undergone up to 4 sequential neurocognitive assessments over a median of 160 days (IQR 138–192). Phenotypic tropism testing (Trofile ES, Monogram, Biosciences) was performed on stored blood samples. Multivariable mixed model repeated measures regression was used to determine the association between HAND and dual-mixed (DM) viral tropism, estimated duration of infection (EDI), HIV RNA, CD4 count and problematic methamphetamine use. Results Six subjects (8.3%) had dual mixed tropism (DM) at their first neurocognitive assessment and four converted to DM in subsequent sampling (for total of 10 DM) at a median EDI of 10.1 months (IQR 7.2–12.2). There were 44 (61.1%) subjects who demonstrated HAND on at least one study visit. HAND was associated with DM tropism (odds ratio 4.4, 95% CI 0.9–20.5) and shorter EDI (odds ratio 1.1 per month earlier, 95% CI 1.0–1.2). Conclusion This study found that recency of HIV-1 infection and the development of DM tropism may be associated with HAND in the relatively early stage of infection. Together these data suggest that viral interaction with cellular receptors may play an important role in the early manifestation of HAND. PMID:24078557

  6. A simple structure-based model for the prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor tropism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 enters host cells through interaction of its V3 loop (which is part of the gp120 protein) with the host cell receptor CD4 and one of two co-receptors, namely CCR5 or CXCR4. Entry inhibitors binding the CCR5 co-receptor can prevent viral entry. As these drugs are only available for CCR5-using viruses, accurate prediction of this so-called co-receptor tropism is important in order to ensure an effective personalized therapy. With the development of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to sequence representative subpopulations of the viral quasispecies. Results Here we present T-CUP 2.0, a model for predicting co-receptor tropism. Based on our recently published T-CUP model, we developed a more accurate and even faster solution. Similarly to its predecessor, T-CUP 2.0 models co-receptor tropism using information of the electrostatic potential and hydrophobicity of V3-loops. However, extracting this information from a simplified structural vacuum-model leads to more accurate and faster predictions. The area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) achieved with T-CUP 2.0 on the training set is 0.968±0.005 in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. When applied to an independent dataset, T-CUP 2.0 has an improved prediction accuracy of around 3% when compared to the original T-CUP. Conclusions We found that it is possible to model co-receptor tropism in HIV-1 based on a simplified structure-based model of the V3 loop. In this way, genotypic prediction of co-receptor tropism is very accurate, fast and can be applied to large datasets derived from next-generation sequencing technologies. The reduced complexity of the electrostatic modeling makes T-CUP 2.0 independent from third-party software, making it easy to install and use. PMID:25120583

  7. Performance comparison of next-generation sequencing platforms for determining HIV-1 coreceptor use

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Stéphanie; Nicot, Florence; Jeanne, Nicolas; Delfour, Olivier; Carcenac, Romain; Lefebvre, Caroline; Cazabat, Michelle; Sauné, Karine; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The coreceptor used by HIV-1 must be determined before a CCR5 antagonist, part of the arsenal of antiretroviral drugs, is prescribed because viruses that enter cells using the CXCR4 coreceptor are responsible for treatment failure. HIV-1 tropism is also correlated with disease progression and so must be determined for virological studies. Tropism can be determined by next-generation sequencing (NGS), but not all of these new technologies have been fully validated for use in clinical practice. The Illumina NGS technology is used in many laboratories but its ability to predict HIV-1 tropism has not been evaluated while the 454 GS-Junior (Roche) is used for routine diagnosis. The genotypic prediction of HIV-1 tropism is based on sequencing the V3 region and interpreting the results with an appropriate algorithm. We compared the performances of the MiSeq (Illumina) and 454 GS-Junior (Roche) systems with a reference phenotypic assay. We used clinical samples for the NGS tropism predictions and assessed their ability to quantify CXCR4-using variants. The data show that the Illumina platform can be used to detect minor CXCR4-using variants in clinical practice but technical optimization are needed to improve quantification. PMID:28186189

  8. Bicyclams, a class of potent anti-HIV agents, are targeted at the HIV coreceptor fusin/CXCR-4.

    PubMed

    Schols, D; Esté, J A; Henson, G; De Clercq, E

    1997-08-01

    Bicyclams are a novel class of antiviral compounds which are highly potent and selective inhibitors of the replication of HIV-1 and HIV-2. The prototype compound, AMD3100, has an IC50 of 1-10 ng/ml, which is a least 100,000 fold lower than the cytotoxic concentration. AMD3100 does not inhibit virus binding to the CD4 receptor and based on time-of-addition experiments, has been assumed to interact with the HIV fusion-uncoating process. Resistance of HIV-1 strains to AMD3100 is associated with the accumulation of several mutations in the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Here, we demonstrate that AMD3100 interacts with fusin (CXCR-4), the coreceptor used by T-tropic viruses to infect the target cells. The replication of NL4-3 wild type virus and NL4-3 dextran sulfate-resistant virus was inhibited by the CXC-chemokine, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), the natural ligand for CXCR-4. In contrast, the replication of the HIV-1 NL4-3 AMD3100-resistant virus was no longer inhibited by SDF-1. The bicyclams are the first low-molecular-weight anti-HIV agents shown to interact with the coreceptor for T-tropic viruses.

  9. Reanalysis of coreceptor tropism in HIV-1-infected adults using a phenotypic assay with enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Goetz, Mathew Bidwell; Leduc, Robert; Skowron, Gail; Su, Zhaohui; Chan, Ellen S; Heera, Jayyant; Chapman, Doug; Spritzler, John; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Gulick, Roy M; Coakley, Eoin

    2011-04-01

    The enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay (TF-ES; Monogram Biosciences) was used to retest coreceptor tropism samples from 4 different cohorts of HIV-1-infected patients. Nine percent to 26% of patients with CCR5-tropic virus by the original Trofile assay had CXCR4-using virus by TF-ES. Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with CXCR4-using virus in all cohorts. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. Algorithm-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Subtype D Coreceptor Use

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Stephanie; Maillard, Anne; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Helene; Rodalec, Audrey; Beby-Defaux, Agnes; Giraudeau, Genevieve; Vallet, Sophie; Mourez, Thomas; Payan, Christopher; Vabret, Astrid; Ruffault, Annick; Ferre, Virginie; Izopet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    We compared the coreceptor tropism-predicting performance of a specific genotypic algorithm for HIV-1 subtype D and that of the geno2pheno algorithm with different cutoffs. The D-specific algorithm and geno2pheno with a false-positivity rate cutoff of 2.5% had the same concordance with the phenotypic determination. The geno2pheno algorithm with a false-positivity rate cutoff of 2.5%, more sensitive but slightly less specific, seems to be an appropriate alternative. PMID:23804380

  11. Algorithm-based prediction of HIV-1 subtype D coreceptor use.

    PubMed

    Dina, Julia; Raymond, Stephanie; Maillard, Anne; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Helene; Rodalec, Audrey; Beby-Defaux, Agnes; Giraudeau, Genevieve; Vallet, Sophie; Mourez, Thomas; Payan, Christopher; Vabret, Astrid; Ruffault, Annick; Ferre, Virginie; Izopet, Jacques; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2013-09-01

    We compared the coreceptor tropism-predicting performance of a specific genotypic algorithm for HIV-1 subtype D and that of the geno2pheno algorithm with different cutoffs. The D-specific algorithm and geno2pheno with a false-positivity rate cutoff of 2.5% had the same concordance with the phenotypic determination. The geno2pheno algorithm with a false-positivity rate cutoff of 2.5%, more sensitive but slightly less specific, seems to be an appropriate alternative.

  12. Viremic Control and Viral Coreceptor Usage in Two HIV-1-Infected Persons Homozygous for CCR5 Δ32

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hanhauser, Emily; Hu, Zixin; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine viral and immune factors involved in transmission and control of HIV-1 infection in persons without functional CCR5 Design Understanding transmission and control of HIV-1 in persons homozygous for CCR5Δ32 is important given efforts to develop HIV-1 curative therapies aimed at modifying or disrupting CCR5 expression. Methods We identified two HIV-infected CCR5Δ32/Δ32 individuals among a cohort of patients with spontaneous control of HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral therapy and determined co-receptor usage of the infecting viruses. We assessed genetic evolution of full-length HIV-1 envelope sequences by single-genome analysis from one participant and his sexual partner, and explored HIV-1 immune responses and HIV-1 mutations following virologic escape and disease progression. Results Both participants experienced viremia of less than 4,000 RNA copies/ml with preserved CD4+ T cell counts off ART for at least 3.3 and 4.6 years after diagnosis, respectively. One participant had phenotypic evidence of X4 virus, had no known favorable HLA alleles, and appeared to be infected by minority X4 virus from a pool that predominately used CCR5 for entry. The second participant had virus that was unable to use CXCR4 for entry in phenotypic assay but was able to engage alternative viral coreceptors (e.g. CXCR6) in vitro. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that individuals may be infected by minority X4 viruses from a population that predominately uses CCR5 for entry, and that viruses may bypass traditional HIV-1 coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) completely by engaging alternative coreceptors to establish and propagate HIV-1 infection. PMID:25730507

  13. A genotypic HIV-1 proviral DNA coreceptor tropism assay: characterization in viremic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 coreceptor tropism testing is used to evaluate eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. However, HIV-1 RNA-based tests are not suitable for virologically suppressed patients, therefore the use of proviral DNA tropism testing has been investigated. We describe a novel proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism assay and compare its performance to that of a sensitive HIV-1 RNA-based genotypic test. Methods Tropism was determined using HIV-1 plasma RNA and proviral DNA from 42 paired samples from patients with plasma viral loads ≥1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL. Proviral DNA sample types included whole blood, separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline and peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in spun plasma. The HIV-1 envelope V3 region was PCR-amplified, sequenced in triplicate, and analyzed for tropism with the geno2pheno algorithm using a 10% false-positive rate (FPR). Results Amplicons were obtained from proviral DNA and plasma RNA in 41/42 samples. Tropism predictions were highly concordant (93%–98%) between proviral DNA and plasma RNA, regardless of the proviral DNA isolation method. Non-R5 proviral DNA results were obtained for 100% of patients with detectable non-R5 plasma HIV-1 RNA results. Geno2pheno FPRs for proviral DNA and plasma RNA were highly correlated (Spearman rho = 0.86). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that proviral DNA tropism determinations from whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were highly concordant with plasma HIV-1 RNA tropism determinations. This assay may be useful for screening virologically suppressed patients for CCR5-antagonist eligibility and for research purposes. PMID:24904682

  14. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S; Taube, Ran; Engel, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential.

  15. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  16. B cell recognition of the conserved HIV-1 co-receptor binding site is altered by endogenous primate CD4.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Mattias N E; Dey, Barna; Mörner, Andreas; Svehla, Krisha; O'dell, Sijy; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Voss, Gerald; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Shaw, George M; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2008-10-03

    The surface HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds to CD4 on the target cell surface to induce the co-receptor binding site on gp120 as the initial step in the entry process. The binding site is comprised of a highly conserved region on the gp120 core, as well as elements of the third variable region (V3). Antibodies against the co-receptor binding site are abundantly elicited during natural infection of humans, but the mechanism of elicitation has remained undefined. In this study, we investigate the requirements for elicitation of co-receptor binding site antibodies by inoculating rabbits, monkeys and human-CD4 transgenic (huCD4) rabbits with envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers possessing high affinity for primate CD4. A cross-species comparison of the antibody responses showed that similar HIV-1 neutralization breadth was elicited by Env trimers in monkeys relative to wild-type (WT) rabbits. In contrast, antibodies against the co-receptor site on gp120 were elicited only in monkeys and huCD4 rabbits, but not in the WT rabbits. This was supported by the detection of high-titer co-receptor antibodies in all sera from a set derived from human volunteers inoculated with recombinant gp120. These findings strongly suggest that complexes between Env and (high-affinity) primate CD4 formed in vivo are responsible for the elicitation of the co-receptor-site-directed antibodies. They also imply that the naïve B cell receptor repertoire does not recognize the gp120 co-receptor site in the absence of CD4 and illustrate that conformational stabilization, imparted by primary receptor interaction, can alter the immunogenicity of a type 1 viral membrane protein.

  17. AMD3100, a small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CXCR4 co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Donzella, G A; Schols, D; Lin, S W; Esté, J A; Nagashima, K A; Maddon, P J; Allaway, G P; Sakmar, T P; Henson, G; De Clercq, E; Moore, J P

    1998-01-01

    The bicyclam AMD3100 (formula weight 830) blocks HIV-1 entry and membrane fusion via the CXCR4 co-receptor, but not via CCR5. AMD3100 prevents monoclonal antibody 12G5 from binding to CXCR4, but has no effect on binding of monoclonal antibody 2D7 to CCR5. It also inhibits binding of the CXC-chemokine, SDF-1alpha, to CXCR4 and subsequent signal transduction, but does not itself cause signaling and has no effect on RANTES signaling via CCR5. Thus, AMD3100 prevents CXCR4 functioning as both a HIV-1 co-receptor and a CXC-chemokine receptor. Development of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry is feasible.

  18. Phenotypic Co-receptor Tropism in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth Failing Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Agwu, Allison L.; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Eshleman, Susan H.; Patel, Kunjal; Huang, Wei; Burchett, Sandra K.; Siberry, George K.; Van Dyke, Russell B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children and youth are often heavily treatment-experienced, with resultant antiretroviral (ARV) resistance and limited treatment options. For those with virologic failure (VF), new agents such as CCR5 (R5) antagonists may be useful; however, reports of R5 antagonist susceptibility in children have mostly relied on genotypic testing, which may not accurately reflect the phenotypic tropism of the viral populations. We characterized phenotypic co-receptor usage among PHIV children and youth with VF on ARV treatment (ART) to identify predictors of CXCR4 (X4) tropism which preclude R5 antagonist use. Methods Plasma samples with >1,000 HIV RNA copies/mL were obtained from 73 PHIV-infected ART-treated children and youth (age 9–21 years) enrolled in the multi-center Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. Samples were analyzed using the Trofile™ phenotypic assay. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with detectable X4-tropism. Results Tropism results were obtained for 59 (81%) of the 73 children and youth; 32 (54%) had X4-tropism. Persistent viremia (≥80% of HIV RNA measurements >400 copies/mL) was associated with detectable X4-tropism (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.6, 95% CI 1.4, 31.4), while longer cumulative nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) use was associated with lower risk of X4-tropism (aOR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5, 0.9). Conclusions Using a phenotypic assay, >50% of PHIV children and youth with VF had X4-tropism, similar to that in treatment-experienced adults, and higher than the 30% reported for children using genotypic assays. Persistent viremia and shorter NRTI exposure are associated with X4-tropism in children and youth and may help target phenotypic testing to those most likely to benefit from R5 antagonist. PMID:27078121

  19. Phenotypic Coreceptor Tropism in Perinatally HIV-infected Youth Failing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Agwu, Allison L; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Eshleman, Susan H; Patel, Kunjal; Huang, Wei; Burchett, Sandra K; Siberry, George K; Van Dyke, Russell B

    2016-07-01

    Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children and youth are often heavily treatment-experienced, with resultant antiretroviral resistance and limited treatment options. For those with virologic failure (VF), new agents such as CCR5 (R5) antagonists may be useful; however, reports of R5 antagonist susceptibility in children have mostly relied on genotypic testing, which may not accurately reflect the phenotypic tropism of the viral populations. We characterized phenotypic coreceptor usage among PHIV children and youth with VF on antiretroviral treatment to identify predictors of CXCR4 (X4) tropism which preclude R5 antagonist use. Plasma samples with >1000 HIV RNA copies/mL were obtained from 73 PHIV antiretroviral treatment-treated children and youth (age 9-21 years) enrolled in the multicenter Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. Samples were analyzed using the Trofile phenotypic assay. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with detectable X4 tropism. Tropism results were obtained for 59 (81%) of the 73 children and youth; 32 (54%) had X4-tropism. Persistent viremia (≥80% of HIV RNA measurements >400 copies/mL) was associated with detectable X4 tropism (adjusted odds ratio: 6.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 31.4), while longer cumulative nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor use was associated with lower risk of X4 tropism (adjusted odds ratio: 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.5, 0.9). Using a phenotypic assay, >50% of PHIV children and youth with VF had X4 tropism, similar to that in experienced adults, and higher than the 30% reported for children using genotypic assays. Persistent viremia and shorter nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure are associated with X4-tropism in children and youth and may help target phenotypic testing to those most likely to benefit from R5 antagonist.

  20. Reanalysis of Coreceptor Tropism in HIV-1–Infected Adults Using a Phenotypic Assay with Enhanced Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Mathew Bidwell; Leduc, Robert; Skowron, Gail; Su, Zhaohui; Chan, Ellen S.; Heera, Jayyant; Chapman, Doug; Spritzler, John; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Gulick, Roy M.; Coakley, Eoin

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay (TF-ES; Monogram Biosciences) was used to retest coreceptor tropism samples from 4 different cohorts of HIV-1–infected patients. Nine percent to 26% of patients with CCR5-tropic virus by the original Trofile assay had CXCR4-using virus by TF-ES. Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with CXCR4-using virus in all cohorts. PMID:21427401

  1. Structural and Functional Analysis of HIV-1 Coreceptors: Roles of Charged Residues and Posttranslational Modifications on Coreceptor Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Virol. 66:4794-4802. 100. Dragic, T., V. Litwin , G. P. Allaway, S. R. Martin, Y. Huang, K. A. Nagashima, C. Cayanan, P. J. Maddon, R. A. Koup, J. P...HIV-1 infection. Cell. 86:367-377. 171 175. Looney, D. J., A. G. Fisher, S. D. Putney, J. R. Rusche, R. R. Redfield, D. S. Burke , R. C. Gallo, and F

  2. Peptide ligands selected with CD4-induced epitopes on native dualtropic HIV-1 envelope proteins mimic extracellular coreceptor domains and bind to HIV-1 gp120 independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Dervillez, Xavier; Klaukien, Volker; Dürr, Ralf; Koch, Joachim; Kreutz, Alexandra; Haarmann, Thomas; Stoll, Michaela; Lee, Donghan; Carlomagno, Teresa; Schnierle, Barbara; Möbius, Kalle; Königs, Christoph; Griesinger, Christian; Dietrich, Ursula

    2010-10-01

    During HIV-1 entry, binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor triggers conformational changes resulting in exposure of new epitopes, the highly conserved CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes that are essential for subsequent binding to chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Due to their functional conservation, CD4i epitopes represent attractive viral targets for HIV-1 entry inhibition. The aim of the present study was to select peptide ligands for CD4i epitopes on native dualtropic (R5X4) HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins by phage display. Using CD4-activated retroviral particles carrying Env from the R5X4 HIV-1 89.6 strain as the target, we performed screenings of random peptide phage libraries under stringent selection conditions. Selected peptides showed partial identity with amino acids in the extracellular domains of CCR5/CXCR4, including motifs rich in tyrosines and aspartates at the N terminus known to be important for gp120 binding. A synthetic peptide derivative (XD3) corresponding to the most frequently selected phages was optimized for Env binding on peptide arrays. Interestingly, the optimized peptide could bind specifically to gp120 derived from HIV-1 strains with different coreceptor usage, competed with binding of CD4i-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17b, and interfered with entry of both a CCR5 (R5)-tropic and a CXCR4 (X4)-tropic Env pseudotyped virus. This peptide ligand therefore points at unique properties of CD4i epitopes shared by gp120 with different coreceptor usage and could thus serve to provide new insight into the conserved structural details essential for coreceptor binding for further drug development.

  3. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  4. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  5. A case-based reasoning system for genotypic prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark C; Paquet, Agnes C; Huang, Wei; Napolitano, Laura; Frantzell, Arne; Toma, Jonathan; Stawiski, Eric W; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Petropoulos, Christos J; Whitcomb, Jeannette; Coakley, Eoin; Haddad, Mojgan

    2013-08-01

    Accurate co-receptor tropism (CRT) determination is critical for making treatment decisions in HIV management. We created a genotypic tropism prediction tool by utilizing the case-based reasoning (CBR) technique that attempts to solve new problems through applying the solution from similar past problems. V3 loop sequences from 732 clinical samples with diverse characteristics were used to build a case library. Additional sequence and molecular properties of the V3 loop were examined and used for similarity assessment. A similarity metric was defined based on each attribute's frequency in the CXCR4-using viruses. We implemented three other genotype-based tropism predictors, support vector machines (SVM), position specific scoring matrices (PSSM), and the 11/25 rule, and evaluated their performance as the ability to predict CRT compared to Monogram's enhanced sensitivity Trofile(®) assay (ESTA). Overall concordance of the CBR based tropism prediction algorithm was 81%, as compared to ESTA. Sensitivity to detect CXCR4 usage was 90% and specificity was at 73%. In comparison, sensitivity of the SVM, PSSM, and the 11/25 rule were 85%, 81%, and 36% respectively while achieving a specificity of 90% by SVM, 75% by PSSM, and 97% by the 11/25 rule. When we evaluated these predictors in an unseen dataset, higher sensitivity was achieved by the CBR algorithm (87%), compared to SVM (82%), PSSM (76%), and the 11/25 rule (33%), while maintaining similar level of specificity. Overall this study suggests that CBR can be utilized as a genotypic tropism prediction tool, and can achieve improved performance in independent datasets compared to model or rule based methods.

  6. Sensitive Deep-Sequencing-Based HIV-1 Genotyping Assay To Simultaneously Determine Susceptibility to Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, Integrase, and Maturation Inhibitors, as Well as HIV-1 Coreceptor Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Richard M.; Meyer, Ashley M.; Winner, Dane; Archer, John; Feyertag, Felix; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel; Robertson, David L.; Schmotzer, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    With 29 individual antiretroviral drugs available from six classes that are approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, a combination of different phenotypic and genotypic tests is currently needed to monitor HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we developed a novel HIV-1 genotypic assay based on deep sequencing (DeepGen HIV) to simultaneously assess HIV-1 susceptibilities to all drugs targeting the three viral enzymes and to predict HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Patient-derived gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/IN- and env-C2V3 PCR products were sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Reads spanning the 3′ end of the Gag, protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase (IN), and V3 regions were extracted, truncated, translated, and assembled for genotype and HIV-1 coreceptor tropism determination. DeepGen HIV consistently detected both minority drug-resistant viruses and non-R5 HIV-1 variants from clinical specimens with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml and from B and non-B subtypes. Additional mutations associated with resistance to PR, RT, and IN inhibitors, previously undetected by standard (Sanger) population sequencing, were reliably identified at frequencies as low as 1%. DeepGen HIV results correlated with phenotypic (original Trofile, 92%; enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay [ESTA], 80%; TROCAI, 81%; and VeriTrop, 80%) and genotypic (population sequencing/Geno2Pheno with a 10% false-positive rate [FPR], 84%) HIV-1 tropism test results. DeepGen HIV (83%) and Trofile (85%) showed similar concordances with the clinical response following an 8-day course of maraviroc monotherapy (MCT). In summary, this novel all-inclusive HIV-1 genotypic and coreceptor tropism assay, based on deep sequencing of the PR, RT, IN, and V3 regions, permits simultaneous multiplex detection of low-level drug-resistant and/or non-R5 viruses in up to 96 clinical samples. This comprehensive test, the first of its class, will be instrumental in the development of new

  7. Determination of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism using proviral DNA in women before and after viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Russell E; Rogers, Amy A; Hamdan, Hasnah B; Burger, Harold; Weiser, Barbara; Gao, Wei; Anastos, Kathryn; Young, Mary; Meyer, William A; Pesano, Rick L; Kagan, Ron M

    2015-01-01

    An HIV-1 tropism test is recommended prior to CCR5 antagonist administration to exclude patients harboring non-R5 virus from treatment with this class of antiretrovirals. HIV-1 tropism determination based on proviral DNA (pvDNA) may be useful in individuals with plasma viral RNA suppression. We developed a genotypic tropism assay for pvDNA and assessed its performance in a retrospective analysis of samples collected longitudinally. We randomly selected paired plasma/PBMC samples from the Women's Interagency HIV Study with plasma viral load ≥5,000 cp/mL at time 1 (T1), undetectable viral load maintained for ≥1 year and CD4+ >200 cells/μL at time 2 (T2). pvDNA was isolated from cryopreserved PBMCs. Sequences were analyzed in triplicate from 49/50 women, with tropism assigned using the geno2pheno (g2p) algorithm. The median time between T1 and T2 was 4.1 years. CXCR4-using virus was detected in 24% of the RNA samples and 33% of the pvDNA samples at T1, compared to 37% of the pvDNA samples at T2. Concordance between plasma RNA and pvDNA tropism was 88% at T1 and 80% at T2. The g2p scores for RNA (T1) vs DNA (T1, T2) were strongly correlated (Spearman rho: 0.85 (T1); 0.78 (T2)). In women with evidence of tropism switch at T2 (either R5 to non-R5 or non-R5 to R5), there was a correlation between change in tropism and time. Mean pvDNA viral load decreased by 0.4 log10 copies/106 cells between T1 and T2 (p < 0.0001), but this decrease was not significantly associated with tropism status. We demonstrated that pvDNA tropism in women with HIV-1 suppression is concordant with prior RNA tropism results, even after a median time of >4 years. pvDNA tropism testing may be useful to determine eligibility of patients with viral suppression to switch to a CCR5-antagonist based regimen as well as for research purposes.

  8. HIV type 1 coreceptor tropism, CCR5 genotype, and integrase inhibitor resistance profiles in Vietnam: implications for the introduction of new antiretroviral regimens.

    PubMed

    Luu, Quynh Phuong; Dean, Jonathan; Do, Trinh Thi Diem; Carr, Michael J; Dunford, Linda; Coughlan, Suzie; Connell, Jeff; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Hall, William W; Nguyen Thi, Lan Anh

    2012-10-01

    In Vietnam, where an estimated 280,000 people will be HIV-positive by 2012, recommended antiretroviral regimens do not include more recently developed therapeutics, such as Integrase inhibitors (INI) and coreceptor antagonists. This study examined HIV-1 coreceptor tropism and INI drug resistance profiles, in parallel with CCR5 genotypes, in a cohort of 60 HIV-positive individuals from different regions of Vietnam. No evidence of INI resistance was detected. Some 40% of individuals had X4-tropic HIV-1, making them unsuitable for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. We identified a novel CCR5 variant-S272P-along with other, previously reported variants: G106R, C178R, W153C, R223Q, and S336I. Interestingly, CCR5 variants known to affect HIV-1 infectivity were observed only in individuals harboring X4-tropic virus. Together, this study presents valuable baseline information on HIV-1 INI resistance, coreceptor tropism, and CCR5 variants in HIV-positive individuals in Vietnam. This should help inform policy on the future use of novel antiretrovirals in Vietnam.

  9. In vivo effect of statins on the expression of the HIV co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    -term administration of statins at therapeutic doses, does not significantly affect the expression of HIV-1 co-receptors or of their ligands. In addition it is important to point out that based on the results obtained, therapeutic administration of statins in HIV-infected patients with lipid disorders is safe in terms of selecting X4 strains. PMID:23634877

  10. Effects of HIV-1 Nef on virus co-receptor expression and cytokine release in human bladder, laryngeal, and intestinal epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Maria Giovanna; Falzano, Loredana; Vincentini, Olimpia; Fiorentini, Carla; Giordani, Luciana; Viora, Marina

    2011-06-01

    HIV infections are mainly acquired by mucosal transmission, through oral, rectal, or genital mucosa. Epithelial cells (EC) are the first cells encountered by HIV during infection through sexual transmission and breastfeeding. EC express several receptors critical for both primary HIV infection and secondary transmission. The regulation of co-receptor expression correlates with changes in susceptibility to infection by HIV-1 strains with different tropism. Moreover, inflammatory responses at mucosal surfaces after HIV-1 transmission may influence disease outcome. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on mucosal EC, using unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated HEp-2, T24, and Caco2 cell lines as models for homeostatic or inflamed mucosal tracts. We found that Nef significantly upregulated the expression of CXCR4 on the Caco-2 cell surface and the expression of galactosylceramide on the T24 cell surface. In addition, Nef significantly upregulated IL-6 production by T24 and Caco-2 cells, and TNF-α release by all three cell lines analyzed. Notably, Nef abrogated the IFN-γ-induced modulation of co-receptor expression and cytokine secretion. Our findings suggest that Nef differently regulates co-receptor expression and cytokine secretion at the epithelial level, depending on the anatomical derivation of the cells and the inflammatory status.

  11. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinquan; Ren, Ruxia; Tan, Suiyi; Zhang, Wanyue; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Yu, Fei; Xun, Tianrong; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2), can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT) and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells. Conclusions and Significance Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection. PMID:26656730

  12. Genome editing of the HIV co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 by CRISPR-Cas9 protects CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhepeng; Chen, Shuliang; Jin, Xu; Wang, Qiankun; Yang, Kongxiang; Li, Chenlin; Xiao, Qiaoqiao; Hou, Panpan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Shaoshuai; Hou, Wei; Xiong, Yong; Kong, Chunyan; Zhao, Xixian; Wu, Li; Li, Chunmei; Sun, Guihong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-01-01

    The main approach to treat HIV-1 infection is combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Although cART is effective in reducing HIV-1 viral load and controlling disease progression, it has many side effects, and is expensive for HIV-1 infected patients who must remain on lifetime treatment. HIV-1 gene therapy has drawn much attention as studies of genome editing tools have progressed. For example, zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 have been utilized to successfully disrupt the HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 or CXCR4, thereby restricting HIV-1 infection. However, the effects of simultaneous genome editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 by CRISPR-Cas9 in blocking HIV-1 infection in primary CD4(+) T cells has been rarely reported. Furthermore, combination of different target sites of CXCR4 and CCR5 for disruption also need investigation. In this report, we designed two different gRNA combinations targeting both CXCR4 and CCR5, in a single vector. The CRISPR-sgRNAs-Cas9 could successfully induce editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 genes in various cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells. Using HIV-1 challenge assays, we demonstrated that CXCR4-tropic or CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infections were significantly reduced in CXCR4- and CCR5-modified cells, and the modified cells exhibited a selective advantage over unmodified cells during HIV-1 infection. The off-target analysis showed that no non-specific editing was identified in all predicted sites. In addition, apoptosis assays indicated that simultaneous disruption of CXCR4 and CCR5 in primary CD4(+) T cells by CRISPR-Cas9 had no obvious cytotoxic effects on cell viability. Our results suggest that simultaneous genome editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 by CRISPR-Cas9 can potentially provide an effective and safe strategy towards a functional cure for HIV-1 infection.

  13. Ethnicity and Smoking-Associated DNA Methylation Changes at HIV Co-Receptor GPR15

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Meeshanthini V.; Xiang, Jinhua; Beach, Steven R. H.; Cutrona, Carolyn; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Simons, Ronald L.; Brody, Gene H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Philibert, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is associated with poorer health outcomes for both African and European Americans. In order to better understand whether ethnic-specific genetic variation may underlie some of these differences, we compared the smoking-associated genome-wide methylation signatures of African Americans with those of European Americans, and followed up this analysis with a focused examination of the most ethnically divergent locus, cg19859270, at the GPR15 gene. We examined the association of methylation at this locus to the rs2230344 SNP and GPR15 gene and protein expression. Consistent with prior analyses, AHRR residue cg05575921 was the most differentially methylated residue in both African Americans and European Americans. However, the second most differentially methylated locus in African Americans, cg19859270, was only modestly differentially methylated in European Americans. Interrogation of the methylation status of this CpG residue found in GPR15, a chemokine receptor involved in HIV pathogenesis, showed a significant interaction of ethnicity with smoking as well as a marginal effect of genotype at rs2230344, a neighboring non-synonymous SNP, but only among African Americans. Gene and protein expression analyses showed that demethylation at cg19859270 was associated with an increase in both mRNA and protein levels. Since GPR15 is involved in the early stages of viral replication for some HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, and the prevalence of HIV is increased in African Americans and smokers, these data support a possible role for GPR15 in the ethnically dependent differential prevalence of HIV. PMID:26441693

  14. Generation of lineage-related, mucosally transmissible subtype C R5 simian-human immunodeficiency viruses capable of AIDS development, induction of neurological disease, and coreceptor switching in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wuze; Mumbauer, Alexandra; Gettie, Agegnehu; Seaman, Michael S; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Westmoreland, Susan; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2013-06-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmissions are initiated with CCR5 (R5)-using viruses across mucosal surfaces, with the majority in regions where HIV type 1 (HIV-1) clade C predominates. Mucosally transmissible, highly replication competent, pathogenic R5 simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) encoding biologically relevant clade C envelopes are therefore needed as challenge viruses in vaccine efficacy studies with nonhuman primates. Here we describe the generation of three lineage-related subtype C SHIVs through four successive rapid transfers in rhesus macaques of SHIVC109F.PB4, a molecular clone expressing the soluble-CD4 (sCD4)-sensitive CCR5-tropic clade C envelope of a recently infected subject in Zambia. The viruses differed in their monkey passage histories and neutralization sensitivities but remained R5 tropic. SHIVC109P3 and SHIVC109P3N were recovered from a passage-3 rapid-progressor animal during chronic infection (24 weeks postinfection [wpi]) and at end-stage disease (34 wpi), respectively, and are classified as tier 1B strains, whereas SHIVC109P4 was recovered from a passage-4 normal-progressor macaque at 22 wpi and is a tier 2 virus, more difficult to neutralize. All three viruses were transmitted efficiently via intrarectal inoculation, reaching peak viral loads of 10(7) to 10(9) RNA copies/ml plasma and establishing viremia at various set points. Notably, one of seven (GC98) and two of six (CL31, FI08) SHIVC109P3- and SHIVC109P3N-infected macaques, respectively, progressed to AIDS, with neuropathologies observed in GC98 and FI08, as well as coreceptor switching in the latter. These findings support the use of these new SHIVC109F.PB4-derived viruses to study the immunopathology of HIV-1 clade C infection and to evaluate envelope-based AIDS vaccines in nonhuman primates.

  15. Toll-like receptor 3 signalling up-regulates expression of the HIV co-receptor G-protein coupled receptor 15 on human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Miriam; Rethi, Bence; Jansson, Marianne; Dillon, Stephanie; Lee, Eric; Lantto, Rebecka; Wilson, Cara; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Chiodi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4(+) T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4(+) T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4(+) T cells. These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4(+) T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Signalling Up-Regulates Expression of the HIV Co-Receptor G-Protein Coupled Receptor 15 on Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Miriam; Rethi, Bence; Jansson, Marianne; Dillon, Stephanie; Lee, Eric; Lantto, Rebecka; Wilson, Cara; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Chiodi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4+ T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. Results Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4+ T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4+ T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4+ T cells. Conclusion These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4+ T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals. PMID:24558379

  17. Heavy Chain-Only IgG2b Llama Antibody Effects Near-Pan HIV-1 Neutralization by Recognizing a CD4-Induced Epitope That Includes Elements of Coreceptor- and CD4-Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Luongo, Timothy S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Louder, Mark K.; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy. PMID:23843638

  18. Heavy chain-only IgG2b llama antibody effects near-pan HIV-1 neutralization by recognizing a CD4-induced epitope that includes elements of coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Luongo, Timothy S; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D; Louder, Mark K; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2013-09-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy.

  19. Switch of predicted HIV-1 tropism in treated subjects and its association with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Antonella; Monno, Laura; Carta, Stefania; Galli, Laura; Carrara, Stefania; Fedele, Valentina; Punzi, Grazia; Fanti, Iuri; Caramello, Pietro; Lepri, Alessandro Cozzi; De Luca, Andrea; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) tropism after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and their association with disease progression are poorly investigated.This was a cohort study on subjects from the ICONA cohort receiving ART with persistently detectable (PD) or persistently undetectable (PU) viral load (VL) and with stored plasma or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples at 2 time-points (T1, T2) after ART initiation. HIV-1 co-receptor tropism was determined by V3-loop sequencing and the geno2pheno algorithm. A switch in viral tropism was defined if the tropism classification at T2 differed from that observed at T1. Time to disease progression, defined as the occurrence of a new acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining event/death from T2, was also evaluated.One hundred ninety-five patients were analyzed (124 PD, 71 PU). Over a median follow-up of 22.6 (19.8-28.1) months, PD and PU patients showed similar rates (95% confidence interval) of switch to a non-R5 virus [PD: 6.9 (3.7-11.2)/100-person-years of follow-up (PYFU); PU: 8.0 (3.4-14.5)/100-PYFU; P = 0.63] and of switch to a R5 virus [PD: 15.4 (7.3-26.4)/100-PYFU; PU: 8.1 (2.5-16.7)/100-PYFU; P = 0.38]. Switch to non-R5 virus was predicted by nadir CD4+ before T1.Twenty-two (18%) PD and 4 (6%) PU subjects experienced disease progression (P = 0.02). The risk of disease progression was independently associated with a switch in co-receptor tropism (adjusted hazard ratio = 4.06, 95% CI: 1.20-13.80, P = 0.03) as well as age, AIDS diagnosis, nadir CD4+ before T2, current CD4+, and VL.Switch of HIV-1 tropism under ART occurs in both directions, with similar rates in subjects with PD or PU VL and it might be predictive of future unfavorable clinical outcome.

  20. Functional HIV CXCR4 coreceptor on human epithelial Langerhans cells and infection by HIV strain X4.

    PubMed

    Tchou, I; Misery, L; Sabido, O; Dezutter-Dambuyant, C; Bourlet, T; Moja, P; Hamzeh, H; Peguet-Navarro, J; Schmitt, D; Genin, C

    2001-08-01

    HIV can cross the intact epithelium of genital mucosae via Langerhans cells. Fresh Langerhans cells are known to express CD4 and CCR5. The presence of CXCR4 on the surface of cultured but not freshly isolated Langerhans cells has been described. In the present study, we demonstrate that CXCR4 was expressed by fresh Langerhans cells isolated and purified from epidermis. However, the percentage of Langerhans cells expressing CXCR4 or CCR5 increased during maturation of the cells in culture, especially in the presence of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. To determine whether CXCR4 was functional, freshly isolated Langerhans cells were infected with HIV LAI, a T-cell-tropic strain, and p24 protein production was measured in culture supernatants. p24 production was observed when infected Langerhans cells were cocultured with SupT1 cells. However, the presence of HIV provirus DNA was evidenced within the infected Langerhans cells by nested PCR. Ultrastructural studies confirmed the formation of syncytia when Langerhans cells were cocultured with SupT1 cells. Preincubation of Langerhans cells with azidothymidine or SDF-1-alpha, a natural ligand for CXCR4, prevented infection. These data demonstrated that CXCR4 is present on the surface of Langerhans cells freshly isolated from human skin epidermis and that this expression is functional.

  1. Characterizing the Diverse Mutational Pathways Associated with R5-Tropic Maraviroc Resistance: HIV-1 That Uses the Drug-Bound CCR5 Coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaowei; Feyertag, Felix; Meehan, Conor J.; McCormack, Grace P.; Travers, Simon A.; Craig, Charles; Westby, Mike; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry inhibitors represent a potent class of antiretroviral drugs that target a host cell protein, CCR5, an HIV-1 entry coreceptor, and not viral protein. Lack of sensitivity can occur due to preexisting virus that uses the CXCR4 coreceptor, while true resistance occurs through viral adaptation to use a drug-bound CCR5 coreceptor. To understand this R5 resistance pathway, we analyzed >500 envelope protein sequences and phenotypes from viruses of 20 patients from the clinical trials MOTIVATE 1 and 2, in which treatment-experienced patients received maraviroc plus optimized background therapy. The resistant viral population was phylogenetically distinct and associated with a genetic bottleneck in each patient, consistent with de novo emergence of resistance. Recombination analysis showed that the C2-V3-C3 region tends to genotypically correspond to the recombinant's phenotype, indicating its primary importance in conferring resistance. Between patients, there was a notable lack of commonality in the specific sites conferring resistance, confirming the unusual nature of R5-tropic resistance. We used coevolutionary and positive-selection analyses to characterize the genotypic determinants of resistance and found that (i) there are complicated covariation networks, indicating frequent coevolutionary/compensatory changes in the context of protein structure; (ii) covarying sites under positive selection are enriched in resistant viruses; (iii) CD4 binding sites form part of a unique covariation network independent of the V3 loop; and (iv) the covariation network formed between the V3 loop and other regions of gp120 and gp41 intersects sites involved in glycosylation and protein secretion. These results demonstrate that while envelope sequence mutations are the key to conferring maraviroc resistance, the specific changes involved are context dependent and thus inherently unpredictable. IMPORTANCE The entry inhibitor drug maraviroc makes the cell coreceptor CCR5

  2. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  3. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  4. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  5. Complexity in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-receptor usage: roles of CCR3 and CCR5 in HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and brain microglia.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Lokesh; Maxwell, Christina R; Peters, Paul J; Clapham, Paul R; Liu, Sue M; Mackay, Charles R; Strayer, David S

    2009-03-01

    CCR3 has been implicated as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), particularly in brain microglia cells. We sought to clarify the comparative roles of CCR3 and CCR5 in the central nervous system (CNS) HIV-1 infection and the potential utility of CCR3 as a target for manipulation via gene transfer. To target CCR3, we developed a single-chain antibody (SFv) and an interfering RNA (RNAi), R3-526. Coding sequences for both were cloned into Tag-deleted SV40-dervied vectors, as these vectors transduce brain microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) highly efficiently. These anti-CCR3 transgenes were compared to SFv-CCR5, an SFv against CCR5, and RNAi-R5, an RNAi that targets CCR5, for the ability to protect primary human brain microglia and MDM from infection with peripheral and neurotropic strains of HIV-1. Downregulation of CCR3 and CCR5 by these transgenes was independent from one another. Confocal microscopy showed that CCR3 and CCR5 co-localized at the plasma membrane with each other and with CD4. Targeting either CCR5 or CCR3 largely protected both microglia and MDM from infection by many strains of HIV-1. That is, some HIV-1 strains, isolated from either the CNS or periphery, required both CCR3 and CCR5 for optimal productive infection of microglia and MDM. Some HIV-1 strains were relatively purely CCR5-tropic. None was purely CCR3-tropic. Thus, some CNS-tropic strains of HIV-1 utilize CCR5 as a co-receptor but do not need CCR3, while for other isolates both CCR3 and CCR5 may be required.

  6. Partial HIV C2V3 envelope sequence analysis reveals association of coreceptor tropism, envelope glycosylation and viral genotypic variability among Kenyan patients on HAART.

    PubMed

    Kitawi, Rose C; Hunja, Carol W; Aman, Rashid; Ogutu, Bernhards R; Muigai, Anne W T; Kokwaro, Gilbert O; Ochieng, Washingtone

    2017-02-14

    HIV-1 is highly variable genetically and at protein level, a property it uses to subvert antiviral immunity and treatment. The aim of this study was to assess if HIV subtype differences were associated with variations in glycosylation patterns and co-receptor tropism among HAART patients experiencing different virologic treatment outcomes. A total of 118 HIV env C2V3 sequence isolates generated previously from 59 Kenyan patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were examined for tropism and glycosylation patterns. For analysis of Potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGs), amino acid sequences generated by the NCBI's Translate tool were applied to the HIVAlign and the N-glycosite tool within the Los Alamos Database. Viral tropism was assessed using Geno2Pheno (G2P), WebPSSM and Phenoseq platforms as well as using Raymond's and Esbjörnsson's rules. Chi square test was used to determine independent variables association and ANOVA applied on scale variables. At respective False Positive Rate (FPR) cut-offs of 5% (p = 0.045), 10% (p = 0.016) and 20% (p = 0.005) for CXCR4 usage within the Geno2Pheno platform, HIV-1 subtype and viral tropism were significantly associated in a chi square test. Raymond's rule (p = 0.024) and WebPSSM (p = 0.05), but not Phenoseq or Esbjörnsson showed significant associations between subtype and tropism. Relative to other platforms used, Raymond's and Esbjörnsson's rules showed higher proportions of X4 variants, while WebPSSM resulted in lower proportions of X4 variants across subtypes. The mean glycosylation density differed significantly between subtypes at positions, N277 (p = 0.034), N296 (p = 0.036), N302 (p = 0.034) and N366 (p = 0.004), with HIV-1D most heavily glycosylated of the subtypes. R5 isolates had fewer PNGs than X4 isolates, but these differences were not significant except at position N262 (p = 0.040). Cell-associated isolates from virologic treatment

  7. Coreceptor usage of Chinese HIV-1 and impact of X4/DM transmission clusters among recently infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Kexin; Li, Wei; Fang, Kun; Musa, Taha Hussein; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Gao, Rong; Guo, Yan; Yan, Wenjuan; Xuan, Yang; Zhong, Ping; Wei, Pingmin

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the current frequency of HIV-1 coreceptor usage in China and assess the candidacy of CCR5 antagonists for treatment of HIV infections. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the potential of X4/DM virus transmission in recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) individuals.Viral tropism testing was performed on samples from 399 MSM individuals and on 2408 available Chinese HIV-1 V3 sequences downloaded from the Los Alamos database using Geno2pheno and WebPSSM in combination. The transmission clusters were evaluated using pol sequences from 291 recently infected MSM with a maximum likelihood, maximum pairwise distance, and Bayesian inference.A higher prevalence of X4/DM viruses was observed in individuals infected with CRF01_AE strains than with subtype B (27.8% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) and CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC/C (27.8% vs 1.0%, P < 0.001). Seven clusters containing only X4/DM viruses were detected in 40 transmission clusters. No significant difference in proportions between clustered X4/DM viruses and R5 viruses was found (P = 0.683).The high proportion of CXCR4 usage for CRF01_AE strains may result in the loss of susceptibility to maraviroc since CRF01_AE has become the most prevalent strains in China. The high prevalence of X4/DM viruses among recently CRF01_AE-infected individuals may be attributed to the stochasticity of HIV transmission, which implied that the early viral tropism screening and treatment would be the key for controlling the epidemic of CRF01_AE strains in China.

  8. Coreceptor usage of Chinese HIV-1 and impact of X4/DM transmission clusters among recently infected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Kexin; Li, Wei; Fang, Kun; Musa, Taha Hussein; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Gao, Rong; Guo, Yan; Yan, Wenjuan; Xuan, Yang; Zhong, Ping; Wei, Pingmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To characterize the current frequency of HIV-1 coreceptor usage in China and assess the candidacy of CCR5 antagonists for treatment of HIV infections. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the potential of X4/DM virus transmission in recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) individuals. Viral tropism testing was performed on samples from 399 MSM individuals and on 2408 available Chinese HIV-1 V3 sequences downloaded from the Los Alamos database using Geno2pheno and WebPSSM in combination. The transmission clusters were evaluated using pol sequences from 291 recently infected MSM with a maximum likelihood, maximum pairwise distance, and Bayesian inference. A higher prevalence of X4/DM viruses was observed in individuals infected with CRF01_AE strains than with subtype B (27.8% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) and CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC/C (27.8% vs 1.0%, P < 0.001). Seven clusters containing only X4/DM viruses were detected in 40 transmission clusters. No significant difference in proportions between clustered X4/DM viruses and R5 viruses was found (P = 0.683). The high proportion of CXCR4 usage for CRF01_AE strains may result in the loss of susceptibility to maraviroc since CRF01_AE has become the most prevalent strains in China. The high prevalence of X4/DM viruses among recently CRF01_AE-infected individuals may be attributed to the stochasticity of HIV transmission, which implied that the early viral tropism screening and treatment would be the key for controlling the epidemic of CRF01_AE strains in China. PMID:27684870

  9. Development and characterization of a novel single-cycle recombinant-virus assay to determine human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Jeannette M; Huang, Wei; Fransen, Signe; Limoli, Kay; Toma, Jonathan; Wrin, Terri; Chappey, Colombe; Kiss, Linda D B; Paxinos, Ellen E; Petropoulos, Christos J

    2007-02-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains require either the CXCR4 or CCR5 chemokine receptor to efficiently enter cells. Blocking viral binding to these coreceptors is an attractive therapeutic target. Currently, several coreceptor antagonists are being evaluated in clinical trials that require characterization of coreceptor tropism for enrollment. In this report, we describe the development of an automated and accurate procedure for determining HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (Trofile) and its validation for routine laboratory testing. HIV-1 pseudoviruses are generated using full-length env genes derived from patient virus populations. Coreceptor tropism is determined by measuring the abilities of these pseudovirus populations to efficiently infect CD4+/U87 cells expressing either the CXCR4 or CCR5 coreceptor. Viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated X4-tropic. Conversely, viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated R5-tropic. Viruses capable of infecting both CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 and CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated dual/mixed-tropic. Assay accuracy and reproducibility were established by evaluating the tropisms of well-characterized viruses and the variability among replicate results from samples tested repeatedly. The viral subtype, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus coinfection, and the plasma viral load did not affect assay performance. Minority subpopulations with alternate tropisms were reliably detected when present at 5 to 10%. The plasma viral load above which samples can be amplified efficiently in the Trofile assay is 1,000 copies per ml of plasma. Trofile has been automated for high-throughput use; it can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment regimens that include a coreceptor inhibitor and to monitor patients on treatment for the emergence of resistant virus populations that switch coreceptor tropism.

  10. Development and Characterization of a Novel Single-Cycle Recombinant-Virus Assay To Determine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism▿

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Jeannette M.; Huang, Wei; Fransen, Signe; Limoli, Kay; Toma, Jonathan; Wrin, Terri; Chappey, Colombe; Kiss, Linda D. B.; Paxinos, Ellen E.; Petropoulos, Christos J.

    2007-01-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains require either the CXCR4 or CCR5 chemokine receptor to efficiently enter cells. Blocking viral binding to these coreceptors is an attractive therapeutic target. Currently, several coreceptor antagonists are being evaluated in clinical trials that require characterization of coreceptor tropism for enrollment. In this report, we describe the development of an automated and accurate procedure for determining HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (Trofile) and its validation for routine laboratory testing. HIV-1 pseudoviruses are generated using full-length env genes derived from patient virus populations. Coreceptor tropism is determined by measuring the abilities of these pseudovirus populations to efficiently infect CD4+/U87 cells expressing either the CXCR4 or CCR5 coreceptor. Viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated X4-tropic. Conversely, viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated R5-tropic. Viruses capable of infecting both CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 and CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated dual/mixed-tropic. Assay accuracy and reproducibility were established by evaluating the tropisms of well-characterized viruses and the variability among replicate results from samples tested repeatedly. The viral subtype, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus coinfection, and the plasma viral load did not affect assay performance. Minority subpopulations with alternate tropisms were reliably detected when present at 5 to 10%. The plasma viral load above which samples can be amplified efficiently in the Trofile assay is 1,000 copies per ml of plasma. Trofile has been automated for high-throughput use; it can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment regimens that include a coreceptor inhibitor and to monitor patients on treatment for the emergence of resistant virus populations that switch coreceptor tropism. PMID:17116663

  11. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  12. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today.

  13. Analysis of co-receptor usage of circulating viral and proviral HIV genome quasispecies by ultra-deep pyrosequencing in patients who are candidates for CCR5 antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbate, I; Rozera, G; Tommasi, C; Bruselles, A; Bartolini, B; Chillemi, G; Nicastri, E; Narciso, P; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2011-05-01

    UDPS combined with genotypic algorithms for prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor usage may provide quantitative data about the tropism of each variant present in the viral quasispecies. The aim of the present study was to assess co-receptor usage by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS), in comparison with the reference phenotypic test (Trofile), in patients who are candidates for CCR5 antagonist treatment, in both circulating and proviral HIV-1. Seventeen patients who were tested by Trofile were enrolled. UDPS of the V3 loop region was carried out on both plasma RNA and proviral DNA. Genotypic prediction of co-receptor usage was established by position-specific score matrices (PSSM) and confirmed, in discordant cases, with geno2pheno. Genetic heterogeneity of the RNA and DNA quasispecies was assessed as well. A total of 196,729 V3 sequences were considered (mean coverage per site, 6346). Concordance between phenotypic test and UDPS with PSSM was 0.82. Geno2pheno results were in line with those obtained with PSSM. Proviral quasispecies were more heterogeneous than those found in circulating HIV. In most patients eligible for CCR5 antagonist treatment, X4 variants were detected in proviral DNA, ranging from 1.0% to 52.7%. UDPS combined with genotypic algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction highlighted the presence of minority variants, with a discordant tropism with respect to the predominant population, in both circulating viral and proviral HIV. In most patients treated with Maraviroc the virological response was independent of the presence of X4 in proviral DNA. The clinical impact of minority X4 variants present in patients who are candidates for anti-CCR5 antagonists remains a crucial point to be addressed.

  14. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) generated by lentivirus vector-mediated delivery of the CCR5{Delta}32 gene despite detectable expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qingwen; Marsh, Jon; Cornetta, Kenneth; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2008-10-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that there are two distinct mechanisms for genetic resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) conferred by the CCR5Delta32 gene: the loss of wild-type CCR5 surface expression and the generation of CCR5Delta32 protein, which interacts with CXCR4. To analyse the protective effects of long-term expression of the CCR5Delta32 protein, recombinant lentiviral vectors were used to deliver the CCR5Delta32 gene into human cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells that had been immortalized by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. Blasticidin S-resistant cell lines expressing the lentivirus-encoded CCR5Delta32 showed a significant reduction in HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion assays. It was shown that CD4(+) T lymphocytes expressing the lentivirus-encoded CCR5Delta32 gene were highly resistant to infection by a primary but not by a laboratory-adapted X4 strain, suggesting different infectivity requirements. In contrast to previous studies that analysed the CCR5Delta32 protective effects in a transient expression system, this study showed that long-term expression of CCR5Delta32 conferred resistance to HIV-1 despite cell-surface expression of the HIV co-receptors. The results suggest an additional unknown mechanism for generating the CCR5Delta32 resistance phenotype and support the hypothesis that the CCR5Delta32 protein acts as an HIV-suppressive factor by altering the stoichiometry of the molecules involved in HIV-1 entry. The lentiviral-CCR5Delta32 vectors offer a method of generating HIV-resistant cells by delivery of the CCR5Delta32 gene that may be useful for stem cell- or T-cell-based gene therapy for HIV-1 infection.

