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  1. Comparison of Matrix-Based and Filter Paper-Based Systems for Transport of Plasma for HIV-1 RNA Quantification and Amplicon Preparation for Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Levine, Molly; Beck, Ingrid; Styrchak, Sheila; Pepper, Gregory; Frenkel, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Two ambient-temperature, dry plasma transport systems, ViveST tubes and RNASound RNA sampling cards, and two extraction methods were compared to frozen plasma for HIV-1 RNA recovery. Significant RNA loss occurred: ViveST+MiniMag > ViveST+QIAamp > RNASound+QIAamp. RNA loss and low specimen volumes may affect the sensitivity of genotyping specimens with HIV-1 RNA of <4.70 log10 copies/ml.

  2. Genotyping of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolates from Chinese HIV-infected patients based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; He, Ai; Cai, Wei Ping; Tang, Xiao Ping; Zheng, Xiao Ying; Li, Zhuo Ya; Zhan, Xi Mei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolates based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA locus has previously been reported. The information about ITS genotype and epidemiology of this organism in Chinese human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients has not been available. In this study, 12 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens obtained from HIV-infected patients were analyzed by PCR followed by cloning, sequencing and typing. Three ITS1 genotypes (E, B and 'H') and four ITS2 genotypes (b, g, i and r) as previously reported were identified, the most common of which were E, b and i. Five ITS haplotypes (Eg, Eb, Bi, Er and 'H'r) and 19 new combination types were also identified with the most common types being Eg (four of 12 patients, 10 of 60 clones), Eb (three of 12 patients, 11 of 60 clones) and Bi (three of 12 patients, 10 of 60 clones). Nine patients were found to be co-infected with more than one ITS genotype of P. jirovecii. The prevalence of ITS genotypes in HIV patients from one Chinese hospital did not seem to be significantly different when compared to reports from other countries.

  3. Comparing Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell DNA and Circulating Plasma viral RNA pol Genotypes of Subtype C HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Banks, Lauren; Gholamin, Sharareh; White, Elizabeth; Zijenah, Lynn; Katzenstein, David A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Drug resistance mutations (DRM) in viral RNA are important in defining to provide effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-1 infected patients. Detection of DRM in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA is another source of information, although the clinical significance of DRMs in proviral DNA is less clear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 25 patients receiving ART at a center in Zimbabwe, 32 blood samples were collected. Dideoxy-sequencing of gag-pol identified subtype and resistance mutations from plasma viral RNA and proviral DNA. Drug resistance was estimated using the calibrated population resistance tool on www.hivdb.stanford.edu database. Numerical resistance scores were calculated for all antiretroviral drugs and for the subjects' reported regimen. Phylogenetic analysis as maximum likelihood was performed to determine the evolutionary distance between sequences. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients, 4 patients (2 of which had given 2 blood samples) were not known to be on ART (NA) and had exclusively wild-type virus, 17 had received Protease inhibitors (PI), 18, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and 19, two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). Of the 17 with history of PI, 10 had PI mutations, 5 had minor differences between mutations in RNA and DNA. Eighteen samples had NNRTI mutations, six of which demonstrated some discordance between DNA and RNA mutations. Although NRTI resistance mutations were frequently different between analyses, mutations resulted in very similar estimated phenotypes as measured by resistance scores. The numerical resistance scores from RNA and DNA for PIs differed between 2/10, for NNRTIs between 8/18, and for NRTIs between 17/32 pairs. When calculated resistance scores were collapsed, 3 pairs showed discordance between RNA and DNA for at least one PI, 6 were discordant for at least one NNRTI and 11 for at least one NRTI. Regarding phylogenetic evolutionary analysis, all

  4. A comparison of human papillomavirus genotype-specific DNA and E6/E7 mRNA detection to identify anal precancer among HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Schwartz, Lauren M.; Lorey, Thomas S.; LaMere, Brandon; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) RNA detection is reportedly more specific for the detection of anogenital precancer than HPV DNA but it is unknown whether this is due to detection of RNA or due to HPV genotype restriction. Materials and Methods 363 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men had two anal cytology samples taken and were evaluated using high-resolution anoscopy and biopsies of visible lesions. Anal specimens were tested for E6/E7 RNA for 5 carcinogenic HPV genotypes (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, and 45) and tested for the DNA of 13 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. Results DNA testing was more likely to be positive than RNA testing (53% vs. 48%, p = 0.02) for the same 5 HPV genotypes in aggregate. When restricted to 5 HPV genotypes targeted by the RNA test, the sensitivity to detect anal precancer was the same for DNA and RNA (81%) while RNA was more specific than DNA (65% vs. 58%, p = 0.007). By comparison, DNA detection of all 13 carcinogenic HPV genotypes was more sensitive (96% vs. 81%, p = 0.001) but much less specific (65% vs. 33%, p < 0.001) compared to RNA detection of the 5 HPV genotypes. Conclusion After controlling for HPV genotypes, RNA was only slightly more specific than DNA detection for anal precancer. Impact DNA or RNA testing for a subset of the most carcinogenic HPV genotypes may be useful for distinguishing between those HPV-positive men at higher and lower risk of anal precancer and cancer. PMID:23155136

  5. HIV RNA and proviral HIV DNA can be detected in semen after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy although HIV RNA is undetectable in blood.

    PubMed

    Du, Peiwei; Liu, An; Jiao, Yanmei; Liu, Cuie; Jiang, Taiyi; Zhu, Weijun; Zhu, Yunxia; Wu, Hao; Sun, Lijun

    2016-03-01

    The risk of sexual transmission of HIV is strongly correlated with amounts of genital HIV RNA. Few studies have reported amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen in HIV-infected Chinese patients undergoing antiviral treatment (ART). In this observational study, the amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen were assessed after six months of ART in HIV-infected Chinese individuals, when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood . This study included 19 HIV-infected Chinese men undergoing ART for six months. Amounts of HIV in paired semen and blood samples were assessed using real-time PCR. The C2-V5 region of the HIV envelope (env) genes was cloned and sequenced and genotype and co-receptor usage predicted based on the sequence. It was found that HIV RNA was undetectable in the plasma of most patients (17/19), whereas HIV RNA could be detected in the semen of most patients (16/19). HIV DNA could be detected in both semen and blood. Genetic diversity of HIV between the seminal and blood compartments was identified. Thus, amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA remain high in semen of HIV-infected Chinese patients after six months of ART treatment, even when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood.

  6. Genotypic and functional properties of early infant HIV-1 envelopes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the properties of HIV-1 variants that are transmitted from women to their infants is crucial to improving strategies to prevent transmission. In this study, 162 full-length envelope (env) clones were generated from plasma RNA obtained from 5 HIV-1 Clade B infected mother-infant pairs. Following extensive genotypic and phylogenetic analyses, 35 representative clones were selected for functional studies. Results Infant quasispecies were highly homogeneous and generally represented minor maternal variants, consistent with transmission across a selective bottleneck. Infant clones did not differ from the maternal in env length, or glycosylation. All infant variants utilized the CCR5 co-receptor, but were not macrophage tropic. Relatively high levels (IC50 ≥ 100 μg/ml) of autologous maternal plasma IgG were required to neutralize maternal and infant viruses; however, all infant viruses were neutralized by pooled sera from HIV-1 infected individuals, implying that they were not inherently neutralization-resistant. All infant viruses were sensitive to the HIV-1 entry inhibitors Enfuvirtide and soluble CD4; none were resistant to Maraviroc. Sensitivity to human monoclonal antibodies 4E10, 2F5, b12 and 2G12 varied. Conclusions This study provides extensive characterization of the genotypic and functional properties of HIV-1 env shortly after transmission. We present the first detailed comparisons of the macrophage tropism of infant and maternal env variants and their sensitivity to Maraviroc, the only CCR5 antagonist approved for therapeutic use. These findings may have implications for improving approaches to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. PMID:21843318

  7. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  8. Performance characteristics of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the Opengene DNA Sequencing System.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Grant, Robert M; Feorino, Paul; Griswold, Marshal; Hoover, Marie; Young, Russell; Day, Stephen; Lloyd Jr, Robert M; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F; Winslow, Dean L

    2003-04-01

    The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System are designed to sequence the protease (PR)- and reverse transcriptase (RT)-coding regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol. Studies were undertaken to determine the accuracy of this assay system in detecting resistance-associated mutations and to determine the effects of RNA extraction methods, anticoagulants, specimen handling, and potentially interfering substances. Samples were plasma obtained from HIV-infected subjects or seronegative plasma to which viruses derived from wild-type and mutant infectious molecular clones (IMC) of HIV-1 were added. Extraction methods tested included standard and UltraSensitive AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR, QIAGEN viral RNA extraction mini kit, and QIAGEN Ultra HIV extraction kit, and NASBA manual HIV-1 quantitative NucliSens. Sequence data from test sites were compared to a "gold standard" reference sequence to determine the percent agreement. Comparisons between test and reference sequences at the nucleotide level showed 97.5 to 100% agreement. Similar results were obtained regardless of extraction method, regardless of use of EDTA or acid citrate dextrose as anticoagulant, and despite the presence of triglycerides, bilirubin, hemoglobin, antiretroviral drugs, HIV-2, hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV, cytomegalovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), or HTLV-2. Samples with HIV-1 RNA titers of >or=1,000 copies/ml gave consistent results. The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System consistently generate highly accurate sequence data when tested with IMC-derived HIV and patient samples.

  9. HIV Infection Affects Streptococcus mutans Levels, but Not Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Saxena, D.; Chen, Z.; Norman, R.G.; Phelan, J.A.; Laverty, M.; Fisch, G.S.; Corby, P.M.; Abrams, W.; Malamud, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical study that examines whether HIV infection affects Streptococcus mutans colonization in the oral cavity. Whole stimulated saliva samples were collected from 46 HIV-seropositive individuals and 69 HIV-seronegative control individuals. The level of S. mutans colonization was determined by conventional culture methods. The genotype of S. mutans was compared between 10 HIV-positive individuals before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 10 non-HIV-infected control individuals. The results were analyzed against viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, salivary flow rate, and caries status. We observed that S. mutans levels were higher in HIV-infected individuals than in the non-HIV-infected control individuals (p = 0.013). No significant differences in S. mutans genotypes were found between the two groups over the six-month study period, even after HAART. There was a bivariate linear relationship between S. mutans levels and CD8+ counts (r = 0.412; p = 0.007), but not between S. mutans levels and either CD4+ counts or viral load. Furthermore, compared with non-HIV-infected control individuals, HIV-infected individuals experienced lower salivary secretion (p = 0.009) and a positive trend toward more decayed tooth surfaces (p = 0.027). These findings suggest that HIV infection can have a significant effect on the level of S. mutans, but not genotypes. PMID:22821240

  10. Genotypic variation of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolates in India based on sequence diversity at mitochondrial large subunit rRNA.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rashmi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Guleria, Randeep; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Kumar, Lalit; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Luthra, Kalpana; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Iyer, Venkateswaran K

    2011-03-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), a common and serious opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, is caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii (formerly known as Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis). The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and distribution of genotypes of P. jirovecii based on sequence polymorphisms at mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA (mt LSU rRNA) region in both HIV and non-HIV immunocompromised individuals with a positive PCR result for PCP in a tertiary health care centre in northern India. From January 2005 to October 2008, 50 patients [22 HIV-seropositive individuals, 10 post-renal transplant (PRT) recipients, 3 cancer patients, and 15 patients with various other kinds of immunosuppression] were found to be positive for P. jirovecii using PCR at the mt LSU rRNA gene. Genotyping of the positive samples was performed at the mt LSU rRNA locus. Genotype 2 was the most common accounting for 42% of total types. This was followed by the genotypes 3 (24%), 1 (20%), and 4 (8%). Mixed infection was observed in 3 cases (6%). The rates of genotype distribution were similar in HIV-seropositive individuals, cancer patients, and in patients with other kinds of immunosuppression. In the PRT recipients, genotype 1 was the most prevalent type (80%). This is the first study describing the prevalence of genotypes in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, immunocompromised patients based on the mt LSU rRNA gene from the Indian subcontinent. The most prevalent genotype observed was type 2 in contrast to many studies from other parts of the world where genotype 1 was the most prevalent type, suggesting geographical variation.

  11. The HIVdb system for HIV-1 genotypic resistance interpretation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Michele W; Liu, Tommy F; Shafer, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    The Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database hosts a freely available online genotypic resistance interpretation system called HIVdb to help clinicians and laboratories interpret HIV-1 genotypic resistance tests. These tests are designed to assess susceptibility to nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI and NNRTI), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. The HIVdb genotypic resistance interpretation system output consists of (1) a list of penalty scores for each antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutation in a submitted sequence, (2) estimates of decreased NRTI, NNRTI, protease and integrase inhibitor susceptibility, and (3) comments about each ARV resistance mutation in the submitted sequence. The application's strengths are its convenience for submitting sequences, its quality control analysis, its transparency and its extensive comments. The Sierra Web service is an extension that enables laboratories analyzing many sequences to individualize the format of their results. The algorithm specification interface compiler makes it possible for HIVdb to provide results using a variety of different HIV-1 genotypic resistance interpretation algorithms.

  12. Sequencing of Gag/Env association with HIV genotyping resolution and HIV-related epidemiologic studies of HIV in China.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Wang, H W; Xu, Y; Feng, Y; Zhang, H F; Wang, K H

    2016-10-24

    HIV genotyping has led to conflicting results between laboratories. Therefore, identifying the most accurate gene combinations to sequence remains a priority. Datasets of Chinese HIV subtypes based on several markers and deposited in PubMed, Metstr, CNKI, and VIP databases between 2000 and 2015 were studied. In total, 9177 cases of amplification-positive samples from 26 provinces of China were collected and used to classify HIV subtypes based on eight individual genes or a combination thereof. CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and B were the prevalent HIV subtypes in China, accounting for 84.07% of all genotypes. Gag/Env sequencing classified a greater number of HIV subtypes compared to other genes or combination of gene fragments. The geographical distribution of Gag and Gag/Env genotypes was similar to that observed with all genetic markers. Further principal component analysis showed a significantly different geographical distribution pattern of HIV in China for HIV genotypes detected with Gag/Env, which was in line with the distribution of all HIV genotypes in China. Gag/Env sequences had the highest diversity of the eight markers studied, followed by Gag and Gag/Pol/Env; Pol/Env polymorphisms were the least divergent. Gag/Env can serve as a high-resolution marker for HIV genotyping.

  13. MicroRNA-155 Reinforces HIV Latency*

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Chan, Jonathan K.; Oh, Eugene; Heidersbach, Amy J.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Chavez, Leonard; Verdin, Eric; Rape, Michael; Greene, Warner C.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a small number of infected but transcriptionally dormant cells currently thwarts a cure for the more than 35 million individuals infected with HIV. Reactivation of these latently infected cells may result in three fates: 1) cell death due to a viral cytopathic effect, 2) cell death due to immune clearance, or 3) a retreat into latency. Uncovering the dynamics of HIV gene expression and silencing in the latent reservoir will be crucial for developing an HIV-1 cure. Here we identify and characterize an intracellular circuit involving TRIM32, an HIV activator, and miR-155, a microRNA that may promote a return to latency in these transiently activated reservoir cells. Notably, we demonstrate that TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, promotes reactivation from latency by directly modifying IκBα, leading to a novel mechanism of NF-κB induction not involving IκB kinase activation. PMID:25873391

  14. Epidemiological Distribution and Genotype Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus Among HIV Patients in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, Hasan; Momen-Heravi, Mansooreh; Farokhzad, Asefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Parenteral transmission is a common route of transmission for both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); therefore, hepatitis C viral infection is highly prevalent among people infected with HIV. Objectives This study was designed to examine the epidemiology and describe the clinical manifestation as well as the HCV genotypes in patients from the city of Kashan, Iran, who are coinfected with HIV and HCV. Patients and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in 2014 in the city of Kashan. The population consisted of all the HIV-infected patients who were referred to the behavioral counseling center and jail in Kashan. Demographic information and HCV- and HIV-related risk behaviors were obtained through the use of an interviewer-assisted questionnaire. After the participants gave written informed consent to participate, 10 cc venous blood samples were collected. The serum samples were screened for HCV infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the event of a positive test for HCV, the RNA was then amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The HCV subtypes were determined via the direct sequencing of the amplicons. All data analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 for the descriptive statistics, and then the chi-square test and Pearson coefficient were performed for additional analysis. Results The results of the analysis indicated that 54 (85%) of the 63 HIV-infected patients were males who were also HCV positive and who had less than a high school level education. There was a significant association between HCV infection and both occupation (P < 0.0001) and level of education (P < 0.05). All the HIV/HCV coinfected cases had a history of illicit drug use, while 92.6% had a history of imprisonment and 40.7% had high risk sexual contacts. Overall, genotype 1 was found in 75.9% of HCV patients, while genotype 3 was found in 24.1%. Some 94.4% of HCV patients had subtype A. There were

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  20. Genotypic resistance testing in HIV by arrayed primer extension

    PubMed Central

    Bodem, Jochen; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Jacob, Anette; Fellenberg, Kurt; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of mutations that are associated with the occurrence of drug resistance is important for monitoring the antiretroviral therapy of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here, we describe the establishment and successful application of Arrayed Primer Extension (APEX) for genotypic resistance testing in HIV as a rapid and economical alternative to standard sequencing. The assay is based on an array of oligonucleotide primers that are immobilised via their 5′-ends. Upon hybridisation of template DNA, a primer extension reaction is performed in the presence of the four dideoxynucleotides, each labelled with a distinct fluorophore. The inserted label immediately indicates the sequence at the respective position. Any mutation changes the colour pattern. We designed a microarray for the analysis of 26 and 33 codons in the HIV protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively, which are of special interest with respect to drug resistance. The enormous genome variability of HIV represents a big challenge for genotypic resistance tests, which include a hybridisation step, both in terms of specificity and probe numbers. The use of degenerated oligonucleotides resulted in a significant reduction in the number of primers needed. For validation, DNA of 94 and 48 patients that exhibited resistance to inhibitors of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively, were analysed. The validation included HIV subtype B, prevalent in industrialised countries, as well as non-subtype B samples that are more common elsewhere. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00216-007-1775-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18202840

  1. Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 responds better to pegylated interferon with ribavirin than genotype 1 in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Mira, José A; Rivero, Antonio; de Los Santos-Gil, Ignacio; López-Cortés, Luis F; Girón-González, José A; Márquez, Manuel; Merino, Dolores; del Mar Viloria, María; Téllez, Francisco; Ríos-Villegas, María J; Omar, Mohamed; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A

    2012-08-24

    We assess the efficacy of pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) with ribavirin (RBV) and the predictors of sustained virological response (SVR) among HIV/hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4)-coinfected patients. Thirty-nine (31.5%) of 124 individuals with HCV-4 achieved SVR compared with 103 (22.7%) of 453 individuals with HCV genotype 1 (P=0.046). Only interleukin-28B (IL28B) genotype CC was independently associated with SVR in HIV/HCV-4-coinfected patients. The efficacy of peg-IFN with RBV in coinfected individuals with genotype 4 is significantly higher than in those with genotype 1. IL28B CC genotype is the main predictor of response in this population.

  2. Micro RNA in Exosomes from HIV-Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Roth, William W; Huang, Ming Bo; Addae Konadu, Kateena; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C

    2015-12-22

    Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles secreted by cells that function to shuttle RNA and proteins between cells. To examine the role of exosomal micro RNA (miRNA) during the early stage of HIV-1 infection we characterized miRNA in exosomes from HIV-infected macrophages, compared with exosomes from non-infected macrophages. Primary human monocytes from uninfected donors were differentiated to macrophages (MDM) which were either mock-infected or infected with the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 BaL strain. Exosomes were recovered from culture media and separated from virus particles by centrifugation on iodixanol density gradients. The low molecular weight RNA fraction was prepared from purified exosomes. After pre-amplification, RNA was hybridized to microarrays containing probes for 1200 miRNA species of known and unknown function. We observed 48 miRNA species in both infected and uninfected MDM exosomes. Additionally, 38 miRNAs were present in infected-cell exosomes but not uninfected-cell exosomes. Of these, 13 miRNAs were upregulated in exosomes from HIV-infected cells, including 4 miRNA species that were increased by more than 10-fold. Though numerous miRNA species have been identified in HIV-infected cells, relatively little is known about miRNA content in exosomes from these cells. In the future, we plan to investigate whether the upregulated miRNA species we identified are increased in exosomes from HIV-1-positive patients.

  3. Impact of triplicate testing on HIV genotypic tropism prediction in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Symons, J; Vandekerckhove, L; Paredes, R; Verhofstede, C; Bellido, R; Demecheleer, E; van Ham, P M; van Lelyveld, S F L; Stam, A J; van Versendaal, D; Nijhuis, M; Wensing, A M J

    2012-06-01

    Guidelines state that the CCR5-inhibitor Maraviroc should be prescribed to patients infected with R5-tropic HIV-1 only. Therefore, viral tropism needs to be assessed phenotypically or genotypically. Preliminary clinical trial data suggest that genotypic analysis in triplicate is associated with improved prediction of virological response by increasing the detection of X4-tropic variants. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of triplicate genotypic analysis on prediction of co-receptor usage in routine clinical practice. Samples from therapy-naive and therapy-experienced patients were collected for routine tropism testing at three European clinical centres. Viral RNA was isolated from plasma and proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Gp120-V3 was amplified in a triplicate nested RT-PCR procedure and sequenced. Co-receptor usage was predicted using the Geno2Pheno([coreceptor]) algorithm and analysed with a false-positive rate (FPR) of 5.75%, 10%, or an FPR of 20% and according to the current European guidelines on the clinical management of HIV-1 tropism testing. A total of 266 sequences were obtained from 101 patient samples. Discordance in tropism prediction for the triplicates was observed in ten samples using an FPR of 10%. Triplicate testing resulted in a 16.7% increase in X4-predicted samples and to reclassification from R5 to X4 tropism for four cases rendering these patients ineligible for Maraviroc treatment. In conclusion, triplicate genotypic tropism testing increases X4 tropism detection in individual cases, which may prove to be pivotal when CCR5-inhibitor therapy is applied.

  4. Achieving HIV-1 Control through RNA-Directed Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Vera; Mitchell, Jye; Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Cavalieri, Francesca; Symonds, Geoff; Caruso, Frank; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection has been transformed by combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART), changing a universally fatal infection into a controllable infection. However, major obstacles for an HIV-1 cure exist. The HIV latent reservoir, which exists in resting CD4+ T cells, is not impacted by ART, and can reactivate when ART is interrupted or ceased. Additionally, multi-drug resistance can arise. One alternate approach to conventional HIV-1 drug treatment that is being explored involves gene therapies utilizing RNA-directed gene regulation. Commonly known as RNA interference (RNAi), short interfering RNA (siRNA) induce gene silencing in conserved biological pathways, which require a high degree of sequence specificity. This review will provide an overview of the silencing pathways, the current RNAi technologies being developed for HIV-1 gene therapy, current clinical trials, and the challenges faced in progressing these treatments into clinical trials. PMID:27941595

  5. New Highly Divergent rRNA Sequence among Biodiverse Genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi Strains Isolated from Humans in Gabon and Cameroon▿

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Jacques; Bart-Delabesse, Emmanuelle; Biligui, Sylvestre; Carbone, Alessandra; Seiller, Xavier; Okome-Nkoumou, Madeleine; Nzamba, Chantal; Kombila, Maryvonne; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Thellier, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal microsporidiosis due to Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a leading cause of chronic diarrhea in severely immunocompromised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. It may be a public health problem in Africa due to the magnitude of the HIV pandemic and to poor sanitary conditions. We designed two prevalence studies of E. bieneusi in Central Africa, the first with HIV-positive patients from an urban setting in Gabon and the second with a nonselected rural population in Cameroon. Stool samples were analyzed by an immunofluorescence antibody test and PCR. Twenty-five out of 822 HIV-positive patients from Gabon and 22 out of 758 villagers from Cameroon were found to be positive for E. bieneusi. The prevalence rates of the two studies were surprisingly similar (3.0% and 2.9%). Genotypic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene showed a high degree of diversity in samples from both countries. In Gabon, 15 isolates showed seven different genotypes: the previously reported genotypes A, D, and K along with four new genotypes, referred to as CAF1, CAF2, CAF3, and CAF4. In Cameroon, five genotypes were found in 20 isolates: the known genotypes A, B, D, and K and the new genotype CAF4. Genotypes A and CAF4 predominated in Cameroon, whereas K, CAF4, and CAF1 were more frequent in Gabon, suggesting that different genotypes present differing risks of infection associated with immune status and living conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of the new genotype CAF4, identified in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive subjects, indicates that it represents a highly divergent strain. PMID:17537939

  6. Prevalence and genotypic variability of TTV in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sherman, K E; Rouster, S D; Feinberg, J

    2001-11-01

    TT virus is a small, circular DNA virus, that has been associated with transfusion hepatitis. We sought to determine the prevalence of TT virus (TTV) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and to characterize the virus in terms of genotypic variability and in the relationship to CD4+, HIV viral loads, HCV/HIV coinfection, and ALT abnormalities. A cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected patients in the United States, including 86 HIV-positive subjects and 118 HIV-negative controls was performed. TTV was detected using a seminested PCR technique. Samples underwent cloning and sequence analysis and/or RFLP to determine genotype. Thirty-eight percent of HIV-positive patients had TTV infection versus 14.4% of patients within the matching cohort (P = 0.0009). The highest rate of TTV infection was in patients with concurrent HCV/HIV infection (54% vs 30%, P = 0.038). HIV-infected subjects with TTV had lower ALT levels than those without TTV (P = 0.036). Intravenous drug use was the leading factor associated with TTV positivity among HIV-positive subjects. Mixed genotypes were more common in those with HIV. Therefore, TTV prevalence, ALT levels, and genomic heterogeneity of TTV all seem to be altered in patients with HIV.

  7. Suppression of HIV-1 replication by microRNA effectors

    PubMed Central

    Chable-Bessia, Christine; Meziane, Oussama; Latreille, Daniel; Triboulet, Robinson; Zamborlini, Alessia; Wagschal, Alexandre; Jacquet, Jean-Marc; Reynes, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Saib, Ali; Bennasser, Yamina; Benkirane, Monsef

    2009-01-01

    The rate of HIV-1 gene expression is a key step that determines the kinetics of virus spread and AIDS progression. Viral entry and gene expression were described to be the key determinants for cell permissiveness to HIV. Recent reports highlighted the involvement of miRNA in regulating HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally. In this study we explored the role of cellular factors required for miRNA-mediated mRNA translational inhibition in regulating HIV-1 gene expression. Here we show that HIV-1 mRNAs associate and co-localize with components of the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC), and we characterize some of the proteins required for miRNA-mediated silencing (miRNA effectors). RCK/p54, GW182, LSm-1 and XRN1 negatively regulate HIV-1 gene expression by preventing viral mRNA association with polysomes. Interestingly, knockdown of RCK/p54 or DGCR8 resulted in virus reactivation in PBMCs isolated from HIV infected patients treated with suppressive HAART. PMID:19272132

  8. Dimeric RNA recognition regulates HIV-1 genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A; Fu, William; Gorelick, Robert J; Tai, S-H Sheldon; Soheilian, Ferri; Ptak, Roger G; Nagashima, Kunio; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2013-03-01

    How retroviruses regulate the amount of RNA genome packaged into each virion has remained a long-standing question. Our previous study showed that most HIV-1 particles contain two copies of viral RNA, indicating that the number of genomes packaged is tightly regulated. In this report, we examine the mechanism that controls the number of RNA genomes encapsidated into HIV-1 particles. We hypothesize that HIV-1 regulates genome packaging by either the mass or copy number of the viral RNA. These two distinct mechanisms predict different outcomes when the genome size deviates significantly from that of wild type. Regulation by RNA mass would result in multiple copies of a small genome or one copy of a large genome being packaged, whereas regulation by copy number would result in two copies of a genome being packaged independent of size. To distinguish between these two hypotheses, we examined the packaging of viral RNA that was larger (≈17 kb) or smaller (≈3 kb) than that of wild-type HIV-1 (≈9 kb) and found that most particles packaged two copies of the viral genome regardless of whether they were 17 kb or 3 kb. Therefore, HIV-1 regulates RNA genome encapsidation not by the mass of RNA but by packaging two copies of RNA. To further explore the mechanism that governs this regulation, we examined the packaging of viral RNAs containing two packaging signals that can form intermolecular dimers or intramolecular dimers (self-dimers) and found that one self-dimer is packaged. Therefore, HIV-1 recognizes one dimeric RNA instead of two copies of RNA. Our findings reveal that dimeric RNA recognition is the key mechanism that regulates HIV-1 genome encapsidation and provide insights into a critical step in the generation of infectious viruses.

  9. Genotypic resistance profiles of HIV-2-treated patients in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Eholié, Serge; Anglaret, Xavier; Bertine, Mélanie; Rouzioux, Christine; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Messou, Eugène; Minga, Albert; Damond, Florence; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Dabis, François; Peytavin, Gilles; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Ekouevi, Didier K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the virological response, genotypic resistance profiles, and antiretroviral plasma concentrations in HIV-2 antiretroviral-treated (antiretroviral therapy, ART) patients in Côte d‘Ivoire. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among HIV-2 patients receiving ART. Plasma HIV-2 viral load was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les hépatites virales (ANRS) assay. Protease and reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed using in-house methods and antiretroviral plasma concentrations were assessed using ultra performance liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Results One hundred and forty-five HIV-2-treated patients were enrolled with a median CD4+ cell count of 360 cells/µl (interquartile range, IQR = 215–528). Median duration of ART was 4 years (IQR = 2–7) and 74% of patients displayed viral load less than 50 copies/ml. Median plasma HIV-2 RNA among patients with viral load more than 50 copies/ml was 3016 copies/ml (IQR = 436–5156). Most patients (84%) received a lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimen. HIV-2 resistance mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors were detected in 21 of 25 (84%) and 20 of 29 (69%) samples, respectively. The most prevalent nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were M184I/V (90%), Q151M (24%), and S215F/Y (24%). The most prevalent protease inhibitor resistance mutations were V47A (60%) and I54M (30%). Median CD4+ cell counts were 434 cells/µl (292–573) and 204 cells/µl (122–281) in patients with viral load less than 50 copies/ml and those exhibiting virological failure (P < 0.0001), respectively. The proportions of patients with adequate antiretroviral plasma concentrations were 81 and 93% in patients displaying virological failure and in those with viral load less than 50 copies/ml, respectively (P = 0.046), suggesting good treatment adherence. Conclusion We observed adequate drug

  10. Lower levels of HIV RNA in semen in HIV-2 compared with HIV-1 infection: implications for differences in transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Agne, Habibatou D.; Stern, Joshua E.; Critchlow, Cathy W.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Sow, Papa Salif

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives HIV-2 infection, in comparison with HIV-1, is characterized by lower plasma viral loads, slower CD4 cell count decline, decreased AIDS-related mortality, and lower rates of mother-to-child and sexual transmission. To gain further insight into why HIV-1 is more readily transmitted as compared with HIV-2, we analyzed semen and plasma HIV RNA levels in HIV-1 and HIV-2-positive men from Senegal. Design and methods Twenty-two HIV-1 and 10 HIV-2-infected subjects from the University of Dakar donated semen and blood samples for this analysis. HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads in semen and plasma were quantified using type-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Results The mean age of the subjects was 37 and 40 years; mean CD4 cell count was 222 and 276 cells/µl and the mean plasma viral load was 4.7 and 3.0 log10 copies/ml for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively (P = 0.002). HIV RNA was detected in semen in 21 of 22 (95%) of HIV-1 and seven of 10 (70%) of HIV-2-infected subjects; P = 0.07). However, the levels of HIV RNA present in semen were markedly different between those with HIV-1 and HIV-2, with a mean of 4.4 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-1 and a mean of 2.6 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-2 (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, plasma viral load and HIV type, but not CD4 cell count, were independently predictive of semen viral load (P = 0.03, 0.05, 0.48, respectively) Conclusions These data suggest that differences in semen viral load between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may be in part responsible for the markedly different transmission rates of these two viruses. In addition, risk of male genital tract shedding strongly correlates with plasma viral loads. Interventions that decrease viral load may help decrease transmission of both HIV-1 and HIV-2. PMID:16549974

  11. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander O; DeMaster, Laura K; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Reiss, Peter; O'Doherty, Una; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-11-11

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent genuine HIV RNA but rather chimeric host-HIV readthrough transcripts. Here, we demonstrate that in HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, such host-derived transcripts do not significantly contribute to the HIV gag RNA level.

  12. HIV infection among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel: sociodemographic and genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Darrell E; Bautista, Christian T; O'Connell, Robert J; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Agan, Brian K; Kijak, Gustavo H; Hakre, Shilpa; Sanchez, Jose L; Sateren, Warren B; McCutchan, Francine E; Michael, Nelson L; Scott, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    Since 1985, the U.S. Department of Defense has periodically screened all military personnel for HIV allowing for the monitoring of the infection in this dynamic cohort population. A nested case-control study was performed to study sociodemographics, overseas assignment, and molecular analysis of HIV. Cases were newly identified HIV infections among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel from 2000 to 2004. Controls were frequency matched to cases by gender and date of case first positive HIV screening test. Genotyping analysis was performed using high-throughput screening assays and partial genome sequencing. HIV was significantly associated with black race [odds ratio (OR) = 6.65], single marital status (OR = 4.45), and age (OR per year = 1.07). Ninety-seven percent were subtype B and 3% were non-B subtypes (A3, CRF01_AE, A/C recombinant, G, CRF02_AG). Among cases, overseas assignment in the period at risk prior to their first HIV-positive test was associated with non-B HIV subtype infection (OR = 8.44). Black and single military personnel remain disproportionately affected by HIV infection. Most non-B HIV subtypes were associated with overseas assignment. Given the increased frequency and length of assignments, and the expanding HIV genetic diversity observed in this population, there is a need for active HIV genotyping surveillance and a need to reinforce primary HIV prevention efforts.

  13. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  14. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  15. MinVar: A rapid and versatile tool for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michael; Metzner, Karin J; Geissberger, Fabienne D; Shah, Cyril; Leemann, Christine; Klimkait, Thomas; Böni, Jürg; Trkola, Alexandra; Zagordi, Osvaldo

    2017-02-01

    Genotypic monitoring of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in HIV-1 infected individuals is strongly recommended to guide selection of the initial antiretroviral therapy (ART) and changes of drug regimens. Traditionally, mutations conferring drug resistance are detected by population sequencing of the reverse transcribed viral RNA encoding the HIV-1 enzymes target by ART, followed by manual analysis and interpretation of Sanger sequencing traces. This process is labor intensive, relies on subjective interpretation from the operator, and offers limited sensitivity as only mutations above 20% frequency can be reliably detected. Here we present MinVar, a pipeline for the analysis of deep sequencing data, which allows reliable and automated detection of DRMs down to 5%. We evaluated MinVar with data from amplicon sequencing of defined mixtures of molecular virus clones with known DRM and plasma samples of viremic HIV-1 infected individuals and we compared it to VirVarSeq, another virus variant detection tool exclusively working on Illumina deep sequencing data. MinVar was designed to be compatible with a diverse range of sequencing platforms and allows the detection of DRMs and insertions/deletions from deep sequencing data without the need to perform additional bioinformatics analysis, a prerequisite to a widespread implementation of HIV-1 genotyping using deep sequencing in routine diagnostic settings.

  16. Development, Validation and Clinical Evaluation of a Low Cost In-House HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping Assay for Indian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Arpan; Vaniawala, Salil; Shah, Parth; Misra, Rabindra Nath; Wani, Minal; Mukhopadhyaya, Pratap N.

    2014-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) drug resistance genotyping assay is a part of clinical management of HIV-1 positive individuals under treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Routine monitoring of drug resistance mutations in resource limited settings like India is not possible due to high cost of commercial drug resistance assays. In this study we developed an in-house, cost effective HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping assay for Indian patients and validated it against the US-FDA-approved ViroSeq HIV-1 drug resistance testing system. A reference panel of 20 clinical samples was used to develop and validate the assay against ViroSeq HIV-1 drug resistance testing system which was subsequently used to genotype a clinical panel of 225 samples. The Stanford HIV database was used to identify drug resistant mutations. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was 1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml of plasma sample while precision and reproducibility was 99.68±0.16% and 99.76±0.18% respectively. One hundred and one drug resistant mutations were detected by the in-house assay compared to 104 by ViroSeq system in the reference panel. The assay had 91.55% success rate in genotyping the clinical panel samples and was able to detect drug resistant mutations related to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) as well as protease inhibitor (PI) classes of antiretroviral drugs. It was found to be around 71.9% more cost effective compared to ViroSeq genotyping system. This evaluation of the assay on the clinical panel demonstrates its potential for monitoring clinical HIV-1 drug resistance mutations and population-based surveillance in resource limited settings like India. PMID:25157501

  17. The longitudinal and interactive effects of HIV status, stimulant use, and host genotype upon neurocognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Levine, Andrew J; Reynolds, Sandra; Cox, Christopher; Miller, Eric N; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Becker, James T; Martin, Eileen; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-06-01

    Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and illicit stimulant use can adversely impact neurocognitive functioning, and these effects can be additive. However, significant variability exists such that as-of-yet unidentified exogenous and endogenous factors affect one's risk for neurocognitive impairment. Literature on both HIV and stimulant use indicates that host genetic variants in immunologic and dopamine-related genes are one such factor. In this study, the individual and interactive effects of HIV status, stimulant use, and genotype upon neurocognitive functioning were examined longitudinally over a 10-year period. Nine hundred fifty-two Caucasian HIV+ and HIV- cases from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study were included. All cases had at least two comprehensive neurocognitive evaluations between 1985 and 1995. Pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) data were examined in order to avoid the confounding effect of variable drug regimens. Linear mixed models were used, with neurocognitive domain scores as the outcome variables. No four-way interactions were found, indicating that HIV and stimulant use do not interact over time to affect neurocognitive functioning as a function of genotype. Multiple three-way interactions were found that involved genotype and HIV status. All immunologically related genes found to interact with HIV status affected neurocognitive functioning in the expected direction; however, only C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and CCL3 affected HIV+ individuals specifically. Dopamine-related genetic variants generally affected HIV-negative individuals only. Neurocognitive functioning among HIV+ individuals who also used stimulants was not significantly different from those who did not use stimulants. The findings support the role of immunologically related genetic differences in CCL2 and CCL3 in neurocognitive functioning among HIV+ individuals; however, their impact is minor. Being consistent with findings from another cohort

  18. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1), Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2), or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and processing bodies (PBs). More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A), allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2), an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries. PMID:27886048

  19. Emergence of occult minority genotype 2b hepatitis C infection in an HIV-1-co-infected patient treated for genotype 5a HCV infection with 48 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Buckton, A J; Kulasegaram, R; Ngui, S L; Fisher, M; James, R; Rangarajan, S; Teo, C G

    2007-09-01

    An HIV-1/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patient with haemophilia received a 48-week course of pegylated interferon-alpha-2b and ribavirin therapy for genotype 5a HCV infection. Virological response was achieved at week 24. At the end of treatment, HCV RNA in serum was detected and identified to belong to genotype 2b, rather than genotype 5a. A sensitive method for identifying minority HCV genotypes in pre-treatment serum showed genotype 2b HCV carriage prior to treatment. Sequencing the interferon sensitivity-determining region of the HCV NS5A gene obtained from pre-, intra- and post-treatment sera revealed emergence of quasispecies bearing R-->K and M-->A/T mutations at codons 2222 and 2223, respectively. Occult presence of minority HCV subpopulations and their acquisition of mutations following therapy can result in poor treatment outcome.

  20. Defective HIV-1 proviruses produce novel protein-coding RNA species in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Rehm, Catherine A; O'Doherty, Una; Paxinos, Ellen E; Fauci, Anthony S; Lane, H Clifford

    2016-08-02

    Despite years of plasma HIV-RNA levels <40 copies per milliliter during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the majority of HIV-infected patients exhibit persistent seropositivity to HIV-1 and evidence of immune activation. These patients also show persistence of proviruses of HIV-1 in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Many of these proviruses have been characterized as defective and thus thought to contribute little to HIV-1 pathogenesis. By combining 5'LTR-to-3'LTR single-genome amplification and direct amplicon sequencing, we have identified the presence of "defective" proviruses capable of transcribing novel unspliced HIV-RNA (usHIV-RNA) species in patients at all stages of HIV-1 infection. Although these novel usHIV-RNA transcripts had exon structures that were different from those of the known spliced HIV-RNA variants, they maintained translationally competent ORFs, involving elements of gag, pol, env, rev, and nef to encode a series of novel HIV-1 chimeric proteins. These novel usHIV-RNAs were detected in five of five patients, including four of four patients with prolonged viral suppression of HIV-RNA levels <40 copies per milliliter for more than 6 y. Our findings suggest that the persistent defective proviruses of HIV-1 are not "silent," but rather may contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by stimulating host-defense pathways that target foreign nucleic acids and proteins.

  1. Human papillomavirus prevalence and genotype distribution among HIV-infected women in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Kyoung; Cho, Heerim; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Seung Geun; Lee, Sang Yeup; Kim, Ki Hyung; Lee, Chang Hun; Chung, Joo Seop; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women in Korea is not well established. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV infection among HIV-infected women in Korea. HPV DNA genotype and cervical cytology were examined in 60 HIV-positive women and 1,938 HIV-negative women. HPV genotypes were analyzed by using a HPV DNA chip. HIV-infected women had higher prevalence of high-risk HPV (hr-HPV) infection (30% vs 4.9%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.63-13.34, P<0.001) and abnormal cervical cytology (18.3% vs 1.8%, AOR, 10.94; 95% CI, 5.18-23.1, P<0.001) compared with controls. The most common hr-HPV genotype detected in HIV-infected women was HPV 16 (10%), followed by 18 (6.7%) and 52 (5%). Prevalence of quadrivalent vaccine-preventable types (HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) was 21.7% and 2.3% in HIV-positive women and HIV-negative women, respectively. Age was a significant risk factor for hr-HPV infection in HIV-infected women (P=0.039). The presence of hr-HPV was significantly associated with abnormal cervical cytology (P<0.001). These findings suggest that HPV testing for cervical cancer screening in HIV-infected women would be necessary, particularly among young age group.