  15. Possible involvement of distinct phylogenetic clusters of HIV-1 variants in the discrepancies between coreceptor tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Hiroshi; Sudo, Koji; Hasegawa, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomohisa; Iketani, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kato, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The coreceptor tropism testing should be conducted prior to commencing a regimen containing a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV-1 infection. For aviremic patients on long antiretroviral therapy, proviral DNA is often used instead of viral RNA in genotypic tropism testing. However, the tropism predictions from RNA and DNA are sometimes different. We examined the cause of the discrepancies between HIV-1 tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the env C2V3C3 region was determined using pair samples of plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 50 HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals using population-based sequencing. The samples with discrepant tropism assessments between RNA and DNA were further analyzed using deep sequencing, followed by phylogenetic analysis. The tropism was assessed using the algorithm geno2pheno with a false-positive rate cutoff of 10 %. In population-based sequencing, five of 50 subjects showed discrepant tropism predictions between their RNA and DNA samples: four exhibited R5 tropism in RNA and X4 tropism in DNA, while one exhibited the opposite pattern. In the deep sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, three subjects had single clusters comprising of RNA- and DNA-derived sequences that were a mixture of R5 and X4 sequences. The other two subjects had two and three distinct phylogenetic clusters of sequences, respectively, each of which was dominated by R5 or X4 sequences; sequences of the R5-dominated cluster were mostly found in RNA, while sequences of the X4-dominated cluster were mostly in DNA. Some of HIV-1 tropism discrepancies between viral RNA and proviral DNA seem to be caused by phylogenetically distinct clusters which resides in plasma and cells in different frequencies. Our findings suggest that the tropism testing using PBMC DNA or deep sequencing may be required when the viral load is not suppressed or rebounds in the course of a CCR5 antagonist-containing regimen.

  16. Optimal Antiviral Switching to Minimize Resistance Risk in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rutao; Piovoso, Michael J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    The development of resistant strains of HIV is the most significant barrier to effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The most common causes of resistance development are patient noncompliance and pre-existence of resistant strains. In this paper, methods of antiviral regimen switching are developed that minimize the risk of pre-existing resistant virus emerging during therapy switches necessitated by virological failure. Two distinct cases are considered; a single previous virological failure and multiple virological failures. These methods use optimal control approaches on experimentally verified mathematical models of HIV strain competition and statistical models of resistance risk. It is shown that, theoretically, order-of-magnitude reduction in risk can be achieved, and multiple previous virological failures enable greater success of these methods in reducing the risk of subsequent treatment failures. PMID:22073250

  17. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Jonathan M.; Zadrozny, Kaneil K.; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D.; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-07-14

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate.

  18. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan M; Zadrozny, Kaneil K; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17063.001 PMID:27416583

  19. Plectin regulates the signaling and trafficking of the HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 and plays a role in HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yun; Zhang Li; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Wang Ziqing; Liu Bingdong; Zhang Jingwu; Fan Guohuang

    2008-02-01

    The CXC chemokine CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 play an important role in inflammation, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and cancer metastasis. The signal transduction and intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 are involved in these functions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the CXCR4 formed a complex with the cytolinker protein plectin in a ligand-dependent manner in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. The glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CXCR4 C-terminal fusion proteins co-precipitated with the full-length and the N-terminal fragments of plectin isoform 1 but not with the N-terminal deletion mutants of plectin isoform 1, thereby suggesting an interaction between the N-terminus of plectin and the C-terminus of CXCR4. This interaction was confirmed by confocal microscopic reconstructions showing co-distribution of these two proteins in the internal vesicles after ligand-induced internalization of CXCR4 in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. Knockdown of plectin with RNA interference (RNAi) significantly inhibited ligand-dependent CXCR4 internalization and attenuated CXCR4-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4 and of Jurkat T cells was inhibited by the plectin RNAi. Moreover, CXCR4 tropic HIV-1 infection in MAGI (HeLa-CD4-LTR-Gal) cells was inhibited by the RNAi of plectin. Thus, plectin appears to interact with CXCR4 and plays an important role in CXCR4 signaling and trafficking and HIV-1 infection.

  20. Selected amino acid changes in HIV-1 subtype-C gp41 are associated with specific gp120(V3) signatures in the regulation of co-receptor usage.

    PubMed

    Dimonte, Salvatore; Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Mercurio, Fabio; Di Pinto, Domenico; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Svicher, Valentina; Perno, Carlo-Federico

    2012-09-01

    The majority of studies have characterized the tropism of HIV-1 subtype-B isolates, but little is known about the determinants of tropism in other subtypes. So, the goal of the present study was to genetically characterize the envelope of viral proteins in terms of co-receptor usage by analyzing 356 full-length env sequences derived from HIV-1 subtype-C infected individuals. The co-receptor usage of V3 sequences was inferred by using the Geno2Pheno and PSSM algorithms, and also analyzed to the "11/25 rule". All reported env sequences were also analyzed with regard to N-linked glycosylation sites, net charge and hydrophilicity, as well as the binomial correlation phi coefficient to assess covariation among gp120(V3) and gp41 signatures and the average linkage hierarchical agglomerative clustering were also performed. Among env sequences present in Los Alamos Database, 255 and 101 sequences predicted as CCR5 and CXCR4 were selected, respectively. The classical V3 signatures at positions 11 and 25, and other specific V3 and gp41 amino acid changes were found statistically associated with different co-receptor usage. Furthermore, several statistically significant associations between V3 and gp41 signatures were also observed. The dendrogram topology showed a cluster associated with CCR5-usage composed by five gp41 mutated positions, A22V, R133M, E136G, N140L, and N166Q that clustered with T2V(V3) and G24T(V3) (bootstrap=1). Conversely, a heterogeneous cluster with CXCR4-usage, involving S11GR(V3), 13-14insIG/LG(V3), P16RQ(V3), Q18KR(V3), F20ILV(V3), D25KRQ(V3), Q32KR(V3) along with A30T(gp41), S107N(gp41), D148E(gp41), A189S(gp41) was identified (bootstrap=0.86). Our results show that as observed for HIV-1 subtype-B, also in subtype-C specific and different gp41 and gp120V3 amino acid changes are associated individually or together with CXCR4 and/or CCR5 usage. These findings strengthen previous observations that determinants of tropism may also reside in the gp41

  1. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  2. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

  3. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; ...

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

  4. A Conserved Glycan in the C2 Domain of HIV-1 Envelope Acts as a Molecular Switch to Control X4 Utilization by Clonal Variants with Identical V3 Loops

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Thomas; Sobrera, Edwin R.; Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all persons newly infected with HIV-1 harbor exclusively CCR5-using virus. CXCR4-using variants eventually arise in up to 50% of patients infected with subtypes B or D. This transition to efficient CXCR4 utilization is often co-incident with progression to AIDS. The basis for HIV-1’s initial dependence on CCR5, the selective force(s) that drive CXCR4-utilization, and the evolutionary pathways by which it occurs are incompletely understood. Greater knowledge of these processes will inform interventions at all stages, from vaccination to cure. The determinants of co-receptor use map primarily, though not exclusively, to the V3 loop of gp120. In this study, we describe five clonal variants with identical V3 loops but divergent CXCR4 use. Mutagenesis revealed two residues controlling this phenotypic switch: a rare polymorphism in C1 and a highly conserved N-glycan in C2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of co-receptor usage regulated by the N-glycan at position 262. PMID:26083631

  5. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    PubMed

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes.

  6. Foreskin T-cell subsets differ substantially from blood with respect to HIV co-receptor expression, inflammatory profile, and memory status.

    PubMed

    Prodger, J L; Gray, R; Kigozi, G; Nalugoda, F; Galiwango, R; Hirbod, T; Wawer, M; Hofer, S O P; Sewankambo, N; Serwadda, D; Kaul, R

    2012-03-01

    The foreskin is the main site of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition in uncircumcised men, but functional data regarding T-cell subsets present at this site are lacking. Foreskin tissue and blood were obtained from Ugandan men undergoing elective adult circumcision. Tissue was treated by mechanical and enzymatic digestion followed by T-cell subset identification and assessment of cytokine production using flow cytometry. Foreskin CD4(+) T cells were predominantly an effector memory phenotype, and compared with blood they displayed a higher frequency of CCR5 expression (42.0% vs. 9.9%) and interleukin-17 production. There was no difference in T-regulatory cell frequency, but interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α production were increased in foreskin CD8(+) T cells. These novel techniques demonstrate that the foreskin represents a proinflammatory milieu that is enriched for HIV-susceptible T-cell subsets. Further characterization of foreskin T-cell subsets may help to define the correlates of HIV susceptibility in the foreskin.

  7. Accelerated In Vivo Proliferation of Memory Phenotype CD4+ T-cells in Human HIV-1 Infection Irrespective of Viral Chemokine Co-receptor Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; de Lara, Catherine; Worth, Andrew; Hegedus, Andrea; Laamanen, Karoliina; Beverley, Peter; Macallan, Derek

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T-cell loss is the hallmark of HIV-1 infection. CD4 counts fall more rapidly in advanced disease when CCR5-tropic viral strains tend to be replaced by X4-tropic viruses. We hypothesized: (i) that the early dominance of CCR5-tropic viruses results from faster turnover rates of CCR5+ cells, and (ii) that X4-tropic strains exert greater pathogenicity by preferentially increasing turnover rates within the CXCR4+ compartment. To test these hypotheses we measured in vivo turnover rates of CD4+ T-cell subpopulations sorted by chemokine receptor expression, using in vivo deuterium-glucose labeling. Deuterium enrichment was modeled to derive in vivo proliferation (p) and disappearance (d*) rates which were related to viral tropism data. 13 healthy controls and 13 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects (CD4 143–569 cells/ul) participated. CCR5-expression defined a CD4+ subpopulation of predominantly CD45R0+ memory cells with accelerated in vivo proliferation (p = 2.50 vs 1.60%/d, CCR5+ vs CCR5−; healthy controls; P<0.01). Conversely, CXCR4 expression defined CD4+ T-cells (predominantly CD45RA+ naive cells) with low turnover rates. The dominant effect of HIV infection was accelerated turnover of CCR5+CD45R0+CD4+ memory T-cells (p = 5.16 vs 2.50%/d, HIV vs controls; P<0.05), naïve cells being relatively unaffected. Similar patterns were observed whether the dominant circulating HIV-1 strain was R5-tropic (n = 9) or X4-tropic (n = 4). Although numbers were small, X4-tropic viruses did not appear to specifically drive turnover of CXCR4-expressing cells (p = 0.54 vs 0.72 vs 0.44%/d in control, R5-tropic, and X4-tropic groups respectively). Our data are most consistent with models in which CD4+ T-cell loss is primarily driven by non-specific immune activation. PMID:23637601

  8. HIV-1 Tropism Dynamics and Phylogenetic Analysis from Longitudinal Ultra-Deep Sequencing Data of CCR5- and CXCR4-Using Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sede, Mariano M.; Moretti, Franco A.; Laufer, Natalia L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coreceptor switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 is associated with HIV disease progression. The molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the CCR5 to CXCR4 switch are the focus of intense recent research. We studied the HIV-1 tropism dynamics in relation to coreceptor usage, the nature of quasispecies from ultra deep sequencing (UDPS) data and their phylogenetic relationships. Methods Here, we characterized C2-V3-C3 sequences of HIV obtained from 19 patients followed up for 54 to 114 months using UDPS, with further genotyping and phylogenetic analysis for coreceptor usage. HIV quasispecies diversity and variability as well as HIV plasma viral load were measured longitudinally and their relationship with the HIV coreceptor usage was analyzed. The longitudinal UDPS data were submitted to phylogenetic analysis and sampling times and coreceptor usage were mapped onto the trees obtained. Results Although a temporal viral genetic structuring was evident, the persistence of several viral lineages evolving independently along the infection was statistically supported, indicating a complex scenario for the evolution of viral quasispecies. HIV X4-using variants were present in most of our patients, exhibiting a dissimilar inter- and intra-patient predominance as the component of quasispecies even on antiretroviral therapy. The viral populations from some of the patients studied displayed evidences of the evolution of X4 variants through fitness valleys, whereas for other patients the data favored a gradual mode of emergence. Conclusions CXCR4 usage can emerge independently, in multiple lineages, along the course of HIV infection. The mode of emergence, i.e. gradual or through fitness valleys seems to depend on both virus and patient factors. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that, besides becoming dominant after population-level switches, minor proportions of X4 viruses might exist along the infection, perhaps even at early stages of it. The fate of these minor

  9. Cell-based Fluorescence Complementation Reveals a Role for HIV-1 Nef Protein Dimerization in AP-2 Adaptor Recruitment and CD4 Co-receptor Down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sherry T; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2017-02-17

    The HIV-1 Nef accessory factor enhances viral infectivity, immune evasion, and AIDS progression. Nef triggers rapid down-regulation of CD4 via the endocytic adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex, a process linked to enhanced viral infectivity and immune escape. Here, we describe a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to visualize the interaction of Nef with AP-2 and CD4 in living cells. Interacting protein pairs were fused to complementary non-fluorescent fragments of YFP and co-expressed in 293T cells. Nef interactions with both CD4 and AP-2 resulted in complementation of YFP and a bright fluorescent signal by confocal microcopy that localized to the cell periphery. Co-expression of the AP-2 α subunit enhanced the Nef·AP-2 σ2 subunit BiFC signal and vice versa, suggesting that the AP-2 α-σ2 hemicomplex interacts cooperatively with Nef. Mutagenesis of Nef amino acids Arg-134, Glu-174, and Asp-175, which stabilize Nef for AP-2 α-σ2 binding in a recent co-crystal structure, substantially reduced AP-2 interaction without affecting CD4 binding. A dimerization-defective mutant of Nef failed to interact with either CD4 or AP-2 in the BiFC assay, indicating that Nef quaternary structure is required for CD4 and AP-2 recruitment as well as CD4 down-regulation. A small molecule previously shown to bind the Nef dimerization interface also reduced Nef interactions with AP-2 and CD4 and restored CD4 expression to the surface of HIV-infected cells. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for previous observations that dimerization-defective Nef mutants fail to down-regulate CD4 and validate the Nef dimerization interface as a target site for antiretroviral drug development.

  10. Contraceptive discontinuation and switching among couples receiving integrated HIV and family planning services in Lusaka, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Lisa; Wall, Kristin M; Vwalika, Bellington; Htee Khu, Naw; Brill, Ilene; Kilembe, William; Stephenson, Rob; Chomba, Elwyn; Vwalika, Cheswa; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe predictors of contraceptive method discontinuation and switching behaviors among HIV positive couples receiving couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing services in Lusaka, Zambia. Design Couples were randomized in a factorial design to two family planning educational intervention videos, received comprehensive family planning services, and were assessed every 3-months for contraceptive initiation, discontinuation and switching. Methods We modeled factors associated with contraceptive method upgrading and downgrading via multivariate Andersen-Gill models. Results Most women continued the initial method selected after randomization. The highest rates of discontinuation/switching were observed for injectable contraceptive and intrauterine device users. Time to discontinuing the more effective contraceptive methods or downgrading to oral contraceptives or condoms was associated with the women's younger age, desire for more children within the next year, heavy menstrual bleeding, bleeding between periods, and cystitis/dysuria. Health concerns among women about contraceptive implants and male partners not wanting more children were associated with upgrading from oral contraceptives or condoms. HIV status of the woman or the couple was not predictive of switching or stopping. Conclusions We found complicated patterns of contraceptive use. The predictors of contraception switching indicate that interventions targeted to younger couples that address common contraception-related misconceptions could improve effective family planning utilization. We recommend these findings be used to increase the uptake and continuation of contraception, especially long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, and that fertility-goal based, LARC-focused family planning be offered as an integral part of HIV prevention services. PMID:24088689

  11. PRO 140--a novel CCR5 co-receptor inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Nadia; Das, Satyajit

    2010-01-01

    Despite an increase in the variety of anti-retroviral agents in the market, there remains a need for novel agents to treat HIV 1 infected individuals, in order to overcome existing problems with adherence, toxicities, drug interactions and viral resistance. In this article, we will describe Pro 140, one of the recently developed class of anti-retroviral agent, the CCR5 co-receptor inhibitor. We will also describe several preclinical and clinical studies that have evaluated the efficacy, tolerability and toxicity profiles of Pro-140. We will also look at how its mechanism of action and mode of delivery may change the way patients take highly active anti-retroviral therapy. There are some promising patents discussed in this short review for the use of PRO 140 as CCR5 co-receptor Inhibitor.

  12. Controlling Multicycle Replication of Live-Attenuated HIV-1 Using an Unnatural Genetic Switch.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Nanxi; Kang, Guobin; Niu, Wei; Li, Qingsheng; Guo, Jiantao

    2017-04-21

    A safe and effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine is urgently needed, but remains elusive. While HIV-1 live-attenuated vaccine can provide potent protection as demonstrated in rhesus macaque-simian immunodeficiency virus model, the potential pathogenic consequences associated with the uncontrolled virus replication preclude such vaccine from clinical applications. We investigated a novel approach to address this problem by controlling live-attenuated HIV-1 replication through an unnatural genetic switch that was based on the amber suppression strategy. Here we report the construction of all-in-one live-attenuated HIV-1 mutants that contain genomic copy of the amber suppression system. This genetic modification resulted in viruses that were capable of multicycle replication in vitro and could be switched on and off using an unnatural amino acid as the cue. This stand-alone, replication-controllable attenuated HIV-1 virus represents an important step toward the generation of a safe and efficacious live-attenuated HIV-1 vaccine. The strategy reported in this work can be adopted for the development of other live-attenuated vaccines.

  13. Measurement error robustness of a closed-loop minimal sampling method for HIV therapy switching.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, E Fabian; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    We test the robustness of a closed-loop treatment scheduling method to realistic HIV viral load measurement error. The purpose of the algorithm is to allow the accurate detection of an induced viral load minimum with a reduced number of samples. Therapy must be switched at or near the viral-load minimum to achieve optimal therapeutic benefit; therapeutic benefit decreases logarithmically with increased viral load at the switching time. The performance of the algorithm is characterized using a number of metrics. These include the number of samples saved vs. fixed-rate sampling, the risk-reduction achieved vs. the risk-reduction possible with frequent sampling, and the difference between the switching time vs. the theoretical optimal switching time. The algorithm is applied to simulated patient data generated from a family of data-driven patient models and corrupted by experimentally confirmed levels of log-normal noise.

  14. Coreceptor gene imprinting governs thymocyte lineage fate

    PubMed Central

    Adoro, Stanley; McCaughtry, Thomas; Erman, Batu; Alag, Amala; Van Laethem, François; Park, Jung-Hyun; Tai, Xuguang; Kimura, Motoko; Wang, Lie; Grinberg, Alex; Kubo, Masato; Bosselut, Remy; Love, Paul; Singer, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Immature thymocytes are bipotential cells that are signalled during positive selection to become either helper- or cytotoxic-lineage T cells. By tracking expression of lineage determining transcription factors during positive selection, we now report that the Cd8 coreceptor gene locus co-opts any coreceptor protein encoded within it to induce thymocytes to express the cytotoxic-lineage factor Runx3 and to adopt the cytotoxic-lineage fate, findings we refer to as ‘coreceptor gene imprinting'. Specifically, encoding CD4 proteins in the endogenous Cd8 gene locus caused major histocompatibility complex class II-specific thymocytes to express Runx3 during positive selection and to differentiate into CD4+ cytotoxic-lineage T cells. Our findings further indicate that coreceptor gene imprinting derives from the dynamic regulation of specific cis Cd8 gene enhancer elements by positive selection signals in the thymus. Thus, for coreceptor-dependent thymocytes, lineage fate is determined by Cd4 and Cd8 coreceptor gene loci and not by the specificity of T-cell antigen receptor/coreceptor signalling. This study identifies coreceptor gene imprinting as a critical determinant of lineage fate determination in the thymus. PMID:22036949

  15. A Putative G Protein-Coupled Receptor, RDC1, Is a Novel Coreceptor for Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobuaki; Soda, Yasushi; Kanbe, Katsuaki; Liu, Hui-yu; Mukai, Ryozaburo; Kitamura, Toshio; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2000-01-01

    More than 10 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been shown to act as coreceptors for infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We have isolated HIV-1 variants infectious to primary brain-derived CD4-positive cells (BT-3 and BT-20/N) and U87/CD4 glioma cells that are resistant to T-cell line-tropic (T-tropic), macrophage-tropic (M-tropic), and T- and M-tropic (dualtropic) (X4, R5, and R5X4) HIV-1 strains. These primary brain-derived cells were also highly susceptible to HIV-2ROD, HIV-2SBL6669, and SIVmndGB-1. A factor or coreceptor that determines the susceptibility of these brain-derived cells to these HIV and SIV strains has not been fully identified. To identify this coreceptor, we examined amino acid sequences of all known HIV and SIV coreceptors and noticed that tyrosine residues are well conserved in their extracellular amino-terminal domains. By this criterion, we selected 18 GPCRs as candidates of coreceptors for HIV and SIV strains infectious to these brain-derived cells. mRNA expression of an orphan GPCR, RDC1, was detected in the brain-derived cells, the C8166 T-cell line, and peripheral blood lymphocytes, all of which are susceptible to HIV-1 variants, but not in macrophages, which are resistant to them. When a CD4-expressing cell line, NP-2/CD4, which shows strict resistance to infection not only with HIV-1 but also with HIV-2 or SIV, was transduced with the RDC1 gene, the cells became highly susceptible to HIV-2 and SIVmnd strains but to neither M- nor T-tropic HIV-1 strains. The cells also acquired a low susceptibility to the HIV-1 variants. These findings indicate that RDC1 is a novel coreceptor for several HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV strains which infect brain-derived cells. PMID:10623723

  16. Relative concordance of human immunodeficiency virus oligomeric and monomeric envelope in CCR5 coreceptor usage

    SciTech Connect

    Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou

    2008-01-20

    A major difference between binding and fusion assays commonly used to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope is the use of monomeric envelope for the former assay and oligomeric envelope for the latter. Due to discrepancies in their readouts for some mutants, envelope regions involved in CCR5 coreceptor usage were systematically studied to determine whether the discordance is due to inherent differences between the two assays or whether it genuinely reflects functional differences at each entry step. By adding the binding inhibitor TAK-779 to delay coreceptor binding kinetics in the fusion assay, the readouts were found comparable between the assays for the mutants analysed in this study. Our finding indicates that monomeric binding reflects oligomeric envelope-CCR5 interaction, thus discordant results between binding and fusion assays do not necessarily indicate differences in coreceptor usage by oligomeric envelope and monomeric gp120.

  17. Reconstructing the Dynamics of HIV Evolution within Hosts from Serial Deep Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Art F. Y.; Swenson, Luke C.; Bunnik, Evelien M.; Edo-Matas, Diana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Harrigan, P. Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a ‘fitness valley’ separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points) from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS). We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30) months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25) months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant. PMID:23133358

  18. Delayed switch of antiretroviral therapy after virologic failure associated with elevated mortality among HIV-infected adults in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya L.; Tran, Linh; Geng, Elvin H.; Reynolds, Steven J.; Kambugu, Andrew; Wood, Robin; Bangsberg, David R.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Routine monitoring of plasma HIV RNA among HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unavailable in many resource-limited settings. Alternative monitoring approaches correlate poorly with virologic failure and can substantially delay switch to second-line therapy. We evaluated the impact of delayed switch on mortality among patients with virologic failure in Africa. Design A cohort. Methods We examined patients with confirmed virologic failure on first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens from four cohorts with serial HIV RNA monitoring in Uganda and South Africa. Marginal structural models aimed to estimate the effect of delayed switch on mortality in a hypothetical trial in which switch time was randomly assigned. Inverse probability weights adjusted for measured confounders including time-updated CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA. Results Among 823 patients with confirmed virologic failure, the cumulative incidence of switch 180 days after failure was 30% [95% confidence interval (CI) 27–33]. The majority of patients (74%) had not failed immunologically as defined by WHO criteria by the time of virologic failure. Adjusted mortality was higher for individuals who remained on first-line therapy than for those who had switched [odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 –4.2]. Among those without immunologic failure, the relative harm of failure to switch was similar (OR 2.4; 95% CI 0.99–5.8) to that of the entire cohort, although of borderline statistical significance. Conclusion Among HIV-infected patients with confirmed virologic failure on first-line ART, remaining on first-line therapy led to an increase in mortality relative to switching. Our results suggest that detection and response to confirmed virologic failure could decrease mortality. PMID:24977440

  19. Usage of the coreceptors CCR-5, CCR-3, and CXCR-4 by primary and cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Sol, N; Ferchal, F; Braun, J; Pleskoff, O; Tréboute, C; Ansart, I; Alizon, M

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR-5 and CXCR-4, and possibly CCR-3, are the principal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptors, apparently interacting with HIV-1 envelope, in association with CD4. Cell lines coexpressing CD4 and these chemokine receptors were infected with a panel of seven primary HIV-2 isolates passaged in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and three laboratory HIV-2 strains passaged in T-cell lines. The CCR-5, CCR-3, and CXCR-4 coreceptors could all be used by HIV-2. The ability to use CXCR-4 represents a major difference between HIV-2 and the closely related simian immunodeficiency viruses. Most HIV-2 strains using CCR-5 could also use CCR-3, sometimes with similar efficiencies. As observed for HIV-1, the usage of CCR-5 or CCR-3 was observed principally for HIV-2 strains derived from asymptomatic individuals, while HIV-2 strains derived from AIDS patients used CXCR-4. However, there were several exceptions, and the patterns of coreceptor usage seemed more complex for HIV-2 than for HIV-1. The two T-tropic HIV-2 strains tested used CXCR-4 and not CCR-5, while T-tropic HIV-1 can generally use both. Moreover, among five primary HIV-2 strains all unable to use CXCR-4, three could replicate in CCR-5-negative PBMC, which has not been reported for HIV-1. These observations suggest that the CCR-5 coreceptor is less important for HIV-2 than for HIV-1 and indicate that HIV-2 can use other cell entry pathways and probably other coreceptors. One HIV-2 isolate replicating in normal or CCR-5-negative PBMC failed to infect CXCR-4+ cells or the U87MG-CD4 and sMAGI cell lines, which are permissive to infection by HIV-2 but not by HIV-1. This suggests the existence of several HIV-2-specific coreceptors, which are differentially expressed in cell lines and PBMC. PMID:9343175

  20. Treatment switches during pregnancy among HIV-positive women on antiretroviral therapy at conception

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, Susie E; Bansi, Loveleen K; Thorne, Claire; Anderson, Jane; Newell, Marie-Louise; Taylor, Graham P; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Tookey, Pat A; Sabin, Caroline A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe antiretroviral therapy (ART) use and clinical status, at start of and during pregnancy, for HIV-positive women receiving ART at conception, including the proportion conceiving on drugs (efavirenz and didanosine) not recommended for use in early pregnancy. Methods Women with a pregnancy resulting in a live birth after 1995 (n=1,537) were identified in an observational cohort of patients receiving HIV care at 12 clinics in the UK by matching records with national pregnancy study data. Treatment and clinical data were analysed for 375 women conceiving on ART, including logistic regression to identify factors associated with changing regimen during pregnancy. Results Of the 375 women on ART at conception, 39 (10%) conceived on dual therapy, 306 (82%) on triple therapy and 30 (8%) on >3 drugs. In total, 116 (31%) women conceived on a regimen containing efavirenz or didanosine (69 efavirenz, 54 didanosine, 7 both). Overall, 38% (143) switched regimen during pregnancy, of whom 41% (n=48) had a detectable viral load (≥50 copies/ml) around that time. Detectable viral load was associated with increased risk of regimen change (adjusted odds ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval [1.3, 3.8]), while women on efavirenz at conception were three times more likely to switch than women on other drugs (3.3, [1.8, 6.0]). Regimen switching was also associated with calendar year at conception (0.9, [0.8-1.0]). Conclusions These findings reinforce the need for careful consideration of ART use among women planning or likely to have a pregnancy in order to reduce viral load before pregnancy and avoid drugs not recommended for early antenatal use. PMID:21673558

  1. Pharmacokinetics of rilpivirine and 24-week outcomes after switching from efavirenz in virologically-suppressed HIV-1-infected adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jantarabenjakul, Watsamon; Anugulruengkitt, Suvaporn; Kasipong, Naruporn; Thammajaruk, Narukjaporn; Sophonphan, Jiratchaya; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Cressey, Tim R; Colbers, Angela; Burger, David M; Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Pancharoen, Chitsanu

    2017-10-10

    Rilpivirine (RPV), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug, could be a favorable drug for maintenance therapy in HIV-infected adolescents because it has few long-term side effects. However, data among adolescents switching from efavirenz (EFV) to RPV are limited. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and efficacy of RPV in virologically-suppressed HIV-1-infected adolescents after switching from EFV. Adolescents aged 12-18 years on EFV-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) were switched from EFV to RPV (25 mg, once daily). Intensive 24-hr blood samplings at 0 (pre-dose), 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 12 and 24 hours were performed 4 weeks after switching. PK parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental method and compared with published data from the PAINT and pooled ECHO/THRIVE substudies. HIV RNA level was measured at weeks 12 and 24. Biochemical profiles were measured at baseline and week 24. From January to June 2016, 20adolescents (12 male) were enrolled. Median (IQR) age was 16 (15-17) years and weight was 49(42-59) kilograms. Mean (SD) AUC24h, C24h and Cmax of RPV were 2041 (745) ng.h/mL, 69 (29) ng/mL and 143 (65) ng/mL, respectively. Median (IQR) Tmax was 5 (2-9) hours. Four adolescents had C24h<40 ng/mL. All PK parameters were comparable with published data. All adolescents remained virologically suppressed at week 24. Significant decreases in fasting total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein were observed (p-value <0.05). Virologically-suppressed HIV-infected adolescents had adequate RPV exposure and remained virologically suppressed after switching from EFV. RPV can be used as long-term maintenance ART in HIV-infected adolescent.

  2. A switch-on mechanism to activate maize ribosome-inactivating protein for targeting HIV-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Law, Sue Ka-Yee; Wang, Rui-Rui; Mak, Amanda Nga-Sze; Wong, Kam-Bo; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2010-10-01

    Maize ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) is a plant toxin that inactivates eukaryotic ribosomes by depurinating a specific adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Maize RIP is first produced as a proenzyme with a 25-amino acid internal inactivation region on the protein surface. During germination, proteolytic removal of this internal inactivation region generates the active heterodimeric maize RIP with full N-glycosidase activity. This naturally occurring switch-on mechanism provides an opportunity for targeting the cytotoxin to pathogen-infected cells. Here, we report the addition of HIV-1 protease recognition sequences to the internal inactivation region and the activation of the maize RIP variants by HIV-1 protease in vitro and in HIV-infected cells. Among the variants generated, two were cleaved efficiently by HIV-1 protease. The HIV-1 protease-activated variants showed enhanced N-glycosidase activity in vivo as compared to their un-activated counterparts. They also possessed potent inhibitory effect on p24 antigen production in human T cells infected by two HIV-1 strains. This switch-on strategy for activating the enzymatic activity of maize RIP in target cells provides a platform for combating pathogens with a specific protease.

  3. CD27− B-Cells Produce Class Switched and Somatically Hyper-Mutated Antibodies during Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cagigi, Alberto; Du, Likun; Dang, Linh Vu Phuong; Grutzmeier, Sven; Atlas, Ann; Chiodi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation occur in mature B-cells in response to antigen stimulation. These processes are crucial for the generation of functional antibodies. During HIV-1 infection, loss of memory B-cells, together with an altered differentiation of naïve B-cells result in production of low quality antibodies, which may be due to impaired immunoglobulin affinity maturation. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HIV-1 infection on class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation by studying the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in peripheral B-cells from a cohort of chronically HIV-1 infected patients as compared to a group of healthy controls. In parallel, we also characterized the phenotype of B-cells and their ability to produce immunoglobulins in vitro. Cells from HIV-1 infected patients showed higher baseline levels of AID expression and increased IgA production measured ex-vivo and upon CD40 and TLR9 stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the percentage of CD27−IgA+ and CD27−IgG+ B-cells in blood was significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients as compared to controls. Interestingly, our results showed a significantly increased number of somatic hypermutations in the VH genes in CD27− cells from patients. Taken together, these results show that during HIV-1 infection, CD27− B-cells can also produce class switched and somatically hypermutated antibodies. Our data add important information for the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the loss of specific antibody production observed during HIV-1 infection. PMID:19412542

  4. Economic Outcomes of First-Line Regimen Switching Among Stable Patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Lisa; Buikema, Ami R; Seare, Jerry; Bengtson, Lindsay G S; Johnson, Jonathan; Cao, Feng; Villasis-Keever, Angelina

    2017-07-01

    Although switching of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a valid approach for addressing treatment failure in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ART changes among those who are well maintained on their current regimens may lead to the development of new side effects or resistance. To examine the effect of first-line regimen switching on subsequent health care utilization and cost among stable HIV patients. This was a retrospective claims data study of adult patients with HIV who initiated ART between 2007 and 2013 and had been treated with their initial regimens for at least 6 continuous months. Those with evidence of pregnancy or HIV-2 were excluded. Patients who underwent an ART change were assigned to a switcher cohort; a nonswitcher cohort was then generated by matching up to 20 nonswitchers for each switcher, with replacement. The index date was the date of the first ART change for switchers and was the claim date closest to the corresponding switcher's switch date for nonswitchers. Patient characteristics at baseline and post-index annualized health care utilization and costs were analyzed descriptively and with multivariable models. Analyses were performed in the full population and among patients designated as virologically stable (had undetectable viral ribonucleic acid [RNA] for 90 days pre-index) and virologically and clinically stable (had undetectable viral RNA and no apparent clinical reason for switching ART). The study population consisted of 6,983 individuals, which included 927 switchers (168 virologically stable; 55 virologically+clinically stable), who were matched with replacement with 18,511 nonswitcher comparators. The switcher cohort was 88.8% male (mean age 43.8 years). Mean preindex and follow-up treatment durations for switchers and nonswitchers were 1.8 years and 1.5 years, respectively; demographic characteristics, pre-index treatment duration, and follow-up duration were similar between cohorts. Significantly more

  5. Efficacy of raltegravir switching strategies in HIV-infected patients with suppressed viraemia according to the genotypic sensitivity score.

    PubMed

    Caby, F; Schneider, L; Blanc, C; Soulié, C; Tindel, M; Peytavin, G; Agher, R; Valantin, M A; Tubiana, R; Wirden, M; Calvez, V; Marcelin, A G; Katlama, C

    2014-04-01

    The lack of antiretroviral (ARV) backbone activity associated with raltegravir has been proposed as the main explanation for virological relapse observed in patients with undetectable viraemia who are switched from a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) to raltegravir. However ARV activity remains difficult to assess in this context. The aim of our study was to precisely assess the ARV backbone activity in patients with undetectable viraemia who underwent raltegravir switching strategies and to evaluate the efficacy of such switching strategies based on the genotypic sensitivity score (GSS). Patients with a plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA level of <50 copies/mL on a stable two ARV-class regimen were enrolled if they switched one of their ARV drugs to raltegravir 400 mg twice daily. The GSS was calculated using a genotyping test performed on the HIV-1 RNA of the last plasma measurement with a HIV-1 RNA level of >50 copies/mL before the switch and on the results of all previous genotyping tests. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a plasma HIV-1 RNA level of <50 copies/mL at week 24. Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study. The proportion of patients with a plasma HIV-1 RNA level of <50 copies/mL at week 24 was 92.9 % (range 83.0-97.2 %) in the intent-to-treat analysis and 98.1 % (90.0-99.7 %) in per-protocol analysis. When the backbone was fully active, the proportion was 100.0 % (86.7-100.0 %) at week 24 and week 48 in the per-protocol analysis. We observed a decrease in plasma total cholesterol and triglycerides of -12.7 % (p = 0.005) and -26.5 % (p = 0.001), respectively. Raltegravir switching strategies are effective when the associated backbone is fully active according to the GSS. In the context of undetectable viraemia, where ARV activity remains difficult to assess, the determination of the GSS requires the entire ARV history of the patient and all previous HIV-RNA genotyping test results.

  6. Determinants for Sensitivity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coreceptor CXCR4 to the Bicyclam AMD3100

    PubMed Central

    Labrosse, Béatrice; Brelot, Anne; Heveker, Nikolaus; Sol, Nathalie; Schols, Dominique; De Clercq, Erik; Alizon, Marc

    1998-01-01

    The bicyclam AMD3100 is a potent and selective inhibitor of the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2). It was recently demonstrated that the compound inhibited HIV entry through CXCR4 but not through CCR5. Selectivity of AMD3100 for CXCR4 was further indicated by its lack of effect on HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection mediated by the CCR5, CCR3, Bonzo, BOB, and US28, coreceptors. AMD3100 completely blocked HIV-1 infection mediated by a mutant CXCR4 bearing a deletion of most of the amino-terminal extracellular domain. In contrast, relative resistance to AMD3100 was conferred by different single amino acid substitutions in the second extracellular loop (ECL2) or in the adjacent membrane-spanning domain, TM4. Only substitutions of a neutral residue for aspartic acid and of a nonaromatic residue for phenylalanine (Phe) were associated with drug resistance. This suggests a direct interaction of AMD3100 with these amino acids rather than indirect effects of their mutation on the CXCR4 structure. The interaction of aspartic acids of ECL2 and TM4 with AMD3100 is consistent with the positive charge of bicyclams, which might block HIV-1 entry by preventing electrostatic interactions between CXCR4 and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120. Other features of AMD3100 must account for its high antiviral activity, in particular the presence of an aromatic linker between the cyclam units. This aromatic group might engage in hydrophobic interactions with the Phe-X-Phe motifs of ECL2 or TM4. These results confirm the importance of ECL2 for the HIV coreceptor activity of CXCR4. PMID:9658078

  7. HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Second-line Treatment in Children Randomized to Switch at Low versus Higher RNA Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Linda; Melvin, Ann; Fiscus, Susan; Saidi, Yacine; Nastouli, Eleni; Harper, Lynda; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Babiker, Abdel; McKinney, Ross; Gibb, Diana; Tudor-Williams, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold. Methods PENPACT-1 had a 2x2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based ART, and switch at a 1000c/ml versus 30000c/ml threshold. Switch-criteria were: not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or CDC-C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000c/ml before switch, re-suppression and at 4-year/trial-end. Results Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000c/ml (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30000c/ml (PI-30000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000c/ml (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30000c/ml (NNRTI-30000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000c/ml switch-criteria during 5 years follow-up. In 30000c/ml threshold arms, median time from 1000c/ml to 30000c/ml switch-criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P=0.81). In NNRTI-30000 more NRTI resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000c/ml (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30000). Sixty-two children started abacavir+lamivudine, 166 lamivudine+zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir+lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30000, 64% NNRTI-1000 and 100% NNRTI-30000 were <400c/ml 24 weeks later. Conclusion Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet re-suppressed on second-line. An abacavir+lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance. PMID:26322666

  8. Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Determination of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, Ana C.; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard M.; Rhea, Ariel M.; Rose, Justine D.; Wylie, Doug; Henry, Kenneth; Wright, Alison; King, Kevin; Archer, John; Poveda, Eva; Soriano, Vicente; Robertson, David L.; Olivo, Paul D.; Arts, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    CCR5 antagonists are a powerful new class of antiretroviral drugs that require a companion assay to evaluate the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior to use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. In this study, we have developed, characterized, verified, and prevalidated a novel phenotypic test to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (VERITROP) based on a sensitive cell-to-cell fusion assay. A proprietary vector was constructed containing a near-full-length HIV-1 genome with the yeast uracil biosynthesis (URA3) gene replacing the HIV-1 env coding sequence. Patient-derived HIV-1 PCR products were introduced by homologous recombination using an innovative yeast-based cloning strategy. The env-expressing vectors were then used in a cell-to-cell fusion assay to determine the presence of R5 and/or non-R5 HIV-1 variants within the viral population. Results were compared with (i) the original version of Trofile (Monogram Biosciences, San Francisco, CA), (ii) population sequencing, and (iii) 454 pyrosequencing, with the genotypic data analyzed using several bioinformatics tools, i.e., the 11/24/25 rule, Geno2Pheno (2% to 5.75%, 3.5%, or 10% false-positive rate [FPR]), and webPSSM. VERITROP consistently detected minority non-R5 variants from clinical specimens, with an analytical sensitivity of 0.3%, with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. In a pilot study, a 73.7% (56/76) concordance was observed with the original Trofile assay, with 19 of the 20 discordant results corresponding to non-R5 variants detected using VERITROP and not by the original Trofile assay. The degree of concordance of VERITROP and Trofile with population and deep sequencing results depended on the algorithm used to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Overall, VERITROP showed better concordance with deep sequencing/Geno2Pheno at a 0.3% detection threshold (67%), whereas Trofile matched better with population sequencing (79%). However, 454

  9. Combined Effects of Aging and HIV Infection on Semantic Verbal Fluency: A View of the Cortical Hypothesis Through the Lens of Clustering and Switching

    PubMed Central

    Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Woods, Steven Paul; Deutsch, Reena; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    The profile of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) has classically been characterized as “subcortical”, but questions have arisen as to whether aging with HIV in the antiretroviral therapy era has subtlety shifted the expression of HAND into a more “cortical” disorder (e.g., decay of semantic memory stores). We evaluated this hypothesis by examining semantic fluency and its component processes (i.e., clustering and switching) in 257 individuals across four groups stratified by age (<40 and ≥ 50 years) and HIV serostatus. Jonckheere-Terpstra tests revealed significant monotonic trends for the combined effects of HIV and aging on overall semantic (and letter) fluency and switching, but not cluster size, with greatest deficits evident in the older adults with HIV infection. Within the older HIV-infected cohort, poorer switching was uniquely associated with self-reported declines in instrumental activities of daily living and deficits in learning and executive functions, but not semantic memory. Results suggest that HIV infection and aging may confer adverse additive effects on the executive components of semantic fluency (i.e., switching), rather than a degradation of semantic memory stores (i.e., cluster size), which is a profile that is most consistent with combined frontostriatal neuropathological burden of these two conditions. PMID:22292479

  10. [Frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation in different French regions].

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G; Mercier, G

    1998-05-01

    We studied the frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation on 1,836 DNA samples originating from ten French regions. This mutation confers, in the homozygous state, resistance to HIV-1 infection. For the whole territory, the mean percentage presence of the delta 32 mutation is 9.2%. The mutation is statistically more frequent in the north (11.2%) than in the south (6.3%) of the country; this differentiation corresponds probably to a gradient of decreasing frequencies of the delta 32 mutation in Europe.

  11. Evidence of Divergent Amino Acid Usage in Comparative Analyses of R5- and X4-Associated HIV-1 Vpr Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Antell, Gregory C.; Zhong, Wen; Kercher, Katherine; Passic, Shendra; Williams, Jean; Liu, Yucheng; James, Tony; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Szep, Zsofia

    2017-01-01

    Vpr is an HIV-1 accessory protein that plays numerous roles during viral replication, and some of which are cell type dependent. To test the hypothesis that HIV-1 tropism extends beyond the envelope into the vpr gene, studies were performed to identify the associations between coreceptor usage and Vpr variation in HIV-1-infected patients. Colinear HIV-1 Env-V3 and Vpr amino acid sequences were obtained from the LANL HIV-1 sequence database and from well-suppressed patients in the Drexel/Temple Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort. Genotypic classification of Env-V3 sequences as X4 (CXCR4-utilizing) or R5 (CCR5-utilizing) was used to group colinear Vpr sequences. To reveal the sequences associated with a specific coreceptor usage genotype, Vpr amino acid sequences were assessed for amino acid diversity and Jensen-Shannon divergence between the two groups. Five amino acid alphabets were used to comprehensively examine the impact of amino acid substitutions involving side chains with similar physiochemical properties. Positions 36, 37, 41, 89, and 96 of Vpr were characterized by statistically significant divergence across multiple alphabets when X4 and R5 sequence groups were compared. In addition, consensus amino acid switches were found at positions 37 and 41 in comparisons of the R5 and X4 sequence populations. These results suggest an evolutionary link between Vpr and gp120 in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:28620613

  12. X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus IIIB utilizes CXCR4 as coreceptor, as distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Adnan, Nihad; Tanaka, Atsushi; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2013-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses initiate infections via CCR5 coreceptors and then change their tropism to C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), this change being associated with rapid disease progression. HIV-1IIIB, a widely described pure X4-tropic strain, is distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses. In this study, the requirement for amino terminal regions (NTRs) of CXCR4 for entry of HIV-1IIIB virus into host cells was examined and compared to that of R5X4-tropic viruses. CXCR4 and its deletion mutant (CXCR4ΔNTR23; first 23 amino acids removed from NTR) were amplified to examine their coreceptor activities. NP-2/CD4/CXCR4 and NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cell lines were prepared accordingly. Indirect immune fluorescence assay (IFA), PCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity were used to compare the process of infection of host cells by HIV-1IIIB virus, one R5-tropic and five other R5X4-tropic viruses. All the R5X4-tropic HIVs were found to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 but unable to use CXCR4ΔNTR23 as coreceptors. In contrast, X4-tropic HIV-1IIIB was found to preferentially infect through CXCR4ΔNTR23. Viral antigens in infected NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cells were detected by IFA and confirmed by detection of proviral DNA and by performing RT assays on the spent cell-supernatants. In dual tropic viruses, deletion of 23 amino acids from NTR abrogates the coreceptor activity of CXCR4. This observation demonstrates that NTR of CXCR4 have an obligatory coreceptor role for dual tropic viruses. However, HIV-1IIIB may have different requirements for NTR than R5X4 viruses or may infect host cells independent of NTR of CXCR4.

  13. Efficacy and safety of switching from branded to generic antiretrovirals in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Andrea; Galli, Laura; Franzin, Michela; Tadini, Patrizia; Galizzi, Nadia; Carbone, Alessia; Merli, Marco; Muccini, Camilla; Oltolini, Chiara; Andolina, Andrea; Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Background Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of switching from branded to generic antiretrovirals in patients with HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL. Methods Matched-cohort study of patients followed at a single clinical center. Since September 2014, all patients with HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL who were receiving branded lamivudine or zidovudine/lamivudine or efavirenz were switched to the generic compound (switchers) and matched, in a ratio 1:1, for age (±5 years), gender, anti-HCV antibodies, nadir and (±50 cells/μL) baseline CD4+ count (±100 cells/μL), duration of antiretroviral therapy (±1 year), with patients with HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL, on treatment with unavailable generic compounds (non-switchers). Incidence rates (IR) of different outcomes were calculated and compared by Poisson regression model. A confirmed HIV-RNA ≥50 copies/mL defined virological failure; any change in the antiretroviral regimen was defined as treatment discontinuation. Results Four hundred forty patients were switched to generic compounds (268 [61%] on lamivudine, 65 [15%] on zidovudine/lamivudine, 87 [20%] on efavirenz and 20 [4%] on efavirenz and either lamivudine or zidovudine/lamivudine). Over a median follow-up of 15.0 (12.1–15.7) months, virological failure occurred in four switchers (IR: 0.07 [0.02–0.18]/100-person months of follow-up [PMFU]) and in ten non-switchers (IR: 0.20 [0.10–0.35]/100-PMFU) (p = 0.0003), while treatment discontinuation occurred in 118 switchers (IR: 2.05 [1.70–2.44]/100-PMFU) and in 128 non-switchers (IR: 2.37 [1.99–2.81]/100-PMFU) (p = 0.699). Conclusions After more than one year of follow-up, we found no evidence of increased risk of reduced efficacy or increased toxicity after switching from branded to generic lamivudine or zidovudine/lamivudine or efavirenz. PMID:28763473

  14. Switching from a ritonavir-boosted PI to dolutegravir as an alternative strategy in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Negredo, Eugènia; Estrada, Vicente; Domingo, Pere; Gutiérrez, Maria Del Mar; Mateo, Gracia M; Puig, Jordi; Bonjoch, Anna; Ornelas, Arelly; Echeverría, Patricia; Estany, Carla; Toro, Jessica; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2017-03-01

    Switching from PIs to dolutegravir in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals has not been assessed. The principal aim was to assess the evolution of bone mineral density (BMD) when switching from a ritonavir-boosted PI to dolutegravir in HIV-infected patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis. The secondary objective was to assess the antiviral efficacy and safety of the switch therapy. This randomized, multicentre study assessed changes in BMD, bone turnover markers, and antiviral efficacy and safety in 73 virologically suppressed patients with osteopenia/osteoporosis taking a ritonavir-boosted PI plus abacavir/lamivudine who were randomized to switch from PI to dolutegravir (DOLU group, n  =   37) or continue with a PI (PI group, n  =   36). Clinical Trials: NCT02577042. One and three patients from the DOLU and PI groups, respectively, withdrew prematurely (unrelated to treatment). At 48 weeks, 97.3% versus 91.7%, respectively, maintained viral suppression (snapshot analysis, ITT, M = F). No significant differences were seen between the groups in percentage change from baseline to week 48 in femoral ( P  =   0.56) and lumbar spine ( P  =   0.29) BMD, although lumbar spine BMD improved by 1.43% (-1.36; 2.92) in the DOLU group [0.12% (-2.83; 2.89) in the PI group]. Bone marker values did not vary significantly. At week 48, triglycerides were lower ( P  <   0.001) and HDL cholesterol higher ( P  =   0.027) in the DOLU group. Dolutegravir + Kivexa ® was safe and well-tolerated in virologically suppressed patients receiving a PI-based regimen. The lipid profile was better, albeit without significant changes in BMD, probably because of the short follow-up.

  15. Do human polyoma viruses and human immunodeficiency virus share common co-receptors?

    PubMed

    Borissov, Kalin; Tsekov, Iliya; Gavazova, Rayna; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Argirova, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Host and/or viral factors involved in human polyomavirus (HPoV) infection in persons living with HIV remain unknown. A hypothesis is outlined suggesting the importance of the co-receptors CCR5, CCR2, and CXCR4 not only for HIV, but also for HPoV. Functionally capable receptors coded by wild-type (wt) genotypes could facilitate internalization of HPoV in the cell resulting in brain and/or kidney infection/s in HIV infected individuals. Forty-nine Bulgarians with HIV, all treated by HAART, without neurological and/or kidney disorders, were tested for JCV and BKV and genotyped for CCR5 (CCR5del32), CCR2 (CCR2-64I), and CXCR4 (SDF1-3'A). In 27/49 (55.1%) individuals a co-infection with HPoV was identified-BKV in 12/49 (24.5%), JCV-in another 12/49 (24.5%), and both viruses-in 3/49 (6.1%). A high frequency of wt CCR5 was found in patients with HPoV (91.7% for BKV and JCV and in 100% with both viruses). V/V of CCR2 was presented in 75% for BKV and JCV and in 66.7% for BKV plus JCV. SDF1-3'G/G predominated in JCV infected patients (75%), while G/A and A/A genotypes were more frequent in patients with BKV (41.7%). Also, 21/22 (95.4%) persons without HPoV infection were heterozygous for SDF1 and CCR2. The number of individuals bearing wt of all co-receptors in the group of persons not infected with HPoV was lower (P = 0.03) than that with polymorphism/s in one or two genes (SDF1 and CCR2) in the same group. The results suggest a probable role of co-receptors used by HIV to facilitate infection with HPoV.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of HIV drug resistance testing to inform switching to second line antiretroviral therapy in low income settings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Mabugu, Travor; Magubu, Travor; Miners, Alec; Ford, Debbie; Pillay, Deenan; De Luca, Andrea; Lundgren, Jens; Revill, Paul

    2014-01-01

    To guide future need for cheap resistance tests for use in low income settings, we assessed cost-effectiveness of drug resistance testing as part of monitoring of people on first line ART - with switching from first to second line ART being conditional on NNRTI drug resistance mutations being identified. An individual level simulation model of HIV transmission, progression and the effect of ART which accounts for adherence and resistance development was used to compare outcomes of various potential monitoring strategies in a typical low income setting in sub-Saharan Africa. Underlying monitoring strategies considered were based on clinical disease, CD4 count or viral load. Within each we considered a strategy in which no further measures are performed, one with a viral load measure to confirm failure, and one with both a viral load measure and a resistance test. Predicted outcomes were assessed over 2015-2025 in terms of viral suppression, first line failure, switching to second line regimen, death, HIV incidence, disability-adjusted-life-years averted and costs. Potential future low costs of resistance tests ($30) were used. The most effective strategy, in terms of DALYs averted, was one using viral load monitoring without confirmation. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for this strategy was $2113 (the same as that for viral load monitoring with confirmation). ART monitoring strategies which involved resistance testing did not emerge as being more effective or cost effective than strategies not using it. The slightly reduced ART costs resulting from use of resistance testing, due to less use of second line regimens, was of similar magnitude to the costs of resistance tests. Use of resistance testing at the time of first line failure as part of the decision whether to switch to second line therapy was not cost-effective, even though the test was assumed to be very inexpensive.

  17. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection and Progression to AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Rathore, Anurag; Vidyant, Sanjukta; Kakkar, Kavita; Dhole, Tapan N.

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22377730

  18. Switching regimens in virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients: evidence base and rationale for integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-containing regimens.