  2. Prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage (tropism) by sequence analysis using a genotypic approach.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Saleta; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine; Thielen, Alexander; Schuelter, Eugen; Heger, Eva; Däumer, Martin; Reuter, Stefan; Esser, Stefan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Pfister, Herbert; Oette, Mark; Lengauer, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is the first licensed antiretroviral drug from the class of coreceptor antagonists. It binds to the host coreceptor CCR5, which is used by the majority of HIV strains in order to infect the human immune cells (Fig. 1). Other HIV isolates use a different coreceptor, the CXCR4. Which receptor is used, is determined in the virus by the Env protein (Fig. 2). Depending on the coreceptor used, the viruses are classified as R5 or X4, respectively. MVC binds to the CCR5 receptor inhibiting the entry of R5 viruses into the target cell. During the course of disease, X4 viruses may emerge and outgrow the R5 viruses. Determination of coreceptor usage (also called tropism) is therefore mandatory prior to administration of MVC, as demanded by EMA and FDA. The studies for MVC efficiency MOTIVATE, MERIT and 1029 have been performed with the Trofile assay from Monogram, San Francisco, U.S.A. This is a high quality assay based on sophisticated recombinant tests. The acceptance for this test for daily routine is rather low outside of the U.S.A., since the European physicians rather tend to work with decentralized expert laboratories, which also provide concomitant resistance testing. These laboratories have undergone several quality assurance evaluations, the last one being presented in 2011. For several years now, we have performed tropism determinations based on sequence analysis from the HIV env-V3 gene region (V3). This region carries enough information to perform a reliable prediction. The genotypic determination of coreceptor usage presents advantages such as: shorter turnover time (equivalent to resistance testing), lower costs, possibility to adapt the results to the patients' needs and possibility of analysing clinical samples with very low or even undetectable viral load (VL), particularly since the number of samples analysed with VL < 1000 copies/μl roughly increased in the last years (Fig. 3). The main steps for tropism testing (Fig. 4) demonstrated in

  3. Translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, Théophile; Mengardi, Chloé; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Translation initiation of the full-length mRNA of the human immunodeficiency virus can occur via several different mechanisms to maintain production of viral structural proteins throughout the replication cycle. HIV-1 viral protein synthesis can occur by the use of both a cap-dependant and IRES-driven mechanism depending on the physiological conditions of the cell and the status of the ongoing infection. For both of these mechanisms there is a need for several viral and cellular co-factors for optimal translation of the viral mRNA. In this review we will describe the mechanism used by the full-length mRNA to initiate translation highlighting the role of co-factors within this process. A particular emphasis will be given to the role of the DDX3 RNA helicase in HIV-1 mRNA translation initiation. PMID:26779410

  4. Translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, Théophile; Mengardi, Chloé; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Translation initiation of the full-length mRNA of the human immunodeficiency virus can occur via several different mechanisms to maintain production of viral structural proteins throughout the replication cycle. HIV-1 viral protein synthesis can occur by the use of both a cap-dependant and IRES-driven mechanism depending on the physiological conditions of the cell and the status of the ongoing infection. For both of these mechanisms there is a need for several viral and cellular co-factors for optimal translation of the viral mRNA. In this review we will describe the mechanism used by the full-length mRNA to initiate translation highlighting the role of co-factors within this process. A particular emphasis will be given to the role of the DDX3 RNA helicase in HIV-1 mRNA translation initiation.

  5. HIV AND HCV COINFECTION: PREVALENCE, ASSOCIATED FACTORS AND GENOTYPE CHARACTERIZATION IN THE MIDWEST REGION OF BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Solange Zacalusni; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Lorenzo, Paulo Cesar; Puga, Marco Antonio Moreira; Tanaka, Tayana Serpa Ortiz; Thomaz, Danilo Yamamoto; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel; Druzian, Angelita Fernandes; Lindenberg, Andréa Siqueira Campos; Torres, Marina Sawada; Pereira, Sérgio A.; Villar, Livia Melo; Lampe, Elisabete; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study on prevalence, associated factors and genotype distribution of HCV infection was conducted among 848 HIV-infected patients recruited at reference centers in the Midwest Region of Brazil. The prevalence rate of HIV-HCV coinfection was 6.9% (95% CI: 5.2 to 8.6). In multivariable analysis, increasing age, use of illicit drugs (injection and non-injection), a history of blood transfusion before 1994, and the absence of a steady partnership were significant independent associated factors for HIV-HCV coinfection. The phylogenetic analysis based on the NS5B region revealed the presence of two major circulating genotypes of HCV: genotypes 1 (58.3%) and 3 (41.7%). The prevalence of HIV-HCV coinfection was lower than those reported in studies conducted with HIV-infected patients in different regions of Brazil, due to the fact that illicit drug use is not a frequent mode of HIV transmission in this region of Brazil. Serologic screening of HIV-patients for HCV before initiating antiretroviral treatment, a comprehensive identification of associated factors, and the implementation of effective harm reduction programs are highly recommended to provide useful information for treatment and to prevent HCV coinfection in these patients. PMID:25351547

  6. HIV-1 tropism: a comparison between RNA and proviral DNA in routine clinical samples from Chilean patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV in Chile has a notification rate of 0.01%. Coreceptor antagonists are a family of antiretroviral drugs that are used with the prior knowledge of patients HIV-1 tropism. Viral RNA-based tropism detection requires a plasma viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, while proviral DNA-based detection can be performed regardless of plasma viral load. This test is useful in patients with low or undetectable viral loads and would benefit with a proper therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between HIV RNA and proviral genotypic DNA tropism tests. Findings Forty three Chilean patients were examined using population-based V3 sequencing, and a geno2pheno false-positive rate (FPR) cutoff values of 5, 5.75, 10 and 20%. With cutoff 5.75% a concordance of 88.4% in tropism prediction was found after a simultaneous comparison between HIV tropism assessment by RNA and DNA. In total, five discrepancies (11.6%) were found, 3 patients were RNA-R5/DNA-X4 and two were RNA-X4/DNA-R5. Proviral DNA enabled the prediction of tropism in patients with a low or undetectable viral load. For cutoff 5 and 5.75% genotypic testing using proviral DNA showed a similar sensitivity for X4 as RNA. We found that the highest sensitivity for detecting the X4 strain occurred with proviral DNA and cutoff of 10 and 20%. Viral loads were higher among X4 strain carriers than among R5 strain carriers (p < 0.05). Conclusions A high degree of concordance was found between tropism testing with RNA and testing with proviral DNA. Our results suggest that proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism testing is a useful option for patients with low or undetectable viral load who require a different therapy. PMID:24165156

  7. Translational Control of the HIV Unspliced Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Ohlmann, Théophile; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 is a highly regulated process that commences in the nucleus of the host infected cell and finishes by the expression of viral proteins in the cytoplasm. Expression of the unspliced genomic RNA is particularly controlled at the level of RNA splicing, export, and translation. It appears increasingly obvious that all these steps are interconnected and they result in the building of a viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) that must be efficiently translated in the cytosolic compartment. This review summarizes our knowledge about the genesis, localization, and expression of this viral RNP. PMID:26247956

  8. The cellular factor TRP-185 regulates RNA polymerase II binding to HIV-1 TAR RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Baer, F; Lane, W S; Gaynor, R B

    1995-01-01

    Activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the transactivator Tat is dependent on an RNA regulatory element located downstream of the transcription initiation site known as TAR. To characterize cellular factors that bind to TAR RNA and are involved in the regulation of HIV-1 transcription, HeLa nuclear extract was fractionated and RNA gel-retardation analysis was performed. This analysis indicated that only two cellular factors, RNA polymerase II and the previously characterized TAR RNA loop binding protein TRP-185, were capable of binding specifically to TAR RNA. To elucidate the function of TRP-185, it was purified from HeLa nuclear extract, amino acid microsequence analysis was performed and a cDNA encoding TRP-185 was isolated. TRP-185 is a novel protein of 1621 amino acids which contains a leucine zipper and potentially a novel RNA binding motif. In gel-retardation assays, the binding of both recombinant TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II was dependent on the presence of an additional group of proteins designated cellular cofactors. Both the TAR RNA loop and bulge sequences were critical for RNA polymerase II binding, while TRP-185 binding was dependent only on TAR RNA loop sequences. Since binding of TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II to TAR RNA was found to be mutually exclusive, our results suggest that TRP-185 may function either alone or in conjunction with Tat to disengage RNA polymerase II which is stalled upon binding to nascently synthesized TAR RNA during transcriptional elongation. Images PMID:8846792

  9. HIV-2 integrase polymorphisms and longitudinal genotypic analysis of HIV-2 infected patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen.

    PubMed

    Cavaco-Silva, Joana; Abecasis, Ana; Miranda, Ana Cláudia; Poças, José; Narciso, Jorge; Águas, Maria João; Maltez, Fernando; Almeida, Isabel; Germano, Isabel; Diniz, António; Gonçalves, Maria de Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Cunha, Celso; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the HIV-2 integrase gene polymorphisms and the pathways to resistance of HIV-2 patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen, we studied 63 integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI)-naïve patients, and 10 heavily pretreated patients exhibiting virological failure while receiving a salvage raltegravir-containing regimen. All patients were infected by HIV-2 group A. 61.4% of the integrase residues were conserved, including the catalytic motif residues. No INSTI-major resistance mutations were detected in the virus population from naïve patients, but two amino acids that are secondary resistance mutations to INSTIs in HIV-1 were observed. The 10 raltegravir-experienced patients exhibited resistance mutations via three main genetic pathways: N155H, Q148R, and eventually E92Q - T97A. The 155 pathway was preferentially used (7/10 patients). Other mutations associated to raltegravir resistance in HIV-1 were also observed in our HIV-2 population (V151I and D232N), along with several novel mutations previously unreported. Data retrieved from this study should help build a more robust HIV-2-specific algorithm for the genotypic interpretation of raltegravir resistance, and contribute to improve the clinical monitoring of HIV-2-infected patients.

  10. HPV Genotype Distribution in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia among HIV-Infected Women in Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Mane, Arati; Nirmalkar, Amit; Risbud, Arun R.; Vermund, Sten H.; Mehendale, Sanjay M.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.

    2012-01-01

    Background The distribution of HPV genotypes, their association with rigorously confirmed cervical precancer endpoints, and factors associated with HPV infection have not been previously documented among HIV-infected women in India. We conducted an observational study to expand this evidence base in this population at high risk of cervical cancer. Methods HIV-infected women (N = 278) in Pune, India underwent HPV genotyping by Linear Array assay. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) disease ascertainment was maximized by detailed assessment using cytology, colposcopy, and histopathology and a composite endpoint. Results CIN2+ was detected in 11.2% while CIN3 was present in 4.7% participants. HPV genotypes were present in 52.5% (146/278) and ‘carcinogenic’ HPV genotypes were present in 35.3% (98/278) HIV-infected women. ‘Possibly carcinogenic’ and ‘non/unknown carcinogenic’ HPV genotypes were present in 14.7% and 29.5% participants respectively. Multiple (≥2) HPV genotypes were present in half (50.7%) of women with HPV, while multiple ‘carcinogenic’ HPV genotypes were present in just over a quarter (27.8%) of women with ‘carcinogenic’ HPV. HPV16 was the commonest genotype, present in 12% overall, as well as in 47% and 50% in CIN2+ and CIN3 lesions with a single carcinogenic HPV infection, respectively. The carcinogenic HPV genotypes in declining order of prevalence overall included HPV 16, 56, 18, 39, 35, 51, 31, 59, 33, 58, 68, 45 and 52. Factors independently associated with ‘carcinogenic’ HPV type detection were reporting ≥2 lifetime sexual partners and having lower CD4+ count. HPV16 detection was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts and currently receiving combination antiretroviral therapy. Conclusion HPV16 was the most common HPV genotype, although a wide diversity and high multiplicity of HPV genotypes was observed. Type-specific attribution of carcinogenic HPV genotypes in CIN3 lesions in HIV-infected women, and etiologic

  11. Examining small molecule: HIV RNA interactions using arrayed imaging reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaimayo, Wanaruk; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has been the subject of intense research for more than three decades as it causes an uncurable disease: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, AIDS. In the pursuit of a medical treatment, RNAtargeted small molecules are emerging as promising targets. In order to understand the binding kinetics of small molecules and HIV RNA, association (ka) and dissociation (kd) kinetic constants must be obtained, ideally for a large number of sequences to assess selectivity. We have developed Aqueous Array Imaged Reflectometry (Aq-AIR) to address this challenge. Using a simple light interference phenomenon, Aq-AIR provides real-time high-throughput multiplex capabilities to detect binding of targets to surface-immobilized probes in a label-free microarray format. The second generation of Aq-AIR consisting of high-sensitivity CCD camera and 12-μL flow cell was fabricated. The system performance was assessed by real-time detection of MBNL1-(CUG)10 and neomycin B - HIV RNA bindings. The results establish this second-generation Aq-AIR to be able to examine small molecules binding to RNA sequences specific to HIV.

  12. RNA structures, genomic organization and selection of recombinant HIV.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is an evolutionary mechanism intrinsic to the evolution of many RNA viruses. In retroviruses and notably in the case of HIV, recombination is so frequent that it can be considered as part of its mode of replication. This process not only plays a central role in shaping HIV genetic diversity worldwide, but has also been involved in immune escape and development of resistance to antiviral treatments. Recombination does not create new mutations in the existing genetic repertoire of the virus, but creates new combinations of pre-existing polymorphisms. The simultaneous insertion of multiple substitutions in a single replication cycle leaves little room for the progressive coevolution of regions of proteins, RNA or, more in general, genomes, to accommodate these drastic sequence changes. Therefore, recombination, while allowing the virus to rapidly explore larger sequence space than the slow accumulation of point mutations, also runs the risk of generating non functional viruses. Recombination is the consequence of a switch in the template used during reverse transcription and is promoted by the presence of structured regions in the genomic RNA template. In this review, we discuss new observations suggesting that the distribution of RNA structures along the HIV genome may enhance recombination rates in regions where the resultant progeny is less likely to be impaired, and could therefore maximize the evolutionary value of this source of genetic diversity.

  13. [Comparison of three genotyping methods for the detection of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs].

    PubMed

    Suárez, A; Picazo, J; Alonso, R; Bouza, E; Delgado, R; Rodríguez-Noriega, A; Bernal, A; García, A

    2002-03-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (P) genes confer drug failure. Evaluation of drug resistance genotyping in HIV-1 has proven to be useful for the selection of drug combinations with maximum antiretroviral activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal procedure to determine the resistance profile in the laboratory. Plasma from 90 antiretroviral-treated patients was analyzed by reverse hybridization, which identifies the presence of wild-types or mutations at the 19 key codons for protease and RT regions, and was compared with two other methods of direct cDNA sequencing. A total of 408 mutations were detected by InnoLiPA HIV-1, (Line Probe Assay, Innogenetics, Belgium), 572 by TrueGene HIV-1 Genotyping System (Visible Genetics, Canada), and 721 by ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System (Perkin Elmer/Applied Biosystems, California). Hybridization detected a significantly higher number of primary mutations which are associated with a high level of drug resistance (p <0.001). Hybridization also detected a higher number of mixtures of wild-type and mutant viruses. There was a good concordance among the three methods, although it was higher between the two sequencing methods. Sequencing determines a higher number of mutations, but hybridization better identifies primary mutations correlated with a high level of drug resistance. Hybridization is more suitable for detecting mixed populations and is easier to implement in clinical laboratories but does not eliminate the need for sequence analysis for detection of drug-resistant HIV.

  14. Field Study of Dried Blood Spot Specimens for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Parry, C. M.; Diallo, K.; Mwebaza, S.; Batamwita, R.; DeVos, J.; Bbosa, N.; Lyagoba, F.; Magambo, B.; Jordan, M. R.; Downing, R.; Zhang, G.; Kaleebu, P.; Bertagnolio, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at −80°C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  15. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  16. Modelling HIV-RNA viral load in vertically infected children.

    PubMed

    Gray, Linsay; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2004-03-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ribo-nucleic acid (RNA) viral load is a measure of actively replicating virus and is used as a marker of disease progression. For a thorough understanding of the dynamics of the evolution of the virus in the early life of HIV-1 vertically infected children, it is important to elucidate the pattern of HIV-RNA viral load over age. An aspect of assay systems used in the quantification of RNA viral load is that they measure values above particular cut-off values for detection, below which the assays used are not sufficiently sensitive. In this way, measurements are potentially left-censored. Recent adult studies suggest that to adequately model RNA pattern over age, it is necessary to account for within-subject correlation, due to repeated measures, and censoring. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish whether it is necessary to use complex methods to allow for repeated measures within individuals and censoring of the HIV-RNA viral load in children enrolled in a cohort study. The approach involved the identification of an appropriate model for the basic pattern of RNA viral load by age and subsequent assessment of various estimation procedures accounting for repeated measures and censoring in different ways. Methods developed by Hughes involving the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm and the Gibbs sampler were taken as the benchmark for comparison of simpler alternatives. Other approaches considered involve linear mixed-effects and ordinary least squares in which censoring is dealt with informally by taking the cut-off value as absolute or taking the mid-point between cut-off and zero. Fractional polynomials provided a substantially superior approach for modelling the dynamics of viral load over age compared to conventional polynomials or change-point models. Allowing for repeated measures was necessary to improve the power of the likelihood ratio tests required to establish the final model, but methods beyond taking

  17. Apolipoprotein E4 Genotype Does Not Increase Risk of HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E.E.; Woods, S.P.; Letendre, S.L.; Franklin, D.R.; Bloss, C.; Goate, A.; Heaton, R.K.; Collier, A.C.; Marra, C.M.; Gelman, B.B.; McArthur, J.C.; Morgello, S.; Simpson, D.M.; McCutchan, J.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Abramson, I.; Gamst, A.; Fennema-Notestine, C.; Smith, D.M.; Grant, I.; Vaida, F.; Clifford, D.B.

    2013-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional, observational study to evaluate the hypothesis that HIV-seropositive (HIV+) apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) carriers are at increased risk for HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) compared to APOE4 noncarriers with HIV in the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) Group sample. APOE genotype was determined in 466 CHARTER participants with varying disease stages and histories of antiretroviral treatment who did not have severe psychiatric or medical comorbid conditions that preclude diagnosis of HAND. HAND diagnoses were based on results of comprehensive neurobehavioral evaluation and use of current neuroAIDS diagnostic criteria. HAND status consisting of two levels: neuropsychologically normal status (i.e., no HAND) and any HAND diagnosis (i.e., asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, minor neurocognitive disorder, HIV-associated dementia). Logistic regression analyses revealed no association between APOE4 carrier status and HAND, and there were no interactions between APOE4 carrier status and ethnicity, age, substance use disorders, duration of infection, or nadir CD4. Results did not differ when analysis was restricted to symptomatic HAND, and no APOE4 gene dose-dependent relationship to HAND emerged. APOE4 status was not associated with concurrent HAND in this large, well-characterized sample. This does not preclude emergence of an association between APOE4 status and HAND as this population ages. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to examine APOE4 as a risk factor for neurocognitive decline, incident HAND at older ages, and potential associations with CSF amyloid. PMID:23408335

  18. Prevalences, Genotypes, and Risk Factors for HIV Transmission in South America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-07

    Western blot confirmatory testing were performed, and env heteroduplex mobility assay genotyping and DNA sequencing were performed on a subset of HIV...Biotech Western blot (WB) test kits (Calypte Biomedical, Alameda, CA). Only samples that were repeatedly reactive by ELISA and that showed a WB banding...the bulk of infections, regardless of geographic region. Throughout the entire Western Hemisphere, the pre- dominant genetic form in circulation has

  19. siRNA and shRNA screens advance key understanding of host factors required for HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Kok, Kin-Hang; Lei, Ting; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2009-08-27

    A recent RNAi screen used a genome-wide shRNA library to search for cellular factors required for HIV-1 replication. This work complements three other siRNA-based screening studies and potentially opens the door to the discovery of factors that are important for HIV-1 replication in physiological host cells such as T lymphocytes. shRNA screens can be further improved, and they could promise to unravel new pathways and new facets of virus-cell interactions.

  20. Probing interaction of a fluorescent ligand with HIV TAR RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Jing; He, Tian; Huo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2017-02-01

    Trans-activator of Transcription (Tat) antagonists could block the interaction between Tat protein and its target, trans-activation responsive region (TAR) RNA, to inhibit Tat function and prevent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. For the first time, a small fluorescence ligand, ICR 191, was found to interact with TAR RNA at the Tat binding site and compete with Tat. It was also observed that the fluorescence of ICR 191 could be quenched when binding to TAR RNA and recovered when discharged via competition with Tat peptide or a well-known Tat inhibitor, neomycin B. The binding parameters of ICR 191 to TAR RNA were determined through theoretical calculations. Mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and molecular docking were used to further confirm the interaction of ICR 191 with TAR RNA. Inspired by these discoveries, a primary fluorescence model for the discovery of Tat antagonists was built using ICR 191 as a fluorescence indicator and the feasibility of this model was evaluated. This ligand-RNA interaction could provide a new strategy for research aimed at discovering Tat antagonists.

  1. Probing interaction of a fluorescent ligand with HIV TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Jing; He, Tian; Huo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2017-02-15

    Trans-activator of Transcription (Tat) antagonists could block the interaction between Tat protein and its target, trans-activation responsive region (TAR) RNA, to inhibit Tat function and prevent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. For the first time, a small fluorescence ligand, ICR 191, was found to interact with TAR RNA at the Tat binding site and compete with Tat. It was also observed that the fluorescence of ICR 191 could be quenched when binding to TAR RNA and recovered when discharged via competition with Tat peptide or a well-known Tat inhibitor, neomycin B. The binding parameters of ICR 191 to TAR RNA were determined through theoretical calculations. Mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and molecular docking were used to further confirm the interaction of ICR 191 with TAR RNA. Inspired by these discoveries, a primary fluorescence model for the discovery of Tat antagonists was built using ICR 191 as a fluorescence indicator and the feasibility of this model was evaluated. This ligand-RNA interaction could provide a new strategy for research aimed at discovering Tat antagonists.

  2. Consensus siRNA for inhibition of HCV genotype-4 replication

    PubMed Central

    Zekri, Abdel Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; El-Din, Hanaa M Alam; Salama, Hosny M

    2009-01-01

    Background HCV is circulating as a heterogeneous group of quasispecies. It has been addressed that siRNA can inhibit HCV replication in-vitro using HCV clone and/or replicon which have only one genotype. The current study was conducted to assess whether siRNA can inhibit different HCV genotypes with many quasispecies and to assess whether consensus siRNA have the same effect as regular siRNA. Methods We generated two chemically synthesized consensus siRNAs (Z3 and Z5) which cover most known HCV genotype sequences and quasispecies using Ambium system. Highly positive HCV patient's serum with nine quasispecies was transfected in-vitro to Huh-7 cell line which supports HCV genotype-4 replication. siRNA (Z3&Z5) were transfected according to Qiagen Porta-lipid technique and subsequently cultured for eight days. HCV replication was monitored by RT-PCR for detection of plus and minus strands. Real-time PCR was used for quantification of HCV, whereas detection of the viral core protein was performed by western blot. Results HCV RNA levels decreased 18-fold (P = 0.001) and 25-fold (P = 0.0005) in cells transfected with Z3 and Z5, respectively, on Day 2 post transfection and continued for Day 3 by Z3 and Day 7 by Z5. Reduction of core protein expression was reported at Day 2 post Z3 siRNA transfection and at Day 1 post Z5 siRNA, which was persistent for Day 4 for the former and for Day 6 for the latter. Conclusion Consensus siRNA could be used as a new molecular target therapy to effectively inhibit HCV replication in the presence of more than one HCV quasispecies. PMID:19173711

  3. Genotyping male-specific RNA coliphages by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, F C; Shieh, Y S; van Duin, J; Beekwilder, M J; Sobsey, M D

    1995-01-01

    F-specific (F+) RNA coliphages are prevalent in sewage and other fecal wastes of humans and animals. There are four antigenically distinct serogroups of F+ RNA coliphages, and those predominating in humans (groups II and III) differ from those predominating in animals (groups I and IV). Hence, it may be possible to distinguish between human and animal wastes by serotyping F+ RNA coliphage isolates. Because serotyping is laborious and requires scarce antiserum reagents, we investigated genotyping using synthetic oligonucleotide probes as an alternative approach to distinguishing the four groups of F+ RNA coliphages. Oligoprobes I, II, III, IV, A, and B were selected to detect group I, II, III, IV, I plus II, and III plus IV phages, respectively. Methods for phage transfer from zones of lysis on a host cell lawn to candidate membrane filters and fixation of genomic nucleic acid on the membranes were optimized. The oligoprobes, which were end labeled with digoxigenin, were applied in DNA-RNA hybridization, and hybrids were observed by colorimetric, immunoenzymatic detection. Of 203 isolates of F+ RNA coliphages from environmental samples of water, wastes, and shellfish, 99.5 and 96.6% could be classified into each group by serotyping and genotyping, respectively. Probes A and B correctly identified 100% of the isolates. On the basis of these results, this method for genotyping F+ RNA coliphages appears to be practical and reliable for typing isolates in field samples. PMID:8526509

  4. Tat-dependent production of an HIV-1 TAR-encoded miRNA-like small RNA

    PubMed Central

    Harwig, Alex; Jongejan, Aldo; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that retroviruses can produce microRNAs (miRNAs). To prevent cleavage of their RNA genome, retroviruses have to use an alternative RNA source as miRNA precursor. The transacting responsive (TAR) hairpin structure in HIV-1 RNA has been suggested as source for miRNAs, but how these small RNAs are produced without impeding virus replication remained unclear. We used deep sequencing analysis of AGO2-bound HIV-1 RNAs to demonstrate that the 3′ side of the TAR hairpin is processed into a miRNA-like small RNA. This ∼21 nt RNA product is able to repress the expression of mRNAs bearing a complementary target sequence. Analysis of the small RNAs produced by wild-type and mutant HIV-1 variants revealed that non-processive transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter results in the production of short TAR RNAs that serve as precursor. These TAR RNAs are cleaved by Dicer and processing is stimulated by the viral Tat protein. This biogenesis pathway differs from the canonical miRNA pathway and allows HIV-1 to produce the TAR-encoded miRNA-like molecule without cleavage of the RNA genome. PMID:26984525

  5. HIV-1 RNAs are Not Part of the Argonaute 2 Associated RNA Interference Pathway in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Hall, Jonathan; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Metzner, Karin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background MiRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. HIV-1 derived small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) have been described in HIV-1 infected cells, but their biological functions still remain to be elucidated. Here, we approached the question whether viral sncRNAs may play a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway or whether viral mRNAs are targeted by cellular miRNAs in human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Methods The incorporation of viral sncRNAs and/or their target RNAs into RNA-induced silencing complex was investigated using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-induced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) as well as high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP), which capture Argonaute2-bound miRNAs and their target RNAs. HIV-1 infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were chosen as target cells, as they have previously been shown to express HIV-1 sncRNAs. In addition, we applied small RNA deep sequencing to study differential cellular miRNA expression in HIV-1 infected versus non-infected MDMs. Results and Conclusion PAR-CLIP and HITS-CLIP data demonstrated the absence of HIV-1 RNAs in Ago2-RISC, although the presence of a multitude of HIV-1 sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected MDMs was confirmed by small RNA sequencing. Small RNA sequencing revealed that 1.4% of all sncRNAs were of HIV-1 origin. However, neither HIV-1 derived sncRNAs nor putative HIV-1 target sequences incorporated into Ago2-RISC were identified suggesting that HIV-1 sncRNAs are not involved in the canonical RNAi pathway nor is HIV-1 targeted by this pathway in HIV-1 infected macrophages. PMID:26226348

  6. Association of APOL1 Genotype with Renal Histology among Black HIV-Positive Patients Undergoing Kidney Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michelle M.; Skorecki, Karl L.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Wasser, Walter G.; Shemer, Revital; Racusen, Lorraine C.; Kuperman, Michael; Foy, Matthew C.; Lucas, Gregory M.; Fine, Derek M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Prior studies have shown that the APOL1 risk alleles are associated with a greater risk of HIV-associated nephropathy and FSGS among blacks who are HIV positive. We sought to determine whether the APOL1 high–risk genotype incrementally improved the prediction of these underlying lesions beyond conventional clinical factors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a cross-sectional study, we analyzed data from 203 blacks who are HIV positive, underwent kidney biopsies between 1996 and 2011, and were genotyped for the APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles. Predictive logistic regression models with conventional clinical factors were compared with those that also included APOL1 genotype using receiver-operating curves and bootstrapping analyses with crossvalidation. Results The addition of APOL1 genotype to HIV–related risk factors for kidney disease in a predictive model improved the prediction of non–HIV–associated nephropathy FSGS, specifically, increasing the c statistic from 0.65 to 0.74 (P=0.04). Although two risk alleles were significantly associated with higher odds of HIV-associated nephropathy, APOL1 genotype did not add incrementally to the prediction of this specific histopathology. Conclusions APOL1 genotype may provide additional diagnostic information to traditional clinical variables in predicting underlying FSGS spectrum lesions in blacks who are HIV positive. In contrast, although APOL1 risk genotype predicts HIV-associated nephropathy, it lacked a high c statistic sufficient for discrimination to eliminate the role of kidney biopsy in the clinical care of blacks who are HIV positive with nephrotic proteinuria or unexplained kidney disease. PMID:26668025

  7. Crystal methamphetamine injection predicts slower HIV RNA suppression among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, Nadia; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Zhang, Ruth; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2011-07-01

    We examined the impact of crystal methamphetamine injection on HIV RNA suppression among a prospective cohort of HIV-positive injection drug users initiating antiretroviral therapy. A multivariate Cox regression analysis found crystal methamphetamine injection to be negatively associated with viral load suppression (RH=0.63 [95% CI: 0.40-0.98]; p=0.039). This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate an association between crystal methamphetamine use and HIV RNA suppression.

  8. Sensitive and Selective Detection of HIV-1 RRE RNA Using Vertical Silicon Nanowire Electrode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyung; Hong, Min-Ho; Han, Sanghun; Na, Jukwan; Kim, Ilsoo; Kwon, Yong-Joon; Lim, Yong-beom; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) RNA was detected via an Au-coated vertical silicon nanowire electrode array (VSNEA). The VSNEA was fabricated by combining bottom-up and top-down approaches and then immobilized by artificial peptides for the recognition of HIV-1 RRE. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) analysis was used to measure the electrochemical response of the peptide-immobilized VSNEA to the concentration and types of HIV-1 RRE RNA. DPV peaks showed linearity to the concentration of RNA with a detection limit down to 1.513 fM. It also showed the clear different peaks to the mutated HIV-1 RRE RNA. The high sensitivity and selectivity of VSNEA for the detection of HIV-1 RRE RNA may be attributed to the high surface-to-volume ratio and total overlap diffusion mode of ions of the one-dimensional nanowire electrodes.

  9. A Rapid, Self-confirming Assay for HIV: Simultaneous Detection of Anti-HIV Antibodies and Viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zongyuan; Zhu, Hui; Malamud, Daniel; Barber, Cheryl; Ongagna, Yhombi Yvon Serge; Yasmin, Rubina; Modak, Sayli; Janal, Malvin N.; Abrams, William R.; Montagna, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We developed a microfluidic system to simultaneously detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in the same specimen in order to satisfy two important diagnostic criteria, especially within resource-limited settings. First, the system can detect acute HIV infection and allow immediate confirmation of a seropositive screening result by detection of HIV RNA. It also addresses the well-known "seroconversion window" during early HIV infection when antibodies are not yet detectable and viral loads are at their highest. Methods We first developed and optimized two separate manual assays for the detection of host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA and then converted them to the microfluidic system. We optimized a commercially available serologic assay to run within the microfluidic device while we incorporated the isothermal LAMP assay to detect the presence of viral RNA. The microfluidic device and instrumentation were developed to simultaneously perform both assays without any user intervention. Results The finalized system consists of a disposable injection molded and film-laminated microfluidic CARD disposable device and a portable, software controlled instrument, which together can automatically perform all steps of both assays without any user intervention after the initial loading of samples and reagents. The microfluidic CARD cartridge has multiple microchannels, valves, pumps and reservoirs, which perform the immunoassay, isolates viral RNA for detection by magnetic bead based purification, and Reverse Transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The microfluidic system was able to detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in either a blood or saliva sample. Conclusion The ability to detect antibodies and simultaneously confirm a seropositive HIV-RNA result provides healthcare workers with a complete and accurate appraisal of a patient's infection status in the earliest stages of the disease and represents an important tool for

  10. Cell-associated HIV RNA: a dynamic biomarker of viral persistence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In most HIV-infected individuals adherent to modern antiretroviral therapy (ART), plasma viremia stays undetectable by clinical assays and therefore, additional virological markers for monitoring and predicting therapy responses and for measuring the degree of HIV persistence in patients on ART should be identified. For the above purposes, quantitation of cell-associated HIV biomarkers could provide a useful alternative to measurements of viral RNA in plasma. This review concentrates on cell-associated (CA) HIV RNA with the emphasis on its use as a virological biomarker. We discuss the significance of CA HIV RNA as a prognostic marker of disease progression in untreated patients and as an indicator of residual virus replication and the size of the dynamic viral reservoir in ART-treated patients. Potential value of this biomarker for monitoring the response to ART and to novel HIV eradication therapies is highlighted. PMID:23587031

  11. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  12. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-11-10

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a 'packageable' gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein.

  13. HIV-1 RNA genome dimerizes on the plasma membrane in the presence of Gag protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Grunwald, David; Sardo, Luca; Burdick, Ryan C; Plisov, Sergey; Liang, Edward; Tai, Sheldon; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2016-01-12

    Retroviruses package a dimeric genome comprising two copies of the viral RNA. Each RNA contains all of the genetic information for viral replication. Packaging a dimeric genome allows the recovery of genetic information from damaged RNA genomes during DNA synthesis and promotes frequent recombination to increase diversity in the viral population. Therefore, the strategy of packaging dimeric RNA affects viral replication and viral evolution. Although its biological importance is appreciated, very little is known about the genome dimerization process. HIV-1 RNA genomes dimerize before packaging into virions, and RNA interacts with the viral structural protein Gag in the cytoplasm. Thus, it is often hypothesized that RNAs dimerize in the cytoplasm and the RNA-Gag complex is transported to the plasma membrane for virus assembly. In this report, we tagged HIV-1 RNAs with fluorescent proteins, via interactions of RNA-binding proteins and motifs in the RNA genomes, and studied their behavior at the plasma membrane by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We showed that HIV-1 RNAs dimerize not in the cytoplasm but on the plasma membrane. Dynamic interactions occur among HIV-1 RNAs, and stabilization of the RNA dimer requires Gag protein. Dimerization often occurs at an early stage of the virus assembly process. Furthermore, the dimerization process is probably mediated by the interactions of two RNA-Gag complexes, rather than two RNAs. These findings advance the current understanding of HIV-1 assembly and reveal important insights into viral replication mechanisms.

  14. CCR5 chemokine receptor genotype frequencies among Puerto Rican HIV-1-seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, S; Tirado, G; Revuelta, G; Yamamura, Y; Lu, Y; Nerurkar, V R; Yanagihara, R

    1998-01-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), despite multiple sexual contacts with subjects with confirmed HIV-1 infection. Several studies have confirmed that individuals who are homozygous for a 32 base pair (bp) deletion mutation in the chemokine receptor gene CCR5, designated as delta 32/ delta 32, are protected against HIV-1 infection. Heterozygotes of the same chemokine receptor deletion mutation are, however, not protected from acquiring HIV-1 infection but seemingly have slower progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndromes (AIDS). Genotype frequencies of the delta 32 CCR5 mutation vary markedly among different ethnic groups; heterozygosity is found in approximately 15% of Caucasians, about 5-7% of Hispanics and African Americans and 1% or less of Asians. The ethnic background of Puerto Ricans is highly complex and usually includes admixture of Caucasian, Caribbean Indian and African traits to a varying extent. This study was conducted to examine the frequencies of the delta 32 CCR5 mutation among Puerto Ricans who are infected with HIV-1. Samples were received from different geographical regions of the island. Of 377 samples tested, 94.2% were wild type (non-deletion mutant) homozygotes, 5.8% were delta 32 CCR5 heterozygotes, and none were delta 32 CCR5 homozygotes. The incidence of CCR5 delta 32/w heterozygous mutation among Puerto Ricans seems to be somewhat lower than what was reported with US Hispanics. Some age and gender associated bias of the mutation frequency were observed with the study population, the reason for which is unclear at present.

  15. Quantitative Distribution of Infectious F-Specific RNA Phage Genotypes in Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Hanamoto, Seiya; Shirasaka, Yuya; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT F-specific RNA phages (FRNAPHs) are considered potential viral indicators of water pollution due to their occurrence and stability in water environments. However, their suitability as viral indicators is not fully elucidated because the characteristics of FRNAPHs are variable depending on the genotype. In this study, for the characterization of infectious FRNAPH genotypes, integrated culture reverse transcription-PCR coupled with the most probable number approach was applied to surface water samples. Further, to recover low concentrations of FRNAPH genotypes, an FRNAPH recovery method was developed. The novel FRNAPH recovery method using a noncharged microfiltration membrane could effectively recover FRNAPH strains without inactivation, while a method using an electronegative microfiltration membrane resulted in the inactivation of some strains. Infectious FRNAPH genotypes in surface water samples were successfully quantified with an efficiency comparable to that of the conventional plaque assay. Genotype I (GI) and GII FRNAPHs tended to be predominant at locations impacted by treated and untreated municipal wastewater, respectively. The numbers and proportions of infectious FRNAPHs tended to be higher during the winter season when water temperature decreased. IMPORTANCE Properties of FRNAPHs are highly variable depending on their genotypes. Previous typing methods for FRNAPHs are not quantitative and/or are based on molecular assays, which cannot differentiate infective strains from inactive strains. Due to the reasons mentioned above, the utility of FRNAPHs as viral indicators of water pollution has not been fully validated. In this study, a quantitative genotyping method for infectious FRNAPHs was developed and applied to surface water samples. The method enabled characterization of infectious FRNAPH genotypes in terms of their occurrence and seasonality. Moreover, comparison of the method to a conventional molecular assay (reverse transcription

  16. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  17. The thermodynamics of Pr55Gag-RNA interaction regulate the assembly of HIV.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Hanumant S; Khoo, Keith K; Garvey, Megan; Waddington, Lynne; Leis, Andrew; Hijnen, Marcel; Velkov, Tony; Dumsday, Geoff J; McKinstry, William J; Mak, Johnson

    2017-02-01

    The interactions that occur during HIV Pr55Gag oligomerization and genomic RNA packaging are essential elements that facilitate HIV assembly. However, mechanistic details of these interactions are not clearly defined. Here, we overcome previous limitations in producing large quantities of full-length recombinant Pr55Gag that is required for isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies, and we have revealed the thermodynamic properties of HIV assembly for the first time. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the binding between RNA and HIV Pr55Gag is an energetically favourable reaction (ΔG<0) that is further enhanced by the oligomerization of Pr55Gag. The change in enthalpy (ΔH) widens sequentially from: (1) Pr55Gag-Psi RNA binding during HIV genome selection; to (2) Pr55Gag-Guanosine Uridine (GU)-containing RNA binding in cytoplasm/plasma membrane; and then to (3) Pr55Gag-Adenosine(A)-containing RNA binding in immature HIV. These data imply the stepwise increments of heat being released during HIV biogenesis may help to facilitate the process of viral assembly. By mimicking the interactions between A-containing RNA and oligomeric Pr55Gag in immature HIV, it was noted that a p6 domain truncated Pr50Gag Δp6 is less efficient than full-length Pr55Gag in this thermodynamic process. These data suggest a potential unknown role of p6 in Pr55Gag-Pr55Gag oligomerization and/or Pr55Gag-RNA interaction during HIV assembly. Our data provide direct evidence on how nucleic acid sequences and the oligomeric state of Pr55Gag regulate HIV assembly.

  18. The thermodynamics of Pr55Gag-RNA interaction regulate the assembly of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, Lynne; Hijnen, Marcel; Velkov, Tony; McKinstry, William J.

    2017-01-01

    The interactions that occur during HIV Pr55Gag oligomerization and genomic RNA packaging are essential elements that facilitate HIV assembly. However, mechanistic details of these interactions are not clearly defined. Here, we overcome previous limitations in producing large quantities of full-length recombinant Pr55Gag that is required for isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies, and we have revealed the thermodynamic properties of HIV assembly for the first time. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the binding between RNA and HIV Pr55Gag is an energetically favourable reaction (ΔG<0) that is further enhanced by the oligomerization of Pr55Gag. The change in enthalpy (ΔH) widens sequentially from: (1) Pr55Gag-Psi RNA binding during HIV genome selection; to (2) Pr55Gag-Guanosine Uridine (GU)-containing RNA binding in cytoplasm/plasma membrane; and then to (3) Pr55Gag-Adenosine(A)-containing RNA binding in immature HIV. These data imply the stepwise increments of heat being released during HIV biogenesis may help to facilitate the process of viral assembly. By mimicking the interactions between A-containing RNA and oligomeric Pr55Gag in immature HIV, it was noted that a p6 domain truncated Pr50Gag Δp6 is less efficient than full-length Pr55Gag in this thermodynamic process. These data suggest a potential unknown role of p6 in Pr55Gag-Pr55Gag oligomerization and/or Pr55Gag-RNA interaction during HIV assembly. Our data provide direct evidence on how nucleic acid sequences and the oligomeric state of Pr55Gag regulate HIV assembly. PMID:28222188

  19. Differences in HIV type 1 RNA plasma load profile of closely related cocirculating Ethiopian subtype C strains: C and C'.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Workenesh; Mekonnen, Yared; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Mengistu, Yohannes; Tsegaye, Aster; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; Wolday, Dawit; Goudsmit, Jaap; Coutinho, Roel; de Baar, Michel; Paxton, William A; Pollakis, Georgios

    2010-07-01

    Two HIV-1 subtype C subclusters have been identified in Ethiopia (C and C') with little knowledge regarding their biological or clinical differences. We longitudinally monitored HIV-1 viral loads and CD4(+) T cell counts for 130 subtype C-infected individuals from Ethiopia over 5 years. The genetic subclusters C and C' were determined and comparisons were made between the groups. None of the study individuals received antiretroviral therapy. Subcluster C' was found to be the more prevalent (72.3%) genotype circulating. Individuals infected with subcluster C' harbored higher viral loads in comparison to subcluster C-infected individuals when the CD4(+) T cell counts were high (500-900 cells/mm(3)), whereas at low CD4(+) T cell counts (0-150 cells/mm(3)) individuals infected with subcluster C viruses showed higher viral loads. We identified a greater number of deaths among individuals infected with subcluster C viruses in comparison to C'. Our results indicate that infection with subcluster C viruses leads to a more rapid onset of disease, despite the initial lower HIV-1 RNA plasma loads. Additionally, the higher viral loads seen for HIV-1 subcluster C' infections at higher CD4(+) T cell counts can help explain the higher prevalence of this subtype in Ethiopia.