    PubMed

    Raffi, F; Esser, S; Nunnari, G; Pérez-Valero, I; Waters, L

    2016-10-01

    In an era when most individuals with treated HIV infection can expect to live into old age, clinicians should proactively review their patients' current and future treatment needs and challenges. Clinical guidelines acknowledge that, in the setting of virological suppression, treatment switch may yield benefits in terms of tolerability, regimen simplification, adherence, convenience and long-term health considerations, particularly in the context of ageing. In this paper, we review evidence from six key clinical studies on switching virologically suppressed patients to regimens based on integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), the antiretroviral class increasingly preferred as initial therapy in clinical guidelines. We review these studies and focus on the virological efficacy, safety, and tolerability of switching to INSTI-based regimens in suppressed HIV-positive individuals. We review the early switch studies SWITCHMRK and SPIRAL [assessing a switch from a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) to raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens], together with data from STRATEGY-PI [assessing a switch to elvitegravir (EVG)-containing regimens; EVG/cobicistat (COBI)/emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) vs. remaining on a PI/r-containing regimen], STRATEGY-NNRTI [assessing a switch to EVG/COBI/FTC/TDF vs. continuation of a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)], STRIIVING [assessing a switch to a dolutegravir (DTG)-containing regimen (abacavir (ABC)/lamivudine (3TC)/DTG) vs. staying on the background regimen], and GS study 109 [assessing a switch to EVG/COBI/FTC/tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF) vs. continuation of FTC/TDF-based regimens]. Switching to INSTI-containing regimens has been shown to support good virological efficacy, with evidence from two studies demonstrating superior virological efficacy for a switch to EVG-containing regimens. In addition, switching

  19. Improvement of endothelial function after switching previously treated HIV-infected patients to an NRTI-sparing bitherapy with maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Enrique; Verdú, Jose Miguel Gomez; Vera, Francisco; Martinez, Onofre; Bravo, Joaquin; Galera, Carlos; Muñoz, Angeles; Garcia, Eva; Serrano, Jose; Perez, Ana; Vera, Carmen; Marín, Irene; Cano, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory effects. Maraviroc (MVC) is an antagonist of CCR5 receptor. CCR5 is the receptor of RANTES (Regulated on Activation, Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted), a mediator of chronic inflammation and endothelial function. Our aim was to evaluate the maintenance of viral suppression and improvement of endothelial function in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients switched to an NRTI-sparing combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with MVC. This observational, non-interventional, multicenter study was performed at the Infectious Diseases Service of Santa Lucia, Morales Meseguer, Virgen de la Arrixaca and Reina Sofía University Hospital (Murcia, Spain). The selection criteria were to be asymptomatic on a regimen with undetectable viral load (<50 HIV-RNA copies/mL) for at least six months, no previous treatment with R5 antagonists, no evidence of previous protease inhibitor (PI) failure and available R5 tropism test. Twenty-one HIV-infected patients were selected after the treatment regimen was changed to Maraviroc 150 mg/once daily plus ritonavir-boosted PI therapy. Endothelial function was prospectively evaluated through flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery at baseline and at weeks 24. We included 21 patients on treatment with PI in combination with 2 NRTI. The mean cART exposition was 133±68.9 months. Fourteen (66.6%) were males, aged 49±9 years, 15 (71.4%) smokers, 4 (19.04%) family history of coronary heart disease, 1 (5.76%) type 2 diabetes and 3 (14.28%) hypertensive, mean total cholesterol was 185.5±35 mg/dL, c-LDL 100.2±37 mg/dL, tryglicerides 170.42±92.03 mg/dL, cHDL 52.6±15.5 mg/dL, CD4 779,5±383.28 cells/mL, nadir CD4 187,96±96 cells/mL. After 24 weeks of follow-up of a switch to an NRTI-sparing regimen, 95.2% of HIV-patients on viral suppressive cART maintained viral suppression and CD4+ T cell count. This cART switch

  20. Improvement of endothelial function after switching previously treated HIV-infected patients to an NRTI-sparing bitherapy with maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Enrique; Miguel Gomez Verdú, Jose; Vera, Francisco; Martinez, Onofre; Bravo, Joaquin; Galera, Carlos; Muñoz, Angeles; Garcia, Eva; Serrano, Jose; Perez, Ana; Vera, Carmen; Marín, Irene; Cano, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory effects. Maraviroc (MVC) is an antagonist of CCR5 receptor. CCR5 is the receptor of RANTES (Regulated on Activation, Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted), a mediator of chronic inflammation and endothelial function. Our aim was to evaluate the maintenance of viral suppression and improvement of endothelial function in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients switched to an NRTI-sparing combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with MVC. Materials and Methods This observational, non-interventional, multicenter study was performed at the Infectious Diseases Service of Santa Lucia, Morales Meseguer, Virgen de la Arrixaca and Reina Sofía University Hospital (Murcia, Spain). The selection criteria were to be asymptomatic on a regimen with undetectable viral load (<50 HIV-RNA copies/mL) for at least six months, no previous treatment with R5 antagonists, no evidence of previous protease inhibitor (PI) failure and available R5 tropism test. Twenty-one HIV-infected patients were selected after the treatment regimen was changed to Maraviroc 150 mg/once daily plus ritonavir-boosted PI therapy. Endothelial function was prospectively evaluated through flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery at baseline and at weeks 24. Results We included 21 patients on treatment with PI in combination with 2 NRTI. The mean cART exposition was 133±68.9 months. Fourteen (66.6%) were males, aged 49±9 years, 15 (71.4%) smokers, 4 (19.04%) family history of coronary heart disease, 1 (5.76%) type 2 diabetes and 3 (14.28%) hypertensive, mean total cholesterol was 185.5±35 mg/dL, c-LDL 100.2±37 mg/dL, tryglicerides 170.42±92.03 mg/dL, cHDL 52.6±15.5 mg/dL, CD4 779,5±383.28 cells/mL, nadir CD4 187,96±96 cells/mL. After 24 weeks of follow-up of a switch to an NRTI-sparing regimen, 95.2% of HIV-patients on viral suppressive cART maintained viral

  1. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  2. Antiretroviral Treatment Switching and Its Association With Economic Outcomes and Adverse Treatment Effects Among Commercially Insured and Medicaid-Enrolled Patients With HIV in the United States.

    PubMed

    Korsnes, Jennifer S; Goodwin, Bridgett B; Murray, Miranda; Candrilli, Sean D

    2016-12-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) of HIV typically involves the use of 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors plus a third agent (eg, protease inhibitor). It has been shown that over the course of treatment, a proportion of patients switch their ART for various reasons (eg, tolerability, long-term toxicities). We hypothesize that there is a relationship between ART treatment switching and economic and clinical outcomes among HIV patients. To determine whether switching ART regimens is associated with greater health care costs, resource use, and adverse treatment effects. Administrative health care claims were used to identify commercially insured and Medicaid-enrolled patients in the United States who had ≥2 claims containing an HIV/AIDS diagnosis from 2006 to 2011 and received an ART prescription from 2007 to 2010. The final population included patients who were ≥18 years old on their index date (ie, date of first ART prescription) and had continuous health plan enrollment for ≥12 months before and after their index date. Treatment characteristics (eg, switching), adverse treatment effects, and health care resource utilization and costs, were evaluated during a 12-month follow-up period. Multivariable models assessed the relationship between ART switching and economic outcomes (ie, costs, number of health care encounters) and adverse treatment effects. A total of 14 590 commercially insured patients met all inclusion criteria and 12% had an ART switch; further, 5744 Medicaid-enrolled patients met all inclusion criteria, and 14% switched treatment. After adjusting for confounders, ART switching was associated with 64% and 36% (P < 0.0001) increases in hospitalizations, 36% and 25% (P < 0.0001) increases in nonpharmacy costs, and 15% and 18% (P < 0.0001) increases in pharmacy costs, among commercially insured and Medicaid-enrolled patients, respectively. ART switching increased the risk of adverse treatment effects, overall and for specific conditions of

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  5. Coreceptor Tropism Can Be Influenced by Amino Acid Substitutions in the gp41 Transmembrane Subunit of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Toma, Jonathan; Fransen, Signe; Stawiski, Eric; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Whitcomb, Jeannette M.; Parkin, Neil; Petropoulos, Christos J.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the third variable region (V3) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) is a major determinant of coreceptor tropism. Other regions in the surface gp120 subunit of Env can modulate coreceptor tropism in a manner that is not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the effect of env determinants outside of V3 on coreceptor usage through the analysis of (i) patient-derived env clones that differ in coreceptor tropism, (ii) chimeric env sequences, and (iii) site-directed mutants. The introduction of distinct V3 sequences from CXCR4-using clones into an R5-tropic env backbone conferred the inefficient use of CXCR4 in some but not all cases. Conversely, in many cases, X4- and dual-tropic env backbones containing the V3 sequences of R5-tropic clones retained the ability to use CXCR4, suggesting that sequences outside of the V3 regions of these CXCR4-using clones were responsible for CXCR4 use. The determinants of CXCR4 use in a set of dual-tropic env sequences with V3 sequences identical to those of R5-tropic clones mapped to the gp41 transmembrane (TM) subunit. In one case, a single-amino-acid substitution in the fusion peptide of TM was able to confer CXCR4 use; however, TM substitutions associated with CXCR4 use varied among different env sequences. These results demonstrate that sequences in TM can modulate coreceptor specificity and that env sequences other than that of V3 may facilitate efficient CXCR4-mediated entry. We hypothesize that the latter plays an important role in the transition from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor use. PMID:18353956

  6. HIV pill reminder device shows some adherence improvement. Technology now switched to cell phone.

    PubMed

    2005-12-01

    Researchers studying a population of HIV patients found that a pill reminder improved adherence for those who were memory impaired. "One reason patients don't take medications is because they simply forget it, and it's more of an issue in the population we studied because some started with mild cognitive impairment," says Adriana Andrade, MD, MPH, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University Division of Infectious Diseases in Baltimore, MD.

  7. Long-term (96-week) Efficacy and Safety After Switching from Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF) to Tenofovir Alafenamide (TAF) in HIV-infected, Virologically Suppressed Adults.

    PubMed

    Raffi, Francois; Orkin, Chloe; Clarke, Amanda; Slama, Laurence; Gallant, Joel; Daar, Eric; Henry, Keith; Santana-Bagur, Jorge; Stein, David K; Bellos, Nicholaos; Scarsella, Anthony; Yan, Mingjin; Abram, Michael E; Cheng, Andrew; Rhee, Martin S

    2017-03-06

    In a double-blind, phase 3 trial, 663 HIV-infected, virologically suppressed adults were randomized to switch to tenofovir alafenamide (TAF; n=333) vs. remain on tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF; n=330), each coformulated with emtricitabine (FTC), while continuing their third agent (boosted protease inhibitor or unboosted third agent). At week 96, 88.6% on FTC/TAF and 89.1% on FTC/TDF had HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL (adjusted difference -0.5%; 95%CI [-5.3%, 4.4%]). Proteinuria, albuminuria, proximal renal tubular function, and bone mineral density improved after switching to TAF- from TDF-containing regimens. These longer-term data support FTC/TAF as a safe, well tolerated, and durable nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone.

  8. Changes in cardiovascular biomarkers in HIV-infected patients switching from ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Esteban; D'Albuquerque, Polyana M; Llibre, Josep M; Gutierrez, Felix; Podzamczer, Daniel; Antela, Antonio; Berenguer, Juan; Domingo, Pere; Moreno, Xabier; Perez, Ignacio; Pich, Judit; Gatell, José M

    2012-11-28

    : Switching from boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r) to raltegravir (RAL) results in a better plasma lipid profile than continuing PI/r. Whether this strategy affects plasma biomarkers associated with atherosclerosis is unknown. : We assessed 48-week changes in fasting lipids and several biomarkers including serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), osteoprotegerin, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin and P-selectin, adiponectin, insulin, and D-dimer in otherwise healthy, virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients treated with PI/r who randomly switched from PI/r to RAL or continued with PI/r in the SPIRAL trial. Biomarkers and lipids at baseline and 48-week changes between both study arms were compared. Correlations between changes in biomarkers and changes in lipids were also evaluated. : Of 273 patients initiating study drugs in the SPIRAL trial, 233 (119 RAL, 114 PI/r) remained on allocated therapy for 48 weeks and had sera available for the purpose of this substudy. Triglycerides (-28%, P < 0.0001), total (-14%, P < 0.0001), low-density lipoprotein (-9%, P = 0.0069), and high-density lipoprotein (-10%, P = 0.0017) cholesterol decreased in RAL relative to the PI/r group. Among biomarkers, hsCRP (-40%, P < 0.0001), MCP-1 (-20%, P = 0.0003), osteoprotegerin (-13%, P = 0.0024), IL-6 (-46%,P < 0.0001), TNF-α (-27%, P = 0.0011), insulin (-26%, P < 0.0001), and D-dimer (-8%, P = 0.0187) decreased in RAL relative to PI/r group, whereas IL-10 (+1%, P = 0.7773), ICAM-1 (-6%, P = 0.1255), VCAM-1(0%, P = 0.8671), E-selectin (-9%, P = 0.2174), P-selectin (-6%, P = 0.3865), and adiponectin (+8%, P = 0.2028) remained unchanged. Biomarkers and lipids changes at 48 weeks were weakly correlated. : Switching from PI/r to RAL induced significant changes in several cardiovascular biomarkers that

  9. ACTG-HIV symptoms changes in patients switched to RPV/FTC/TDF due to previous intolerance to CART. Interim analysis of the PRO-STR study

    PubMed Central

    Podzamczer, Daniel; Rozas, Nerea; Domingo, Pere; Ocampo, Antonio; Van den Eynde, Eva; Deig, Elisabeth; Vergara, Antonio; Knobel, Hernando; Pasquau, Juan; Antela, Antonio; Crespo, Manuel; Clotet, Bonaventure; Muñoz, Jessica; Fernandez, Pedro; Geijo, Paloma; Rodríguez de Castro, Eduardo; Diz, Julio; Casado, Araceli; Torres, Covadonga

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tolerability and convenience are crucial aspects for the long-term success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact in routine clinical practice of switching to the single tablet regimen (STR) RPV/FTC/TDF in patients with intolerance to previous cART, in terms of patients’ well-being, assessed by several validated measures. Methods Prospective, multicenter study. Adult HIV-infected patients with viral load under 1.000 copies/mL while receiving a stable ART for at least the last three months and switched to RPV/FTC/TDF due to intolerance of previous regimen, were included. Analyses were performed by ITT. Presence/magnitude of symptoms (ACTG-HIV Symptom Index), quality of life (EQ-5D, EUROQoL & MOS-HIV), adherence (SMAQ), preference of treatment and perceived ease of medication (ESTAR) through 48 weeks were performed. Results Interim analysis of 125 patients with 16 weeks of follow up was performed. 100 (80%) were male, mean age 46 years. Mean CD4 at baseline was 629.5±307.29 and 123 (98.4%) had viral load <50 copies/mL; 15% were HCV co-infected. Ninety two (73.6%) patients switched from a NNRTI (84.8% from EFV/FTC/TDF) and 33 (26.4%) from a PI/r. The most frequent reasons for switching were psychiatric disorders (51.2%), CNS adverse events (40.8%), gastrointestinal (19.2%) and metabolic disorders (19.2%). At the time of this analysis (week 16), four patients (3.2%) discontinued treatment: one due to adverse events, two virologic failures and one with no data. A total of 104 patients (83.2%) were virologically suppressed (<50 copies/mL). The average degree of discomfort in the ACTG-HIV Symptom Index significantly decreased from baseline (21±15.55) to week 4 (10.89±12.36) & week 16 (10.81±12.62), p<0.001. In all the patients, quality of life tools showed a significant benefit in well-being of the patients (Table 1). Adherence to therapy significantly and progressively increased (SMAQ) from

  10. Finding host targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsui, C Kimberly; Gupta, Amita; Bassik, Michael C

    2017-01-31

    A CRISPR screen conducted in a CD4(+) T cell leukemia line has identified host factors required for HIV infection but dispensable for cellular survival. The results highlight sulfation on the HIV co-receptor CCR5 and cellular aggregation as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Rates of switching to second-line antiretroviral therapy and impact of delayed switching on immunologic, virologic, and mortality outcomes among HIV-infected adults with virologic failure in Rakai, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ssempijja, Victor; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Chang, Larry; Gray, Ron; Wawer, Maria; Ndyanabo, Anthony; Kasule, Jingo; Serwadda, David; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Hoog, Anja Van't; Reynolds, Steven James

    2017-08-22

    Switch from first to second-line ART is recommended by WHO for patients with virologic failure. Delays in switching may contribute to accumulated drug resistance, advanced immunosuppression, increased morbidity and mortality. The 3rd 90' of UNAIDS 90:90:90 targets 90% viral suppression for persons on ART. We evaluated the rate of switching to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the impact of delayed switching on immunologic, virologic, and mortality outcomes in the Rakai Health Sciences Program (RHSP) Clinical Cohort Study which started providing ART in 2004 and implemented 6 monthly routine virologic monitoring beginning in 2005. Retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults on first-line ART who had two consecutive viral loads (VLs) >1000 copies/ml after 6 months on ART between June 2004 and June 2011 was studied for switching to second-line ART. Immunologic decline after virologic failure was defined as decrease in CD4 count of ≥50 cells/ul and virologic increase was defined as increase of 0.5 log 10 copies/ml. Competing risk models were used to summarize rates of switching to second-line ART while cox proportional hazard marginal structural models were used to assess the risk of virologic increase or immunologic decline associated with delay to switch first line ART failing patients. The cumulative incidence of switching at 6, 12, and 24 months following virologic failure were 30.2%, 44.6%, and 65.0%, respectively. The switching rate was increased with higher VL at the time of virologic failure; compared to those with VLs ≤ 5000 copies/ml, patients with VLs = 5001-10,000 copies/ml had an aHR = 1.81 (95% CI = 0.9-3.6), and patients with VLs > 10,000 copies/ml had an aHR = 3.38 (95%CI = 1.9-6.2). The switching rate was also increased with CD4 < 100 cells/ul at ART initiation, compared to those with CD4 ≥ 100 cells/ul (aHR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.5-3.6). Mortality in patients not switched to second-line ART was 11

  12. Results of External Quality Assessment for Proviral DNA Testing of HIV Tropism in the Maraviroc Switch Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Land, Sally; Pett, Sarah; Emery, Sean; Marks, Kat; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Kaye, Steve; Kaiser, Rolf; Schuelter, Eugene; Harrigan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Maraviroc Switch collaborative study (MARCH) is a study in aviremic patients on stable antiretroviral therapy and utilizes population-based sequencing of proviral DNA to determine HIV tropism and susceptibility to maraviroc. An external quality assessment (EQA) program was implemented to ensure competency in assessing the tropism of clinical samples conducted by MARCH laboratories (n = 14). The MARCH EQA has three prestudy phases assessing V3 loop sequencing and tropism determination using the bioinformatic algorithm geno2pheno, which generates a false-positive rate (FPR). DNA sequences with low FPRs are more likely to be from CXCR4-using (X4) viruses. Phase 1 of the EQA involved chromatogram interpretation. Phases 2, 2/3, and 3 involved patient and clonal samples. Clinical samples used in these phases were from treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers; 18/20 had viral loads of <50 copies/ml, and 10/15 were CXCR4-tropic on prior phenotyping. All samples were tested in triplicate, and any replicate with a geno2pheno FPR of <10% was designated X4. Performance was deemed adequate if ≤2 R5 and ≤1 X4 specimens were miscalled. For several clinical samples in the EQA, triplicate testing revealed marked DNA variability (FPR range, 0 to 96.7%). Therefore, a consensus-based approach was employed for each sample, i.e., a median FPR across laboratories was used to define sample tropism. Further sequencing analysis showed mixed viral populations in the clinical samples, explaining the differences in tropism predictions. All laboratories passed the EQA after achieving predefined competence thresholds in either of the phase 2 rounds. The use of clinical samples from patients resembling those who were likely to be screened in the MARCH, coupled with triplicate testing, revealed inherent DNA variability that might have been missed if single or duplicate testing and/or clonal samples alone were used. These data highlight the importance of intensive EQA of tropism

  13. Results of external quality assessment for proviral DNA testing of HIV tropism in the Maraviroc Switch collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Tu, Elise; Swenson, Luke C; Land, Sally; Pett, Sarah; Emery, Sean; Marks, Kat; Kelleher, Anthony D; Kaye, Steve; Kaiser, Rolf; Schuelter, Eugene; Harrigan, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Maraviroc Switch collaborative study (MARCH) is a study in aviremic patients on stable antiretroviral therapy and utilizes population-based sequencing of proviral DNA to determine HIV tropism and susceptibility to maraviroc. An external quality assessment (EQA) program was implemented to ensure competency in assessing the tropism of clinical samples conducted by MARCH laboratories (n = 14). The MARCH EQA has three prestudy phases assessing V3 loop sequencing and tropism determination using the bioinformatic algorithm geno2pheno, which generates a false-positive rate (FPR). DNA sequences with low FPRs are more likely to be from CXCR4-using (X4) viruses. Phase 1 of the EQA involved chromatogram interpretation. Phases 2, 2/3, and 3 involved patient and clonal samples. Clinical samples used in these phases were from treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers; 18/20 had viral loads of <50 copies/ml, and 10/15 were CXCR4-tropic on prior phenotyping. All samples were tested in triplicate, and any replicate with a geno2pheno FPR of <10% was designated X4. Performance was deemed adequate if ≤2 R5 and ≤1 X4 specimens were miscalled. For several clinical samples in the EQA, triplicate testing revealed marked DNA variability (FPR range, 0 to 96.7%). Therefore, a consensus-based approach was employed for each sample, i.e., a median FPR across laboratories was used to define sample tropism. Further sequencing analysis showed mixed viral populations in the clinical samples, explaining the differences in tropism predictions. All laboratories passed the EQA after achieving predefined competence thresholds in either of the phase 2 rounds. The use of clinical samples from patients resembling those who were likely to be screened in the MARCH, coupled with triplicate testing, revealed inherent DNA variability that might have been missed if single or duplicate testing and/or clonal samples alone were used. These data highlight the importance of intensive EQA of tropism

  14. A pièce de resistance: how HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John P.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Small molecule inhibitors targeting the CCR5 coreceptor represent a new class of drugs for treating HIV-1 infection. Maraviroc has received regulatory approvals, and vicriviroc is in phase 3 trials. Understanding how resistance to these drugs develops and is diagnosed is essential to guide clinical practice. We review what has been learned from in vitro resistance studies, and how this relates to what is being seen, or can be anticipated, in clinical studies. Recent findings The principal resistance pathway in vitro involves continued use of CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner; the resistant viruses recognize the inhibitor-CCR5 complex, as well as free CCR5. Switching to use the CXCR4 coreceptor is rare. The principal genetic pathway involves accumulating 2–4 sequence changes in the gp120 V3 region, but a non-V3 pathway is also known. The limited information available from clinical studies suggests that a similar escape process is followed in vivo. However, the most common change associated with virologic failure involves expansion of pre-existing, CXCR4-using viruses that are insensitive to CCR5 inhibitors. Summary HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors by continuing to use CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner, or evades them by expanding naturally insensitive, CXCR4-using variants. PMID:19339950

  15. A time lag insensitive approach for estimating HIV-1 transmission direction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ge, Meng; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2012-05-15

    Identifying the direction of transmission in transmission pairs is important both for forensic investigations and for the monitoring of HIV epidemics, however, reliable methods are not yet available due to the long time lag between infection and sampling in most real cases. Based on bottleneck effect and coreceptor switching, we aimed at identifying an estimator from sequences of viral gp120 proteins to determine transmission direction between transmission pairs. The estimator should be changed with HIV transmission but was independent of disease progression in an individual. Here, we present a novel and reliable approach for identifying transmission direction. We derived a set of conserved patterns, called common patterns, from the sequences of viruses, which differed in their coreceptor usage. The number of unique common patterns in viral sequences decreased with transmission but remained almost constant with the progress of disease in an individual. We used this number as an estimator to determine transmission direction in 73 transmission pairs for which the transmission direction was already known. Our method predicted transmission direction with an accuracy of up to 94.5%. Of greater importance, our approach was not influenced by time lags between infection and sampling, and even transmission direction for transmission pairs with long time lags ranging from 2 years to more than 18 years were correctly determined. Our approach for accurately determining transmission direction between transmission pairs is irrespective of the time lag between infection and sampling, which means a promising applications prospect.

  16. Interactions between HIV-1 Gag molecules in solution: an inositol phosphate-mediated switch.

    PubMed

    Datta, Siddhartha A K; Zhao, Zhuojun; Clark, Patrick K; Tarasov, Sergey; Alexandratos, Jerry N; Campbell, Stephen J; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Lebowitz, Jacob; Rein, Alan

    2007-01-19

    Retrovirus particle assembly is mediated by the Gag protein. Gag is a multi-domain protein containing discrete domains connected by flexible linkers. When recombinant HIV-1 Gag protein (lacking myristate at its N terminus and the p6 domain at its C terminus) is mixed with nucleic acid, it assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs) in a fully defined system in vitro. However, this assembly is defective in that the radius of curvature of the VLPs is far smaller than that of authentic immature virions. This defect can be corrected to varying degrees by addition of inositol phosphates to the assembly reaction. We have now explored the binding of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) to Gag and its effects upon the interactions between Gag protein molecules in solution. Our data indicate that basic regions at both ends of the protein contribute to IP6 binding. Gag is in monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution, and mutation of the previously described dimer interface within its capsid domain drastically reduces Gag dimerization. In contrast, when IP6 is added, Gag is in monomer-trimer rather than monomer-dimer equilibrium. The Gag protein with a mutation at the dimer interface also remains almost exclusively monomeric in IP6; thus the "dimer interface" is essential for the trimeric interaction in IP6. We discuss possible explanations for these results, including a change in conformation within the capsid domain induced by the binding of IP6 to other domains within the protein. The participation of both ends of Gag in IP6 interaction suggests that Gag is folded over in solution, with its ends near each other in three-dimensional space; direct support for this conclusion is provided in a companion manuscript. As Gag is an extended rod in immature virions, this apparent proximity of the ends in solution implies that it undergoes a major conformational change during particle assembly.

  17. Immunological failure of first-line and switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in Tanzania: analysis of routinely collected national data.

    PubMed

    Vanobberghen, Fiona M; Kilama, Bonita; Wringe, Alison; Ramadhani, Angela; Zaba, Basia; Mmbando, Donan; Todd, Jim

    2015-07-01

    Rates of first-line treatment failure and switches to second-line therapy are key indicators for national HIV programmes. We assessed immunological treatment failure defined by WHO criteria in the Tanzanian national HIV programme. We included adults initiating first-line therapy in 2004-2011 with a pre-treatment CD4 count, and ≥6-months of follow-up. We assessed subhazard ratios (SHR) for immunological treatment failure, and subsequent switch to second-line therapy, using competing risks methods to account for deaths. Of 121 308 adults, 7% experienced immunological treatment failure, and 2% died without observed immunological treatment failure, over a median 1.7 years. The 6-year cumulative probability of immunological treatment failure was 19.0% (95% CI 18.5, 19.7) and of death, 5.1% (4.8, 5.4). Immunological treatment failure predictors included earlier year of treatment initiation (P < 0.001), initiation in lower level facilities (SHR = 2.23 [2.03, 2.45] for dispensaries vs. hospitals), being male (1.27 [1.19, 1.33]) and initiation at low or high CD4 counts (for example, 1.78 [1.65, 1.92] and 5.33 [4.65, 6.10] for <50 and ≥500 vs. 200-349 cells/mm(3) , respectively). Of 7382 participants in the time-to-switch analysis, 6% switched and 5% died before switching. Four years after immunological treatment failure, the cumulative probability of switching was 7.3% (6.6, 8.0) and of death, 6.8% (6.0, 7.6). Those who immunologically failed in dispensaries, health centres and government facilities were least likely to switch. Immunological treatment failure rates and unmet need for second-line therapy are high in Tanzania; virological monitoring, at least for persons with immunological treatment failure, is required to minimise unnecessary switches to second-line therapy. Lower level government health facilities need more support to reduce treatment failure rates and improve second-line therapy uptake to sustain the benefits of increased coverage. © 2015 The

  18. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A.; Siberry, George K.; Seage, George R.; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 12-month CD4+ and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. Design: This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Methods: Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4+% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Results: Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4+% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) −1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (−0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4+% decline −3.18 percentage points (95% CI −5.25 to −1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (−1.15 log10VL). Conclusion: In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring. PMID:26182197

  19. Role of Naturally Occurring Basic Amino Acid Substitutions in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype E Envelope V3 Loop on Viral Coreceptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kayoko; Sato, Hironori; Takebe, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    To assess the role of naturally occurring basic amino acid substitutions in the V3 loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype E on viral coreceptor usage and cell tropism, we have constructed a panel of chimeric viruses with mutant V3 loops of HIV-1 subtype E in the genetic background of HIV-1LAI. The arginine substitutions naturally occurring at positions 8, 11, and 18 of the V3 loop in an HIV-1 subtype E X4 strain were systematically introduced into that of an R5 strain to generate a series of V3 loop mutant chimera. These chimeric viruses were employed in virus infectivity assays using HOS-CD4 cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR4, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, T-cell lines, or macrophages. The arginine substitution at position 11 of the V3 loop uniformly caused the loss of infectivity in HOS-CD4-CCR5 cells, indicating that position 11 is critical for utilization of CCR5. CXCR4 usage was conferred by a minimum of two arginine substitutions, regardless of combination, whereas arginine substitutions at position 8 and 11 were required for T-cell line tropism. Nonetheless, macrophage tropism was not conferred by the V3 loop of subtype E R5 strain per se. We found that the specific combinations of amino acid changes in HIV-1 subtype E env V3 loop are critical for determining viral coreceptor usage and cell tropism. However, the ability to infect HOS-CD4 cells through either CXCR4 or CCR5 is not necessarily correlated with T-cell or macrophage tropism, suggesting that cellular tropism is not dictated solely by viral coreceptor utilization. PMID:10364300

  20. gp120 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency viruses competitively antagonize signaling by coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Madani, N; Kozak, S L; Kavanaugh, M P; Kabat, D

    1998-07-07

    Signal transductions by the dual-function CXCR4 and CCR5 chemokine receptors/HIV type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptors were electrophysiologically monitored in Xenopus laevis oocytes that also coexpressed the viral receptor CD4 and a G protein-coupled inward-rectifying K+ channel (Kir 3.1). Large Kir 3.1-dependent currents generated in response to the corresponding chemokines (SDF-1alpha for CXCR4 and MIP-1alpha; MIP-1beta and RANTES for CCR5) were blocked by pertussis toxin, suggesting involvement of inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Prolonged exposures to chemokines caused substantial but incomplete desensitization of responses with time constants of 5-7 min and recovery time constants of 12-19 min. CXCR4 and CCR5 exhibited heterologous desensitization in this oocyte system, suggesting possible inhibition of a common downstream step in their signaling pathways. In contrast to chemokines, perfusion with monomeric or oligomeric preparations of the glycoprotein of Mr 120, 000 (gp120) derived from several isolates of HIV-1 did not activate signaling by CXCR4 or CCR5 regardless of CD4 coexpression. However, adsorption of the gp120 from a T-cell-tropic virus resulted in CD4-dependent antagonism of CXCR4 response to SDF-1alpha, whereas gp120 from macrophage-tropic viruses caused CD4-dependent antagonism of CCR5 response to MIP-1alpha. These antagonisms could be partially overcome by high concentrations of chemokines and were specific for coreceptors of the corresponding HIV-1 isolates, suggesting that they resulted from direct interactions of gp120-CD4 complexes with coreceptors and that they did not involve the desensitization pathway. These results indicate that monomeric or oligomeric gp120s specifically antagonize CXCR4 and CCR5 signaling in response to chemokines, but they do not exclude the possibility that gp120s might also function as weak agonists in some cells. The gp120-mediated disruption of CXCR4 and CCR5 signaling may contribute to AIDS pathogenesis.

  1. Reversibility of lipoatrophy in HIV-infected patients 2 years after switching from a thymidine analogue to abacavir: the MITOX Extension Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Allison; Smith, Don E; Carr, Andrew; Ringland, Clare; Amin, Janaki; Emery, Sean; Hoy, Jennifer; Workman, Cassy; Doong, Nicholas; Freund, Judith; Cooper, David A

    2004-04-30

    To determine if long-term improvement in HIV lipoatrophy can be attained by substitution of thymidine analogues zidovudine (ZDV) or stavudine (d4T) with abacavir (ABC). Long-term follow-up (104 weeks) of a randomized, open-label study. Seventeen ambulatory HIV clinics in Australia and London. Patients with HIV lipodystrophy were randomized to switch from a thymidine analogue to ABC, while continuing all other antiretroviral therapy (ABC arm) (n = 42) or continue current therapy (ZDV/d4T arm) (n = 43). At week 24, all control patients could switch to ABC. Of the original 111 patients randomized, 85 had long-term follow-up data, with 77 having imaging data available at 104 weeks. The primary endpoint was time-weighted change in limb fat mass, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). At week 104, the mean increase in limb fat for the ABC and ZDV/d4T group was 1.26 +/- 2.02 kg and 0.49 +/- 1.38 kg, respectively. The time-weighted change for limb fat was significantly different between the two arms (0.43 kg; P = 0.008). On-treatment analysis demonstrated a trend for increased limb fat in patients in the ABC arm. Visceral fat accumulation, buffalo hump, self-assessed lipodystrophy or the lipodystrophy case definition score (LCDS) did not improve. In patients with moderate-to-severe lipodystrophy, significant improvements in subcutaneous fat continued over 104 weeks after switching from a thymidine analogue to ABC. Nevertheless, the lipodystrophy syndrome was still evident, indicating additional strategies need evaluating.

  2. Dual therapy with darunavir/r plus etravirine is safe and effective as switching therapy in antiretroviral experienced HIV-patients. The BITER Study.

    PubMed

    Portilla, Joaquín; Arazo, Piedad; Crusells, Josefa; Pérez-Martínez, Laura; Martínez-Madrid, Onofre; Boix, Vicente; Moreno, Javier; Navarro, Vicente; Rubio, Teresa; Reus, Sergio; Galera, Carlos; Bernal, Enrique; Jover, Francisco; Amador, Concepcion; Baño, David; Merino, Esperanza; Saiz-de-la-Hoya, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Switching therapy studies are usually designed as second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) in patients without previous virologic failures. Combined ART (cART) with DRV/r and ETR has a good pharmacokinetic profile, high genetic barrier and has been proved as rescue therapy. The aim of our study was to analyze efficacy and safety of therapy with DRV/r plus ETR in treatment experienced HIV-patients with previous therapeutic failures that need to switch ART. We present results at first 24 weeks. Multicentre retrospective observational study. adult HIV-patients on ART with HIV-VL <1000 cop/mL who started their ART with DRV/r (600/100 bid or 800/100 qd)+ETR by adverse events, non-adherence, tolerability or prevention of future complications. Patients with acute AIDS events, HBV, pregnancy, drug addiction or previous selected mutations to DRV or ETR were excluded. Ninety-nine patients were included, mean age: 47 years (r: 22-79); 70% men, 40.4% previous AIDS event and 39.3% HCV. Ninety-one patients had received ≥3 cART regimens and 45≥5, 75 patients had HIV-VL <50 cop/mL and 24 low-level viremia (LLV): 297.5±261.4 cop/mL, CD4+ 568±279 cells/µL. ART before switching: NRTI+PI/r (33%), NNRTI (17%), PI/r+NNRTI (23%), PI/r+INI (13%), other (14%). Main reason to switching was: toxicity/intolerance 50 patients (renal 32%, gastrointestinal: 14%, hyperlipidaemia 10%; osteopenia/osteoporosis: 6%); improving adherence 26 patients; prevention of complications 19 patients. Nine subjects withdrew ART during follow-up because: intolerance or new toxicity three; non-adherence two; simplification to DRV/r monotherapy two; persistence of previous toxicity one; virologic failure one. At week 24, among patients who continued with DRV/r+ETR (n=90): 81 (89%) had VL<50 cop/mL, in those with with HIV-VL<50 at baseline (67/90), 94% persisted with <50 cop., and in those with LLV (24/90), 61% (n=14) achieved a VL<50 cop. We didn't observe any significant difference in lab parameters

  3. Dual therapy with darunavir/r plus etravirine is safe and effective as switching therapy in antiretroviral experienced HIV-patients. The BITER Study

    PubMed Central

    Portilla, Joaquín; Arazo, Piedad; Crusells, Josefa; Pérez-Martínez, Laura; Martínez-Madrid, Onofre; Boix, Vicente; Moreno, Javier; Navarro, Vicente; Rubio, Teresa; Reus, Sergio; Galera, Carlos; Bernal, Enrique; Jover, Francisco; Amador, Concepcion; Baño, David; Merino, Esperanza; Saiz-de-la-Hoya, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Switching therapy studies are usually designed as second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) in patients without previous virologic failures. Combined ART (cART) with DRV/r and ETR has a good pharmacokinetic profile, high genetic barrier and has been proved as rescue therapy. The aim of our study was to analyze efficacy and safety of therapy with DRV/r plus ETR in treatment experienced HIV-patients with previous therapeutic failures that need to switch ART. We present results at first 24 weeks. Methods Multicentre retrospective observational study. Inclusion criteria: adult HIV-patients on ART with HIV-VL <1000 cop/mL who started their ART with DRV/r (600/100 bid or 800/100 qd)+ETR by adverse events, non-adherence, tolerability or prevention of future complications. Patients with acute AIDS events, HBV, pregnancy, drug addiction or previous selected mutations to DRV or ETR were excluded. Results Ninety-nine patients were included, mean age: 47 years (r: 22–79); 70% men, 40.4% previous AIDS event and 39.3% HCV. Ninety-one patients had received ≥3 cART regimens and 45≥5, 75 patients had HIV-VL <50 cop/mL and 24 low-level viremia (LLV): 297.5±261.4 cop/mL, CD4+ 568±279 cells/µL. ART before switching: NRTI+PI/r (33%), NNRTI (17%), PI/r+NNRTI (23%), PI/r+INI (13%), other (14%). Main reason to switching was: toxicity/intolerance 50 patients (renal 32%, gastrointestinal: 14%, hyperlipidaemia 10%; osteopenia/osteoporosis: 6%); improving adherence 26 patients; prevention of complications 19 patients. Nine subjects withdrew ART during follow-up because: intolerance or new toxicity three; non-adherence two; simplification to DRV/r monotherapy two; persistence of previous toxicity one; virologic failure one. At week 24, among patients who continued with DRV/r+ETR (n=90): 81 (89%) had VL<50 cop/mL, in those with with HIV-VL<50 at baseline (67/90), 94% persisted with <50 cop., and in those with LLV (24/90), 61% (n=14) achieved a VL<50 cop. We didn't observe

  4. The anti-HIV activity of ADS-J1 targets the HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Tintori, Cristina; Manetti, Fabrizio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Botta, Maurizio; Esté, José A

    2005-12-05

    Recent data suggest that heparin sulfates may bind to a CD4 induced epitope in the HIV-1 gp120 that constitutes the coreceptor binding site. We have studied the mechanism of action of ADS-J1, a non-peptidic compound selected by docking analysis to interact with gp41 and to interfere with the formation of N-36/C-34 complexes in sandwich ELISA experiments. We show that ADS-J1 blocked the binding of wild-type HIV-1 NL4-3 strain to MT-4 cells but not virus-cell binding of a polyanion-resistant virus. However, ADS-J1 blocked the replication of polyanion-resistant, T-20- and C34-resistant HIV-1, suggesting a second mechanism of action. Development of resistance to ADS-J1 on the polyanion-resistant HIV-1 led to mutations in gp120 coreceptor binding site and not in gp41. Time of addition experiments confirmed that ADS-J1, but not polyanions such as dextran sulfate or AR177, worked at a step that mimics the activity of an HIV coreceptor antagonist but prior to gp41-dependent fusion. We conclude that ADS-J1 may bind to the HIV coreceptor binding site as its mechanism of anti-HIV activity.

  5. Protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in persons with repeated exposure: evidence for T cell immunity in the absence of inherited CCR5 coreceptor defects.

    PubMed

    Goh, W C; Markee, J; Akridge, R E; Meldorf, M; Musey, L; Karchmer, T; Krone, M; Collier, A; Corey, L; Emerman, M; McElrath, M J

    1999-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection may result from either acquired host immunity, inheritance of a dysfunctional CCR5 HIV-1 coreceptor, or a low or attenuated virus inoculum. Thirty-seven HIV-1-uninfected persons engaging in repeated high-risk sexual activity with an HIV-1-infected partner were prospectively studied to determine the contribution of these factors in protecting against HIV-1 transmission. More than one-third (13/36) demonstrated HIV-1-specific cytotoxicity, and this activity significantly correlated with the wild type CCR5 genotype (P=.03). Only 1 subject (3%) demonstrated the homozygous CCR5 32-bp deletion (Delta32/Delta32). Median plasma HIV-1 RNA levels from 18 HIV-1-infected sex partners were not statistically different from those of matched infected control patients. These results indicate that inheritance of the Delta32 CCR5 mutation does not account for the majority of persistently HIV-1-resistant cases, and the presence of cellular immunity in these persons suggests either undetected infection or protective immunity.

  6. Inheritance pattern of mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor gene CCR5 in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Husain, S; Goila, R; Shahi, S; Banerja, A C

    1998-01-01

    The most common form of mutation found in the CCR5 gene has been the precise 32-base pair (bp) deletion in the region corresponding to second extracellular loop of the chemokine receptor CCR5. Individuals homozygous for the delta 32 allele of CCR5 usually remain uninfected despite multiple exposures to HIV, whereas heterozygous individuals support less virus replication and show slower progression of the disease. This mutant allele in either homozygous or heterozygous form is quite common in white people of European heritage. Earlier work involving large populations of Asians and Africans failed to detect the presence of this mutant allele. We screened 145 normal unrelated healthy Indians and found one person who was heterozygous for the delta 32 allele of CCR5. We studied the inheritance of this deleted allele in this person's family. One parent, one of two sons, and the only daughter possessed this mutant allele. We cloned the entire coding region of wild-type and mutant alleles of CCR5 gene from the heterozygous individual mentioned and studied its coreceptor functions. The mutant allele had only a moderate interfering effect on coreceptor activity of the wild-type CCR5 allele in a cell fusion assay. We also report an improved method of genotyping CCR5 gene in this communication.

  7. Virus entry via the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and FPRL1 differs by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype.

    PubMed

    Nedellec, R; Coetzer, M; Shimizu, N; Hoshino, H; Polonis, V R; Morris, L; Mårtensson, U E A; Binley, J; Overbaugh, J; Mosier, D E

    2009-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infects target cells by binding to CD4 and a chemokine receptor, most commonly CCR5. CXCR4 is a frequent alternative coreceptor (CoR) in subtype B and D HIV-1 infection, but the importance of many other alternative CoRs remains elusive. We have analyzed HIV-1 envelope (Env) proteins from 66 individuals infected with the major subtypes of HIV-1 to determine if virus entry into highly permissive NP-2 cell lines expressing most known alternative CoRs differed by HIV-1 subtype. We also performed linear regression analysis to determine if virus entry via the major CoR CCR5 correlated with use of any alternative CoR and if this correlation differed by subtype. Virus pseudotyped with subtype B Env showed robust entry via CCR3 that was highly correlated with CCR5 entry efficiency. By contrast, viruses pseudotyped with subtype A and C Env proteins were able to use the recently described alternative CoR FPRL1 more efficiently than CCR3, and use of FPRL1 was correlated with CCR5 entry. Subtype D Env was unable to use either CCR3 or FPRL1 efficiently, a unique pattern of alternative CoR use. These results suggest that each subtype of circulating HIV-1 may be subject to somewhat different selective pressures for Env-mediated entry into target cells and suggest that CCR3 may be used as a surrogate CoR by subtype B while FPRL1 may be used as a surrogate CoR by subtypes A and C. These data may provide insight into development of resistance to CCR5-targeted entry inhibitors and alternative entry pathways for each HIV-1 subtype.

  8. Brief Report: Efficacy and Safety of Switching to a Single-Tablet Regimen of Elvitegravir/Cobicistat/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide in HIV-1/Hepatitis B–Coinfected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brunetta, Jason; Crofoot, Gordon; Benson, Paul; Mills, Anthony; Brinson, Cynthia; Oka, Shinichi; Cheng, Andrew; Garner, Will; Fordyce, Marshall; Das, Moupali; McCallister, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Coformulated elvitegravir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide (E/C/F/TAF) has high efficacy and improved renal and bone safety in multiple phase 3 trials; TAF single agent is being studied in 2 phase 3 trials in patients with chronic hepatitis B. We report the results of an open-label, noncomparative switch study evaluating the efficacy and safety of E/C/F/TAF in HIV/hepatitis B virus (HBV)–coinfected adults. At 48 weeks, 91.7% of the 72 participants maintained or achieved virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL; HBV DNA <29 IU/mL). Seroconversion occurred in 2.9% of hepatitis B surface antigen–positive participants and in 3.3% of HBV e antigen–positive participants; 40% of those with abnormal alanine aminotransferase normalized. E/C/F/TAF was associated with improved renal function and reduced bone turnover. These data support the use of E/C/F/TAF in treating HIV/HBV coinfection. PMID:27171740

  9. Evaluation of the virological and metabolic effects of switching protease inhibitor combination antiretroviral therapy to nevirapine-based therapy for the treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo; Yarasheski, Kevin; Henry, Keith; Claxton, Sherri; Kane, E; Bordenave, B; Klebert, Michael; Powderly, William G

    2004-06-01

    In spite of indisputable benefits, the use of antiretroviral therapy is associated with multiple metabolic complications. Switching to simpler regimens might maintain viral suppression, improve metabolic side effects, and provide insight into the pathogenesis of these complications. Our objective was to carefully characterize the virological and metabolic effects of switching from a successful protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral regimen to a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen with nevirapine (NVP). Forty patients, taking their first successful (less than 40 HIV RNA copies/ml) PI-based regimen, switched their PI to NVP. If patients did not tolerate NVP, substitution with efavirenz was allowed. The duration of the study was 48 weeks. At 12 weeks intervals subjects had multiple virological and metabolic parameters including glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, proinsulin, blood lipids, and lipoproteins. A subgroup of 18 patients also had body composition evaluations with DEXA scans and MRIs of the abdomen and the thighs as well as insulin tolerance tests. Ninety-five percent of the patients maintained viral suppression (95% CI 88-100%); only one patient failed and another developed hepatitis. There were improvements in glucose (decreased fasting glucose, insulin, and improved insulin tolerance) and lipid metabolism (decreased triglycerides and increased HDL), but no changes in body composition and bone mineral density. Our study supports a pathogenic role for PIs in the development of hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, but a more limited role in the fat redistribution syndrome.

  10. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M.; Antinori, Andrea; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  11. The role of the alternative coreceptor GPR15 in SIV tropism for human cells.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Miriam; Marzi, Andrea; Urbanczyk, Andreas; Bertram, Stephanie; Fisch, Tanja; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gnirss, Kerstin; Karsten, Christina B; Palesch, David; Münch, Jan; Chiodi, Francesca; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Steffen, Imke

    2012-11-10

    Many SIV isolates can employ the orphan receptor GPR15 as coreceptor for efficient entry into transfected cell lines, but the role of endogenously expressed GPR15 in SIV cell tropism is largely unclear. Here, we show that several human B and T cell lines express GPR15 on the cell surface, including the T/B cell hybrid cell line CEMx174, and that GPR15 expression is essential for SIV infection of CEMx174 cells. In addition, GPR15 expression was detected on subsets of primary human CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD19(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), respectively. However, GPR15(+) PBMCs were not efficiently infected by HIV and SIV, including cells from individuals homozygous for the defective Δ32 ccr5 allele. These results suggest that GPR15 is coexpressed with CD4 on PBMCs but that infection of CD4(+), GPR15(+) cells is not responsible for the well documented ability of SIV to infect CCR5(-) blood cells.

  12. Effect of lysine to arginine mutagenesis in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 on viral entry efficiency and neutralization.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Birco; Schreiber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by an ongoing replication leading to T-lymphocyte decline which is paralleled by the switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor usage. To predict coreceptor usage, several computer algorithms using gp120 V3 loop sequence data have been developed. In these algorithms an occupation of the V3 positions 11 and 25, by one of the amino acids lysine (K) or arginine (R), is an indicator for CXCR4 usage. Amino acids R and K dominate at these two positions, but can also be identified at positions 9 and 10. Generally, CXCR4-viruses possess V3 sequences, with an overall positive charge higher than the V3 sequences of R5-viruses. The net charge is calculated by subtracting the number of negatively charged amino acids (D, aspartic acid and E, glutamic acid) from the number of positively charged ones (K and R). In contrast to D and E, which are very similar in their polar and acidic properties, the characteristics of the R guanidinium group differ significantly from the K ammonium group. However, in coreceptor predictive computer algorithms R and K are both equally rated. The study was conducted to analyze differences in infectivity and coreceptor usage because of R-to-K mutations at the V3 positions 9, 10 and 11. V3 loop mutants with all possible RRR-to-KKK triplets were constructed and analyzed for coreceptor usage, infectivity and neutralization by SDF-1α and RANTES. Virus mutants R9R10R11 showed the highest infectivity rates, and were inhibited more efficiently in contrast to the K9K10K11 viruses. They also showed higher efficiency in a virus-gp120 paired infection assay. Especially V3 loop position 9 was relevant for a switch to higher infectivity when occupied by R. Thus, K-to-R exchanges play a role for enhanced viral entry efficiency and should therefore be considered when the viral phenotype is predicted based on V3 sequence data.

  13. The rhesus macaque CCR3 chemokine receptor is a cell entry cofactor for HIV-2, but not for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sol, N; Tréboute, C; Gomas, E; Ferchal, F; Shacklett, B; Alizon, M

    1998-01-20

    The eotaxin receptor (CCR3) is a CD4-associated coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2). By comparison with other chemokine receptors, such as CCR5 and CXCR4, the primary sequences of human CCR3 and its rhesus macaque homolog were markedly different in their extracellular domains. Human CD4+ cells expressing CCR3 from either human or macaque origin could be infected by HIV-2, with apparently similar efficiency, but only cells expressing human CCR3 could be infected by HIV-1. It suggests that HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope proteins interact differently with the CCR3 coreceptor HIV-1 could infect cells expressing chimeric human/macaque CCR3 bearing either the first and second, or the third and fourth extracellular domains of human CCR3. As previously observed for CCR5, there seems to be a certain functional redundancy between domains supporting the coreceptor activity of CCR3. In spite of their close genetic relationship to HIV-2, two macaque simian immunodeficiency virus strains were apparently unable to use the CCR3 coreceptor from either human or simian origin.

  14. A Randomized, Open-Label Trial to Evaluate Switching to Elvitegravir/Cobicistat/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide Plus Darunavir in Treatment-Experienced HIV-1-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Gallant, Joel; Wilkin, Timothy; Cheng, Andrew; Yan, Mingjin; Zhong, Lijie; Callebaut, Christian; Custodio, Joseph M.; Fordyce, Marshall W.; Das, Moupali; McCallister, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Background: HIV-infected, treatment-experienced adults with a history of prior resistance and regimen failure can be virologically suppressed but may require multitablet regimens associated with lower adherence and potential resistance development. Methods: We enrolled HIV-infected, virologically suppressed adults with 2-class to 3-class drug resistance and at least 2 prior regimen failures into this phase 3, open-label, randomized study. The primary endpoint was the percentage of participants with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per milliliter at week 24 [Food and Drug Administration (FDA) snapshot algorithm]. Results: For 135 participants [elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (E/C/F/TAF) plus darunavir (DRV), n = 89; baseline regimen, n = 46], most of whom were taking a median of 5 tablets/d, simplification to E/C/F/TAF plus DRV was noninferior to continuation of baseline regimens at week 24 (plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per milliliter: 96.6% vs. 91.3%, difference 5.3%, 95.001% CI: −3.4% to 17.4%). E/C/F/TAF plus DRV met prespecified criteria for noninferiority and superiority at week 48 for the same outcome. E/C/F/TAF plus DRV was well tolerated and had an improved renal safety profile compared with baseline regimens, with statistically significant differences between groups in quantitative total proteinuria and markers of proximal tubular proteinuria. Compared with baseline regimens, participants who switched to E/C/F/TAF plus DRV reported higher mean treatment satisfaction scale total scores and fewer days with missed doses. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that regimen simplification from a 5-tablet regimen to the 2-tablet, once-daily combination of E/C/F/TAF plus DRV has durable maintenance of virologic suppression and improvements in specific markers of renal safety. Such a strategy may lead to greater adherence and improved quality of life. PMID:27753684

  15. A randomized, open-label study of the safety and efficacy of switching stavudine or zidovudine to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in HIV-1-infected children with virologic suppression.

    PubMed

    Saez-Llorens, Xavier; Castaño, Elizabeth; Rathore, Mobeen; Church, Joseph; Deville, Jaime; Gaur, Aditya; Estripeaut, Dora; White, Kirsten; Arterburn, Sarah; Enejosa, Jeffrey V; Cheng, Andrew K; Chuck, Steven L; Rhee, Martin S

    2015-04-01

    The safety and efficacy of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) in HIV-1-infected children have not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Subjects (2 to <16 years) on a stavudine (d4T) or zidovudine (ZDV) containing regimen with HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL were randomized to either switch d4T or ZDV to TDF or continue d4T or ZDV. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA < 400 copies/mL at Week 48 with a prespecified noninferiority margin of 15%. After the 48-week randomized phase, eligible subjects were rolled over to an extension phase. Ninety-seven children (48 TDF vs. 49 d4T or ZDV) were randomized and treated. The percent of subjects who maintained virologic suppression in the TDF versus d4T or ZDV group at Week 24 were 93.8% versus 89.8% (difference 4.0%; 95% confidence interval:: -6.9% to 14.9%) and at Week 48 were 83.3% versus 91.8% (difference: -8.5%; 95% confidence interval: -21.5% to 4.5%; missing = failure, intent-to-treat analysis). No subjects discontinued study drug because of an adverse event in the 48 weeks of randomized phase. Four subjects discontinued TDF because of proximal renal tubulopathy in the extension phase. Our study did not demonstrate noninferiority of TDF versus d4T or ZDV at Week 48. Overall safety and tolerability of TDF in children were consistent with adults. TDF may be considered as an alternative to d4T or ZDV in HIV-infected children.

  16. Development of a Novel Codon-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Detection of CXCR4-Utilizing HIV Type 1 Subtype B

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Luke C.; Hu, Shengbo; Hughes, Paul; Harrigan, P. Richard; Coombs, Robert W.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Insight concerning the switch in HIV-1 coreceptor use will lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis and host-virus dynamics. Predicting CXCR4 utilization by analyzing HIV-1 envelope consensus sequences is highly specific, but minority variants in the viral population are often missed resulting in low sensitivity. Commercial phenotypic assays are costly, and the development of sensitive in-house phenotypic assays to detect CXCR4-using HIV may not be feasible for some laboratories. A sensitive, inexpensive genotyping assay was developed to detect viral sequences associated with CXCR4-utilizing virus (X4). Codon-specific primer pairs were used to detect X4-associated codons at five positions in the HIV-1 envelope V3 loop (11, 13, 24, 25, and 32). Sixty plasma samples from HIV-1-infected individuals were analyzed by consensus sequencing and codon-specific PCR (CS-PCR). Forty-six of these were also phenotyped by Trofile or Enhanced Sensitivity Trofile (ESTA). CS-PCR detected X4 variants 17% more often than 11/24/25 consensus sequencing alone (n=60), 30% more often than Trofile (n=27), and in a limited data set, 16% more often than ESTA (n=19). CS-PCR combined with consensus sequencing had approximately 80% concordance with ESTA. PMID:23343425

  17. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; Lüttichau, Hans R; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A virus-free cell-based fusion reporter assay, based on mixing "effector cells" (expressing HIV Env and luciferase activator) with "target cells" (expressing CD4, CCR5 wild type or a selection of well-described mutations, and luciferase reporter), was used as fusion readout. Receptor expression was evaluated by ELISA and fluorescence microscopy. On CCR5 WT, Maraviroc and Aplaviroc inhibited fusion with high potencies (EC 50 values of 91 and 501 nM, respectively), whereas removal of key residues for both antagonists (Glu283Ala) or Maraviroc alone (Tyr251Ala) prevented fusion inhibition, establishing this assay as suitable for screening of HIV entry inhibitors. Both ligands inhibited HIV fusion on signaling-deficient CCR5 mutations (Tyr244Ala and Trp248Ala). Moreover, the steric hindrance CCR5 mutation (Gly286Phe) impaired fusion, presumably by a direct hindrance of gp120 interaction. Finally, the efficacy switch mutation (Leu203Phe) - converting small-molecule antagonists/inverse agonists to full agonists biased toward G-protein activation - uncovered that also small-molecule agonists can function as direct HIV-1 cell entry inhibitors. Importantly, no agonist-induced receptor internalization was observed for this mutation. Our studies of the pharmacodynamic requirements for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors highlight the possibility of future development of biased ligands with selective targeting of the HIV-CCR5 interaction without interfering with the normal functionality of CCR5.

  18. Bioinformatic Analysis of HIV-1 Entry and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Dampier, Will; Antell, Gregory; Rivera, Nina; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Pirrone, Vanessa; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with respect to co-receptor utilization has been shown to be relevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease. The CCR5-utilizing (R5) virus has been shown to be important in the very early stages of transmission and highly prevalent during asymptomatic infection and chronic disease. In addition, the R5 virus has been proposed to be involved in neuroinvasion and central nervous system (CNS) disease. In contrast, the CXCR4-utilizing (X4) virus is more prevalent during the course of disease progression and concurrent with the loss of CD4+ T cells. The dual-tropic virus is able to utilize both co-receptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) and has been thought to represent an intermediate transitional virus that possesses properties of both X4 and R5 viruses that can be encountered at many stages of disease. The use of computational tools and bioinformatic approaches in the prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor usage has been growing in importance with respect to understanding HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease, developing diagnostic tools, and improving the efficacy of therapeutic strategies focused on blocking viral entry. Current strategies have enhanced the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility relative to the prediction of co-receptor use; however, these technologies need to be improved with respect to their efficient and accurate use across the HIV-1 subtypes. The most effective approach may center on the combined use of different algorithms involving sequences within and outside of the env-V3 loop. This review focuses on the HIV-1 entry process and on co-receptor utilization, including bioinformatic tools utilized in the prediction of co-receptor usage. It also provides novel preliminary analyses for enabling identification of linkages between amino acids in V3 with other components of the HIV-1 genome and demonstrates that these linkages are different between X4 and R5 viruses. PMID:24862329

  19. Mutations in the V3 stem versus the V3 crown and C4 region have different effects on the binding and fusion steps of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 interaction with the CCR5 coreceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou . E-mail: tunhoule@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-03-30

    The current model for HIV-1 envelope-coreceptor interaction depicts the V3 stem and bridging sheet binding to the CCR5 N-terminus while the V3 crown interacts with the second extracellular loop, which is the coreceptor domain that appears to be relatively more important for fusion and infection. Our prediction based on this model is that mutations in the V3 crown might consequently have more effects on cell-cell fusion and virus entry than mutations introduced in the V3 stem and C4 region. We performed alanine-scanning of the V3 loop and selected C4 residues in the JRFL envelope and tested the capacity of the resulting mutants for CCR5 binding, cell-cell fusion, and virus infection. Our cross comparison analysis revealed that residues in C4 and in both the V3 stem and crown were important for CCR5 binding of gp120 subunits. Contrary to our prediction, mutations in the V3 crown had less effect on membrane fusion than mutations in the V3 stem. The V3 stem thus appears to be the most important region for CCR5 utilization since it affected both coreceptor binding and subsequent fusion and viral entry. Our data raises the possibility that some residues in the V3 crown and in C4 may play distinct roles in the binding and fusion steps of envelope-coreceptor interaction.

  20. Efficacy and tolerability of switching to a dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir plus raltegravir in HIV-infected patients with HIV-1 RNA ≤50 cp/mL.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Giordano; Rusconi, Stefano; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Bonora, Stefano; Carbone, Alessia; De Luca, Andrea; Gianotti, Nicola; Di Biagio, Antonio; Antinori, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) toxicity may represent a threat for long-term success of combined antiretroviral therapy. Some studies have suggested a possible improvement of NRTI-related toxicity after switching to NRTI-sparing regimens. We aimed to explore the efficacy and tolerability of switching to darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) plus raltegravir (RAL) while having a viral load (VL) ≤50 copies/mL in the clinical setting. Treatment-experienced HIV 1-infected patients enrolled in the ICONA Foundation Study cohort were included if they switched their current regimen to DRV/r + RAL with a HIV-RNA ≤50 copies/mL. Different definitions of virological failure (VF) and treatment failure (TF) were employed. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression models were performed to estimate time to event probability. We included 72 HIV-infected patients, 22 (31%) of these were female, 31 (43%) men who have sex with men (MSM) amd 15 (21%) had hepatitis co-infections. Median age was 44 (IQR: 35-50) years amd CD4 count was 389 (IQR 283-606) cells/mmc. Median follow-up time for TF was 24 (IQR 9-31) months. Twenty-five discontinuations occurred (60% simplifications); only 2 (8%) were toxicity-driven (lipid elevations). The probability of VF (confirmed VL >50 copies/mL) was estimated at 7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1-13%] by 12 and 9% (95% CI 2-16%) by 24 months. When considering TF, we found a probability of stop/intensification/single VL > 200 copies/mL of 13% (95% CI 1-17%) and 22% (95% CI 11-33%) by 12 and 24 months. Female gender (adjusted relative hazard, ARH = 0.10; 95% CI 0.01-0.74; p = 0.024) and older age (AHR = 0.50 per 10 years older; 95% CI 0.25-0.99; p = 0.045) were associated with a lower risk of TF. A previous PI failure was strongly associated with TF (AHR = 52.6, 95% CI 3.6-779; p = 0.004). DRV/r + RAL is a valuable NRTI-sparing option, especially in female and older patients, with a relatively low risk of VF and good

  1. Lefty Blocks a Subset of TGFβ Signals by Antagonizing EGF-CFC Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Simon K; Olale, Felix; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2004-01-01

    Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFβ signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFβ signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFβ agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFβ signals result in greater ligand diversity. PMID:14966532

  2. Lefty blocks a subset of TGFbeta signals by antagonizing EGF-CFC coreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Simon K; Olale, Felix; Brivanlou, Ali H; Schier, Alexander F

    2004-02-01

    Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFbeta signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFbeta signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFbeta agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFbeta signals result in greater ligand diversity.

  3. The efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and safety of a nevirapine to rilpivirine switch in virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Rokx, Casper; Blonk, Maren; Verbon, Annelies; Burger, David; Rijnders, Bart J A

    2015-01-01

    : This prospective, open-label nonrandomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of substituting nevirapine/emtricitabine/tenofovir for rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir in 50 suppressed HIV-1 switchers. One hundred thirty-nine nonswitchers remained on nevirapine as controls. Week 12 HIV-1 RNA was <50 copies per milliliter in 92.0% of switchers and was <50 copies per milliliter at week 24 in 88.0% of switchers and 90.6% of nonswitchers (difference 2.6%, 95% confidence interval: -7.6% to 12.8%). Week 3 geometric mean nevirapine concentration was undetectable and week 1 geometric mean rilpivirine concentration (0.083 mg/L) was comparable with phase 3 trial (P = 0.747). Substituting nevirapine for rilpivirine resulted in ongoing virological suppression and did not have clinically relevant pharmacokinetic effects by cytochrome P450 interactions.

  4. CCR5 antagonism in HIV infection: current concepts and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Gulick, Roy M

    2012-01-01

    CCR5 antagonists inhibit HIV-1 entry by blocking the interaction of HIV-1 with the CCR5 cellular receptor. In patients with established HIV-1 infection, some viral strains use an alternative coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, CXCR4; CCR5 antagonists are not effective in patients harboring these viral strains. Coreceptor tropism testing of viral strains in an individual patient is necessary prior to treating with a CCR5 antagonist. There is one CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, that is FDA-approved for treatment of HIV-1 infection. This drug is used most commonly for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in patients who have failed other antiretroviral regimens. In addition to virologic effects, CCR5 antagonists are under investigation for immune-modulating effects and for HIV-1 prevention. Ongoing research will further elucidate the role of CCR5 antagonists in combating HIV disease.

  5. Effectiveness, Safety, and Costs of a Treatment Switch to Dolutegravir Plus Rilpivirine Dual Therapy in Treatment-Experienced HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Revuelta-Herrero, José Luis; Chamorro-de-Vega, Esther; Rodríguez-González, Carmen Guadalupe; Alonso, Roberto; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2017-08-01

    Evidence about the use of dolutegravir (DTG) and rilpivirine (RPV) as an antiretroviral therapy (ART) in treatment-experienced patients is scarce. To explore the effectiveness, safety, and costs of switching to a DTG plus RPV regimen in this population. This observational, prospective study included all treatment-experienced patients who switched to DTG plus RPV between November 2014 and July 2016. Patients were excluded if resistance mutations to integrase inhibitors or RPV were found. The effectiveness endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved virological suppression (viral load [VL] <50 copies/mL) at week 48 (W48). Safety (incidence of adverse events leading to discontinuation and laboratory abnormalities), adherence, and costs were analyzed. A total of 35 patients were included, and 91.4% were virologically suppressed at baseline. Patients were treated with ART for a median of 14 years (interquartile range = 7-20). At W48, 91.4% of patients were virologically suppressed (95% CI = 77.0-98.2). Two of the 3 patients not suppressed at baseline achieved undetectable VL at W48, and 2 patients discontinued DTG plus RPV (intolerance and a drug-drug interaction). None of the virologically suppressed patients at baseline showed virological rebound through W48. There were no significant changes in lipid, liver, and renal profiles. The proportion of patients with an ART adherence >90% increased from 65.6% to 93.8% ( P = 0.004). The annual per-patient ART costs dropped by €665 ( P = 0.265). Switching to DTG plus RPV seems to be an effective and safe strategy. Significant improvements in patients' adherence and costs were achieved.

  6. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  7. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  8. Brief Report: Switching to Tenofovir Alafenamide, Coformulated With Elvitegravir, Cobicistat, and Emtricitabine, in HIV-Infected Adults With Renal Impairment: 96-Week Results From a Single-Arm, Multicenter, Open-Label Phase 3 Study.

    PubMed

    Post, Frank A; Tebas, Pablo; Clarke, Amanda; Cotte, Laurent; Short, William R; Abram, Michael E; Jiang, Shuping; Cheng, Andrew; Das, Moupali; Fordyce, Marshall W

    2017-02-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate is associated with renal and bone toxicity. In a single-arm, open-label study of 242 virologically suppressed, HIV-infected participants with creatinine clearance 30-69 mL/min who switched to elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide, participants had stable creatinine clearance, significant and durable improvements in proteinuria, albuminuria, and tubular proteinuria (P < 0.001), and significant increases in hip and spine bone mineral density through 96 weeks (P < 0.001). Eighty-eight percent maintained HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 96. These longer-term results support the use of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide in HIV-infected individuals with mild-moderately impaired renal function.

  9. Brief Report: Switching to Tenofovir Alafenamide, Coformulated With Elvitegravir, Cobicistat, and Emtricitabine, in HIV-Infected Adults With Renal Impairment: 96-Week Results From a Single-Arm, Multicenter, Open-Label Phase 3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Clarke, Amanda; Cotte, Laurent; Short, William R.; Abram, Michael E.; Jiang, Shuping; Cheng, Andrew; Das, Moupali; Fordyce, Marshall W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate is associated with renal and bone toxicity. In a single-arm, open-label study of 242 virologically suppressed, HIV-infected participants with creatinine clearance 30–69 mL/min who switched to elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide, participants had stable creatinine clearance, significant and durable improvements in proteinuria, albuminuria, and tubular proteinuria (P < 0.001), and significant increases in hip and spine bone mineral density through 96 weeks (P < 0.001). Eighty-eight percent maintained HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 96. These longer-term results support the use of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide in HIV-infected individuals with mild-moderately impaired renal function. PMID:27673443

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell-based gene therapy for HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiem, Hans-Peter; Jerome, Keith R.; Deeks, Steven G.; McCune, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Although combination antiretroviral therapy can dramatically reduce the circulating viral load in those infected with HIV, replication-competent virus persists. To eliminate the need for indefinite treatment, there is growing interest in creating a functional HIV-resistant immune system through the use of gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Proof-of-concept for this approach has been provided in the instance of an HIV-infected adult transplanted with allogeneic stem cells from a donor lacking the HIV co-receptor, CCR5. Here, we review this and other strategies for HSC-based gene therapy for HIV disease. PMID:22305563

  11. HIV RNA and proviral HIV DNA can be detected in semen after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy although HIV RNA is undetectable in blood.

    PubMed

    Du, Peiwei; Liu, An; Jiao, Yanmei; Liu, Cuie; Jiang, Taiyi; Zhu, Weijun; Zhu, Yunxia; Wu, Hao; Sun, Lijun

    2016-03-01

    The risk of sexual transmission of HIV is strongly correlated with amounts of genital HIV RNA. Few studies have reported amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen in HIV-infected Chinese patients undergoing antiviral treatment (ART). In this observational study, the amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen were assessed after six months of ART in HIV-infected Chinese individuals, when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood . This study included 19 HIV-infected Chinese men undergoing ART for six months. Amounts of HIV in paired semen and blood samples were assessed using real-time PCR. The C2-V5 region of the HIV envelope (env) genes was cloned and sequenced and genotype and co-receptor usage predicted based on the sequence. It was found that HIV RNA was undetectable in the plasma of most patients (17/19), whereas HIV RNA could be detected in the semen of most patients (16/19). HIV DNA could be detected in both semen and blood. Genetic diversity of HIV between the seminal and blood compartments was identified. Thus, amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA remain high in semen of HIV-infected Chinese patients after six months of ART treatment, even when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood.

  12. PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory co-receptors act synergistically to prevent autoimmunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Il-mi; Wang, Jian; Sugiura, Daisuke; Nakaki, Fumio; Yoshida, Taku; Kato, Yu; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Eto, Tomoo; Hioki, Kyoji; Honjo, Tasuku

    2011-01-01

    Stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors play fundamental roles in the regulation of the immune system. We describe a new mouse model of spontaneous autoimmune disease. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase–linked autoimmunity (aida) mice harbor a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), an inhibitory co-receptor. Although LAG-3 deficiency alone did not induce autoimmunity in nonautoimmune-prone mouse strains, it induced lethal myocarditis in BALB/c mice deficient for the gene encoding the inhibitory co-receptor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). In addition, LAG-3 deficiency alone accelerated type 1 diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic mice. These results demonstrate that LAG-3 acts synergistically with PD-1 and/or other immunoregulatory genes to prevent autoimmunity in mice. PMID:21300912

  13. Predictors of treatment failure and time to detection and switching in HIV-infected Ethiopian children receiving first line anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Tigist; Tilahun, Birkneh; Worku, Alemayehu

    2012-08-24

    The emergence of resistance to first line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen leads to the need for more expensive and less tolerable second line drugs. Hence, it is essential to identify and address factors associated with an increased probability of first line ART regimen failure. The objective of this article is to report on the predictors of first line ART regimen failure, the detection rate of ART regime failure, and the delay in switching to second line ART drugs. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from 2005 to 2011. All HIV infected children under the age of 15 who took first line ART for at least six months at the four major hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia were included. Data were collected, entered and analyzed using Epi info/ENA version 3.5.1 and SPSS version 16. The Cox proportional-hazard model was used to assess the predictors of first line ART failure. Data of 1186 children were analyzed. Five hundred seventy seven (48.8%) were males with a mean age of 6.22 (SD = 3.10) years. Of the 167(14.1%) children who had treatment failure, 70 (5.9%) had only clinical failure, 79 (6.7%) had only immunologic failure, and 18 (1.5%) had both clinical and immunologic failure. Patients who had height for age in the third percentile or less at initiation of ART were found to have higher probability of ART treatment failure [Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR), 3.25 95% CI, 1.00-10.58]. Patients who were less than three years old [AHR, 1.85 95% CI, 1.24-2.76], chronic diarrhea after initiation of antiretroviral treatment [AHR, 3.44 95% CI, 1.37-8.62], ART drug substitution [AHR, 1.70 95% CI, 1.05-2.73] and base line CD4 count below 50 cells/mm3 [AHR, 2.30 95% CI, 1.28-4.14] were also found to be at higher risk of treatment failure. Of all the 167 first line ART failure cases, only 24 (14.4%) were switched to second line ART with a mean delay of 24 (SD = 11.67) months. The remaining 143 (85.6%) cases were diagnosed to have treatment failure retrospectively by the

  14. High rate of virological failure and low rate of switching to second-line treatment among adolescents and adults living with HIV on first-line ART in Myanmar, 2005-2015

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Oo, Myo Minn; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Win, Than; Aung, Thet Ko; Min, Aung Chan; Oo, Htun Nyunt

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Myanmar has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This study aimed to estimate rates of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART due to treatment failure at the Integrated HIV Care program (IHC). Methods Routinely collected data of all adolescent and adult patients living with HIV who were initiated on first-line ART at IHC between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative hazard of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART were estimated. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox regression model to identify risk factors associated with the two outcomes. Results Of 23,248 adults and adolescents, 7,888 (34%) were tested for HIV viral load. The incidence rate of virological failure among those tested was 3.2 per 100 person-years follow-up and the rate of switching to second-line ART among all patients was 1.4 per 100 person-years follow-up. Factors associated with virological failure included: being adolescent; being lost to follow-up at least once; having WHO stage 3 and 4 at ART initiation; and having taken first-line ART elsewhere before coming to IHC. Of the 1032 patients who met virological failure criteria, 762 (74%) switched to second-line ART. Conclusions We found high rates of virological failure among one third of patients in the cohort who were tested for viral load. Of those failing virologically on first-line ART, about one quarter were not switched to second-line ART. Routine viral load monitoring, especially for those identified as having a higher risk of treatment failure, should be considered in this setting to detect all patients failing on first-line ART. Strategies also need to be put in place to prevent treatment failure and to treat more of those patients who are actually failing. PMID:28182786

  15. High rate of virological failure and low rate of switching to second-line treatment among adolescents and adults living with HIV on first-line ART in Myanmar, 2005-2015.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Harries, Anthony D; Kumar, Ajay M V; Oo, Myo Minn; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Win, Than; Aung, Thet Ko; Min, Aung Chan; Oo, Htun Nyunt

    2017-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Myanmar has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This study aimed to estimate rates of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART due to treatment failure at the Integrated HIV Care program (IHC). Routinely collected data of all adolescent and adult patients living with HIV who were initiated on first-line ART at IHC between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative hazard of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART were estimated. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox regression model to identify risk factors associated with the two outcomes. Of 23,248 adults and adolescents, 7,888 (34%) were tested for HIV viral load. The incidence rate of virological failure among those tested was 3.2 per 100 person-years follow-up and the rate of switching to second-line ART among all patients was 1.4 per 100 person-years follow-up. Factors associated with virological failure included: being adolescent; being lost to follow-up at least once; having WHO stage 3 and 4 at ART initiation; and having taken first-line ART elsewhere before coming to IHC. Of the 1032 patients who met virological failure criteria, 762 (74%) switched to second-line ART. We found high rates of virological failure among one third of patients in the cohort who were tested for viral load. Of those failing virologically on first-line ART, about one quarter were not switched to second-line ART. Routine viral load monitoring, especially for those identified as having a higher risk of treatment failure, should be considered in this setting to detect all patients failing on first-line ART. Strategies also need to be put in place to prevent treatment failure and to treat more of those patients who are actually failing.

  16. Response to Vicriviroc in Treatment-Experienced Subjects Using an Enhanced Sensitivity Co-receptor Tropism Assay: Reanalysis of AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5211

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaohui; Gulick, Roy M.; Krambrink, Amy; Coakley, Eoin; Hughes, Michael D.; Han, Dong; Flexner, Charles; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Greaves, Wayne L.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced sensitivity Trofile assay was used to re-test co-receptor usage at study screening and entry for the 118 ACTG A5211 treatment-experienced subjects who had CCR5-tropic (R5) virus by the original Trofile assay at study screening. Among 90 vicriviroc recipients, a significantly (P<0.001) greater mean reduction in HIV-1 RNA was observed in 72 subjects with R5 virus versus 15 subjects reclassified with dual/mixed-tropic viruses at screening: −1.11 vs. −0.09 (day 14), −1.91 vs. −0.57 (week 24) log10 copies/mL, respectively. Results suggest that the enhanced sensitivity assay is a better screening tool for determining patient eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. PMID:19874179

  17. Quasispecies tropism and compartmentalization in gut and peripheral blood during early and chronic phases of HIV-1 infection: possible correlation with immune activation markers.

    PubMed

    Rozera, G; Abbate, I; Vlassi, C; Giombini, E; Lionetti, R; Selleri, M; Zaccaro, P; Bartolini, B; Corpolongo, A; D'Offizi, G; Baiocchini, A; Del Nonno, F; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2014-03-01

    HIV quasispecies was analysed in plasma and proviral genomes hosted by duodenal mucosa and peripheral blood cells (PBMC) from patients with early or chronic infection, with respect to viral heterogeneity, tropism compartmentalization and extent of immune activation. Seventeen HIV-1-infected combined antiretroviral therapy naive patients were enrolled (11 early infection and six chronic infection). V3 and nef genomic regions were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Sequences were used to infer co-receptor usage and to construct phylogenetic trees. As markers of immune activation, plasma sCD14 and soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor II (sTNFRII) levels were measured. Median diversity of HIV RNA was lower in patients with early infection versus chronic infection patients. Overall, direct correlation was observed between V3 diversity and X4 frequency; V3 diversity of HIV RNA was inversely correlated with CD4 T-cell count; median sCD14 and sTNFRII values were similar in early and chronic patients, but X4 frequency of HIV RNA was directly correlated with plasma sCD14. The proportion of patients harbouring X4 variants and median intra-patient X4 frequency of proviral genomes tended to be higher in chronic infection than early infection patients. More pronounced compartmentalization of proviral quasispecies in gut compared with PBMC samples was observed in patients with early infection compared with chronic patients. The loss of gut/PBMC compartmentalization in more advanced stages of HIV infection was confirmed by longitudinal observation. More studies are needed to understand the pathogenetic significance of early HIV quasispecies compartmentalization and progressive intermixing of viral variants in subsequent phases of the infection, as well as the role of immune activation in tropism switch.

  18. Functional analysis of naturally occurring mutations in the open reading frame of CCR5 in HIV-infected Chinese patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Lee, Shui-Shan; Wong, Ka-Hing; Chan, Kenny C W; Ng, Fai; Chan, Chris C S; Han, Dan; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ng, Mun-Hon; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2005-04-15

    We studied polymorphism of the HIV coreceptor CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 in 1099 Chinese adults residing in Hong Kong, including 785 HIV-negative healthy donors and 314 HIV-positive patients. Ten mutants in the CCR5 open reading frame were identified, 7 of which were nonsynonymous. The frequencies of these alleles did not show a significant difference between HIV patients and healthy controls. G106R, Delta32, R223Q, 299(FS), and S336I were cloned from prevalent mutant genes, and their effects on HIV infection were analyzed by a series of in vitro experiments to determine their transcription levels, expression levels, conformational changes, and HIV coreceptor function. R223Q is the most prevalent CCR5 mutant in ethnic Chinese, with a frequency of 0.046, which does not affect HIV infection in vitro, however. The S336I mutant also does not affect its transcription, expression, or HIV coreceptor function. Similar to 299(FS), the mutant G106R located in the third transmembrane domain results in diminished HIV coreceptor function in vitro through conformation changes in ECL2.

  19. Effect on transmission of HIV-1 resistance of timing of implementation of viral load monitoring to determine switches from first to second-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Garnett, Geoff; Bennett, Diane; Vitoria, Marco; Cambiano, Valentina; Lundgren, Jens

    2011-03-27

    There is concern that antiretroviral therapy (ART) use with only clinical monitoring for failure will result in high rates of transmission of virus with resistance to drugs currently in use. A stochastic simulation model of transmission of HIV, natural history and the effect of ART, was developed and used to predict the proportion of new infections with resistance according to whether and when viral load monitoring is introduced. In our base model, there was predicted to be 12.4% of new HIV infections with primary antiretroviral resistance in 2020 if clinical monitoring is used throughout, compared with 5.4 and 6.1% if viral load-guided switching (based on viral load measured every 6 months, with switch determined by a value >500 copies/ml) was introduced in 2010 or 2015, respectively. The death rate for those on ART was lowest when viral load monitoring was used, but the overall death rate in all infected people was higher if viral load monitoring was introduced at the expense of scale-up in HIV diagnosis and ART initiation beyond their 2010 coverage levels (4.7 compared with 3.1 per 100 person-years). To preserve current first-line drugs for the long term there is an eventual need for some form of cheap and practical viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings. However, a delay in introduction of 5 years has limited consequences for resistance transmission so the current priority for countries' ART programmes is to increase HIV testing and provide treatment for all those in need of ART.

  20. Stalk region of beta-chain enhances the coreceptor function of CD8.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny S; Wang, Xiaosong; Witte, Torsten; Nie, Linghu; Carvou, Nicolas; Kern, Petra; Chang, Hsiu-Ching

    2003-07-15

    CD8 glycoproteins are expressed as either alphaalpha homodimers or alphabeta heterodimers on the surface of T cells. CD8alphabeta is a more efficient coreceptor than the CD8alphaalpha for peptide Ag recognition by TCR. Each CD8 subunit is composed of four structural domains, namely, Ig-like domain, stalk region, transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic domain. In an attempt to understand why CD8alphabeta is a better coreceptor than CD8alphaalpha, we engineered, expressed, and functionally tested a chimeric CD8alpha protein whose stalk region is replaced with that of CD8beta. We found that the beta stalk region enhances the coreceptor function of chimeric CD8alphaalpha to a level similar to that of CD8alphabeta. Surprisingly, the beta stalk region also restored functional activity to an inactive CD8alpha variant, carrying an Ala mutation at Arg(8) (R8A), to a level similar to that of wild-type CD8alphabeta. Using the R8A variant of CD8alpha, a panel of anti-CD8alpha Abs, and three MHC class I (MHCI) variants differing in key residues known to be involved in CD8alpha interaction, we show that the introduction of the CD8beta stalk leads to a different topology of the CD8alpha-MHCI complex without altering the overall structure of the Ig-like domain of CD8alpha or causing the MHCI to employ different residues to interact with the CD8alpha Ig domain. Our results show that the stalk region of CD8beta is capable of fine-tuning the coreceptor function of CD8 proteins as a coreceptor, possibly due to its distinct protein structure, smaller physical size and the unique glycan adducts associated with this region.

  1. Soluble Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers from a CD4-Independent HIV-1 Elicit Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Marta K.; Teran, Victor A.; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Wang, Baomin; Kim, Su Hyon; LaBranche, Celia C.; Richard, Jonathan; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    CD4-independent HIV-1 variants can infect coreceptor-expressing cells lacking CD4. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins on these HIV-1 variants expose a coreceptor binding site that overlaps some CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes. Reports have demonstrated that CD4i antibodies mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Here we investigated the immunogenicity of soluble Env trimers (sgp140) from a CD4-independent HIV-1 in guinea pigs and found that the sgp140 elicited ADCC-mediating antibodies. Therefore, these sgp140 might be useful in vaccine regimens aimed at eliciting ADCC responses. PMID:26246571

  2. Immunological failure of first-line and switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in Tanzania: analysis of routinely collected national data

    PubMed Central

    Vanobberghen, Fiona M; Kilama, Bonita; Wringe, Alison; Ramadhani, Angela; Zaba, Basia; Mmbando, Donan; Todd, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Rates of first-line treatment failure and switches to second-line therapy are key indicators for national HIV programmes. We assessed immunological treatment failure defined by WHO criteria in the Tanzanian national HIV programme. Methods We included adults initiating first-line therapy in 2004–2011 with a pre-treatment CD4 count, and ≥6-months of follow-up. We assessed subhazard ratios (SHR) for immunological treatment failure, and subsequent switch to second-line therapy, using competing risks methods to account for deaths. Results Of 121 308 adults, 7% experienced immunological treatment failure, and 2% died without observed immunological treatment failure, over a median 1.7 years. The 6-year cumulative probability of immunological treatment failure was 19.0% (95% CI 18.5, 19.7) and of death, 5.1% (4.8, 5.4). Immunological treatment failure predictors included earlier year of treatment initiation (P < 0.001), initiation in lower level facilities (SHR = 2.23 [2.03, 2.45] for dispensaries vs. hospitals), being male (1.27 [1.19, 1.33]) and initiation at low or high CD4 counts (for example, 1.78 [1.65, 1.92] and 5.33 [4.65, 6.10] for <50 and ≥500 vs. 200–349 cells/mm3, respectively). Of 7382 participants in the time-to-switch analysis, 6% switched and 5% died before switching. Four years after immunological treatment failure, the cumulative probability of switching was 7.3% (6.6, 8.0) and of death, 6.8% (6.0, 7.6). Those who immunologically failed in dispensaries, health centres and government facilities were least likely to switch. Conclusions Immunological treatment failure rates and unmet need for second-line therapy are high in Tanzania; virological monitoring, at least for persons with immunological treatment failure, is required to minimise unnecessary switches to second-line therapy. Lower level government health facilities need more support to reduce treatment failure rates and improve second-line therapy uptake to sustain the

  3. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  4. TROCAI (Tropism Coreceptor Assay Information): a New Phenotypic Tropism Test and Its Correlation with Trofile Enhanced Sensitivity and Genotypic Approaches▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Serna, Alejandro; Leal, Manuel; Genebat, Miguel; Abad, Maria Antonia; Garcia-Perganeda, Antonio; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel

    2010-01-01

    The only clinically validated assay available to determine HIV tropism is Trofile, an assay that possesses some limitations. Our first aim was to develop a new phenotypic tropism test (TROCAI [tropism coreceptor assay information]) and to categorize results generated by this test according to the virological response to a short-term exposure to the CCR5 receptor antagonist maraviroc (maraviroc clinical test). Our second aim was to compare TROCAI results to those obtained by Trofile enhanced sensitivity (ES) and to different genotypic algorithms. TROCAI assayed HIV tropism in 33 HIV-infected patient viral isolates obtained from a modified coculture, followed by multiple infection cycles of indicator cells. TROCAI obtained a reportable result in all patients with viral loads of >500 HIV RNA copies/ml and in 3/6 patients with <500 HIV RNA copies/ml (30/33 patients, 91.9%). Patients who responded to maraviroc had an X4-using virus proportion in indicator cell supernatant of 0 to 0.41%. Hence, we used the threshold of 0.5% to categorize TROCAI results as R5 (<0.5%) or dual/mixed (>0.5%). The concordance between TROCAI and Trofile (ES) was 22/24 (91.6%), and with genotypic approaches it was 22/26 (84.6%). TROCAI results, which were categorized in this study by the maraviroc clinical test, could be used as a test in addition to those currently used to select patients for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. PMID:20943871

  5. HIV-1 Tropism Determines Different Mutation Profiles in Proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Brito, Sieberth; Paulo Zukurov, Jean; Maricato, Juliana T; Volpini, Angela C; Salim, Anna Christina M; Araújo, Flávio M G; Coimbra, Roney S; Oliveira, Guilherme C; Antoneli, Fernando; Janini, Luiz Mário R

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish new infections HIV-1 particles need to attach to receptors expressed on the cellular surface. HIV-1 particles interact with a cell membrane receptor known as CD4 and subsequently with another cell membrane molecule known as a co-receptor. Two major different co-receptors have been identified: C-C chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-X-C chemokine Receptor type 4 (CXCR4) Previous reports have demonstrated cellular modifications upon HIV-1 binding to its co-receptors including gene expression modulations. Here we investigated the effect of viral binding to either CCR5 or CXCR4 co-receptors on viral diversity after a single round of reverse transcription. CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped viruses were used to infect non-stimulated and stimulated PBMCs and purified CD4 positive cells. We adopted the SOLiD methodology to sequence virtually the entire proviral DNA from all experimental infections. Infections with CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped virus resulted in different patterns of genetic diversification. CCR5 virus infections produced extensive proviral diversity while in CXCR4 infections a more localized substitution process was observed. In addition, we present pioneering results of a recently developed method for the analysis of SOLiD generated sequencing data applicable to the study of viral quasi-species. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of viral quasi-species evaluation by NGS methodologies. We presented for the first time strong evidence for a host cell driving mechanism acting on the HIV-1 genetic variability under the control of co-receptor stimulation. Additional investigations are needed to further clarify this question, which is relevant to viral diversification process and consequent disease progression.

  6. Limited Evolution of Inferred HIV-1 Tropism while Viremia Is Undetectable during Standard HAART Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guinevere Q.; Dong, Winnie; Mo, Theresa; Knapp, David J. H. F.; Brumme, Chanson J.; Woods, Conan K.; Kanters, Steve; Yip, Benita; Harrigan, P. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy have undetectable viremia making it impossible to screen plasma HIV tropism if regimen change is required during suppression. We investigated the prevalence and predictors of tropism switch from CCR5-using (“R5”) to non-CCR5-using (“non-R5”) before and after viral suppression in the initially therapy-naïve HOMER cohort from British Columbia, Canada. Methods We compared pre-therapy and post-suppression viral genotypic tropism in patients who initiated on PI/NNRTI-based antiretroviral regimens between 1996-1999 (n = 462). Virologic suppression was defined as having two consecutive viral loads of <500 copies/mL, which was the sensitivity limit of most viral load assays at the time. Viral tropism was inferred by V3-loop-population-sequencing and geno2pheno[coreceptor] with cutoff at 5.75% false positive rate (FPR). Results When virologic suppression was defined as two-consecutive viral loads <500 copies/mL, 34 (9%) of the 397 patients with pre-therapy R5-virus switched to non-R5 at viral load rebound after a median of 19 months (IQR 8–41 months) of undetectable viremia. Duration of viral load suppression was not a predictor of switch, but lower CD4 count during suppression (median 400 versus 250 cells/mL) and an increased prevalence of pre-therapy non-R5 HIV by “deep” sequencing (median 0.2% versus 3.2%) were independently associated with switch (p = 0.03 and p<0.0001, respectively). Conclusion R5-to-non-R5 tropism switches in plasma virus after undetectable viremia were relatively rare events especially among patients with higher CD4 counts during virologic suppression. Our study supports the use of pre-suppression tropism results if maraviroc is being considered during virologic suppression in this subgroup of patients. PMID:24905411

  7. Interactive Effects of Morphine on HIV Infection: Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pichili Vijaya Bhaskar; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Saxena, Shailendra K; Saiyed, Zainulabedin; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2012-01-01

    HIV epidemic continues to be a severe public health problem and concern within USA and across the globe with about 33 million people infected with HIV. The frequency of drug abuse among HIV infected patients is rapidly increasing and is another major issue since injection drug users are at a greater risk of developing HIV associated neurocognitive dysfunctions compared to non-drug users infected with HIV. Brain is a major target for many of the recreational drugs and HIV. Evidences suggest that opiate drug abuse is a risk factor in HIV infection, neural dysfunction and progression to AIDS. The information available on the role of morphine as a cofactor in the neuropathogenesis of HIV is scanty. This review summarizes the results that help in understanding the role of morphine use in HIV infection and neural dysfunction. Studies show that morphine enhances HIV-1 infection by suppressing IL-8, downregulating chemokines with reciprocal upregulation of HIV coreceptors. Morphine also activates MAPK signaling and downregulates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Better understanding on the role of morphine in HIV infection and mechanisms through which morphine mediates its effects may help in devising novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in opiate using HIV-infected population.

  8. High rate of HIV resuppression after viral failure on first-line antiretroviral therapy in the absence of switch to second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravindra K; Goodall, Ruth L; Ranopa, Michael; Kityo, Cissy; Munderi, Paula; Lyagoba, Fred; Mugarura, Lincoln; Gilks, Charles F; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Pillay, Deenan

    2014-04-01

    In a randomized comparison of nevirapine or abacavir with zidovudine plus lamivudine, routine viral load monitoring was not performed, yet 27% of individuals with viral failure at week 48 experienced resuppression by week 96 without switching. This supports World Health Organization recommendations that suspected viral failure should trigger adherence counseling and repeat measurement before a treatment switch is considered.

  9. Identification of RL-TGR, a coreceptor involved in aversive chemical signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Staci P.; Haack, Karla K. V.; Halstead-Nussloch, Gwyneth E.; Bernard, Karen F.; Hatt, Hanns; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical signaling plays an important role in predator–prey interactions and feeding dynamics. Like other organisms that are sessile or slow moving, some marine sponges contain aversive compounds that defend these organisms from predation. We sought to identify and characterize a fish chemoreceptor that detects one of these compounds. Using expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes coexpressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), and fractions of a zebrafish cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA clone encoding receptor activity–modifying protein (RAMP)-like triterpene glycoside receptor (RL-TGR), a novel coreceptor involved in signaling in response to triterpene glycosides. This coreceptor appears to be structurally and functionally related to RAMPs, a family of coreceptors that physically associate with and modify the activity of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). In membranes from formoside-responsive oocytes, RL-TGR was immunoprecipitated in an apparent complex with β2AR. In HEK293 cells, coexpression of β2AR induced the trafficking of RL-TGR from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that RL-TGR in the predatory fish physically associates with the β2AR or another, more physiologically relevant GPCR and modifies its pharmacology to respond to triterpene glycosides found in sponges that serve as a potential food source for the fish. RL-TGR forms a coreceptor that responds to a chemical defense compound in the marine environment, and its discovery might lead the way to the identification of other receptors that mediate chemical defense signaling. PMID:20566865

  10. Hepatitis C virus has a genetically determined lymphotropism through co-receptor B7.2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Huang, Jeffrey Y.; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Tahara, Stanley M; Zhou, Lin; Kondo, Yasuteru; Schechter, Joel; Su, Lishan; Lai, Michael M C.; Wakita, Takaji; Cosset, François-Loïc; Jung, Jae U; Machida, Keigo

    2017-01-01

    B-cell infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been a controversial topic. To examine whether HCV has a genetically determined lymphotropism through a co-receptor specific for the infection by lymphotropic HCV, we established an infectious clone and chimeric virus of hepatotropic and lymphotropic HCV strains derived from an HCV-positive B-cell lymphoma. The viral envelope and 5′-UTR sequences of the lymphotropic HCV strain were responsible for the lymphotropism. Silencing of the virus sensor, RIGI, or overexpression of microRNA-122 promoted persistent viral replication in B cells. By cDNA library screening, we identified an immune cell-specific, co-stimulatory receptor B7.2 (CD86) as a co-receptor of lymphotropic HCV. Infection of B cells by HCV inhibited the recall reaction to antigen stimulation. Together, a co-receptor B7.2 enabled lymphotropic HCV to infect memory B cells, leading to inhibition of memory B-cell function and persistent HCV infection in HCV-infected hosts. PMID:28067225

  11. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  12. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  13. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  14. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection. PMID:26674113

  15. Role of CXCR4 in HIV infection and its potential as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2010-07-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the two major coreceptors for HIV entry. Numerous efforts have been made to develop a new class of anti-HIV agents that target these coreceptors as an additional or alternative therapy to standard HAART. Among the CCR5 inhibitors developed so far, maraviroc is the first drug that has been approved by the US FDA for treating patients with R5 HIV-1. Although many CXCR4 inhibitors, some of which are highly active and orally bioavailable, have also been studied, they are still at preclinical stages or have been suspended during development. Importantly, the interaction between CXCR4 and its ligand SDF-1 is involved in various disease conditions, such as cancer cell metastasis, leukemia cell proliferation, rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, CXCR4 inhibitors have potential as novel therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases as well as HIV infection.

  16. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  17. CCR5Δ32 mutation and HIV infection: basis for curative HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is expressed on potential human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) target cells and serves as the predominant co-receptor for viral entry during initial transmission and through the early stages of infection. A homozygous Δ32 mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents CCR5 cell surface expression and thus confers resistance to infection with CCR5-tropic HIV strains. Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells from a CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donor was previously successful in eliminating HIV from the recipient's immune system, suggesting that targeted CCR5 disruption can lead to an HIV cure. Therefore, intense work is currently being carried out on CCR5 gene-editing tools to develop curative HIV therapy. Here, we review the natural function of CCR5, the progress made on CCR5 gene editing to date and discuss the current limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of chemokine receptor gene variants with HIV-1 genotype predicted tropism.

    PubMed

    Parczewski, M; Urbańska, A; Maciejewska, K; Clark, J; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, M

    2014-11-01

    As a switch from chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 [CCR5 (R5)] to chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 [CXCR4 (X4)] HIV-1 tropism is associated with symptomatic and AIDS stages of infection, while chemokine receptor gene variants modify the tempo of HIV disease progression, we aimed to analyse the association between pretreatment HIV-1 tropism and chemokine polymorphisms known to restrict disease progression. V3 genotype tropism prediction was performed in a group of 221 treatment-naïve patients, with subsequent CCR5 Δ32 (rs333), CCR2 V64I (rs1799864), CCR5 promoter (-627 C/T; rs1799988) and CX3CR1 V249I (rs3732378) genotyping performed in 206 patients. Alleles with a protective effect were assigned positive values while risk alleles were assigned negative values to calculate genetic scores. χ(2) tests, Mann-Whitney U-tests and logistic and linear regression models were used for statistical analyses. R5 tropism was found in 85.5% of patients (n = 189) using a false positive rate (FPR) of 5.75% and in 72.8% of patients (n = 161) using an FPR of 10%. A higher frequency of the 5.75% FPR predicted R5 tropism was associated with the CX3CR1 A allele (P = 0.027). Lower additive genetic scores were associated with an increased frequency of 5.75% FPR predicted R5 tropism (P = 0.0059), with the trend confirmed by logistic regression [odds ratio (OR) 0.5819; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3457-0.9795; P = 0.0416]. Viral load tended to increase with decreasing genetic score in the logistic regression analysis (slope = -0.127 ± 0.076; P = 0.095; r(2)  = 0.161). The CX3CR1 A allele and lower genetic scores may restrict the switch of HIV-1 tropism from R5 to X4. This effect may be associated with the amount of co-receptor on the cell surface. Chemokine receptor gene polymorphisms influence both disease progression and tropism variability. © 2014 British HIV Association.

  19. Maraviroc, as a Switch Option, in HIV-1-infected Individuals With Stable, Well-controlled HIV Replication and R5-tropic Virus on Their First Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Plus Ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitor Regimen: Week 48 Results of the Randomized, Multicenter MARCH Study.

    PubMed

    Pett, Sarah Lilian; Amin, Janaki; Horban, Andrejz; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Losso, Marcelo; Porteiro, Norma; Sierra Madero, Juan; Belloso, Waldo; Tu, Elise; Silk, David; Kelleher, Anthony; Harrigan, Richard; Clark, Andrew; Sugiura, Wataru; Wolff, Marcelo; Gill, John; Gatell, Jose; Fisher, Martin; Clarke, Amanda; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Prazuck, Thierry; Kaiser, Rolf; Woolley, Ian; Arnaiz, Juan Alberto; Cooper, David; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Mallon, Patrick; Emery, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Alternative combination antiretroviral therapies in virologically suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients experiencing side effects and/or at ongoing risk of important comorbidities from current therapy are needed. Maraviroc (MVC), a chemokine receptor 5 antagonist, is a potential alternative component of therapy in those with R5-tropic virus. The Maraviroc Switch Study is a randomized, multicenter, 96-week, open-label switch study in HIV type 1-infected adults with R5-tropic virus, virologically suppressed on a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) plus double nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (2 N(t)RTI) backbone. Participants were randomized 1:2:2 to current combination antiretroviral therapy (control), or replacing the protease inhibitor (MVC + 2 N(t)RTI arm) or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone (MVC + PI/r arm) with twice-daily MVC. The primary endpoint was the difference (switch minus control) in proportion with plasma viral load (VL) <200 copies/mL at 48 weeks. The switch arms were judged noninferior if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference in the primary endpoint was < -12% in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. The ITT population comprised 395 participants (control, n = 82; MVC + 2 N(t)RTI, n = 156; MVC + PI/r, n = 157). Baseline characteristics were well matched. At week 48, noninferior rates of virological suppression were observed in those switching away from a PI/r (93.6% [95% CI, -9.0% to 2.2%] and 91.7% [95% CI, -9.6% to 3.8%] with VL <200 and <50 copies/mL, respectively) compared to the control arm (97.6% and 95.1% with VL <200 and <50 copies/mL, respectively). In contrast, MVC + PI/r did not meet noninferiority bounds and was significantly inferior (84.1% [95% CI, -19.8% to -5.8%] and 77.7% [95% CI, -24.9% to -8.4%] with VL <200 and <50 copies/mL, respectively) to the control arm in the ITT analysis. These data support MVC as a switch

  20. A simplification trial switching from nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors to once-daily fixed-dose abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine in HIV-1-infected patients with virological suppression.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Esteban; Arranz, José A; Podzamczer, Daniel; Loncá, Montserrat; Sanz, José; Barragán, Patricia; Ribera, Esteban; Knobel, Hernando; Roca, Victor; Gutiérrez, Félix; Blanco, José L; Mallolas, Josep; Llibre, Josep M; Clotet, Bonaventura; Dalmau, David; Segura, Ferran; Arribas, José R; Cosín, Jaime; Barrufet, Pilar; Casas, Esperanza; Ferrer, Elena; Curran, Adrià; González, Alicia; Pich, Judit; Cruceta, Ana; Arnaiz, Joan A; Miró, José M; Gatell, José M

    2009-07-01

    Data comparing abacavir/lamivudine versus tenofovir/emtricitabine in antiretroviral-naive patients are controversial. We compared 48-week efficacy and safety of these combinations as substitutes of nucleosides in patients with virological suppression. We randomly assigned 333 HIV-1-infected patients on lamivudine-containing triple regimens with <200 copies per milliliter for at least 6 months to switch their nucleosides to either abacavir/lamivudine (n = 167) or tenofovir/emtricitabine (n = 166). The primary outcome was treatment failure ["switching = failure" intention to treat (ITT) analysis, noninferiority margin 12.5%]. Secondary outcomes were time to treatment failure, virological failure, adverse events, and changes in CD4 count, fasting plasma lipids, lipodystrophy, body fat, bone mineral density, and renal function. Treatment failure occurred in 32 patients (19%) on abacavir/lamivudine and 22 patients (13%) on tenofovir/emtricitabine [difference 5.9%; (95% confidence interval -2.1% to 14.0%), P = 0.06]. Four patients in the abacavir/lamivudine group versus none in the tenofovir/emtricitabine group developed virological failure [difference 2.4; (95% confidence interval 0.05 to 6.0), P = 0.04]. Twenty-three patients (14%) assigned to abacavir/lamivudine and 10 (6%) to tenofovir/lamivudine experienced grade 3 or 4 adverse effects (P = 0.03). CD4 counts and plasma lipids showed higher increments in the abacavir/lamivudine group than in the tenofovir/emtricitabine group. In HIV-1-infected patients with virological suppression, abacavir/lamivudine did not meet the noninferiority outcome for treatment efficacy compared with tenofovir/emtricitabine.

  1. Coaxial Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-23

    08-2015 Publication Coaxial Switch David J. Bamford et al Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell Street, Bldg 102T, Code 00L...Distribution A A coaxial switch having a housing and a shaft extending through and rotatably mounted to the housing. The shaft extends from opposite...conductor members are electrically connected together. When the coaxial switch is engaged, the conductor members are inserted into the connector body

  2. Brief Report: High Need to Switch cART or Comedication With the Initiation of DAAs in Elderly HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Elise J; Smit, Colette; T M M de Kanter, Clara; Dofferiiof, Anton S M; Arends, Joop E; Brinkman, Kees; Rijnders, Bart; van der Valk, Marc; Reiss, Peter; Burger, David M

    2017-10-01

    To describe the use of nonantiretroviral comedication and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients coinfected with HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) and to predict the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional study, using the Dutch, nationwide ATHENA observational HIV cohort database. All patients with a known HIV/HCV coinfection on January 1, 2015, were included. Comedication and cART registered in the database were listed. The potential for DDIs between DAAs and comedication/cART were predicted using http://hep-druginteractions.org. DDIs were categorized as: (1) no clinically relevant DDI; (2) possible DDI; (3) contraindication; or (4) no information available. We included 777 patients of whom 488 (63%) used nonantiretroviral comedication. At risk for a category 2/3 DDI with nonantiretroviral comedications were 299 patients (38%). Most DDIs were predicted with paritaprevir/ritonavir, ombitasvir ± dasabuvir (47% of the drugs) and least with grazoprevir/elbasvir (11% of the drugs). Concerning cART, daclatasvir/sofosbuvir is the most favorable combination as no cART is contraindicated with this combination. In genotype 1/4 patients, grazoprevir/elbasvir is least favorable as 75% of the patients must alter their cART. This study showed that comedication use in the aging HIV/HCV population is frequent and diverse. There is a high potential for DDIs between DAAs and comedication/cART.