  20. Hierarchical Modeling and Differential Expression Analysis for RNA-seq Experiments with Inbred and Hybrid Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The performance of inbred and hybrid genotypes is of interest in plant breeding and genetics. High-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has proven to be a useful tool in the study of the molecular genetic responses of inbreds and hybrids to environmental stresses. Commonly used experimental designs and sequencing methods lead to complex data structures that require careful attention in data analysis. We demonstrate an analysis of RNA-seq data from a split-plot design involving drought stress applied to two inbred genotypes and two hybrids formed by crosses between the inbreds. Our generalized linear modeling strategy incorporates random effects for whole-plot experimental units and uses negative binomial distributions to allow for overdispersion in count responses for split-plot experimental units. Variations in gene length and base content, as well as differences in sequencing intensity across experimental units, are also accounted for. Hierarchical modeling with thoughtful parameterization and prior specification allows for borrowing of information across genes to improve estimation of dispersion parameters, genotype effects, treatment effects, and interaction effects of primary interest. PMID:27110090

  1. Hierarchical Modeling and Differential Expression Analysis for RNA-seq Experiments with Inbred and Hybrid Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The performance of inbred and hybrid genotypes is of interest in plant breeding and genetics. High-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has proven to be a useful tool in the study of the molecular genetic responses of inbreds and hybrids to environmental stresses. Commonly used experimental designs and sequencing methods lead to complex data structures that require careful attention in data analysis. We demonstrate an analysis of RNA-seq data from a split-plot design involving drought stress applied to two inbred genotypes and two hybrids formed by crosses between the inbreds. Our generalized linear modeling strategy incorporates random effects for whole-plot experimental units and uses negative binomial distributions to allow for overdispersion in count responses for split-plot experimental units. Variations in gene length and base content, as well as differences in sequencing intensity across experimental units, are also accounted for. Hierarchical modeling with thoughtful parameterization and prior specification allows for borrowing of information across genes to improve estimation of dispersion parameters, genotype effects, treatment effects, and interaction effects of primary interest.

  2. The Distribution of HIV DNA and RNA in Cell Subsets Differs in Gut and Blood of HIV-Positive Patients on ART: Implications for Viral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep K.; Ho, Terence; Killian, Maudi; Girling, Valerie; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Wong, Lisa K.; Crouch, Pierre; Deeks, Steven G.; Havlir, Diane V.; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K.

    2013-01-01

    Even with optimal antiretroviral therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in plasma, blood cells, and tissues. To develop new therapies, it is essential to know what cell types harbor residual HIV. We measured levels of HIV DNA, RNA, and RNA/DNA ratios in sorted subsets of CD4+ T cells (CCR7+, transitional memory, and effector memory) and non-CD4+ T leukocytes from blood, ileum, and rectum of 8 ART-suppressed HIV-positive subjects. Levels of HIV DNA/million cells in CCR7+ and effector memory cells were higher in the ileum than blood. When normalized by cell frequencies, most HIV DNA and RNA in the blood were found in CCR7+ cells, whereas in both gut sites, most HIV DNA and RNA were found in effector memory cells. HIV DNA and RNA were observed in non-CD4+ T leukocytes at low levels, particularly in gut tissues. Compared to the blood, the ileum had higher levels of HIV DNA and RNA in both CD4+ T cells and non-CD4+ T leukocytes, whereas the rectum had higher HIV DNA levels in both cell types but lower RNA levels in CD4+ T cells. Future studies should determine whether different mechanisms allow HIV to persist in these distinct reservoirs, and the degree to which different therapies can affect each reservoir. PMID:23852128

  3. Epidemiology of HPV Genotypes among HIV Positive Women in Kenya: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sonia; Wusiman, Aibibula; Boily, Marie Claude; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Mabeya, Hillary; Luchters, Stanley; Forland, Frode; Rossi, Rodolfo; Callens, Steven; vanden Broeck, Davy

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of data on the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in the HIV positive population and in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in Kenya. This may be different from genotypes found in abnormal cytology. Yet, with the advent of preventive HPV vaccines that target HPV 16 and 18, and the nonavalent vaccine targeting 90% of all ICC cases, such HPV genotype distribution data are indispensable for predicting the impact of vaccination and HPV screening on prevention. Even with a successful vaccination program, vaccinated women will still require screening to detect those who will develop ICC from other High risk (HR) HPV genotypes not prevented by current vaccines. The aim of this review is to report on the prevalence of pHR/HR HPV types and multiple pHR/HR HPV genotypes in Kenya among HIV positive women with normal, abnormal cytology and ICC. Methods PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and PROQUEST were searched for articles on HPV infection up to August 2nd 2016. Search terms were HIV, HPV, Cervical Cancer, Incidence or Prevalence, and Kenya. Results The 13 studies included yielded a total of 2116 HIV-infected women, of which 89 had ICC. The overall prevalence of pHR/HR HPV genotypes among HIV-infected women was 64% (95%CI: 50%-77%). There was a borderline significant difference in the prevalence of pHR/HR HPV genotypes between Female Sex workers (FSW) compared to non-FSW in women with both normal and abnormal cytology. Multiple pHR/HR HPV genotypes were highly prominent in both normal cytology/HSIL and ICC. The most prevalent HR HPV genotypes in women with abnormal cytology were HPV 16 with 26%, (95%CI: 23.0%-30.0%) followed by HPV 35 and 52, with 21% (95%CI: 18%-25%) and 18% (95%CI: 15%-21%), respectively. In women with ICC, the most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (37%; 95%CI: 28%-47%) and HPV 18 (24%; 95%CI: 16%-33%). Conclusion HPV 16/18 gains prominence as the severity of cervical disease increases, with HPV 16/18 accounting for 61

  4. Acute kidney injury and inflammatory immune reconstitution syndrome in mixed genotype (A/E) hepatitis B virus co-infection in HIV-associated lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Katsushi; Kohno, Kei; Shiono, Yosuke; Suzuki, Ikuko; Kato, Yuichi; Hiroshima, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Ohtake, Hiroya; Iwaba, Akiko; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Kato, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    We report a first case of HIV-associated lymphoma (HAL) presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and inflammatory immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS). A 39-year-old male, treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for one month prior to admission, developed AKI, left testicular tumor, and recurrent swelling of the right parotid gland. A resected testicular tumor exhibited features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. Renal biopsy showed hydro-degeneration of renal tubules, interstitial inflammatory cells, and a small number of lymphoma cells in the sub-capsule, compatible with acute interstitial nephritis. His renal dysfunction rapidly recovered following chemotherapy and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). He developed pneumonia concomitantly with a decrease in HIV-RNA level and an increase in CD4+ cells after the first cycle of chemotherapy, which spontaneously resolved after the second cycle of chemotherapy without additional anti-infection drugs; thus, his pneumonia fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for IRIS. We suggest that IRIS may frequently develop during chemotherapy for HAL, but may be overlooked. He was coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), which genotypes known as is associated with liver-related mortality and response to antiviral therapy; recently, an intimate interplay between HIV and HBV in the onset of lymphoma has been reported. Therefore, we addressed the HBV genotype in the patient. The analysis revealed that he exhibited a mixed genotype (A/E) not native to Japan and primarily found in Europe and North America or West Africa. These findings suggest that universal vaccination for juveniles against HBV is warranted in Japan.

  5. HIV-1 Drug Discovery: Targeting Folded RNA Structures With Branched Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an RNA virus that is prone to high rates of mutation. While the disease is managed with current antiretroviral therapies, drugs with a new mode of action are needed. A strategy towards this goal is aimed at targeting the native three-dimensional fold of conserved RNA structures. This perspective highlights medium-sized peptides and peptidomimetics used to target two conserved RNA structures of HIV-1. In particular, branched peptides have the capacity to bind in a multivalent fashion, utilizing a large surface area to achieve the necessary affinity and selectivity toward the target RNA. PMID:25958855

  6. Cellular RNA helicases and HIV-1: insights from genome-wide, proteomic, and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Liu, Xiang; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Sharma, Amit; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2013-02-01

    RNA helicases are ubiquitous in plants and animals and function in many cellular processes. Retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), encode no RNA helicases in their genomes and utilize host cellular RNA helicases at various stages of their life cycle. Here, we briefly summarize the roles RNA helicases play in HIV-1 replication that have been identified recently, in part, through genome-wide screenings, proteomics, and molecular studies. Some of these helicases augment virus propagation while others apparently participate in antiviral defenses against viral replication.

  7. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F.; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Antoni, Anna Degli; Galluzzo, Clementina M.; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According to plasma HIV-RNA levels, three groups were defined: full suppression (target not detected), low-level viremia (target detected but <37 copies/ml), and quantifiable HIV-RNA (≥37 copies/ml). Multivariable logistic regression was used to define determinants of full viral suppression and of quantifiable HIV-RNA. Among 107 women evaluated at a median gestational age of 35 weeks, 90 (84.1%) had HIV-RNA <37 copies/ml. Most of them (59/90, 65.6%) had full suppression, with the remaining (31/90, 34.4%) showing low-level viremia (median: 11.9 copies/ml; IQR 7.4–16.3). Among the 17 women with quantifiable viral load, median HIV-RNA was 109 copies/ml (IQR 46–251), with only one case showing resistance (mutation M184V; rate: 9.1%). In multivariable analyses, women with higher baseline HIV-RNA levels and with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were significantly more likely to have quantifiable HIV-RNA in late pregnancy. Full viral suppression was significantly more likely with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens and significantly less likely with higher HIV-RNA in early pregnancy. No cases of HIV transmission occurred. In conclusion, HIV-infected pregnant women showed a high rate of viral suppression and a low resistance rate before delivery. In most cases no target HIV-RNA was detected in plasma, suggesting a low risk of subsequent virological rebound and development of resistance. Women with high levels of HIV-RNA in early pregnancy and

  8. Mechanism of HIV-1 Tat RNA translation and its activation by the Tat protein

    PubMed Central

    Charnay, Nicolas; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ohlmann, Théophile; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein is a major viral transactivator required for HIV-1 replication. In the nucleus Tat greatly stimulates the synthesis of full-length transcripts from the HIV-1 promoter by causing efficient transcriptional elongation. Tat induces elongation by directly interacting with the bulge of the transactivation response (TAR) RNA, a hairpin-loop located at the 5'-end of all nascent viral transcripts, and by recruiting cellular transcriptional co-activators. In the cytoplasm, Tat is thought to act as a translational activator of HIV-1 mRNAs. Thus, Tat plays a central role in the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression both at the level of mRNA and protein synthesis. The requirement of Tat in these processes poses an essential question on how sufficient amounts of Tat can be made early on in HIV-1 infected cells to sustain its own synthesis. To address this issue we studied translation of the Tat mRNA in vitro and in human cells using recombinant monocistronic and dicistronic RNAs containing the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Tat RNA. Results This study shows that the Tat mRNA can be efficiently translated both in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that translation initiation from the Tat mRNA probably occurs by a internal ribosome entry site (IRES) mechanism. Finally, we show that Tat protein can strongly stimulate translation from its cognate mRNA in a TAR dependent fashion. Conclusion These results indicate that Tat mRNA translation is efficient and benefits from a feedback stimulation by the Tat protein. This translational control mechanism would ensure that minute amounts of Tat mRNA are sufficient to generate enough Tat protein required to stimulate HIV-1 replication. PMID:19671151

  9. The Evolving Genotypic Profile of HIV-1 Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Treatment in the North Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carmen Andréa F.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Falci, Diego R.; Sprinz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    HIV related mutations can be associated with decreased susceptibility to antiretrovirals and treatment failures. There is scarce information about HIV mutations in persons failing HIV treatment in North of Brazil. Our aim was to evaluate evolution of HIV subtypes and mutations patterns related to antiretroviral therapy in this region. We investigated HIV resistance profile in adults failing antiretroviral regimen in Northern Brazil from January, 2004, through December, 2013. Genotype data was evaluated through Stanford University algorithm. There were 377 genotypes from different individuals to evaluate. Resistance mutations were similar to worldwide reports and related to antiretroviral exposure. Most prevalent mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene were M184V (80.1%) and K130N (40.6%). Thymidine associated mutations were more frequent in multiexperienced patients. Most common protease mutations were M46I, V82A, I54V, L90M, I84V, M46L, and L76V. Subtype B was the most prevalent (90.7%). There were differences between subtypes B and non-B mutations. We documented for the first time subtypes and patterns of HIV associated mutations in Northern Brazil. A1 subtype was identified for the first time in this area. Depending on drug regimen and how experienced the patient is, an empirical switch of a failing antiretroviral treatment could be a reasonable option. PMID:26543866

  10. Low Efficacy of Pegylated Interferon plus Ribavirin plus Nitazoxanide for HCV Genotype 4 and HIV Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Juan; López-Cortés, Luis F.; Téllez, Francisco; Recio, Eva; Ojeda-Burgos, Guillermo; Ríos, MªJosé; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Delgado, Marcial; Jeremías, Rivas-; Pineda, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nitazoxanide (NTZ) plus pegylated interferon and ribavirin (Peg-IFN/RBV) improved the sustained virological response (SVR) achieved with Peg-IFN/RBV in hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4)-monoinfected patients. There are no data currently on the efficacy of Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-4 coinfection. Therefore, the objectives of this clinical trial were to assess the efficacy and to evaluate the safety of Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ in HIV/HCV-4-coinfected patients. Patients and Methods This was an open-label, single arm, multicenter phase II pilot clinical trial (NCT01529073) enrolling HIV-infected individuals with HCV-4 chronic infection, naïve to HCV therapy. Patients were treated with NTZ 500 mg bid for 4 weeks, followed by NTZ 500 mg bid plus Peg-IFN alpha-2b 1.5 μg/kg/week plus weight-adjusted RBV during 48 weeks. Analyses were done by intention-to-treat (ITT, missing = failure). A historical cohort of HIV/HCV-4-infected patients treated with Peg-IFN alpha-2b and RBV at the same area was used as control. Results Two (9.5%) of 21 patients included in the trial compared with 5 (21.7%) of 23 patients included in the historical cohort achieved SVR (SVR risk difference, -12.2%; 95% confidence interval, -33.2% to 8.8%; p = 0.416). Virological failure was due to lack of response in 13 (62%) individuals recruited in the trial. Two (9.5%) patients included in the trial and two (9.5%) individuals from the historical cohort discontinued permanently due to adverse events. Conclusions No increase in SVR was observed among HIV/HCV-4-coinfected patients receiving Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ compared with a historical cohort treated with Peg-IFN/RBV. Interruptions due to adverse events of Peg-IFN/RBV plus NTZ were similar to those of dual therapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01529073 PMID:26640956

  11. Intra-tRNA distance measurements for nucleocapsid proteindependent tRNA unwinding during priming of HIV reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Chan, B; Weidemaier, K; Yip, W T; Barbara, P F; Musier-Forsyth, K

    1999-01-19

    We report here the direct measurement of intra-tRNA distances during annealing of the tRNA primer to the HIV RNA genome. This key step in the initiation of retroviral reverse transcription involves hybridization of one strand of the acceptor arm of a specific lysine tRNA to the primer binding site on the RNA genome. Although the mechanism of tRNA unwinding and annealing is not known, previous studies have shown that HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) greatly accelerates primer/template binary complex formation in vitro. An open question is whether NC alone unwinds the primer or whether unwinding by NC requires the RNA genome. We monitored the annealing process in solution by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Distance measurements demonstrate unequivocally that the tRNA acceptor stem is not substantially unwound by NC in the absence of the RNA genome, that is, unwinding is not separable from hybridization. Moreover, FRET measurements show that both heat- and NC-mediated annealing result in an approximately 40-A increase in the separation of the two ends of the tRNA acceptor arm on binding to the template. This large increase in separation of the two ends suggests a complete displacement of the nonhybridized strand of the acceptor stem in the initiation complex.

  12. Association between immunoglobulin GM and KM genotypes and placental malaria in HIV-1 negative and positive women in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C; Pandey, Janardan P; Williamson, John; Blackstock, Anna J; Yesupriya, Ajay; Namboodiri, Aryan M; Rocca, Keith M; van Eijk, Anna Maria; Ayisi, John; Oteino, Juliana; Lal, Renu B; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Steketee, Richard; Nahlen, Bernard; Slutsker, Laurence; Shi, Ya Ping

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) GM and KM allotypes, genetic markers of γ and κ chains, are associated with humoral immune responsiveness. Previous studies have shown the relationships between GM6-carrying haplotypes and susceptibility to malaria infection in children and adults; however, the role of the genetic markers in placental malaria (PM) infection and PM with HIV co-infection during pregnancy has not been investigated. We examined the relationship between the gene polymorphisms of Ig GM6 and KM allotypes and the risk of PM infection in pregnant women with known HIV status. DNA samples from 728 pregnant women were genotyped for GM6 and KM alleles using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Individual GM6 and KM genotypes and the combined GM6 and KM genotypes were assessed in relation to PM in HIV-1 negative and positive women, respectively. There was no significant effect of individual GM6 and KM genotypes on the risk of PM infection in HIV-1 negative and positive women. However, the combination of homozygosity for GM6(+) and KM3 was associated with decreased risk of PM (adjusted OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08-0.8; P = 0.019) in HIV-1 negative women while in HIV-1 positive women the combination of GM6(+/-) with either KM1-3 or KM1 was associated with increased risk of PM infection (adjusted OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.18-3.73; P = 0.011). Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) tests further showed an overall significant positive F(is) (indication of deficit in heterozygotes) for GM6 while there was no deviation for KM genotype frequency from HWE in the same population. These findings suggest that the combination of homozygous GM6(+) and KM3 may protect against PM in HIV-1 negative women while the HIV-1 positive women with heterozygous GM6(+/-) combined with KM1-3 or KM1 may be more susceptible to PM infection. The deficit in heterozygotes for GM6 further suggests that GM6 could be under selection likely by malaria infection.

  13. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  14. Relation of cerebrospinal fluid/plasma HIV-RNA discordance with neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Graciela; López-González, M; Monzón-Falconi, J F; Soto-Hernández, J L; Perales-Martínez, D; López-Vejar, C

    2015-01-01

    Neurological involvement is common in patients infected with HIV. The effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs in lowering the levels of HIV-RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is limited by their inability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Discordance in CSF/plasma HIV-RNA levels may have a bearing on the progression of neurological disease in these patients. We report a woman with subacute neurocognitive impairment and abnormal findings on brain MRI, in whom there was a discordance between CSF/plasma HIV-RNA levels. The patient improved after a change in her highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen. We also reviewed the available literature on the subject and found seven articles describing 27 patients.

  15. A case-based reasoning system for genotypic prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark C; Paquet, Agnes C; Huang, Wei; Napolitano, Laura; Frantzell, Arne; Toma, Jonathan; Stawiski, Eric W; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Petropoulos, Christos J; Whitcomb, Jeannette; Coakley, Eoin; Haddad, Mojgan

    2013-08-01

    Accurate co-receptor tropism (CRT) determination is critical for making treatment decisions in HIV management. We created a genotypic tropism prediction tool by utilizing the case-based reasoning (CBR) technique that attempts to solve new problems through applying the solution from similar past problems. V3 loop sequences from 732 clinical samples with diverse characteristics were used to build a case library. Additional sequence and molecular properties of the V3 loop were examined and used for similarity assessment. A similarity metric was defined based on each attribute's frequency in the CXCR4-using viruses. We implemented three other genotype-based tropism predictors, support vector machines (SVM), position specific scoring matrices (PSSM), and the 11/25 rule, and evaluated their performance as the ability to predict CRT compared to Monogram's enhanced sensitivity Trofile(®) assay (ESTA). Overall concordance of the CBR based tropism prediction algorithm was 81%, as compared to ESTA. Sensitivity to detect CXCR4 usage was 90% and specificity was at 73%. In comparison, sensitivity of the SVM, PSSM, and the 11/25 rule were 85%, 81%, and 36% respectively while achieving a specificity of 90% by SVM, 75% by PSSM, and 97% by the 11/25 rule. When we evaluated these predictors in an unseen dataset, higher sensitivity was achieved by the CBR algorithm (87%), compared to SVM (82%), PSSM (76%), and the 11/25 rule (33%), while maintaining similar level of specificity. Overall this study suggests that CBR can be utilized as a genotypic tropism prediction tool, and can achieve improved performance in independent datasets compared to model or rule based methods.

  16. Increased hepatic expression of miRNA-122 in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ketti G; Malta, Fernanda M; Nastri, Ana C S S; Widman, Azzo; Faria, Paola L; Santana, Rúbia A F; Alves, Venâncio A F; Carrilho, Flair J; Pinho, João R R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 3 % of the world population. HCV targets hepatic tissue, and most infected patients develop a chronic infection. Currently, studies have demonstrated an association between HCV-RNA replication and miR-122, the most abundant microRNA in the liver. Our aim was to evaluate liver and serum expression of miR-122 in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 3, and to identify possible associations between miR-122 expression and lipid profiles, HCV viral load, apolipoproteins and liver enzymes. MicroRNAs were isolated from blood and liver tissue, and miR-122 expression was quantified by real-time PCR. HCV viral load was quantified by real-time PCR and HCV genotype, and serum biomarkers were obtained from medical report. The levels of miR-122 were higher in liver than those in blood from individuals infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 3 (p < 0.0001). The tissue levels of miR-122 were higher in subjects infected with HCV genotype 3 (6.22-fold, p < 0.001). A positive correlation was observed between the blood and hepatic levels of miR-122 in patients infected with HCV genotype 1 (r = 0.302, p = 0.026); in these patients, an inverse correlation was observed between serum apolipoprotein A-II (ApoA-II) levels and the blood (r = -0.330; p = 0.014) and hepatic (r = -0.311; p = 0.020) levels of miR-122. In patients infected with HCV genotype 3, there was a positive correlation between the hepatic miR-122 and the high-density lipoprotein-HDL (r = 0.412, p = 0.036) and insulin (r = 0.478, p = 0.044). Lipid metabolism proteins and miR-122 expression levels have different relations in HCV-3- and HCV-1-infected patients.

  17. Does HIV-1 mRNA 5'-untranslated region bear an internal ribosome entry site?

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Victoria V; Terenin, Ilya M; Khutornenko, Anastasia A; Andreev, Dmitri E; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2016-02-01

    Unspliced human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) mRNA is capped and therefore can be translated via conventional scanning mechanism. In addition, its 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) is thought to function as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) during G2/M-phase of cell cycle or when cap-dependent translation is inhibited. Recently, customary methods of internal initiation demonstrating have been challenged, and consequently existence of certain IRESs of cellular origin has been put under question. Since a precise knowledge of translation initiation mechanism used by HIV may be important for cure development, presence of the IRES in HIV-1 mRNA demands a careful reexamination using contemporary stringent criteria. The key point of our strategy is to compare translation efficiency of bicistronic mRNA bearing HIV-1 unspliced mRNA 5' UTR in the intercistronic position to that of the corresponding capped monocistronic mRNA. This approach allows determination of internal initiation contribution into the overall level of particular mRNA translation. We found that both in cell-free systems and in cultured cells monocistronic mRNA with HIV-1 unspliced mRNA 5'UTR is translated significantly better than bicistronic one. Importantly, it is also true for G2/M-phase stalled cells or for cells under conditions of inhibited cap-dependent translation. Thus, in our hands contribution of internal ribosome entry into the overall level of translation driven by HIV-1 unspliced mRNA 5'UTR is negligible, and 5'-dependent scanning is a primary mechanism of its translation initiation.

  18. Argonaute proteins regulate HIV-1 multiply spliced RNA and viral production in a Dicer independent manner.

    PubMed

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Ségéral, Emmanuel; Pinzón, Natalia; Ulveling, Damien; Amadori, Céline; Charpentier, Marine; Nidelet, Sabine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Zagury, Jean-François; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Seitz, Hervé; Emiliani, Stéphane; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah

    2016-12-20

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins associate with microRNAs (miRNAs) to form the core of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that mediates post-transcriptional gene silencing of target mRNAs. As key players in anti-viral defense, Ago proteins are thought to have the ability to interact with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. However, the role of this interaction in regulating HIV-1 replication has been debated. Here, we used high throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) to explore the interaction between Ago2 and HIV-1 RNA in infected cells. By only considering reads of 50 nucleotides length in our analysis, we identified more than 30 distinct binding sites for Ago2 along the viral RNA genome. Using reporter assays, we found four binding sites, located near splice donor sites, capable of repressing Luciferase gene expression in an Ago-dependent manner. Furthermore, inhibition of Ago1 and Ago2 levels in cells expressing HIV-1 led to an increase of viral multiply spliced transcripts and to a strong reduction in the extracellular CAp24 level. Depletion of Dicer did not affect these activities. Our results highlight a new role of Ago proteins in the control of multiply spliced HIV-1 transcript levels and viral production, independently of the miRNA pathway.

  19. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  20. Reconstitution of selective HIV-1 RNA packaging in vitro by membrane-bound Gag assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Lars-Anders; Bai, Yun; Keane, Sarah C; Doudna, Jennifer A; Hurley, James H

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag selects and packages a dimeric, unspliced viral RNA in the context of a large excess of cytosolic human RNAs. As Gag assembles on the plasma membrane, the HIV-1 genome is enriched relative to cellular RNAs by an unknown mechanism. We used a minimal system consisting of purified RNAs, recombinant HIV-1 Gag and giant unilamellar vesicles to recapitulate the selective packaging of the 5’ untranslated region of the HIV-1 genome in the presence of excess competitor RNA. Mutations in the CA-CTD domain of Gag which subtly affect the self-assembly of Gag abrogated RNA selectivity. We further found that tRNA suppresses Gag membrane binding less when Gag has bound viral RNA. The ability of HIV-1 Gag to selectively package its RNA genome and its self-assembly on membranes are thus interdependent on one another. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14663.001 PMID:27343348

  1. Collaborative study for the calibration of HCV RNA, HBV DNA and HIV RNA reference preparations against the relative international standards.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Giulio; Marino, Francesco; Cristiano, Karen; Bisso, Guillermo Mario; Mele, Caludio; Luciani, Francesca; Wirz, Maria; Gentili, Giuliano

    2007-01-01

    We organised a collaborative study to calibrate three new ISS reference preparations (ISS: Istituto Superiore di Sanità), one for HCV RNA, one for HIV RNA and one for HBV DNA, to be used for nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT) in blood testing. Serial dilution of the ISS reference preparations and the respective international standards were tested in different days by each participating laboratory using two commercial NAT assays. Data were collected by the ISS for statistical analysis. Based on the mean potency of the HCV RNA and HIV RNA preparations, calculated from the results provided by the 12 participating laboratories, a definitive concentrations of 5700 IU/mL and 4000 IU/mL, respectively, were assigned to the reference materials. On the contrary, it was not possible to obtain a consensus titre for the HBV DNA reference material. These new Italian reference preparations (HCV RNA ISS/1005 and HIV RNA ISS/1005) calibrated against the respective international standards are available free of charge to any laboratory upon request.

  2. Outbreak of infections by hepatitis B virus genotype A and transmission of genetic drug resistance in patients coinfected with HIV-1 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Shiino, Teiichiro; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Hattori, Junko; Ibe, Shiro; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Shirasaka, Takuma; Hamaguchi, Motohiro; Sugiura, Wataru

    2011-03-01

    The major routes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Japan has been mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) and blood transfusion. However, HBV cases transmitted through sexual contact are increasing, especially among HIV-1-seropositive patients. To understand the molecular epidemiology of HBV in HBV/HIV-1 coinfection, we analyzed HBV genotypes and HIV-1 subtypes in HBV/HIV-1-coinfected patients at Nagoya Medical Center from 2003 to 2007. Among 394 HIV-1-infected Japanese men having sex with men (MSM) who were newly diagnosed during the study period, 31 (7.9%) tested positive for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen. HBV sequence analyses were successful in 26 cases, with 21 (80.7%) and 5 (19.3%) cases determined as genotypes A and C, respectively. Our finding that HBV genotype A was dominant in HIV-1-seropositive patients alerts clinicians to an alternative outbreak of HBV genotype A in the HIV-1-infected MSM population and a shift in HBV genotype from C to A in Japan. The narrow genetic diversity in genotype A cases suggests that genotype A has been recently introduced into the MSM population and that sexual contacts among MSM were more active than speculated from HIV-1 tree analyses. In addition, we found a lamivudine resistance mutation in one naïve case, suggesting a risk of drug-resistant HBV transmission. As genotype A infection has a higher risk than infection with other genotypes for individuals to become HBV carriers, prevention programs are urgently needed for the target population.

  3. RNA-Seq reveals genotype-specific molecular responses to water deficit in eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a context of climate change, phenotypic plasticity provides long-lived species, such as trees, with the means to adapt to environmental variations occurring within a single generation. In eucalyptus plantations, water availability is a key factor limiting productivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptation of eucalyptus to water shortage remain unclear. In this study, we compared the molecular responses of two commercial eucalyptus hybrids during the dry season. Both hybrids differ in productivity when grown under water deficit. Results Pyrosequencing of RNA extracted from shoot apices provided extensive transcriptome coverage - a catalog of 129,993 unigenes (49,748 contigs and 80,245 singletons) was generated from 398 million base pairs, or 1.14 million reads. The pyrosequencing data enriched considerably existing Eucalyptus EST collections, adding 36,985 unigenes not previously represented. Digital analysis of read abundance in 14,460 contigs identified 1,280 that were differentially expressed between the two genotypes, 155 contigs showing differential expression between treatments (irrigated vs. non irrigated conditions during the dry season), and 274 contigs with significant genotype-by-treatment interaction. The more productive genotype displayed a larger set of genes responding to water stress. Moreover, stress signal transduction seemed to involve different pathways in the two genotypes, suggesting that water shortage induces distinct cellular stress cascades. Similarly, the response of functional proteins also varied widely between genotypes: the most productive genotype decreased expression of genes related to photosystem, transport and secondary metabolism, whereas genes related to primary metabolism and cell organisation were over-expressed. Conclusions For the most productive genotype, the ability to express a broader set of genes in response to water availability appears to be a key characteristic in the maintenance

  4. In vivo SELEX of single-stranded domains in the HIV-1 leader RNA.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-02-01

    The 5' untranslated leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is a strongly conserved sequence that encodes several regulatory motifs important for viral replication. Most of these motifs are exposed as hairpin structures, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS), the major splice donor site (SD), and the packaging signal (Ψ), which are connected by short single-stranded regions. Mutational analysis revealed many functions of these hairpins, but only a few studies have focused on the single-stranded purine-rich sequences. Using the in vivo SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) approach, we probed the sequence space in these regions that is compatible with efficient HIV-1 replication and analyzed the impact on the RNA secondary structure of the leader RNA. Our results show a strong sequence requirement for the DIS hairpin flanking regions. We postulate that these sequences are important for the binding of specific protein factors that support leader RNA-mediated functions. The sequence between the SD and Ψ hairpins seems to have a less prominent role, despite the strong conservation of the stretch of 5 A residues in natural isolates. We hypothesize that this may reflect the subtle evolutionary pressure on HIV-1 to acquire an A-rich RNA genome. In silico analyses indicate that sequences are avoided in all 3 single-stranded domains that affect the local or overall leader RNA folding. IMPORTANCE Many regulatory RNA sequences are clustered in the untranslated leader domain of the HIV-1 RNA genome. Several RNA hairpin structures in this domain have been proposed to fulfill specific roles, e.g., mediating RNA dimer formation to facilitate HIV-1 recombination. We now focus on the importance of a few well-conserved single-stranded sequences that connect these hairpins. We created libraries of HIV-1 variants in which these segments were randomized and selected the best-replicating variants. For two

  5. Exosomes Derived from HIV-1-infected Cells Contain Trans-activation Response Element RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 104–106 copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 103 copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  6. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-05

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS.

  7. Predominance of Hepatitis B Virus genotype A among treated HIV infected patients experiencing high HBV drug resistance in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mabeya, Sepha Nyatichi; Ngugi, Caroline Wangari; Lihana, Raphael W; Khamadi, Samoel Ashimosi; Nyamache, Anthony Kebira

    2017-03-19

    HBV/HIV coinfections are becoming common with information on HBV genetic diversity and drug resistance still remaining elusive. To evaluate the HBV genetic diversity and drug resistance associated mutations among drug experienced HIV patients, the genetic analysis of the partial HBV-pol-reverse trancriptase gene was successfully sequenced from 13 samples. Analysis of the sequences showed that all (13) the sequences belonged to genotype A. Nucleos(t)ide drug resistance mutations were found in six (6) patients. Five subjects had rtV173L, rtL180M, rtM204V and one with rtL180M, rtM204V major mutations. HBV genotype A remains the most predominant genotype circulating in Nairobi city with detected high level of HBV drug resistance to Lamivudine telbivudine and emtricitabine. The detected circulating HBV genotype A in Nairobi reflects its possible spread in the population with its origin being within the country. We suggest that patients should not be on lamivudine monotherapy. These individuals should be managed on combination of tenofovir plus lamivudine or emtricitabine therapy in order to prevent the emergence of HBV drug resistant variants alongside a continuous surveillance monitoring of drug resistance and HBV genotypes.

  8. Prevalence of HIV, Hepatitis B and C Infections and an Assessment of HCV-Genotypes and Two IL28B SNPs among People Who Inject Drugs in Three Regions of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Hans-Tilmann; Karmacharya, Dibesh; Shakya, Jivan; Manandhar, Sulochana; Panthi, Santosh; Karmacharya, Prajwola; Sitaula, Deepika; Thapaliya, Reenu; K. C., Prawachan; Rai, Apurva; Dixit, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive health care programme for people who use drugs in Nepal, HIV and viral hepatitis B and C status—including risk factors, HCV-genotypes and co-infections—as well as two IL28B Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed for a random sample of 401 people who inject drugs in three regions of Nepal: mid-western Terrai (Nepalgunj), the eastern region (Dharan, Biratnagar) and the central region (Kathmandu, Lalitpur and Chitwan). Individuals were included who showed at least a minimum of health care seeking behaviour. This latter criterion was defined by being registered with any organisation offering health services. The average age of the participants was 30.5 yrs, and the average length of intravenous drug use was 8.5 yrs. The prevalence rates of HBsAg, anti-HIV antibodies and HCV-RNA were 3.5%, 13.8% and 41.9%, respectively. Spontaneous HCV clearance was evident in 16% of all of those who tested positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Independent risk factors for HCV-RNA positivity were age, gender, geographical region, duration of injecting drug use, history of imprisonment and HIV co-infection. In the age group ≤24 yrs, the rate of spontaneous HCV clearance was 43.5%. Overall, 59.8% of HCV infections were caused by HCV genotype 3 and 40.2% by HCV genotype 1. No other HCV genotypes were identified in this study. The IL28B SNP rs12979860 and rs8099917 were identified in 122 patients, and 75.4% of all participants had both favourable genotypes rs12979860 C/C and rs8099917 T/T. PMID:26263394

  9. Genotype-specific RNA probes for direct identification of wild polioviruses by blot hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    De, L; Yang, C F; Da Silva, E; Boshell, J; Cáceres, P; Gómez, J R; Pallansch, M; Kew, O

    1997-01-01

    We have developed RNA probes for the direct identification of wild poliovirus isolates by blot hybridization. The probes are complementary to sequences of the first 30 to 32 codons of VP1, which evolve more extensively (approximately 1.5-fold) than the rest of VP1. To illustrate our general approach, we describe the design of probes specific to each of four major genotypes recently endemic (1981 to 1991) to the Americas: Andean type 1, Brazil type 1, Brazil type 3, and Central America-Mexico type 3. A wild isolate of each genotype was selected according to molecular and epidemiologic criteria to be representative of the principal lineages in circulation. Variable VP1 sequences of the representative isolates were amplified by the reverse transcriptase PCR and were inserted into a plasmid vector containing a T7 promoter. The in vitro transcripts, labeled with digoxigenin, served as probes. These formed stable hybrids only with RNAs of isolates of the corresponding genotypes. Hybrids were detected by a sensitive chemiluminescence assay, capable under normal diagnostic conditions of detecting specific wild poliovirus sequences in samples containing up to a 100-fold excess of Sabin vaccine strain-related sequences of the same serotype. PMID:9350743

  10. On the role of four small hairpins in the HIV-1 RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    Knoepfel, Stefanie A.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    An RNA secondary structure model for the complete HIV-1 genome has recently been published based on SHAPE technology. Several well-known RNA motifs such as TAR and RRE were confirmed and numerous new structured motifs were described that may play important roles in virus replication. The 9 kb viral RNA genome is densely packed with many RNA hairpin motifs and the collective fold may play an important role in HIV-1 biology. We initially focused on 16 RNA hairpin motifs scattered along the viral genome. We considered conservation of these structures, despite sequence variation among virus isolates, as a first indication for a significant function. Four relatively small hairpins exhibited considerable structural conservation and were selected for experimental validation in virus replication assays. Mutations were introduced into the HIV-1 RNA genome to destabilize individual RNA structures without affecting the protein-coding properties (silent codon changes). No major virus replication defects were scored, suggesting that these four hairpin structures do not play essential roles in HIV-1 replication. PMID:23535706

  11. On the role of four small hairpins in the HIV-1 RNA genome.

    PubMed

    Knoepfel, Stefanie A; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-04-01

    An RNA secondary structure model for the complete HIV-1 genome has recently been published based on SHAPE technology. Several well-known RNA motifs such as TAR and RRE were confirmed and numerous new structured motifs were described that may play important roles in virus replication. The 9 kb viral RNA genome is densely packed with many RNA hairpin motifs and the collective fold may play an important role in HIV-1 biology. We initially focused on 16 RNA hairpin motifs scattered along the viral genome. We considered conservation of these structures, despite sequence variation among virus isolates, as a first indication for a significant function. Four relatively small hairpins exhibited considerable structural conservation and were selected for experimental validation in virus replication assays. Mutations were introduced into the HIV-1 RNA genome to destabilize individual RNA structures without affecting the protein-coding properties (silent codon changes). No major virus replication defects were scored, suggesting that these four hairpin structures do not play essential roles in HIV-1 replication.

  12. RNA Structures Facilitate Recombination-Mediated Gene Swapping in HIV-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny. PMID:20881047

  13. RNA structures facilitate recombination-mediated gene swapping in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P; Weeks, Kevin M; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny.

  14. Detection of HIV-1 RNA/DNA and CD4 mRNA in feces and urine from chronic HIV-1 infected subjects with and without anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Caruso, Lori; Ding, Ming; Shen, Chengli; Buchanan, William; Gupta, Phalguni; Rinaldo, Charles R; Chen, Yue

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 infects gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) very early after transmission by multiple routes. The infected GALT consequently serves as the major reservoir for HIV-1 infection and could constantly shed HIV-1 and CD4+ T cells into the intestinal lumen. To examine this hypothesis, we monitored HIV-1 RNA/DNA and CD4 mRNA in fecal samples of chronically infected subjects with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared this to levels of HIV-1 RNA/DNA in urine and blood from the same subjects. Our results show that HIV-1 DNA, RNA and CD4 mRNA were detected in 8%, 19% and 31% respectively, of feces samples from infected subjects with detectable plasma viral load, and were not detected in any of subjects on ART with undetectable plasma viral load. In urine samples, HIV-1 DNA was detected in 24% of infected subjects with detectable plasma viral load and 23% of subjects on ART with undetectable plasma viral load. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope sequences of HIV-1 revealed distinct virus populations in concurrently collected serum, feces and urine samples from one subject. In addition, our study demonstrated for the first time the presence of CD4 mRNA in fecal specimens of HIV-1 infected subjects, which could be used to assess GALT pathogenesis in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19799780

  15. Estimating HIV-1 fitness characteristics from cross-sectional genotype data.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Sathej; Montazeri, Hesam; Menz, Stephan; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Huisinga, Wilhelm

    2014-11-01

    Despite the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, virological failure due to drug resistance development remains a major challenge. Resistant mutants display reduced drug susceptibilities, but in the absence of drug, they generally have a lower fitness than the wild type, owing to a mutation-incurred cost. The interaction between these fitness costs and drug resistance dictates the appearance of mutants and influences viral suppression and therapeutic success. Assessing in vivo viral fitness is a challenging task and yet one that has significant clinical relevance. Here, we present a new computational modelling approach for estimating viral fitness that relies on common sparse cross-sectional clinical data by combining statistical approaches to learn drug-specific mutational pathways and resistance factors with viral dynamics models to represent the host-virus interaction and actions of drug mechanistically. We estimate in vivo fitness characteristics of mutant genotypes for two antiretroviral drugs, the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine (ZDV) and the protease inhibitor indinavir (IDV). Well-known features of HIV-1 fitness landscapes are recovered, both in the absence and presence of drugs. We quantify the complex interplay between fitness costs and resistance by computing selective advantages for different mutants. Our approach extends naturally to multiple drugs and we illustrate this by simulating a dual therapy with ZDV and IDV to assess therapy failure. The combined statistical and dynamical modelling approach may help in dissecting the effects of fitness costs and resistance with the ultimate aim of assisting the choice of salvage therapies after treatment failure.

  16. RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: evidence of discrimination between DNA and RNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S G; Anderson, K S

    1997-11-18

    The RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been investigated using pre-steady-state kinetics under single turnover conditions. In contrast to previous estimates of low replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, the present study finds the enzyme to be more highly discriminating when an RNA/DNA template-primer is employed as compared with the corresponding DNA/DNA template-primer. The basis of this selectivity is due to extremely slow polymerization kinetics for incorporation of an incorrect deoxynucleotide. The maximum rates for misincorporation (kpol) of dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP opposite a template uridine were 0.2, 0.03, and 0.003 s-1, respectively. The equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the incorrect nucleotide opposite a template uridine were 1.0, 1.1, and 0.7 mM for dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP, respectively. These kinetic values provide fidelity estimates of 26 000 for discrimination against dGTP, 176 000 for dCTP, and 1 x 10(6) for dTTP misincorporation at this position. Similar observations were obtained when incorrect nucleotide misincorporation was examined opposite a template adenine. Thus in a direct comparison of RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA template-primer substrates, HIV-1 RT exhibits approximately a 10-60-fold increase in fidelity. This study augments our current understanding of the similarities and differences of catalytic activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using RNA and DNA substrates. Moreover, these studies lend further support for a model for nucleotide incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase involving a two-step binding mechanism governed by a rate-limiting conformational change for correct incorporation.

  17. High efficiency of HIV-1 genomic RNA packaging and heterozygote formation revealed by single virion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Singh, Jatinder; Wright, Andrew; Bencsics, Craig E; Coffin, John M; Ni, Na; Lockett, Stephen; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2009-08-11

    A long-standing question in retrovirus biology is how RNA genomes are distributed among virions. In the studies presented in this report, we addressed this issue by directly examining HIV-1 RNAs in virions using a modified HIV-1 genome that contained recognition sites for BglG, an antitermination protein in the Escherichia coli bgl operon, which was coexpressed with a fragment of BglG RNA binding protein fused to a fluorescent protein. Our results demonstrate that the majority of virions (>90%) contain viral RNAs. We also coexpressed HIV-1 genomes containing binding sites for BglG or the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein along with 2 fluorescent protein-tagged RNA binding proteins. This method allows simultaneously labeling and discrimination of 2 different RNAs at single-RNA-detection sensitivity. Using this strategy, we obtained physical evidence that virions contain RNAs derived from different parental viruses (heterozygous virion) at ratios expected from a random distribution, and we found that this ratio can be altered by changing the dimerization sequences. Our studies of heterozygous virions also support a generally accepted but unproven assumption that most particles contain 1 dimer. This study provides answers to long-standing questions in HIV-1 biology and illustrates the power and sensitivity of the 2-RNA labeling method, which can also be adapted to analyze various issues of RNA biogenesis including the detection of different RNAs in live cell imaging.

  18. Structure-guided discovery of a novel aminoglycoside conjugate targeting HIV-1 RNA viral genome.

    PubMed

    Ennifar, Eric; Aslam, Muhammad Waqar; Strasser, Perrine; Hoffmann, Guillaume; Dumas, Philippe; van Delft, Floris L

    2013-11-15

    The dimerization initiation site (DIS) of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is a conserved stem-loop that promotes viral genome dimerization by forming a loop-loop complex. The DIS constitutes a potentially interesting target because it is crucial for several key steps of the viral replication. In this work we describe the synthesis of a rationally designed aminoglycoside conjugate that binds the HIV-1 DIS viral RNA with high specificity, as shown by an extensive in vitro binding characterization. We propose a three-dimensional model of the drug-RNA interaction that perfectly fits with binding data. Our results show the feasibility of targeting the HIV DIS viral RNA dimer and open the way to the rationale design of a new class of antiviral drugs. In addition, due to similarities between the HIV-1 DIS RNA and the bacterial aminoacyl decoding site (A site) RNA, we show that this novel aminoglycoside conjugate also binds the bacterial A site with a similar affinity as natural aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  19. Cervical Shedding of HIV-1 RNA Among Women With Low Levels of Viremia While Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michael N.; Benning, Lorie; Xu, Jiaao; Strickler, Howard D.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Minkoff, Howard; Young, Mary; Bremer, James; Levine, Alexandra M.; Kovacs, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background Among women with low o r undetectable quantities of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, factors associated with genital HIV-1 RNA shedding, including choice of treatment regimen, are poorly characterized. Methods We measured HIV-1 RNA in cervical swab specimens obtained from participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study who had concurrent plasma viral RNA levels <500 copies/mL, and we assessed factors associated with genital HIV shedding. The study was powered to determine the relative effects of antiretroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) on viral RNA shedding. Results Overall, 44 (15%) of 290 women had detectable HIV-1 RNA in cervical specimens. In the final multivariate model, shedding was independently associated with NNRTI (vs. PI) use (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.24, 1.13 to 4.45) and illicit drug use (OR, 95% CI: 2.41, 0.96 to 5.69). Conclusions This is the largest study to define risks for genital HIV-1 RNA shedding in women with low/undetectable plasma virus. Shedding in this population was common, and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (vs. PI-based HAART) was associated with genital HIV shedding. Further study is required to determine the impact of these findings on transmission of HIV from mother to child or to sexual partners. PMID:17106279

  20. Specific Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 by dCas9-SunTag-VP64-mediated Guide RNA Targeting the HIV-1 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haiyan; Jiang, Zhengtao; Lu, Panpan; Ma, Li; Li, Chuan; Pan, Hanyu; Fu, Zheng; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Pengfei; Deng, Junxiao; Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Jianhua; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 escapes antiretroviral agents by integrating into the host DNA and forming a latent transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus. Transcriptional activation is prerequisite for reactivation and the eradication of latent HIV-1 proviruses. dCas9-SunTag-VP64 transcriptional system has been reported that it can robustly activate the expression of an endogenous gene using a single guide RNA (sgRNA). Here, we systematically investigated the potential of dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with the designed sgRNAs for reactivating latent HIV-1. We found dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with sgRNA 4 or sgRNA 5 targeted from -164 to -146 or -124 to -106 bp upstream of the transcription start sites of HIV-1 could induce high expression of luciferase reporter gene after screening of sgRNAs targeting different regions of the HIV-1 promoter. Further, we confirmed that dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with sgRNA 4 or sgRNA 5 can effectively reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription in several latently infected human T-cell lines. Moreover, we confirmed that the reactivation of latent HIV-1 by dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with the designed sgRNA occurred through specific binding to the HIV-1 LTR promoter without genotoxicity and global T-cell activation. Taken together, our data demonstrated dCas9-SunTag-VP64 system can effectively and specifically reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription, suggesting that this strategy could offer a novel approach to anti-HIV-1 latency.

  1. Clinical and resistance consequences of misquantification of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in samples from an HIV-1 subtype G-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Delaugerre, Constance; Denis, Blandine; Peytavin, Gilles; Palmer, Pierre; Mourez, Thomas; Le Goff, Jerôme; Molina, Jean-Michel; Simon, François

    2009-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load is the main marker used to monitor antiviral treatment efficacy and resistance. We report a case of underquantification of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from an HIV-1 subtype G-infected woman, leading to delayed diagnosis of HIV encephalitis and to the emergence of drug resistance.

  2. Anogenital HIV RNA in Thai men who have sex with men in Bangkok during acute HIV infection and after randomization to standard vs. intensified antiretroviral regimens

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; van Griensven, Frits; Chomchey, Nitiya; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Fletcher, James LK; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Pattanachaiwit, Supanit; Michael, Nelson; Phanuphak, Praphan; Kim, Jerome H; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV transmission risk is highest during acute HIV infection (AHI). We evaluated HIV RNA in the anogenital compartment in men who have sex with men (MSM) during AHI and compared time to undetectable HIV RNA after three-drug versus five-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART) to understand risk for onward HIV transmission. Methods MSM with AHI (n=54) had blood, seminal plasma and anal lavage collected for HIV RNA at baseline, days 3 and 7, and weeks 2, 4, 12 and 24. Data were compared between AHI stages: 1 (fourth-generation antigen-antibody combo immunoassay [IA]–, third-generation IA–, n=15), 2 (fourth-generation IA+, third-generation IA–, n=9) and 3 (fourth-generation IA+, third-generation IA+, western blot–/indeterminate, n=30) by randomization to five-drug (tenofovir+emtricitabine+efavirenz+raltegravir+maraviroc, n=18) versus three-drug (tenofovir+emtricitabine+efavirenz, n=18) regimens. Results Mean age was 29 years and mean duration since HIV exposure was 15.4 days. Mean baseline HIV RNA was 5.5 in blood, 3.9 in seminal plasma and 2.6 log10 copies/ml in anal lavage (p<0.001). Blood and seminal plasma HIV RNA were higher in AHI Stage 3 compared to Stage 1 (p<0.01). Median time from ART initiation to HIV RNA <50 copies/ml was 60 days in blood, 15 days in seminal plasma and three days in anal lavage. Compared with the three-drug ART, the five-drug ART had a shorter time to HIV RNA <1500 copies/ml in blood (15 vs. 29 days, p=0.005) and <50 copies/ml in seminal plasma (13 vs. 24 days, p=0.048). Conclusions Among MSM with AHI, HIV RNA was highest in blood, followed by seminal plasma and anal lavage. ART rapidly reduced HIV RNA in all compartments, with regimen intensified by raltegravir and maraviroc showing faster HIV RNA reductions in blood and seminal plasma. PMID:25956171

  3. Multivalency in the recognition and antagonism of a HIV TAR RNA-TAT assembly using an aminoglycoside benzimidazole scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ranjan, Nihar; Kellish, Patrick; Gong, Changjun; Watkins, Derrick; Arya, Dev P

    2016-02-14

    Recognition of RNA by high-affinity binding small molecules is crucial for expanding existing approaches in RNA recognition, and for the development of novel RNA binding drugs. A novel neomycin dimer benzimidazole conjugate 5 (DPA 83) was synthesized by conjugating a neomycin-dimer with a benzimidazole alkyne using click chemistry to target multiple binding sites on HIV TAR RNA. Ligand 5 significantly enhances the thermal stability of HIV TAR RNA and interacts stoichiometrically with HIV TAR RNA with a low nanomolar affinity. 5 displayed enhanced binding compared to its individual building blocks including the neomycin dimer azide and benzimidazole alkyne. In essence, a high affinity multivalent ligand was designed and synthesized to target HIV TAR RNA.

  4. Multivalency in Recognition and Antagonism of HIV TAR RNA – TAT Assembly using an Aminoglycoside Benzimidazole Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ranjan, Nihar; Kellish, Patrick; Gong, Changjun; Watkins, Derrick; Arya, Dev P.

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of RNA by high-affinity binding small molecules is crucial for expanding existing approaches in RNA recognition, and for the development of novel RNA binding drugs. A novel neomycin dimer benzimidazole conjugate 5 (DPA 83) was synthesized by conjugating a neomycin-dimer with benzimidazole alkyne using click chemistry to target multiple binding sites on HIV TAR RNA. Ligand 5 significantly enhances the thermal stability of HIV TAR RNA and interacts stoichiometrically with HIV TAR RNA with a low nanomolar affinity. 5 displayed enhanced binding than its individual building blocks including neomycin dimer azide and benzimidazole alkyne. In essence, a high affinity multivalent ligand was designed and synthesized to target HIV TAR RNA. PMID:26765486

  5. TREAT Asia Quality Assessment Scheme (TAQAS) to standardize the outcome of HIV genotypic resistance testing in a group of Asian laboratories.

    PubMed

    Land, Sally; Cunningham, Philip; Zhou, Jialun; Frost, Kevin; Katzenstein, David; Kantor, Rami; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Oka, Shinichi; DeLong, Allison; Sayer, David; Smith, Jeffery; Dax, Elizabeth M; Law, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    The TREAT Asia (Therapeutics, Research, Education, and AIDS Training in Asia) Network is building capacity for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) drug resistance testing in the region. The objective of the TREAT Asia Quality Assessment Scheme - designated TAQAS - is to standardize HIV-1 genotypic resistance testing (HIV genotyping) among laboratories to permit rigorous comparison of results from different clinics and testing centres. TAQAS has evaluated three panels of HIV-1-positive plasma from clinical material or low-passage, culture supernatant for up to 10 Asian laboratories. Laboratory participants used their standard protocols to perform HIV genotyping. Assessment was in comparison to a target genotype derived from all participants and the reference laboratory's result. Agreement between most participants at the edited nucleotide sequence level was high (>98%). Most participants performed to the reference laboratory standard in detection of drug resistance mutations (DRMs). However, there was variation in the detection of nucleotide mixtures (0-83%) and a significant correlation with the detection of DRMs (p<0.01). Interpretation of antiretroviral resistance showed approximately 70% agreement among participants when different interpretation systems were used but >90% agreement with a common interpretation system, within the Stanford University Drug Resistance Database. Using the principles of external quality assessment and a reference laboratory, TAQAS has demonstrated high quality HIV genotyping results from Asian laboratories.

  6. Influence of IL28B Polymorphisms on Response to a Lower-Than-Standard Dose peg-IFN-α 2a for Genotype 3 Chronic Hepatitis C in HIV-Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis; González-Escribano, María F.; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; Mata, Rosario; Rivero, Antonio; Pineda, Juan A.; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Viciana, Pompeyo

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on which to base definitive recommendations on the doses and duration of therapy for genotype 3 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients are scarce. We evaluated the efficacy of a lower peginterferon-α 2a dose and a shorter duration of therapy than the current standard of care in genotype 3 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients. Methods and Findings Pilot, open-label, single arm clinical trial which involved 58 Caucasian HCV/HIV-coinfected patients who received weekly 135 µg peginterferon-α 2a plus ribavirin 400 mg twice daily during 20 weeks after attaining undetectable viremia. The relationships between baseline patient-related variables, including IL28B genotype, plasma HCV-RNA, ribavirin dose/kg, peginterferon-α 2a and ribavirin levels with virological responses were analyzed. Only 4 patients showed lack of response and 5 patients dropped out due to adverse events related to the study medication. Overall, sustained virologic response (SVR) rates were 58.3% by intention-to-treat and 71.4% by per protocol analysis, respectively. Among patients with rapid virologic response (RVR), SVR and relapses rates were 92.6% and 7.4%, respectively. No relationships were observed between viral responses and ribavirin dose/kg, peginterferon-α 2a concentrations, ribavirin levels or rs129679860 genotype. Conclusions Weekly 135 µg pegIFN-α 2a could be as effective as the standard 180 µg dose, with a very low incidence of severe adverse events. A 24-week treatment duration appears to be appropriate in patients achieving RVR, but extending treatment up to just 20 weeks beyond negativization of viremia is associated with a high relapse rate in those patients not achieving RVR. There was no influence of IL28B genotype on the virological responses. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00553930 PMID:22235243

  7. Extensive Genetic Diversity of HIV-1 in Incident and Prevalent Infections among Malaysian Blood Donors: Multiple Introductions of HIV-1 Genotypes from Highly Prevalent Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Bon, Abdul Hamid; Keating, Sheila; Anderios, Fread; Halim, Hazwan Abdul; Takebe, Yutaka; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Busch, Michael P.; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infections including HIV-1 continue to pose major risks for unsafe blood transfusions due to both window phase infections and divergent viruses that may not be detected by donor screening assays. Given the recent emergence of several HIV-1 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) in high-risk populations in the Southeast Asia region, we investigated the genetic diversity of HIV-1 among the blood donors in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 211 HIV-positive plasma samples detected among 730,188 donations to the National Blood Centre between 2013 and 2014 were provided (90.5% male, median age: 27.0 years old). Recent or long-term infection status at the time of donation was determined using a limiting antigen avidity enzyme immunoassay (LAg-Avidity EIA). HIV-1 gag-pol genes were amplified and sequenced from residual plasma for 149 cases followed by genotype determination using phylogenetic and recombination analyses. Transmitted antiretroviral resistance mutations were not observed among the blood donors, among which 22.7% were classified as recent or incident infections. Major circulating HIV-1 genotypes determined by neighbour-joining phylogenetic inference included CRF01_AE at 40.9% (61/149), CRF33_01B at 21.5% (32/149), and subtype B at 10.1% (15/149). Newly-described CRFs including CRF54_01B circulated at 4.0%, CRF74_01B at 2.0%, and CRF53_01B and CRF48_01B at 0.7% each. Interestingly, unique HIV-1 genotypes including African subtype G (8.7%), CRF45_cpx (1.3%), CRF02_AG (0.7%) and CRF07_BC (0.7%) from China were detected for the first time in the country. A cluster of subtype G sequences formed a distinct founder sub-lineage within the African strains. In addition, 8.7% (13/149) of HIV-infected donors had unique recombinant forms (URFs) including CRF01_AE/B' (4.7%), B'/C (2.7%) and B'/G (1.3%) recombinants. Detailed analysis identified similar recombinant structures with shared parental strains among the B'/C and B'/G URFs, some of which

  8. VS411 Reduced Immune Activation and HIV-1 RNA Levels in 28 Days: Randomized Proof-of-Concept Study for AntiViral-HyperActivation Limiting Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Franco; De Forni, Davide; Katabira, Elly; Baev, Denis; Maserati, Renato; Calarota, Sandra A.; Cahn, Pedro; Testori, Marco; Rakhmanova, Aza; Stevens, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background A new class of antiretrovirals, AntiViral-HyperActivation Limiting Therapeutics (AV-HALTs), has been proposed as a disease-modifying therapy to both reduce Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA levels and the excessive immune activation now recognized as the major driver of not only the continual loss of CD4+ T cells and progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), but also of the emergence of both AIDS-defining and non-AIDS events that negatively impact upon morbidity and mortality despite successful (ie, fully suppressive) therapy. VS411, the first-in-class AV-HALT, combined low-dose, slow-release didanosine with low-dose hydroxycarbamide to accomplish both objectives with a favorable toxicity profile during short-term administration. Five dose combinations were administered as VS411 to test the AV-HALT Proof-of-Concept in HIV-1-infected subjects. Methods Multinational, double-blind, 28-day Phase 2a dose-ranging Proof-of-Concept study of antiviral activity, immunological parameters, safety, and genotypic resistance in 58 evaluable antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected adults. Randomization and allocation to study arms were carried out by a central computer system. Results were analyzed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, ANCOVA, and two-tailed paired t tests. Results VS411 was well-tolerated, produced significant reductions of HIV-1 RNA levels, increased CD4+ T cell counts, and led to significant, rapid, unprecedented reductions of immune activation markers after 28 days despite incomplete viral suppression and without inhibiting HIV-1-specific immune responses. The didanosine 200 mg/HC 900 mg once-daily formulation demonstrated the greatest antiviral efficacy (HIV-1 RNA: −1.47 log10 copies/mL; CD4+ T cell count: +135 cells/mm3) and fewest adverse events. Conclusions VS411 successfully established the Proof-of-Concept that AV-HALTs can combine antiviral efficacy with rapid, potentially beneficial reductions in the excessive immune system

  9. Apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype status is not associated with neuroimaging outcomes in a large cohort of HIV+ individuals.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Sarah A; Paul, Robert H; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Morgan, Erin E; Vaida, Florin; Deng, Qianqian; Chen, Jie Ashley; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald; Clifford, David B; Marra, Christina M; Collier, Ann C; Gelman, Benjamin B; McArthur, Justin C; McCutchan, J Allen; Simpson, David M; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Ances, Beau M

    2016-10-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggest a negative relationship between the apolipoprotein (ApoE) ε4 allele and brain integrity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) individuals, although the presence of this relationship across adulthood remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to clarify the discrepancies using a large, diverse group of HIV+ individuals and multiple imaging modalities sensitive to HIV. The association of ApoE ε4 with structural neuroimaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was examined in 237 HIV+ individuals in the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Cortical and subcortical gray matter, abnormal and total white matter, ventricles, sulcal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and cerebellar gray matter, white matter, and CSF volumes, and MRS concentrations of myo-inositol, creatine, N-acetyl-aspartate, and choline in the frontal white matter (FWM), frontal gray matter (FGM), and basal ganglia were examined. Secondary analyses explored this relationship separately in individuals ≥50 years old (n = 173) and <50 years old (n = 63). No significant differences were observed between ApoE ε4+ (ApoE ε3/ε4 and ApoE ε4/ε4) individuals (n = 69) and ApoE ε4- (ApoE ε2/ε3 and ApoE ε3/ε3) individuals (n = 167). When individuals were further divided by age, no significant genotype group differences were identified in individuals <50 or ≥50 years of age on any neuroimaging outcome. The ApoE ε4 allele did not affect brain integrity in this large, diverse sample of HIV+ individuals. The effects of ApoE ε4 may not be apparent until more advanced ages and may be more prominent when present along with other risk factors for neuronal damage.

  10. Association of DC-SIGNR Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with DC-SIGNR Genotypes in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Omkar; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bala, Manju; Singh, Jasbir; Hazarika, Anjali; Luthra, Kalpana

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin related molecule (DC-SIGNR) is a C-type lectin, calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein, which can act as a cell-adhesion and pathogen recognition receptor. DC-SIGNR is known to be highly expressed on liver sinusoidal cells and in the lymph nodes. However, its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in HIV-1 infection has not been addressed. Therefore, this study determined the expression of DC-SIGNR in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients and healthy seronegative individuals by real-time polymerase chain reaction and assessed its correlation with CD4+ T cell counts and DC-SIGNR genotypes. A significantly higher expression of DC-SIGNR was observed in the PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients compared with healthy seronegative individuals. Further, there was a negative correlation between DC-SIGNR expression and CD4+ T cell counts and positive with viral load, with higher DC-SIGNR expression in the PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients with a CD4+ T cell count <200 cells/μL than those with >200 cells/μL. This is the first study to report the expression of DC-SIGNR in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients. A salient finding of this study is that the DC-SIGNR expression was higher in HIV-1-infected patients, and its positive correlation with viral load and negative with CD4+ T cells counts suggesting a potential role of DC-SIGNR in HIV-1 infection.

  11. Controlling HIV-1: Non-Coding RNA Gene Therapy Approaches to a Functional Cure.

    PubMed

    Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L; Suzuki, Kazuo; Marks, Katherine; Symonds, Geoff P; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    The current treatment strategy for HIV-1 involves prolonged and intensive combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), which successfully suppresses plasma viremia. It has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic disease. However, despite the success of cART, a latent form of HIV-1 infection persists as integrated provirus in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. Virus can reactivate from this reservoir upon cessation of treatment, and hence HIV requires lifelong therapy. The reservoir represents a major barrier to eradication. Understanding molecular mechanisms regulating HIV-1 transcription and latency are crucial to develop alternate treatment strategies, which impact upon the reservoir and provide a path toward a "functional cure" in which there is no detectable viremia in the absence of cART. Numerous reports have suggested ncRNAs are involved in regulating viral transcription and latency. This review will discuss the latest developments in ncRNAs, specifically short interfering (si)RNA and short hairpin (sh)RNA, targeting molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 transcription, which may represent potential future therapeutics. It will also briefly address animal models for testing potential therapeutics and current gene therapy clinical trials.

  12. The Life-Cycle of the HIV-1 Gag–RNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mailler, Elodie; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Smyth, Redmond P.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication is a highly regulated process requiring the recruitment of viral and cellular components to the plasma membrane for assembly into infectious particles. This review highlights the recent process of understanding the selection of the genomic RNA (gRNA) by the viral Pr55Gag precursor polyprotein, and the processes leading to its incorporation into viral particles. PMID:27626439

  13. Efficient Methodologies for Sensitive HIV-1 RNA Quantitation from Plasma and Vaginal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Tara C.; Lacour, Nedra; Amedee, Angela Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantifying HIV levels in mucosal secretions is essential to study compartmentalized expression of HIV and facilitate development of intervention strategies to prevent disease progression and transmission. Objectives To develop a sensitive, reliable, and cost-effective technique to quantify HIV from blood and vaginal secretions that is compatible with efficient implementation in clinical research environments. Study Design A sensitive, reliable, internally-controlled real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR assay, which uses the HIV-1 pol gene as a target (Hpol assay) was developed to quantify HIV levels in plasma and genital secretions, and compared to the widely-used Roche Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor assay. In addition, a simplified method of sample collection and processing of genital secretions (self-collection and use of RNAlater with batch processing) was compared to provider collection of samples and immediate processing. Results The sensitivity and reliability of HIV levels detected by the assay described herein correlate well with measurements from Roche Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor assay for both plasma and vaginal secretions (R2= 0.9179 and R2=0.942, respectively). The Hpol assay reproducibly quantifies a lower limit of 5 HIV-1 RNA copies per reaction, with low-levels of inter-assay and intra-assay variation. Additionally, vaginal viral levels and detection frequency did not differ significantly between the two the collection and processing methods. Conclusions The methodologies developed here provide sensitive, reliable, and cost-effective quantification of HIV levels in plasma and mucosal secretions, and are compatible with efficient use in clinical research studies. PMID:19783472

  14. Changes in the Plasticity of HIV-1 Nef RNA during the Evolution of the North American Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Manzourolajdad, Amirhossein; Gonzalez, Mileidy; Spouge, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Because of a high mutation rate, HIV exists as a viral swarm of many sequence variants evolving under various selective pressures from the human immune system. Although the Nef gene codes for the most immunogenic of HIV accessory proteins, which alone makes it of great interest to HIV research, it also encodes an RNA structure, whose contribution to HIV virulence has been largely unexplored. Nef RNA helps HIV escape RNA interference (RNAi) through nucleotide changes and alternative folding. This study examines Historic and Modern Datasets of patient HIV-1 Nef sequences during the evolution of the North American epidemic for local changes in RNA plasticity. By definition, RNA plasticity refers to an RNA molecule’s ability to take alternative folds (i.e., alternative conformations). Our most important finding is that an evolutionarily conserved region of the HIV-1 Nef gene, which we denote by R2, recently underwent a statistically significant increase in its RNA plasticity. Thus, our results indicate that Modern Nef R2 typically accommodates an alternative fold more readily than Historic Nef R2. Moreover, the increase in RNA plasticity resides mostly in synonymous nucleotide changes, which cannot be a response to selective pressures on the Nef protein. R2 may therefore be of interest in the development of antiviral RNAi therapies. PMID:27685447

  15. In Vivo SELEX of Single-Stranded Domains in the HIV-1 Leader RNA

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 5′ untranslated leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is a strongly conserved sequence that encodes several regulatory motifs important for viral replication. Most of these motifs are exposed as hairpin structures, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS), the major splice donor site (SD), and the packaging signal (Ψ), which are connected by short single-stranded regions. Mutational analysis revealed many functions of these hairpins, but only a few studies have focused on the single-stranded purine-rich sequences. Using the in vivo SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) approach, we probed the sequence space in these regions that is compatible with efficient HIV-1 replication and analyzed the impact on the RNA secondary structure of the leader RNA. Our results show a strong sequence requirement for the DIS hairpin flanking regions. We postulate that these sequences are important for the binding of specific protein factors that support leader RNA-mediated functions. The sequence between the SD and Ψ hairpins seems to have a less prominent role, despite the strong conservation of the stretch of 5 A residues in natural isolates. We hypothesize that this may reflect the subtle evolutionary pressure on HIV-1 to acquire an A-rich RNA genome. In silico analyses indicate that sequences are avoided in all 3 single-stranded domains that affect the local or overall leader RNA folding. IMPORTANCE in vivo PMID:24335293

  16. RNA interference-based therapeutics for human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 treatment: synthetic siRNA or vector-based shRNA?

    PubMed Central

    Subramanya, Sandesh; Kim, Sang-Soo; Manjunath, N; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Importance of the field Despite the extraordinary clinical benefits of HAART, the prospect of life-long antiretroviral regimen poses significant practical problems, which has spurred an interest in developing new drugs and strategies to treat HIV infection and to eliminate persistent viral reservoirs. RNAi is a highly potent natural gene silencing mechanism that has emerged as a novel therapeutic possibility for HIV. Areas covered in this review Our aim is to discuss the recent progress in overcoming the hurdles for translating transient and stable RNAi enabling technologies towards clinical applications in HIV infection and the review covers literature from the past 2–3 years. What the reader will gain HIV inhibition can be achieved by transfection of chemically or enzymatically synthesized siRNAs or by DNA-based vector systems to express short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that are processed intracellularly into siRNA. This review compares the merits and shortcomings of the two approaches, focusing on technical and safety issues that will guide the choice of the appropriate strategy for clinical use. Take home message Introduction of synthetic siRNA into cells or its stable endogenous production using vector-driven shRNA have both been shown to effectively suppress HIV replication in vitro and in some instances in vivo. Each method has its own advantages and limitations in terms of ease of delivery, duration of silencing, emergence of escape mutants and potential toxicity. Thus, both methods appear to have potential as future therapeutics for HIV, once the technical and safety issues unique to each of the approaches are overcome. PMID:20088715

  17. Detection of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Women Following Administration of a Single Dose of Nevirapine: Comparison of Plasma RNA to Cellular DNA by Consensus Sequencing and by Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thor A.; Kress, Catherine M.; Beck, Ingrid; Techapornroong, Malee; Wittayapraparat, Pakorn; Tansuphasawasdikul, Somboon; Jourdain, Gonzague; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Lallemant, Marc; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    A single dose of nevirapine (sdNVP) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 increases the risk of failure of subsequent NVP-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART), especially when initiated within 6 months of sdNVP administration, emphasizing the importance of understanding the decay of nevirapine-resistant mutants. Nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 genotypes (with the mutations K103N, Y181C, and/or G190A) from 21 women were evaluated 10 days and 6 weeks after sdNVP administration and at the initiation of ART. Resistance was assayed by consensus sequencing and by a more sensitive assay (oligonucleotide ligation assay [OLA]) using plasma-derived HIV-1 RNA and cell-associated HIV-1 DNA. OLA detected nevirapine resistance in more specimens than consensus sequencing did (63% versus 33%, P < 0.01). When resistance was detected only by OLA (n = 45), the median mutant concentration was 18%, compared to 61% when detected by both sequencing and OLA (n = 51) (P < 0.0001). The proportion of women whose nevirapine resistance was detected by OLA 10 days after sdNVP administration was higher when we tested their HIV-1 RNA (95%) than when we tested their HIV-1 DNA (88%), whereas at 6 weeks after sdNVP therapy, the proportion was greater with DNA (85%) than with RNA (67%) and remained higher with DNA (33%) than with RNA (11%) at the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (median, 45 weeks after sdNVP therapy). Fourteen women started NVP-ART more than 6 months after sdNVP therapy; resistance was detected by OLA in 14% of the women but only in their DNA. HIV-1 resistance to NVP following sdNVP therapy persists longer in cellular DNA than in plasma RNA, as determined by a sensitive assay using sufficient copies of virus, suggesting that DNA may be superior to RNA for detecting resistance at the initiation of ART. PMID:20181911

  18. A small circular TAR RNA decoy specifically inhibits Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Colvin, R A; Puttaraju, M; Been, M D; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1996-01-01

    Linear TAR RNA has previously been used as a decoy to inhibit HIV-1 transcription in vitro and HIV-1 replication in vivo. A 48 nucleotide circular RNA containing the stem, bulge and loop of the HIV-1 TAR element was synthesized using the self-splicing activity of a group I permuted intron-exon and was tested for its ability to function as a TAR decoy in vitro. This small circular TAR molecule was exceptionally stable in HeLa nuclear extracts, whereas a similar linear TAR molecule was rapidly degraded. The TAR circle bound specifically to Tfr38, a peptide containing the TAR-binding region of Tat. The ability of Tat to trans-activate transcription from the HIV-1 promoter in vitro was efficiently inhibited by circular TAR RNA but not by TAR circles that contained either bulge or loop mutations. TAR circles did not inhibit transactivation exclusively by binding to Tat since this inhibition was not reversed by adding excess Tat to the transcription reaction. Together, these data suggest that TAR circles act as decoys that inhibit transactivation by binding to Tat and at least one cellular factor. These data also demonstrate the utility of small circular RNA molecules as tools for biochemical studies. PMID:8871552

  19. RNA-directed gene editing specifically eradicates latent and prevents new HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenhui; Kaminski, Rafal; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yonggang; Cosentino, Laura; Li, Fang; Luo, Biao; Alvarez-Carbonell, David; Garcia-Mesa, Yoelvis; Karn, Jonathan; Mo, Xianming; Khalili, Kamel

    2014-08-05

    AIDS remains incurable due to the permanent integration of HIV-1 into the host genome, imparting risk of viral reactivation even after antiretroviral therapy. New strategies are needed to ablate the viral genome from latently infected cells, because current methods are too inefficient and prone to adverse off-target effects. To eliminate the integrated HIV-1 genome, we used the Cas9/guide RNA (gRNA) system, in single and multiplex configurations. We identified highly specific targets within the HIV-1 LTR U3 region that were efficiently edited by Cas9/gRNA, inactivating viral gene expression and replication in latently infected microglial, promonocytic, and T cells. Cas9/gRNAs caused neither genotoxicity nor off-target editing to the host cells, and completely excised a 9,709-bp fragment of integrated proviral DNA that spanned from its 5' to 3' LTRs. Furthermore, the presence of multiplex gRNAs within Cas9-expressing cells prevented HIV-1 infection. Our results suggest that Cas9/gRNA can be engineered to provide a specific, efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic approach against AIDS.

  20. Ebola Virus RNA in Semen from an HIV-Positive Survivor of Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Emerson; Baller, April; White, Stephen; Soka, Moses; Choi, Mary J.; Mahmoud, Nuha; Wasunna, Christine; Massaquoi, Moses; Kollie, Jomah; Dweh, Straker; Bemah, Philip; Ladele, Victor; Kpaka, Jonathan; Jawara, Mary; Mugisha, Margaret; Subah, Onyekachi; Faikai, Mylene; Bailey, Jeff A.; Rollin, Pierre; Marston, Barbara; Nyenswah, Tolbert; Gasasira, Alex; Knust, Barbara; Nichol, Stuart; Williams, Desmond

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus is known to persist in semen of male survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD). However, maximum duration of, or risk factors for, virus persistence are unknown. We report an EVD survivor with preexisting HIV infection, whose semen was positive for Ebola virus RNA 565 days after recovery from EVD. PMID:28287374

  1. Ebola Virus RNA in Semen from an HIV-Positive Survivor of Ebola.

    PubMed

    Purpura, Lawrence J; Rogers, Emerson; Baller, April; White, Stephen; Soka, Moses; Choi, Mary J; Mahmoud, Nuha; Wasunna, Christine; Massaquoi, Moses; Kollie, Jomah; Dweh, Straker; Bemah, Philip; Ladele, Victor; Kpaka, Jonathan; Jawara, Mary; Mugisha, Margaret; Subah, Onyekachi; Faikai, Mylene; Bailey, Jeff A; Rollin, Pierre; Marston, Barbara; Nyenswah, Tolbert; Gasasira, Alex; Knust, Barbara; Nichol, Stuart; Williams, Desmond

    2017-04-01

    Ebola virus is known to persist in semen of male survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD). However, maximum duration of, or risk factors for, virus persistence are unknown. We report an EVD survivor with preexisting HIV infection, whose semen was positive for Ebola virus RNA 565 days after recovery from EVD.

  2. Identification of genetic variation between obligate plant pathogens Psuedoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli using RNA sequencing and genotyping-by-sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification from two economically important obligate plant pathogens, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli. Twenty isolates of P. cubensis and 19 isolates of P. humuli were genotyped...

  3. Imaging HIV-1 RNA dimerization in cells by multicolor super-resolution and fluctuation microscopies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Mireia; Clerté, Caroline; Chamontin, Célia; Basyuk, Eugenia; Lainé, Sébastien; Hottin, Jérome; Bertrand, Edouard; Margeat, Emmanuel; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization is a unique and vital characteristic of retroviral genomes. It is commonly accepted that genomic RNA (gRNA) must be dimeric at the plasma membrane of the infected cells to be packaged during virus assembly. However, where, when and how HIV-1 gRNA find each other and dimerize in the cell are long-standing questions that cannot be answered using conventional approaches. Here, we combine two state-of-the-art, multicolor RNA labeling strategies with two single-molecule microscopy technologies to address these questions. We used 3D-super-resolution structured illumination microscopy to analyze and quantify the spatial gRNA association throughout the cell and monitored the dynamics of RNA-RNA complexes in living-cells by cross-correlation fluctuation analysis. These sensitive and complementary approaches, combined with trans-complementation experiments, reveal for the first time the presence of interacting gRNA in the cytosol, a challenging observation due to the low frequency of these events and their dilution among the bulk of other RNAs, and allow the determination of the subcellular orchestration of the HIV-1 dimerization process. PMID:27280976

  4. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs.

  5. Stability of HIV Frameshift Site RNA Correlates with Frameshift Efficiency and Decreased Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Becker, Jordan T.; Benner, Bayleigh E.; Blume, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication is strongly dependent upon a programmed ribosomal frameshift. Here we investigate the relationships between the thermodynamic stability of the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA frameshift site stem-loop, frameshift efficiency, and infectivity, using pseudotyped HIV-1 and HEK293T cells. The data reveal a strong correlation between frameshift efficiency and local, but not overall, RNA thermodynamic stability. Mutations that modestly increase the local stability of the frameshift site RNA stem-loop structure increase frameshift efficiency 2-fold to 3-fold in cells. Thus, frameshift efficiency is determined by the strength of the thermodynamic barrier encountered by the ribosome. These data agree with previous in vitro measurements, suggesting that there are no virus- or host-specific factors that modulate frameshifting. The data also indicate that there are no sequence-specific requirements for the frameshift site stem-loop. A linear correlation between Gag-polymerase (Gag-Pol) levels in cells and levels in virions supports the idea of a stochastic virion assembly mechanism. We further demonstrate that the surrounding genomic RNA secondary structure influences frameshift efficiency and that a mutation that commonly arises in response to protease inhibitor therapy creates a functional but inefficient secondary slippery site. Finally, HIV-1 mutants with enhanced frameshift efficiencies are significantly less infectious, suggesting that compounds that increase frameshift efficiency by as little as 2-fold may be effective at suppressing HIV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE HIV, like many retroviruses, utilizes a −1 programmed ribosomal frameshift to generate viral enzymes in the form of a Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor. Thus, frameshifting is essential for viral replication. Here, we utilized a panel of mutant HIV strains to demonstrate that in cells, frameshifting efficiency is correlated with the stability of the local

  6. Knowledge discovery in RNA sequence families of HIV using scalable computers

    SciTech Connect

    Hofacker, I.L.; Huynen, M.A.; Stadler, P.F.; Stolorz, P.E.

    1996-12-31

    The prediction of RNA secondary structure on the basis of sequence information is an important tool in biosequence analysis. However, it has typically been restricted to molecules containing no more than 4000 nucleotides due to the computational complexity of the underlying dynamic programming algorithm used. We describe here an approach to RNA sequence analysis based upon scalable computers, which enables molecules containing up to 20,000 nucleotides to be analyzed. We apply the approach to investigation of the entire HIV genome, illustrating the power of these methods to perform knowledge discovery by identification of important secondary structure motifs within RNA sequence families.

  7. Use of Dried Plasma Spots for HIV-1 Viral Load Determination and Drug Resistance Genotyping in Mexican Patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Auad, Juan Pablo; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Lira, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring antiretroviral therapy using measurements of viral load (VL) and the genotyping of resistance mutations is not routinely performed in low- to middle-income countries because of the high costs of the commercial assays that are used. The analysis of dried plasma spot (DPS) samples on filter paper may represent an alternative for resource-limited settings. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of analyzing DPS samples to determine VL and identify drug resistance mutations (DRM) in a group of HIV-1 patients. The VL was measured from 22 paired plasma and DPS samples. In these samples, the average VL was 4.7 log10 copies/mL in liquid plasma and 4.1 log10 copies/mL in DPS, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.83. A 1.1 kb fragment of HIV pol could be amplified in 14/22 (63.6%) of the DPS samples and the same value was amplified in plasma samples. A collection of ten paired DPS and liquid plasma samples was evaluated for the presence of DRM; an excellent correlation was found in the identification of DRM between the paired samples. All HIV-1 pol sequences that were obtained corresponded to HIV subtype B. The analysis of DPS samples offers an attractive alternative for monitoring ARV therapy in resource-limited settings.

  8. Use of Dried Plasma Spots for HIV-1 Viral Load Determination and Drug Resistance Genotyping in Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Auad, Juan Pablo; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma. Teresa; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring antiretroviral therapy using measurements of viral load (VL) and the genotyping of resistance mutations is not routinely performed in low- to middle-income countries because of the high costs of the commercial assays that are used. The analysis of dried plasma spot (DPS) samples on filter paper may represent an alternative for resource-limited settings. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of analyzing DPS samples to determine VL and identify drug resistance mutations (DRM) in a group of HIV-1 patients. The VL was measured from 22 paired plasma and DPS samples. In these samples, the average VL was 4.7 log10 copies/mL in liquid plasma and 4.1 log10 copies/mL in DPS, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.83. A 1.1 kb fragment of HIV pol could be amplified in 14/22 (63.6%) of the DPS samples and the same value was amplified in plasma samples. A collection of ten paired DPS and liquid plasma samples was evaluated for the presence of DRM; an excellent correlation was found in the identification of DRM between the paired samples. All HIV-1 pol sequences that were obtained corresponded to HIV subtype B. The analysis of DPS samples offers an attractive alternative for monitoring ARV therapy in resource-limited settings. PMID:26779533

  9. Anti-HIV microRNA expression in a novel Indian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Rakesh; Soni, Kartik; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Kumar, Vikram; Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Scaria, Vinod; Solomon, Suniti; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Pillai, Beena

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication inside host cells is known to be regulated by various host factors. Host miRNAs, by virtue of its normal functioning, also regulate HIV-1 RNA expression by either directly targeting virus mRNAs or indirectly by regulating host proteins that HIV-1 uses for own replication. Therefore, it is highly possible that with differential miRNA expression, rate of disease progression will vary in HIV-1 infected individuals. In this study we have compared expression of a panel of 13 reported anti-HIV miRNAs in human PBMCs from long term non progressors (LTNPs), regular progressors and rapid progressors. We found that LTNPs have substantial lower expression of miR-382-5p that positively correlates with viral loads. Combinatorial regulation is highly probable in dictating differential disease progression as average expression of miR-382-5p and miR-155-5p can substantially distinguish LTNP individuals from regular progressors. PMID:27320691

  10. Analytical Performances of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA-Based Amplix® Real-Time PCR Platform for HIV-1 RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mboumba Bouassa, Ralph-Sydney; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Wolyec, Serge Tonen; Robin, Leman; Matta, Mathieu; Longo, Jean de Dieu; Grésenguet, Gérard; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the performances of Amplix real-time PCR platform developed by Biosynex (Strasbourg, France), combining automated station extraction (Amplix station 16 Dx) and real-time PCR (Amplix NG), for quantifying plasma HIV-1 RNA by lyophilized HIV-1 RNA-based Amplix reagents targeting gag and LTR, using samples from HIV-1-infected adults from Central African Republic. Results. Amplix real-time PCR assay showed low limit of detection (28 copies/mL), across wide dynamic range (1.4–10 log copies/mL), 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity, high reproducibility, and accuracy with mean bias < 5%. The assay showed excellent correlations and concordance of 95.3% with the reference HIV-1 RNA load assay (Roche), with mean absolute bias of +0.097 log copies/mL by Bland-Altman analysis. The assay was able to detect and quantify the most prevalent HIV-1 subtype strains and the majority of non-B subtypes, CRFs of HIV-1 group M, and HIV-1 groups N and O circulating in Central Africa. The Amplix assay showed 100% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity to diagnose virological failure in clinical samples from antiretroviral drug-experienced patients. Conclusions. The HIV-1 RNA-based Amplix real-time PCR platform constitutes sensitive and reliable system for clinical monitoring of HIV-1 RNA load in HIV-1-infected children and adults, particularly adapted to intermediate laboratory facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:28050283

  11. Favourable IFNL3 Genotypes Are Associated with Spontaneous Clearance and Are Differentially Distributed in Aboriginals in Canadian HIV-Hepatitis C Co-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moqueet, Nasheed; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Platt, Robert W.; Young, Jim; Cooper, Curtis; Hull, Mark; Walmsley, Sharon; Klein, Marina B.