  3. Randomised Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Once-Daily Etravirine-Based Regimen as a Switching Strategy in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving a Protease Inhibitor–Containing Regimen. Etraswitch Study

    PubMed Central

    Echeverría, Patricia; Bonjoch, Anna; Puig, Jordi; Moltó, José; Paredes, Roger; Sirera, Guillem; Ornelas, Arelly; Pérez-Álvarez, Nuria; Clotet, Bonaventura; Negredo, Eugènia

    2014-01-01

    Background Etravirine (ETR) was approved for patients with virological failure and antiretroviral resistance mutations. It has also shown antiviral efficacy in antiretroviral-naïve patients. However, data on the switching from protease inhibitors (PI) to ETR are lacking. Methods HIV-1-infected patients with suppressed viral load (VL) during a PI-containing regimen (>12 months) and no previous virological failure were randomized to switch from the PI to ETR (400 mg/day, dissolved in water) (ETR group, n = 22) or to continue with the same regimen (control group, n = 21). Percentage of patients with VL≤50 copies/mL were assessed at week 48, as well as changes in CD4 T-cell counts and metabolic profile. Results We included 43 patients [72.9% male, 46.3 (42.2; 50.6) years]. Two patients receiving ETR (grade-1 diarrhea and voluntary discontinuation) and another in the control group (simplification) discontinued therapy early. No patients presented virological failure (two consecutive VL>50 copies/mL); treatment was successful in 95.2% of the control group and 90.9% of the ETR group (intention-to-treat analysis, missing = failure) (p = 0.58). CD4+ T-cell counts did not significantly vary [+49 cells/µL in the ETR group (p = 0.25) and −4 cells/µL in the control group (p = 0.71)]. The ETR group showed significant reductions in cholesterol (p<0.001), triglycerides (p = <0.001), and glycemia (p = 0.03) and higher satisfaction (0–10 scale) (p = 0.04). Trough plasma concentrations of ETR were similar to observed in studies using ETR twice daily. Conclusion Switch from a PI-based regimen to a once-daily combination based on ETR maintained undetectable VL during 48 weeks in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients while lipid profile and patient satisfaction improved significantly. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01034917 PMID:24503952

  4. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  5. Molecular Recognition of CXCR4 by a Dual Tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 cell entry is initiated by the interaction of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4, and chemokine coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. The molecular recognition of CXCR4 or CCR5 by the HIV-1 gp120 is mediated through the V3 loop, a fragment of gp120. The binding of the V3 loop to CXCR4 or CCR5 determines the cell tropism of HIV-1 and constitutes a key step before HIV-1 cell entry. Thus, elucidating the molecular recognition of CXCR4 by the V3 loop is important for understanding HIV-1 viral infectivity and tropism, and for the design of HIV-1 inhibitors. We employed a comprehensive set of computational tools, predominantly based on free energy calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations, to investigate the molecular recognition of CXCR4 by a dual tropic V3 loop. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop:CXCR4 complex structure. The computationally derived structure reveals an abundance of polar and nonpolar intermolecular interactions contributing to the HIV-1 gp120:CXCR4 binding. Our results are in remarkable agreement with previous experimental findings. Therefore, this work sheds light on the functional role of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop and CXCR4 residues associated with HIV-1 coreceptor activity. PMID:24048002

  6. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Yu, Jie; Zhu, Lei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  7. Integrin αvβ3 is a Coreceptor for Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Huang, David Y.; Huong, Shu-Mei; Huang, Eng-Shang

    2006-01-01

    HCMV is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that causes birth defects in newborns and severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. The broad tropism of HCMV infection suggests that it utilizes multiple receptors. We recently demonstrated that EGFR serves as a receptor for HCMV. Here we show that HCMV also uses integrin αvβ3 as a coreceptor. Upon infection, HCMV glycoproteins gB and gH independently bind to EGFR and αvβ3, respectively, to initiate viral entry and signaling. αvβ3 then translocates to lipid rafts where it interacts with EGFR to induce coordinated signaling. The coordination between EGFR and αvβ3 is essential for the early events of HCMV infection, including viral entry, RhoA downregulation, stress fiber disassembly, and viral nuclear trafficking. Our findings support a model where EGFR and αvβ3 work together as coreceptors for HCMV entry and signaling. This discovery is fundamental to understanding HCMV pathogenesis and developing treatment strategies targeted to viral receptors. PMID:15834425

  8. Co-receptor and co-stimulation blockade for mixed chimerism and tolerance without myelosuppressive conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Graca, Luis; Daley, Stephen; Fairchild, Paul J; Cobbold, Stephen P; Waldmann, Herman

    2006-01-01

    Background A major challenge in the application of marrow transplantation as a route to immunological tolerance of a transplanted organ is to achieve hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment with minimal myelosuppressive treatments. Results We here describe a combined antibody protocol which can achieve long-term engraftment with clinically relevant doses of MHC-mismatched bone marrow, without the need for myelosuppressive drugs. Although not universally applicable in all strains, we achieved reliable engraftment in permissive strains with a two-stage strategy: involving first, treatment with anti-CD8 and anti-CD4 in advance of transplantation; and second, treatment with antibodies targeting CD4, CD8 and CD40L (CD154) at the time of marrow transplantation. Long-term mixed chimerism through co-receptor and co-stimulation blockade facilitated tolerance to donor-type skin grafts, without any evidence of donor-antigen driven regulatory T cells. Conclusion We conclude that antibodies targeting co-receptor and co-stimulatory molecules synergise to enable mixed hematopoietic chimerism and central tolerance, showing that neither cytoreductive conditioning nor 'megadoses' of donor bone marrow are required for donor HSC to engraft in permissive strains. PMID:16638128

  9. Anti-coreceptor therapy drives selective T cell egress by suppressing inflammation-dependent chemotactic cues

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron J.; Clark, Matthew; Gojanovich, Gregory; Manzoor, Fatima; Miller, Keith; Kline, Douglas E.; Morillon, Y. Maurice; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be a need for immunotherapies to treat type 1 diabetes in the clinic. We previously reported that nondepleting anti-CD4 and -CD8 Ab treatment effectively reverses diabetes in new-onset NOD mice. A key feature of the induction of remission is the egress of the majority of islet-resident T cells. How this occurs is undefined. Herein, the effects of coreceptor therapy on islet T cell retention were investigated. Bivalent Ab binding to CD4 and CD8 blocked TCR signaling and T cell cytokine production, while indirectly downregulating islet chemokine expression. These processes were required for T cell retention, as ectopic IFN-γ or CXCL10 inhibited Ab-mediated T cell purging. Importantly, treatment of humanized mice with nondepleting anti–human CD4 and CD8 Ab similarly reduced tissue-infiltrating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrate that Ab binding of CD4 and CD8 interrupts a feed-forward circuit by suppressing T cell–produced cytokines needed for expression of chemotactic cues, leading to rapid T cell egress from the islets. Coreceptor therapy therefore offers a robust approach to suppress T cell–mediated pathology by purging T cells in an inflammation-dependent manner. PMID:27777971

  10. CD36 is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus E1 protein attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun-Jun; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Ma, Lin-Lin; Wu, Zhou-Yi; Jiang, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Jing; Li, Yu-Huan; Han, Yan-Xing; Li, Hu; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yan-Xiang; Song, Dan-Qing; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) is a membrane protein related to lipid metabolism. We show that HCV infection in vitro increased CD36 expression in either surface or soluble form. HCV attachment was facilitated through a direct interaction between CD36 and HCV E1 protein, causing enhanced entry and replication. The HCV co-receptor effect of CD36 was independent of that of SR-BI. CD36 monoclonal antibodies neutralized the effect of CD36 and reduced HCV replication. CD36 inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO), which directly bound CD36 but not SR-BI, significantly interrupted HCV entry, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. SSO’s antiviral effect was seen only in HCV but not in other viruses. SSO in combination with known anti-HCV drugs showed additional inhibition against HCV. SSO was considerably safe in mice. Conclusively, CD36 interacts with HCV E1 and might be a co-receptor specific for HCV entry; thus, CD36 could be a potential drug target against HCV. PMID:26898231

  11. CCR5 as a natural and modulated target for inhibition of HIV.

    PubMed

    Burke, Bryan P; Boyd, Maureen P; Impey, Helen; Breton, Louis R; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Symonds, Geoff P; Hütter, Gero

    2013-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of target cells requires CD4 and a co-receptor, predominantly the chemokine receptor CCR5. CCR5-delta32 homozygosity results in a truncated protein providing natural protection against HIV infection-this without detrimental effects to the host-and transplantation of CCR5-delta32 stem cells in a patient with HIV ("Berlin patient") achieved viral eradication. As a more feasible approach gene-modification strategies are being developed to engineer cellular resistance to HIV using autologous cells. We have developed a dual therapeutic anti-HIV lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46) that down-regulates CCR5 and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of the gp41-derived peptide, C46. This construct, effective against multiple strains of both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, is being tested in Phase I/II trials by engineering HIV-resistant hematopoietic cells.

  12. High need to switch cART or co-medication with the initiation of DAAs in elderly HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Elise J; Smit, Colette; Tmm De Kanter, Clara; Dofferhoff, Anton; Arends, Joop E; Brinkman, Kees; Rijnders, Bart; Van Der Valk, Marc; Reiss, Peter; Burger, David M

    2017-06-22

    To describe the use of non-antiretroviral co-medication and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients, and to predict the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional study, using the Dutch nationwide ATHENA observational HIV cohort database. All patients with a known HIV/HCV co-infection on 1 January 2015 were included. Co-medication and cART registered in the database were listed. The potential for DDIs between DAAs and co-medication/cART were predicted, using http://hep-druginteractions.org. DDIs were categorized as: (1) no clinically relevant DDI; (2) possible DDI; (3) contra-indication; or (4) no information available. We included 777 patients of whom 488 (63%) used non-antiretroviral co-medication. At risk for a category 2/3 DDI with non-antiretroviral co-medications were 299 patients (38%). Most DDIs were predicted with paritaprevir/ritonavir, ombitasvir ± dasabuvir (47% of the drugs) and least with grazoprevir/elbasvir (11% of the drugs).Concerning cART, daclatasvir/sofosbuvir is the most favourable combination as no cART is contra-indicated with this combination. In genotype 1/4 patients grazoprevir/elbasvir is least favourable as 75% of the patients must alter their cART. This study showed that co-medication use in the aging HIV/HCV population is frequent and diverse. There is a high potential for DDIs between DAAs and co-medication/cART.

  13. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing pre-integration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin.

  14. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  15. Arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Planche, C; Lacour-Gayet, F; Serraf, A

    1998-01-01

    A relatively large spectra of anatomic variations are found within the unifying features of discordant ventriculoarterial connections. Variants that lend themselves to anatomic repair by the arterial switch operation are discussed, these include transposition of the great arteries with intact ventricular septum (TGA IVS), TGA associated with a ventricular septal defect (TGA VSD), double-outlet right ventricle with subpulmonary VSD (DORV VSD), and TGA or DORV with VSD associated with coarctation. Double discordance with VSD, which is currently treated by double switch or Rastelli and atrial switch and which probably represents, in our department, the only remaining indication for atrial switch, is not discussed. Also, we exclude TGA associated with pulmonary stenosis, which is treated by Rastelli or REV operation.

  16. Magnetic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic switching is a pulse compression technique that uses a saturable inductor (reactor) to pass pulses of energy between two capacitors. A high degree of pulse compression can be achieved in a network when several of these simple, magnetically switched circuits are connected in series. Individual inductors are designed to saturate in cascade as a pulse moves along the network. The technique is particularly useful when a single-pulse network must be very reliable or when a multi-pulse network must operate at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Today, magnetic switches trigger spark gaps, sharpen the risetimes of high energy pulses, power large lasers, and drive high PRF linear induction accelerators. This paper will describe the technique of magnetic pulse compression using simple networks and design equations. A brief review of modern magnetic materials and of their role in magnetic switch design will be presented.

  17. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  18. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  19. Nucleosome Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Rudnick, Joseph; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    We present a statistical-mechanical model for the positioning of nucleosomes along genomic DNA molecules as a function of the strength of the binding potential and the chemical potential of the nucleosomes. We show that a significant section of the DNA is composed of two-level nucleosome switching regions where the nucleosome distribution undergoes a localized, first-order transition. The location of the nucleosome switches shows a strong correlation with the location of gene-regulation regions.

  20. Nucleosome switches.

    PubMed

    Schwab, David J; Bruinsma, Robijn F; Rudnick, Joseph; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-06

    We present a statistical-mechanical model for the positioning of nucleosomes along genomic DNA molecules as a function of the strength of the binding potential and the chemical potential of the nucleosomes. We show that a significant section of the DNA is composed of two-level nucleosome switching regions where the nucleosome distribution undergoes a localized, first-order transition. The location of the nucleosome switches shows a strong correlation with the location of gene-regulation regions.

  1. Next-Generation Sequencing to Help Monitor Patients Infected with HIV: Ready for Clinical Use?

    PubMed

    Gibson, Richard M; Schmotzer, Christine L; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2014-04-01

    Given the extreme variability of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its ability to replicate as complex viral populations, HIV variants with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs or with specific coreceptor tropism (CCR5 and/or CXCR4) may be present as minority members of the viral quasispecies. The sensitivity of current HIV genotypic or phenotypic assays is limited, and thus, these tests usually fail to detect low-abundance viral variants. Next-generation (deep) sequencing (NGS) produces an enormous amount of information that allows the detection of minority HIV variants at levels unimaginable using standard Sanger sequencing. NGS technologies continue to evolve, opening new and more affordable opportunities to implement this methodology in clinical laboratories, and HIV is not an exception. The ample use of a battery of more effective antiretroviral drugs, together with careful patient monitoring based on HIV resistance testing, has resulted in HIV-infected patients whose disease is usually well-controlled. The vast majority of adherent patients without detectable resistance become virologically suppressed; however, a subset of these patients with undetectable resistance by standard methods may fail antiretroviral therapy, perhaps due to the presence of minority HIV-resistant variants. Novel NGS-based HIV assays with increased sensitivity for identifying low-level drug resistance and/or coreceptor tropism may play an important role in the success of antiretroviral treatments.

  2. First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy With A Protease Inhibitor Versus Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor And Switch At Higher Versus Low Viral Load In Hiv-Infected Children: An Open-Label, Randomised Phase 2/3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Randomised long-term comparisons between protease inhibitor(PI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor(NNRTI) first-line antiretroviral therapy(ART) and viral load(VL) switch criteria have never been undertaken in HIV-infected children. Methods PENPACT-1(ISRCTN73318385) assessed long-term effectiveness of ART-naïve children from Europe and North/South America initiating 2NRTIs+PI vs 2NRTIs+NNRTI, and switch to second-line at VL ≥1000c/ml vs ≥30000c/ml in a randomised open-label factorial design. The primary outcome was VL change between baseline and 4 years. Results 266 children were randomised(66 PI-1000, 65 PI-30000, 68 NNRTI-1000, 67 NNRTI-30000), and 263 analysed(3 NNRTI-30000 excluded); median age 6.5(IQR:2.8–12.9)years; mean(SD) CD4 18%(11); VL 5.1(0.8)log10c/ml. Median follow-up was 5.0(IQR:4.2–6.0)years; 188(71%) children were on first-line ART at trial end. For children starting second-line ART, median VLs at switch were 6720c/ml vs 35712c/ml in 1000 vs 30000; children in the 30000 group switched 41 weeks later, on average. At 4 years, mean VL reductions were −3.16 vs −3.31log10c/ml for PI vs NNRTI(difference −0.15log10c/ml,95%CI[−0.41,0.11];p=0.26), and −3.26 vs −3.20log10c/ml for 1000 vs 30000(difference 0.06log10c/ml,95%CI[−0.20,0.32];p=0.56); VL was <400c/ml in 82%PI vs 82%NNRTI, p=0.91 and 83%1000 vs 80%30000, p=0.42. Nine children with new CDC-C events, and 60 experiencing grade 3/4 adverse events were balanced across randomisations. PI resistance was uncommon and no increase in NRTI resistance occurred in PI-30000 compared to PI-1000. In contrast, NNRTI resistance was selected early (similar in 1000 and 30000), and ~10% more children accumulated NRTI mutations in NNRTI-30000 than NNRTI-1000. Conclusion There was no difference between initiating ART with PI or NNRTI-based regimens; both achieved good long-term virological outcomes. Delayed switching on NNRTI-based ART increases NRTI, but not NNRTI

  3. Gene number determination and genetic polymorphism of the gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1 genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background WC1 co-receptors belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily and are encoded by a multi-gene family. Expression of particular WC1 genes defines functional subpopulations of WC1+ '' T cells. Our previous study identified partial sequences for 13 different WC1 genes by annota...

  4. Development of a G118R mutation in HIV-1 integrase following a switch to dolutegravir monotherapy leading to cross-resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Thomas, Réjean; Blanco, José Luis; Ibanescu, Ruxandra-Ilinca; Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Golubkov, Olga; Roger, Michel; Garcia, Federico; Martinez, Esteban; Wainberg, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Dolutegravir shows a high barrier to resistance with no previously reported cases of acquired integrase mutations during first-line therapy. In this study, rapid development of the G118R mutation arose following a switch from first-line elvitegravir/cobicistat/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine to dolutegravir monotherapy. The G118R mutation also arose in a treatment-experienced patient switched to dolutegravir monotherapy. The genetic basis for G118R selection and potential phenotypic outcome was ascertained. Genotypic analysis was performed on patients with virological failure (<1000 copies/mL) on dolutegravir-containing regimens. The Los Alamos database was queried for glycine codon 118 polymorphisms. Cell culture selections and phenotypic drug susceptibility assays assessed resistance via the G118R pathway. We report on two patients who developed viral failure while on dolutegravir monotherapy. Both patients had been on a current or previous regimen containing integrase inhibitors. Virological failure (<1000 copies/mL) emerged early within 2 months following the dolutegravir switch. The appearance of G118R in these two cases and subtype C and CRF02_AG in vitro selections were related to a rare GGA natural polymorphism at codon 118 (1.5% prevalence), facilitating a GGA to AGA transition. Cell culture selections were used to assess the in vitro progression of the G118R pathway leading to cross-resistance to all integrase inhibitors. Although resistance to dolutegravir is typically rare, genetic polymorphisms and monotherapy can facilitate the acquisition of G118R. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Establishment of HIV-1 model cell line GHOST(3) with stable DRiP78 and NHERF1 knockdown

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Lin; HUANG, Xu-He; ZHOU, Ping-Ping; YU, Guo-Long; YAN, Jin; QIN, Bing; YAN, Xin-Ge; DIAO, Li-Mei; LIN, Peng; KUANG, Yi-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are indispensable co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In our previous study, we identified that dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 (DRiP78) and Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) are the CXCR4 and CCR5 homo- or hetero-dimer-interacting proteins. DRiP78 and NHERF1 are able to influence the co-receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking. Over-expression of NHERF1 affects the ligands or HIV-1 gp120-induced CCR5 internalization and HIV-1 production. It is reasonable to speculate that DRiP78 and NHERF1, as well as the signaling pathways involved in viral replication, would probably affect HIV-1 replication through regulating the co-receptors. In this present study, we designed two short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the DRiP78 and NHERF1, respectively, and constructed the pLenti6/BLOCK-iT-DEST lentiviral plasmids expressing DRiP78 or NHERF1 shRNA. The packaged lentiviruses were used to transduce the widely-applied HIV-1 model cell line GHOST(3). Then, cells with stable knockdown were established through selecting transduced cells with Blasticidin. This study, for the first time, reported the establishment of the GHOST(3) with DRiP78 and NHERF1 knockdown, which is the first stable cell line with HIV-1 co-receptor-interacting molecular defects. PMID:26018859

  6. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Wang, Xu; Chen, Hui; Song, Li; Ye, Li; Wang, Shi-Hong; Wang, Yan-Jian; Zhou, Lin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the use of methamphetamine (meth), a sympathomimetic stimulant, is particularly common among patients infected with HIV. However, there is a lack of direct evidence that meth promotes HIV infection of target cells. This study examined whether meth is able to enhance HIV infection of macrophages, the primary target site for the virus. Meth treatment resulted in a significant and dose-dependent increase of HIV reverse transcriptase activity in human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Dopamine D1 receptor antagonists (SCH23390 and SKF83566) blocked this meth-mediated increase in the HIV infectivity of macrophages. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of meth action showed that meth up-regulated the expression of the HIV entry co-receptor CCR5 on macrophages. Additionally, meth inhibited the expression of endogenous interferon-α and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 in macrophages. These findings provide direct in vitro evidence to support the possibility that meth may function as a cofactor in the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection and may lead to the future development of innate immunity-based intervention for meth users with HIV infection. PMID:18458095

  7. Targeted mutagenesis of an odorant receptor co-receptor using TALEN in Ostrinia furnacalis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Fujii, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Genome editing using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) has been applied for various model organisms but not yet for agricultural pest insects. In this study, TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of the gene encoding odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco) of an important agricultural pest Ostrinia furnacalis (OfurOrco) was carried out. Of the two pairs of TALEN constructs designed, one generated somatic and germline mutations at rates of 70.8% and 20.8%, respectively. Physiological and behavioral analyses using a gas chromatograph-electroantennographic detector system and a wind tunnel, respectively, revealed that antennal responses to sex pheromone components were decreased to trace levels, and behavioral responses were abolished in OfurOrco mutants. This study demonstrated that TALEN-mediated mutagenesis is applicable to pest insects, and these results will open the way for a better understanding of chemosensory systems in wild insects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CDO, an Hh-coreceptor, mediates lung cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity through Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling.

  9. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  10. Ubiquitin-dependent folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6.

    PubMed

    Perrody, Elsa; Abrami, Laurence; Feldman, Michal; Kunz, Beatrice; Urbé, Sylvie; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-10-18

    Many membrane proteins fold inefficiently and require the help of enzymes and chaperones. Here we reveal a novel folding assistance system that operates on membrane proteins from the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6 is promoted by ubiquitination of a specific lysine, retaining it in the ER while avoiding degradation. Subsequent ER exit requires removal of ubiquitin from this lysine by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP19. This ubiquitination-deubiquitination is conceptually reminiscent of the glucosylation-deglucosylation occurring in the ER lumen during the calnexin/calreticulin folding cycle. To avoid infinite futile cycles, folded LRP6 molecules undergo palmitoylation and ER export, while unsuccessfully folded proteins are, with time, polyubiquitinated on other lysines and targeted to degradation. This ubiquitin-dependent folding system also controls the proteostasis of other membrane proteins as CFTR and anthrax toxin receptor 2, two poor folders involved in severe human diseases.

  11. Innate gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection: Terra relatively Incognita in novel vaccination strategies?

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Sacchi, Alessandra; Casetti, Rita; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Despite a long-lasting global effort, the Holy Grail quest for a protective vaccine, able to confer prevention to HIV infection, did not reach the hoped for results, nor seems able to do so in the near future. Since mucosal surfaces of the host serve as the main entry point for HIV, it seems now logical to switch from a systemic to a localized view of events, in order to reveal critical steps useful in designing new and different vaccination strategies. In this context, the recent description of the very early phases of infection, from the eclipse to the viremia peak phase, seems to define a point-of-no-return threshold after which the main HIV infection steps, i.e. the massive destruction of the CD4+CCR5+ cell pool, the destruction of the mucosal physical barrier, and the establishment of reservoir sanctuaries, have already been accomplished. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms, the timing, and the consequences of evasion mechanisms exploited by HIV are still under scrutiny. Innate immunity, as part of a rapid lymphoid stress surveillance system, is known to play a central role in host responses to many infectious agents. In particular, Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells are able to quickly respond to danger signals without the need for classical major histocompatibility complex presentation, and may act as a bridge between innate and acquired arms of immune response, being able to kill infected/transformed cells, release antimicrobial soluble factors, and increase the deployment of other innate and acquired responses. Many experimental evidences suggest a direct role of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells during HIV disease. They may exert a direct anti-HIV role by secreting chemokines competing for HIV entry coreceptors as well as other soluble antiviral factors, and by killing infected cells by cytotoxic natural killer-like mechanisms. Moreover, they were found progressively depleted and anergic in advanced stages of HIV disease, this effect being directly linked to uncontrolled

  12. Abscisic acid sensor RCAR7/PYL13, specific regulator of protein phosphatase coreceptors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Stefan; Tischer, Stefanie V; Wunschel, Christian; Christmann, Alexander; Grill, Erwin

    2014-04-15

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) acts both as a developmental signal and as an integrator of environmental cues such as drought and cold. ABA perception recruits an ABA-binding regulatory component [regulatory component of ABA receptor (RCAR)/PYR1/PYL] and an associated protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Phytohormone binding inactivates the phosphatase activity of the coreceptor, permitting phosphorelay of the ABA signal via downstream protein kinases. RCARs and PP2C coreceptors are represented by small protein families comprising 14 and 9 members in Arabidopsis, respectively. The specificity of the RCAR-PP2C interaction and the constraints contributing to specific combinations are poorly understood. In this contribution, we analyzed RCAR7/PYL13, which is characterized by three variant amino acid residues in the conserved ABA-binding pocket. RCAR7 regulated the phosphatase activity of the PP2Cs ABI1, ABI2, and PP2CA in vitro at nanomolar ABA levels; however, it was unable to regulate the structurally related hypersensitive to ABA 1 (HAB1). Site-directed mutagenesis of HAB1 established ABA-dependent regulation by RCAR7. Conversion of the noncanonical amino acid residues of RCAR7 into the consensus ABA-binding pocket did not perceptibly change receptor function. Ectopic expression of RCAR7 in Arabidopsis resulted in ABA hypersensitivity affecting gene regulation, seed germination, and stomatal closure. The RCAR7 loss-of-function mutant revealed no changes in ABA responses, similar to the RCAR9 knockout line, whereas the combined deficiency of RCAR7 and RCAR9 resulted in ABA-insensitive seed germination. The study shows a role of RCAR7 in early plant development, proves its ABA receptor function, and identifies structural constraints of RCAR7-PP2C interaction.

  13. C-terminal tail of FGF19 determines its specificity toward Klotho co-receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinle; Lemon, Bryan; Li, XiaoFan; Gupte, Jamila; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Stevens, Jennitte; Hawkins, Nessa; Shen, Wenyan; Lindberg, Richard; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Li, Yang

    2008-11-28

    FGF19 subfamily proteins (FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23) are unique members of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) that regulate energy, bile acid, glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis in an endocrine fashion. Their activities require the presence of alpha or betaKlotho, two related single-pass transmembrane proteins, as co-receptors in relevant target tissues. We previously showed that FGF19 can bind to both alpha and betaKlotho, whereas FGF21 and FGF23 can bind only to either betaKlotho or alphaKlotho, respectively in vitro. To determine the mechanism regulating the binding and specificity among FGF19 subfamily members to Klotho family proteins, chimeric proteins between FGF19 subfamily members or chimeric proteins between Klotho family members were constructed to probe the interaction between those two families. Our results showed that a chimera of FGF19 with the FGF21 C-terminal tail interacts only with betaKlotho and a chimera with the FGF23 C-terminal tail interacts only with alphaKlotho. FGF signaling assays also reflected the change of specificity we observed for the chimeras. These results identified the C-terminal tail of FGF19 as a region necessary for its recognition of Klotho family proteins. In addition, chimeras between alpha and betaKlotho were also generated to probe the regions in Klotho proteins that are important for signaling by this FGF subfamily. Both FGF23 and FGF21 require intact alpha or betaKlotho for signaling, respectively, whereas FGF19 can signal through a Klotho chimera consisting of the N terminus of alphaKlotho and the C terminus of betaKlotho. Our results provide the first glimpse of the regions that regulate the binding specificity between this unique family of FGFs and their co-receptors.

  14. Immune Receptors and Co-receptors in Antiviral Innate Immunity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Bianca C.; Calil, Iara P.; Machado, João Paulo B.; Santos, Anésia A.; Fontes, Elizabeth P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Plants respond to pathogens using an innate immune system that is broadly divided into PTI (pathogen-associated molecular pattern- or PAMP-triggered immunity) and ETI (effector-triggered immunity). PTI is activated upon perception of PAMPs, conserved motifs derived from pathogens, by surface membrane-anchored pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). To overcome this first line of defense, pathogens release into plant cells effectors that inhibit PTI and activate effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS). Counteracting this virulence strategy, plant cells synthesize intracellular resistance (R) proteins, which specifically recognize pathogen effectors or avirulence (Avr) factors and activate ETI. These coevolving pathogen virulence strategies and plant resistance mechanisms illustrate evolutionary arms race between pathogen and host, which is integrated into the zigzag model of plant innate immunity. Although antiviral immune concepts have been initially excluded from the zigzag model, recent studies have provided several lines of evidence substantiating the notion that plants deploy the innate immune system to fight viruses in a manner similar to that used for non-viral pathogens. First, most R proteins against viruses so far characterized share structural similarity with antibacterial and antifungal R gene products and elicit typical ETI-based immune responses. Second, virus-derived PAMPs may activate PTI-like responses through immune co-receptors of plant PTI. Finally, and even more compelling, a viral Avr factor that triggers ETI in resistant genotypes has recently been shown to act as a suppressor of PTI, integrating plant viruses into the co-evolutionary model of host-pathogen interactions, the zigzag model. In this review, we summarize these important progresses, focusing on the potential significance of antiviral immune receptors and co-receptors in plant antiviral innate immunity. In light of the innate immune system, we also discuss a newly uncovered layer of

  15. Neuropilins are multifunctional coreceptors involved in tumor initiation, growth, metastasis and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Prud'homme, Gérald J.; Glinka, Yelena

    2012-01-01

    The neuropilins (Nrps) are multifunctional proteins involved in development, immunity and cancer. Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), or its homologue neuropilin-2 (Nrp2), are coreceptors that enhance responses to several growth factors (GFs) and other mediators. Nrps are coreceptors for the class 3 semaphorins (SEMA3), involved in axonal guidance, and several members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. However, recent findings reveal they have a much broader spectrum of activity. They bind transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and its receptors, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor (cMet), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), and integrins. Nrps also promote Hedgehog signaling. These ligands and pathways are all relevant to angiogenesis and wound healing. In the immune system, the Nrps are expressed primarily by dendritic cells (DCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), and exert mainly inhibitory effects. In cancer, Nrps have been linked to a poor prognosis, which is consistent with their numerous interactions with ligands and receptors that promote tumor progression. We hypothesize that Nrps boost responses by capturing ligands, regulating GF receptor expression, endocytosis and recycling, and possibly also by signaling independently. Importantly, they promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the survival of cancer stem cells. The recent finding that Nrps bind and internalize cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) with arginine/lysine-rich C-terminal motifs (C-end rule; e.g., RXXR) is of interest. These CPPs can be coupled to large drugs for cancer therapy. Almost all studies have been preclinical, but findings suggest Nrps are excellent targets for anti-cancer drug development. PMID:22948112

  16. A prospective study of haematological changes after switching from stavudine to zidovudine-based antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Hemal, Alok; Agarwal, Sheetal; Dubey, N K; Buxi, Gurdeep

    2016-11-01

    Long-term use of stavudine is associated with a high incidence of lipodystrophy, warranting its substitution with zidovudine in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. In a prospective observational study, we determined the spectrum and severity of haematological changes after switching from stavudine- to zidovudine-based ART in Indian children aged 2-18 years who had received a stavudine-based ART regimen for at least 48 weeks. They were followed for 48 weeks for changes in haematological parameters and CD4 cell counts after switching to zidovudine. Of the 60 children analysed, 45 (75%) showed a significant fall in Hb (>1 g/dl). A majority developed grade 1 anaemia (14 [31%]) while only three (6%) developed grade 4 anaemia. The lowest Hb was recorded between 12 and 16 weeks with spontaneous improvement noticed after 28 weeks. A significant drop in absolute neutrophil count (5067 cells/mm(3) to 3625 cells/mm(3); p = 0.004) was also observed but none developed severe neutropenia. No significant changes were observed in platelet and CD4 cell counts. Since the incidence of severe drug toxicity was low with zidovudine and the majority of children recovered without intervention, drug toxicity should not preclude its routine use in poor countries.

  17. Transmission of Multiple HIV-1 Subtype C Transmitted/founder Viruses into the Same Recipients Was not Determined by Modest Phenotypic Differences

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongshuo; Hora, Bhavna; Giorgi, Elena E.; Kumar, Amit; Cai, Fangping; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S.; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A severe bottleneck exists during HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, viral properties that determine HIV-1 transmissibility are not fully elucidated. We identified multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in six HIV-1-infected subjects by analyzing whole genome sequences. Comparison of biological phenotypes of different T/F viruses from the same individual allowed us to more precisely identify critical determinants for viral transmissibility since they were transmitted under similar conditions. All T/F viruses used coreceptor CCR5, while no T/F viruses used CXCR4 or GPR15. However, the efficiency for different T/F viruses from the same individual to use CCR5 was significantly variable, and the differences were even more significant for usage of coreceptors FPRL1, CCR3 and APJ. Resistance to IFN-α was also different between T/F viruses in 2 of 3 individuals. The relative fitness between T/F viruses from the same subject was highly variable (2–6%). Importantly, the levels of coreceptor usage efficiency, resistance to IFN-α and viral fitness were not associated with proportions of T/F viruses in each individual during acute infection. Our results show that the modest but significant differences in coreceptor usage efficiency, IFN-α sensitivity and viral fitness each alone may not play a critical role in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27909304

  18. 17β-estradiol protects primary macrophages against HIV infection through induction of interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Carley; Ding, Jian; Schmolke, Mirco; Rivera-Medina, Amariliz; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Chang, Theresa L

    2014-05-01

    Estrogen has been shown to increase resistance to HIV/SIV transmission by increasing the thickness of the genital epithelium. The immunological role of estrogen in HIV infection of primary target cells is less well characterized. We have found that primary macrophages are a target for anti-HIV activity of 17β-estradiol (E2). E2 did not affect surface expression of CD4 and HIV co-receptors nor HIV attachment to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). In addition, E2 treatment blocked infection by a co-receptor-independent HIV-1VSV-G pseudotyped virus. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of HIV reverse transcribed DNA products indicated that E2 blocked HIV reverse transcription. E2 upregulated gene expression of interferons (IFNs) in MDMs from multiple donors. However, induction of host restriction factors APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, or SAMHD1 was not consistent, with exception of APOBEC3A. Anti-HIV activity of E2 was abolished in the presence of IFN-α neutralizing antibody, and was absent in bone marrow-derived macrophages from IFN-α receptor deficient mice. Interestingly, HIV overcame E2-mediated HIV inhibition by suppressing induction of IFNs when MDMs were exposed to HIV before E2 treatment. These results offer a new mechanism of E2 on HIV inhibition. Future studies on the interplay between HIV and E2-mediated innate immune responses will likely provide insights relevant for development of effective strategies for HIV prevention.

  19. Selective transmission of R5 HIV-1 variants: where is the gatekeeper?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To enter target cells HIV-1 uses CD4 and a coreceptor. In vivo the coreceptor function is provided either by CCR5 (for R5) or CXCR4 (for X4 HIV-1). Although both R5 and X4 HIV-1 variants are present in body fluids (semen, blood, cervicovaginal and rectal secretions), R5 HIV-1 appears to transmit infection and dominates early stages of HIV disease. Moreover, recent sequence analysis of virus in acute infection shows that, in the majority of cases of transmission, infection is initiated by a single virus. Therefore, the existence of a “gatekeeper” that selects R5 over X4 HIV-1 and that operates among R5 HIV-1 variants has been suggested. In the present review we consider various routes of HIV-transmission and discuss potential gatekeeping mechanisms associated with each of these routes. Although many mechanisms have been identified none of them explains the almost perfect selection of R5 over X4 in HIV-1 transmission. We suggest that instead of one strong gatekeeper there are multiple functional gatekeepers and that their superimposition is sufficient to protect against X4 HIV-1 infection and potentially select among R5 HIV-1 variants. In conclusion, we propose that the principle of multiple barriers is more general and not restricted to protection against X4 HIV-1 but rather can be applied to other phenomena when one factor has a selective advantage over the other(s). In the case of gatekeepers for HIV-1 transmission, the task is to identify them and to decipher their molecular mechanisms. Knowledge of the gatekeepers‘ localization and function may enable us to enhance existing barriers against R5 transmission and to erect the new ones against all HIV-1 variants. PMID:21284905

  20. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  1. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  2. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1985-01-18

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  3. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Viral Determinants of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are important target cells for HIV-1 infection that play significant roles in the maintenance of viral reservoirs and other aspects of pathogenesis. Understanding the determinants of HIV-1 tropism for macrophages will inform HIV-1 control and eradication strategies. Tropism for macrophages is both qualitative (infection or not) and quantitative (replication capacity). For example many R5 HIV-1 isolates cannot infect macrophages, but for those that can the macrophage replication capacity can vary by up to 1000-fold. Some X4 viruses are also capable of replication in macrophages, indicating that cellular tropism is partially independent of co-receptor preference. Preliminary data obtained with a small number of transmitted/founder viruses indicate inefficient macrophage infection, whereas isolates from later in disease are more frequently tropic for macrophages. Thus tropism may evolve over time, and more macrophage tropic viruses may be implicated in the pathogenesis of advanced HIV-1 infection. Compartmentalization of macrophage-tropic brain-derived envelope glycoproteins (Envs), and non-macrophage tropic non-neural tissue-derived Envs points to adaptation of HIV-1 quasi-species in distinct tissue microenvironments. Mutations within and adjacent to the Env-CD4 binding site have been identified that determine macrophage tropism at the entry level, but post-entry molecular determinants of macrophage replication capacity involving HIV-1 accessory proteins need further definition. PMID:22163344

  5. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  6. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  7. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  8. Switched power workshop. [Switched power electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a switched power electron gun. Particular topics discussed are: vacuum photodiode switch; laser switched solid state diodes; gun performance; charging supply; and laser requirements. (LSP)

  9. T-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Derived V3 Loop Peptides Directly Bind to CXCR-4 and Inhibit T-Tropic HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakaida, Hitoshi; Hori, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Akihito; Sato, Akihiko; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshie, Osamu; Hattori, Toshio; Uchiyama, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Certain types of chemokine receptors have been identified as coreceptors for HIV-1 infection. The process of viral entry is initiated by the interaction between an envelope protein gp120 of HIV-1, CD4, and one of the relevant coreceptors. To understand the precise mechanism of the Env-mediated fusion and entry of HIV-1, we examined whether the V3 region of gp120 of T-cell line tropic (T-tropic) virus directly interacts with the coreceptor, CXCR-4, by using five synthetic V3 peptides: two cyclized V3 peptides (V3-BH10 and V3-ELI) which correspond to the V3 regions of the T-tropic HIV-1 IIIB and HIV-1 ELI strains, respectively, a linear V3 peptide (CTR36) corresponding to that of HIV-1 IIIB strain; and cyclized V3 peptides corresponding to that of the macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 ADA strain (V3-ADA) or the dualtropic HIV-1 89.6 strain (V3-89.6). FACScan analysis with a CXCR-4+ human B-cell line, JY, showed that V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6 but not CTR36 or V3-ADA blocked the binding of IVR7, an anti-CXCR-4 monoclonal antibody (MAb), to CXCR-4 with different magnitudes in a dose-dependent manner, while none of the V3 peptides influenced binding of an anti-CD19 MAb at all. Next, the effects of the V3 peptides on SDF-1β-induced transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ were investigated. Three V3 peptides (V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6) prevented Ca2+ mobilization. Furthermore, the three peptides inhibited infection by T-tropic HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by an MTT assay and a reverse transcriptase assay, while the other peptides had no effects. These results present direct evidence that the V3 loop of gp120 of T-tropic HIV-1 can interact with its coreceptor CXCR-4 independently of the V1/V2 regions of gp120 or cellular CD4. PMID:9811711

  10. Host and Viral Factors in HIV-Mediated Bystander Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections lead to a progressive loss of CD4 T cells primarily via the process of apoptosis. With a limited number of infected cells and vastly disproportionate apoptosis in HIV infected patients, it is believed that apoptosis of uninfected bystander cells plays a significant role in this process. Disease progression in HIV infected individuals is highly variable suggesting that both host and viral factors may influence HIV mediated apoptosis. Amongst the viral factors, the role of Envelope (Env) glycoprotein in bystander apoptosis is well documented. Recent evidence on the variability in apoptosis induction by primary patient derived Envs underscores the role of Env glycoprotein in HIV disease. Amongst the host factors, the role of C-C Chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5), a coreceptor for HIV Env, is also becoming increasingly evident. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene and promoter affect CCR5 cell surface expression and correlate with both apoptosis and CD4 loss. Finally, chronic immune activation in HIV infections induces multiple defects in the immune system and has recently been shown to accelerate HIV Env mediated CD4 apoptosis. Consequently, those factors that affect CCR5 expression and/or immune activation in turn indirectly regulate HIV mediated apoptosis making this phenomenon both complex and multifactorial. This review explores the complex role of various host and viral factors in determining HIV mediated bystander apoptosis. PMID:28829402

  11. Clinical Applications of Genome Editing to HIV Cure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cathy X; Cannon, Paula M

    2016-12-01

    Despite significant advances in HIV drug treatment regimens, which grant near-normal life expectancies to infected individuals who have good virological control, HIV infection itself remains incurable. In recent years, novel gene- and cell-based therapies have gained increasing attention due to their potential to provide a functional or even sterilizing cure for HIV infection with a one-shot treatment. A functional cure would keep the infection in check and prevent progression to AIDS, while a sterilizing cure would eradicate all HIV viruses from the patient. Genome editing is the most precise form of gene therapy, able to achieve permanent genetic disruption, modification, or insertion at a predesignated genetic locus. The most well-studied candidate for anti-HIV genome editing is CCR5, an essential coreceptor for the majority of HIV strains, and the lack of which confers HIV resistance in naturally occurring homozygous individuals. Genetic disruption of CCR5 to treat HIV has undergone clinical testing, with seven completed or ongoing trials in T cells and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and has shown promising safety and potential efficacy profiles. Here we summarize clinical findings of CCR5 editing for HIV therapy, as well as other genome editing-based approaches under pre-clinical development. The anticipated development of more sophisticated genome editing technologies should continue to benefit HIV cure efforts.

  12. EGF-CFC proteins are essential coreceptors for the TGF-beta signals Vg1 and GDF1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Simon K; Olale, Felix; Bennett, James T; Brivanlou, Ali H; Schier, Alexander F

    2003-01-01

    The TGF-beta signals Nodal, Activin, GDF1, and Vg1 have been implicated in mesoderm induction and left-right patterning. Nodal and Activin both activate Activin receptors, but only Nodal requires EGF-CFC coreceptors for signaling. We report that Vg1 and GDF1 signaling in zebrafish also depends on EGF-CFC proteins, but not on Nodal signals. Correspondingly, we find that in Xenopus Vg1 and GDF1 bind to and signal through Activin receptors only in the presence of EGF-CFC proteins. These results establish that multiple TGF-beta signals converge on Activin receptor/EGF-CFC complexes and suggest a more widespread requirement for coreceptors in TGF-beta signaling than anticipated previously.

  13. EGF-CFC proteins are essential coreceptors for the TGF-β signals Vg1 and GDF1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Simon K.; Olale, Felix; Bennett, James T.; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Schier, Alexander F.

    2003-01-01

    The TGF-β signals Nodal, Activin, GDF1, and Vg1 have been implicated in mesoderm induction and left-right patterning. Nodal and Activin both activate Activin receptors, but only Nodal requires EGF-CFC coreceptors for signaling. We report that Vg1 and GDF1 signaling in zebrafish also depends on EGF-CFC proteins, but not on Nodal signals. Correspondingly, we find that in Xenopus Vg1 and GDF1 bind to and signal through Activin receptors only in the presence of EGF-CFC proteins. These results establish that multiple TGF-β signals converge on Activin receptor/EGF-CFC complexes and suggest a more widespread requirement for coreceptors in TGF-β signaling than anticipated previously. PMID:12514096

  14. Visualizing High-Efficiency HIV Transfer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the causative agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), infects and eventually kills CD4 receptor-expressing T cells, which are critical for proper immune system function. The gp120 protein on the surface of HIV particles is known to bind CD4 and a co-receptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4, leading to fusion of the virus and T cell membranes and infection of the cell. The most efficient means of viral infection occurs when an uninfected T cell interacts with a dendritic cell (DC) that has previously come in contact with HIV. Antigen presenting cells, such as DCs, normally circulate throughout the body binding or engulfing foreign material and presenting it to T cells to initiate an immune response. HIV takes advantage of this close cell-cell association to propagate, so knowing the cells’ spatial arrangement during viral transmission could elucidate novel modes of treatment.

  15. [Analysis of genetic recombination between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Kazushi

    2009-03-01

    It is estimated that one million people are dually infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-I (HIV-1) and type-II (HIV-2) in West Africa and parts of India. HIV-1 and HIV-2 use the same receptor and coreceptors for entry into cells, and thus target the same cell populations in the host. Additionally, we first examined whether RNAs from HIV-1 and HIV-2 can be copackaged into the same virion. Therefore these properties suggest that in the dually infected population, it is likely that some cells can be infected by both HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby providing opportunities for these two viruses to interact with each other. We constructed recombination assay system for measurement recombination frequencies and analyzed recombination rate between HIV-1 and HIV-2. We used modified near-full-length viruses that each contained a green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) with a different inactivating mutation. Thus, a functional gfp could be reconstituted via recombination, which was used to detect copackaging of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNAs. In this study, approximately 0.2% of infection events generated the GFP phenotype. Therefore, the appearance of the GFP+ phenotype in the current system is approximately 35-fold lower than that between two homologous HIV-1 or HIV-2 viruses. We then mapped the general structures of the recombinant viruses and characterized the recombination junctions by DNA sequencing. We observed several different recombination patterns including those only had crossovers in gfp. The most common hybrid genomes had heterologous LTRs. Although infrequent, crossovers were also identified in the viral sequences. Such chimeric HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses have yet to be observed in the infected population. It is unclear whether the lack of observed chimeras is due to the divergence between HIV-1 and HIV-2 being too great for such an event to occur, or whether such events could occur but have not yet been observed. Given the number of coinfected people, the potential for

  16. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infection with a RANTES-IgG3 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Challita-Eid, P M; Klimatcheva, E; Day, B T; Evans, T; Dreyer, K; Rimel, B J; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1998-12-20

    The natural ligands for the chemokine receptors CCR5 (RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta) and CXCR4 (SDF-1) can act as potent inhibitors of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at the level of viral entry. Unlike antibody-mediated inhibition, chemokine-mediated inhibition is broadly effective. Different HIV-1 strains can utilize the same coreceptor(s) for viral entry and, therefore, can be blocked by the same chemokine(s). HIV-1 strains that are highly resistant to neutralization by V3-specific antibodies are sensitive to inhibition by chemokines. Therefore, the use of chemokine-derived molecules constitutes a potential therapeutic approach to prevent infection by HIV-1. We have generated a fusion protein between RANTES and human IgG3 (RANTES-IgG3). The effectiveness of RANTES-IgG3 inhibition of infection by HIV-1 was similar to that of rRANTES. Inhibition of HIV-1 by RANTES-IgG3 was specific for CCR5-dependent but not CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 isolates. Fusion of a chemokine to an IgG moiety offers two desirable properties with respect to the recombinant chemokine alone. First, IgG fusion proteins have extended half-lives in vivo. Second, molecules with IgG heavy chain moieties may be able to cross the placenta and potentially induce fetal protection.

  17. Anti-coreceptor antibodies profoundly affect staining with peptide-MHC class I and class II tetramers.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Scriba, Thomas J; Milicic, Anita; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Phillips, Rodney E; Sewell, Andrew K

    2006-07-01

    The T cell coreceptors CD8 and CD4 bind to invariable regions of peptide-MHC class I (pMHCI) and class II (pMHCII) molecules, respectively, and facilitate antigen recognition by a number of mechanisms. It is established that some antibodies (Ab) specific for the CD8 molecule, which stabilizes TCR/pMHCI interactions, can alter the binding of pMHCI tetramers to cell surface TCR. In contrast, the extremely weak pMHCII/CD4 interaction does not stabilize TCR/pMHCII interactions or contribute to cognate tetramer binding; consequently, it is assumed that anti-CD4 Ab do not affect pMHCII binding. Here, we used a panel of point-mutated HLA A2 molecules with a range of affinities for CD8 spanning over three orders of magnitude to demonstrate that anti-CD8 Ab-mediated inhibition of pMHCI tetramer binding and cognate T cell activation correlates directly with the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction. Further, some anti-CD4 Ab were found to block pMHCII tetramer binding; these effects were also paralleled in T cell activation assays. In sum, these data challenge the assertion that anti-coreceptor Ab exert their effects on T cell activation and pMHC binding solely by blocking pMHC/coreceptor interactions.

  18. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Containing a Glypican 5 Core and 2-O-Sulfo-iduronic Acid Function as Sonic Hedgehog Co-receptors to Promote Proliferation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Rochelle M.; Hecht, Marie-Lyn; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Cohen, Samuel M.; Noti, Christian; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Fuller, Maria; Chan, Jennifer A.; Hopwood, John J.; Seeberger, Peter H.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is crucial for growth, cell fate determination, and axonal guidance in the developing nervous system. Although the receptors Patched (Ptch1) and Smoothened (Smo) are required for Shh signaling, a number of distinct co-receptors contribute to these critical responses to Shh. Several membrane-embedded proteins such as Boc, Cdo, and Gas1 bind Shh and promote signaling. In addition, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have also been implicated in the initiation of Shh responses. However, the attributes of HSPGs that function as co-receptors for Shh have not yet been defined. Here, we identify HSPGs containing a glypican 5 core protein and 2-O-sulfo-iduronic acid residues at the nonreducing ends of the glycans as co-receptors for Shh. These HSPG co-receptors are expressed by cerebellar granule cell precursors and promote Shh binding and signaling. At the subcellular level, these HSPG co-receptors are located adjacent to the primary cilia that act as Shh signaling organelles. Thus, Shh binds to HSPG co-receptors containing a glypican 5 core and 2-O-sulfo-iduronic acid to promote neural precursor proliferation. PMID:23867465

  19. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans containing a glypican 5 core and 2-O-sulfo-iduronic acid function as Sonic Hedgehog co-receptors to promote proliferation.

    PubMed

    Witt, Rochelle M; Hecht, Marie-Lyn; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Cohen, Samuel M; Noti, Christian; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Fuller, Maria; Chan, Jennifer A; Hopwood, John J; Seeberger, Peter H; Segal, Rosalind A

    2013-09-06

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is crucial for growth, cell fate determination, and axonal guidance in the developing nervous system. Although the receptors Patched (Ptch1) and Smoothened (Smo) are required for Shh signaling, a number of distinct co-receptors contribute to these critical responses to Shh. Several membrane-embedded proteins such as Boc, Cdo, and Gas1 bind Shh and promote signaling. In addition, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have also been implicated in the initiation of Shh responses. However, the attributes of HSPGs that function as co-receptors for Shh have not yet been defined. Here, we identify HSPGs containing a glypican 5 core protein and 2-O-sulfo-iduronic acid residues at the nonreducing ends of the glycans as co-receptors for Shh. These HSPG co-receptors are expressed by cerebellar granule cell precursors and promote Shh binding and signaling. At the subcellular level, these HSPG co-receptors are located adjacent to the primary cilia that act as Shh signaling organelles. Thus, Shh binds to HSPG co-receptors containing a glypican 5 core and 2-O-sulfo-iduronic acid to promote neural precursor proliferation.

  20. MIF allele-dependent regulation of the MIF coreceptor CD44 and role in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Ah; Leng, Lin; Kim, Bum-Joon; Du, Xin; Tilstam, Pathricia V; Kim, Kyung Hee; Kong, Jin-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Liu, Aihua; Wang, Tian; Song, Yan; Sauler, Maor; Bernhagen, Jurgen; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Lee, Patty; Cho, Chul-Soo; Kim, Wan-Uk; Bucala, Richard

    2016-12-06

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes mediate joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis and exhibit sustained proinflammatory and invasive properties. CD44 is a polymorphic transmembrane protein with defined roles in matrix interaction and tumor invasion that is also a signaling coreceptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which engages cell surface CD74. High-expression MIF alleles (rs5844572) are associated with rheumatoid joint erosion, but whether MIF signaling through the CD74/CD44 receptor complex promotes upstream autoimmune responses or contributes directly to synovial joint destruction is unknown. We report here the functional regulation of CD44 by an autocrine pathway in synovial fibroblasts that is driven by high-expression MIF alleles to up-regulate an inflammatory and invasive phenotype. MIF increases CD44 expression, promotes its recruitment into a functional signal transduction complex, and stimulates alternative exon splicing, leading to expression of the CD44v3-v6 isoforms associated with oncogenic invasion. CD44 recruitment into the MIF receptor complex, downstream MAPK and RhoA signaling, and invasive phenotype require MIF and CD74 and are reduced by MIF pathway antagonists. These data support a functional role for high-MIF expression alleles and the two-component CD74/CD44 MIF receptor in rheumatoid arthritis and suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of this pathway may offer a specific means to interfere with progressive joint destruction.

  1. Utilization of sialic acid as a coreceptor is required for reovirus-induced biliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Erik S.; Youree, Bryan E.; Ebert, Daniel H.; Forrest, J. Craig; Connolly, Jodi L.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Washington, Kay; Wetzel, J. Denise; Dermody, Terence S.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of neonatal mice with some reovirus strains produces a disease similar to infantile biliary atresia, but previous attempts to correlate reovirus infection with this disease have yielded conflicting results. We used isogenic reovirus strains T3SA– and T3SA+, which differ solely in the capacity to bind sialic acid as a coreceptor, to define the role of sialic acid in reovirus encephalitis and biliary tract infection in mice. Growth in the intestine was equivalent for both strains following peroral inoculation. However, T3SA+ spread more rapidly from the intestine to distant sites and replicated to higher titers in spleen, liver, and brain. Strikingly, mice infected with T3SA+ but not T3SA– developed steatorrhea and bilirubinemia. Liver tissue from mice infected with T3SA+ demonstrated intense inflammation focused at intrahepatic bile ducts, pathology analogous to that found in biliary atresia in humans, and high levels of T3SA+ antigen in bile duct epithelial cells. T3SA+ bound 100-fold more efficiently than T3SA– to human cholangiocarcinoma cells. These observations suggest that the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a virus can dramatically alter disease in the host and highlight the need for epidemiologic studies focusing on infection by sialic acid–binding reovirus strains as a possible contributor to the pathogenesis of neonatal biliary atresia. PMID:12813018

  2. Role of HER2/HER3 co-receptor in breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Way, Tzong-Der; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2005-12-01

    ErbB receptors are essential mediators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Their aberrant activation is associated with the development and severity of many cancers. Homo- and heterodimerization of ErbB receptors result in a wide variety of cellular signal transduction. Dimerization of human epidermal growth-factor receptor (HER)2 and HER3 occurs frequently and is a preferred heterodimer. The HER2/HER3 dimer constitutes a high affinity co-receptor for heregulin, which is capable of potent mitogenic signaling. HER3 is a kinase-defective protein that is phosphorylated by HER2. Tyrosine phosphorylated HER3 is able to directly couple to phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase, a lipid kinase involved in the proliferation, survival, adhesion and motility of tumor cells. The authors' research provides mechanistic evidence that apigenin induces apoptosis by depleting the HER2 protein and, in turn, suppressing the signaling of the HER2/HER3-phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. This indicates that inhibition of HER2/HER3 heterodimer function may be an especially effective and unique strategy for blocking the HER2-mediated carcinogenesis of breast cancer cells.

  3. Jasmonate perception by inositol-phosphate-potentiated COI1-JAZ co-receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, Laura B; Tan, Xu; Mao, Haibin; Withers, John; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Hinds, Thomas R; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Sharon, Michal; Browse, John; He, Sheng Yang; Rizo, Josep; Howe, Gregg A; Zheng, Ning

    2011-11-07

    Jasmonates are a family of plant hormones that regulate plant growth, development and responses to stress. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) mediates jasmonate signalling by promoting hormone-dependent ubiquitylation and degradation of transcriptional repressor JAZ proteins. Despite its importance, the mechanism of jasmonate perception remains unclear. Here we present structural and pharmacological data to show that the true Arabidopsis jasmonate receptor is a complex of both COI1 and JAZ. COI1 contains an open pocket that recognizes the bioactive hormone (3R,7S)-jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) with high specificity. High-affinity hormone binding requires a bipartite JAZ degron sequence consisting of a conserved {alpha}-helix for COI1 docking and a loop region to trap the hormone in its binding pocket. In addition, we identify a third critical component of the jasmonate co-receptor complex, inositol pentakisphosphate, which interacts with both COI1 and JAZ adjacent to the ligand. Our results unravel the mechanism of jasmonate perception and highlight the ability of F-box proteins to evolve as multi-component signalling hubs.