    2015-01-01

    Canadian Aboriginals are reported to clear Hepatitis C (HCV) more frequently. We tested the association of spontaneous clearance and three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the Interferon-lambda 3 (IFNL3) gene (rs12979860, rs8099917, functional variant rs8103142) and compared the SNP frequencies between HIV-HCV co-infected whites and Aboriginals from the Canadian Co-infection Cohort. HCV treatment-naïve individuals with at least two HCV RNA tests were included (n = 538). A spontaneous clearance case was defined as someone with two consecutive HCV RNA-negative tests, at least six months apart. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards adjusted for sex and ethnicity. Advantageous variants and haplotypes were more common in Aboriginals than Caucasians: 57% vs. 46% had the rs12979860 CC genotype, respectively; 58% vs. 48%, rs8103142 TT; 74% vs. 67%, the rs12979860 C allele; and 67% vs. 64% the TCT haplotype with three favourable alleles. The adjusted Hazard Ratios (95% CI) for spontaneous clearance were: rs12979860: 3.80 (2.20, 6.54); rs8099917: 5.14 (2.46, 10.72); and rs8103142: 4.36 (2.49, 7.62). Even after adjusting for rs12979860, Aboriginals and females cleared HCV more often, HR (95% CI) = 1.53 (0.89, 2.61) and 1.42 (0.79, 2.53), respectively. Our results suggest that favourable IFNL3 genotypes are more common among Aboriginals than Caucasians, and may partly explain the higher HCV clearance rates seen among Aboriginals. PMID:25803108

  12. The Major Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Packaging Signal Is Present on All HIV-2 RNA Species: Cotranslational RNA Encapsidation and Limitation of Gag Protein Confer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Stephen D. C.; Allen, Jane F.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Deletion of a region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) 5′ leader RNA reduces genomic RNA encapsidation to about 5% that of wild-type virus with no defect in viral protein production but severely limits virus spread in Jurkat T cells, indicating that this region contains a major cis-acting encapsidation signal, or psi (Ψ). Being upstream of the major splice donor, it is present on all viral transcripts. We have shown that HIV-2 selects its genomic RNA for encapsidation cotranslationally, rendering wild-type HIV-2 unable to encapsidate vector RNAs in trans . Virus with Ψ deleted, however, encapsidates an HIV-2 vector, demonstrating competition for Gag protein. HIV-2 overcomes the lack of packaging signal location specificity by two novel mechanisms, cotranslational packaging and competition for limiting Gag polyprotein. PMID:11711596

  13. Bioavailable inhibitors of HIV-1 RNA biogenesis identified through a Rev-based screen.

    PubMed

    Prado, Silvia; Beltrán, Manuela; Coiras, Mayte; Bedoya, Luis M; Alcamí, José; Gallego, José

    2016-05-01

    New antiretroviral agents with alternative mechanisms are needed to complement the combination therapies used to treat HIV-1 infections. Here we report the identification of bioavailable molecules that interfere with the gene expression processes of HIV-1. The compounds were detected by screening a small library of FDA-approved drugs with an assay based on measuring the displacement of Rev, and essential virus-encoded protein, from its high-affinity RNA binding site. The antiretroviral activity of two hits was based on interference with post-integration steps of the HIV-1 cycle. Both hits inhibited RRE-Rev complex formation in vitro, and blocked LTR-dependent gene expression and viral transcription in cellular assays. The best compound altered the splicing pattern of HIV-1 transcripts in a manner consistent with Rev inhibition. This mechanism of action is different from those used by current antiretroviral agents. The screening hits recognized the Rev binding site in the viral RNA, and the best compound did so with substantial selectivity, allowing the identification of a new RNA-binding scaffold. These results may be used for developing novel antiretroviral drugs.

  14. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    PubMed Central

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  15. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-02

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus.

  16. HPV genotypes detected in the oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, M; Mazza, F; Frati, E R; Fasolo, M M; Colzani, D; Bianchi, S; Fasoli, E; Amendola, A; Orlando, G; Tanzi, E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological profile of HPV oropharyngeal infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. A total of 135 subjects were enrolled at the L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan, Italy) to evaluate their HPV oropharyngeal infection status at baseline and at a follow-up visit at least 12 months later. HPV DNA was detected from oropharyngeal swabs using an in-house nested PCR that amplifies a segment of the L1 gene. The PCR products were then sequenced and genotyped. A greater percentage of high-risk genotypes was identified compared to low-risk genotypes (13·7% vs. 6·9%, P < 0·05), and two uncommon alpha-HPV genotypes were detected, i.e. HPV-102 and HPV-114. HPV infection prevalence was 24·4% and the cumulative incidence was 24·1%. During the follow-up period, one case of HPV infection (HPV-33) persisted, while the overall rate of infection clearance was 58·3%. HPV oropharyngeal infection was widespread in the cohort examined, and most of the infections were transient and cleared within 12 months. These results may help to clarify the role of HPV in the oropharynx and may also improve our understanding of the need to implement preventive strategies in at-risk populations.

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 Viral Infection by an Engineered CRISPR Csy4 RNA Endoribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Li, Wei; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial defense system CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has been explored as a powerful tool to edit genomic elements. In this study, we test the potential of CRISPR Csy4 RNA endoribonuclease for targeting HIV-1. We fused human codon-optimized Csy4 endoribonuclease with VPR, a HIV-1 viral preintegration complex protein. An HIV-1 cell model was modified to allow quantitative detection of active virus production. We found that the trans-expressing VPR-Csy4 almost completely blocked viral infection in two target cell lines (SupT1, Ghost). In the MAGI cell assay, where the HIV-1 LTR β-galactosidase is expressed under the control of the tat gene from an integrated provirus, VPR-Csy4 significantly blocked the activity of the provirus-activated HIV-1 reporter. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that Csy4 endoribonuclease is a promising tool that could be tailored further to target HIV-1.

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 Viral Infection by an Engineered CRISPR Csy4 RNA Endoribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Li, Wei; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial defense system CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has been explored as a powerful tool to edit genomic elements. In this study, we test the potential of CRISPR Csy4 RNA endoribonuclease for targeting HIV-1. We fused human codon-optimized Csy4 endoribonuclease with VPR, a HIV-1 viral preintegration complex protein. An HIV-1 cell model was modified to allow quantitative detection of active virus production. We found that the trans-expressing VPR-Csy4 almost completely blocked viral infection in two target cell lines (SupT1, Ghost). In the MAGI cell assay, where the HIV-1 LTR β-galactosidase is expressed under the control of the tat gene from an integrated provirus, VPR-Csy4 significantly blocked the activity of the provirus-activated HIV-1 reporter. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that Csy4 endoribonuclease is a promising tool that could be tailored further to target HIV-1. PMID:26495836

  19. Coordination of Genomic RNA Packaging with Viral Assembly in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hellmund, Chris; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress made in unraveling the complexities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication has resulted in a library of drugs to target key aspects of the replication cycle of the virus. Yet, despite this accumulated wealth of knowledge, we still have much to learn about certain viral processes. One of these is virus assembly, where the viral genome and proteins come together to form infectious progeny. Here we review this topic from the perspective of how the route to production of an infectious virion is orchestrated by the viral genome, and we compare and contrast aspects of the assembly mechanisms employed by HIV-1 with those of other RNA viruses. PMID:27428992

  20. Coordination of Genomic RNA Packaging with Viral Assembly in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Hellmund, Chris; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-07-14

    The tremendous progress made in unraveling the complexities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication has resulted in a library of drugs to target key aspects of the replication cycle of the virus. Yet, despite this accumulated wealth of knowledge, we still have much to learn about certain viral processes. One of these is virus assembly, where the viral genome and proteins come together to form infectious progeny. Here we review this topic from the perspective of how the route to production of an infectious virion is orchestrated by the viral genome, and we compare and contrast aspects of the assembly mechanisms employed by HIV-1 with those of other RNA viruses.

  1. Prevalence of non-confounded HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment in the context of plasma HIV RNA suppression.

    PubMed

    Cysique, Lucette A; Brew, Bruce J

    2011-04-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder is known to occur in the context of successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART; plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/ml). Here, we newly provide an analysis of its prevalence and nature in the absence of medical or psychiatric confounds that may otherwise inflate the prevalence rate. We enrolled a cohort of 116 advanced HIV + individuals on cART (51% virally suppressed (VS)). They were screened for active Hepatitis C, current substance use disorder and were assessed with standard neuropsychological (NP) testing. Our results showed that out of the entire sample, NP impairment occurred in 18.1% (21/116) in VS individuals which was not statistically different from the 24.1% (28/116) that were found to be NP-impaired and not VS. In comparison with NP-normal-VS persons, NP impairment in VS individuals was associated with shorter duration of current cART and lower pre-morbid ability. Higher cART CNS penetration effectiveness tended to be associated with lesser cognitive severity in NP-impaired VS individuals. Current CD4 cell count, depression symptoms and past CNS HIV-related diseases did not specifically account for persistent NP impairment in VS individuals. In conclusion, despite suppression of systemic viral load, non-confounded HIV-related NP-impairment prevalence reached 18.1%. Of the potential explanations for this persistent deficit, a "burnt-out" form of the disease and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome were the less likely explanations, while a shorter current cART duration and lower pre-morbid intellectual capacity were significant. Nonetheless, predictive modelling with these last two factors misclassified 27% and had low sensitivity (43%) emphasising that other yet-to-be-defined factors were operative.

  2. Seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration is strongly associated with altered levels of seminal plasma interferon-γ, interleukin-17, and interleukin-5.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jennifer C; Anton, Peter A; Baldwin, Gayle Cocita; Elliott, Julie; Anisman-Posner, Deborah; Tanner, Karen; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Sugar, Catherine; Yang, Otto O; Hoffman, Risa M

    2014-11-01

    Seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level is an important determinant of the risk of HIV-1 sexual transmission. We investigated potential associations between seminal plasma cytokine levels and viral concentration in the seminal plasma of HIV-1-infected men. This was a prospective, observational study of paired blood and semen samples from 18 HIV-1 chronically infected men off antiretroviral therapy. HIV-1 RNA levels and cytokine levels in seminal plasma and blood plasma were measured and analyzed using simple linear regressions to screen for associations between cytokines and seminal plasma HIV-1 levels. Forward stepwise regression was performed to construct the final multivariate model. The median HIV-1 RNA concentrations were 4.42 log10 copies/ml (IQR 2.98, 4.70) and 2.96 log10 copies/ml (IQR 2, 4.18) in blood and seminal plasma, respectively. In stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis, blood HIV-1 RNA level (p<0.0001) was most strongly associated with seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level. After controlling for blood HIV-1 RNA level, seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level was positively associated with interferon (IFN)-γ (p=0.03) and interleukin (IL)-17 (p=0.03) and negatively associated with IL-5 (p=0.0007) in seminal plasma. In addition to blood HIV-1 RNA level, cytokine profiles in the male genital tract are associated with HIV-1 RNA levels in semen. The Th1 and Th17 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17 are associated with increased seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA, while the Th2 cytokine IL-5 is associated with decreased seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA. These results support the importance of genital tract immunomodulation in HIV-1 transmission.

  3. HIV-1 pre-mRNA commitment to Rev mediated export through PSF and Matrin 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Anna; Gharu, Lavina; Marcello, Alessandro

    2013-01-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus gene expression and replication are regulated at several levels. Incompletely spliced viral RNAs and full-length genomic RNA contain the RRE element and are bound by the viral trans-acting protein Rev to be transported out of the nucleus. Previously we found that the nuclear matrix protein MATR3 was a cofactor of Rev-mediated RNA export. Here we show that the pleiotropic protein PSF binds viral RNA and is associated with MATR3. PSF is involved in the maintenance of a pool of RNA available for Rev activity. However, while Rev and PSF bind the viral pre-mRNA at the site of viral transcription, MATR3 interacts at a subsequent step. We propose that PSF and MATR3 define a novel pathway for RRE-containing HIV-1 RNAs that is hijacked by the viral Rev protein.

  4. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-07

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors.

  5. Emergence of a complex relationship between HIV-1 and the microRNA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Dominique L.; Plante, Isabelle; Barat, Corinne; Tremblay, Michel J.; Provost, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent experimental evidences support the existence of an increasingly complex and multifaceted interaction between viruses and the microRNA-guided RNA silencing machinery of human cells. The discovery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are designed to mediate cleavage of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs), prompted virologists to establish therapeutic strategies based on siRNAs with the aim to suppress replication of several viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). It has been appreciated only recently that viral RNAs can also be processed endogenously by the microRNA-generating enzyme Dicer or recognized by cellular miRNAs, in processes that could be viewed as an adapted antiviral defense mechanism. Known to repress mRNA translation through recognition of specific binding sites usually located in their 3′ untranslated region, miRNAs of host or viral origin may exert regulatory effects towards host and/or viral genes and influence viral replication and/or the host response to viral infection. This article summarizes our current state of knowledge on the relationship between HIV-1 and miRNA-guided RNA silencing, and discusses the different aspects of their interaction. PMID:19301659

  6. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  7. Dynamics of HIV-1 mRNA expression in patients with long-term nonprogressive HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Comar, M; Simonelli, C; Zanussi, S; Paoli, P; Vaccher, E; Tirelli, U; Giacca, M

    1997-01-01

    A large number of evidences indicate that progression of HIV disease is driven by an increase in viral burden. It is still unclear, however, to what extent this is contributed by the dysregulation of the molecular mechanisms governing virus gene expression at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional levels. To address this issue, several quantitative virologic parameters (including provirus transcriptional activity and splicing pattern) were analyzed in individuals with nonprogressive HIV infection and compared with those of a matched group of progressor patients. Exact quantification was achieved by a competitive PCR procedure using a multicompetitor template. Nonprogressors were characterized by striking differences in the levels of viremia, provirus copy number, and overall levels of all viral mRNA classes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Additionally, the transcriptional activity of the proviral DNA in these patients was mainly engaged in the production of multiprocessed transcripts, with a pattern resembling the early phases of the experimental infection. Taken together, these results show that both viral load and provirus transcription pattern are remarkably different in infected individuals nonprogressing toward overt disease, and further support the notion that disease progression is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of HIV gene expression. PMID:9259589

  8. Development of a reverse genetics system based on RNA polymerase II for Newcastle disease virus genotype VII.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Chunfeng; Feng, Na; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Yang, Songtao; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Yin, Renfu; Liu, Xiufan; Hu, Shunlin; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing; Cong, Yanlong; Ding, Zhuang

    2015-02-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has only a single serotype but diversified genotypes. Genotype VII strains are the prevalent currently circulating genotype worldwide, and in particular, these strains cause outbreaks in waterfowl. In this study, a reverse genetics system for highly virulent NDV isolated from goose flocks was developed independent of conventional T7 RNA polymerase. Infectious virus was successfully generated by an RNA polymerase II promoter to drive transcription of the full-length virus antigenome. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing virus was generated by inserting an additional transcription cassette coding for the enhanced GFP between the P and M genes of the genome. The expression of GFP was confirmed by western blotting and fluorescence microscopy. The replication kinetics and pathogenicity of the recombinant viruses are indistinguishable from the parental wild-type virus. This reverse genetics system will provide a powerful tool for the analysis of goose-origin NDV dissemination and pathogenesis, as well as preparation for genotype-matched NDV attenuated vaccines.

  9. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    PubMed

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA < 50 copies/ml. In unadjusted analyses, self-reported hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  10. HIV-1 RRE RNA acts as an RNA silencing suppressor by competing with TRBP-bound siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Sylvanne M; Sinck, Lucile; Ward, Natalie J; Melendez-Peña, Carlos E; Scarborough, Robert J; Azar, Ibrahim; Rance, Elodie; Daher, Aïcha; Pang, Ka-Ming; Rossi, John J; Gatignol, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Several proteins and RNAs expressed by mammalian viruses have been reported to interfere with RNA interference (RNAi) activity. We investigated the ability of the HIV-1-encoded RNA elements Trans-Activation Response (TAR) and Rev-Response Element (RRE) to alter RNAi. MicroRNA let7-based assays showed that RRE is a potent suppressor of RNAi activity, while TAR displayed moderate RNAi suppression. We demonstrate that RRE binds to TAR-RNA Binding Protein (TRBP), an essential component of the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC). The binding of TAR and RRE to TRBP displaces small interfering (si)RNAs from binding to TRBP. Several stem-deleted RRE mutants lost their ability to suppress RNAi activity, which correlated with a reduced ability to compete with siRNA-TRBP binding. A lentiviral vector expressing TAR and RRE restricted RNAi, but RNAi was restored when Rev or GagPol were coexpressed. Adenoviruses are restricted by RNAi and encode their own suppressors of RNAi, the Virus-Associated (VA) RNA elements. RRE enhanced the replication of wild-type and VA-deficient adenovirus. Our work describes RRE as a novel suppressor of RNAi that acts by competing with siRNAs rather than by disrupting the RISC. This function is masked in lentiviral vectors co-expressed with viral proteins and thus will not affect their use in gene therapy. The potent RNAi suppressive effects of RRE identified in this study could be used to enhance the expression of RNAi restricted viruses used in oncolysis such as adenoviruses. PMID:25668122

  11. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Robert J; Lévesque, Michel V; Boudrias-Dalle, Etienne; Chute, Ian C; Daniels, Sylvanne M; Ouellette, Rodney J; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Gatignol, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies. PMID:25072692

  12. G3BP1 restricts HIV-1 replication in macrophages and T-cells by sequestering viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Martinez, Fernando O; Booiman, Thijs; van Dort, Karel A; van de Klundert, Maarten A A; Gordon, Siamon; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 exploits the cellular machinery for replication and therefore several interactions with cellular factors take place, some of which are yet unknown. We identified GTPase-activating protein-(SH3 domain)-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) as a cellular factor that restricts HIV-1, by analyzing transcriptome profiles of in vitro-cytokine-activated macrophages that are non-permissive to HIV-1 replication. Silencing of G3BP1 by RNA interference resulted in increased HIV-1 replication in primary T-cells and macrophages, but did not affect replication of other retroviruses. G3BP1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 RNA in the cytoplasm, suggesting that it sequesters viral transcripts, thus preventing translation or packaging. G3BP1 was highly expressed in resting naïve or memory T-cells from healthy donors and HIV-1 infected patients, but significantly lower in IL-2-activated T-cells. These results strongly suggest that G3BP1 captures HIV-1 RNA transcripts and thereby restricts mRNA translation, viral protein production and virus particle formation.

  13. Sequence-specific interaction between HIV-1 matrix protein and viral genomic RNA revealed by in vitro genetic selection.

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, P; Dupont, S; Stevenson, M; Green, M R

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 matrix protein (HIV-1 MA) is a multifunctional structural protein synthesized as part of the Pr55 gag polyprotein. We have used in vitro genetic selection to identify an RNA consensus sequence that specifically interacts with MA (Kd = 5 x 10(-7) M). This 13-nt MA binding consensus sequence bears a high degree of homology (77%) to a region (nt 1433-1446) within the POL open reading frame of the HIV-1 genome (consensus sequence from 38 HIV-1 strains). Chemical interference experiments identified the nucleotides within the MA binding consensus sequence involved in direct contact with MA. We further demonstrate that this RNA-protein interaction is mediated through a stretch of basic amino acids within MA. Mutations that disrupt the interaction between MA and its RNA binding site within the HIV-1 genome resulted in a measurable decrease in viral replication. PMID:11345436

  14. Suppression of HIV-1 Nef translation by Sam68 mutant-induced stress granules and nef mRNA sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Liu, Ying; Park, In-Woo; Zhang, Jizhong; Sanford, Jeremy; He, Johnny J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV-1 Nef plays important roles in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis. It is translated from completely spliced HIV-1 RNA, its expression is inherently regulated at the levels of viral DNA transcription and RNA splicing. Here we show that Sam68 cytoplasmic mutants potently suppress Nef expression. The suppression requires Sam68 domain aa269-321 and is correlated with its ability to induce stress granules. In addition, the suppression is specific to Nef, and direct binding to nef mRNA 3′UTR confers the suppression specificity. Furthermore, nef mRNA is targeted to and enriched in these induced stress granules. Importantly, Nef suppression occurs in the context of HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes with little MHC I and CD4 down-regulation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stress granule induction and nef mRNA sequestration account for this translational suppression of Nef expression and offers a new strategy for development of anti-HIV therapeutics to buttress our fight against HIV/AIDS. PMID:19150430

  15. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA) and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mualif, Siti Aisyah; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Chew, Yik Wei; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd; Ali, Syed A

    2015-01-01

    Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW) rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef), HIV-1 p24 (ca), and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3) E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  16. PCR-based identification of eight Lactobacillus species and 18 hr-HPV genotypes in fixed cervical samples of South African women at risk of HIV and BV.

    PubMed

    Dols, Joke A M; Reid, Gregor; Kort, Remco; Schuren, Frank H J; Tempelman, Hugo; Bontekoe, Tj Romke; Korporaal, Hans; Van der Veer, E M; Smit, Pieter W; Boon, Mathilde E

    2012-06-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli assessed by PCR-based microarray and PCR-based genotyping of HPV in South African women at risk for HIV and BV. Vaginal lactobacilli can be defined by microarray techniques in fixed cervical samples of South African women. Cervical brush samples suspended in the coagulant fixative BoonFix of one hundred women attending a health centre for HIV testing in South Africa were available for this study. In the Ndlovu Medical Centre in Elandsdoorn, South Africa, identification of 18 hr-HPV genotypes was done using the INNO-LiPA method. An inventory of lactobacilli organisms was performed using microarray technology. On the basis of the Lactobacillus and Lactobacillus biofilm scoring, the cases were identified as Leiden bacterial vaginosis (BV) negative (BV-; n = 41), Leiden BV intermediate (BV±; n = 25), and Leiden BV positive (BV+; n = 34). Fifty-one women were HIV positive and 49 HIV negative. Out of the 51 HIV positive women, 35 were HPV infected. These 51 HIV positive women were frequently infected with HPV16 and HPV18. In addition, HPV35, HPV52, HPV33, and HPV66 were often detected in these samples. Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus iners were the most prevalent lactobacilli as established by the microarray technique. In women with HPV infection, the prevalence of Lactobacillus crispatus was significantly reduced. In both HIV and HPV infection, a similar (but not identical) shift in the composition of the lactobacillus flora was observed. We conclude that there is a shift in the composition of vaginal lactobacilli in HIV-infected women. Because of the prominence of HPV35, HPV52, HPV33, and HPV66, vaccination for exclusively HPV16 and HPV18 might be insufficient in South African HIV+ women.

  17. Identification of Novel Recombinant Forms of Hepatitis B Virus Generated from Genotypes Ae and G in HIV-1-Positive Japanese Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Kawahata, Takuya; Mori, Haruyo; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Itoda, Ichiro; Komano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rare hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) coinfects HIV-1-positive individuals along with HBV/A and generates recombinants. However, the circulation of HBV A/G recombinants remains poorly understood. This molecular epidemiologic study examined HBV A/G recombinants in Japanese HIV-1-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Initially, blood specimens submitted for confirmatory tests of HIV infection in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, from 2006 to 2013 were examined for HIV-1, and HIV-1-positive specimens were screened for HBV. Among 817 specimens from HIV-1-positive individuals, HBsAg was detected in 59 specimens; of these, HBV/Ae (alternatively A2), a subgenotype of HBV/A prevalent in Europe and North America, was identified in 70.2%, HBV/C in 17.5%, and HBV/G in 10.5%, and HBV/E in 1.8% according to the core gene sequence. The full-length genome analysis of HBV was performed on HBV/G-positive specimens because some HBV A/G recombinants were historically overlooked by genotyping based on a partial genome analysis. It revealed that five of the specimens contained novel Ae/G recombinants, the core gene of which had a high sequence similarity to HBV/G. Detailed analyses showed that novel recombinants were coinfected with HBV/Ae in a recombinant-dominant fashion. No major drug-resistant mutations were found in the newly identified HBV Ae/G recombinants. Some of the individuals asymptomatically coinfected with HIV/HBV suffered mild liver injury. This study demonstrated that novel Ae/G HBV recombinants were identified in Japanese HIV-1-positive MSM. The pathogenicity of novel HBV Ae/G recombinants should be examined in a future longitudinal study. Surveillance of such viruses in HIV-1-positive individuals should be emphasized. PMID:25825936

  18. Identification of Novel Recombinant Forms of Hepatitis B Virus Generated from Genotypes Ae and G in HIV-1-Positive Japanese Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoko; Kawahata, Takuya; Mori, Haruyo; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Itoda, Ichiro; Komano, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The rare hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) coinfects HIV-1-positive individuals along with HBV/A and generates recombinants. However, the circulation of HBV A/G recombinants remains poorly understood. This molecular epidemiologic study examined HBV A/G recombinants in Japanese HIV-1-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Initially, blood specimens submitted for confirmatory tests of HIV infection in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, from 2006 to 2013 were examined for HIV-1, and HIV-1-positive specimens were screened for HBV. Among 817 specimens from HIV-1-positive individuals, HBsAg was detected in 59 specimens; of these, HBV/Ae (alternatively A2), a subgenotype of HBV/A prevalent in Europe and North America, was identified in 70.2%, HBV/C in 17.5%, and HBV/G in 10.5%, and HBV/E in 1.8% according to the core gene sequence. The full-length genome analysis of HBV was performed on HBV/G-positive specimens because some HBV A/G recombinants were historically overlooked by genotyping based on a partial genome analysis. It revealed that five of the specimens contained novel Ae/G recombinants, the core gene of which had a high sequence similarity to HBV/G. Detailed analyses showed that novel recombinants were coinfected with HBV/Ae in a recombinant-dominant fashion. No major drug-resistant mutations were found in the newly identified HBV Ae/G recombinants. Some of the individuals asymptomatically coinfected with HIV/HBV suffered mild liver injury. This study demonstrated that novel Ae/G HBV recombinants were identified in Japanese HIV-1-positive MSM. The pathogenicity of novel HBV Ae/G recombinants should be examined in a future longitudinal study. Surveillance of such viruses in HIV-1-positive individuals should be emphasized.

  19. Single genome amplification and standard bulk PCR yield HIV-1 envelope products with similar genotypic and phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Behzad; Ghulam-Smith, Melissa; Gonzalez, Oscar; White, Laura F; Sagar, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that single genome amplification (SGA) as compared to standard bulk PCR and virus stocks from 293T transfection versus short term passage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) yield a less biased representation of HIV-1 envelope characteristics. In 9 different subjects, genetic diversity, divergence, and population structure were not significantly different among SGA or bulk PCR amplified envelope V1-V3 segments. In these subjects, 293T transfection derived virus stocks with SGA or bulk PCR amplified envelopes have similar infectivity, replication kinetics, co-receptor usage, and neutralization susceptibility. While PBMC passage as compared to the 293T derived virus stocks had similar co-receptor usage, PBMC viruses were less neutralization susceptible to some specific antibodies. Our results suggest that the method of envelope sequence amplification, either SGA or bulk PCR, does not have a significant impact on the genotypic and phenotypic properties of the virus envelope quasispecies.

  20. Evaluations of an in-house drug resistance method for HIV-1 drug resistance using ViroSeq™ 2.0 genotyping system as a gold standard.

    PubMed

    Chaturbhuj, Devidas N; Deshmukh, Pravin S; Hingankar, Nitin K; Siddhaarth, K; Deshpande, Sohan N; Sen, Sourav; Kabra, Sandhya; Paranjape, Ramesh S; Tripathy, Srikanth P

    2013-04-01

    An in-house method was evaluated for its efficiency to detect the HIV-1 drug resistance mutations. This method was compared with the ViroSeq™ Genotyping System 2.0 (Celera Diagnostics, US) a gold standard. Sixty-five stored plasma samples, previously tested for HIV-1 drug resistance using the ViroSeq™ method were used to evaluate the in-house method. Out of the sixty five plasma samples, sixty were HIV-1 positive clinical samples; four samples from the Virology Quality Assessment (VQA) program and one positive control from the ViroSeq™ kit were used in this study. The sequences generated by the ViroSeq™ and an in-house method showed 99.5±0.5% and 99.7±0.4% (mean±SD) nucleotide and amino acid identity, respectively. Out of 214 Stanford HIVdb listed HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in the protease and reverse transcriptase regions, concordance was observed in 203 (94.9%), partial discordance in 11 (5.1%) and complete discordance was absent. The in-house primers are broadly sensitive in genotyping multiple HIV-1 group M subtypes. The amplification sensitivity of the in-house method was 1000 copies/ml. The evaluation of the in-house method provides results comparable with that of ViroSeq™ method thus, making the in-house method suitable for HIV-1 drug resistance testing in the developing countries.

  1. Attacking HIV-1 RNA versus DNA by sequence-specific approaches: RNAi versus CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be effectively controlled by potent antiviral drugs, but this never results in a cure. The patient should therefore take these drugs for the rest of his/her life, which can cause drug-resistance and adverse effects. Therefore, more durable therapeutic strategies should be considered, such as a stable gene therapy to protect the target T cells against HIV-1 infection. The development of potent therapeutic regimens based on the RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) mechanisms will be described, which can be delivered by lentiviral vectors. These mechanisms attack different forms of the viral genome, the RNA and DNA, respectively, but both mechanisms act in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Early RNAi experiments demonstrated profound virus inhibition, but also indicated that viral escape is possible. Such therapy failure can be prevented by the design of a combinatorial RNAi attack on the virus and this gene therapy is currently being tested in a preclinical humanized mouse model. Recent CRISPR-Cas studies also document robust virus inhibition, but suggest a novel viral escape route that is induced by the cellular nonhomologous end joining DNA repair pathway, which is activated by CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA breaks. We will compare these two approaches for durable HIV-1 suppression and discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages. The potential for future clinical applications will be described.

  2. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates interfere with the HIV-1 Tat–TAR RNA interaction critical for viral replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, Michael J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat and TAR (transactivation responsive region) RNA, plays a critical role in HIV-1 transcription. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates were evaluated for their in vitro activity to inhibit Tat–TAR RNA interaction using UV melting studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and RNase A footprinting. The results demonstrate that iron(II) supramolecular helicates inhibit Tat-TAR interaction at nanomolar concentrations by binding to TAR RNA. These studies provide a new insight into the biological potential of metallosupramolecular helicates.

  3. Comparative RNA-seq analysis of the Tritrichomonas foetus PIG30/1 isolate from pigs reveals close association with Tritrichomonas foetus BP-4 isolate 'bovine genotype'.

    PubMed

    Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Mueller, Kai; Conesa, Ana; Šlapeta, Jan

    2015-09-15

    Tritrichomonas foetus was described as a commensal of the stomach, caecum and nasal cavity of pigs before it was recognised as the cause of reproductive tract disease of cattle. T. foetus also causes chronic large bowel diarrhoea in domestic cats. Multi-locus genotyping and comparative transcriptome analysis has previously revealed that T. foetus isolated from cat and cattle hosts are genetically distinct, referred to as the 'feline genotype' and 'bovine genotype', respectively. Conversely, multi-locus genotyping has grouped porcine T. foetus with the 'bovine genotype'. To compare the extent of the similarity between porcine T. foetus and cattle 'bovine genotype' isolates, RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to produce the first cell-wide transcriptome library of porcine T. foetus PIG30/1. Comparative transcriptome analysis of the PIG30/1 with the published bovine (BP-4) and feline (G10/1) transcriptomes revealed that the porcine T. foetus shares a 4.7 fold greater number of orthologous genes with the bovine T. foetus than with the feline T. foetus. Comparing transcription of the virulence factors, cysteine proteases (CP) between the three isolates, the porcine T. foetus was found to preferentially transcribe CP8 like the 'bovine genotype' T. foetus, compared to thehigh transcription of CP7 seen for 'feline genotype' T. foetus. At the cell-wide transcriptome level, the porcine T. foetus isolate (PIG30/1) groups closer with the 'bovine genotype' T. foetus rather than the 'feline genotype' T. foetus.

  4. The unique HCV genotype distribution and the discovery of a novel subtype 6u among IDUs co-infected with HIV-1 in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xueshan; Lu, Ling; Tee, Kok Keng; Zhao, Wenhua; Wu, Jianguo; Yu, Jing; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yixiong; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood; Hagedorn, Curt H; Takebe, Yutaka

    2008-07-01

    The Yunnan province is the epicenter of HIV-1 epidemics in China and a center for drug trafficking to the other parts of the world. In six prefectures of this province, a total of 132 IDUs were recruited to determine the sero-prevalence of HCV and HIV-1 and the positive rates were 93.94% and 68.18%, respectively (P<0.001). Co-infection with HCV and HIV-1 was found among 89 IDUs, of whom several HCV fragments were amplified and sequenced. Sequences of the HCV 5'NCR-C and NS5B region were determined from 82 IDUs. Phylogenetic analyses showed consistent genotyping among 80 IDUs. Among them HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6n, and a tentatively assigned novel 6u subtype were found in 1 (1.25%), 16 (20%), 19 (23.75%), 24 (30%), 4 (5%), 9 (11.25%) and 7 (8.75%) individuals, respectively. In two IDUs, genotyping results were discordant, suggesting mixed HCV infections or recombination. The proportion of patients with HCV 1b tended to decrease from the north to south and from the east to west in this province. Genotype 3 and 6 strains were more frequent in the southern prefectures. The novel subtype 6u strains were only detected in Dehong which borders Myanmar. Our findings showed a unique pattern of HCV genotype distribution, which is similar to that in the southeastern Asian countries but distinct from that among the general population in China. Routes of drug trafficking and the resulting high prevalence of HIV-1 infection may have contributed to this pattern of HCV genotype distribution.

  5. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Chen, Jianbo; Hammarskjöld, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2009-10-01

    Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  6. Residential Eviction and Risk of Detectable Plasma HIV-1 RNA Viral Load Among HIV-Positive People Who Use Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Mary Clare; Kerr, Thomas; McNeil, Ryan; Parashar, Surita; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2017-03-01

    We examined the relationship between residential eviction and exhibiting detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) among a prospective cohort of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed HIV-seropositive people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) in Vancouver, Canada. We used multivariable generalized estimating equations to estimate the effect of residential eviction on detectable VL and examine ART adherence as a mediating variable. Between June 2007 and May 2014, 705 ART-exposed participants were included in the study, among whom 500 (70.9 %) experienced at least one period of detectable VL. In a time-updated multivariable model, eviction independently increased the odds of detectable VL among those who were homeless [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.25; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.18-4.29] as well as not homeless (AOR = 1.76; 95 % CI 1.17-2.63) post eviction. The results of mediation analyses suggest that this association was mediated by incomplete ART adherence. These findings suggest the need for further development and evaluation of interventions to prevent evictions and promote ART adherence among PWUD facing eviction.

  7. Impact of aciclovir on genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA in HSV-2/HIV-1 co-infected women: a randomised placebo-controlled trial in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Delany, Sinéad; Mlaba, Nonkululeko; Clayton, Tim; Akpomiemie, Godspower; Capovilla, Alexio; Legoff, Jerome; Belec, Laurent; Stevens, Wendy; Rees, Helen; Mayaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest that herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) may enhance HIV-1 transmission and disease progression. Methods We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of aciclovir 400mg BD for 3 months in 300 HSV-2/HIV-1 co-infected women not yet on HAART. Participants were evaluated pre-randomisation and at monthly visits for 3 months. Primary outcomes were the detection and quantity of genital HIV-1 RNA at the month 3 (M3) visit. Analyses were also undertaken using data from all visits. The treatment effects on plasma HIV-1 RNA, CD4+ count and genital HSV-2 DNA were also assessed. Results At M3 fewer women has detectable genital HIV in the aciclovir group compared to placebo, but this was not significant (61/132 [46%] vs.71/137 [52%], risk ratio [RR] 0.89, 95%CI 0.70 to 1.14, p=0.36). There was also little difference in quantity of HIV-1 RNA among shedders (+0.13 log10 copies/mL, 95%CI −0.14 to 0.39) at M3. However, aciclovir significantly decreased the frequency of HIV-1 shedding over all visits (adjusted odds-ratio 0.57, 95%CI 0.36 to 0.89). Significant reductions in M3 plasma HIV-1 RNA (−0.34 log10 copies/mL 95%CI 0.15 to 0.54), genital HSV-2 DNA (8% vs. 20%, RR 0.37, 95%CI 0.19 to 0.73) and genital ulceration (8% vs. 18%, RR 0.43, 95%CI 0.22 to 0.84) were observed in the aciclovir group. Conclusion HSV-2 suppressive therapy, by reducing HIV-1 plasma viral load and altering the pattern of genital HIV-1 shedding, may contribute to the reduction in sexual transmission of HIV-1 and may delay the requirement for HAART initiation. PMID:19155993

  8. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 resides in cell nuclei in association with genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaya, A G; Vorkunova, G K; Tentsov YYu

    1992-10-01

    We have shown previously that HIV-1 matrix protein p17 is transported to the nucleus of Jurkat-tat and H9 cells soon after infection. As shown in this combination, gag polyprotein p55 synthesized 48 h after cell infection is cleaved in cytosol rapidly after its synthesis, and nascent p17 enters the nuclei and gradually accumulates there. Uncleaved p55 molecules and intermediate precursors are rapidly transported to the membranes and are also found in nuclei. Mature gag proteins are seen in membranes only after prolonged period of labelling or chase (4 or more hours later). To determine whether the nascent p17 is associated with viral genomic RNA in the nuclei, the cells were fractionated, the viral complexes were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against gag proteins, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by slot and blot hybridization. MAb against p17 precipitated all the viral RNA from the nuclei including full-size genomic RNA and essential parts from membranes while MAb against p24 did not precipitate any viral RNA from the nuclei. These data suggest that matrix protein is linked to genomic RNA in the nuclei and raise the possibility that p17 may transfer viral nucleocapsids from the nuclei to plasma membranes, the site of virus assembly.

  9. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is performed that detects the genetic material ( RNA ) of the virus. An HIV RNA test will detect HIV in most people by ... next test to perform is an HIV-1 RNA test (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT). If the ...

  10. HIV-1 Nef-associated Factor 1 Enhances Viral Production by Interacting with CRM1 to Promote Nuclear Export of Unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Hai-Bo; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Xiong, Si-Dong; Jin, Xia; Wu, Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-02-26

    HIV-1 depends on host-cell-encoded factors to complete its life cycle. A comprehensive understanding of how HIV-1 manipulates host machineries during viral infection can facilitate the identification of host targets for antiviral drugs or gene therapy. The cellular protein Naf1 (HIV-1 Nef-associated factor 1) is a CRM1-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and has been identified to regulate multiple receptor-mediated signal pathways in inflammation. The cytoplasm-located Naf1 can inhibit NF-κB activation through binding to A20, and the loss of Naf1 controlled NF-κB activation is associated with multiple autoimmune diseases. However, the effect of Naf1 on HIV-1 mRNA expression has not been characterized. In this study we found that the nucleus-located Naf1 could promote nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA. We demonstrated that the association between Naf1 and CRM1 was required for this function as the inhibition or knockdown of CRM1 expression significantly impaired Naf1-promoted HIV-1 production. The mutation of Naf1 nuclear export signals (NESs) that account for CRM1 recruitment for nuclear export decreased Naf1 function. Additionally, the mutation of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Naf1 diminished its ability to promote HIV-1 production, demonstrating that the shuttling property of Naf1 is required for this function. Our results reveal a novel role of Naf1 in enhancing HIV-1 production, and provide a potential therapeutic target for controlling HIV-1 infection.

  11. Effect of hard-drug use on CD4 cell percentage, HIV RNA level, and progression to AIDS-defining class C events among HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Lorna E; Frederick, Margaret; Pitt, Jane; Cheng, Irene; Watts, D Heather; Buschur, Shelley; Green, Karen; Zorrilla, Carmen; Landesman, Sheldon H; Hershow, Ronald C

    2004-11-01

    In vitro and animal studies suggest that cocaine and heroin increase HIV replication and suppress immune function, whereas epidemiologic studies are inconclusive regarding their effect on HIV infection progression. The authors prospectively examined the association between illicit-drug use and 4 outcome measures (CD4 cell percentage, HIV RNA level, survival to class C diagnosis of HIV infection, and death) in a national cohort of HIV-infected women. Women enrolled between 1989 and 1995 were followed for 5 years and repeatedly interviewed about illicit ("hard")--drug use. Up to 3 periodic urine screens validated self-reported use. Outcomes were compared between hard-drug users (women using cocaine, heroin, methadone, or injecting drugs) and nonusers, adjusting for age, antiretroviral therapy, number of pregnancies, smoking, and baseline CD4 cell percentage. Of 1148 women, 40% reported baseline hard-drug use during pregnancy. In multivariate analyses, hard-drug use was not associated with change in CD4 cell percentage (P = 0.84), HIV RNA level (P = 0.48), or all-cause mortality (relative hazard = 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.61-1.98). Hard-drug users did, however, exhibit a higher risk of developing class C diagnoses (relative hazard = 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.72), especially herpes, pulmonary tuberculosis, and recurrent pneumonia. Hard-drug-using women may have a higher risk for nonfatal opportunistic infections.

  12. Genetic Variation of HIV: Viral Load and Genotypic Diversity in Relation to Viral Pathogenesis and Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-20

    symptomatic man from Abidjan, C6te d’Ivoire was also studied. He was 32 years old, had lymphadenopathy, cutaneous anergy and recurrent skin abscesses, and...with HIV-1 from H9/ HTLV -IUb-infected cells. 53 vox tat tat nef LT ga C env [O]LTR vpro LJLJ 192prev reTv JL7b P01(11/ 08bo) 43bo neILTR pal~int)env

  13. Genetic Variation of HIV: Viral Load and Genotypic Diversity in Relation to Viral Pathogenesis and Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-20

    inclusion of children exposed to HIV-1 in utero and postpartum , the methodology for plasma virus cultivation, and the resultant data concerning the...discovered they did not meet entry criteria and were ineligible. There were no differences in the frequency of fever, headache or asthenia/ fatigue . However...ame drawn to scale (the bar represents K - 0.010 substitutions per site, or 1% divergence); vertical separation is for clarity only. 101 vex tZ tat net

  14. Anal human papillomavirus genotype distribution in HIV-infected men who have sex with men by geographical origin, age, and cytological status in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia; Ortiz, Marta

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients.

  15. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients. PMID:23966501

  16. The A-nucleotide preference of HIV-1 in the context of its structured RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    van Hemert, Formijn J.; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    A bipartition of HIV-1 RNA genome sequences into single- and double-stranded nucleotides is possible based on the secondary structure model of a complete 9 kb genome. Subsequent analysis revealed that the well-known lentiviral property of A-accumulation is profoundly present in single-stranded domains, yet absent in double-stranded domains. Mutational rate analysis by means of an unrestricted model of nucleotide substitution suggests the presence of an evolutionary equilibrium to preserve this biased nucleotide distribution. PMID:23235488

  17. HIV-1 RNA May Decline More Slowly in Semen than in Blood following Initiation of Efavirenz-Based Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Susan M.; Holte, Sarah E.; Dragavon, Joan A.; Ramko, Kelly M.; Mandaliya, Kishor N.; McClelland, R. Scott; Peshu, Norbert M.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Krieger, John N.; Coombs, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases HIV-1 RNA levels in semen and reduces sexual transmission from HIV-1-infected men. Our objective was to study the time course and magnitude of seminal HIV-1 RNA decay after initiation of efavirenz-based ART among 13 antiretroviral-naïve Kenyan men. Methods HIV-1 RNA was quantified (lower limit of detection, 120 copies/mL) in blood and semen at baseline and over the first month of ART. Median log10 HIV-1 RNA was compared at each time-point using Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests. Perelson’s two-phase viral decay model and nonlinear random effects were used to compare decay rates in blood and semen. Results Median baseline HIV-1 RNA was 4.40 log10 copies/mL in blood (range, 3.20–5.08 log10 copies/mL) and 3.69 log10 copies/mL in semen (range, <2.08–4.90 log10 copies/mL). The median reduction in HIV-1 RNA by day 28 was 1.90 log10 copies/mL in blood (range, 0.56–2.68 log10 copies/mL) and 1.36 log10 copies/mL in semen (range, 0–2.66 log10 copies/mL). ART led to a decrease from baseline by day 7 in blood and day 14 in semen (p = 0.005 and p = 0.006, respectively). The initial modeled decay rate was slower in semen than in blood (p = 0.06). There was no difference in second-phase decay rates between blood and semen. Conclusions Efavirenz-based ART reduced HIV-1 RNA levels more slowly in semen than in blood. Although this difference was of borderline significance in this small study, our observations suggest that there is suboptimal suppression of seminal HIV-1 RNA for some men in the early weeks of treatment. PMID:22912795

  18. Abnormalities in apolipoprotein and lipid levels in an HIV-infected Brazilian population under different treatment profiles: the relevance of apolipoprotein E genotypes and immunological status.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Abrão, Emiliana P; Mikawa, Angela Y; Landgraf, Viviane O; da Costa, Paulo I

    2004-05-01

    HIV infection is associated with disturbances in lipid metabolism due to a host's response mechanism and the current antiretroviral therapy. The pathological appearance and progression of atherosclerosis is dependent on the presence of injurious agents in the vascular endothelium and variations in different subsets of candidate genes. Therefore, the Hha I polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene was evaluated in addition to triglycerides, total cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and apolipoprotein (apo) Al, B and E levels in 86 Brazilian HIV-infected patients and 29 healthy controls. The allele frequency for apoE in the HIV-infected group and controls was in agreement with data on the Brazilian population. Dyslipidemia was observed in the HIV group and verified by increased levels of triglycerides, VLDL and apoE, and decreased levels of HDL and apoAl. The greatest abnormalities in these biochemical variables were shown in the HIV-infected individuals whose immune function was more compromised. The effect of the genetic variation at the APOE gene on biochemical variables was more pronounced in the HIV-infected individuals who carried the apoE2/3 genotype. The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART)-receiving group presented increased levels of total cholesterol and apoE. Dyslipidemia was a predictable consequence of HIV infection and the protease inhibitors intensified the increase in apoE values.

  19. HIV type 1 coreceptor tropism, CCR5 genotype, and integrase inhibitor resistance profiles in Vietnam: implications for the introduction of new antiretroviral regimens.

    PubMed

    Luu, Quynh Phuong; Dean, Jonathan; Do, Trinh Thi Diem; Carr, Michael J; Dunford, Linda; Coughlan, Suzie; Connell, Jeff; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Hall, William W; Nguyen Thi, Lan Anh

    2012-10-01

    In Vietnam, where an estimated 280,000 people will be HIV-positive by 2012, recommended antiretroviral regimens do not include more recently developed therapeutics, such as Integrase inhibitors (INI) and coreceptor antagonists. This study examined HIV-1 coreceptor tropism and INI drug resistance profiles, in parallel with CCR5 genotypes, in a cohort of 60 HIV-positive individuals from different regions of Vietnam. No evidence of INI resistance was detected. Some 40% of individuals had X4-tropic HIV-1, making them unsuitable for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. We identified a novel CCR5 variant-S272P-along with other, previously reported variants: G106R, C178R, W153C, R223Q, and S336I. Interestingly, CCR5 variants known to affect HIV-1 infectivity were observed only in individuals harboring X4-tropic virus. Together, this study presents valuable baseline information on HIV-1 INI resistance, coreceptor tropism, and CCR5 variants in HIV-positive individuals in Vietnam. This should help inform policy on the future use of novel antiretrovirals in Vietnam.

  20. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R; Heider, Dominik

    2016-04-29

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients.

  1. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y.; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R.; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  2. Targeted binding of nucleocapsid protein transforms the folding landscape of HIV-1 TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Manthei, Kelly A.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are nucleic acid chaperones that play a key role in the viral life cycle. During reverse transcription, HIV-1 NC facilitates the rearrangement of nucleic acid secondary structure, allowing the transactivation response (TAR) RNA hairpin to be transiently destabilized and annealed to a cDNA hairpin. It is not clear how NC specifically destabilizes TAR RNA but does not strongly destabilize the resulting annealed RNA–DNA hybrid structure, which must be formed for reverse transcription to continue. By combining single-molecule optical tweezers measurements with a quantitative mfold-based model, we characterize the equilibrium TAR stability and unfolding barrier for TAR RNA. Experiments show that adding NC lowers the transition state barrier height while also dramatically shifting the barrier location. Incorporating TAR destabilization by NC into the mfold-based model reveals that a subset of preferential protein binding sites is responsible for the observed changes in the unfolding landscape, including the unusual shift in the transition state. We measure the destabilization induced at these NC binding sites and find that NC preferentially targets TAR RNA by binding to specific sequence contexts that are not present on the final annealed RNA–DNA hybrid structure. Thus, specific binding alters the entire RNA unfolding landscape, resulting in the dramatic destabilization of this specific structure that is required for reverse transcription. PMID:26483503

  3. Dense genotyping of immune-related loci identifies variants associated with clearance of HPV among HIV-positive women in the HIV epidemiology research study (HERS).

    PubMed

    Sudenga, Staci L; Wiener, Howard W; King, Caroline C; Rompalo, Anne M; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Klein, Robert S; Shah, Keerti V; Sobel, Jack D; Jamieson, Denise J; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2014-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is a necessary and causal factor of cervical cancer. Most women naturally clear HPV infections; however, the biological mechanisms related to HPV pathogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. Host genetic factors that specifically regulate immune response could play an important role. All HIV-positive women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS) with a HR-HPV infection and at least one follow-up biannual visit were included in the study. Cervicovaginal lavage samples were tested for HPV using type-specific HPV hybridization assays. Type-specific HPV clearance was defined as two consecutive HPV-negative tests after a positive test. DNA from participants was genotyped for 196,524 variants within 186 known immune related loci using the custom ImmunoChip microarray. To assess the influence of each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with HR-HPV clearance, the Cox proportional hazards model with the Wei-Lin-Weissfeld approach was used, adjusting for CD4+ count, low risk HPV (LR-HPV) co-infection, and relevant confounders. Three analytical models were performed: race-specific (African Americans (n = 258), European Americans (n = 87), Hispanics (n = 55), race-adjusted combined analysis, and meta-analysis of pooled independent race-specific analyses. Women were followed for a median time of 1,617 days. Overall, three SNPs (rs1112085, rs11102637, and rs12030900) in the MAGI-3 gene and one SNP (rs8031627) in the SMAD3 gene were associated with HR-HPV clearance (p<10(-6)). A variant (rs1633038) in HLA-G were also significantly associated in African American. Results from this study support associations of immune-related genes, having potential biological mechanism, with differential cervical HR-HPV infection outcomes.

  4. Rapid and Efficient Purification of RNA-Binding Proteins: Application to HIV-1 Rev

    PubMed Central

    Marenchino, Marco; Armbruster, David W.; Hennig, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    Non-specifically bound nucleic acid contaminants are an unwanted feature of recombinant RNA-binding proteins purified from Escherichia coli (E. coli). Removal of these contaminants represents an important step for the proteins’ application in several biological assays and structural studies. The method described in this paper is a one-step protocol which is effective at removing tightly bound nucleic acids from over-expressed tagged HIV-1 Rev in E. coli. We combined affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions with subsequent on-column refolding, to prevent self-association of Rev while removing the nucleic acid contaminants from the end product. We compare this purification method with an established, multi-step protocol involving precipitation with polyethyleneimine (PEI). As our tailored protocol requires only one step to simultaneously purify tagged proteins and eliminate bound cellular RNA and DNA, it represents a substantial advantage in time, effort, and expense. PMID:18852051

  5. Circulating microRNA signature of genotype-by-age interactions in the long-lived Ames dwarf mouse.

    PubMed

    Victoria, Berta; Dhahbi, Joseph M; Nunez Lopez, Yury O; Spinel, Lina; Atamna, Hani; Spindler, Stephen R; Masternak, Michal M

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that serum levels of specific miRNAs significantly change with age. The ability of circulating sncRNAs to act as signaling molecules and regulate a broad spectrum of cellular functions implicates them as key players in the aging process. To discover circulating sncRNAs that impact aging in the long-lived Ames dwarf mice, we conducted deep sequencing of small RNAs extracted from serum of young and old mice. Our analysis showed genotype-specific changes in the circulating levels of 21 miRNAs during aging [genotype-by-age interaction (GbA)]. Genotype-by-age miRNAs showed four distinct expression patterns and significant overtargeting of transcripts involved in age-related processes. Functional enrichment analysis of putative and validated miRNA targets highlighted cellular processes such as tumor suppression, anti-inflammatory response, and modulation of Wnt, insulin, mTOR, and MAPK signaling pathways, among others. The comparative analysis of circulating GbA miRNAs in Ames mice with circulating miRNAs modulated by calorie restriction (CR) in another long-lived mouse suggests CR-like and CR-independent mechanisms contributing to longevity in the Ames mouse. In conclusion, we showed for the first time a signature of circulating miRNAs modulated by age in the long-lived Ames mouse.

  6. Humoral, Mucosal, and Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Vaccine and Nonvaccine Genotypes After Administration of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine to HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Song, Lin-Ye; Saah, Alfred; Brown, Martha; Moscicki, Anna B.; Meyer, William A.; Bryan, Janine; Levin, Myron J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To characterize the immunogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (QHPV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected children, we studied their immune responses to 3 or 4 doses. Methods. HIV-infected children aged 7–12 years with a CD4 cell percentage of ≥15% of lymphocytes, received 3 doses of QHPV with or without a fourth dose after 72 weeks. Type-specific and cross-reactive antibodies and cell-mediated immunity were measured. Results. Type-specific antibodies to HPV6, 11, and 16 were detected in 100% and ≥94% of children at 4 and 72 weeks, respectively, after the third QHPV dose. Corresponding numbers for HPV18 were 97% and 76%, respectively. A fourth QHPV dose increased seropositivity to ≥96% for all vaccine genotypes. Four weeks after the third QHPV dose, 67% of vaccinees seroconverted to HPV31, an HPV16-related genotype not in the vaccine; 69% and 39% of vaccinees developed mucosal HPV16 and 18 immunoglobulin G antibodies, respectively; and 60% and 52% of vaccinees developed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for HPV16 and 31, respectively. Conclusions. Three QHPV doses generated robust and persistent antibodies to HPV6, 11, and 16 but comparatively weaker responses to HPV18. A fourth dose increased antibodies against all vaccine genotypes in an anamnestic fashion. CTLs and mucosal antibodies against vaccine genotypes, as well as cross-reactive antibodies and CTL against nonvaccine genotypes, were detected. PMID:22859825

  7. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA.

    PubMed

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-12-08

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-Ran(GTP) nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression.

  8. Dual Mechanisms of Translation Initiation of the Full-Length HIV-1 mRNA Contribute to Gag Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Matias; Cohen, Éric A.; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The precursor group-specific antigen (pr55Gag) is central to HIV-1 assembly. Its expression alone is sufficient to assemble into virus-like particles. It also selects the genomic RNA for encapsidation and is involved in several important virus-host interactions for viral assembly and restriction, making its synthesis essential for aspects of viral replication. Here, we show that the initiation of translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is mediated through both a cap-dependent and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated mechanisms. In support of this notion, pr55Gag synthesis was maintained at 70% when cap-dependent translation initiation was blocked by the expression of eIF4G- and PABP targeting viral proteases in two in vitro systems and in HIV-1-expressing cells directly infected with poliovirus. While our data reveal that IRES-dependent translation of the viral genomic RNA ensures pr55Gag expression, the synthesis of other HIV-1 proteins, including that of pr160Gag/Pol, Vpr and Tat is suppressed early during progressive poliovirus infection. The data presented herein implies that the unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA utilizes both cap-dependent and IRES-dependent translation initiation to supply pr55Gag for virus assembly and production. PMID:23861855

  9. Yeast tRNA(Phe) expressed in human cells can be selected by HIV-1 for use as a reverse transcription primer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Nathan J; Morrow, Casey D

    2003-09-01

    All naturally occurring human immune deficiency viruses (HIV-1) select and use tRNA(Lys,3) as the primer for reverse transcription. Studies to elucidate the mechanism of tRNA selection from the intracellular milieu have been hampered due to the difficulties in manipulating the endogenous levels of tRNA(Lys,3). We have previously described a mutant HIV-1 with a primer binding site (PBS) complementary to yeast tRNA(Phe) (psHIV-Phe) that relies on transfection of yeast tRNA(Phe) for infectivity. To more accurately recapitulate the selection process, a cDNA was designed for the intracellular expression of the yeast tRNA(Phe). Increasing amounts of the plasmid encoding tRNA(Phe) resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of yeast tRNA(Phe) in the cell. The yeast tRNA(Phe) isolated from cells transfected with the cDNA for yeast tRNA(Phe), or in the cell lines expressing yeast tRNA(Phe), were aminoacylated, indicating that the expressed yeast tRNA(Phe) was incorporated into tRNA biogenesis pathways and translation. Increasing the cytoplasmic levels of tRNA(Phe) resulted in increased encapsidation of tRNA(Phe) in viruses with a PBS complementary to tRNA(Phe) (psHIV-Phe) or tRNA(Lys,3) (wild-type HIV-1). Production of infectious psHIV-Phe was dependent on the amount of cotransfected tRNA(Phe) cDNA. Increasing amounts of plasmids encoding yeast tRNA(Phe) produced an increase of infectious psHIV-Phe that plateaued at a level lower than that from the transfection of the wild-type genome, which uses tRNA(Lys,3) as the primer for reverse transcription. Cell lines were generated that expressed yeast tRNA(Phe) at levels approximately 0.1% of that for tRNA(Lys,3). Even with this reduced level of yeast tRNA(Phe), the cell lines complemented psHIV-Phe over background levels. The results of these studies demonstrate that intracellular levels of primer tRNA can have a direct effect on HIV-1 infectivity and further support the role for PBS-tRNA complementarity in the primer

  10. Pilot Study of Pioglitazone Prior to HCV Re-treatment in HIV/HCV Genotype 1-Infected Subjects with Insulin Resistance and Prior Nonresponse to Peginterferon and Ribavirin Therapy: A5239

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Kristen; Kitch, Douglas; Chung, Raymond T.; Hadigan, Colleen; Andersen, Janet; Tien, Phyllis; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Alston-Smith, Beverly; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with nonresponse to HCV treatment. In this multicenter, single-arm pilot study, adult, HIV/HCV genotype 1 coinfected prior nonresponders to peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) with homeostatic model assessment-IR >2.5 were treated with pioglitazone(PIO) for 24 weeks followed by PegIFN/RBV/PIO. 3/19 subjects (15.8%) achieved undetectable HCV RNA at week 24 of PegIFN/RBV/PIO which was not significantly different than the historical null rate of 10% (p=0.29, lower limit of the exact 1-sided 90% confidence interval 5.9%). Over the 24 weeks of PIO monotherapy, ALT and AST declined significantly and correlated with improved metabolic parameters. PMID:24525470

  11. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation.

    PubMed

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3'UTR than for the 5'UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent K(d) = 27 +/- 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5' and 3'UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5'UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes.

  12. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation

    PubMed Central

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3′UTR than for the 5′UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent Kd = 27 ± 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5′ and 3′UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5′UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes. PMID:19910370

  13. Correlation between Use of Antiretroviral Adherence Devices by HIV-infected Youth and Plasma HIV RNA and Self-reported Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Parya; Mayer, Kenneth; Vittinghoff, Eric; Naar-King, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate antiretroviral adherence device use by HIV-infected youth and assess associations of device use with viral suppression and self-reported adherence. This cross-sectional, multisite, clinic-based study included data from 1,317 HIV-infected individuals 12-24 years of age that were prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Mean adherence in the past seven days was 86.1% and 50.5% had an undetectable HIV RNA. Pillbox was the most commonly endorsed device. No specific device was independently associated with higher odds of 100% adherence. Paradoxically, having an undetectable HIV RNA was inversely associated with use of adherence devices (OR=0.80; p=0.04); however, among those with <100% adherence, higher adherence was associated with use of one or more adherence devices (coefficient=7.32; p=0.003). Our data suggest that adolescents who experienced virologic failure often used adherence devices which may not have been sufficiently effective in optimizing adherence. Therefore, other tailored adherence-enhancing methods need to be considered to maximize virologic suppression and decrease drug resistance and HIV transmission. PMID:24879628

  14. Methamphetamine inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells by modulating anti-HIV-1 miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Mantri, Jyoti V; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4(+) T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4(+) T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti-HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4(+) T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  15. Methamphetamine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Modulating Anti–HIV-1 miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Mantri, Jyoti V.; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4+ T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti–HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4+ T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:24434277

  16. HIV Viral RNA Extraction in Wax Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension (IFAST) Devices

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; LaVanway, Alex J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Guckenberger, David J.; Anderson, Meghan A.; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Beebe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of viral load is critical for proper management of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive patients. Unfortunately, in the developing world, significant economic and geographical barriers exist, limiting access to this test. The complexity of current viral load assays makes them expensive and their access limited to advanced facilities. We attempted to address these limitations by replacing conventional RNA extraction, one of the essential processes in viral load quantitation, with a simplified technique known as immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST). Furthermore, these devices were produced via the embossing of wax, enabling local populations to produce and dispose of their own devices with minimal training or infrastructure, potentially reducing the total assay cost. In addition, IFAST can be used to reduce cold chain dependence during transportation. Viral RNA extracted from raw samples stored at 37°C for 1 week exhibited nearly complete degradation. However, IFAST-purified RNA could be stored at 37°C for 1 week without significant loss. These data suggest that RNA isolated at the point of care (eg, in a rural clinic) via IFAST could be shipped to a central laboratory for quantitative RT-PCR without a cold chain. Using this technology, we have demonstrated accurate and repeatable measurements of viral load on samples with as low as 50 copies per milliliter of sample. PMID:24613822

  17. Characterization of the HIV-1 RNA associated proteome identifies Matrin 3 as a nuclear cofactor of Rev function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the fully competent replication cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced RNAs mediated by the Rev posttranscriptional activator and the Rev response element (RRE). Results Here, we introduce a novel method to explore the proteome associated with the nuclear HIV-1 RNAs. At the core of the method is the generation of cell lines harboring an integrated provirus carrying RNA binding sites for the MS2 bacteriophage protein. Flag-tagged MS2 is then used for affinity purification of the viral RNA. By this approach we found that the viral RNA is associated with the host nuclear matrix component MATR3 (Matrin 3) and that its modulation affected Rev activity. Knockdown of MATR3 suppressed Rev/RRE function in the export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs. However, MATR3 was able to associate with Rev only through the presence of RRE-containing viral RNA. Conclusions In this work, we exploited a novel proteomic method to identify MATR3 as a cellular cofactor of Rev activity. MATR3 binds viral RNA and is required for the Rev/RRE mediated nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs. PMID:21771346

  18. The Influence of Genotype and Environment on Small RNA Profiles in Grapevine Berry

    PubMed Central

    Paim Pinto, Daniela Lopes; Brancadoro, Lucio; Dal Santo, Silvia; De Lorenzis, Gabriella; Pezzotti, Mario; Meyers, Blake C.; Pè, Mario E.; Mica, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between the genetic composition and the environment is crucial for modern viticulture. We approached this issue by focusing on the small RNA transcriptome in grapevine berries of the two varieties Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese, growing in adjacent vineyards in three different environments. Four different developmental stages were studied and a total of 48 libraries of small RNAs were produced and sequenced. Using a proximity-based pipeline, we determined the general landscape of small RNAs accumulation in grapevine berries. We also investigated the presence of known and novel miRNAs and analyzed their accumulation profile. The results showed that the distribution of small RNA-producing loci is variable between the two cultivars, and that the level of variation depends on the vineyard. Differently, the profile of miRNA accumulation mainly depends on the developmental stage. The vineyard in Riccione maximizes the differences between the varieties, promoting the production of more than 1000 specific small RNA loci and modulating their expression depending on the cultivar and the maturation stage. In total, 89 known vvi-miRNAs and 33 novel vvi-miRNA candidates were identified in our samples, many of them showing the accumulation profile modulated by at least one of the factors studied. The in silico prediction of miRNA targets suggests their involvement in berry development and in secondary metabolites accumulation such as anthocyanins and polyphenols. PMID:27761135

  19. An Efficient Microarray-Based Genotyping Platform for the Identification of Drug-Resistance Mutations in Majority and Minority Subpopulations of HIV-1 Quasispecies

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Verónica; Perales, Celia; Fernández-Algar, María; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Garrido, Patricia; Pernas, María; Parro, Víctor; Moreno, Miguel; García-Pérez, Javier; Alcamí, José; Torán, José Luis; Abia, David; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The response of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies to antiretroviral therapy is influenced by the ensemble of mutants that composes the evolving population. Low-abundance subpopulations within HIV-1 quasispecies may determine the viral response to the administered drug combinations. However, routine sequencing assays available to clinical laboratories do not recognize HIV-1 minority variants representing less than 25% of the population. Although several alternative and more sensitive genotyping techniques have been developed, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, they are usually very time consuming, expensive and require highly trained personnel, thus becoming unrealistic approaches in daily clinical practice. Here we describe the development and testing of a HIV-1 genotyping DNA microarray that detects and quantifies, in majority and minority viral subpopulations, relevant mutations and amino acid insertions in 42 codons of the pol gene associated with drug- and multidrug-resistance to protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. A customized bioinformatics protocol has been implemented to analyze the microarray hybridization data by including a new normalization procedure and a stepwise filtering algorithm, which resulted in the highly accurate (96.33%) detection of positive/negative signals. This microarray has been tested with 57 subtype B HIV-1 clinical samples extracted from multi-treated patients, showing an overall identification of 95.53% and 89.24% of the queried PR and RT codons, respectively, and enough sensitivity to detect minority subpopulations representing as low as 5–10% of the total quasispecies. The developed genotyping platform represents an efficient diagnostic and prognostic tool useful to personalize antiviral treatments in clinical practice. PMID:27959928

  20. An Efficient Microarray-Based Genotyping Platform for the Identification of Drug-Resistance Mutations in Majority and Minority Subpopulations of HIV-1 Quasispecies.

    PubMed

    Martín, Verónica; Perales, Celia; Fernández-Algar, María; Dos Santos, Helena G; Garrido, Patricia; Pernas, María; Parro, Víctor; Moreno, Miguel; García-Pérez, Javier; Alcamí, José; Torán, José Luis; Abia, David; Domingo, Esteban; Briones, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The response of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies to antiretroviral therapy is influenced by the ensemble of mutants that composes the evolving population. Low-abundance subpopulations within HIV-1 quasispecies may determine the viral response to the administered drug combinations. However, routine sequencing assays available to clinical laboratories do not recognize HIV-1 minority variants representing less than 25% of the population. Although several alternative and more sensitive genotyping techniques have been developed, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, they are usually very time consuming, expensive and require highly trained personnel, thus becoming unrealistic approaches in daily clinical practice. Here we describe the development and testing of a HIV-1 genotyping DNA microarray that detects and quantifies, in majority and minority viral subpopulations, relevant mutations and amino acid insertions in 42 codons of the pol gene associated with drug- and multidrug-resistance to protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. A customized bioinformatics protocol has been implemented to analyze the microarray hybridization data by including a new normalization procedure and a stepwise filtering algorithm, which resulted in the highly accurate (96.33%) detection of positive/negative signals. This microarray has been tested with 57 subtype B HIV-1 clinical samples extracted from multi-treated patients, showing an overall identification of 95.53% and 89.24% of the queried PR and RT codons, respectively, and enough sensitivity to detect minority subpopulations representing as low as 5-10% of the total quasispecies. The developed genotyping platform represents an efficient diagnostic and prognostic tool useful to personalize antiviral treatments in clinical practice.

  1. The Cellular TAR RNA Binding Protein, TRBP, Promotes HIV-1 Replication Primarily by Inhibiting the Activation of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Kinase PKR▿

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Viraj R.; Steel, Laura F.

    2011-01-01

    The TAR RNA binding protein, TRBP, is a cellular double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein that can promote the replication of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral TAR element as well as with cellular proteins that affect the efficiency of translation of viral transcripts. The structured TAR element, present on all viral transcripts, can impede efficient translation either by sterically blocking access of translation initiation factors to the 5′-cap or by activating the dsRNA-dependent kinase, PKR. Several mechanisms by which TRBP can facilitate translation of viral transcripts have been proposed, including the binding and unwinding of TAR and the suppression of PKR activation. Further, TRBP has been identified as a cofactor of Dicer in the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs), and sequestration of TRBP by TAR in infected cells has been proposed as a viral countermeasure to potential host cell RNA interference-based antiviral activities. Here, we have addressed the relative importance of these various roles for TRBP in HIV-1 replication. Using Jurkat T cells, primary human CD4+ T cells, and additional cultured cell lines, we show that depletion of TRBP has no effect on viral replication when PKR activation is otherwise blocked. Moreover, the presence of TAR-containing mRNAs does not affect the efficacy of cellular miRNA silencing pathways. These results establish that TRBP, when expressed at physiological levels, promotes HIV-1 replication mainly by suppressing the PKR-mediated antiviral response, while its contribution to HIV-1 replication through PKR-independent pathways is minimal. PMID:21937648

  2. Differential microRNA regulation of HLA-C expression and its association with HIV control

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Smita; Savan, Ram; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Yuki, Yuko; Bass, Sara E.; Martin, Maureen P.; Hunt, Peter; Deeks, Steven G.; Telenti, Amalio; Pereyra, Florencia; Goldstein, David; Wolinsky, Steven; Walker, Bruce; Young, Howard A.; Carrington, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The HLA-C locus is distinct relative to the other classical HLA class I loci in that it has relatively limited polymorphism1, lower expression on the cell surface2,3, and more extensive ligand-receptor interactions with killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR)4. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 35Kb upstream of HLA-C (rs9264942; termed −35) associates with control of HIV5–7, and with levels of HLA-C mRNA transcripts8 and cell surface expression7, but the mechanism underlying its varied expression is unknown. We proposed that the −35 SNP is not the causal variant for differential HLA-C expression, but rather is marking another polymorphism that directly affects levels of HLA-C7. Here we show that variation within the 3′ untranslated region of HLA-C regulates binding of the microRNA Hsa-miR-148a to its target site, resulting in relatively low surface expression of alleles that bind this microRNA and high expression of HLA-C alleles that escape post-transcriptional regulation. The 3′UTR variant associates strongly with control of HIV, potentially adding to the effects of genetic variation encoding the peptide-binding region of the HLA class I loci. Variation in HLA-C expression adds another layer of diversity to this highly polymorphic locus that must be considered when deciphering the function of these molecules in health and disease. PMID:21499264

  3. The contribution of viral genotype to plasma viral set-point in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Hodcroft, Emma; Hadfield, Jarrod D; Fearnhill, Esther; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pillay, Deenan; Leigh Brown, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Disease progression in HIV-infected individuals varies greatly, and while the environmental and host factors influencing this variation have been widely investigated, the viral contribution to variation in set-point viral load, a predictor of disease progression, is less clear. Previous studies, using transmission-pairs and analysis of phylogenetic signal in small numbers of individuals, have produced a wide range of viral genetic effect estimates. Here we present a novel application of a population-scale method based in quantitative genetics to estimate the viral genetic effect on set-point viral load in the UK subtype B HIV-1 epidemic, based on a very large data set. Analyzing the initial viral load and associated pol sequence, both taken before anti-retroviral therapy, of 8,483 patients, we estimate the proportion of variance in viral load explained by viral genetic effects to be 5.7% (CI 2.8-8.6%). We also estimated the change in viral load over time due to selection on the virus and environmental effects to be a decline of 0.05 log10 copies/mL/year, in contrast to recent studies which suggested a reported small increase in viral load over the last 20 years might be due to evolutionary changes in the virus. Our results suggest that in the UK epidemic, subtype B has a small but significant viral genetic effect on viral load. By allowing the analysis of large sample sizes, we expect our approach to be applicable to the estimation of the genetic contribution to traits in many organisms.

  4. The CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype influences the development of AIDS, but not HIV susceptibility or the response to HAART

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Stanton, Jennifer; Kim, Eun - Young; Kunstman, Kevin; Phair, John; Jacobson, Lisa P; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    A selective advantage against infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS is associated with differences in the genes relevant to immunity and virus replication. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), the principal coreceptor for HIV, and its chemokine ligands, including CCL3L1, influences the CD4+ target cells susceptibility to infection. The CCL3L1 gene is in a region of segmental duplication on the q-arm of human chromosome 17. Increased numbers of CCL3L1 gene copies that affect the gene expression phenotype might have substantial protective effects. Here we show that the population-specific CCL3L1 gene copy number and the CCR5 {Delta}32 protein-inactivating deletion that categorizes the CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype do not influence HIV/AIDS susceptibility or the robustness of immune recovery after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  5. Plasma HIV-2 RNA According to CD4 Count Strata among HIV-2-Infected Adults in the IeDEA West Africa Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Ekouévi, Didier K.; Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Tchounga, Boris K.; Coffie, Patrick A.; Sawadogo, Adrien; Minta, Daouda; Minga, Albert; Eholie, Serge P.; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Damond, Florence; Dabis, François; Rouzioux, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasma HIV-1 RNA monitoring is one of the standard tests for the management of HIV-1 infection. While HIV-1 RNA can be quantified using several commercial tests, no test has been commercialized for HIV-2 RNA quantification. We studied the relationship between plasma HIV-2 viral load (VL) and CD4 count in West African patients who were either receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) or treatment-naïve. Method A cross sectional survey was conducted among HIV-2-infected individuals followed in three countries in West Africa from March to December 2012. All HIV-2 infected-patients who attended one of the participating clinics were proposed a plasma HIV-2 viral load measurement. HIV-2 RNA was quantified using the new ultrasensitive in-house real-time PCR assay with a detection threshold of 10 copies/ mL (cps/mL). Results A total of 351 HIV-2-infected individuals participated in this study, of whom 131 (37.3%) were treatment naïve and 220 (62.7%) had initiated ART. Among treatment-naïve patients, 60 (46.5%) had undetectable plasma HIV-2 viral load (<10 cps/mL), it was detectable between 10-100 cps/mL in 35.8%, between 100-1000 cps/mL in 11.7% and >1000 cps/mL in 6.0% of the patients. Most of the treatment-naïve patients (70.2%) had CD4-T cell count ≥500 cells/mm3 and 43 (46.7%) of these patients had a detectable VL (≥10 cps/mL). Among the 220 patients receiving ART, the median CD4-T cell count rose from 231 to 393 cells/mm3 (IQR [259-561]) after a median follow-up duration of 38 months and 145 (66.0%) patients had CD4-T cell count ≤ 500 cells/mm3 with a median viral load of 10 cps/mL (IQR [10-33]). Seventy five (34.0%) patients had CD4-T cell count ≥ 500 cells/mm3, among them 14 (18.7%) had a VL between 10-100 cps/mL and 2 (2.6%) had VL >100 cps/mL. Conclusion This study suggests that the combination of CD4-T cell count and ultrasensitive HIV-2 viral load quantification with a threshold of 10 cps/mL, could improve ART initiation among treatment na

  6. Epstein-Barr and cytomegalovirus DNA salivary shedding correlate with long-term plasma HIV RNA detection in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Renzo; Andreis, Samantha; Basso, Monica; Franchin, Elisa; Franzetti, Marzia; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Torti, Carlo; Mengoli, Carlo; Cruciani, Mario; Sarmati, Loredana; Palù, Giorgio; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA salivary shedding in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and to determine whether viro-immunological parameters and long-term (24 months) plasma HIV RNA (pHIV) detection may predict herpesviruses replication. A total of 193 HIV-positive MSM were consecutively recruited (mean CD4+ cell count 607 cells/mm(3) and mean nadir value 333 cells/mm(3) ); pHIV was analyzed for 24 months prior to saliva sampling: patients were categorized as successfully suppressed (SS) and not suppressed (NS). The EBV viral load was categorized as high viral load (HVL), intermediate (IVL), or low (LVL), CMV DNA as positive or negative. NS patients experienced both herpesviruses detectability more frequently respect to SS patients (P = 0.034); conversely, no salivary shedding was more frequent in SS patients (P = 0.014). HVL EBV was more frequent in NS patients than in SS subjects (P = 0.038 for isolated EBV detection and P = 0.001 when CMV shedding was associated). NS subjects with HVL EBV had a median pHIV of 43,820 copies/ml, significantly higher respect to IVL and LVL patients (P = 0.027 and P = 0.0005, respectively). CMV shedding was mostly associated to EBV shedding. NS patients showed a significantly higher frequency of saliva HVL EBV detection compared to SS patients; moreover, NS patients with HVL EBV had a higher pHIV respect to those with IVL and LVL shedding. Our results suggest that a successful pHIV suppression could reduce the burden of salivary EBV replication and likely the risk of herpesviruses-related cancers.

  7. RNA versus DNA (NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 versus Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5) for early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Kébé, K; Ndiaye, O; Ndiaye, H Diop; Mengue, P Mbakob; Guindo, P M M; Diallo, S; Léye, N; Gueye, S B; Diallo, A Gaye; Kane, C Touré; Mboup, S

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 platform (bioMérieux, France) to the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5 (Roche Molecular Systems, Switzerland) in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants using venipuncture-derived whole blood in tubes and dried blood spots. A total of 149 dried blood spots and 43 EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood samples were collected throughout Dakar and other areas in Senegal from infants and children aged 3 weeks to 24 months who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers. Samples were tested using the NucliSENS and Amplicor technologies. The NucliSENS and Amplicor results were 100% concordant using either EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood or dried blood spots. Compared to Amplicor, the sensitivity and specificity of the NucliSENS test were 100%. The NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 RNA assay performed as well as the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants. In addition, this platform can give an indication of the viral load baseline. The NucliSENS EasyQ platform is a good alternative for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection.

  8. Protection of HIV neutralizing aptamers against rectal and vaginal nucleases: implications for RNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Cookson, Jonathan; Coventry, Veronica K; Sproat, Brian; Rabe, Lorna; Cranston, Ross D; McGowan, Ian; James, William

    2011-01-28

    RNA-based drugs are an emerging class of therapeutics. They have the potential to regulate proteins, chromatin, as well as bind to specific proteins of interest in the form of aptamers. These aptamers are protected from nuclease attack by chemical modifications that enhance their stability for in vivo usage. However, nucleases are ubiquitous, and as we have yet to characterize the entire human microbiome it is likely that many nucleases are yet to be identified. Any novel, unusual enzymes present in vivo might reduce the efficacy of RNA-based therapeutics, even when they are chemically modified. We have previously identified an RNA-based aptamer capable of neutralizing a broad spectrum of clinical HIV-1 isolates and are developing it as a vaginal and rectal microbicide candidate. As a first step we addressed aptamer stability in the milieu of proteins present in these environments. Here we uncover a number of different nucleases that are able to rapidly degrade 2'-F-modified RNA. We demonstrate that the aptamer can be protected from the nuclease(s) present in the vaginal setting, without affecting its antiviral activity, by replacement of key positions with 2'-O-Me-modified nucleotides. Finally, we show that the aptamer can be protected from all nucleases present in both vaginal and rectal compartments using Zn(2+) cations. In conclusion we have derived a stable, antiviral RNA-based aptamer that could form the basis of a pre-exposure microbicide or be a valuable addition to the current tenofovir-based microbicide candidate undergoing clinical trials.

  9. Comparative evaluation of a triplex nucleic acid test for detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA, with the Procleix Tigris System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xinglong; Zhai, Jianxin; Zeng, Jinfeng; Tian, Cong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Yigang

    2013-02-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) is valuable for screening blood donors for occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and infection during the window period in countries where HBV is endemic, such as China. An "in-house" NAT (Triplex NAT) was developed for screening for HBV DNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. Using the Triplex NAT, a head-to-head comparative clinical evaluation was carried out against the most common commercial NAT used for blood screening in China: the Procleix Tigris System. A total of 33,025 specimens which were negative for Hepatitis B surface antigen, HCV antibody and HIV-1 antibody/antigen from potential blood donors were tested for HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA by both the in-house Triplex assay and the commercially available Procleix Tigris System. Eleven specimens were detected as HBV positive by both NATs. Twelve specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Procleix Ultrio assay and the discriminatory assays, and not the Triplex. Twenty-eight specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Triplex and not the Procleix Ultrio. This study, combined with other data obtained in China, suggest that at least 50% HBV surface antigen negative but DNA-positive blood donations would be undetected using the current commercial NATs because of their insufficient sensitivity and/or Mini-Pool formatting strategies.

  10. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  11. The Interaction of RNA Helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP Complex during the HIV Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP. PMID:25723178

  12. Internal translation initiation from HIV-1 transcripts is conferred by a common RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Cencic, Regina; Pelletier, Jerry; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA transcripts produces mRNAs encoding nine different viral proteins. The leader of each contains a common non-coding exon at the 5' end. Previous studies showed that the leaders from the common exon-containing transcripts gag, nef, vif, vpr and vpu can direct protein synthesis through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) with varying efficiencies. Here we explored whether the common exon acts as an IRES element in the context of all the 5' leaders or if each harbors a distinct IRES. We also explored the relationship between the IRESs and initiation codon selection. We find that the common exon adopts a similar conformation in every leader we explored and that the sequence and structure is required for IRES activity. We also find that each leader uses a scanning mechanism for start codon identification. Together, our data point to a model in which the common exon on HIV-1 transcripts acts as the ribosome landing pad, recruiting preinitiation complexes upstream of the initiation codon, followed by scanning to each transcript's initiator AUG.

  13. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem–loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR–cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59. PMID:26826129

  14. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem-loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR-cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59.

  15. Internal translation initiation from HIV-1 transcripts is conferred by a common RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Cencic, Regina; Pelletier, Jerry; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA transcripts produces mRNAs encoding nine different viral proteins. The leader of each contains a common non-coding exon at the 5' end. Previous studies showed that the leaders from the common exon-containing transcripts gag, nef, vif, vpr and vpu can direct protein synthesis through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) with varying efficiencies. Here we explored whether the common exon acts as an IRES element in the context of all the 5' leaders or if each harbors a distinct IRES. We also explored the relationship between the IRESs and initiation codon selection. We find that the common exon adopts a similar conformation in every leader we explored and that the sequence and structure is required for IRES activity. We also find that each leader uses a scanning mechanism for start codon identification. Together, our data point to a model in which the common exon on HIV-1 transcripts acts as the ribosome landing pad, recruiting preinitiation complexes upstream of the initiation codon, followed by scanning to each transcript's initiator AUG. PMID:26779399

  16. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGENT HIV, a single-stranded, positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus in the genus Lentivirus. TRANSMISSION HIV can ... be diagnosed is approximately 9 days, when HIV RNA becomes detectable in blood; however, tests needed to ...

  17. Repeated HIV-1 resistance genotyping external quality assessments improve virology laboratory performance.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Diane; Delaugerre, Constance; Masquelier, Bernard; Ruffault, Annick; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Izopet, Jacques; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Calvez, Vincent; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Costagliola, Dominique

    2006-02-01

    The performance of French virology laboratories belonging to the ANRS network has been assessed annually for 3 years. The performance of these laboratories was compared between the years 2002 and 2003. Ten and 7 coded samples were sent to 38 virology laboratories in 2002 and 45 virology laboratories in 2003, respectively. Each panel of coded samples included at least one HIV-negative control, a pair of duplicate specimens, samples with a wide range of viral loads, and samples with a large number of resistance mutations. The laboratories used their standard sequencing procedures and were asked to report the amino acids at codons associated with resistance mutations, based on the IAS-USA expert panel list. The reference amino acid sequences were defined as those most frequently reported by the participants. The specificity of detection of RT mutations was significantly better in 2003 (99.9%) than in 2002 (99.7%) (P = 0.05). There was no difference between 2002 and 2003 in the specificity of detection of protease mutations (99.6% and 99.8%) or the sensitivity of detection of RT mutations (98.8% and 98.2%). The sensitivity of detection of protease mutations improved significantly between 2002 and 2003 (97.6% and 99.0%, respectively; P = 0.037). The proportion of laboratories reporting fully accurate results, in terms of amplification, specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility, tended to increase between 2002 and 2003 (P = 0.077). No errors were made by 19% of laboratories in 2002, compared to 42% in 2003. These results show the value of repeated external quality assessments.

  18. Administration of nucleoside-modified mRNA encoding broadly neutralizing antibody protects humanized mice from HIV-1 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Pardi, Norbert; Secreto, Anthony J.; Shan, Xiaochuan; Debonera, Fotini; Glover, Joshua; Yi, Yanjie; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Ni, Houping; Mui, Barbara L.; Tam, Ying K.; Shaheen, Farida; Collman, Ronald G.; Karikó, Katalin; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn A.; Madden, Thomas D.; Hope, Michael J.; Weissman, Drew

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceutical products, however, their potential is limited by the high cost of development and manufacturing. Here we present a safe and cost-effective platform for in vivo expression of therapeutic antibodies using nucleoside-modified mRNA. To demonstrate feasibility and protective efficacy, nucleoside-modified mRNAs encoding the light and heavy chains of the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody VRC01 are generated and encapsulated into lipid nanoparticles. Systemic administration of 1.4 mg kg−1 of mRNA into mice results in ∼170 μg ml−1 VRC01 antibody concentrations in the plasma 24 h post injection. Weekly injections of 1 mg kg−1 of mRNA into immunodeficient mice maintain trough VRC01 levels above 40 μg ml−1. Most importantly, the translated antibody from a single injection of VRC01 mRNA protects humanized mice from intravenous HIV-1 challenge, demonstrating that nucleoside-modified mRNA represents a viable delivery platform for passive immunotherapy against HIV-1 with expansion to a variety of diseases. PMID:28251988

  19. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  20. Effects of diamond-FET-based RNA aptamer sensing for detection of real sample of HIV-1 Tat protein.