  4. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memory T cells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies.

  5. Ubiquitin-dependent folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Perrody, Elsa; Abrami, Laurence; Feldman, Michal; Kunz, Beatrice; Urbé, Sylvie; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-01-01

    Many membrane proteins fold inefficiently and require the help of enzymes and chaperones. Here we reveal a novel folding assistance system that operates on membrane proteins from the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6 is promoted by ubiquitination of a specific lysine, retaining it in the ER while avoiding degradation. Subsequent ER exit requires removal of ubiquitin from this lysine by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP19. This ubiquitination-deubiquitination is conceptually reminiscent of the glucosylation-deglucosylation occurring in the ER lumen during the calnexin/calreticulin folding cycle. To avoid infinite futile cycles, folded LRP6 molecules undergo palmitoylation and ER export, while unsuccessfully folded proteins are, with time, polyubiquitinated on other lysines and targeted to degradation. This ubiquitin-dependent folding system also controls the proteostasis of other membrane proteins as CFTR and anthrax toxin receptor 2, two poor folders involved in severe human diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19083.001 PMID:27751231

  6. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  7. Wnt Isoform-Specific Interactions with Coreceptor Specify Inhibition or Potentiation of Signaling by LRP6 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yan; Bourhis, Eric; Chiu, Cecilia; Stawicki, Scott; DeAlmeida, Venita I.; Liu, Bob Y.; Phamluong, Khanhky; Cao, Tim C.; Carano, Richard A. D.; Ernst, James A.; Solloway, Mark; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Hannoush, Rami N.; Wu, Yan; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike

    2010-01-01

    β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is initiated as Wnt binds to both the receptor FZD and coreceptor LRP5/6, which then assembles a multimeric complex at the cytoplasmic membrane face to recruit and inactivate the kinase GSK3. The large number and sequence diversity of Wnt isoforms suggest the possibility of domain-specific ligand-coreceptor interactions, and distinct binding sites on LRP6 for Wnt3a and Wnt9b have recently been identified in vitro. Whether mechanistically different interactions between Wnts and coreceptors might mediate signaling remains to be determined. It is also not clear whether coreceptor homodimerization induced extracellularly can activate Wnt signaling, as is the case for receptor tyrosine kinases. We generated monoclonal antibodies against LRP6 with the unexpected ability to inhibit signaling by some Wnt isoforms and potentiate signaling by other isoforms. In cell culture, two antibodies characterized further show reciprocal activities on most Wnts, with one antibody antagonizing and the other potentiating. We demonstrate that these antibodies bind to different regions of LRP6 protein, and inhibition of signaling results from blocking Wnt binding. Antibody-mediated dimerization of LRP6 can potentiate signaling only when a Wnt isoform is also able to bind the complex, presumably recruiting FZD. Endogenous autocrine Wnt signaling in different tumor cell lines can be either antagonized or enhanced by the LRP6 antibodies, indicating expression of different Wnt isoforms. As anticipated from the roles of Wnt signaling in cancer and bone development, antibody activities can also be observed in mice for inhibition of tumor growth and in organ culture for enhancement of bone mineral density. Collectively, our results indicate that separate binding sites for different subsets of Wnt isoforms determine the inhibition or potentiation of signaling conferred by LRP6 antibodies. This complexity of coreceptor-ligand interactions may allow for

  8. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  9. Contribution of Intrinsic Reactivity of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins to CD4-Independent Infection and Global Inhibitor Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Haim, Hillel; Strack, Bettina; Kassa, Aemro; Madani, Navid; Wang, Liping; Courter, Joel R.; Princiotto, Amy; McGee, Kathleen; Pacheco, Beatriz; Seaman, Michael S.; Smith, Amos B.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) enters cells following sequential activation of the high-potential-energy viral envelope glycoprotein trimer by target cell CD4 and coreceptor. HIV-1 variants differ in their requirements for CD4; viruses that can infect coreceptor-expressing cells that lack CD4 have been generated in the laboratory. These CD4-independent HIV-1 variants are sensitive to neutralization by multiple antibodies that recognize different envelope glycoprotein epitopes. The mechanisms underlying CD4 independence, global sensitivity to neutralization and the association between them are still unclear. By studying HIV-1 variants that differ in requirements for CD4, we investigated the contribution of CD4 binding to virus entry. CD4 engagement exposes the coreceptor-binding site and increases the “intrinsic reactivity” of the envelope glycoproteins; intrinsic reactivity describes the propensity of the envelope glycoproteins to negotiate transitions to lower-energy states upon stimulation. Coreceptor-binding site exposure and increased intrinsic reactivity promote formation/exposure of the HR1 coiled coil on the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein and allow virus entry upon coreceptor binding. Intrinsic reactivity also dictates the global sensitivity of HIV-1 to perturbations such as exposure to cold and the binding of antibodies and small molecules. Accordingly, CD4 independence of HIV-1 was accompanied by increased susceptibility to inactivation by these factors. We investigated the role of intrinsic reactivity in determining the sensitivity of primary HIV-1 isolates to inhibition. Relative to the more common neutralization-resistant (“Tier 2-like”) viruses, globally sensitive (“Tier 1”) viruses exhibited increased intrinsic reactivity, i.e., were inactivated more efficiently by cold exposure or by a given level of antibody binding to the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Virus sensitivity to neutralization was dictated both by the efficiency of

  10. The Odorant Receptor Co-Receptor from the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Rodriguez, Stacy D.; Drake, Lisa L.; Price, David P.; Blakely, Brittny N.; Hammond, John I.; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Monroy, Erika Y.; Maio, William A.; Romero, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs’ antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs) associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco). Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers. PMID:25411789

  11. The odorant receptor co-receptor from the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Immo A; Rodriguez, Stacy D; Drake, Lisa L; Price, David P; Blakely, Brittny N; Hammond, John I; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Monroy, Erika Y; Maio, William A; Romero, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs' antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs) associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco). Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers.

  12. Trace amines inhibit insect odorant receptor function through antagonism of the co-receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Many insect behaviors are driven by olfaction, making insect olfactory receptors (ORs) appealing targets for insect control.  Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, with each receptor thought to be composed of a representative from a large, variable family of odorant binding subunits and a highly conserved co-receptor subunit (Orco), assembled in an unknown stoichiometry.  Synthetic Orco directed agonists and antagonists have recently been identified.  Several Orco antagonists have been shown to act via an allosteric mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants.  The high degree of conservation of Orco across insect species results in Orco antagonists having broad activity at ORs from a variety of insect species and suggests that the binding site for Orco ligands may serve as a modulatory site for compounds endogenous to insects or may be a target of exogenous compounds, such as those produced by plants.  To test this idea, we screened a series of biogenic and trace amines, identifying several as Orco antagonists.  Of particular interest were tryptamine, a plant-produced amine, and tyramine, an amine endogenous to the insect nervous system.  Tryptamine was found to be a potent antagonist of Orco, able to block Orco activation by an Orco agonist and to allosterically inhibit activation of ORs by odorants.  Tyramine had effects similar to those of tryptamine, but was less potent.  Importantly, both tryptamine and tyramine displayed broad activity, inhibiting odorant activation of ORs of species from three different insect orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera), as well as odorant activation of six diverse ORs from a single species (the human malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae).  Our results suggest that endogenous and exogenous natural compounds serve as Orco ligands modulating insect olfaction and that Orco can be an important target for the development of novel insect repellants. PMID:25075297

  13. The phosphatidylserine receptor TIM4 utilizes integrins as coreceptors to effect phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Flannagan, Ronald S.; Canton, Johnathan; Furuya, Wendy; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM4), a phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-binding receptor, mediates the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. How TIM4 exerts its function is unclear, and conflicting data have emerged. To define the mode of action of TIM4, we used two distinct but complementary approaches: 1) we compared bone marrow–derived macrophages from wild-type and TIM4−/− mice, and 2) we heterologously expressed TIM4 in epithelioid AD293 cells, which rendered them competent for engulfment of PtdSer-bearing targets. Using these systems, we demonstrate that rather than serving merely as a tether, as proposed earlier by others, TIM4 is an active participant in the phagocytic process. Furthermore, we find that TIM4 operates independently of lactadherin, which had been proposed to act as a bridging molecule. Of interest, TIM4-driven phagocytosis depends on the activation of integrins and involves stimulation of Src-family kinases and focal adhesion kinase, as well as the localized accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate. These mediators promote recruitment of the nucleotide-exchange factor Vav3, which in turn activates small Rho-family GTPases. Gene silencing or ablation experiments demonstrated that RhoA, Rac1, and Rac2 act synergistically to drive the remodeling of actin that underlies phagocytosis. Single-particle detection experiments demonstrated that TIM4 and β1 integrins associate upon receptor clustering. These findings support a model in which TIM4 engages integrins as coreceptors to evoke the signal transduction needed to internalize PtdSer-bearing targets such as apoptotic cells. PMID:24623723

  14. Identification of New Agonists and Antagonists of the Insect Odorant Receptor Co-Receptor Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insects detect attractive and aversive chemicals using several families of chemosensory receptors, including the OR family of olfactory receptors, making these receptors appealing targets for the control of insects. Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, comprised of at least one common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco) and at least one variable odorant specificity subunit. Each of the many ORs of an insect species is activated or inhibited by an unique set of odorants that interact with the variable odorant specificity subunits, making the development of OR directed insect control agents complex and laborious. However, several N-,2-substituted triazolothioacetamide compounds (VUAA1, VU0450667 and VU0183254) were recently shown to act directly on the highly conserved Orco subunit, suggesting that broadly active compounds can be developed. We have explored the chemical space around the VUAA1 structure in order to identify new Orco ligands. Principal Findings We screened ORs from several insect species, using heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and an electrophysiological assay, with a panel of 22 compounds structurally related to VUAA1. By varying the nitrogen position in the pyridine ring and altering the moieties decorating the phenyl ring, we identified two new agonists and a series of competitive antagonists. Screening smaller compounds, similar to portions of the VUAA1 structure, also yielded competitive antagonists. Importantly, we show that Orco antagonists inhibit odorant activation of ORs from several insect species. Detailed examination of one antagonist demonstrated inhibition to be through a non-competitive mechanism. Conclusions A similar pattern of agonist and antagonist sensitivity displayed by Orco subunits from different species suggests a highly conserved binding site structure. The susceptibility to inhibition of odorant activation by Orco antagonism is conserved across disparate insect species

  15. Identification of a Putative Coreceptor on Vero Cells That Participates in Dengue 4 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barragán, José de Jesús; del Angel, Rosa M.

    2001-01-01

    Dengue virus infects target cells by attaching to a cell surface receptor through the envelope (E) glycoprotein, located on the surface of the viral membrane. On Vero and BHK cells, heparan sulfate (HS) moieties of proteoglycans are the receptors for dengue virus; however, additional proteins have also been described as putative dengue virus receptors on C6/36, HL60, and BM cells. HS can also act as a receptor for other types of viruses or as an attachment molecule for viruses that require additional host cell molecules to allow viral penetration. In this study we searched for molecules other than HS that could participate in dengue virus infection of Vero cells. Labeled dengue 4 virus bound with high affinity to two molecules of 74 and 44 kDa. Binding of dengue virus to the 74-kDa molecule was susceptible to protease and sodium periodate treatment and resistant to heparinase treatments. Lectins such as concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin prevented dengue virus binding to both the 74- and the 44-kDa protein in overlay assays, while phytohemagglutinin P did not affect binding, suggesting that carbohydrate residues (α-mannose or N-acetylglucosamine) are important in virus binding to host cells. Protease susceptibility, biotin labeling, and immunofluorescence with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 74-kDa protein consistently identified the protein on the surfaces of Vero cells. Moreover, the antibody against the 74-kDa protein was able to inhibit dengue virus infection. These data suggest that HS might serve as a primary receptor, probably concentrating virus particles on the surfaces of Vero cells, and then other molecules, such as the 74-kDa protein, might participate as coreceptors in viral penetration. The 74-kDa protein possibly constitutes part of a putative receptor complex for dengue virus infection of Vero cells. PMID:11483725

  16. Frequent CXCR4 tropism of HIV-1 subtype A and CRF02_AG during late-stage disease - indication of an evolving epidemic in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is one of the fastest evolving pathogens, and is distinguished by geographic and genetic variants that have been classified into different subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Early in infection the primary coreceptor is CCR5, but during disease course CXCR4-using HIV-1 populations may emerge. This has been correlated with accelerated disease progression in HIV-1 subtype B. Basic knowledge of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism is important due to the recent introduction of coreceptor antagonists in antiretroviral therapy, and subtype-specific differences regarding how frequently HIV-1 CXCR4-using populations appear in late-stage disease need to be further investigated. To study how frequently CXCR4-using populations appear in late-stage disease among HIV-1 subtype A and CRF02_AG, we evaluated the accuracy of a recombinant virus phenotypic assay for these subtypes, and used it to determine the HIV-1 coreceptor tropism of plasma samples collected during late-stage disease in Guinea-Bissau. We also performed a genotypic analysis and investigated subtype-specific differences in the appearance of CXCR4 tropism late in disease. Results We found that the recombinant virus phenotypic assay accurately predicted HIV-1 coreceptor tropism of subtype A and CRF02_AG. Over the study period (1997-2007), we found an increasing and generally high frequency of CXCR4 tropism (86%) in CRF02_AG. By sequence analysis of the V3 region of our samples we developed a novel genotypic rule for predicting CXCR4 tropism in CRF02_AG, based on the combined criteria of the total number of charged amino acids and net charge. This rule had higher sensitivity than previously described genotypic rules and may be useful for development of future genotypic tools for this CRF. Finally, we conducted a literature analysis, combining data of 498 individuals in late-stage disease, and found high amounts of CXCR4 tropism for all major HIV-1 subtypes (60-77%), except for subtype C (15

  17. Severe anaemia is not associated with HIV-1 env gene characteristics in Malawian children

    PubMed Central

    Calis, Job CJ; Rotteveel, Hellen P; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Kachala, David; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele; Cornelissen, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Background Anaemia is the most common haematological complication of HIV and associated with a high morbidity and a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated anaemia is poorly understood and may include a direct effect of HIV on erythropoiesis. In vitro studies have suggested that specific HIV strains, like X4 that uses the CXCR4 co-receptor present on erythroid precursors, are associated with diminished erythropoiesis. This co-receptor affinity is determined by changes in the hypervariable loop of the HIV-1 envelope genome. In a previous case-control study we observed an association between HIV and severe anaemia in Malawian children that could not be fully explained by secondary infections and micronutrient deficiencies alone. We therefore explored the possibility that alterations in the V1-V2-V3 fragment of HIV-1 were associated with severe anaemia. Methods Using peripheral blood nucleic acid isolates of HIV-infected children identified in the previous studied we assessed if variability of the V1-V2-V3 region of HIV and the occurrence of X4 strains were more common in HIV-infected children with (cases, n = 29) and without severe anaemia (controls, n = 30). For 15 cases bone marrow isolates were available to compare against peripheral blood. All children were followed for 18 months after recruitment. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed that HIV-1 subtype C was present in all but one child. All V1-V2-V3 characteristics tested: V3 charge, V1-V2 length and potential glycosylation sites, were not found to be different between cases and controls. Using a computer model (C-PSSM) four children (7.8%) were identified to have an X4 strain. This prevalence was not different between study groups (p = 1.00). The V3 loop characteristics for bone marrow and peripheral blood isolates in the case group were identical. None of the children identified as having an X4 strain developed a (new) episode of severe anaemia during follow up. Conclusion The prevalence of X4

  18. Magnetic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.; Cook, E.; Hawkins, S.; Poor, S.; Reginato, L.; Schmidt, J.; Smith, M.

    1983-06-01

    The paper discusses the development program in magnetic switching which was aimed at solving the rep-rate and reliability limitations of the ATA spark gaps. The end result has been a prototype physically very similar to the present Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) pulse power unit but vastly superior in performance. This prototype, which is easily adaptable to the existing systems, has achieved a burst rep-rate of 20 kHz and an output voltage of 500 kV. A one-on-one substitution of the existing pulse power module would result in a 100 MeV accelerator. Furthermore, the high efficiency of the magnetic pulse compression stages has allowed CW operation of the prototype at one kilohertz opening up other applications for the pulse power. Performance and design details will be described.

  19. Roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3'-kinase in ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor-mediated heregulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Vijapurkar, Ulka; Kim, Myong-Soo; Koland, John G

    2003-04-01

    ErbB2/HER2 and ErbB3/HER3, two members of the ErbB/HER family, together constitute a heregulin coreceptor complex that elicits a potent mitogenic and transforming signal. Among known intracellular effectors of the ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin coreceptor are mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. Activation of the distinct MAPK and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways by the ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor in response to heregulin and their relative contributions to the mitogenic and transformation potentials of the activated coreceptor were investigated here. To this end, cDNAs encoding the wild-type ErbB3 protein (ErbB3-WT) and ErbB3 proteins with amino acid substitutions in either the Shc-binding site (ErbB3-Y1325F), the six putative PI 3-kinase-binding sites (ErbB3-6F), or both (ErbB3-7F) were generated and expressed in NIH-3T3 cells to form functional ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin coreceptors. While the coreceptor incorporating ErbB3-WT activated both the MAPK and the PI 3-kinase signaling pathways, those incorporating ErbB3-Y1325F or ErbB3-6F activated either PI 3-kinase or MAPK, respectively. The ErbB2/ErbB3-7F coreceptor activated neither. Elimination of either signaling pathway lowered basal and eliminated heregulin-dependent expression of cyclin D1, which was in each case accompanied by an attenuated mitogenic response. Selective elimination of the PI 3-kinase pathway severely impaired the ability of heregulin to transform cells expressing the coreceptor, whereas attenuation of the MAPK pathway had a lesser effect. Thus, while both pathways contributed in a roughly additive manner to the mitogenic response elicited by the activated ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor, the PI 3-kinase pathway predominated in the induction of cellular transformation.

  20. HIV-1 gp41 fusion intermediate: a target for HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chungen; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is initiated by the binding of gp120 envelope glyco-protein to its cell receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5), followed by a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane subunit. These changes include insertion of fusion peptide into the target cell membrane and association of C-heptad repeat (CHR) peptide with the N-heptad repeat (NHR) trimer, a pre-hairpin fusion intermediate. A stable six-helix bundle core is then formed, bringing the viral envelope and target cell membrane into close proximity for fusion. Peptides derived from the CHR region, such as T20 and C34, inhibit HIV-1 fusion by interacting with the gp41 fusion intermediate. A number of anti-HIV-1 peptides and small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 NHR-trimer have been identified. By combining HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting different sites in the gp41 fusion intermediate, a potent synergistic effect takes place, resulting in a potential new therapeutic strategy for the HIV infection/AIDS. Here, we present an overview of the current development of anti-HIV drugs, particularly those targeting the gp41 fusion intermediate.

  1. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed.

  2. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  3. Effects of opiates and HIV proteins on neurons: the role of ferritin heavy chain and a potential for synergism.

    PubMed

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor for HIV, may prove to be important in elucidating the interaction between HIV proteins and opiates. This review summarizes our current knowledge of central nervous system damage inflicted by HIV and opiates, as well as the regulation of CXCR4 by opiate-induced changes in FHC protein levels. We propose that HIV proteins and opiates exhibit an additive or synergistic effect on FHC/CXCR4, thereby decreasing neuronal signaling and function.

  4. CCR5 and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanpain, Cédric; Libert, Frédérick; Vassart, Gilbert; Parmentier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the trafficking of leukocyte populations across the body, and are involved in the development of a large variety of human diseases. CCR5 is the main coreceptor used by macrophage (M)-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2, which are responsible for viral transmission. CCR5 therefore plays an essential role in HIV pathogenesis. A number of inflammatory CC-chemokines, including MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, RANTES, MCP-2, and HCC-1[9-74] act as CCR5 agonists, while MCP-3 is a natural antagonist of the receptor. CCR5 is mainly expressed in memory T-cells, macrophages, and immature dendritic cells, and is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. It is coupled to the Gi class of heterotrimeric G-proteins, and inhibits cAMP production, stimulates Ca2+ release, and activates PI3-kinase and MAP kinases, as well as other tyrosine kinase cascades. A mutant allele of CCR5, CCR5 delta 32 is frequent in populations of European origin, and encodes a nonfunctional truncated protein that is not transported to the cell surface. Homozygotes for the delta 32 allele exhibit a strong, although incomplete, resistance to HIV infection, whereas heterozygotes display delayed progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Many other alleles, affecting the primary structure of CCR5 or its promoter have been described, some of which lead to nonfunctional receptors or otherwise influence AIDS progression. CCR5 is considered as a drug target in the field of HIV, but also in a growing number of inflammatory diseases. Modified chemokines, monoclonal antibodies and small chemical antagonists, as well as a number of gene therapy approaches have been developed in this frame.

  5. Understanding Factors That Modulate the Establishment of HIV Latency in Resting CD4+ T-Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jenny L.; Mota, Talia M.; Evans, Vanessa A.; Kumar, Nitasha; Rezaei, Simin D.; Cheong, Karey; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Cameron, Paul U.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Developing robust in vitro models of HIV latency is needed to better understand how latency is established, maintained and reversed. In this study, we examined the effects of donor variability, HIV titre and co-receptor usage on establishing HIV latency in vitro using two models of HIV latency. Using the CCL19 model of HIV latency, we found that in up to 50% of donors, CCL19 enhanced latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells by CXCR4-tropic HIV in the presence of low dose IL-2. Increasing the infectious titre of CXCR4-tropic HIV increased both productive and latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells. In a different model where myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) were co-cultured with resting CD4+ T-cells, we observed a higher frequency of latently infected cells in vitro than CCL19-treated or unstimulated CD4+ T-cells in the presence of low dose IL-2. In the DC-T-cell model, latency was established with both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic virus but higher titres of CCR5-tropic virus was required in most donors. The establishment of latency in vitro through direct infection of resting CD4+ T-cells is significantly enhanced by CCL19 and mDC, but the efficiency is dependent on virus titre, co-receptor usage and there is significant donor variability. PMID:27383184

  6. Understanding Factors That Modulate the Establishment of HIV Latency in Resting CD4+ T-Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenny L; Mota, Talia M; Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Rezaei, Simin D; Cheong, Karey; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    Developing robust in vitro models of HIV latency is needed to better understand how latency is established, maintained and reversed. In this study, we examined the effects of donor variability, HIV titre and co-receptor usage on establishing HIV latency in vitro using two models of HIV latency. Using the CCL19 model of HIV latency, we found that in up to 50% of donors, CCL19 enhanced latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells by CXCR4-tropic HIV in the presence of low dose IL-2. Increasing the infectious titre of CXCR4-tropic HIV increased both productive and latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells. In a different model where myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) were co-cultured with resting CD4+ T-cells, we observed a higher frequency of latently infected cells in vitro than CCL19-treated or unstimulated CD4+ T-cells in the presence of low dose IL-2. In the DC-T-cell model, latency was established with both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic virus but higher titres of CCR5-tropic virus was required in most donors. The establishment of latency in vitro through direct infection of resting CD4+ T-cells is significantly enhanced by CCL19 and mDC, but the efficiency is dependent on virus titre, co-receptor usage and there is significant donor variability.

  7. Plasma Switch Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-08

    switch :9 (1) the low-pressure gas switch 17 (2) the surface flashover switch ,18 (3) the thyrtron,’ŕ (4) the high pressure...spark gap, (5) the magnetic switch .’ 9 20 and (6) the ECS. The ongoing research for both the low pressure gas and surface flashover closing- switches has... investigations into optimizing gas mixtures for opening switch applications 1 ’"’"’’’a𔃻 ; and a preliminary study of the discharge stabili-

  8. Potent and Broad Inhibition of HIV-1 by a Peptide from the gp41 Heptad Repeat-2 Domain Conjugated to the CXCR4 Amino Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Haggarty, Beth S.; Duong, Jennifer; Jordon, Andrea P. O.; Romano, Josephine; DeClercq, Joshua J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Riley, James L.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry can be inhibited by soluble peptides from the gp41 heptad repeat-2 (HR2) domain that interfere with formation of the 6-helix bundle during fusion. Inhibition has also been seen when these peptides are conjugated to anchoring molecules and over-expressed on the cell surface. We hypothesized that potent anti-HIV activity could be achieved if a 34 amino acid peptide from HR2 (C34) were brought to the site of virus-cell interactions by conjugation to the amino termini of HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4. C34-conjugated coreceptors were expressed on the surface of T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells, retained the ability to mediate chemotaxis in response to cognate chemokines, and were highly resistant to HIV-1 utilization for entry. Notably, C34-conjugated CCR5 and CXCR4 each exhibited potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1 isolates from diverse clades irrespective of tropism (i.e., each could inhibit R5, X4 and dual-tropic isolates). This inhibition was highly specific and dependent on positioning of the peptide, as HIV-1 infection was poorly inhibited when C34 was conjugated to the amino terminus of CD4. C34-conjugated coreceptors could also inhibit HIV-1 isolates that were resistant to the soluble HR2 peptide inhibitor, enfuvirtide. When introduced into primary cells, CD4 T cells expressing C34-conjugated coreceptors exhibited physiologic responses to T cell activation while inhibiting diverse HIV-1 isolates, and cells containing C34-conjugated CXCR4 expanded during HIV-1 infection in vitro and in a humanized mouse model. Notably, the C34-conjugated peptide exerted greater HIV-1 inhibition when conjugated to CXCR4 than to CCR5. Thus, antiviral effects of HR2 peptides can be specifically directed to the site of viral entry where they provide potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1. This approach to engineer HIV-1 resistance in functional CD4 T cells may provide a novel cell-based therapeutic for controlling HIV infection in humans. PMID:27855210

  9. Genetic characterization of HIV before widespread testing of HIV vaccine candidates at a clinical trial site in Pretoria, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Musyoki, Andrew; Mothapo, Khutso; Rakgole, Johnny; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Bessong, Pascal; Selabe, Gloria; Bredell, Helba; Williamson, Carolyn; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2012-09-01

    We studied 123 samples from adult chronic HIV patients initiating HAART from various centers around a newly established clinical trial site in Pretoria. Each sample was sequenced in at least one structural gene (pol, gag, and env) or functional gene (vif, vpr, and vpu). A subset of 25 samples was subjected to near full-genome analysis. All samples were HIV-1 subtype C. Highly conserved regions within the gene sequences were observed. Overall, the gag and vif sequences showed closer similarity followed by the env, vpr, pol, and vpu. The env gene was the most difficult to sequence, resulting in only 31 sequences from 40 samples; of these, 25 were predicted to be R5 coreceptor tropic, while 6 were X4 tropic. The study asserted the predominance of HIV-1 subtype C within the catchment population.

  10. Statistical correlation of nonconservative substitutions of HIV gp41 variable amino acid residues with the R5X4 HIV-1 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Martínez, Elena; Figueroa-Medina, Evangelina; Villarreal, Carlos; Cocho, Germinal; Medina-Franco, José L; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Huerta, Leonor

    2016-02-16

    The interaction of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 (gp120/gp41) with coreceptor molecules has important implications for specific cellular targeting and pathogenesis. Experimental and theoretical evidences have shown a role for gp41 in coreceptor tropism, although there is no consensus about the positions involved. Here we analyze the association of physicochemical properties of gp41 amino acid residues with viral tropism (X4, R5, and R5X4) using a large set of HIV-1 sequences. Under the assumption that conserved regions define the complex structural features essential for protein function, we focused our search only on amino acids in the gp41 variable regions. Gp41 amino acid sequences of 2823 HIV-1 strains from all clades with known coreceptor tropism were retrieved from Los Alamos HIV Database. Consensus sequences were constructed for homologous sequences (those obtained from the same patient and having the same tropism) in order to avoid bias due to sequence overrepresentation, and the variability (entropy) per site was determined. Comparisons of hydropathy index (HI) and charge (Q) of amino acid residues at highly variable positions between coreceptor groups were performed using two non-parametrical tests and Benjamini-Hochberg correction. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to determine covariance of HI and Q values. Calculation of variability per site rendered 58 highly variable amino acid positions. Of these, statistical analysis rendered significantly different HI or Q only for the R5 vs. R5X4 comparison at twelve positions: 535, 602, 619, 636, 640, 641, 658, 662, 667, 723, 756 and 841. The largest differences in particular amino acid frequencies between coreceptor groups were found at 619, 636, 640, 641, 662, 723 and 756. A hydrophobic tendency of residues 619, 640, 641, 723 and 756, along with a hydrophilic/charged tendency at residues 636 and 662 was observed in R5X4 with respect to R5 sequences. HI of position 640 covariated with that of

  11. Disseminated and sustained HIV infection in CD34+ cord blood cell-transplanted Rag2−/−γc−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Baenziger, Stefan; Tussiwand, Roxane; Schlaepfer, Erika; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Kurrer, Michael O.; Behnke, Silvia; Frey, Joachim; Oxenius, Annette; Joller, Helen; Aguzzi, Adriano; Manz, Markus G.; Speck, Roberto F.

    2006-01-01

    Because of species selectivity, HIV research is largely restricted to in vitro or clinical studies, both limited in their ability to rapidly assess new strategies to fight the virus. To prospectively study some aspects of HIV in vivo, immunodeficient mice, transplanted with either human peripheral blood leukocytes or human fetal tissues, have been developed. Although these are susceptible to HIV infection, xenoreactivity, and short infection spans, resource and ethical constraints, as well as biased HIV coreceptor tropic strain infection, pose substantial problems in their use. Rag2−/−γc−/− mice, transplanted as newborns with human CD34+ cells, were recently shown to develop human B, T, and dendritic cells, constituting lymphoid organs in situ. Here we tested these mice as a model system for HIV-1 infection. HIV RNA levels peaked to up to 2 × 106 copies per milliliter of plasma early after infection, and viremia was observed for up to 190 days, the longest time followed. A marked relative CD4+ T cell depletion in peripheral blood occurred in CXCR4-tropic strain-infected mice, whereas this was less pronounced in CCR5-tropic strain-infected animals. Thymus infection was almost exclusively observed in CXCR4-tropic strain-infected mice, whereas spleen and lymph node HIV infection occurred irrespective of coreceptor selectivity, consistent with respective coreceptor expression on human CD4+ T cells. Thus, this straightforward to generate and cost-effective in vivo model closely resembles HIV infection in man and therefore should be valuable to study virus-induced pathology and to rapidly evaluate new approaches aiming to prevent or treat HIV infection. PMID:17038503

  12. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  13. The changes in the T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine balance during HIV-1 infection are indicative of an allergic response to viral proteins that may be reversed by Th2 cytokine inhibitors and immune response modifiers--a review and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Yechiel

    2004-01-01

    The HIV-1 infection in humans induces an early cellular immune response to react to the viral proteins with a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response that fails to inhibit virus replication and the spread of the virus. It became evident that the progression of the disease causes chronic changes to the immune system of which a gradual increase in IgE antibodies is one of its features. When the HIV-1 epidemic began, the relation between the gradual increase in IgE content and AIDS was not understood, but later it became a marker for disease prognosis. The advances in the knowledge on T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 2 (Th2) cells revealed that Th1 cells produce cytokines that stimulate the proliferation of CTLs. Th2 cells produce cytokines that are responsible for the activation of the humoral immune response in healthy people. Studies on both Th1 and Th2 cytokine synthesis revealed an aberration in HIV-1 infected people. Clerici and Shearer presented a hypothesis (1993) whereby Th1 cell activity declines and Th2 activity increases (the Th1 --> Th2 switch hypothesis) in HIV-1 infected people. In fact, experiments concerning this hypothesis ultimately supported the premise that the switch involves a critical change in the cytokine balance, which leads to the contraction of AIDS. However, the research community must still discern why such a Th1 --> Th2 switch takes place in infected people and how it can be reversed. The present review points to the fact that a similar Th1 --> Th2 switch constitutes the response of allergic people to environmental allergens. HIV-1 patients and allergic people that are exposed to allergens respond with an increased synthesis of Th2 cytokines and IgE, together with a decrease in Th1 cytokines. The studies on allergen-induced Th2 cells revealed that the Th2 cytokine IL-4 induces B cells to synthesize IgE, and cytokine IL-5 is the inducer of eosinophilia, just as in HIV-1 infection. The difference between the HIV-1 infection and allergies is the

  14. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  15. Distinct Requirements for HIV-Cell Fusion and HIV-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Naoyuki; Marin, Mariana; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Desai, Tanay M.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    Whether HIV-1 enters cells by fusing with the plasma membrane or with endosomes is a subject of active debate. The ability of HIV-1 to mediate fusion between adjacent cells, a process referred to as “fusion-from-without” (FFWO), shows that this virus can fuse with the plasma membrane. To compare FFWO occurring at the cell surface with HIV-cell fusion through a conventional entry route, we designed an experimental approach that enabled the measurements of both processes in the same sample. The following key differences were observed. First, a very small fraction of viruses fusing with target cells participated in FFWO. Second, whereas HIV-1 fusion with adherent cells was insensitive to actin inhibitors, post-CD4/coreceptor binding steps during FFWO were abrogated. A partial dependence of HIV-cell fusion on actin remodeling was observed in CD4+ T cells, but this effect appeared to be due to the actin dependence of virus uptake. Third, deletion of the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 dramatically enhanced the ability of the virus to promote FFWO, while having a modest effect on virus-cell fusion. Distinct efficiencies and actin dependences of FFWO versus HIV-cell fusion are consistent with the notion that, except for a minor fraction of particles that mediate fusion between the plasma membranes of adjacent cells, HIV-1 enters through an endocytic pathway. We surmise, however, that cell-cell contacts enabling HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane could be favored at the sites of high density of target cells, such as lymph nodes. PMID:25589785

  16. Genetic interactions between the hedgehog co-receptors Gas1 and Boc regulate cell proliferation during murine palatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Guilherme M.; Seppala, Maisa; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N.; Fan, Chen-Ming; Cobourne, Martyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal regulation of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been described in a variety of human cancers and developmental anomalies, which highlights the essential role of this signaling molecule in cell cycle regulation and embryonic development. Gas1 and Boc are membrane co-receptors for Shh, which demonstrate overlapping domains of expression in the early face. This study aims to investigate potential interactions between these co-receptors during formation of the secondary palate. Mice with targeted mutation in Gas1 and Boc were used to generate Gas1; Boc compound mutants. The expression of key Hedgehog signaling family members was examined in detail during palatogenesis via radioactive in situ hybridization. Morphometric analysis involved computational quantification of BrdU-labeling and cell packing; whilst TUNEL staining was used to assay cell death. Ablation of Boc in a Gas1 mutant background leads to reduced Shh activity in the palatal shelves and an increase in the penetrance and severity of cleft palate, associated with failed elevation, increased proliferation and reduced cell death. Our findings suggest a dual requirement for Boc and Gas1 during early development of the palate, mediating cell cycle regulation during growth and subsequent fusion of the palatal shelves. PMID:27811357

  17. Identification of a D-amino acid decapeptide HIV-1 entry inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Boggiano, Cesar; Jiang Shibo; Lu Hong; Zhao Qian; Liu Shuwen; Binley, James; Blondelle, Sylvie E. . E-mail: sylvieb@burnham.org

    2006-09-08

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virion into host cells involves three major steps, each being a potential target for the development of entry inhibitors: gp120 binding to CD4, gp120-CD4 complex interacting with a coreceptor, and gp41 refolding to form a six-helix bundle. Using a D-amino acid decapeptide combinatorial library, we identified peptide DC13 as having potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory activity, and effectively inhibiting infection by several laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 strains. While DC13 did not block binding of gp120 to CD4, nor disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, it effectively blocked the binding of an anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody and chemokine SDF-1{alpha} to CXCR4-expressing cells. However, because R5-using primary viruses were also neutralized, the antiviral activity of DC13 implies additional mode(s) of action. These results suggest that DC13 is a useful HIV-1 coreceptor antagonist for CXCR4 and, due to its biostability and simplicity, may be of value for developing a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  18. The temperature arrested intermediate of virus-cell fusion is a functional step in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Hamani I; Hope, Thomas J

    2006-05-25

    HIV entry occurs via membrane-mediated fusion of virus and target cells. Interactions between gp120 and cellular co-receptors lead to both the formation of fusion pores and release of the HIV genome into target cells. Studies using cell-cell fusion assays have demonstrated that a temperature-arrested state (TAS) can generate a stable intermediate in fusion related events. Other studies with MLV pseudotyped with HIV envelope also found that a temperature sensitive intermediate could be generated as revealed by the loss of a fluorescently labeled membrane. However, such an intermediate has never been analyzed in the context of virus infection. Therefore, we used virus-cell infection with replication competent HIV to gain insights into virus-cell fusion. We find that the TAS is an intermediate in the process culminating in the HIV infection of a target cell. In the virion-cell TAS, CD4 has been engaged, the heptad repeats of gp41 are exposed and the complex is kinetically predisposed to interact with coreceptor to complete the fusion event leading to infection.

  19. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  20. A Novel CCR5 Mutation Common in Sooty Mangabeys Reveals SIVsmm Infection of CCR5-Null Natural Hosts and Efficient Alternative Coreceptor Use In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Nadeene E.; Hermann, Emilia A.; Loftin, Lamorris M.; Elliott, Sarah T.; Wey, Winston C.; Cervasi, Barbara; Taaffe, Jessica; Engram, Jessica C.; Li, Bing; Else, James G.; Li, Yingying; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Sodora, Donald L.; Apetrei, Cristian; Paiardini, Mirko; Silvestri, Guido; Collman, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to HIV infection in humans and SIV in macaques, SIV infection of natural hosts including sooty mangabeys (SM) is non-pathogenic despite robust virus replication. We identified a novel SM CCR5 allele containing a two base pair deletion (Δ2) encoding a truncated molecule that is not expressed on the cell surface and does not support SIV entry in vitro. The allele was present at a 26% frequency in a large SM colony, along with 3% for a CCR5Δ24 deletion allele that also abrogates surface expression. Overall, 8% of animals were homozygous for defective CCR5 alleles and 41% were heterozygous. The mutant allele was also present in wild SM in West Africa. CD8+ and CD4+ T cells displayed a gradient of CCR5 expression across genotype groups, which was highly significant for CD8+ cells. Remarkably, the prevalence of natural SIVsmm infection was not significantly different in animals lacking functional CCR5 compared to heterozygous and homozygous wild-type animals. Furthermore, animals lacking functional CCR5 had robust plasma viral loads, which were only modestly lower than wild-type animals. SIVsmm primary isolates infected both homozygous mutant and wild-type PBMC in a CCR5-independent manner in vitro, and Envs from both CCR5-null and wild-type infected animals used CXCR6, GPR15 and GPR1 in addition to CCR5 in transfected cells. These data clearly indicate that SIVsmm relies on CCR5-independent entry pathways in SM that are homozygous for defective CCR5 alleles and, while the extent of alternative coreceptor use in SM with CCR5 wild type alleles is uncertain, strongly suggest that SIVsmm tropism and host cell targeting in vivo is defined by the distribution and use of alternative entry pathways in addition to CCR5. SIVsmm entry through alternative pathways in vivo raises the possibility of novel CCR5-negative target cells that may be more expendable than CCR5+ cells and enable the virus to replicate efficiently without causing disease in the face of extremely

  1. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  2. Insights into the Structure, Correlated Motions, and Electrostatic Properties of Two HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loops

    PubMed Central

    Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    The V3 loop of the glycoprotein 120 (gp120) is a contact point for cell entry of HIV-1 leading to infection. Despite sequence variability and lack of specific structure, the highly flexible V3 loop possesses a well-defined role in recognizing and selecting cell-bound coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 through a mechanism of charge complementarity. We have performed two independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to gain insights into the dynamic character of two V3 loops with slightly different sequences, but significantly different starting crystallographic structures. We have identified highly populated trajectory-specific salt bridges between oppositely charged stem residues Arg9 and Glu25 or Asp29. The two trajectories share nearly identical correlated motions within the simulations, despite their different overall structures. High occupancy salt bridges play a key role in the major cross-correlated motions in both trajectories, and may be responsible for transient structural stability in preparation for coreceptor binding. In addition, the two V3 loops visit conformations with similarities in spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials, despite their inherent flexibility, which may play a role in coreceptor recognition. It is plausible that cooperativity between overall electrostatic potential, charged residue interactions, and correlated motions could be associated with a coreceptor selection and binding. PMID:23185486

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 by fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is responsible for entry of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells by mediating attachment to target cells and subsequent membrane fusion. Env consists of three gp120 subunits that mediate receptor and co-receptor attachment and three gp41 subunits responsible for membrane fusion. Several steps of the entry process can serve as drug targets. Receptor antagonists prevent attachment of gp120 to the receptor or co-receptor and conformational changes within gp41 required for membrane fusion can be inhibited by fusion inhibitors. Enfuvirtide (T20, Fuzeon) is a peptide based on the gp41 sequence and is the only approved fusion inhibitor. It prevents membrane fusion by competitively binding to gp41 and blocking the formation of the post-fusion structure. New generations of T20-like peptides have been developed with improved potency and stability. Besides T20 and derivatives, other fusion inhibitors have been developed that target different domains of gp41. Here we discuss the development of fusion inhibitors, their mode of action and their potential for incorporation in future drug regimens.

  4. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  5. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  6. Distribution of HIV-1 Infection in Different T Lymphocyte Subsets: Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve vs. Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Raul; Gibson, Sonia; Lopez, Pablo; Koenig, Ellen; De Castro, Marisol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Memory CD4 T cells are the primary targets of HIV-1 infection, which then subsequently spreads to other T lymphocyte subsets. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) alters the pattern of HIV-1 distribution. Blood samples were collected from ART-naïve or -experienced HIV-1 patients, and the memory and naïve subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, respectively, were isolated by cell sorting. DNA was extracted and the HIV-1 env C2/V3 region PCR amplified. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced, and genetic relatedness among different HIV-1 compartments was determined by the phylogenetic analysis of clonal sequences. The viral V3 sequence of HIV-1 in each compartment was analyzed by using webPSSM to determine CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor binding property of the virus. The direction of viral migration among involved compartments was determined by using the MacClade program. In ART-naïve patients, HIV-1 was generally confined to the memory CD4 T (mT4) cell compartment, even though in a few cases, naïve CD4 T (nT4) cells were also infected. When this occurred, the HIV-1 gene migrated from nT4 to mT4. In contrast, HIV-1 was detected in nT4 and mT4 as well as in the memory CD8 T (mT8) compartments of ART-experienced patients. However, no clear pattern of directional HIV-1 gene flow among the compartments could be determined because of the small sample size. All HIV-1–infected T cell compartments housed the virus that used either CCR5 or CXCR4 as the coreceptor. PMID:21054214

  7. The Evolving HIV-1 Epidemic in Warao Amerindians Is Dominated by an Extremely High Frequency of CXCR4-Utilizing Strains.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Héctor R; Bello, Gonzalo; Villalba, Julian A; Sulbaran, Yoneira F; Garzaro, Domingo; Maes, Mailis; Loureiro, Carmen L; de Waard, Jacobus H; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection in Warao Amerindians from Venezuela due to the rapid spread of a single B subtype strain. In this study we evaluated the coreceptor use of the HIV-1 strains infecting this Amerindian community. Sequences of the HIV-1 V3 loop from 56 plasma samples were genotyped for coreceptor use. An extremely high frequency of CXCR4 strains was found among HIV-1-infecting Waraos (47/49, 96%), compared to HIV-1 strains infecting the non-Amerindian Venezuelan population (35/79, 44%, p < 0.00001). Evolutionary analysis showed that a significant number of infections occurred between 1 and 12 months before collection and that a great proportion (50-70%) of HIV-1 transmissions occurred within the very early phase of infection (≤12 months). This is consistent with an initial infection dominated by an X4 strain or a very rapid selection of X4 variants after infection. This Amerindian population also exhibits the highest prevalence of tuberculosis in Venezuela, being synergistically bad prognostic factors for the evolution of morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population.

  8. Homozygous delta 32 deletion of the CCR-5 chemokine receptor gene in an HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Bagnarelli, P; Violin, M; Ridolfo, A L; Zhou, D; Berlusconi, A; Corvasce, S; Corbellino, M; Clementi, M; Clerici, M; Moroni, M; Galli, M

    1997-08-01

    Recent research has found that entry of non-syncytium-inducing (NSI), monocyte-macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolates requires binding to both CD4 and CCR5 receptors, and that delta 32/delta 32 homozygous individuals are protected against infection. To analyse the polymorphism of CCR-5 gene in HIV-1-infected and uninfected subjects. CCR-5 sequences were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from DNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Samples from 152 HIV-1-infected subjects and 122 uninfected controls were tested for the detection of the 32 base-pair deletion. HIV-1 phenotype was determined by viral isolation and MT-2 evaluation. The wild-type/delta 32 heterozygous and delta 32/delta 32 homozygous conditions were represented in 10.7 and 0.8% of healthy controls and in 9.8 and 0.7% of HIV-1-infected subjects, respectively. Of note, the delta 32/delta 32 deletion of the CCR-5 gene was detected by PCR and sequencing confirmed in a patient with progressive infection harbouring a clade B virus with SI phenotype. delta 32/delta 32 homozygosity for the CCR-5 gene does not confer absolute protection against HIV-1 infection, suggesting that either macrophage-tropic viral strains could use coreceptors other than CCR-5 or infect independently of the presence of a functional CCR-5 coreceptor. Alternatively, primary infection sustained by T-cell-tropic isolates, although exceptional, may occur.

  9. HIV and Drug Resistance: Hitting a Moving Target | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Prior research revealed how HIV-1 makes its destructive entry into the target cell by fusing together the cholesterol-rich lipid bilayer of the viral envelope—made with key glycoproteins gp120 and gp41—and the host cell’s plasma membrane. Cell-viral interactions begin with the binding of gp120 to the CD4 receptor molecule on the target cell, followed by gp120 binding to coreceptors. These coreceptors likely reside in structures called lipid rafts—areas in the cell plasma membrane that are rich in cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, and certain proteins that facilitate the entry of viruses into host cells. Finally, sequences in gp41 trigger the fusion of the viral and cellular lipid bilayers. The lipid rafts are then involved in the production of new viral particles.

  10. Temporal switching jitter in photoconductive switches

    SciTech Connect

    GAUDET,JOHN A.; SKIPPER,MICHAEL C.; ABDALLA,MICHAEL D.; AHERN,SEAN M.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; ROMERO,SAMUEL P.

    2000-04-13

    This paper reports on a recent comparison made between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the temporal switch jitter times. It is found that the optical trigger laser characteristics are dominant in determining the PCSS jitter.

  11. Genistein interferes with SDF-1- and HIV-mediated actin dynamics and inhibits HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Binding of HIV to the chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 mediates viral fusion and signal transduction that promotes actin dynamics critical for HIV infection of blood resting CD4 T cells. It has been suggested that this gp120-mediated actin activity resembles the chemotactic actin dynamics mediated by chemokines such as SDF-1. To determine whether inhibiting SDF-1-mediated chemotactic activity can also inhibit HIV infection, we screened several inhibitors known to reduce SDF-1-mediated chemotaxis of T cells. Results We found that a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, inhibited both SDF-1-mediated chemotaxis and HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells. Genistein was also found to interfere with SDF-1- and HIV-mediated actin dynamics in CD4 T cells. This reduction in actin activity correlates with genistein-mediated inhibition of viral DNA accumulation in resting CD4 T cells. In addition, we also tested two other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib and AG1478. Sunitinib, but not AG1478, inhibited HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells. We further tested the safety of genistein in 3 Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and each animal was given a monotherapy of genistein at 10 mg/kg orally for 12 weeks. No adverse drug effects were observed in these animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that novel therapeutic strategies can be developed based on targeting cellular proteins involved in HIV-dependent signaling. This approach can interfere with HIV-mediated actin dynamics and inhibit HIV infection. PMID:23782904

  12. New approaches in the treatment of HIV/AIDS – focus on maraviroc and other CCR5 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Hans P; Schellhorn, Sarah; Dezube, Bruce J; Jacobson, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has produced dramatic success for many patients. Nevertheless, viral resistance continues to limit the efficacy of currently available agents in many patients. The CCR5 antagonists are a new class of antiretroviral agents that target a necessary coreceptor for viral entry of many strains of HIV-1. Recently, the first agent within this class, maraviroc, was approved by a number of regulatory agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration. Herein we review the role of the CCR5 receptor in HIV-1 infection and potential methods to target it in anti-HIV-1 therapy. We review the various categories of agents and discuss specific agents that have progressed to clinical study. We discuss in detail the recently approved, first in class CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, and discuss aspects of resistance to CCR5 antagonism and the potential role of CCR5 antagonism in the management of HIV-1 infection. PMID:18728830

  13. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Kroemer, Guido; Perfettini, Jean-Luc

    2011-08-29

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A.; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M.; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21859844

  15. Evolution and Recombination of Genes Encoding HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Tropism during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Binshan; Kitchen, Christina; Weiser, Barbara; Mayers, Douglas; Foley, Brian; Kemal, Kimdar; Anastos, Kathryn; Suchard, Marc; Parker, Monica; Brunner, Cheryl; Burger, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of residual plasma virus during antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a high priority to improve understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis and therapy. To understand the evolution of HIV-1 pol and env genes in viremic patients under selective pressure of ART, we performed longitudinal analyses of plasma-derived pol and env sequences from single HIV-1 genomes. We tested the hypotheses that drug resistance in pol was unrelated to changes in coreceptor usage (tropism), and that recombination played a role in evolution of viral strains. Recombinants were identified by using Bayesian and other computational methods. High-level genotypic resistance was seen in ~70% of X4 and R5 strains during ART. There was no significant association between resistance and tropism. Each patient displayed at least one recombinant encompassing env and representing a change in predicted tropism. These data suggest that, in addition to mutation, recombination can play a significant role in shaping HIV-1 evolution. PMID:20451945

  16. Therapeutic strategies underpinning the development of novel techniques for the treatment of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jian J.; Cong, Xiao J.; Hu, Li M.; Wang, Cun X.; Jia, Lee; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2010-01-01

    The HIV replication cycle offers multiple targets for chemotherapeutic intervention, including the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120; viral co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5; transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41; integrase; reverse transcriptase; protease and so on. Most currently used anti-HIV drugs are reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors. The expanding application of simulation to drug design combined with experimental techniques have developed a large amount of novel inhibitors that interact specifically with targets besides transcriptase and protease. This review presents details of the anti-HIV inhibitors discovered with computer-aided approaches and provides an overview of the recent five-year achievements in the treatment of HIV infection and the application of computational methods to current drug design. PMID:20096804

  17. A biosensor assay for studying ligand-membrane receptor interactions: Binding of antibodies and HIV-1 Env to chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Trevor L.; Canziani, Gabriela; Jia, Li; Rucker, Joseph; Doms, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein mediates entry into cells by binding CD4 and an appropriate coreceptor, which triggers structural changes in Env that lead to fusion between the viral and cellular membranes. The major HIV-1 coreceptors are the seven transmembrane domain chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. The type of coreceptor used by a virus strain is an important determinant of viral tropism and pathogenesis, and virus-receptor interactions can be therapeutic targets. However, Envs from many virus strains interact with CXCR4 and CCR5 with low affinity such that direct study of this important interaction is difficult if not impossible using standard cell-surface binding techniques. We have developed an approach that makes it possible to study ligand binding to membrane proteins, including Env–coreceptor interactions, using an optical biosensor. CCR5, CXCR4, and other membrane proteins were incorporated into retrovirus particles, which were purified and attached to the biosensor surface. Binding of conformationally sensitive antibodies as well as Env to these receptors was readily detected. The equilibrium dissociation constant for the interaction between an Env derived from the prototype HIV-1 strain IIIB for CXCR4 was approximately 500 nM, explaining the difficulty in measuring this interaction using standard equilibrium binding techniques. Retroviral pseudotypes represent easily produced, stable, homogenous structures that can be used to present a wide array of single and multiple membrane-spanning proteins in a native lipid environment for biosensor studies, thus avoiding the need for detergent solubilization, purification, and reconstitution. The approach should have general applicability and can be used to correlate Env–receptor binding constants to viral tropism and pathogenesis. PMID:11005830

  18. Coreceptor signal strength regulates positive selection but does not determine CD4/CD8 lineage choice in a physiologic in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Erman, Batu; Alag, Amala S; Dahle, Oyvind; van Laethem, François; Sarafova, Sophia D; Guinter, Terry I; Sharrow, Susan O; Grinberg, Alexander; Love, Paul E; Singer, Alfred

    2006-11-15

    TCR signals drive thymocyte development, but it remains controversial what impact, if any, the intensity of those signals have on T cell differentiation in the thymus. In this study, we assess the impact of CD8 coreceptor signal strength on positive selection and CD4/CD8 lineage choice using novel gene knockin mice in which the endogenous CD8alpha gene has been re-engineered to encode the stronger signaling cytoplasmic tail of CD4, with the re-engineered CD8alpha gene referred to as CD8.4. We found that stronger signaling CD8.4 coreceptors specifically improved the efficiency of CD8-dependent positive selection and quantitatively increased the number of MHC class I (MHC-I)-specific thymocytes signaled to differentiate into CD8+ T cells, even for thymocytes expressing a single, transgenic TCR. Importantly, however, stronger signaling CD8.4 coreceptors did not alter the CD8 lineage choice of any MHC-I-specific thymocytes, even MHC-I-specific thymocytes expressing the high-affinity F5 transgenic TCR. This study documents in a physiologic in vivo model that coreceptor signal strength alters TCR-signaling thresholds for positive selection and so is a major determinant of the CD4:CD8 ratio, but it does not influence CD4/CD8 lineage choice.