    PubMed

    Rahim Ruslinda, A; Tanabe, Kyosuke; Ibori, Shoji; Wang, Xianfen; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2013-02-15

    Diamond is a promising material for merging solid-state and biological systems owing to its chemical stability, low background current, wide potential window and biocompatibility. The effects of surface charge density on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Trans-activator transcription (HIV-1 Tat) protein binding have been investigated on a diamond field-effect transistor (FET) using ribonucleic acid (RNA) aptamers as a sensing element on a solid surface. A change in the gate potential of 91.6 mV was observed, whereby a shift in the negative direction was observed at a source-drain current of -8 μA in the presence of HIV-1 Tat protein bound to the RNA aptamers. Moreover, the reversible change in gate potential caused by the binding and regeneration cycles was very stable throughout cyclical detections. The stable immobilization is achieved via RNA aptamers covalently bonded to the carboxyl-terminated terephtalic acids on amine sites, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the HIV-1 Tat protein sensor. The reliable use of a real sample of HIV-1 Tat protein by an aptamer-FET was demonstrated for the first time, which showed the potential of diamond biointerfaces in clinical biosensor applications.

  1. HIV-1 and M-PMV RNA Nuclear Export Elements Program Viral Genomes for Distinct Cytoplasmic Trafficking Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Becker, Jordan T.; Swanson, Chad M.; Ahlquist, Paul; Sherer, Nathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses encode cis-acting RNA nuclear export elements that override nuclear retention of intron-containing viral mRNAs including the full-length, unspliced genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged into assembling virions. The HIV-1 Rev-response element (RRE) recruits the cellular nuclear export receptor CRM1 (also known as exportin-1/XPO1) using the viral protein Rev, while simple retroviruses encode constitutive transport elements (CTEs) that directly recruit components of the NXF1(Tap)/NXT1(p15) mRNA nuclear export machinery. How gRNA nuclear export is linked to trafficking machineries in the cytoplasm upstream of virus particle assembly is unknown. Here we used long-term (>24 h), multicolor live cell imaging to directly visualize HIV-1 gRNA nuclear export, translation, cytoplasmic trafficking, and virus particle production in single cells. We show that the HIV-1 RRE regulates unique, en masse, Rev- and CRM1-dependent “burst-like” transitions of mRNAs from the nucleus to flood the cytoplasm in a non-localized fashion. By contrast, the CTE derived from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) links gRNAs to microtubules in the cytoplasm, driving them to cluster markedly to the centrosome that forms the pericentriolar core of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). Adding each export element to selected heterologous mRNAs was sufficient to confer each distinct export behavior, as was directing Rev/CRM1 or NXF1/NXT1 transport modules to mRNAs using a site-specific RNA tethering strategy. Moreover, multiple CTEs per transcript enhanced MTOC targeting, suggesting that a cooperative mechanism links NXF1/NXT1 to microtubules. Combined, these results reveal striking, unexpected features of retroviral gRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport and demonstrate roles for mRNA export elements that extend beyond nuclear pores to impact gRNA distribution in the cytoplasm. PMID:27070420

  2. HIV-1 and M-PMV RNA Nuclear Export Elements Program Viral Genomes for Distinct Cytoplasmic Trafficking Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Ginger M; Becker, Jordan T; Swanson, Chad M; Ahlquist, Paul; Sherer, Nathan M

    2016-04-01

    Retroviruses encode cis-acting RNA nuclear export elements that override nuclear retention of intron-containing viral mRNAs including the full-length, unspliced genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged into assembling virions. The HIV-1 Rev-response element (RRE) recruits the cellular nuclear export receptor CRM1 (also known as exportin-1/XPO1) using the viral protein Rev, while simple retroviruses encode constitutive transport elements (CTEs) that directly recruit components of the NXF1(Tap)/NXT1(p15) mRNA nuclear export machinery. How gRNA nuclear export is linked to trafficking machineries in the cytoplasm upstream of virus particle assembly is unknown. Here we used long-term (>24 h), multicolor live cell imaging to directly visualize HIV-1 gRNA nuclear export, translation, cytoplasmic trafficking, and virus particle production in single cells. We show that the HIV-1 RRE regulates unique, en masse, Rev- and CRM1-dependent "burst-like" transitions of mRNAs from the nucleus to flood the cytoplasm in a non-localized fashion. By contrast, the CTE derived from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) links gRNAs to microtubules in the cytoplasm, driving them to cluster markedly to the centrosome that forms the pericentriolar core of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). Adding each export element to selected heterologous mRNAs was sufficient to confer each distinct export behavior, as was directing Rev/CRM1 or NXF1/NXT1 transport modules to mRNAs using a site-specific RNA tethering strategy. Moreover, multiple CTEs per transcript enhanced MTOC targeting, suggesting that a cooperative mechanism links NXF1/NXT1 to microtubules. Combined, these results reveal striking, unexpected features of retroviral gRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport and demonstrate roles for mRNA export elements that extend beyond nuclear pores to impact gRNA distribution in the cytoplasm.

  3. Connectivity and HIV-1 infection: role of CD4(+) T-cell counts and HIV-1 RNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Padierna-Olivos, L; Moreno-Altamirano, M M; Sánchez-Colón, S; Massó-Rojas, F; Sánchez-García, F J

    2000-12-01

    Following primary infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, antibodies against specific HIV-1 epitopes are elicited. However, non-HIV-1 specific antibodies, including autoantibodies, also arise. In fact, it has been proposed that such autoantibodies have an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Because an imbalance in connectivity has been associated with autoimmune processes, we investigated the connectivity status of HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, we tested the possible role of viral load and CD4(+) T-cell counts, in connectivity, because these parameters appear to be important in the prognosis of HIV-1 infection. Results show that indeed, there is an alteration in connectivity in these patients, both for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM, which is an immune alteration not previously identified in HIV-1 infection. In addition, our results show that viral load and CD4(+) T-cell counts are both equally important in defining the characteristic pattern of connectivity in HIV-1-infected individuals, and that neither is independently responsible for alterations in patient connectivity status.

  4. Detergent-induced activation of the hepatitis C virus genotype 1b RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Weng, Leiyun; Kohara, Michinori; Wakita, Takaji; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Toyoda, Tetsuya

    2012-04-01

    Recently, we found that sphingomyelin bound and activated hepatitis C virus (HCV) 1b RNA polymerase (RdRp), thereby recruiting the HCV replication complex into lipid raft structures. Detergents are commonly used for resolving lipids and purifying proteins, including HCV RdRp. Here, we tested the effect of detergents on HCV RdRp activity in vitro and found that non-ionic (Triton X-100, NP-40, Tween 20, Tween 80, and Brij 35) and twitterionic (CHAPS) detergents activated HCV 1b RdRps by 8-16.6 folds, but did not affect 1a or 2a RdRps. The maximum effect of these detergents was observed at around their critical micelle concentrations. On the other hand, ionic detergents (SDS and DOC) completely inactivated polymerase activity at 0.01%. In the presence of Triton X-100, HCV 1b RdRp did not form oligomers, but recruited more template RNA and increased the speed of polymerization. Comparison of polymerase and RNA-binding activity between JFH1 RdRp and Triton X-100-activated 1b RdRp indicated that monomer RdRp showed high activity because JFH1 RdRp was a monomer in physiological conditions of transcription. Besides, 502H plays a key role on oligomerization of 1b RdRp, while 2a RdRps which have the amino acid S at position 502 are monomers. This oligomer formed by 502H was disrupted both by high salt and Triton X-100. On the contrary, HCV 1b RdRp completely lost fidelity in the presence of 0.02% Triton X-100, which suggests that caution should be exercised while using Triton X-100 in anti-HCV RdRp drug screening tests.

  5. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Ryan T; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M; Higgins, Christina A; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding.

  6. CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype influences durability of immune recovery during antiretroviral therapy of HIV-1–infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Sunil K; Kulkarni, Hemant; Catano, Gabriel; Agan, Brian K; Camargo, Jose F; He, Weijing; O'Connell, Robert J; Marconi, Vincent C; Delmar, Judith; Eron, Joseph; Clark, Robert A; Frost, Simon; Martin, Jeffrey; Ahuja, Seema S; Deeks, Steven G; Little, Susan; Richman, Douglas; Hecht, Frederick M; Dolan, Matthew J

    2008-01-01

    The basis for the extensive variability seen in the reconstitution of CD4+ T cell counts in HIV-infected individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is not fully known. Here, we show that variations in CCL3L1 gene dose and CCR5 genotype, but not major histocompatibility complex HLA alleles, influence immune reconstitution, especially when HAART is initiated at <350 CD4+ T cells/mm3. The CCL3L1-CCR5 genotypes favoring CD4+ T cell recovery are similar to those that blunted CD4+ T cell depletion during the time before HAART became available (pre-HAART era), suggesting that a common CCL3L1-CCR5 genetic pathway regulates the balance between pathogenic and reparative processes from early in the disease course. Hence, CCL3L1-CCR5 variations influence HIV pathogenesis even in the presence of HAART and, therefore, may prospectively identify subjects in whom earlier initiation of therapy is more likely to mitigate immunologic failure despite viral suppression by HAART. Furthermore, as reconstitution of CD4+ cells during HAART is more sensitive to CCL3L1 dose than to CCR5 genotypes, CCL3L1 analogs might be efficacious in supporting immunological reconstitution. PMID:18376407

  7. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  9. Influence of storage temperature on the stability of HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions collected by vaginal washing.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jerome; Tanton, Clare; Lecerf, Maxime; Grésenguet, Gérard; Nzambi, Khonde; Bouhlal, Hicham; Weiss, Helen; Belec, Laurent

    2006-12-01

    Variability in the handling of samples of genital secretions prior to quantitation of HIV-1 RNA and HSV DNA may profoundly affect both the detection and quantitation of these nucleic acids. Over 144 h, we evaluated, the influence of storage temperature (4 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 30 degrees C) on the quantity of HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in HIV and HSV negative cervicovaginal lavage pools spiked with known amounts of HIV-1 and HSV-2 and in HIV-1 and HSV-2 co-infected cervicovaginal lavage pools. The level of viral nucleic acids remained stable at 4 degrees C for 24h but decreased significantly when cervicovaginal lavages were stored at 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C, demonstrating that, cervicovaginal lavages to be quantified for viral RNA or DNA require, at minimum, immediate storage at 4 degrees C.

  10. HIV-1 Recruits UPF1 but Excludes UPF2 to Promote Nucleocytoplasmic Export of the Genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Ajamian, Lara; Abel, Karen; Rao, Shringar; Vyboh, Kishanda; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Kulozik, Andreas E; Gehring, Niels H; Mouland, Andrew J

    2015-10-20

    Unspliced, genomic HIV-1 RNA (vRNA) is a component of several ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP) during the viral replication cycle. In earlier work, we demonstrated that the host upframeshift protein 1 (UPF1), a key factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), colocalized and associated to the viral structural protein Gag during viral egress. In this work, we demonstrate a new function for UPF1 in the regulation of vRNA nuclear export. OPEN ACCESS Biomolecules 2015, 5 2809 We establish that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of UPF1 is required for this function and demonstrate that UPF1 exists in two essential viral RNPs during the late phase of HIV-1 replication: the first, in a nuclear export RNP that contains Rev, CRM1, DDX3 and the nucleoporin p62, and the second, which excludes these nuclear export markers but contains Gag in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we observed that both UPF2 and the long isoform of UPF3a, UPF3aL, but not the shorter isoforms UPF3aS and UPF3b, are excluded from the UPF1-Rev-CRM1-DDX3 complex as they are negative regulators of vRNA nuclear export. In silico protein-protein docking analyses suggest that Rev binds UPF1 in a region that overlaps the UPF2 binding site, thus explaining the exclusion of this negative regulatory factor by HIV-1 that is necessary for vRNA trafficking. This work uncovers a novel and unique regulatory circuit involving several UPF proteins that ultimately regulate vRNA nuclear export and trafficking.

  11. HIV-1 Recruits UPF1 but Excludes UPF2 to Promote Nucleocytoplasmic Export of the Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ajamian, Lara; Abel, Karen; Rao, Shringar; Vyboh, Kishanda; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Gehring, Niels H.; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Unspliced, genomic HIV-1 RNA (vRNA) is a component of several ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP) during the viral replication cycle. In earlier work, we demonstrated that the host upframeshift protein 1 (UPF1), a key factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), colocalized and associated to the viral structural protein Gag during viral egress. In this work, we demonstrate a new function for UPF1 in the regulation of vRNA nuclear export. We establish that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of UPF1 is required for this function and demonstrate that UPF1 exists in two essential viral RNPs during the late phase of HIV-1 replication: the first, in a nuclear export RNP that contains Rev, CRM1, DDX3 and the nucleoporin p62, and the second, which excludes these nuclear export markers but contains Gag in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we observed that both UPF2 and the long isoform of UPF3a, UPF3aL, but not the shorter isoforms UPF3aS and UPF3b, are excluded from the UPF1-Rev-CRM1-DDX3 complex as they are negative regulators of vRNA nuclear export. In silico protein-protein docking analyses suggest that Rev binds UPF1 in a region that overlaps the UPF2 binding site, thus explaining the exclusion of this negative regulatory factor by HIV-1 that is necessary for vRNA trafficking. This work uncovers a novel and unique regulatory circuit involving several UPF proteins that ultimately regulate vRNA nuclear export and trafficking. PMID:26492277

  12. Long-term impact of acyclovir suppressive therapy on genital and plasma HIV RNA in Tanzanian women: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tanton, Clare; Weiss, Helen A; Rusizoka, Mary; LeGoff, Jerome; Changalucha, John; Baisley, Kathy; Mugeye, Kokugonza; Everett, Dean; Belec, Laurent; Clayton, Tim C.; Ross, David A.; Hayes, Richard J.; Watson-Jones, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus (HSV) suppressive therapy reduces genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA over periods up to three months but the longer-term effect is unknown. Methods 484 HIV-1 and HSV-2 seropositive Tanzanian women aged 16-35 years were enrolled in a randomised placebo-controlled trial of acyclovir 400mg bid. Cervico-vaginal lavage and blood samples were collected at 6m, 12m and 24m for quantification of genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA, and genital HSV DNA. Primary outcomes were detection and quantity of cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA at 6m. Results At 6m, there was little difference between acyclovir and placebo arms for cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA detection [88/213 (41.3%) vs. 84/191 (44.0%); odds ratio (OR)=0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI):0.60-1.33], HSV DNA detection [20/213 (9.4%) vs. 22/191 (11.5%); OR=0.80, 95%CI:0.42-1.51], genital HIV or HSV viral loads or plasma HIV-1 RNA load. Estimated median adherence was 91%. There was a suggestion of an impact on cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA detection among women with estimated adherence ≥90% (OR=0.74, 95%CI:0.50-1.09) when data from all three visits were included. Conclusions Acyclovir 400mg bid is unlikely to be a useful long-term intervention to reduce HIV transmission. The lack of effect on HIV may be due to suboptimal adherence or treatment regimen. (www.controlled-trials.com; ISRCTN35385041) PMID:20235836

  13. Mechanism of HIV-1 RNA dimerization in the central region of the genome and significance for viral evolution.

    PubMed

    Piekna-Przybylska, Dorota; Sharma, Gaurav; Bambara, Robert A

    2013-08-16

    The genome of HIV-1 consists of two identical or nearly identical RNA molecules. The RNA genomes are held in the same, parallel orientation by interactions at the dimer initiation site (DIS). Previous studies showed that in addition to interactions at DIS, sequences located 100 nucleotides downstream from the 5' splice site can dimerize in vitro through an intermolecular G-quartet structure. Here we report that the highly conserved G-rich sequence in the middle portion of the HIV-1 genome near the central polypurine tract (cPPT) dimerizes spontaneously under high ionic strength in the absence of protein. The antisense RNA does not dimerize, strongly indicating that RNA dimerization does not exclusively involve A:U and G:C base pairing. The cation-dependent reverse transcriptase pausing profile, CD spectra profile, and cation-dependent association and thermal dissociation characteristics indicate G-quartet structures. Different forms of G-quartets are formed including monomers and, significantly, intermolecular dimers. Our results indicate that RNA genome dimerization and parallel alignment initiated through interactions at DIS may be greatly expanded and stabilized by formation of an intermolecular G-quartet at a distant site near the cPPT. It is likely that formation of G-quartet structure near the cPPT in vivo keeps the RNA genomes in proximity over a long range, promoting genetic recombination in numerous hot spots.

  14. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  15. Estimation of measurement error in plasma HIV-1 RNA assays near their limit of quantification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Brumme, Chanson; Wu, Lang; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Harrigan, P. Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background Plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (pVLs), routinely used for clinical management, are influenced by measurement error (ME) due to physiologic and assay variation. Objective To assess the ME of the COBAS HIV-1 Ampliprep AMPLICOR MONITOR ultrasensitive assay version 1.5 and the COBAS Ampliprep Taqman HIV-1 assay versions 1.0 and 2.0 close to their lower limit of detection. Secondly to examine whether there was any evidence that pVL measurements closest to the lower limit of quantification, where clinical decisions are made, were susceptible to a higher degree of random noise than the remaining range. Methods We analysed longitudinal pVL of treatment-naïve patients from British Columbia, Canada, during their first six months on treatment, for time periods when each assay was uniquely available: Period 1 (Amplicor): 08/03/2000–01/02/2008; Period 2 (Taqman v1.0): 07/01/2010–07/03/2012; Period 3 (Taqman v2.0): 08/03/2012–30/06/2014. ME was estimated via generalized additive mixed effects models, adjusting for several clinical and demographic variables and follow-up time. Results The ME associated with each assay was approximately 0.5 log10 copies/mL. The number of pVL measurements, at a given pVL value, was not randomly distributed; values ≤250 copies/mL were strongly systematically overrepresented in all assays, with the prevalence decreasing monotonically as the pVL increased. Model residuals for pVL ≤250 copies/mL were approximately three times higher than that for the higher range, and pVL measurements in this range could not be modelled effectively due to considerable random noise of the data. Conclusions Although the ME was stable across assays, there is substantial increase in random noise in measuring pVL close to the lower level of detection. These findings have important clinical significance, especially in the range where key clinical decisions are made. Thus, pVL values ≤250 copies/mL should not be taken as the “truth” and repeat p

  16. Induction of HIV-1 gag specific immune responses by cationic micelles mediated delivery of gag mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengnan; Li, Man; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, mRNA-based vaccines have emerged to be a great alternative to DNA-based vaccines due to the safety of not inserting into host genome. However, mRNA molecules are single-stranded nucleic acids that are vulnerable under RNase existing in human skin and tissues. In this study, a self-assembled cationic nanomicelles based on polyethyleneimine-stearic acid (PSA) copolymer were developed to delivery HIV-1 gag encoding mRNA to dendritic cells and BALB/c mice. We evaluated the transfection efficiency and cell uptake efficiency of naked EGFP mRNA, PSA, PEI-2k and PEI-25k nanoparticles format on DC2.4 cell lines. Immune responses after sub-cutaneous administration of gag mRNA to BALB/c mice were notably induced by PSA as compared with naked gag mRNA. We found the PSA/mRNA nanomicelles were potent systems that can effectively deliver mRNA and induce antigen-specific immune response, stimulating various new vaccine strategies using mRNA.

  17. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA and RNA synthesis during primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Pantaleo, G; Butini, L; Demarest, J F; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Fauci, A S

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 replication and viral burden in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have been reported to be high in primary infection but generally very low during the prolonged period of clinical latency. It is uncertain precisely when this transition occurs during the HIV-1 infection and what the relationship is between the changes in HIV-1 replication versus the clearance of infected cells in the overall control of viral replication. In the present study, the kinetics of viral burden (i.e., frequency of HIV-1-infected cells) and replication during primary and early-chronic infection were analyzed in PBMC of four acutely infected individuals. High frequencies of HIV-1-infected cells and high levels of virus replication were observed in PBMC after primary HIV-1 infection. Down-regulation of virus replication in PBMC was observed in all four patients coincident with the emergence of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Other parameters of virus replication, such as circulating plasma p24 antigen and plasma viremia showed similar kinetics. In contrast, a significant decline in viral burden in PBMC was observed in only one of four patients. These results indicate that the down-regulation in the levels of virus replication associated with the clinical transition from acute to chronic infection does not necessarily reflect a reduction in viral burden, thus suggesting the involvement of additional factors. Identification of these factors will be important in elucidating the host mechanisms involved in the early control of HIV-1 infection and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8341646

  18. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  19. LEDGF/p75 interacts with mRNA splicing factors and targets HIV-1 integration to highly spliced genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parmit Kumar; Plumb, Matthew R; Ferris, Andrea L; Iben, James R; Wu, Xiaolin; Fadel, Hind J; Luke, Brian T; Esnault, Caroline; Poeschla, Eric M; Hughes, Stephen H; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Levin, Henry L

    2015-11-01

    The host chromatin-binding factor LEDGF/p75 interacts with HIV-1 integrase and directs integration to active transcription units. To understand how LEDGF/p75 recognizes transcription units, we sequenced 1 million HIV-1 integration sites isolated from cultured HEK293T cells. Analysis of integration sites showed that cancer genes were preferentially targeted, raising concerns about using lentivirus vectors for gene therapy. Additional analysis led to the discovery that introns and alternative splicing contributed significantly to integration site selection. These correlations were independent of transcription levels, size of transcription units, and length of the introns. Multivariate analysis with five parameters previously found to predict integration sites showed that intron density is the strongest predictor of integration density in transcription units. Analysis of previously published HIV-1 integration site data showed that integration density in transcription units in mouse embryonic fibroblasts also correlated strongly with intron number, and this correlation was absent in cells lacking LEDGF. Affinity purification showed that LEDGF/p75 is associated with a number of splicing factors, and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of HEK293T cells lacking LEDGF/p75 or the LEDGF/p75 integrase-binding domain (IBD) showed that LEDGF/p75 contributes to splicing patterns in half of the transcription units that have alternative isoforms. Thus, LEDGF/p75 interacts with splicing factors, contributes to exon choice, and directs HIV-1 integration to transcription units that are highly spliced.

  20. Genotypic prediction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism by use of plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the routine clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Paar, Christian; Geit, Maria; Stekel, Herbert; Berg, Jörg

    2011-07-01

    We developed a sequencing assay for genotypic HIV-1 tropism determination. The assay allows examination of HIV RNA from plasma and HIV DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), including PBMC samples from patients with undetectable viral loads. Assessment of 100 pairs of plasma and PBMC samples showed a high concordance of 90%. With the limitations of population-based sequencing, the assay was found to be robust and suitable for the routine clinical laboratory.

  1. The role of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 genotype and cerebrospinal fluid chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 in neurocognition among HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Thames, April D.; Briones, Marisa S.; Magpantay, Larry I.; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Singer, Elyse J.; Hinkin, Charles H.; Morgello, Susan; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Moore, David J.; Heizerling, Keith; Levine, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined interrelationships between chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) genotype and expression of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma viral load, CD4+ cell count and neurocognitive functioning among HIV-infected adults. We hypothesized that HIV-positive carriers of the ‘risk’ CCL2 −2578G allele, caused by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at rs1024611, would have a higher concentration of CCL2 in CSF, and that CSF CCL2 would be associated with both higher concentrations of other proinflammatory markers in CSF and worse neurocognitive functioning. Design A cross-sectional study of 145 HIV-infected individuals enrolled in the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium cohort for whom genotyping, CSF and neurocognitive data were available. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or frozen tissue specimens. CSF levels of CCL2, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, sIL-6Rα, sIL-2, sCD14 and B-cell activating factor were quantified. Neurocognitive functioning was measured using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Results Carriers of the CCL2 −2578G allele had a significantly higher concentration of CCL2 in CSF. CSF CCL2 level was positively and significantly associated with other CSF neuroinflammatory markers and worse cognitive functioning. There was a significant association between genotype and plasma viral load, such that carriers of the CCL2 −2578G allele with high viral load expressed greater levels of CCL2 and had higher neurocognitive deficit scores than other genotype/viral load groups. Conclusion Individuals with the CCL2 −2578G allele had higher levels of CCL2 in CSF, which was associated with increased pro-inflammatory markers in CSF and worse neurocognitive functioning. The results highlight the potential role of intermediate phenotypes in studies of

  2. Fluorescently-labeled RNA packaging into HIV-1 particles: Direct examination of infectivity across central nervous system cell types.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruqiang; El-Hage, Nazira; Dever, Seth M

    2015-11-01

    HIV penetrates the central nervous system (CNS), and although it is clear that microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes are infected, whether certain other cell types such as neurons are infected remains unclear. Here, we confirmed the finding that RNAs of both cellular and viral origins are present in native HIV-1 particles and exploited this phenomenon to directly examine HIV-1 infectivity of CNS cell types. Using in vitro transcribed mRNAs that were labeled with a fluorescent dye, we showed that these fluorescent mRNAs were packaged into HIV-1 particles by directly examining infected cells using fluorescence microscopy. Cells in culture infected with these labeled virions showed the fluorescent signals of mRNA labels by a distinct pattern of punctate, focal signals within the cells which was used to demonstrate that the CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 strain was able to enter microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes, but not neurons. The strategy used in the present study may represent a novel approach of simplicity, robustness and reliability for versatile applications in HIV studies, such as the determination of infectivity across a broad range of cell types and within sub-populations of an individual cell type by direct visualization of viral entry into cells.

  3. Early HIV RNA decay during raltegravir-containing regimens exhibits two distinct subphases (1a and 1b)

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Adriana; Guedj, Jeremie; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Lu, Darlene; Mellors, John; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Perelson, Alan S.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We analyzed the early kinetics with integrase inhibitor treatment to gain new insights into viral dynamics. Methodology We analyzed data from 39 HIV-1 infected, treatment-naïve, participants; 28 treated with raltegravir (RAL; multiple doses) monotherapy for 9 days, and 11 with RAL 400 mg BID and emtricitabine (200 mg QD)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg QD). Plasma HIV-1 RNA was measured frequently; the data was fitted using a mathematical model of viral dynamics distinguishing between infected cells with unintegrated HIV DNA and productively infected cells. Parameters were estimated using mixed-effect models. Results RAL treatment led to a biphasic viral decline with a rapid first phase (1a) lasting ~5 days followed by a slower phase (1b). Phase 1a is attributed to the rapid elimination of productively infected cells. Phase 1b reflects the loss of infected cells with non-integrated provirus due to cell loss and integration of HIV DNA. The half-life of productively infected cells and of infected cells that had completed reverse transcription but had not yet integrated HIV DNA were ~19 h and between 3.6 and 5.8 days, respectively. The effectiveness of RAL in preventing HIV-1 integration was 94% and 99.7%, for the combination therapy and monotherapy groups, respectively. Conclusion We found that the first phase of viral decay with RAL therapy was composed of 2 subphases corresponding to the half-lives of infected cells with integrated proviruses and with unintegrated HIV-1 DNA. PMID:26558541

  4. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China--Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youhua; Wen, Yan; You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China.

  5. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China—Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China. PMID:26196543

  6. Food Insecurity is Associated with Incomplete HIV RNA Suppression Among Homeless and Marginally Housed HIV-infected Individuals in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Frongillo, Edward A.; Ragland, Kathleen; Hogg, Robert S.; Riley, Elise D.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is growing international concern that food insecurity may negatively impact antiretroviral (ARV) treatment outcomes, but no studies have directly evaluated the effect of food insecurity on viral load suppression and antiretroviral adherence. We hypothesized that food insecurity would be associated with poor virologic response among homeless and marginally housed HIV-positive ARV-treated patients. Design This is a cross-sectional study. Participants and Setting Participants were ARV-treated homeless and marginally housed persons receiving adherence monitoring with unannounced pill counts in the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless (REACH) Cohort. Measurements Food insecurity was measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). The primary outcome was suppression of HIV viral RNA to <50 copies/ml. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess whether food insecurity was associated with viral suppression. Results Among 104 participants, 51% were food secure, 24% were mildly or moderately food insecure and 25% were severely food insecure. Severely food insecure participants were less likely to have adherence >=80%. In adjusted analyses, severe food insecurity was associated with a 77% lower odds of viral suppression (95% CI = 0.06–0.82) when controlling for all covariates. In analyses stratified by adherence level, severe food insecurity was associated with an 85% lower odds of viral suppression (95% CI = 0.02–0.99) among those with <=80% adherence and a 66% lower odds among those with >80% adherence (95% CI = 0.06–1.81). Conclusions Food insecurity is present in half of the HIV-positive urban poor in San Francisco, one of the best resourced settings for HIV-positive individuals in the United States, and is associated with incomplete viral suppression. These findings suggest that ensuring access to food should be an integral component of public health HIV programs serving impoverished

  7. A parallel genome-wide mRNA and microRNA profiling of the frontal cortex of HIV patients with and without HIV-associated dementia shows the role of axon guidance and downstream pathways in HIV-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is the most common dementia type in young adults less than 40 years of age. Although the neurotoxins, oxidative/metabolic stress and impaired activity of neurotrophic factors are believed to be underlying reasons for the development of HAD, the genomic basis, which ultimately defines the virus-host interaction and leads to neurologic manifestation of HIV disease is lacking. Therefore, identifying HIV fingerprints on the host gene machinery and its regulation by microRNA holds a great promise and potential for improving our understanding of HAD pathogenesis, its diagnosis and therapy. Results A parallel profiling of mRNA and miRNA of the frontal cortex autopsies from HIV positive patients with and without dementia was performed using Illumina Human-6 BeadChip and Affymetrix version 1.0 miRNA array, respectively. The gene ontology and pathway analysis of the two data sets showed high concordance between miRNA and mRNAs, revealing significant interference with the host axon guidance and its downstream signalling pathways in HAD brains. Moreover, the differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs identified in this study, in particular miR-137, 153 and 218, based on which most correlations were built cumulatively targeted neurodegeneration related pathways, implying their future potential in diagnosis, prognosis and possible therapies for HIV-mediated and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, this relationship between DE miRNAs and DE mRNAs was also reflected in correlation analysis using Bayesian networks by splitting-averaging strategy (SA-BNs), which revealed 195 statistically significant correlated miRNA-mRNA pairs according to Pearson’s correlation test (P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provides the first evidence on unambiguous support for intrinsic functional relationship between mRNA and miRNA in the context of HIV-mediated neurodegeneration, which shows that neurologic manifestation in HIV patients possibly

  8. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a combination of letters and numbers (for example, K103N) where the letters refer to the amino acid associated with the gene and the number refers to the position of the mutation in the genome . The laboratory report may also ...

  9. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping from antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve and first-line treatment failures in Djiboutian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study we report the prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistant HIV-1 genotypes of virus isolated from Djiboutian patients who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) and from ART naïve patients. Patients and methods A total of 35 blood samples from 16 patients who showed first-line ART failure (>1000 viral genome copies/ml) and 19 ART-naïve patients were collected in Djibouti from October 2009 to December 2009. Both the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified and sequenced using National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS) protocols. The Stanford HIV database algorithm was used for interpretation of resistance data and genotyping. Results Among the 16 patients with first-line ART failure, nine (56.2%) showed reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strains: two (12.5%) were resistant to nucleoside (NRTI), one (6.25%) to non-nucleoside (NNRTI) reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and six (37.5%) to both. Analysis of the DNA sequencing data indicated that the most common mutations conferring drug resistance were M184V (38%) for NRTI and K103N (25%) for NNRTI. Only NRTI primary mutations K101Q, K103N and the PI minor mutation L10V were found in ART naïve individuals. No protease inhibitor resistant strains were detected. In our study, we found no detectable resistance in ∼ 44% of all patients who experienced therapeutic failure which was explained by low compliance, co-infection with tuberculosis and malnutrition. Genotyping revealed that 65.7% of samples were infected with subtype C, 20% with CRF02_AG, 8.5% with B, 2.9% with CRF02_AG/C and 2.9% with K/C. Conclusion The results of this first study about drug resistance mutations in first-line ART failures show the importance of performing drug resistance mutation test which guides the choice of a second-line regimen. This will improve the management of HIV-infected Djiboutian patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  10. Efficient HIV-1 inhibition by a 16 nt-long RNA aptamer designed by combining in vitro selection and in silico optimisation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Luque, Francisco J.; Stich, Michael; Manrubia, Susanna; Briones, Carlos; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genome contains multiple, highly conserved structural RNA domains that play key roles in essential viral processes. Interference with the function of these RNA domains either by disrupting their structures or by blocking their interaction with viral or cellular factors may seriously compromise HIV-1 viability. RNA aptamers are amongst the most promising synthetic molecules able to interact with structural domains of viral genomes. However, aptamer shortening up to their minimal active domain is usually necessary for scaling up production, what requires very time-consuming, trial-and-error approaches. Here we report on the in vitro selection of 64 nt-long specific aptamers against the complete 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 genome, which inhibit more than 75% of HIV-1 production in a human cell line. The analysis of the selected sequences and structures allowed for the identification of a highly conserved 16 nt-long stem-loop motif containing a common 8 nt-long apical loop. Based on this result, an in silico designed 16 nt-long RNA aptamer, termed RNApt16, was synthesized, with sequence 5'-CCCCGGCAAGGAGGGG-3'. The HIV-1 inhibition efficiency of such an aptamer was close to 85%, thus constituting the shortest RNA molecule so far described that efficiently interferes with HIV-1 replication.

  11. Differences in HCV Viral Decline between Low and Standard-Dose Pegylated-Interferon-Alpha-2a with Ribavirin in HIV/HCV Genotype 3 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Lopez-Cortes, Luis F.; Camacho, Angela; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; Pineda, Juan A.; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Caruz, Antonio; Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Torre-Cisneros, Julian; Gutierrez-Valencia, Alicia; Rivero, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to analyze the different impact of standard and low-dose Peg-IFN-α2a/RBV therapies on HCV viral decline in HIV/HCV genotype 3 co-infected patients during the first weeks of treatment. Methods Plasma HCV viral decline was analyzed between baseline and weeks 1, 2 and 4 in two groups of treatment-naïve HCV genotype 3 patients with HIV co-infection. The Standard Dose Group (SDG) included patients who received Peg-IFN at 180 µg/per week with a weight-adjusted dose of ribavirin; Low-Dose Group (LDG) patients received Peg-IFN at 135 µg/per week with 800 mg/day ribavirin. The effect of IL28B genotype on HCV viral decline was evaluated in both groups. HCV viral decline was analyzed using a multivariate linear regression model. Results One hundred and six patients were included: 48 patients in the SDG and 58 in the LDG. HCV viral decline for patients in the LDG was less than for those in the SDG (week 1∶1.72±0.74 log10 IU/mL versus 1.78±0.67 log10 IU/mL, p = 0.827; week 2∶2.3±0.89 log10 IU/mL versus 3.01±1.02 log10 IU/mL, p = 0.013; week 4∶3.52±1.2 log10 IU/mL versus 4.09±1.1 log10 IU/mL, p = 0.005). The linear regression model identified the Peg-IFN/RBV dose as an independent factor for HCV viral decline at week 4. Conclusions Our results showed that HCV viral decline was less for patients in the low-dose group compared to those receiving the standard dose. Until a randomized clinical trial is conducted, clinicians should be cautious about using lower doses of Peg-IFN/RBV in HIV/HCV genotype 3 co-infected patients. PMID:23145040

  12. Comparison of Ahlstrom grade 226, Munktell TFN, and Whatman 903 filter papers for dried blood spot specimen collection and subsequent HIV-1 load and drug resistance genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Rottinghaus, Erin; Bile, Ebi; Modukanele, Mosetsanagape; Maruping, Maruping; Mine, Madisa; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected onto filter paper have eased the difficulty of blood collection in resource-limited settings. Currently, Whatman 903 (W-903) filter paper is the only filter paper that has been used for HIV load and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing. We therefore evaluated two additional commercially available filter papers, Ahlstrom grade 226 (A-226) and Munktell TFN (M-TFN), for viral load (VL) testing and HIVDR genotyping using W-903 filter paper as a comparison group. DBS specimens were generated from 344 adult patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana. The VL was measured with NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v2.0, and genotyping was performed for those specimens with a detectable VL (≥ 2.90 log(10) copies/ml) using an in-house method. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a strong concordance in quantitative VL analysis between W-903 and A-226 (bias = -0.034 ± 0.246 log(10) copies/ml [mean difference ± standard deviation]) and W-903 and M-TFN (bias = -0.028 ± 0.186 log(10) copies/ml) filter papers, while qualitative VL analysis for virological failure determination, defined as a VL of ≥ 3.00 log(10) copies/ml, showed low sensitivities for A-266 (71.54%) and M-TFN (65.71%) filter papers compared to W-903 filter paper. DBS collected on M-TFN filter paper had the highest genotyping efficiency (100%) compared to W-903 and A-226 filter papers (91.7%) and appeared more sensitive in detecting major HIVDR mutations. DBS collected on A-226 and M-TFN filter papers performed similarly to DBS collected on W-903 filter paper for quantitative VL analysis and HIVDR detection. Together, the encouraging genotyping results and the variability observed in determining virological failure from this small pilot study warrant further investigation of A-226 and M-TFN filter papers as specimen collection devices for HIVDR monitoring surveys.

  13. Super learner analysis of electronic adherence data improves viral prediction and may provide strategies for selective HIV RNA monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya L.; LeDell, Erin; Schwab, Joshua; Sarovar, Varada; Gross, Robert; Reynolds, Nancy; Haberer, Jessica E.; Goggin, Kathy; Golin, Carol; Arnsten, Julia; Rosen, Marc; Remien, Robert; Etoori, David; Wilson, Ira; Simoni, Jane M.; Erlen, Judith A.; van der Laan, Mark J.; Liu, Honghu; Bangsberg, David R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Regular HIV RNA testing for all HIV positive patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expensive and has low yield since most tests are undetectable. Selective testing of those at higher risk of failure may improve efficiency. We investigated whether a novel analysis of adherence data could correctly classify virological failure and potentially inform a selective testing strategy. Design Multisite prospective cohort consortium. Methods We evaluated longitudinal data on 1478 adult patients treated with ART and monitored using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) in 16 United States cohorts contributing to the MACH14 consortium. Since the relationship between adherence and virological failure is complex and heterogeneous, we applied a machine-learning algorithm (Super Learner) to build a model for classifying failure and evaluated its performance using cross-validation. Results Application of the Super Learner algorithm to MEMS data, combined with data on CD4+ T cell counts and ART regimen, significantly improved classification of virological failure over a single MEMS adherence measure. Area under the ROC curve, evaluated on data not used in model fitting, was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.80) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.81) for failure defined as single HIV RNA level >1000 copies/ml or >400 copies/ml, respectively. Our results suggest 25–31% of viral load tests could be avoided while maintaining sensitivity for failure detection at or above 95%, for a cost savings of $16–$29 per person-month. Conclusions Our findings provide initial proof-of-concept for the potential use of electronic medication adherence data to reduce costs through behavior-driven HIV RNA testing. PMID:25942462

  14. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology.

  15. High-specificity single-tube multiplex genotyping using Ribo-PAP PCR, tag primers, alkali cleavage of RNA/DNA chimeras and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Florence; Gelfand, David H; Gupta, Amar; Bodepudi, Veeraiah; Will, Stephen G; Bauer, Keith; Myers, Thomas W; Gut, Ivo G

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe a high-throughput, single-tube, allele-specific ribonucleotide analog pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization (ribo-PAP) PCR multiplex genotyping and resequencing method. An RNA/DNA chimeric PCR product is generated using genomic DNA as starting template, a panel of allele-selective 5'-tagged primers, a reverse primer, one nucleotide in the ribo-form (90-100%), the other nucleotides in the deoxy-form, a DNA polymerase capable of incorporating ribonucleotides, a suitable buffer and thermal cycling. The RNA/DNA chimeric PCR products are fragmented by treatment with alkali and analyzed by mass spectrometry. All allele-selective primers have a 5' repetitive motif where each repeat unit has a unique, distinct mass upon reverse copying and alkali fragmentation. The mass of the complement repeat fragment or flag identifies the primer or primers that were recruited in the ribo-PAP PCR. The method readily identifies homozygous and heterozygous positions in simplex or duplex ribo-PAP PCR. Many different tags can be analyzed simultaneously. The assay can genotype several SNPs in a single tube. It thus constitutes the simplest genotyping protocol with multiplex analysis. This novel genotyping and resequencing protocol was applied to different genomic loci: NOS1 and H19 in 30 individuals in simplex ribo-PAP PCR and at two SLCO1B1 loci in 95 individuals in duplex ribo-PAP PCR.

  16. High-risk oncogenic HPV genotype infection associates with increased immune activation and T cell exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV-1-infected women

    PubMed Central

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Surrey, Lea F.; Glencross, Deborah K.; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Omar, Tanvier; Feldman, Michael D.; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Siminya, Maureen; Swarts, Avril; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Montaner, Luis J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical disease in the context of HIV co-infection can be influenced by introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sustained immune activation despite ART. We conducted a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate immune activation/exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV+ women with or without high-risk (HR) HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). 55 South African women were recruited in three groups: HR (-) (n = 16) and HR (+) (n = 15) HPV with negative cervical histopathology, and HR (+) HPV with CIN grade 1/2/3 (n = 24). Sampling included endocervical brushing (HPV DNA genotyping), Pap smear (cytology), colposcopic punch biopsy (histopathology, histochemical evaluation of immune cells), and peripheral blood (clinical assessment, flow cytometry-based immune subset characterization). Statistics were done using R2.5.1. Irrespective of the presence of CIN, HR (+) HPV women had higher circulating levels of T cells expressing markers of activation/exhaustion (CD38, PD1, CTLA-4, BTLA, CD160), Tregs, and myeloid subsets expressing corresponding ligands (PDL1, PDL2, CD86, CD40, HVEM) than HR (-) HPV women. A decrease in circulating NK cells was associated with CIN grade. CD4+ T cell count associated negatively with T cell exhaustion and expression of negative regulators on myeloid cells. Women with CIN when compared to HR (-) HPV women, had higher cervical cell density in stroma and epithelium for CD4+, CD68+, and CD11c+ cells, and only in stroma for CD8+ cells. We conclude that in ART-suppressed HIV-infected women with HPV co-infection the levels of T and myeloid cell activation/exhaustion are associated with the presence of HR HPV genotypes. PMID:27467943

  17. HIV-1 Rev protein specifies the viral RNA export pathway by suppressing TAP/NXF1 recruitment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Mabuchi, Naoto; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear RNA export pathways in eukaryotes are often linked to the fate of a given RNA. Therefore, the choice of export pathway should be well-controlled to avoid an unfavorable effect on gene expression. Although some RNAs could be exported by more than one pathway, little is known about how the choice is regulated. This issue is highlighted when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein induces the export of singly spliced and unspliced HIV-1 transcripts. How these RNAs are exported is not well understood because such transcripts should have the possibility of utilizing CRM1-dependent export via Rev or cellular TAP/NXF1-dependent export via the transcription/export (TREX) complex, or both. Here we found that Rev suppressed TAP/NXF1-dependent export of model RNA substrates that recapitulated viral transcripts. In this effect, Rev interacted with the cap-binding complex and inhibited the recruitment of the TREX complex. Thus, Rev controls the identity of the factor occupying the cap-proximal region that determines the RNA export pathway. This ribonucleoprotein remodeling activity of Rev may favor viral gene expression.