  19. Differential Ability of Primary HIV-1 Nef Isolates To Downregulate HIV-1 Entry Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Mako; Ogata, Yoko; Mahiti, Macdonald; Maeda, Yosuke; Kuang, Xiaomei T.; Miura, Toshiyuki; Jessen, Heiko; Walker, Bruce D.; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Nef downregulates the viral entry receptor CD4 as well as the coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 from the surface of HIV-infected cells, and this leads to promotion of viral replication through superinfection resistance and other mechanisms. Nef sequence motifs that modulate these functions have been identified via in vitro mutagenesis with laboratory HIV-1 strains. However, it remains unclear whether the same motifs contribute to Nef activity in patient-derived sequences and whether these motifs may differ in Nef sequences isolated at different infection stages and/or from patients with different disease phenotypes. Here, nef clones from 45 elite controllers (EC), 46 chronic progressors (CP), and 43 acute progressors (AP) were examined for their CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 downregulation functions. Nef clones from EC exhibited statistically significantly impaired CD4 and CCR5 downregulation ability and modestly impaired CXCR4 downregulation activity compared to those from CP and AP. Nef's ability to downregulate CD4 and CCR5 correlated positively in all cohorts, suggesting that they are functionally linked in vivo. Moreover, impairments in Nef's receptor downregulation functions increased the susceptibility of Nef-expressing cells to HIV-1 infection. Mutagenesis studies on three functionally impaired EC Nef clones revealed that multiple residues, including those at novel sites, were involved in the alteration of Nef functions and steady-state protein levels. Specifically, polymorphisms at highly conserved tryptophan residues (e.g., Trp-57 and Trp-183) and immune escape-associated sites were responsible for reduced Nef functions in these clones. Our results suggest that the functional modulation of primary Nef sequences is mediated by complex polymorphism networks. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 Nef, a key factor for viral pathogenesis, downregulates functionally important molecules from the surface of infected cells, including the viral entry receptor CD4 and coreceptors CCR5

  20. HIV-1 Fusion Is Blocked through Binding of GB Virus C E2D Peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 Disulfide Loop

    PubMed Central

    Eissmann, Kristin; Mueller, Sebastian; Sticht, Heinrich; Jung, Susan; Zou, Peng; Jiang, Shibo; Gross, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Reil, Heide

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C), since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:23349893

  1. HIV-1 fusion is blocked through binding of GB Virus C E2-derived peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop [corrected].

    PubMed

    Eissmann, Kristin; Mueller, Sebastian; Sticht, Heinrich; Jung, Susan; Zou, Peng; Jiang, Shibo; Gross, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Reil, Heide

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C), since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  2. Enhancement of HIV-1 infection and intestinal CD4+ T cell depletion ex vivo by gut microbes altered during chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Stephanie M; Lee, Eric J; Donovan, Andrew M; Guo, Kejun; Harper, Michael S; Frank, Daniel N; McCarter, Martin D; Santiago, Mario L; Wilson, Cara C

    2016-01-14

    Early HIV-1 infection is characterized by high levels of HIV-1 replication and substantial CD4 T cell depletion in the intestinal mucosa, intestinal epithelial barrier breakdown, and microbial translocation. HIV-1-induced disruption of intestinal homeostasis has also been associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome that are linked to mucosal and systemic immune activation. In this study, we investigated the impact of representative bacterial species that were altered in the colonic mucosa of viremic HIV-1 infected individuals (HIV-altered mucosal bacteria; HAMB) on intestinal CD4 T cell function, infection by HIV-1, and survival in vitro. Lamina propria (LP) mononuclear cells were infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL or mock infected, exposed to high (3 gram-negative) or low (2 gram-positive) abundance HAMB or control gram-negative Escherichia coli and levels of productive HIV-1 infection and CD4 T cell depletion assessed. HAMB-associated changes in LP CD4 T cell activation, proliferation and HIV-1 co-receptor expression were also evaluated. The majority of HAMB increased HIV-1 infection and depletion of LP CD4 T cells, but gram-negative HAMB enhanced CD4 T cell infection to a greater degree than gram-positive HAMB. Most gram-negative HAMB enhanced T cell infection to levels similar to that induced by gram-negative E. coli despite lower induction of T cell activation and proliferation by HAMB. Both gram-negative HAMB and E. coli significantly increased expression of HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 on LP CD4 T cells. Lipopolysaccharide, a gram-negative bacteria cell wall component, up-regulated CCR5 expression on LP CD4 T cells whereas gram-positive cell wall lipoteichoic acid did not. Upregulation of CCR5 by gram-negative HAMB was largely abrogated in CD4 T cell-enriched cultures suggesting an indirect mode of stimulation. Gram-negative commensal bacteria that are altered in abundance in the colonic mucosa of HIV-1 infected individuals have the capacity to enhance

  3. Long-term CD4+ T-cell count evolution after switching from regimens including HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) plus protease inhibitors to regimens containing NRTI plus non-NRTI or only NRTI

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Data regarding CD4+ recovery after switching from protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimens to regimens not containing PI are scarce. Methods Subjects with virological success on first-PI-regimens who switched to NNRTI therapy (NNRTI group) or to nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI)-only (NRTI group) were studied. The effect of the switch on the ongoing CD4+ trend was assessed by two-phase linear regression (TPLR), allowing us to evaluate whether a change in the CD4+ trend (hinge) occurred and the time of its occurrence. Furthermore, we described the evolution of the frequencies in CD4-count classes across four relevant time-points (baseline, before and immediately after the switch, and last visit). Finally, we explored whether the CD4+ counts evolved differently in patients who switched to NNRTI or NRTI-only regimens by considering: the overall CD4+ trends, the time to CD4+≥ 500/mm3 after the switch, and the area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the CD4+ after the switch. Results Eight hundred and ninety-six patients, followed for a median of 2,121 days, were included. At TPLR, hinges occurred in 581/844 (68.9%), but in only 40/581 (6.9%) within a time interval (180 days) compatible with a possible relationship to the switch; furthermore, in 19/40 cases, CD4+ counts appeared to decrease after the hinges. In comparison with the NNRTI group, the NRTI group showed CD4+ count greater at baseline (P = 0.0234) and before the switch (P ≤ 0.0001), superior CD4+ T-cell increases after HAART was started, lower probability of not achieving CD4+ ≥ 500/mm3 (P = 0.0024), and, finally, no significant differences in the CD4+ T-cell AUC after the switch after adjusting for possible confounders (propensity score and pre-switch AUC). Persistence at CD4+ < 200/mm3 was observed in 34/435 (7.5%) patients, and a decrease below this level was found in only 10/259 (3.9%) with baseline CD4+ ≥ 350/mm3. Conclusions Switching from first-line PI to NNRTI- or NRTI-based regimens did

  4. HIV-1 RNA Rectal Shedding Is Reduced in Men With Low Plasma HIV-1 RNA Viral Loads and Is Not Enhanced by Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections of the Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Haaland, Richard E.; Patel, Pragna; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Farshy, Carol; Hanson, Debra; Mayer, Kenneth; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, John T.; Hart, Clyde E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men (MSM) taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the impact of rectal sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on rectal HIV-1 shedding is unknown. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA was quantified from rectal swabs collected for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) screening of HIV-1-infected MSM. Correlations of STIs with rectal viral load were explored using multinomial regression modeling. HIV-1 coreceptor tropism was predicted from sequencing in a subset of men. Results. Thirty-one (39%) of 80 men (59 prescribed combination antiretroviral therapy [cART]) had HIV detected in 38 (42%) of 91 rectal swabs. Rectal HIV detection was associated with plasma virus loads above 3.15 log10 copies/mL (95% confidence limit [CL] 2.73, 3.55) and paired rectal viral loads and plasma viral loads were correlated (Kendall’s tau [τ] 0.68, Spearman rho [P] = .77). Rectal STIs and abnormal anal cytology were not associated with rectal viral load. HIV coreceptor distribution was very similar between the plasma and rectum in 3 of 4 men. Conclusions. Plasma and rectal viral load were correlated, and rectal STIs did not increase the likelihood of detecting HIV in the rectal secretions in MSM, including those with low or undetectable plasma viral load. Suppressing plasma viral load is likely to reduce risk of HIV transmission to insertive partners. PMID:21844302

  5. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  6. [CD80 and CD86 coreceptors expression on lymphocytes B in hypertrophied adenoids in children with otitis media with effusion].

    PubMed

    Ratomski, Karol; Zelazowska-Rutkowska, Beata; Wysocka, Jolanta; Skotnicka, Bozena; Kasprzycka, Edwina; Ilona, Bauer

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluation of the percentage and mean fluorescence intensity of lymphocytes B with expression CD80 and CD86 in hypertrophied adenoids in children with otitis media with effusion. Expression coreceptors CD80 and CD86 on lymphocytes B in adenoid tissue were estimated by flow cytometry method. 15 children with otitis media with effusion and 15 children with hypertrophied adenoid were tested. This study showed significantly higher percentage of lymphocytes CD19+ CD80+ in children with otitis media with effusion (OME 1.42% +/- 0.91) than in comparative group with hypertrophied adenoids (AH 0.63% +/- 0.21). The receptor CD86 didn't show differences in expression on lymphocytes B between both examinated groups. Low expression of CD80 and CD86 indicates that local immunity response in hypertrophied adenoids in children with otitis media with effusion is weakened. It can contribute to the otitis media with effusion.

  7. The endocytosis and signaling of the γδ T cell coreceptor WC1 are regulated by a dileucine motif.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Haoting; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-03-01

    WC1 proteins, which are specifically expressed by bovine γδ T cells from a gene array containing 13 members, are part of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family. WC1 cytoplasmic domains contains multiple tyrosines, one of which is required to be phosphorylated for TCR coreceptor activity, and a dileucine endocytosis motif. Like the TCR coreceptor CD4, WC1 is endocytosed in response to PMA. Because WC1 endocytosis may play a role in the activation of γδ T cells, we examined WC1 endocytosis in the adherent cell 293T and Jurkat T cell lines using a fusion protein of extracellular CD4 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain of WC1. Individual mutation of the two leucine residues of the endocytic dileucine motif in the WC1 cytoplasmic domain significantly reduced PMA-induced endocytosis in both cell types and enhanced IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1 in Jurkat cells, suggesting that the sustained membrane coligation of CD3/TCR with WC1 caused by a decrease in endocytosis increases T cell activation. Mutation of two serines upstream of the endocytic dileucine motif affected endocytosis only in adherent 293T cells. Although the two upstream serines were not required for WC1 endocytosis in Jurkat cells, the pan-protein kinase C inhibitor Gö6983 blocked endocytosis of CD4/WC1, and mutation of the upstream serines in WC1 inhibited IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1. These studies provide insights into the signaling of WC1 gene arrays that are present in most mammals and play critical roles in γδ T cell responses to bacterial pathogens.

  8. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  9. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  10. Remote switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  11. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  12. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  13. Performance of genotypic tools for prediction of tropism in HIV-1 subtype C V3 loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Soham; Neogi, Ujjwal; Srinivasa, Hiresave; Shet, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no consensus on the genotypic tools to be used for tropism analysis in HIV-1 subtype C strains. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of the different V3 loop-based genotypic algorithms available. We compiled a dataset of 645 HIV-1 subtype C V3 loop sequences of known coreceptor phenotypes (531 R5-tropic/non-syncytium-inducing and 114 X4-tropic/R5X4-tropic/syncytium-inducing sequences) from the Los Alamos database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/) and previously published literature. Coreceptor usage was predicted based on this dataset using different software-based machine-learning algorithms as well as simple classical rules. All the sophisticated machine-learning methods showed a good concordance of above 85%. Geno2Pheno (false-positive rate cutoff of 5-15%) and CoRSeqV3-C were found to have a high predicting capability in determining both HIV-1 subtype C X4-tropic and R5-tropic strains. The current sophisticated genotypic tropism tools based on V3 loop perform well for tropism prediction in HIV-1 subtype C strains and can be used in clinical settings. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  15. On the Switching Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balas, Valentina E.; Balas, Marius M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper is discussing the measures able to reject the instability that may unexpectedly appear in particular conditions, in switching controllers applications. The switching controllers' effect is explained by the combined effects of the unsuitable choice of the switching moments (in the first or third quadrants of the phase trajectory of the switching error) and of the temporal aliasing that can distort the digital control systems when the sampling rate is close to the frequency of the oscillations that are produced by the commutation. The correct switching moments are located into the second and fourth quadrants of the phase trajectory of the switching error, but an active preparation of the commutation may be simply achieved by using a tracking controller, that is driving the output of open loop controller to follow the output of the close loop controller, permanently minimizing the switching error. Simulations issued from a dc driver speed controller and from an aircraft are provided.

  16. A combination of molecular dynamics and docking calculations to explore the binding mode of ADS-J1, a polyanionic compound endowed with anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Tintori, Cristina; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Massa, Silvio; Ragno, Rino; Esté, José A; Botta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    The HIV-1 entry process is an important target for the design of new pharmaceuticals for the multidrug therapy of AIDS. A lot of polyanionic compounds, such as polysulfonated and polysulfated, are reported in the literature for their ability to block early stages of HIV-1 replication. Several studies have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the anti-HIV-1 activity of sulfated polysaccharides and polyanions in general, including binding to cell surface CD4 and interfering with the gp120-coreceptor interaction. Here, we show molecular modeling investigations on ADS-J1, a polyanionic compound with anti-HIV activity that is able to interfere with gp120-coreceptor interactions. Agreeing with experimental data, computer simulations suggested that the V3 loop of gp120 was the preferential binding site for ADS-J1 onto HIV-1. Moreover, mutations induced by the inhibitor significantly changed the stereoelectronic properties of the gp120 surface, justifying a marked drop in the affinity of ADS-J1 toward an ADS-J1-resistant HIV-1 strain.

  17. Single genome amplification and standard bulk PCR yield HIV-1 envelope products with similar genotypic and phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Behzad; Ghulam-Smith, Melissa; Gonzalez, Oscar; White, Laura F; Sagar, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that single genome amplification (SGA) as compared to standard bulk PCR and virus stocks from 293T transfection versus short term passage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) yield a less biased representation of HIV-1 envelope characteristics. In 9 different subjects, genetic diversity, divergence, and population structure were not significantly different among SGA or bulk PCR amplified envelope V1-V3 segments. In these subjects, 293T transfection derived virus stocks with SGA or bulk PCR amplified envelopes have similar infectivity, replication kinetics, co-receptor usage, and neutralization susceptibility. While PBMC passage as compared to the 293T derived virus stocks had similar co-receptor usage, PBMC viruses were less neutralization susceptible to some specific antibodies. Our results suggest that the method of envelope sequence amplification, either SGA or bulk PCR, does not have a significant impact on the genotypic and phenotypic properties of the virus envelope quasispecies.

  18. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Stages of HIV Infection How Does HIV Progress in Your Body? Without treatment, HIV advances ... are the three stages of HIV infection: Acute HIV Infection Stage Within 2-4 weeks after HIV ...

  19. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  20. Treatment for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Treatment » Treatment Decisions and HIV HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... here Enter ZIP code here Treatment Decisions and HIV for Veterans and the Public Treatment for HIV: ...

  1. Semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection is donor-dependent and correlates with the levels of SEVI

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is usually transmitted in the presence of semen. We have shown that semen boosts HIV-1 infection and contains fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) forming amyloid aggregates termed SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection) that promote virion attachment to target cells. Despite its importance for the global spread of HIV-1, however, the effect of semen on virus infection is controversial. Results Here, we established methods allowing the meaningful analysis of semen by minimizing its cytotoxic effects and partly recapitulating the conditions encountered during sexual HIV-1 transmission. We show that semen rapidly and effectively enhances the infectivity of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. This enhancement occurs independently of the viral genotype and coreceptor tropism as well as the virus producer and target cell type. Semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection was also observed under acidic pH conditions and in the presence of vaginal fluid. We further show that the potency of semen in boosting HIV-1 infection is donor dependent and correlates with the levels of SEVI. Conclusions Our results show that semen strongly enhances the infectivity of HIV-1 and other primate lentiviruses and that SEVI contributes to this effect. Thus, SEVI may play an important role in the sexual transmission of HIV-1 and addition of SEVI inhibitors to microbicides may improve their efficacy. PMID:20573198

  2. Optoelectronic techniques for broadband switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, S. F.; Jou, L.; Lenart, J.

    1988-01-01

    Optoelectronic switching employs a hybrid optical/electronic principle to perform the switching function and is applicable for either analog broadband or high-bit rate digital switching. The major advantages of optoelectronic switching include high isolation, low crosstalk, small physical size, light weight, and low power consumption. These advantages make optoelectronic switching an excellent candidate for on-board satellite switching. This paper describes a number of optoelectronic switching architectures. System components required for implementing these switching architectures are discussed. Performance of these architectures are evaluated by calculating their crosstalk, isolation, insertion loss, matrix size, drive power, throughput, and switching speed. Technologies needed for monolithic optoelectronic switching are also identified.

  3. Design and Characterization of a Peptide Mimotope of the HIV-1 gp120 Bridging Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Marco; Fiume, Giuseppe; Caivano, Antonella; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Falcone, Cristina; Masci, Francesca Fasanella; Iaccino, Enrico; Mimmi, Selena; Palmieri, Camillo; Pisano, Antonio; Pontoriero, Marilena; Rossi, Annalisa; Scialdone, Annarita; Vecchio, Eleonora; Andreozzi, Concetta; Trovato, Maria; Rafay, Jan; Ferko, Boris; Montefiori, David; Lombardi, Angela; Morsica, Giulia; Poli, Guido; Quinto, Ileana; Pavone, Vincenzo; de Berardinis, Piergiuseppe; Scala, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The Bridging Sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 is highly conserved among the HIV-1 strains and allows HIV-1 binding to host cells via the HIV-1 coreceptors. Further, the bridging sheet domain is a major target to neutralize HIV-1 infection. We rationally designed four linear peptide epitopes that mimic the three-dimensional structure of bridging sheet by using molecular modeling. Chemically synthesized peptides BS3 and BS4 showed a fair degree of antigenicity when tested in ELISA with IgG purified from HIV+ broadly neutralizing sera while the production of synthetic peptides BS1 and BS2 failed due to their high degree of hydrophobicity. To overcome this limitation, we linked all four BS peptides to the COOH-terminus of GST protein to test both their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Only the BS1 peptide showed good antigenicity; however, no envelope specific antibodies were elicited upon mice immunization. Therefore we performed further analyses by linking BS1 peptide to the NH2-terminus of the E2 scaffold from the Geobacillus Stearothermophylus PDH complex. The E2-BS1 fusion peptide showed good antigenic results, however only one immunized rabbit elicited good antibody titers towards both the monomeric and oligomeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). In addition, moderate neutralizing antibodies response was elicited against two HIV-1 clade B and one clade C primary isolates. These preliminary data validate the peptide mimotope approach as a promising tool to obtain an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:22754323

  4. Antiviral Breadth and Combination Potential of Peptide Triazole HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Karyn; Fletcher, Patricia; Rossi, Fiorella; Kantharaju; Umashankara, Muddagowda; Pirrone, Vanessa; Rajagopal, Srivats; Gopi, Hosahudya; Krebs, Fred C.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Shattock, Robin J.

    2012-01-01

    The first stage of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection involves the fusion of viral and host cellular membranes mediated by viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Inhibitors that specifically target gp120 are gaining increased attention as therapeutics or preventatives to prevent the spread of HIV-1. One promising new group of inhibitors is the peptide triazoles, which bind to gp120 and simultaneously block its interaction with both CD4 and the coreceptor. In this study, we assessed the most potent peptide triazole, HNG-156, for inhibitory breadth, cytotoxicity, and efficacy, both alone and in combination with other antiviral compounds, against HIV-1. HNG-156 inhibited a panel of 16 subtype B and C isolates of HIV-1 in a single-round infection assay. Inhibition of cell infection by replication-competent clinical isolates of HIV-1 was also observed with HNG-156. We found that HNG-156 had a greater than predicted effect when combined with several other entry inhibitors or the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. Overall, we find that HNG-156 is noncytotoxic, has a broad inhibition profile, and provides a positive combination with several inhibitors of the HIV-1 life cycle. These results support the pursuit of efficacy and toxicity analyses in more advanced cell and animal models to develop peptide triazole family inhibitors of HIV-1 into antagonists of HIV-1 infection. PMID:22083481

  5. HIV Infects Bronchial Epithelium and Suppresses Components of the Mucociliary Clearance Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Chinnapaiyan, S; Parira, T; Dutta, R; Agudelo, M; Morris, A; Nair, M; Unwalla, H J

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent lung infections and pneumonia are emerging as significant comorbidities in the HIV-infected population in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV infection has been reported to suppress nasal mucociliary clearance (MCC). Since the primary components driving nasal MCC and bronchial MCC are identical, it is possible that bronchial MCC is affected as well. Effective MCC requires optimal ciliary beating which depends on the maintenance of the airway surface liquid (ASL), a function of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activity and the integrity of the signaling mechanism that regulates ciliary beating and fluid secretion. Impairment of either component of the MCC apparatus can compromise its efficacy and promote microbial colonization. We demonstrate that primary bronchial epithelium expresses HIV receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 and can be infected by both R5 and X4 tropic strains of HIV. We show that HIV Tat suppresses CFTR biogenesis and function in primary bronchial epithelial cells by a pathway involving TGF-β signaling. HIV infection also interferes with bronchial epithelial cell differentiation and suppresses ciliogenesis. These findings suggest that HIV infection suppresses tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance and this may predispose HIV-infected patients to recurrent lung infections, pneumonia and chronic bronchitis.

  6. HIV Infects Bronchial Epithelium and Suppresses Components of the Mucociliary Clearance Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapaiyan, S.; Parira, T.; Dutta, R.; Agudelo, M.; Morris, A.; Nair, M.; Unwalla, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent lung infections and pneumonia are emerging as significant comorbidities in the HIV-infected population in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV infection has been reported to suppress nasal mucociliary clearance (MCC). Since the primary components driving nasal MCC and bronchial MCC are identical, it is possible that bronchial MCC is affected as well. Effective MCC requires optimal ciliary beating which depends on the maintenance of the airway surface liquid (ASL), a function of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activity and the integrity of the signaling mechanism that regulates ciliary beating and fluid secretion. Impairment of either component of the MCC apparatus can compromise its efficacy and promote microbial colonization. We demonstrate that primary bronchial epithelium expresses HIV receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 and can be infected by both R5 and X4 tropic strains of HIV. We show that HIV Tat suppresses CFTR biogenesis and function in primary bronchial epithelial cells by a pathway involving TGF-β signaling. HIV infection also interferes with bronchial epithelial cell differentiation and suppresses ciliogenesis. These findings suggest that HIV infection suppresses tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance and this may predispose HIV-infected patients to recurrent lung infections, pneumonia and chronic bronchitis. PMID:28060951

  7. Design and characterization of a peptide mimotope of the HIV-1 gp120 bridging sheet.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Marco; Fiume, Giuseppe; Caivano, Antonella; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Falcone, Cristina; Masci, Francesca Fasanella; Iaccino, Enrico; Mimmi, Selena; Palmieri, Camillo; Pisano, Antonio; Pontoriero, Marilena; Rossi, Annalisa; Scialdone, Annarita; Vecchio, Eleonora; Andreozzi, Concetta; Trovato, Maria; Rafay, Jan; Ferko, Boris; Montefiori, David; Lombardi, Angela; Morsica, Giulia; Poli, Guido; Quinto, Ileana; Pavone, Vincenzo; de Berardinis, Piergiuseppe; Scala, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The Bridging Sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 is highly conserved among the HIV-1 strains and allows HIV-1 binding to host cells via the HIV-1 coreceptors. Further, the bridging sheet domain is a major target to neutralize HIV-1 infection. We rationally designed four linear peptide epitopes that mimic the three-dimensional structure of bridging sheet by using molecular modeling. Chemically synthesized peptides BS3 and BS4 showed a fair degree of antigenicity when tested in ELISA with IgG purified from HIV(+) broadly neutralizing sera while the production of synthetic peptides BS1 and BS2 failed due to their high degree of hydrophobicity. To overcome this limitation, we linked all four BS peptides to the COOH-terminus of GST protein to test both their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Only the BS1 peptide showed good antigenicity; however, no envelope specific antibodies were elicited upon mice immunization. Therefore we performed further analyses by linking BS1 peptide to the NH2-terminus of the E2 scaffold from the Geobacillus Stearothermophylus PDH complex. The E2-BS1 fusion peptide showed good antigenic results, however only one immunized rabbit elicited good antibody titers towards both the monomeric and oligomeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). In addition, moderate neutralizing antibodies response was elicited against two HIV-1 clade B and one clade C primary isolates. These preliminary data validate the peptide mimotope approach as a promising tool to obtain an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  8. Flow virometric sorting and analysis of HIV quasispecies from plasma

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Demberg, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry is utilized extensively for cellular analysis, but technical limitations have prevented its routine application for characterizing virus. The recent introduction of nanoscale fluorescence-activated cytometric cell sorting now allows analysis of individual virions. Here, we demonstrate staining and sorting of infectious HIV. Fluorescent antibodies specific for cellular molecules found on budding virions were used to label CCR5-tropic Bal HIV and CXCR4-tropic NL4.3 HIV Env-expressing pseudovirions made in THP-1 cells (monocyte/macrophage) and H9 cells (T cells), respectively. Using a flow cytometer, we resolved the stained virus beyond isotype staining and demonstrated purity and infectivity of sorted virus populations on cells with the appropriate coreceptors. We subsequently sorted infectious simian/human immunodeficiency virus from archived plasma. Recovery was approximately 0.5%, but virus present in plasma was already bound to viral-specific IgG generated in vivo, likely contributing to the low yield. Importantly, using two broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies, PG9 and VRC01, we also sorted virus from archived human plasma and analyzed the sorted populations genetically and by proteomics, identifying the quasispecies present. The ability to sort infectious HIV from clinically relevant samples provides material for detailed molecular, genetic, and proteomic analyses applicable to future design of vaccine antigens and potential development of personalized treatment regimens. PMID:28239654

  9. Predominance of CXCR4 tropism in HIV-1 CRF14_BG strains from newly diagnosed infections.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Delgado, Elena; Vega, Yolanda; Montero, Vanessa; Cuevas, Teresa; Fernández-García, Aurora; García-Riart, Beatriz; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Real, Ricardo; López-Álvarez, María José; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Lezaun, María Jesús; Ordóñez, Patricia; Ramos, Carmen; Bereciartua, Elena; Calleja, Sara; Sánchez-García, Ana M; Thomson, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    R5-tropic viruses are associated with HIV-1 transmission and predominate during the early stages of infection. X4-tropic populations have been detected in ~50% of patients with late-stage disease infected with subtype B viruses. In this study, we compared the frequency of X4 tropism in individuals infected with HIV-1 CRF14_BG viruses, which have a V3 loop of subtype B, with a control group of individuals infected with subtype B viruses. Sixty-three individuals infected with HIV-1 CRF14_BG (n = 31) or subtype B (n = 32) were studied. Similar proportions of newly diagnosed and chronically infected individuals were included in the subtype B and CRF14_BG groups. V3 sequences were obtained and coreceptor tropism was predicted using the Geno2pheno[coreceptor] algorithm. V3 net charge and 11/25 rules were also used for coreceptor prediction. Overall, X4 tropism was more frequent among individuals infected with CRF14_BG viruses (87.1%) than subtype B viruses (34.3%), a difference that was statistically highly significant (P = 0.00001). Importantly, the frequencies among newly diagnosed individuals were 90% and 13.3%, respectively (P = 0.0007). Characteristic amino acids in the V3 loop (T13, M14, V19 and W20) were identified at higher frequencies in CRF14_BG viruses (54%) than subtype B viruses (0%; P < 0.000001). CRF14_BG is the genetic form with the highest proportion of X4-tropic viruses reported to date in newly diagnosed and chronic infections. This suggests high pathogenicity for CRF14_BG viruses, potentially leading to rapid disease progression. CCR5 antagonists will be ineffective in most CRF14_BG-infected patients, even at early stages of infection.

  10. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Sturdevant, Christa B; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the "immune privileged" CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir.

  11. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir. PMID:25236812

  12. Inhibition of HIV infection of H9 cells by chlorpromazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, I; Lee, S; Molnar, J; Foldeak, S; Pine, P S; Weaver, J L; Aszalos, A

    1997-05-01

    The binding between the HIV surface protein, gp120, and the CD4 coreceptor is known to be initiated by electrostatic interactions. Because of the ability of chlorpromazine to interact with proteins by charge transfer, we tested several derivatives for their ability to block binding of HIV to CD4+ cells. We have shown that 7,8-dioxo-chlorpromazine blocks binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled anti-Leu3a and rgp120 to peripheral human blood T4 cells and blocks syncytia formation between gp120- and CD4-expressing cells. We also found that 7,8-dioxo-chlorpromazine blocks HIV infectivity of H9 cells and acts synergistically with zidovudine.

  13. Monolithic Microwave Switching Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Ch'en, Daniel R.; Petersen, Wendell C.

    1989-01-01

    Gallium arsenide integrated-circuit chip switches any of three microwave input signals to any of three output ports. Measuring 4.9 mm on side, chip contains nine field-effect transistor (FET) crosspoint switches. Housed in custom-designed package with standard connectors for easy integration into system. FET's on chip operated as passive switches and consume no static power and insignificant amounts of switching power. Chip module cascades with similar modules into large arrays handling as many as 100 inputs and 100 outputs. Applications include switching and routing vast amounts of data between computers at extremely high speed. On communications satellite, chip switches microwave signals to and from Earth stations and other satellites.

  14. Vaccine-delivered HIV envelope inhibits CD4+ T-cell activation, a mechanism for poor HIV vaccine responses

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Kathy; Hu, Haitao; Ni, Houping; Hoxie, James A.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes impairment of the immune system in part by targeting CD4+ T cells for infection and dysfunction. HIV envelope (Env) present on free virions and infected cells causes dysfunction of uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells via interaction with both CD4 and coreceptors. Env is commonly used as part of a cocktail of HIV antigens in current vaccines. In DNA and viral vector vaccine approaches, antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and non-APCs in the vicinity of the vaccine delivery site and draining lymph node express vaccine-derived antigens. The studies here demonstrate that cell-surface expression of Env on APCs and non-APCs as part of the vaccine action causes an inhibition of antigen-induced CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation mediated by CD4 binding and suggests a potential mechanism for reduced activity of Env-containing HIV vaccines. Similar studies using a functional Env lacking CD4 binding circumvented suppression, suggesting an alternative and potentially superior approach to HIV vaccine design. PMID:17158230

  15. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  16. Host SAMHD1 Protein Promotes HIV-1 Recombination in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Daly, Michele B.; Allan, Kevin C.; Kim, Baek

    2014-01-01

    Template switching can occur during the reverse transcription of HIV-1. Deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) concentrations have been biochemically shown to impact HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-mediated strand transfer. Lowering the dNTP concentrations promotes RT pausing and RNA template degradation by RNase H activity of the RT, subsequently leading to strand transfer. Terminally differentiated/nondividing macrophages, which serve as a key HIV-1 reservoir, contain extremely low dNTP concentrations (20–50 nm), which results from the cellular dNTP hydrolyzing sterile α motif and histidine aspartic domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) protein, when compared with activated CD4+ T cells (2–5 μm). In this study, we first observed that HIV-1 template switching efficiency was nearly doubled in human primary macrophages when compared with activated CD4+ T cells. Second, SAMHD1 degradation by viral protein X (Vpx), which elevates cellular dNTP concentrations, decreased HIV-1 template switching efficiency in macrophages to the levels comparable with CD4+ T cells. Third, differentiated SAMHD1 shRNA THP-1 cells have a 2-fold increase in HIV-1 template switching efficiency. Fourth, SAMHD1 degradation by Vpx did not alter HIV-1 template switching efficiency in activated CD4+ T cells. Finally, the HIV-1 V148I RT mutant that is defective in dNTP binding and has DNA synthesis delay promoted RT stand transfer when compared with wild type RT, particularly at low dNTP concentrations. Here, we report that SAMHD1 regulation of the dNTP concentrations influences HIV-1 template switching efficiency, particularly in macrophages. PMID:24352659

  17. Exploiting the Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Acyclovir: Suppression of Primary and Drug-Resistant HIV Isolates and Potentiation of the Activity by Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Introini, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Munawwar, Arshi; Merbah, Melanie; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Derudas, Marco; McGuigan, Christopher; Balzarini, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) suppressive therapy using acyclovir (ACV) or valacyclovir in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected persons increased the patient's survival and decreased the HIV-1 load. It has been shown that the incorporation of ACV-monophosphate into the nascent DNA chain instead of dGMP results in the termination of viral DNA elongation and directly inhibits laboratory strains of HIV-1. We evaluated here the anti-HIV activity of ACV against primary HIV-1 isolates of different clades and coreceptor specificity and against viral isolates resistant to currently used drugs, including zidovudine, lamivudine, nevirapine, a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), a fusion inhibitor, and two protease inhibitors. We found that, at clinically relevant concentrations, ACV inhibits the replication of these isolates in human tissues infected ex vivo. Moreover, addition of ribavirin, an antiviral capable of depleting the pool of intracellular dGTP, potentiated the ACV-mediated HIV-1 suppression. These data warrant further clinical investigations of the benefits of using inexpensive and safe ACV alone or in combination with other drugs against HIV-1, especially to complement or delay highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation in low-resource settings. PMID:22314523

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis induces CCR5-dependent transfer of infectious HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells

    PubMed Central

    Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Asrani, Anil C; Gebhard, Kristin H; Dietrich, Elizabeth A; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infection with HIV occurs infrequently through the oral route. The frequency of occurrence may be increased by concomitant bacterial infection of the oral tissues, since co-infection and inflammation of some cell types increases HIV-1 replication. A putative periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis selectively up-regulates expression of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 on oral keratinocytes. We, therefore, hypothesized that P. gingivalis modulates the outcome of HIV infection in oral epithelial cells. Results Oral and tonsil epithelial cells were pre-incubated with P. gingivalis, and inoculated with either an X4- or R5-type HIV-1. Between 6 and 48 hours post-inoculation, P. gingivalis selectively increased the infectivity of R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral and tonsil keratinocytes; infectivity of X4-tropic HIV-1 remained unchanged. Oral keratinocytes appeared to harbor infectious HIV-1, with no evidence of productive infection. HIV-1 was harbored at highest levels during the first 6 hours after HIV exposure and decreased to barely detectable levels at 48 hours. HIV did not appear to co-localize with P. gingivalis, which increased selective R5-tropic HIV-1 trans infection from keratinocytes to permissive cells. When CCR5 was selectively blocked, HIV-1 trans infection was reduced. Conclusion P. gingivalis up-regulation of CCR5 increases trans infection of harbored R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells. Oral infections such as periodontitis may, therefore, increase risk for oral infection and dissemination of R5-tropic HIV-1. PMID:18371227

  19. Double-Bounce Switching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    module. Adjustments provided to investigate double- bounce switching are noted. limitation is at a higher level and occurs in the conventionally...To be presented at the 4th IEEE PUlsed Power Conference, June 6-8, 1983, Albuquerque, NM. DOUBLE- BOUNCE SWITCHING* George B. Frazier and Steven R...Ashby Physics International Company 2700 Merced Street San Leandro, California 94577 Abstract Double- bounce switching is a technique for

  20. Avalanche Photoconductive Switching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    held off across the switch. In our case this corresponds to 70 kV/cm and is limited by surface flashover . The pulse length is determined by the...off across the gap of the switch, which in turn appears to be limited by surface flashover . There appears to be a threshold electric field of 20-60...and understand this mode of operation. Introduction Laser activated photoconductive switching in semiconductors is a promising technology for high

  1. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  2. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  3. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  4. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  5. The CCR6/CCL20 Chemokine Axis in HIV Immunity and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adrian Yong Sing; Körner, Heinrich

    2016-12-21

    Recent studies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have garnered interest for the role of CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) and its known ligands, CCL20 and human β-defensins, in viral entry, dissemination and anti-viral immunity. Several studies have suggested that CCR6 may also act as a weak co-receptor of HIV entry, in addition to the canonical CXCR4 and CCR5.However, the pathogenic significance has yet to be demonstrated as the observations for preferential infection of CD4+CCR6+ over CD4+CCR6¯ T cells appear to be independent of CCR6 expression. This indicates means for preferential infection other than CCR6 co-receptor use. Attention has also turned to the inadvertent role for the CCR6/CCL20 axis in attracting key immune cells, including TH17 cells and DCs, to sites of infection and propagating the virus to other sites of the body. This review article will summarise the latest evidence that the CCR6/CCL20 chemokine axis is playing an important role in HIV pathogenesis and immunity. Further work with in vivo studies are needed to establish the biological, and hence, therapeutic, significance of these findings.

  6. Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6 overexpression confers protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced neurotoxicity and reduces tau phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqi; Bahety, Priti; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Emerging studies have suggested the involvement of dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin cascade in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, genetic variations in Wnt co-receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 6 causing reduced Wnt signaling has been linked to late-onset AD. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 would serve as an effective new approach in reducing neurotoxicity induced by oxidative stress and decreasing tau phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our results showed that overexpression of LRP5 and LRP6 in SH-SY5Y cells activates Wnt signaling and downstream proliferation genes, whereas knockdown of the co-receptors represses Wnt signaling and the transcription of proliferative markers. We further demonstrated that overexpression of LRP5 and LRP6 protects SH-SY5Y from cell death caused by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, inhibits GSK3β activity and subsequently reduces tau phosphorylation. Together, our findings suggest that rescuing LRP5/6-mediated Wnt signaling improves neuronal cell survival and reduces tau phosphorylation, which support the hypothesis that Wnt signaling might be an attractive therapeutic strategy for managing AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CD8 Co-receptor promotes susceptibility of CD8+ T cells to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zloza, Andrew; Jagoda, Michael C.; Lyons, Gretchen E.; Graves, Michael C.; Kohlhapp, Frederick J.; O’Sullivan, Jeremy A.; Lacek, Andrew T.; Nishimura, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cell function depends on a finely orchestrated balance of activation/suppression signals. While the stimulatory role of the CD8 co-receptor and pleiotropic capabilities of TGF-β have been studied individually, the influence of CD8 co-receptor on TGF-β function in CD8+ T cells is unknown. Here, we show that while CD8 enhances T cell activation, it also enhances susceptibility to TGF-β-mediated immune suppression. Using Jurkat cells expressing a full-length, truncated or no αβCD8 molecule, we demonstrate that cells expressing full-length αβCD8 were highly susceptible, αβCD8-truncated cells were partially susceptible, and CD8-deficient cells were completely resistant to suppression by TGF-β. Additionally, we determined that inhibition of Lck rendered mouse CD8+ T cells highly resistant to TGF-β suppression. Resistance was not associated with TGF-β receptor expression but did correlate with decreased Smad3 and increased Smad7 levels. These findings highlight a previously unrecognized third role for CD8 co-receptor which appears to prepare activated CD8+ T cells for response to TGF-β. Based on the important role which TGF-β-mediated suppression plays in tumor immunology, these findings unveil necessary considerations in formulation of CD8+ T cell-related cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21193909

  8. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  9. Alarm toe switch

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, Floyd P.

    1982-01-01

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

  10. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  11. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  12. Platform switching and bone platform switching.

    PubMed

    Carinci, Francesco; Brunelli, Giorgio; Danza, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Bone platform switching involves an inward bone ring in the coronal part of the implant that is in continuity with the alveolar bone crest. Bone platform switching is obtained by using a dental fixture with a reverse conical neck. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional vs reverse conical neck implants. In the period between May 2004 and November 2007, 86 patients (55 females and 31 males; median age, 53 years) were operated and 234 implants were inserted: 40 and 194 were conventional vs reverse conical neck implants, respectively. Kaplan-Meier algorithm and Cox regression were used to detect those variables associated with the clinical outcome. No differences in survival and success rates were detected between conventional vs reverse conical neck implants alone or in combination with any of the studied variables. Although bone platform switching leads to several advantages, no statistical difference in alveolar crest resorption is detected in comparison with reverse conical neck implants. We suppose that the proximity of the implant abutment junction to the alveolar crestal bone gives no protection against the microflora contained in the micrograph. Additional studies on larger series and a combination of platform switching and bone platform switching could lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  13. HIV Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibody tests, combination or fourth-generation tests, and nucleic acid tests (NAT). HIV tests may be performed on ... retested 3 months after your possible exposure. A nucleic acid test (NAT) looks for HIV in the blood. ...

  14. Neuropilin-1 functions as a VEGFR2 co-receptor to guide developmental angiogenesis independent of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Maria V; Hagan, Nellwyn; Tata, Aleksandra; Oh, Won-Jong; Lacoste, Baptiste; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Kopycinska, Justyna; Bischoff, Joyce; Wang, Jia-Huai; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-09-22

    During development, tissue repair, and tumor growth, most blood vessel networks are generated through angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of this process and currently both VEGF and its receptors, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and Neuropilin1 (NRP1), are targeted in therapeutic strategies for vascular disease and cancer. NRP1 is essential for vascular morphogenesis, but how NRP1 functions to guide vascular development has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we generated a mouse line harboring a point mutation in the endogenous Nrp1 locus that selectively abolishes VEGF-NRP1 binding (Nrp1(VEGF-)). Nrp1(VEGF-) mutants survive to adulthood with normal vasculature revealing that NRP1 functions independent of VEGF-NRP1 binding during developmental angiogenesis. Moreover, we found that Nrp1-deficient vessels have reduced VEGFR2 surface expression in vivo demonstrating that NRP1 regulates its co-receptor, VEGFR2. Given the resources invested in NRP1-targeted anti-angiogenesis therapies, our results will be integral for developing strategies to re-build vasculature in disease.

  15. Role of Wnt Co-receptor LRP6 in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinlu; Lu, Wenyan; Chen, Dongquan; Xu, Bo; Li, Yonghe

    2017-03-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Although studies have shown an increased expression of LRP6 in several types of cancer, its function in tumor development and progression remains to be elucidated. We herein demonstrated that LRP6 expression is up-regulated in human triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients and human TNBC cell lines, and that knockdown of LRP6 expression and treatment of recombinant Mesd protein (a specific inhibitor of LRP6) significantly decreased cell migration and invasion of TNBC MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Interestingly, the effects of LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment on TNBC cell migration and invasion were more prominent than on TNBC cell proliferation/viability. Mechanistically, LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling and decreased the expression of S100A4, a mediator of cancer metastasis and a specific target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, in TNBC cells. Together, our data suggest that LRP6 promotes TNBC cell migration and invasion by regulating the expression and function of S100A4 via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of cervical cancer stem cell-like cells: phenotyping, stemness, and human papilloma virus co-receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Santiago-López, Luz; Cruz-Domínguez, Verónica B; Toledo-Guzmán, Mariel E; Hernández-Cueto, Daniel; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Garrido, Efraín; Cantú De León, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2016-05-31

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit high tumorigenic capacity in several tumor models. We have now determined an extended phenotype for cervical cancer stem cells. Our results showed increased CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ expression in these cells, together with higher Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHbright)activity in Cervical CSC (CCSC) enriched in cervospheres. An increase in stem cell markers, represented by OCT-4, Nanog, and β-catenin proteins, was also observed, indicating that under our culture conditions, CCSC are enriched in cervospheres, as compared to monolayer cultures. In addition, we were able to show that an increased ALDHbright activity correlated with higher tumorigenic activity. Flow cytometry and immunflorescence assays demonstrated that CCSC in cervosphere cultures contain a sub-population of cells that contain Annexin II, a Human papillomavirus (HPV) co-receptor. Taken together, under our conditions there is an increase in the number of CCSC in cervosphere cultures which exhibit the following phenotype: CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ and high ALDH activity, which in turn correlates with higher tumorigenicity. The presence of Annexin II and CD49f in CCSC opens the possibility that normal cervical stem cells could be the initial target of infection by high risk HPV.

  17. Growth and turning properties of adult glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 nonpeptidergic sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, GuiFang; Singh, Vandana; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-09-01

    An overlapping population of adult primary sensory neurons that innervate the skin express the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 (GFRα1), the lectin IB4, and the "regenerative brake" phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10. Using an adapted turning and growth assay, we analyzed the growth cone behavior of adult immunoselected GFRα1 sensory neurons. These neurons had less robust baseline growth and reluctant responsiveness to individual growth factors but responded to synergistic types of input from glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, a phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor, or a downstream Rho kinase inhibitor. Hepatocyte growth factor and the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor were associated with growth cone turning. A gradient of protein extracted from skin samples, a primary target of GFRα1 axons, replicated the impact of synergistic support. Within the skin, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed within epidermal axons, indicating an autocrine role accompanying local hepatocyte growth factor synthesis. Taken together, our findings identify unique growth properties and plasticity of a distinct population of epidermal axons that are relevant to neurologic repair and skin reinnervation.

  18. A Sonic hedgehog coreceptor, BOC regulates neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth via interaction with ABL and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Tuan Anh; Leem, Young-Eun; Kim, Bok-Geon; Cho, Hana; Lee, Sang-Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a critical step for neurogenesis and remodeling synaptic circuitry during neuronal development and regeneration. An immunoglobulin superfamily member, BOC functions as Sonic hedgehog (Shh) coreceptor in canonical and noncanonical Shh signaling in neuronal development and axon outgrowth/guidance. However signaling mechanisms responsible for BOC action during these processes remain unknown. In our previous studies, a multiprotein complex containing BOC and a closely related protein CDO promotes myogenic differentiation through activation of multiple signaling pathways, including non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL. Given that ABL and Jun. N-terminal kinase (JNK) are implicated in actin cytoskeletal dynamics required for neurogenesis, we investigated the relationship between BOC, ABL and JNK during neuronal differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that BOC and ABL are induced in P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells and cortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs) during neuronal differentiation. BOC-depleted EC cells or Boc(-/-) NPCs exhibit impaired neuronal differentiation with shorter neurite formation. BOC interacts with ABL through its putative SH2 binding domain and seems to be phosphorylated in an ABL activity-dependent manner. Unlike wildtype BOC, ABL-binding defective BOC mutants exhibit impaired JNK activation and neuronal differentiation. Finally, Shh treatment enhances JNK activation which is diminished by BOC depletion. These data suggest that BOC interacts with ABL and activates JNK thereby promoting neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of cervical cancer stem cell-like cells: phenotyping, stemness, and human papilloma virus co-receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Santiago-López, Luz; Cruz-Domínguez, Verónica B.; Toledo-Guzmán, Mariel E.; Hernández-Cueto, Daniel; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Garrido, Efraín; De León, David Cantú; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit high tumorigenic capacity in several tumor models. We have now determined an extended phenotype for cervical cancer stem cells. Our results showed increased CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ expression in these cells, together with higher Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHbright)activity in Cervical CSC (CCSC) enriched in cervospheres. An increase in stem cell markers, represented by OCT-4, Nanog, and β-catenin proteins, was also observed, indicating that under our culture conditions, CCSC are enriched in cervospheres, as compared to monolayer cultures. In addition, we were able to show that an increased ALDHbright activity correlated with higher tumorigenic activity. Flow cytometry and immunflorescence assays demonstrated that CCSC in cervosphere cultures contain a sub-population of cells that contain Annexin II, a Human papillomavirus (HPV) co-receptor. Taken together, under our conditions there is an increase in the number of CCSC in cervosphere cultures which exhibit the following phenotype: CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ and high ALDH activity, which in turn correlates with higher tumorigenicity. The presence of Annexin II and CD49f in CCSC opens the possibility that normal cervical stem cells could be the initial target of infection by high risk HPV. PMID:27008711

  20. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06587.001 PMID:26052747

  1. Initiation of Wnt signaling: control of Wnt coreceptor Lrp6 phosphorylation/activation via frizzled, dishevelled and axin functions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xin; Huang, He; Tamai, Keiko; Zhang, Xinjun; Harada, Yuko; Yokota, Chika; Almeida, Karla; Wang, Jianbo; Doble, Brad; Woodgett, Jim; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hsieh, Jen-Chieh; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling has central roles in development and diseases, and is initiated by the action of the frizzled (Fz) receptor, its coreceptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), and the cytoplasmic dishevelled (Dvl) protein. The functional relationships among Fz, Lrp6 and Dvl have long been enigmatic. We demonstrated previously that Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation via glycogen synthase kinase 3 (Gsk3) initiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Here we show that both Fz and Dvl functions are critical for Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation through Fz-Lrp6 interaction. We also show that axin, a key scaffolding protein in the Wnt pathway, is required for Lrp6 phosphorylation via its ability to recruit Gsk3, and inhibition of Gsk3 at the plasma membrane blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our results suggest a model that upon Wnt-induced Fz-Lrp6 complex formation, Fz recruitment of Dvl in turn recruits the axin-Gsk3 complex, thereby promoting Lrp6 phosphorylation to initiate β-catenin signaling. We discuss the dual roles of the axin-Gsk3 complex and signal amplification by Lrp6-axin interaction during Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:18077588

  2. Overweight in Mice and Enhanced Adipogenesis In Vitro Are Associated With Lack of the Hedgehog Coreceptor Boc

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Jin; Jo, Shin-Bum; Romer, Anthony I.; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Min-Jung; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Obesity arises from a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. However, the processes that regulate white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion at the level of the adipocyte are not well understood. The Hedgehog (HH) pathway plays a conserved role in adipogenesis, inhibiting fat formation in vivo and in vitro, but it has not been shown that mice with reduced HH pathway activity have enhanced adiposity. We report that mice lacking the HH coreceptor BOC displayed age-related overweight and excess WAT. They also displayed alterations in some metabolic parameters but normal food intake. Furthermore, they had an exacerbated response to a high-fat diet, including enhanced weight gain and adipocyte hypertrophy, livers with greater fat accumulation, and elevated expression of genes related to adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and adipokine production. Cultured Boc−/− mouse embryo fibroblasts showed enhanced adipogenesis relative to Boc+/+ cells, and they expressed reduced levels of HH pathway target genes. Therefore, a loss-of-function mutation in an HH pathway component is associated with WAT accumulation and overweight in mice. Variant alleles of such HH regulators may contribute to WAT accumulation in human individuals with additional genetic or lifestyle-based predisposition to obesity. PMID:25576054

  3. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Bernd; Tao, Shijie; Yu, Tingsheng; Huysseune, Ann; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26121341

  4. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-06-08

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor.

  5. The macrophage and HIV: basic concepts and methodologies.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Along with CD4+ T-lymphocytes, macrophage lineage cells serve as primary hosts for HIV replication in vivo. In some tissues such as brain, where T-cell infection is essentially absent, the development of HIV-associated disease is mediated through infection of macrophages. This fact underscores the importance of experimental methods that yield results and conclusions that accurately reflect the mechanisms operational in vivo. Unfortunately, our understanding of key aspects of HIV-macrophage interactions, most notably, features of viral entry, replication, latency and persistence, lags behind that of T-cell infection. While some questions are best approached by direct examination of patient specimens using methods such as immunohistochemistry and phylogenetics, experiments based on HIV infection of macrophages in vitro can, necessarily, identify and elucidate the events, molecular mechanisms, and pathological consequences associated with this infection. In addition, macrophage culture methods can provide for the isolation of infectious HIV from patient blood monocytes and tissue macrophages, as well as subsequent continued propagation of these isolates in their host cell of origin. Maintenance of the host cell pedigree limits the possibility of alteration of viral properties such as chemokine coreceptor usage that may then no longer reflect the situation in vivo. This chapter focuses on HIV infection of macrophages. We describe methods for the cultivation of human blood monocyte-derived macrophages, their infection with HIV and subsequent maintenance, and the isolation of infectious HIV from them. Also included is a protocol using accutase for macrophage detachment. Accutase is a relatively new dissociation medium, used primarily in stem cell research. In our laboratory, it has far out-performed all other methods by providing for the gentle, yet thorough, detachment of macrophages without the need for scraping, and without loss of surface antigens or viability.

  6. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M.; Petersen, Maya L.; Gibb, Diana M.; Gilks, Charles F.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G.; Walker, A. Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003–2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm3 or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count <250) was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 0.97) with 12-weekly CD4 testing, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.95, 0.97) with 24-weekly CD4 testing, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) with a single CD4 test at 48 weeks (baseline), and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.94) with no CD4 testing. Comparing randomized groups by 48-week CD4 count, the mortality risk associated with CDM versus LCM was greater in persons with CD4 counts of <100 (hazard ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) than in those with CD4 counts of ≥100 (hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.7; interaction P = 0.04). These findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  7. Broad anti-HIV activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue lectin family

    PubMed Central

    Férir, Geoffrey; Huskens, Dana; Noppen, Sam; Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Schols, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. The founding member OAA and a designed hybrid OAAH (OPA) recognize similar but unique carbohydrate structures of Man-9, compared with other antiviral carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs). These two newly described CBAs were evaluated for their inactivating properties on HIV replication and transmission and for their potential as microbicides. Methods Various cellular assays were used to determine antiviral activity against wild-type and certain CBA-resistant HIV-1 strains: (i) free HIV virion infection in human T lymphoma cell lines and PBMCs; (ii) syncytium formation assay using persistently HIV-infected T cells and non-infected CD4+ T cells; (iii) DC-SIGN-mediated viral capture; and (iv) transmission to uninfected CD4+ T cells. OAA and OPA were also evaluated for their mitogenic properties and potential synergistic effects using other CBAs. Results OAA and OPA inhibit HIV replication, syncytium formation between HIV-1-infected and uninfected T cells, DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 capture and transmission to CD4+ target T cells, thereby rendering a variety of HIV-1 and HIV-2 clinical isolates non-infectious, independent of their coreceptor use. Both CBAs competitively inhibit the binding of the Manα(1-2)Man-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. The HIV-1 NL4.32G12res, NL4.3MVNres and IIIBGRFTres strains were equally inhibited as the wild-type HIV-1 strains by these CBAs. Combination studies indicate that OAA and OPA act synergistically with Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, 2G12 mAb and griffithsin (GRFT), with the exception of OPA/GRFT. Conclusions OAA and OPA are unique CBAs with broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity; however, further optimization will be necessary for microbicidal application. PMID:24970741

  8. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  9. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Anti-HIV scFv Efficiently Protects CD4 T Cells from HIV-1 Infection and Deletion in hu-PBL Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chaobaihui; Wang, Weiming; Cheng, Liang; Li, Guangming; Wen, Michael; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Qing; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite success in viral inhibition and CD4 T cell recovery by highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), HIV-1 is still not curable due to the persistence of the HIV-1 reservoir during treatment. One patient with acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a homozygous CCR5 Δ32 donor has had no detectable viremia for 9 years after HAART cessation. This case has inspired a field of HIV-1 cure research focusing on engineering HIV-1 resistance in permissive cells. Here, we employed a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-scFv X5 approach to confer resistance of human primary CD4 T cells to HIV-1. We showed that primary CD4 T cells expressing GPI-scFv X5 were resistant to CCR5 (R5)-, CXCR4 (X4)-, and dual-tropic HIV-1 and had a survival advantage compared to control cells ex vivo. In a hu-PBL mouse study, GPI-scFv X5-transduced CD4 T cells were selected in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues upon HIV-1 infection. Finally, GPI-scFv X5-transduced CD4 T cells, after being cotransfused with HIV-infected cells, showed significantly reduced viral loads and viral RNA copy numbers relative to CD4 cells in hu-PBL mice compared to mice with GPI-scFv AB65-transduced CD4 T cells. We conclude that GPI-scFv X5-modified CD4 T cells could potentially be used as a genetic intervention against both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 infections. IMPORTANCE Blocking of HIV-1 entry is one of most promising approaches for therapy. Genetic disruption of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 by nucleases in T cells is under 2 clinical trials and leads to reduced viremia in patients. However, the emergence of viruses using the CXCR4 coreceptor is a concern for therapies applying single-coreceptor disruption. Here, we report that HIV-1-permissive CD4 T cells engineered with GPI-scFv X5 are resistant to R5-, X4-, or dual-tropic virus infection ex vivo. In a preclinical study using hu-PBL mice, we show that CD4 T cells were protected and that GPI-scFv X5

  10. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Anti-HIV scFv Efficiently Protects CD4 T Cells from HIV-1 Infection and Deletion in hu-PBL Mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chaobaihui; Wang, Weiming; Cheng, Liang; Li, Guangming; Wen, Michael; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Qing; Li, Dan; Zhou, Paul; Su, Lishan

    2017-02-01

    Despite success in viral inhibition and CD4 T cell recovery by highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), HIV-1 is still not curable due to the persistence of the HIV-1 reservoir during treatment. One patient with acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a homozygous CCR5 Δ32 donor has had no detectable viremia for 9 years after HAART cessation. This case has inspired a field of HIV-1 cure research focusing on engineering HIV-1 resistance in permissive cells. Here, we employed a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-scFv X5 approach to confer resistance of human primary CD4 T cells to HIV-1. We showed that primary CD4 T cells expressing GPI-scFv X5 were resistant to CCR5 (R5)-, CXCR4 (X4)-, and dual-tropic HIV-1 and had a survival advantage compared to control cells ex vivo In a hu-PBL mouse study, GPI-scFv X5-transduced CD4 T cells were selected in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues upon HIV-1 infection. Finally, GPI-scFv X5-transduced CD4 T cells, after being cotransfused with HIV-infected cells, showed significantly reduced viral loads and viral RNA copy numbers relative to CD4 cells in hu-PBL mice compared to mice with GPI-scFv AB65-transduced CD4 T cells. We conclude that GPI-scFv X5-modified CD4 T cells could potentially be used as a genetic intervention against both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 infections. Blocking of HIV-1 entry is one of most promising approaches for therapy. Genetic disruption of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 by nucleases in T cells is under 2 clinical trials and leads to reduced viremia in patients. However, the emergence of viruses using the CXCR4 coreceptor is a concern for therapies applying single-coreceptor disruption. Here, we report that HIV-1-permissive CD4 T cells engineered with GPI-scFv X5 are resistant to R5-, X4-, or dual-tropic virus infection ex vivo In a preclinical study using hu-PBL mice, we show that CD4 T cells were protected and that GPI-scFv X5-transduced cells were

  11. Higher viral load and genetic diversity of HIV-1 in seminal compartments than in blood of seven Chinese men who have sex with men and have early HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan-Mei; Chen, Guang-Lei; Zhu, Wei-Jun; Huang, Hui-Huang; Fu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ming; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2017-06-01

    To date, there have been no reports characterizing HIV-1 in the semen of Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) with early infection. In this study, genetic diversity and viral load of HIV-1 in the seminal compartments and blood of Chinese MSM with early HIV-1 infection were examined. Viral load and genetic diversity of HIV-1 in paired samples of semen and blood were analyzed in seven MSM with early HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 RNA and DNA were quantitated by real-time PCR assays. Through sequencing the C2-V5 region of the HIV-1 env gene, the HIV-1 genotype and genetic diversity based on V3 loop amino acid sequences were determined by using Geno2pheno and PSSM programs co-receptor usage. It was found that there was more HIV-1 RNA in seminal plasma than in blood plasma and total, and more 2-LTR circular and integrated HIV-1 DNA in seminal cells than in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all seven patients with early HIV-infection. There was also greater HIV-1 genetic diversity in seminal than in blood compartments. HIV-1 in plasma displayed higher genetic diversity than in cells from the blood and semen. In addition, V3 loop central motifs, which present some key neutralizing antibody epitopes, varied between blood and semen. Thus, virological characteristics in semen may be more representative when evaluating risk of transmission in persons with early HIV infection. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 Infects Human Hepatic Stellate Cells and Promotes Collagen I and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Expression: Implications for the Pathogenesis of HIV/Hepatitis C Virus–Induced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuyama, Ana C.; Hong, Feng; Saiman, Yedidya; Wang, Chuansheng; Ozkok, Derya; Mosoian, Arevik; Chen, Ping; Chen, Benjamin K.; Klotman, Mary E.; Bansal, Meena B.

    2010-01-01

    Patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) develop more rapid fibrosis than those infected with HCV only. In HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, fibrosis progression correlates with HIV RNA levels, suggesting a direct role of HIV in liver fibrogenesis. Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) and cysteine-X-cysteine receptor 4 (CXCR4), the two major coreceptors required for HIV entry into cells, are expressed on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the principle fibrogenic cell type in the liver. We therefore examined whether HIV can infect HSCs, explored the potential mechanisms of viral entry, and assessed the impact of infection as reflected by the ability of HSCs to transfer virus to T lymphocytes and elicit a proinflammatory and profibrogenic response. We report that the laboratory-adapted viruses HIV-IIIB (CXCR4-tropic or X4) and HIV-BaL (CCR5-tropic or R5) and primary HIV isolates can infect both a human stellate cell line, LX-2, and primary human HSCs. HIV entry and gene expression in HSCs was confirmed using HIV–green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression viral constructs in the presence or absence of the reverse-transcriptase inhibitor azidothymidine. CD4 expression on a subset of primary HSCs was demonstrated using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and immunofluorescence staining. Blocking experiments in the presence of anti-CD4, anti-CXCR4, and anti-CCR5 revealed that HIV entry into HSCs is predominantly CD4/chemokine coreceptor-independent. HIV infection promoted HSC collagen I expression and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Furthermore, infected LX-2 cells were capable of transferring GFP-expressing virus to T lymphocytes in a coculture system. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest a potential role of HIV in liver fibrosis/inflammation mediated through effects on HSCs. The role of early highly active antiretroviral therapy initiation in patients with HIV

  13. Quantum cryptography without switching.

    PubMed

    Weedbrook, Christian; Lance, Andrew M; Bowen, Warwick P; Symul, Thomas; Ralph, Timothy C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-10-22

    We propose a new coherent state quantum key distribution protocol that eliminates the need to randomly switch between measurement bases. This protocol provides significantly higher secret key rates with increased bandwidths than previous schemes that only make single quadrature measurements. It also offers the further advantage of simplicity compared to all previous protocols which, to date, have relied on switching.

  14. Power-Switching Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praver, Gerald A.; Theisinger, Peter C.; Genofsky, John

    1987-01-01

    Functions of circuit breakers, meters, and switches combined. Circuit that includes power field-effect transistors (PFET's) provides on/off switching, soft starting, current monitoring, current tripping, and protection against overcurrent for 30-Vdc power supply at normal load currents up to 2 A. Has no moving parts.

  15. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  16. Reflective HTS switch

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  17. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  18. A Novel Molecular Switch

    PubMed Central

    Daber, Robert; Lewis, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a fundamental process for regulating the flux of all metabolic pathways. For the last several decades, the lac operon has served as a valuable model for studying transcription. More recently, the switch that controls the operon has also been successfully adapted to function in mammalian cells. Here we describe how, using directed evolution, we have created a novel switch that recognizes an asymmetric operator sequence. The new switch has a repressor with altered headpiece domains for operator recognition, and a redesigned dimer interface to create a heterodimeric repressor. Quite unexpectedly, the heterodimeric switch functions better than the natural system. It can repress more tightly than the naturally occurring switch of the lac operon; it is less leaky and can be induced more efficiently. Ultimately these novel repressors could be evolved to recognize eukaryotic promoters and used to regulate gene expression in mammalian systems. PMID:19540845

  19. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  20. CCR5 inhibitors: Emerging promising HIV therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Padmasri Kutikuppala Surya

    2009-01-01

    Though potent anti-HIV therapy has spectacularly reduced the morbidity and mortality of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection in the advanced countries, it continues to be associated with substantial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, difficulties in adherence, and abnormal cost. As a result, better effective, safe antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies keep on to be pursued. In this process, CCR5 (chemokine receptor 5) inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drug used in the treatment of HIV. They are designed to prevent HIV infection of CD4 T-cells by blocking the CCR5. When the CCR5 receptor is unavailable, 'R5-tropic' HIV (the variant of the virus that is common in earlier HIV infection) cannot engage with a CD4 T-cell to infect the cell. In August 2007, the FDA approved the first chemokine (C-C motif) CCR5 inhibitor, maraviroc, for treatment-experienced patients infected with R5-using virus. Studies from different cohort in regions, affected by clad B HIV-1, demonstrate that 81-88% of HIV-1 variants in treatment naïve patients are CCR5 tropic and that virtually all the remaining variants are dual/mixed tropic i.e., are able to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 coreceptors. In treatment experienced patients, 49-78% of the variants are purely CCR5 tropic, 22-48% are dual/mixed tropic, and 2-5% exclusively utilize CXCR4. A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene, which results in a frame shift and truncation of the normal CCR5 protein, was identified in a few persons who had remained uninfected after exposure to CCR5 tropic HIV-1 virus. This allele is common in white of European origin, with prevalence near to 10%, but is absent among East Asian, American Indian, Tamil Indian, and African ethnic groups. HIV-infected individuals, who are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32, have slower rates of disease progression. The currently available data supports the continuation of the development of CCR5 antagonists in different settings related to HIV-1 infection. If

  1. Combinatorial anti-HIV gene therapy: using a multipronged approach to reach beyond HAART.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C W; Younan, P; Jerome, K R; Kiem, H-P

    2013-07-01

    The 'Berlin Patient', who maintains suppressed levels of HIV viremia in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, continues to be a standard bearer in HIV eradication research. However, the unique circumstances surrounding his functional cure are not applicable to most HIV(+) patients. To achieve a functional or sterilizing cure in a greater number of infected individuals worldwide, combinatorial treatments, targeting multiple stages of the viral life cycle, will be essential. Several anti-HIV gene therapy approaches have been explored recently, including disruption of the C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) coreceptor loci in CD4(+) T cells and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. However, less is known about the efficacy of these strategies in patients and more relevant HIV model systems such as non-human primates (NHPs). Combinatorial approaches, including genetic disruption of integrated provirus, functional enhancement of endogenous restriction factors and/or the use of pharmacological adjuvants, could amplify the anti-HIV effects of CCR5/CXCR4 gene disruption. Importantly, delivering gene disruption molecules to genetic sites of interest will likely require optimization on a cell type-by-cell type basis. In this review, we highlight the most promising gene therapy approaches to combat HIV infection, methods to deliver these therapies to hematopoietic cells and emphasize the need to target viral replication pre- and post-entry to mount a suitably robust defense against spreading infection.

  2. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  3. Protective effect of CCR5 Delta-32 allele against HIV-1 in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Aguirre, Jesús A; Cázarez-Salazar, Silvestre G; Ochoa-Ramírez, Luis A; Acosta-Cota, Selene de J; Zamora-Gómez, Román; Najar-Reyes, Guilermi M; Villarreal-Escamilla, Perla; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Díaz-Camacho, Sylvia P; Sánchez-Zazueta, Jorge G; Ríos-Tostado, Juan J; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S

    2013-09-01

    C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is known for its role as a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection. Some individuals possess a 32 bp deletion, known as Delta-32 allele which has been reported to confer resistance to HIV-1 infection. In order to estimate the distribution of Delta-32 allele of CCR5 gene, 1034 mestizo individuals from the Northwest of Mexico, including 385 HIV-1-infected individuals, 472 healthy controls and 177 uninfected female sex workers; were examined by allele-specific PCR. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of Delta-32 allele between HIV-1 positive and healthy individuals (OR= 1.1, p= 0.6). However, we found a significantly reduced prevalence of CCR5 Delta-32 heterozygous genotype in female patients (OR= 0.084, 95% CI= 0.011 - 0.630, p= 0.002), as well as in allele frequency, compared to male patients. Furthermore, we observed an inverse relationship between allele frequency and the risk of HIV-1 transmission and AIDS progression among female healthy controls, sex workers and HIV-1 infected groups. Our findings support previous data showing Delta-32 as a genetic protective factor against HIV-1 infection in Mexican women, as well as in women from other populations.

  4. Suppression of HIV replication in vitro by CpG and CpG conjugated to the non toxic B subunit of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Jansson, Marianne; Adamsson, Jenni; Lindblad, Marianne; Fenyö, Eva-Maria; Holmgren, Jan; Harandi, Ali M

    2008-05-01

    Administration of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing CpG motifs generates a rapid and potent response of CC-chemokines, known as ligands of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5, in the murine female genital tract. The present study explored the potential HIV inhibitory activities of different human CpG prototypes either alone or conjugated to the non-toxic subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Results showed that in vitro replication of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 can be suppressed by different human CpG prototypes. Importantly, the conjugation of CpG ODN to CTB (CTB-CpG) enhanced the antiviral activity of CpG against primary HIV-1 isolates of both R5 and X4 phenotypes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as well as U87.CD4 co-receptor indicator cells. CTB-CpGs triggered higher amounts of MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta in PBMC than the corresponding CpG ODNs, which may explain the superior antiviral effect of CTB-CpG against R5 virus in PBMC. Incubation of PBMC with CpG ODN and CTB-CpG did not alter surface expression of HIV-1 receptors indicating that the observed anti-HIV-1 effect is not mediated through down regulation of HIV-1 receptors on target cells. Further, the enhanced antiviral effect of CTB-CpG was dependent on the presence of phosphorothioate backbone in the ODN, whereas the presence of CpG motif in ODNs was dispensable. These results have implications for the development of novel intervention strategies to prevent HIV infection.

  5. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  6. Defining Binding Efficiency and Specificity of Auxins for SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA Co-receptor Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Structure–activity profiles for the phytohormone auxin have been collected for over 70 years, and a number of synthetic auxins are used in agriculture. Auxin classification schemes and binding models followed from understanding auxin structures. However, all of the data came from whole plant bioassays, meaning the output was the integral of many different processes. The discovery of Transport Inhibitor-Response 1 (TIR1) and the Auxin F-Box (AFB) proteins as sites of auxin perception and the role of auxin as molecular glue in the assembly of co-receptor complexes has allowed the development of a definitive quantitative structure–activity relationship for TIR1 and AFB5. Factorial analysis of binding activities offered two uncorrelated factors associated with binding efficiency and binding selectivity. The six maximum-likelihood estimators of Efficiency are changes in the overlap matrixes, inferring that Efficiency is related to the volume of the electronic system. Using the subset of compounds that bound strongly, chemometric analyses based on quantum chemical calculations and similarity and self-similarity indices yielded three classes of Specificity that relate to differential binding. Specificity may not be defined by any one specific atom or position and is influenced by coulomb matrixes, suggesting that it is driven by electrostatic forces. These analyses give the first receptor-specific classification of auxins and indicate that AFB5 is the preferred site for a number of auxinic herbicides by allowing interactions with analogues having van der Waals surfaces larger than that of indole-3-acetic acid. The quality factors are also examined in terms of long-standing models for the mechanism of auxin binding. PMID:24313839

  7. Genetic predisposition of variants in TLR2 and its co-receptors to severe malaria in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Subhendu; Kar, Avishek; Tripathy, Sagnika; Mohapatra, Manoj K; Dhangadamajhi, Gunanidhi

    2016-02-01

    Although the role of TLRs signalling in malaria pathogenesis is well established, contribution of individual TLR to clinical outcome of malaria still remains inconclusive. Given the importance of TLR2 and its co-receptors in recognising distinct structural forms of key malaria toxins and mediating innate immune response, it is essential to delineate their genetic contribution. Variants in TLR1 (I602S) and TLR6 (P249S) were genotyped by PCR-RFLP methods, and TLR2 (I/D) was genotyped by PCR in 200 samples each from uncomplicated malaria (UM) and severe malaria (SM). Further, SM was categorised into its sub-clinical groups (CM and NCSM or SOD and MODS) and analysed. The results showed the PP genotype of TLR6 (P249S) to be significantly more common in UM (P < 0.0001), whereas the 'SS' genotype was the risk factor for SM including its sub-clinical categories. The TLR1 (602S) and TLR2 (D) variants were significantly high in patients with CM; however, negative LD was observed between TLR2 and TLR6 in NCSM and MODS. Haplotype analysis showed significantly high frequency of I-I-S haplotype in all forms of subclinical SM and was associated with low parasite load in SM (P = 0.013). The haplotypes I-D-S and S-I-P were significantly high in SOD and CM, respectively. The TLR6 '249S' variant appeared to be the dominant determinant for genetic predisposition to SM and that its association with either TLR2 'D' or TLR1 '602S' modulates for CM development. The present study opens up several new avenues for their exploration and validation in future studies in different global settings for malaria.

  8. MuSK is a BMP co-receptor that shapes BMP responses and calcium signaling in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Atilgan; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Ozdeslik, Rana N.; Schmiedel, Carolyn; Mentzer, Sarah; Schorl, Christoph; Oancea, Elena; Thompson, Thomas B.; Fallon, Justin R.

    2017-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) function in most tissues but have cell type-specific effects. Given the relatively small number of BMP receptors, this exquisite signaling specificity requires additional molecules to regulate this pathway’s output. The receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is critical for neuromuscular junction formation and maintenance. Here, we show that MuSK also promotes BMP signaling in muscle cells. MuSK bound to BMP4 and related BMPs with low nanomolar affinity in vitro and to the type I BMP receptors ALK3 and ALK6 in a ligand-independent manner both in vitro and in cultured myotubes. High-affinity binding to BMPs required the third, alternatively spliced MuSK immunoglobulin-like domain. In myoblasts, endogenous MuSK promoted BMP4-dependent phosphorylation of SMADs and transcription of Id1, which encodes a transcription factor involved in muscle differentiation. Gene expression profiling showed that MuSK was required for the BMP4-induced expression of a subset of genes in myoblasts, including regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4). In myotubes, MuSK enhanced the BMP4-induced expression of a distinct set of genes, including transcripts characteristic of slow muscle. MuSK-mediated stimulation of BMP signaling required type I BMP receptor activity but was independent of MuSK tyrosine kinase activity. MuSK-dependent expression of Rgs4 resulted in the inhibition of Ca2+ signaling induced by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in myoblasts. These findings establish that MuSK has dual roles in muscle cells, acting both as a tyrosine kinase-dependent synaptic organizing molecule and as a BMP co-receptor that shapes BMP transcriptional output and cholinergic signaling. PMID:27601729

  9. Localization and action of Dragon (repulsive guidance molecule b), a novel bone morphogenetic protein coreceptor, throughout the reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Sidis, Yisrael; Mukherjee, Abir; Samad, Tarek A; Brenner, Gary; Woolf, Clifford J; Lin, Herbert Y; Schneyer, Alan

    2005-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in reproduction including primordial germ cell formation, follicular development, spermatogenesis, and FSH secretion. Dragon, a recently identified glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored member of the repulsive guidance molecule family, is also a BMP coreceptor. In the present study, we determined the tissue and cellular localization of Dragon in reproductive organs using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Among reproductive organs, Dragon was expressed in testis, epididymis, ovary, uterus, and pituitary. In the testis of early postnatal mice, Dragon was found in gonocytes and spermatogonia, whereas in immature testes, Dragon was only weakly expressed in spermatogonia. Interestingly, pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment of immature mice robustly induced Dragon production in spermatocytes. In adult testis, Dragon was found in spermatocytes and round spermatids. In the ovary, Dragon was detected exclusively within oocytes and primarily those within secondary follicles. In the pituitary, Dragon-expressing cells overlapped FSH-expressing cells. Dragon was also expressed in a number of cell lines originating from reproductive tissues including Ishikawa, Hela, LbetaT2, MCF-7, and JEG3 cells. Immunocytochemistry and gradient sucrose ultracentrifugation studies showed Dragon was localized in lipid rafts within the plasma membrane. In reproductive cell lines, Dragon expression enhanced signaling of exogenous BMP2 or BMP4. The present studies demonstrate that Dragon expression is dynamically regulated throughout the reproductive tract and that Dragon protein modulates BMP signaling in cells from reproductive tissues. The overlap between Dragon expression and the functional BMP signaling system suggests that Dragon may play a role in mammalian reproduction.

  10. MuSK is a BMP co-receptor that shapes BMP responses and calcium signaling in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Atilgan; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Ozdeslik, Rana N; Schmiedel, Carolyn; Mentzer, Sarah; Schorl, Christoph; Oancea, Elena; Thompson, Thomas B; Fallon, Justin R

    2016-09-06

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) function in most tissues but have cell type-specific effects. Given the relatively small number of BMP receptors, this exquisite signaling specificity requires additional molecules to regulate this pathway's output. The receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is critical for neuromuscular junction formation and maintenance. Here, we show that MuSK also promotes BMP signaling in muscle cells. MuSK bound to BMP4 and related BMPs with low nanomolar affinity in vitro and to the type I BMP receptors ALK3 and ALK6 in a ligand-independent manner both in vitro and in cultured myotubes. High-affinity binding to BMPs required the third, alternatively spliced MuSK immunoglobulin-like domain. In myoblasts, endogenous MuSK promoted BMP4-dependent phosphorylation of SMADs and transcription of Id1, which encodes a transcription factor involved in muscle differentiation. Gene expression profiling showed that MuSK was required for the BMP4-induced expression of a subset of genes in myoblasts, including regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4). In myotubes, MuSK enhanced the BMP4-induced expression of a distinct set of genes, including transcripts characteristic of slow muscle. MuSK-mediated stimulation of BMP signaling required type I BMP receptor activity but was independent of MuSK tyrosine kinase activity. MuSK-dependent expression of Rgs4 resulted in the inhibition of Ca(2+) signaling induced by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in myoblasts. These findings establish that MuSK has dual roles in muscle cells, acting both as a tyrosine kinase-dependent synaptic organizing molecule and as a BMP co-receptor that shapes BMP transcriptional output and cholinergic signaling. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Deletion of the Bombyx mori odorant receptor co-receptor (BmOrco) impairs olfactory sensitivity in silkworms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qun; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Baosheng; Wang, Guirong; Hao, Dejun; Huang, Yongping

    2017-07-01

    Olfaction plays an essential role in many important insect behaviors such as feeding and reproduction. To detect olfactory stimuli, an odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco) is required. In this study, we deleted the Orco gene in the Lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori, using a binary transgene-based clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. We initially generated somatic mutations in two targeted sites, from which we obtained homozygous mutants with deletion of a 866 base pair sequence. Because of the flight inability of B. mori, we developed a novel method to examine the adult mating behavior. Considering the specialization in larval feeding, we examined food selection behavior in Orco somatic mutants by the walking trail analysis of silkworm position over time. Single sensillum recordings indicated that the antenna of the homozygous mutant was unable to respond to either of the two sex pheromones, bombykol or bombykal. An adult mating behavior assay revealed that the Orco mutant displayed a significantly impaired mating selection behavior in response to natural pheromone released by a wild-type female moth as well as an 11:1 mixture of bombykol/bombykal. The mutants also exhibited a decreased response to bombykol and, similar to wild-type moths, they displayed no response to bombykal. A larval feeding behavior assay revealed that the Orco mutant displayed defective selection for mulberry leaves and different concentrations of the volatile compound cis-jasmone found in mulberry leaves. Deletion of BmOrco severely disrupts the olfactory system, suggesting that BmOrco is indispensable in the olfactory pathway. The approach used for generating somatic and homozygous mutations also highlights a novel method for mutagenesis. This study on BmOrco function provides insights into the insect olfactory system and also provides a paradigm for agroforestry pest control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekel, Eyal; Ruschin, Shlomo; Majer, Daniel; Levy, Jeff; Matmon, Guy; Koenigsberg, Lisa; Vecht, Jacob; Geron, Amir; Harlavan, Rotem; Shfaram, Harel; Arbel, Arnon; McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2005-02-01

    We report here a scalable, multichassis, 6.3 terabit core router, which utilizes our proprietary optical switch. The router is commercially available and deployed in several customer sites. Our solution combines optical switching with electronic routing. An internal optical packet switching network interconnects the router"s electronic line cards, where routing and buffering functions take place electronically. The system architecture and performance will be described. The optical switch is based on Optical Phased Array (OPA) technology. It is a 64 x 64, fully non-blocking, optical crossbar switch, capable of switching in a fraction of a nanosecond. The basic principles of operation will be explained. Loss and crosstalk results will be presented, as well as the results of BER measurements of a 160 Gbps transmission through one channel. Basic principles of operation and measured results will be presented for the burst-mode-receivers, arbitration algorithm and synchronization. Finally, we will present some of our current research work on a next-generation optical switch. The technological issues we have solved in our internal optical packet network can have broad applicability to any global optical packet network.

  13. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  14. Identification of dual-tropic HIV-1 using evolved neural networks.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Gary B; Lamers, Susanna L; Liu, Enoch S; Salemi, Marco; McGrath, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Blocking the binding of the envelope HIV-1 protein to immune cells is a popular concept for development of anti-HIV therapeutics. R5 HIV-1 binds CCR5, X4 HIV-1 binds CXCR4, and dual-tropic HIV-1 can bind either coreceptor for cellular entry. R5 viruses are associated with early infection and over time can evolve to X4 viruses that are associated with immune failure. Dual-tropic HIV-1 is less studied; however, it represents functional antigenic intermediates during the transition of R5 to X4 viruses. Viral tropism is linked partly to the HIV-1 envelope V3 domain, where the amino acid sequence helps dictate the receptor a particular virus will target; however, using V3 sequence information to identify dual-tropic HIV-1 isolates has remained difficult. Our goal in this study was to elucidate features of dual-tropic HIV-1 isolates that assist in the biological understanding of dual-tropism and develop an approach for their detection. Over 1559 HIV-1 subtype B sequences with known tropisms were analyzed. Each sequence was represented by 73 structural, biochemical and regional features. These features were provided to an evolved neural network classifier and evaluated using balanced and unbalanced data sets. The study resolved R5X4 viruses from R5 with an accuracy of 81.8% and from X4 with an accuracy of 78.8%. The approach also identified a set of V3 features (hydrophobicity, structural and polarity) that are associated with tropism transitions. The ability to distinguish R5X4 isolates will improve computational tropism decisions for R5 vs. X4 and assist in HIV-1 research and drug development efforts.

  15. HIV-1 Mutation and Recombination Rates Are Different in Macrophages and T-cells.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Deborah; Schlub, Timothy E; Smyth, Redmond P; Grimm, Andrew J; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Davenport, Miles P; Mak, Johnson

    2016-04-22

    High rates of mutation and recombination help human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to evade the immune system and develop resistance to antiretroviral therapy. Macrophages and T-cells are the natural target cells of HIV-1 infection. A consensus has not been reached as to whether HIV replication results in differential recombination between primary T-cells and macrophages. Here, we used HIV with silent mutation markers along with next generation sequencing to compare the mutation and the recombination rates of HIV directly in T lymphocytes and macrophages. We observed a more than four-fold higher recombination rate of HIV in macrophages compared to T-cells (p < 0.001) and demonstrated that this difference is not due to different reliance on C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) co-receptors between T-cells and macrophages. We also found that the pattern of recombination across the HIV genome (hot and cold spots) remains constant between T-cells and macrophages despite a three-fold increase in the overall recombination rate. This indicates that the difference in rates is a general feature of HIV DNA synthesis during macrophage infection. In contrast to HIV recombination, we found that T-cells have a 30% higher mutation rate than macrophages (p < 0.001) and that the mutational profile is similar between these cell types. Unexpectedly, we found no association between mutation and recombination in macrophages, in contrast to T-cells. Our data highlights some of the fundamental difference of HIV recombination and mutation amongst these two major target cells of infection. Understanding these differences will provide invaluable insights toward HIV evolution and how the virus evades immune surveillance and anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  16. The Complexity of HIV Persistence and Pathogenesis in the Lung Under Antiretroviral Therapy: Challenges Beyond AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral therapy (ART) represents a significant milestone in the battle against AIDS. However, we continue learning about HIV and confronting challenges 30 years after its discovery. HIV has cleverly tricked both the host immune system and ART. First, the many HIV subtypes and recombinant forms have different susceptibilities to antiretroviral drugs, which may represent an issue in countries where ART is just being introduced. Second, even under the suppressive pressures of ART, HIV still increases inflammatory mediators, deregulates apoptosis and proliferation, and induces oxidative stress in the host. Third, the preference of HIV for CXCR4 as a co-receptor may also have noxious outcomes, including potential malignancies. Furthermore, HIV still replicates cryptically in anatomical reservoirs, including the lung. HIV impairs bronchoalveolar T-lymphocyte and macrophage immune responses, rendering the lung susceptible to comorbidities. In addition, HIV-infected individuals are significantly more susceptible to long-term HIV-associated complications. This review focuses on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary arterial hypertension, and lung cancer. Almost two decades after the advent of highly active ART, we now know that HIV-infected individuals on ART live as long as the uninfected population. Fortunately, its availability is rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Nevertheless, ART is not risk-free: the developed world is facing issues with antiretroviral drug toxicity, resistance, and drug–drug interactions, while developing countries are confronting issues with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Several aspects of the complexity of HIV persistence and challenges with ART are discussed, as well as suggestions for new avenues of research. PMID:24797368

  17. Bryostatin-1 synergizes with histone deacetylase inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Moisés; de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Marquez, Nieves; Bellido, M Luz; Muñoz-Fernandez, M Angeles; Moreno, Santiago; Castor, Trevor P; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-infected cellular reservoirs represents the major hurdle to virus eradication on patients treated with HAART. It has been suggested that successful depletion of such latent reservoirs will require a combination of therapeutic agents that can specifically and efficiently act on cells harboring latent HIV-1 provirus. Using Jurkat-LAT-GFP cells, a tractable model of HIV-1 latency, we have found that bryostatin -1 reactivates HIV-1 through a classical PKC-dependent pathway. Bryostatin-1 also activates MAPKs and NF-κB pathways and synergizes with HDAC inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency. Bryostatin-1 downregulates the expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors CD4 and CXCR4 and prevented de novo HIV-1 infection in susceptible cells. We applied proteomic methods to investigate major changes in protein expression in Jurkat-LAT-GFP under latency and reactivation conditions. We identified up-regulation of proteins that may be involved in the innate anti-HIV-1 response (NKEF-A and MHD2) and in different cell functions (i.e. cofilin-1 and transgelin-2) of the host cells. PKC agonists may represent a valuable pharmacological approach to purge latent HIV from cellular reservoirs and at the moment, the only clinically available PKC agonist is bryostatin-1. This drug has been tested in numerous clinical trials and its pharmacokinetics and toxicity in humans is well known. Moreover, bryostatin-1 potently synergizes with other HDAC inhibitors commonly used in the medical practice such as valproic acid. Therefore, bryostatin-1, alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitors, could be used in HAART treated patients to validate the hypothesis that reactivating HIV-1 from latency could purge HIV-1 reservoirs.

  18. HIV-1: the confounding variables of virus neutralization.

    PubMed

    Nara, Peter L; Lin, George

    2005-06-01

    The development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 would be greatly facilitated by the ability to elicit potent, high affinity antibodies that are capable of broad neutralization, viral inactivation and protection against infection and/or disease. New insights into the structure and function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) that mediates viral fusion and entry may ultimately lead to strategies successful in eliciting these protective antibody responses. Insights have been gained regarding HIV-1 Env attachment and receptor engagement, the fusion process and kinetics, and the structural/functional attributes of Env that allow humoral immune evasion. In addition, studies of a limited number of broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies have shed some light as to how antibodies may penetrate the immune evading armor that HIV-1 has evolved. As the elusive goal of generating these types of antibodies emerge and are developed in the context of generating new candidate HIV-1 vaccines, a relevant in vitro measurement of neutralization by these types of antibodies becomes a complex task. This is in part due to a list of confounding variables which include: the physical and genomic nature (amino acid variation) of the infecting virion, the type of target cells, the concentration and clonality of the reactants, assay format and design, the affinity and kinetics of the reaction, receptors/coreceptors and attachment factors, and soluble host factors. This review will focus on the past, current, and future knowledge required to advance the field of HIV-1 humoral immunity as it impacts future HIV-1 vaccine development.

  19. HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors: Recent Development and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on drugs in the later stages of clinical development. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves viral attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Antiretroviral drugs that interact with each step in the entry process have been developed, but only two are currently approved for clinical use. The small molecule attachment inhibitor BMS-663068 has shown potent antiviral activity in early phase studies, and phase 2b trials are currently underway. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown antiviral activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies, including subcutaneous delivery of drug to healthy individuals, are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonist maraviroc is approved for use in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Cenicriviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 antagonist that also has activity as a CCR2 antagonist, has entered phase 2b studies. No CXCR4 antagonists are currently in clinical trials, but once daily, next-generation injectable peptide fusion inhibitors have entered human trials. Both maraviroc and ibalizumab are being studied for prevention of HIV-1 transmission and/or for use in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing antiretroviral regimens. Summary Inhibition of HIV-1 entry continues to be a promising target for antiretroviral drug development. PMID:23290628

  20. The clinical applications of genome editing in HIV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cathy X; Cannon, Paula M

    2016-05-26

    HIV/AIDS has long been at the forefront of the development of gene- and cell-based therapies. Although conventional gene therapy approaches typically involve the addition of anti-HIV genes to cells using semirandomly integrating viral vectors, newer genome editing technologies based on engineered nucleases are now allowing more precise genetic manipulations. The possible outcomes of genome editing include gene disruption, which has been most notably applied to the CCR5 coreceptor gene, or the introduction of small mutations or larger whole gene cassette insertions at a targeted locus. Disruption of CCR5 using zinc finger nucleases was the first-in-human application of genome editing and remains the most clinically advanced platform, with 7 completed or ongoing clinical trials in T cells and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Here we review the laboratory and clinical findings of CCR5 editing in T cells and HSPCs for HIV therapy and summarize other promising genome editing approaches for future clinical development. In particular, recent advances in the delivery of genome editing reagents and the demonstration of highly efficient homology-directed editing in both T cells and HSPCs are expected to spur the development of even more sophisticated applications of this technology for HIV therapy. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Editing CCR5: a novel approach to HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Tatjana I; Mussolino, Claudio; Bloom, Kristie; Cathomen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disorder caused by infection of individuals with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Entry of HIV-1 into target cells depends on the presence of two surface proteins on the cell membrane: CD4, which serves as the main receptor, and either CCR5 or CXCR4 as a co-receptor. A limited number of people harbor a genomic 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32), leading to expression of a truncated gene product that provides resistance to HIV-1 infection in individuals homozygous for this mutation. Moreover, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation with CCR5∆32 donor cells seems to confer HIV-1 resistance to the recipient as well. However, since Δ32 donors are scarce and allogeneic HSC transplantation is not exempt from risks, the development of gene editing tools to knockout CCR5 in the genome of autologous cells is highly warranted. Targeted gene editing can be accomplished with designer nucleases, which essentially are engineered restriction enzymes that can be designed to cleave DNA at specific sites. During repair of these breaks, the cellular repair pathway often introduces small mutations at the break site, which makes it possible to disrupt the ability of the targeted locus to express a functional protein, in this case CCR5. Here, we review the current promise and limitations of CCR5 gene editing with engineered nucleases, including factors affecting the efficiency of gene disruption and potential off-target effects.

  2. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singhal, Pravin C

    2013-08-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electromechanical magnetization switching

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Jaafar, Reem

    2015-03-14

    We show that the magnetization of a torsional oscillator that, in addition to the magnetic moment also possesses an electrical polarization, can be switched by the electric field that ignites mechanical oscillations at the frequency comparable to the frequency of the ferromagnetic resonance. The 180° switching arises from the spin-rotation coupling and is not prohibited by the different symmetry of the magnetic moment and the electric field as in the case of a stationary magnet. Analytical equations describing the system have been derived and investigated numerically. Phase diagrams showing the range of parameters required for the switching have been obtained.

  4. Sleep State Switching

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Lu, Jun; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    We take for granted the ability to fall asleep or to snap out of sleep into wakefulness, but these changes in behavioral state require specific switching mechanisms in the brain that allow well-defined state transitions. In this review, we examine the basic circuitry underlying the regulation of sleep and wakefulness, and discuss a theoretical framework wherein the interactions between reciprocal neuronal circuits enable relatively rapid and complete state transitions. We also review how homeostatic, circadian, and allostatic drives help regulate sleep state switching, and discuss how breakdown of the switching mechanism may contribute to sleep disorders such as narcolepsy. PMID:21172606

  5. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Ca[rasp, George J

    2013-10-22

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  6. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  7. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.

    2015-10-27

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  8. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  9. Dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 infection of T-cells demonstrates a direct relationship to plasma viral RNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Reetakshi; Bull, Lara; Siwak, Edward B.; Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Arduino, Roberto C.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between infectivity of HIV-1 variants in dendritic cell-mediated in trans infection of T-cells and plasma viral RNA levels in infected subjects. Methods HIV-1 was isolated from PBMCs of chronically infected individuals, typed for coreceptor usage, and viral replication was examined in monocyte derived-dendritic cells-peripheral blood lymphocytes (DC-PBL) co-cultures. The rate of p24 antigen production during the logarithmic phase of viral replication was determined by ELISA. Additionally, nef variants were cloned and expressed in trans with a HIV-luciferase vector and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 envelope, and infectivity was measured in DC-mediated capture-transfer assays. Results Replication capacity of HIV-1 viral CCR5-tropic isolates in DC-PBL co-cultures was linearly associated with the plasma viral RNA levels in a cohort of HIV-1 infected individuals exhibiting an inverse relationship between plasma viral RNA and CD4 cell count. Furthermore, infectivity activity of Nef variants in context of DC-mediated enhanced infection of T-cells also showed a linear relationship to plasma viral RNA levels. Conclusion These results illustrate that replication capacity of HIV-1 in DC-T-cell cultures is a significant predictor of plasma viral RNA level. The data suggest that adaptation of HIV-1 to DC interactions with T-cells influences the level of viral replication in the host. PMID:20386455

  10. Impact of triplicate testing on HIV genotypic tropism prediction in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Symons, J; Vandekerckhove, L; Paredes, R; Verhofstede, C; Bellido, R; Demecheleer, E; van Ham, P M; van Lelyveld, S F L; Stam, A J; van Versendaal, D; Nijhuis, M; Wensing, A M J

    2012-06-01

    Guidelines state that the CCR5-inhibitor Maraviroc should be prescribed to patients infected with R5-tropic HIV-1 only. Therefore, viral tropism needs to be assessed phenotypically or genotypically. Preliminary clinical trial data suggest that genotypic analysis in triplicate is associated with improved prediction of virological response by increasing the detection of X4-tropic variants. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of triplicate genotypic analysis on prediction of co-receptor usage in routine clinical practice. Samples from therapy-naive and therapy-experienced patients were collected for routine tropism testing at three European clinical centres. Viral RNA was isolated from plasma and proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Gp120-V3 was amplified in a triplicate nested RT-PCR procedure and sequenced. Co-receptor usage was predicted using the Geno2Pheno([coreceptor]) algorithm and analysed with a false-positive rate (FPR) of 5.75%, 10%, or an FPR of 20% and according to the current European guidelines on the clinical management of HIV-1 tropism testing. A total of 266 sequences were obtained from 101 patient samples. Discordance in tropism prediction for the triplicates was observed in ten samples using an FPR of 10%. Triplicate testing resulted in a 16.7% increase in X4-predicted samples and to reclassification from R5 to X4 tropism for four cases rendering these patients ineligible for Maraviroc treatment. In conclusion, triplicate genotypic tropism testing increases X4 tropism detection in individual cases, which may prove to be pivotal when CCR5-inhibitor therapy is applied.

  11. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Efficiently Utilizes Non-CCR5 Entry Pathways in African Green Monkey Lymphocytes: Potential Role for GPR15 and CXCR6 as Viral Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Nadeene E.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Whitted, Sonya; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Goldstein, Simoy; Goeken, Robert M.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and infection in these animals is generally nonpathogenic, whereas infection of nonnatural hosts, such as rhesus macaques (RM), is commonly pathogenic. CCR5 has been described as the primary entry coreceptor for SIV in vivo, while human-derived CXCR6 and GPR15 also appear to be used in vitro. However, sooty mangabeys that are genetically deficient in CCR5 due to an out-of-frame deletion are infectible with SIVsmm, indicating that SIVsmm can use alternative coreceptors in vivo. In this study, we examined the CCR5 dependence of SIV strains derived from vervet AGM (SIVagmVer) and the ability of AGM-derived GPR15 and CXCR6 to serve as potential entry coreceptors. We found that SIVagmVer replicated efficiently in AGM and RM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, despite the fact that maraviroc was capable of blocking the CCR5-tropic strains SIVmac239, SIVsmE543-3, and simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-AD8 in RM PBMC. We also found that AGM CXCR6 and AGM GPR15, to a lesser extent, supported entry of pseudotype viruses bearing SIVagm envelopes, including SIVagm transmitted/founder envelopes. Lastly, we found that CCR5, GPR15, and CXCR6 mRNAs were detected in AGM and RM memory CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that GPR15 and CXCR6 are expressed on AGM CD4+ T cells and are potential alternative coreceptors for SIVagm use in vivo. These data suggest that the use of non-CCR5 entry pathways may be a common feature of SIV replication in natural host species, with the potential to contribute to nonpathogenicity in these animals. IMPORTANCE African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of SIV, and infection in these animals generally does not cause AIDS, whereas SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RM) typically develop AIDS. Although it has been reported that SIV generally uses CD4 and CCR5 to enter target cells in vivo, other

  12. Solar array switching unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Jr., Calvin L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A solar array switching (SASU) unit (22) according to the present invention includes a control system (24), a solar cell array (26) and switch circuits (28). The SASU unit (22) is associated with a power card (30) for receiving an output from the array (26). The array (26) has a number (0.5Y) of rows (38) each of which includes a pair of cell strings (42) separated by one of the switch circuits (28). Each of the strings (42) includes a number (X) of cells in electrical series. The SASU (22) switches the array (26) between a short string configuration where the array (26) effectively includes Y strings of X length, and a long string configuration where the array (26) effectively includes 0.5Y strings of 2X length. The SASU (22) thereby facilitates the use of solar power for space missions where solar intensity, operating temperature or other factors vary significantly.

  13. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  14. An optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-04-30

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch having an electron attaching gas wherein electron attachment is brought about by indirect excitation of molecules to long live states by exposure to laser light. 3 figs.

  15. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  16. Cytokines Elevated in HIV Elite Controllers Reduce HIV Replication In Vitro and Modulate HIV Restriction Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Evan S; Keating, Sheila M; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Gibb, Stuart L; Heitman, John W; Inglis, Heather C; Martin, Jeffrey N; Zhang, Jinbing; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Deng, Xutao; Wu, Shiquan; Anastos, Kathryn; Crystal, Howard; Villacres, Maria C; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Landay, Alan L; Gange, Stephen J; Deeks, Steven G; Golub, Elizabeth T; Pillai, Satish K; Norris, Philip J

    2017-03-15

    A subset of HIV-infected individuals termed elite controllers (ECs) maintain CD4(+) T cell counts and control viral replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Systemic cytokine responses may differentiate ECs from subjects with uncontrolled viral replication or from those who require ART to suppress viral replication. We measured 87 cytokines in four groups of women: 73 ECs, 42 with pharmacologically suppressed viremia (ART), 42 with uncontrolled viral replication (noncontrollers [NCs]), and 48 HIV-uninfected (NEG) subjects. Four cytokines were elevated in ECs but not NCs or ART subjects: CCL14, CCL21, CCL27, and XCL1. In addition, median stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) levels were 43% higher in ECs than in NCs. The combination of the five cytokines suppressed R5 and X4 virus replication in resting CD4(+) T cells, and individually SDF-1β, CCL14, and CCL27 suppressed R5 virus replication, while SDF-1β, CCL21, and CCL14 suppressed X4 virus replication. Functional studies revealed that the combination of the five cytokines upregulated CD69 and CCR5 and downregulated CXCR4 and CCR7 on CD4(+) T cells. The CD69 and CXCR4 effects were driven by SDF-1, while CCL21 downregulated CCR7. The combination of the EC-associated cytokines induced expression of the anti-HIV host restriction factors IFITM1 and IFITM2 and suppressed expression of RNase L and SAMHD1. These results identify a set of cytokines that are elevated in ECs and define their effects on cellular activation, HIV coreceptor expression, and innate restriction factor expression. This cytokine pattern may be a signature characteristic of HIV-1 elite control, potentially important for HIV therapeutic and curative strategies.IMPORTANCE Approximately 1% of people infected with HIV control virus replication without taking antiviral medications. These subjects, termed elite controllers (ECs), are known to have stronger immune responses targeting HIV than the typical HIV-infected subject, but the

  17. Optical fiber crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, Michael K.; Beccue, Stephen M.; Brar, Berinder; Robinson, G.; Pedrotti, Kenneth D.; Haber, William A.

    1990-07-01

    Advances in high performance computers and signal processing systems have led to parallel system architectures. The main limitation in achieving the performance expected of these parallel systems has been the realization of an efficient means to interconnect many processors into a effective parallel system. Electronic interconnections have proved cumbersome, costly and ineffective. The Optical Fiber Crossbar Switch (OFCS) is a compact low power, multi-gigahertz bandwidth multi-channel switch which can be used in large scale computer and telecommunication applications. The switch operates in the optical domain using GaAs semiconductor lasers to transmit wideband multiple channel optical data over fiber optic cables. Recently, a 32 X 32 crossbar switching system was completed and demonstrated. Error free performance was obtained at a data bandwidth of 410 MBPS, using a silicon switch IC. The switch can be completely reconfigured in less than 50 nanoseconds under computer control. The fully populated OFCS has the capability to handle 12.8 gigabits per second (GBPS) of data while switching this data over 32 channels without the loss of a single bit during switching. GaAs IC technology has now progressed to the point that 16 X 16 GaAs based crossbar switch Ics are available which have increased the data bandwidth capability to 2.4 GBPS. The present optical interfaces are integrated GaAs transmitter drivers, GaAs lasers, and integrated GaAs optical receivers with data bandwidths exceeding 2.4 GBPS. A system using all Ill-V switching and optoelectronic components is presently under development for both NASA and DoD programs. The overall system is designed to operate at 1.3 GBPS. It is expected that these systems will find wide application in high capacity computing systems based on parallel microprocessor architecture which require high data bandwidth communication between processors. The OFCS will also have application in commercial optical telecommunication systems

  18. Cygnus PFL Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mitton, G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, et al.

    2007-07-21

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following X-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rads at 1 m, 50-ns full-widthhalf-maximum. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are Marx generator, water-filled pulse forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, threecell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance may be jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the source X-ray spectrum and dose. Therefore, PFL switch jitter may contribute to shot-to-shot variation in these parameters, which are crucial to radiographic quality. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and present the correlation with dose. For this analysis, the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting, which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition the PFL switch performance for one larger switch gap setting will be examined.

  19. uv preilluminated gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  20. High Power Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Kao, Y. C.; Carnahan, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Improved switching transistors handle 400-A peak currents and up to 1,200 V. Using large diameter silicon wafers with twice effective area as D60T, form basis for D7 family of power switching transistors. Package includes npn wafer, emitter preform, and base-contact insert. Applications are: 25to 50-kilowatt high-frequency dc/dc inverters, VSCF converters, and motor controllers for electrical vehicles.

  1. Cygnus Water Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

    2008-03-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

  2. Persistence of dual-tropic HIV-1 in an individual homozygous for the CCR5 Delta 32 allele.

    PubMed

    Gorry, Paul R; Zhang, Chengsheng; Wu, Sam; Kunstman, Kevin; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Phair, John; Wolinsky, Steven; Gabuzda, Dana

    2002-05-25

    Entry of HIV-1 into a cell happens only after viral envelope glycoproteins have bound to CD4 and a chemokine receptor. Generally, macrophage-tropic strains use CCR5, and T cell-line-tropic strains use CXCR4 as coreceptors for virus entry. Dual-tropic viruses can use both CCR5 and CXCR4. About 1% of white people are homozygous for a non-functional CCR5 allele, containing a 32 base pair deletion (CCR5 Delta 32). We studied the persistence of dual-tropic HIV-1 in an individual homozygous for this deletion. Our results suggest that structural features of the HIV-1 envelope linked to CCR5 tropism could confer a selective advantage in vivo.

  3. Genome editing of CXCR4 by CRISPR/cas9 confers cells resistant to HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Panpan; Chen, Shuliang; Wang, Shilei; Yu, Xiao; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Meng; Zhuang, Ke; Ho, Wenzhe; Hou, Wei; Huang, Jian; Guo, Deyin

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 has become an efficient and reliable way to make precise, targeted changes to the genome of living cells. CXCR4 is a co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and has been considered as an important therapeutic target for AIDS. CXCR4 mediates viral entry into human CD4+ cells by binding to envelope protein, gp120. Here, we show that human CXCR4 gene is efficiently disrupted by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, leading to HIV-1 resistance of human primary CD4+ T cells. We also show that the Cas9-mediated ablation of CXCR4 demonstrated high specificity and negligible off-target effects without affecting cell division and propagation. The precise and efficient genome editing of CXCR4 will provide a new strategy for therapeutic application against HIV-1 infection. PMID:26481100

  4. Genome editing of CXCR4 by CRISPR/cas9 confers cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Panpan; Chen, Shuliang; Wang, Shilei; Yu, Xiao; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Meng; Zhuang, Ke; Ho, Wenzhe; Hou, Wei; Huang, Jian; Guo, Deyin

    2015-10-20

    Genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 has become an efficient and reliable way to make precise, targeted changes to the genome of living cells. CXCR4 is a co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and has been considered as an important therapeutic target for AIDS. CXCR4 mediates viral entry into human CD4(+) cells by binding to envelope protein, gp120. Here, we show that human CXCR4 gene is efficiently disrupted by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, leading to HIV-1 resistance of human primary CD4(+) T cells. We also show that the Cas9-mediated ablation of CXCR4 demonstrated high specificity and negligible off-target effects without affecting cell division and propagation. The precise and efficient genome editing of CXCR4 will provide a new strategy for therapeutic application against HIV-1 infection.

  5. Heregulin-dependent activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt via the ErbB2/ErbB3 co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, N J; Kim, M S; Koland, J G

    2001-11-09

    The ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin co-receptor has been shown to couple to phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase in a heregulin-dependent manner. The recruitment and activation of PI 3-kinase by this co-receptor is presumed to occur via its interaction with phosphorylated Tyr-Xaa-Xaa-Met (YXXM) motifs occurring in the ErbB3 C terminus. In this study, mutant ErbB3 receptor proteins expressed in COS7 cells were used to investigate PI 3-kinase-dependent signaling pathways activated by the ErbB2/ErbB3 co-receptor. We observed that a mutant ErbB3 protein with each of its six YXXM motifs containing a Tyr --> Phe substitution was unable to bind either the p85 regulatory or p110 catalytic subunit of PI 3-kinase. However, restoration of a single YXXM motif was sufficient to mediate association with the PI 3-kinase holoenzyme, although at a lower level than wild-type ErbB3. When ErbB3 YXXM motifs were restored in pairs, evidence for cooperativity between two, those incorporating Tyr-1273 and Tyr-1286, was observed. Interestingly, we have shown that an apparent association of PI 3-kinase activity with ErbB2/Neu was due to the residual presence of ErbB3 in ErbB2 immunoprecipitates. The necessity of ErbB3 association with PI 3-kinase for downstream signaling to the effector kinase Akt was also investigated. Here, the heregulin-dependent translocation of Akt to the plasma membrane and its subsequent activation was observed in intact NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. Recruitment of PI 3-kinase to ErbB3 was required for both activities, and it appeared that ErbB2 activation alone was not sufficient to activate PI 3-kinase signaling in these cells.

  6. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  7. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  8. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2013-08-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level.

  9. The Lupane-type Triterpene 30-Oxo-calenduladiol Is a CCR5 Antagonist with Anti-HIV-1 and Anti-chemotactic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-González, Jonathan; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; García-Expósito, Laura; Machado, José-David; Z