  18. Persistent CSF but not plasma HIV RNA is associated with increased risk of new-onset moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms; a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Edward R; Crum, Rosa M; Treisman, Glenn J; Mehta, Shruti H; Clifford, David B; Ellis, Ronald J; Gelman, Benjamin B; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L; Marra, Christina M; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M; Mcarthur, Justin C

    2016-08-01

    Major depressive disorder is the most common neuropsychiatric complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. We determined if detectable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA) at threshold ≥50 copies/ml is associated with increased risk of depression. The CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort is a six-center US-based prospective cohort with bi-annual follow-up of 674 participants. We fit linear mixed models (N = 233) and discrete-time survival models (N = 154; 832 observations) to evaluate trajectories of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II scores and the incidence of new-onset moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 17) among participants on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), who were free of depression at study entry and received a minimum of three CSF examinations over 2496 person-months follow-up. Detectable CSF HIV RNA (threshold ≥50 copies/ml) at any visit was associated with a 4.7-fold increase in new-onset depression at subsequent visits adjusted for plasma HIV RNA and treatment adherence; hazard ratio (HR) = 4.76, (95 % CI 1.58-14.3); P = 0.006. Depression (BDI) scores were 2.53 points higher (95 % CI 0.47-4.60; P = 0.02) over 6 months if CSF HIV RNA was detectable at a prior study visit in fully adjusted models including age, sex, race, education, plasma HIV RNA, duration and adherence of CART, and lifetime depression diagnosis by Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) criteria. Persistent CSF but not plasma HIV RNA is associated with an increased risk for new-onset depression. Further research evaluating the role of immune activation and inflammatory markers may improve our understanding of this association.

  19. Distribution of natural resistance to NS3 protease inhibitors in hepatitis C genotype 1a separated into clades 1 and 2 and in genotype 1b of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bagaglio, S; Uberti-Foppa, C; Messina, E; Merli, M; Hasson, H; Andolina, A; Galli, A; Lazzarin, A; Morsica, G

    2016-04-01

    Naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) within the protease domain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (G) 1a separated into clades 1 and 2, and G1b were investigated in 59 HIV/HCV coinfected patients. RAVs were detected in 10/23 G1a/clade 1 and 1/19 G1b (p 0.0059). A similar frequency of RAVs was found when comparing G1a/clade 2 and G1b (p 0.1672). A cross-resistance to the macrocyclic compounds simeprevir and paritaprevir was detected in two G1a/clade 2 and 1 G1b sequences and none of G1a/clade 1 sequences. The simultaneous characterization of subtype and natural RAVs by population analysis of the NS3 domain by may add important information for anti-HCV treatment strategies including protease inhibitors.

  20. Role of the primer activation signal in tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome studied by single-molecule FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Beerens, Nancy; Jepsen, Mette D E; Nechyporuk-Zloy, Volodymyr; Krüger, Asger C; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Kjems, Jørgen; Birkedal, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNAlys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS) in the genomic RNA. An additional interaction between the tRNA molecule and the primer activation signal (PAS) is thought to regulate the initiation of reverse transcription. The mechanism of tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome was examined using ensemble and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) assays, in which fluorescent donor and acceptor molecules were covalently attached to an RNA template mimicking the PBS region. The role of the viral nucleocapsid (NC) protein in tRNA annealing was studied. Both heat annealing and NC-mediated annealing of tRNAlys3 were found to change the FRET efficiency, and thus the conformation of the HIV-1 RNA template. The results are consistent with a model for tRNA annealing that involves an interaction between the tRNAlys3 molecule and the PAS sequence in the HIV-1 genome. The NC protein may stimulate the interaction of the tRNA molecule with the PAS, thereby regulating the initiation of reverse transcription.

  1. Strategies for recognition of stem-loop RNA structures by synthetic ligands: application to the HIV-1 frameshift stimulatory sequence.

    PubMed

    Palde, Prakash B; Ofori, Leslie O; Gareiss, Peter C; Lerea, Jaclyn; Miller, Benjamin L

    2010-08-26

    Production of the Gag-Pol polyprotein in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) requires a -1 ribosomal frameshift, which is directed by a highly conserved RNA stem-loop. Building on our discovery of a set of disulfide-containing peptides that bind this RNA, we describe medicinal chemistry efforts designed to begin to understand the structure-activity relationships and RNA sequence-selectivity relationships associated with these compounds. Additionally, we have prepared analogues incorporating an olefin or saturated hydrocarbon bioisostere of the disulfide moiety, as a first step toward enhancing biostability. The olefin-containing compounds exhibit affinity comparable to the lead disulfide and, importantly, have no discernible toxicity when incubated with human fibroblasts at concentrations up to 1 mM.

  2. Mechanistic studies of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-10-13

    HIV-1 reverse transcription involves several nucleic acid rearrangements, which are catalyzed by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) DNA hairpin to a complementary TAR RNA hairpin, resulting in the formation of an extended 98-base-pair duplex, is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. To elucidate the TAR RNA/DNA annealing reaction pathway, annealing kinetics were studied systematically by gel-shift assays performed in the presence or absence of HIV-1 NC. Truncated 27 nucleotide mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs were used in this work. In the absence of NC, the annealing is slow, and involves the fast formation of an unstable extended "kissing" loop intermediate, followed by a slower strand exchange between the terminal stems. This annealing is very sensitive to loop-loop complementarity, as well as to nucleic acid concentration, ionic strength and temperature. NC stimulates the annealing approximately 5000-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate approximately 100 to 200-fold, and promoting the subsequent strand exchange reaction approximately 10 to 20-fold. NC concentration dependence studies suggest that there is a direct correlation between the amount of NC required to stabilize the intermediate and the amount needed to induce mini-TAR aggregation. Whereas saturating levels of NC are required to efficiently aggregate nucleic acids, sub-saturating NC is sufficient to significantly enhance duplex destabilization. Equilibrium levels of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing were also measured under a variety of conditions. Taken together, the results presented here provide a quantitative accounting of HIV-1 NC's aggregation and duplex destabilizing activity, and provide insights into the universal nucleic acid chaperone activity of this essential viral protein.

  3. The structure of HIV-1 genomic RNA in the gp120 gene determines a recombination hot spot in vivo.

    PubMed

    Galetto, Román; Moumen, Abdeladim; Giacomoni, Véronique; Véron, Michel; Charneau, Pierre; Negroni, Matteo

    2004-08-27

    By frequently rearranging large regions of the genome, genetic recombination is a major determinant in the plasticity of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) population. In retroviruses, recombination mostly occurs by template switching during reverse transcription. The generation of retroviral vectors provides a means to study this process after a single cycle of infection of cells in culture. Using HIV-1-derived vectors, we present here the first characterization and estimate of the strength of a recombination hot spot in HIV-1 in vivo. In the hot spot region, located within the C2 portion of the gp120 envelope gene, the rate of recombination is up to ten times higher than in the surrounding regions. The hot region corresponds to a previously identified RNA hairpin structure. Although recombination breakpoints in vivo cluster in the top portion of the hairpin, the bias for template switching in this same region appears less marked in a cell-free system. By modulating the stability of this hairpin we were able to affect the local recombination rate both in vitro and in infected cells, indicating that the local folding of the genomic RNA is a major parameter in the recombination process. This characterization of reverse transcription products generated after a single cycle of infection provides insights in the understanding of the mechanism of recombination in vivo and suggests that specific regions of the genome might be prompted to yield different rates of evolution due to the presence of circumscribed recombination hot spots.

  4. Duplex structural differences and not 2'-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA.

    PubMed

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T; DeStefano, Jeffrey J

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3' recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA-DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA-DNA. Replacing 2'- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2'-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hydroxyls and RT amino acids do not stabilize binding. RT's K(d) (k(off)/k(on)) for DNA-DNA and RNA-DNA were similar, although k(off) differed almost 40-fold, suggesting a faster k(on) for DNA-DNA. Avian myeloblastosis and Moloney murine leukemia virus RTs also bound more stably to RNA-DNA, but the difference was less pronounced than with HIV-RT. We propose that the H- versus B-form structures of RNA-DNA and DNA-DNA, respectively, allow the former to conform more easily to HIV-RT's binding cleft, leading to more stable binding. Biologically, the ability of RT to form a more stable complex on RNA-DNA may aid in degradation of RNA fragments that remain after DNA synthesis.

  5. Identification of Genetic Variation between Obligate Plant Pathogens Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli Using RNA Sequencing and Genotyping-By-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Summers, Carly F; Gulliford, Colwyn M; Carlson, Craig H; Lillis, Jacquelyn A; Carlson, Maryn O; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Gent, David H; Smart, Christine D

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification from two economically important obligate plant pathogens, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli. Twenty isolates of P. cubensis and 19 isolates of P. humuli were genotyped using RNA-seq and GBS. Principle components analysis (PCA) of each data set showed genetic separation between the two species. Additionally, results supported previous findings that P. cubensis isolates from squash are genetically distinct from cucumber and cantaloupe isolates. A PCA-based procedure was used to identify SNPs correlated with the separation of the two species, with 994 and 4,231 PCA-correlated SNPs found within the RNA-seq and GBS data, respectively. The corresponding unigenes (n = 800) containing these potential species-specific SNPs were then annotated and 135 putative pathogenicity genes, including 3 effectors, were identified. The characterization of genes containing SNPs differentiating these two closely related downy mildew species may contribute to the development of improved detection and diagnosis strategies and improve our understanding of host specificity pathways.

  6. Identification of Genetic Variation between Obligate Plant Pathogens Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli Using RNA Sequencing and Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Carly F.; Gulliford, Colwyn M.; Carlson, Craig H.; Lillis, Jacquelyn A.; Carlson, Maryn O.; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Gent, David H.; Smart, Christine D.

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification from two economically important obligate plant pathogens, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli. Twenty isolates of P. cubensis and 19 isolates of P. humuli were genotyped using RNA-seq and GBS. Principle components analysis (PCA) of each data set showed genetic separation between the two species. Additionally, results supported previous findings that P. cubensis isolates from squash are genetically distinct from cucumber and cantaloupe isolates. A PCA-based procedure was used to identify SNPs correlated with the separation of the two species, with 994 and 4,231 PCA-correlated SNPs found within the RNA-seq and GBS data, respectively. The corresponding unigenes (n = 800) containing these potential species-specific SNPs were then annotated and 135 putative pathogenicity genes, including 3 effectors, were identified. The characterization of genes containing SNPs differentiating these two closely related downy mildew species may contribute to the development of improved detection and diagnosis strategies and improve our understanding of host specificity pathways. PMID:26599440

  7. High levels of virological failure with major genotypic resistance mutations in HIV-1-infected children after 5 years of care according to WHO-recommended 1st-line and 2nd-line antiretroviral regimens in the Central African Republic: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mossoro-Kpinde, Christian Diamant; Gody, Jean-Chrysostome; Mboumba Bouassa, Ralph-Sydney; Mbitikon, Olivia; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Robin, Leman; Matta, Mathieu; Zeitouni, Kamal; Longo, Jean De Dieu; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Grésenguet, Gérard; Touré Kane, Ndèye Coumba; Bélec, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    A large cohort of 220 HIV-1-infected children (median [range] age: 12 [4-17] years) was cared and followed up in the Central African Republic, including 198 in 1st-line and 22 in 2nd-line antiretroviral regimens. Patients were monitored clinically and biologically for HIV-1 RNA load and drug resistance mutations (DRMs) genotyping. A total of 87 (40%) study children were virological responders and 133 (60%) nonresponders. In children with detectable viral load, the majority (129; 97%) represented a virological failure. In children receiving 1st-line regimens in virological failure for whom genotypic resistance test was available, 45% displayed viruses harboring at least 1 DRM to NNRTI or NRTI, and 26% showed at least 1 major DRM to NNRTI or NRTI; more than half of children in 1st-line regimens were resistant to 1st-generation NNRTI and 24% of the children in 1st-line regimens had a major DRMs to PI. Virological failure and selection of DRMs were both associated with poor adherence. These observations demonstrate high rate of virological failure after 3 to 5 years of 1st-line or 2nd-line antiretroviral treatment, which is generally associated with DRMs and therapeutic failure. Overall, more than half (55%) of children receiving 1st-line antiretroviral treatment for a median of 3.4 years showed virological failure and antiretroviral-resistance and thus eligible to 2nd-line treatment. Furthermore, two-third (64%) of children under 2nd-line therapy were eligible to 3rd-line regimen. Taken together, these observations point the necessity to monitor antiretroviral-treated children by plasma HIV-1 RNA load to diagnose as early as possible the therapeutic failure and operate switch to a new therapeutic line.

  8. High levels of virological failure with major genotypic resistance mutations in HIV-1-infected children after 5 years of care according to WHO-recommended 1st-line and 2nd-line antiretroviral regimens in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Mossoro-Kpinde, Christian Diamant; Gody, Jean-Chrysostome; Mboumba Bouassa, Ralph-Sydney; Mbitikon, Olivia; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Robin, Leman; Matta, Mathieu; Zeitouni, Kamal; Longo, Jean De Dieu; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Grésenguet, Gérard; Touré Kane, Ndèye Coumba; Bélec, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A large cohort of 220 HIV-1-infected children (median [range] age: 12 [4–17] years) was cared and followed up in the Central African Republic, including 198 in 1st-line and 22 in 2nd-line antiretroviral regimens. Patients were monitored clinically and biologically for HIV-1 RNA load and drug resistance mutations (DRMs) genotyping. A total of 87 (40%) study children were virological responders and 133 (60%) nonresponders. In children with detectable viral load, the majority (129; 97%) represented a virological failure. In children receiving 1st-line regimens in virological failure for whom genotypic resistance test was available, 45% displayed viruses harboring at least 1 DRM to NNRTI or NRTI, and 26% showed at least 1 major DRM to NNRTI or NRTI; more than half of children in 1st-line regimens were resistant to 1st-generation NNRTI and 24% of the children in 1st-line regimens had a major DRMs to PI. Virological failure and selection of DRMs were both associated with poor adherence. These observations demonstrate high rate of virological failure after 3 to 5 years of 1st-line or 2nd-line antiretroviral treatment, which is generally associated with DRMs and therapeutic failure. Overall, more than half (55%) of children receiving 1st-line antiretroviral treatment for a median of 3.4 years showed virological failure and antiretroviral-resistance and thus eligible to 2nd-line treatment. Furthermore, two-third (64%) of children under 2nd-line therapy were eligible to 3rd-line regimen. Taken together, these observations point the necessity to monitor antiretroviral-treated children by plasma HIV-1 RNA load to diagnose as early as possible the therapeutic failure and operate switch to a new therapeutic line. PMID:28272247

  9. Changes in HIV-1 Subtypes B and C Genital Tract RNA in Women and Men After Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fiscus, Susan A.; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Eshete, Abel Tilahun; Hughes, Michael D.; Bao, Yajing; Hosseinipour, Mina; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W.; Braun, Ken; Moran, Laura; Hakim, James; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, N.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Klingman, Karin L.; Nair, Apsara; Walawander, Ann; Smeaton, Laura M.; De Gruttola, Victor; Martinez, Ana I.; Swann, Edith; Barnett, Ronald L.; Brizz, Barbara; Delph, Yvette; Gettinger, Nikki; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Eshleman, Susan; Safren, Steven; Andrade, Adriana; Haas, David W.; Amod, Farida; Berthaud, Vladimir; Bollinger, Robert C.; Bryson, Yvonne; Celentano, David; Chilongozi, David; Cohen, Myron; Collier, Ann C.; Currier, Judith Silverstein; Eron, Joseph; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Flexner, Charles; Gallant, Joel E.; Gulick, Roy M.; Hammer, Scott M.; Hoffman, Irving; Kazembe, Peter; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Kumwenda, Newton; Lama, Javier R.; Lawrence, Jody; Maponga, Chiedza; Martinson, Francis; Mayer, Kenneth; Nielsen, Karin; Pendame, Richard B.; Ramratnam, Bharat; Rooney, James F.; Sanchez, Jorge; Sanne, Ian; Schooley, Robert T.; Snowden, Wendy; Solomon, Suniti; Tabet, Steve; Taha, Taha; Uy, Jonathan; van der Horst, Charles; Wanke, Christine; Gormley, Joan; Marcus, Cheryl J.; Putnam, Beverly; Ntshele, Smanga; Loeliger, Edde; Pappa, Keith A.; Webb, Nancy; Shugarts, David L.; Winters, Mark A.; Descallar, Renard S.; Sharma, Jabin; Poongulali, S.; Cardoso, Sandra Wagner; Faria, Deise Lucia; Berendes, Sima; Burke, Kelly; Kanyama, Cecelia; Kayoyo, Virginia; Samaneka, Wadzanai P.; Chisada, Anthony; Santos, Breno; La Rosa, Alberto; Infante, Rosa; Balfour, Henry H.; Mullan, Beth; Kim, Ge-Youl; Klebert, Michael K.; Mildvan, Donna; Revuelta, Manuel; Jan Geiseler, P.; Santos, Bartolo; Daar, Eric S.; Lopez, Ruben; Frarey, Laurie; Currin, David; Haas, David H.; Bailey, Vicki L.; Tebas, Pablo; Zifchak, Larisa; Sha, Beverly E.; Fritsche, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) reduces genital tract human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) load and reduces the risk of sexual transmission, but little is known about the efficacy of cART for decreasing genital tract viral load (GTVL) and differences in sex or HIV-1 subtype. Methods. HIV-1 RNA from blood plasma, seminal plasma, or cervical wicks was quantified at baseline and at weeks 48 and 96 after entry in a randomized clinical trial of 3 cART regimens. Results. One hundred fifty-eight men and 170 women from 7 countries were studied (men: 55% subtype B and 45% subtype C; women: 24% subtype B and 76% subtype C). Despite similar baseline CD4+ cell counts and blood plasma viral loads, women with subtype C had the highest GTVL (median, 5.1 log10 copies/mL) compared to women with subtype B and men with subtype C or B (4.0, 4.0, and 3.8 log10 copies/mL, respectively; P < .001). The proportion of participants with a GTVL below the lower limit of quantification (LLQ) at week 48 (90%) and week 96 (90%) was increased compared to baseline (16%; P < .001 at both times). Women were significantly less likely to have GTVL below the LLQ compared to men (84% vs 94% at week 48, P = .006; 84% vs 97% at week 96, P = .002), despite a more sensitive assay for seminal plasma than for cervical wicks. No difference in GTVL response across the 3 cART regimens was detected. Conclusions. The female genital tract may serve as a reservoir of persistent HIV-1 replication during cART and affect the use of cART to prevent sexual and perinatal transmission of HIV-1. PMID:23532477

  10. Characterization of Giardia lamblia genotypes in dogs from Tucson, Arizona using SSU-rRNA and β-giardin sequences.

    PubMed

    Johansen, K M; Castro, N S; Lancaster, K E; Madrid, E; Havas, A; Simms, J; Sterling, C R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if human genotypes of Giardia lamblia could be found in canine companion animals from urban and peri-urban environments in Tucson, Arizona. Canine fecal samples collected from the Humane Society of Southern Arizona between July 2006 and April 2009 were screened for G. lamblia infection using immunofluorescent microscopy and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 672 samples screened, 196 were found positive by IFA and 185 of those positive were successfully amplified through PCR. Sequencing analysis showed samples were primarily of the C or D genotypes (n =154), or showing a mix of the C and D genotypes (n =10). One sample showed a mixed infection of a human genotype (A) and a dog-specific genotype (C). These data are consistent with previous studies showing dog specific genotypes to be dominant in environments where dog-to-dog transmission is likely to occur, and provides further evidence that multiple genes should be targeted for more accurate genotype characterization.

  11. ASSESEMENT OF THE SEVERITY OF IMMUNODEFICIENCY IN PATIENTS OF ASIAN ETHNICITY WITH HIV/HCV CO-INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Begaidarova, R; Asenova, L; Alshynbekova, G; Devdariani, Kh; Dyusembaeva, A; Starikov, Y; Zolotareva, O

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the HIV RNA viral load and CD4+ cell count to assess the severity of immune deficiency in patients of Asian ethnicity with HIV/HCV co-infection by different HCV genotypes. 181 HIV-infected patients of Asian ethnicity were studied from several regions of Kazakhstan, predominantly from Karaganda region, including prisons. The diagnosis of HIV infection was confirmed by immunoblotting after a positive ELISA screening test. The patient data for analysis were extracted from the patients' medical charts. Analysis of peripheral blood and urine, blood biochemistry tests were performed for each patient. The flow cytometry was used to determine the CD3, CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the whole blood. Detection and quantification of HCV RNA in clinical samples of serum or plasma was performed by reverse transcription of viral RNA followed by amplification using DNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) with hybridization-fluorescence detection of PCR products in real-time. Statistical analysis was performed using STATISTICA software package. Student's t test was used to evaluate the differences between the means. HCV antibodies were detected in 73 patients out of 181. HCV genotyping showed presence of first genotype in 18 (24.7%), genotype 2 in 19 (26.0%) and genotype 3 in 36 (49.3%) patients. The third genotype was the most prevalent according to our study. More severe immunosuppression was observed in patients with HCV genotypes 1 and 3 in comparison with those with HCV genotype 2. HCV infection is a negative risk-factor in the course of HIV infection, accelerating the decrease of CD4+ cells. The greatest risk of progression of HIV infection to AIDS occurs in the presence of HCV genotype 1 and 3 which can be explained by more aggressive course of the disease and a poorer prognosis in comparison with the infection with genotype 2.

  12. Relationship between innate immunity, soluble markers and metabolic-clinical parameters in HIV+ patients ART treated with HIV-RNA<50 cp/mL

    PubMed Central

    Dentone, Chiara; Fenoglio, Daniela; Signori, Alessio; Cenderello, Giovanni; Parodi, Alessia; Bozzano, Federica; Guerra, Michele; De Leo, Pasqualina; Bartolacci, Valentina; Mantia, Eugenio; Orofino, Giancarlo; Kalli, Francesca; Marras, Francesco; Fraccaro, Paolo; Giacomini, Mauro; Cassola, Giovanni; Bruzzone, Bianca; Ferrea, Giuseppe; Viscoli, Claudio; Filaci, Gilberto; De Maria, Andrea; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of immune activation and inflammation in HIV patients with HIV-RNA (VL) undetectable causes many co-morbidities [1–3]. The aim of this study is to correlate monocytes (m) and NK cell activation levels, soluble markers and oxidative stress with clinical, biochemical and metabolic data in HIV-1 infected patients with VL≤50 copies (cp)/mL on antiretroviral therapy. Materials and Methods Multicentre, cross-sectional study in patients with VL≤50 cp/mL and on antiretroviral therapy by at least six months. We studied: activation/homing markers (CD38, HLA-DR, CCR-2, PDL-1) on inflammatory, intermediate, proinflammatory m; activatory receptors NKp30, NKp46 and HLA-DR on NK cells; soluble inflammatory (sCD14, adiponectina, MCP-1) and stress oxidative markers (dRoms, antiRoms). Univariate analyses are performed with non-parametric and Pearson tests. The significant correlations were adjusted for possible known confounding factors (smoking, Cytomegalovirus IgG serology, Raltegravir, Protease Inhibitor [PI] therapy and HCV-RNA) with multivariate analysis. Results In the 68 patients the positive correlation between age and antiRoms was significant also after adjustment for PI use (p=0.05). The% CD8+T was associated with% proinflammatory m (p=0.043) and with their expression of CCR2 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) (p=0.012). The% NKp46+ was positively correlated with CD4+T count (p=0.001). The fibrinogen was positively associated with dRoms (p=0.052) and the positive correlation between triglycerides and antiRoms has been confirmed (p<0.001); the impact of antiRoms on HDL/triglycerides ratio (p=0.006) was observed after adjustment for PI use. The BMI was associated with smoking (p=0.011). Only the maraviroc-treated patients showed minimal arterial pressure, fibrinogen and antiRoms lower (p=0.001, 0.004 e 0.006) and sCD14 values higher (p=0.029). Conclusions Patients with long history of HIV infection and stable immunological and virological

  13. A short sequence motif in the 5' leader of the HIV-1 genome modulates extended RNA dimer formation and virus replication.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E M; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-12-19

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication.

  14. H2 genotypes of G4P[6], G5P[7], and G9[23] porcine rotaviruses show super-short RNA electropherotypes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Makoto; Shimada, Saya; Fujii, Yoshiki; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Oba, Mami; Katayama, Yukie; Tsuchiaka, Shinobu; Okazaki, Sachiko; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Furuya, Tetsuya; Koyama, Satoshi; Shirai, Junsuke; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2015-04-17

    During group A rotavirus (RVA) surveillance of pig farms in Japan, we detected three RVA strains (G4P[6], G5P[7], and G9P[23] genotypes), which showed super-short RNA patterns by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in samples from a healthy eight-day-old pig and two pigs of seven and eight days old with diarrhea from three farms. Reverse transcription PCR and sequencing revealed that the full-length NSP5 gene of these strains contained 952 or 945 nucleotides, which is consistent with their super-short electropherotypes. Due to a lack of whole genome data on Japanese porcine RVAs, we performed whole genomic analyses of the three strains. The genomic segments of these RVA strains showed typical porcine RVA constellations, except for H2 NSP5 genotype, (G4,5,9-P[6,7,23]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H2 representing VP7-VP4-VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5 genes). In phylogenetic analyses, these porcine RVA strains clustered with porcine and porcine-like human RVA strains and showed a typical porcine RVA backbone, except for the NSP5 gene; however, intra-genotype reassortment events among porcine and porcine-like human RVA strains were observed. The NSP5 gene segments of these strains were clustered within the H2b genotype with super-short human RVA strains. The H2 genotype has to date only been identified in human and lapine RVA strains. Thus, to our knowledge, this report presents the first case of H2 NSP5 genotype showing a super-short RNA pattern in porcine RVA. These data suggest the possibility of interspecies transmission between pigs and humans and imply that super-short porcine RVA strains possessing H2 genotype are circulating among both asymptomatic and diarrheic porcine populations in Japan.

  15. [The HIV-infection outbreak in the town Lys'va (Perm region): homozygote genotype CCR5 delta32/CCR5 delta32 provides the high level of the persistence in the parenteral transmission of the virus].

    PubMed

    Riabov, G S; Kazennova, E V; Korepanova, L B; Mal'tseva, E A; Zhalnin, V V; Krasnikova, L A; Zverev, S Ia; Pokrovskiĭ, V V; Bobkov, A F; Weber, J N

    2002-01-01

    Specific features of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission among injecting drug users were studied on HIV infection outbreak in Lysva, the Perm region. During the period from November 1998 to March 2000, 32 injecting drug users infected with the subtype A HIV-1 variant originating from the same source, were found in this town. To understand the role of the CCR5 delta 32 mutation in parenteral transmission of HIV-1 the distribution of the mutant CCR5 delta 32 allele in HIV-infected and in non-infected but HIV-exposed drug users (n = 74) was analysed. The percentage of the homozygous CCR5 delta 32 genotype among HIV-exposed individuals (4/74, 5.4%) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the analogous rate for healthy blood donors in Russia (1/163, 0.6%). Thus, the homozygosity for this mutant allele confers a high resistance level to HIV even in parenteral transmission.

  16. Simultaneous recognition of HIV-1 TAR RNA bulge and loop sequences by cyclic peptide mimics of Tat protein

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Amy; Leeper, Thomas C.; Athanassiou, Zafiria; Patora-Komisarska, Krystyna; Karn, Jonathan; Robinson, John A.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-07-21

    The interaction of the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat with its transactivation response (TAR) RNA is an essential step in viral replication and therefore an attractive target for developing antivirals with new mechanisms of action. Numerous compounds that bind to the 3-nt bulge responsible for binding Tat have been identified in the past, but none of these molecules had sufficient potency to warrant pharmaceutical development. We have discovered conformationally-constrained cyclic peptide mimetics of Tat that are specific nM inhibitors of the Tat-TAR interaction by using a structure-based approach. The lead peptides are nearly as active as the antiviral drug nevirapine against a variety of clinical isolates in human lymphocytes. The NMR structure of a peptide–RNA complex reveals that these molecules interfere with the recruitment to TAR of both Tat and the essential cellular cofactor transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) by binding simultaneously at the RNA bulge and apical loop, forming an unusually deep pocket. This structure illustrates additional principles in RNA recognition: RNA-binding molecules can achieve specificity by interacting simultaneously with multiple secondary structure elements and by inducing the formation of deep binding pockets in their targets. It also provides insight into the P-TEFb binding site and a rational basis for optimizing the promising antiviral activity observed for these cyclic peptides.

  17. Associations of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes with high-grade cervical neoplasia (CIN2+) in a cohort of women living with HIV in Burkina Faso and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe associations of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in women living with HIV (WLHIV) in Burkina Faso (BF) and South Africa (SA). Methods Prospective cohort of WLHIV attending HIV outpatient clinics and treatment centres. Recruitment was stratified by ART status. Cervical HPV genotyping using INNO-LiPA and histological assessment of 4-quadrant cervical biopsies at enrolment and 16 months later. Results Among women with CIN2+ at baseline, the prevalence of any HR-HPV genotypes included in the bi/quadrivalent (HPV16/18) or nonavalent (HPV16/18/31/35/45/52/58) HPV vaccines ranged from 37% to 90%. HPV58 was most strongly associated with CIN2+ (aOR = 5.40, 95%CI: 2.77–10.53). At 16-months follow-up, persistence of any HR-HPV was strongly associated with incident CIN2+ (aOR = 7.90, 95%CI: 3.11–20.07), as was persistence of HPV16/18 (aOR = 5.25, 95%CI: 2.14–12.91) and the additional HR types in the nonavalent vaccine (aOR = 3.23, 95%CI: 1.23–8.54). Conclusion HR-HPV persistence is very common among African WLHIV and is linked to incident CIN2+. HPV vaccines could prevent between 37–90% of CIN2+ among African WLHIV. PMID:28333966

  18. The Magnitude and Kinetics of the Mucosal HIV-Specific CD8+ T Lymphocyte Response and Virus RNA Load in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Kang, Helen H.; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Stacey, Andrea R.; Lovingood, Rachel V.; Denny, Thomas N.; Kalilani, Linda; Bunn, James E. G.; Meshnick, Steve R.; Borrow, Persephone; Letvin, Norman L.; Permar, Sallie R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk of postnatal HIV transmission is associated with the magnitude of the milk virus load. While HIV-specific cellular immune responses control systemic virus load and are detectable in milk, the contribution of these responses to the control of virus load in milk is unknown. Methods We assessed the magnitude of the immunodominant GagRY11 and subdominant EnvKY9-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte response in blood and milk of 10 A*3002+, HIV-infected Malawian women throughout the period of lactation and correlated this response to milk virus RNA load and markers of breast inflammation. Results The magnitude and kinetics of the HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses were discordant in blood and milk of the right and left breast, indicating independent regulation of these responses in each breast. However, there was no correlation between the magnitude of the HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte response and the milk virus RNA load. Further, there was no correlation between the magnitude of this response and markers of breast inflammation. Conclusions The magnitude of the HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte response in milk does not appear to be solely determined by the milk virus RNA load and is likely only one of the factors contributing to maintenance of low virus load in milk. PMID:21886819

  19. Long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication with RNA interference against cellular co-factors.

    PubMed

    Eekels, Julia J M; Geerts, Dirk; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2011-01-01

    In this study we tested whether HIV-1 replication could be inhibited by stable RNAi-mediated knockdown of cellular co-factors. Cell lines capable of expressing shRNAs against 30 candidate co-factors implicated at different steps of the viral replication cycle were generated and analyzed for effects on cell viability and inhibition of HIV-1 replication. For half of these candidate co-factors we obtained knockdown cell lines that are less susceptible to virus replication. For three co-factors (ALIX, ATG16 and TRBP) the cell lines were resistant to HIV-1 replication for up to 2 months. With these cells we could test the hypothesis that HIV-1 is not able to escape from RNAi-mediated suppression of cellular co-factors, which was indeed not detected.

  20. Validation of the Gen-Probe Aptima qualitative HIV-1 RNA assay for diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus infection in infants.

    PubMed

    Fiscus, Susan A; McMillion, Takesha; Nelson, Julie A E; Miller, William C

    2013-12-01

    The qualitative Roche HIV-1 DNA Amplicor assay has been used for the past 20 years to diagnose HIV infection in infants and young children but is being phased out; hence, alternative assays must be found. The Gen-Probe Aptima qualitative HIV-1 RNA assay is currently the only FDA-cleared HIV-1 nucleic acid assay approved for diagnosis, but data on the use of this assay with infant plasma are limited. We assessed Aptima's performance using control material for reproducibility and limit of detection and 394 plasma samples (0.2 to 0.5 ml) from HIV-exposed infected and uninfected infants and children for analytical sensitivity and specificity. Assays to assess within-run repeatability and between-run reproducibility indicated that the controls with 10,000 (5 of 5), 200 (5 of 5), 100 (16 of 16), 50 (12 of 12), and 25 (20 of 20) HIV-1 RNA copies/ml (cp/ml) were always positive, and negatives were always negative (20 of 20). The limit of detection was 14 cp/ml, as determined by probit analysis. The analytic sensitivity of the assay was 99.5% (189/190 samples; 95% confidence interval [CI], 97.1 to 99.9%) and specificity was 99.5% (199/200 samples; 95% CI, 97.2 to 99.9%). These results suggest that the assay is suitable for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1.

  1. Conserved stem-loop structures in the HIV-1 RNA region containing the A3 3' splice site and its cis-regulatory element: possible involvement in RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Jacquenet, S; Ropers, D; Bilodeau, P S; Damier, L; Mougin, A; Stoltzfus, C M; Branlant, C

    2001-01-15

    The HIV-1 transcript is alternatively spliced to over 30 different mRNAs. Whether RNA secondary structure can influence HIV-1 RNA alternative splicing has not previously been examined. Here we have determined the secondary structure of the HIV-1/BRU RNA segment, containing the alternative A3, A4a, A4b, A4c and A5 3' splice sites. Site A3, required for tat mRNA production, is contained in the terminal loop of a stem-loop structure (SLS2), which is highly conserved in HIV-1 and related SIVcpz strains. The exon splicing silencer (ESS2) acting on site A3 is located in a long irregular stem-loop structure (SLS3). Two SLS3 domains were protected by nuclear components under splicing condition assays. One contains the A4c branch points and a putative SR protein binding site. The other one is adjacent to ESS2. Unexpectedly, only the 3' A residue of ESS2 was protected. The suboptimal A3 polypyrimidine tract (PPT) is base paired. Using site-directed mutagenesis and transfection of a mini-HIV-1 cDNA into HeLa cells, we found that, in a wild-type PPT context, a mutation of the A3 downstream sequence that reinforced SLS2 stability decreased site A3 utilization. This was not the case with an optimized PPT. Hence, sequence and secondary structure of the PPT may cooperate in limiting site A3 utilization.

  2. Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reveals different miRNAs regulating HIV/HCV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Liu, B; Wu, J Q; Soriano, V; Vispo, E; Carroll, A P; Goldie, B J; Cairns, M J; Saksena, N K

    2014-02-01

    Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is common due to shared transmission routes. The genomic basis of HIV/HCV co-infection and its regulation by microRNA (miRNA) is unknown. Therefore, our objective was to investigate genome-wide mRNA expression and its regulation by miRNA in primary PBMCs derived from 27 patients (5 HCV - mono-infected, 5 HIV-mono-infected, 12 HCV/HIV co-infected, and 5 healthy controls). This revealed 27 miRNAs and 476 mRNAs as differentially expressed (DE) in HCV/HIV co-infection when compared to controls (adj p<0.05). Our study shows the first evidence of miRNAs specific for co-infection, several of which are correlated with key gene targets demonstrating functional relationships to pathways in cancer, immune-function, and metabolism. Notable was the up regulation of HCV-specific miR-122 in co-infection (FC>50, p=4.02E-06), which may have clinical/biological implications.

  3. An Intronic G Run within HIV-1 Intron 2 Is Critical for Splicing Regulation of vif mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Widera, Marek; Erkelenz, Steffen; Hillebrand, Frank; Krikoni, Aikaterini; Widera, Darius; Kaisers, Wolfgang; Deenen, René; Gombert, Michael; Dellen, Rafael; Pfeiffer, Tanya; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Münk, Carsten; Bosch, Valerie; Köhrer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Within target T lymphocytes, human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) encounters the retroviral restriction factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G), which is counteracted by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vif. Vif is encoded by intron-containing viral RNAs that are generated by splicing at 3′ splice site (3′ss) A1 but lack splicing at 5′ss D2, which results in the retention of a large downstream intron. Hence, the extents of activation of 3′ss A1 and repression of D2, respectively, determine the levels of vif mRNA and thus the ability to evade A3G-mediated antiviral effects. The use of 3′ss A1 can be enhanced or repressed by splicing regulatory elements that control the recognition of downstream 5′ss D2. Here we show that an intronic G run (GI2-1) represses the use of a second 5′ss, termed D2b, that is embedded within intron 2 and, as determined by RNA deep-sequencing analysis, is normally inefficiently used. Mutations of GI2-1 and activation of D2b led to the generation of transcripts coding for Gp41 and Rev protein isoforms but primarily led to considerable upregulation of vif mRNA expression. We further demonstrate, however, that higher levels of Vif protein are actually detrimental to viral replication in A3G-expressing T cell lines but not in A3G-deficient cells. These observations suggest that an appropriate ratio of Vif-to-A3G protein levels is required for optimal virus replication and that part of Vif level regulation is effected by the novel G run identified here. PMID:23255806

  4. MicroRNA Profile in CD8+ T-Lymphocytes from HIV-Infected Individuals: Relationship with Antiviral Immune Response and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bargalló, Manel E.; Planet, Evarist; Vilaplana, Elisenda; Escribà, Tuixent; Pérez, Iñaki; Gatell, Josep Maria; García, Felipe; Arnedo, Mireia; Plana M, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between host microRNAs (miRNA), viral control and immune response has not yet been elucidated in the field of HIV. The aim of this study was to assess the differential miRNA profile in CD8+ T-cells between HIV-infected individuals who differ in terms of viral replication control and immune response. Methods miRNA profile from resting and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD8+ T-cells from uninfected individuals (HIV-, n = 11), Elite Controllers (EC, n = 15), Viremic Controllers (VC, n = 15), Viremic Progressors (VP, n = 13) and HIV-infected patients on therapy (ART, n = 14) was assessed using Affymetrix miRNA 3.1 arrays. After background correction, quantile normalization and median polish summarization, normalized data were fit to a linear model. The analysis comprised: resting samples between groups; stimulated samples between groups; and stimulated versus resting samples within each group. Enrichment analyses of the putative target genes were perfomed using bioinformatic algorithms. Results A downregulated miRNA pattern was observed when resting samples from all infected groups were compared to HIV-. A miRNA downregulation was also observed when stimulated samples from EC, ART and HIV- groups were compared to VP, being hsa-miR-4492 the most downregulated. Although a preferential miRNA downregulation was observed when stimulated samples were compared to the respective resting samples, VP presented a differential miRNA expression pattern. In fact, hsa-miR-155 and hsa-miR-181a were downregulated in VP whereas in the other groups, either an upregulation or no differences were observed after stimulation, respectively. Overall, functional enrichment analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were involved in signal transduction pathways, metabolic regulation, apoptosis, and immune response. Conclusions Resting CD8+ T-cells do not exhibit a differential miRNA expression between HIV-infected individuals but they do differ from non

  5. Sleep quality in efavirenz-treated Chinese HIV patients - comparing between GT and GG genotype of CYP2B6-516 G/T polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; To, Kin Wang; Lee, Man Po; Wong, Ngai Sze; Chan, Denise P C; Li, Patrick C K; Cheung, Siu Wai; Chan, Raphael C Y

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-two adult Chinese HIV-positive treatment-naïve patients were recruited in a study to evaluate prospectively the associations between CYP2B6 516 G/T polymorphisms and sleep quality following treatment with an efavirenz-based regimen. Overall, the patients gave an allelic frequency of 0.3 for CYP2B6 516 T, and a genotype frequency of 9.4% for TT. Compared to GG, GT gave a higher median value of plasma efavirenz level at four weeks (3.77 mg/L vs 2.59 mg/L, p < 0.001) and 12 months (3.57 mg/L vs 2.97 mg/L, p = 0.026). Using generalised estimating equations analysis to track the variance over time, there was poorer Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in GT compared to GG, while GT was associated with a higher efavirenz level of >4 mg/L. There was however no difference in the component sleep scores nor was there direct association between sleep quality and plasma efavirenz levels. The results suggested that CYP2B6 genotype was associated with different patterns of sleep problems, further investigation of which is warranted with the objective of optimizing therapy with efavirenz-based regimens.

  6. Intra-host evolution of multiple genotypes of hepatitis C virus in a chronically infected patient with HIV along a 13-year follow-up period.

    PubMed

    Culasso, A C A; Baré, P; Aloisi, N; Monzani, M C; Corti, M; Campos, R H

    2014-01-20

    The intra-host evolutionary process of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was analyzed by phylogenetic and coalescent methodologies in a patient co-infected with HCV-1a, HCV-2a, HCV-3a and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) along a 13-year period. Direct sequence analysis of the E2 and NS5A regions showed diverse evolutionary dynamics, in agreement with different relationships between these regions and the host factors. The Bayesian Skyline Plot analyses of the E2 sequences (cloned) yielded different intra-host evolutionary patterns for each genotype: a steady state of a "consensus" sequence for HCV-1a; a pattern of lineage splitting and extinction for HCV-2a; and a two-phase (drift/diversification) process for HCV-3a. Each genotype evolving in the same patient and at the same time presents a different pattern apparently modulated by the immune pressure of the host. This study provides useful information for the management of co-infected patients and provides insights into the mechanisms behind the intra-host evolution of HCV.

  7. Options for treatment of hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David L

    2006-01-01

    Irrespective of whether a patient has HIV infection, the optimal treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is peginterferon alpha and ribavirin. In both HIV-infected and uninfected persons, sustained virologic response (SVR) rates are higher for genotype 2 and genotype 3 HCV infection and for patients with lower pre-treatment HCV RNA levels. HIV-infection does not alter either the reality that persons who fail to achieve a 2log(10) reduction in HCV RNA level after 12 weeks of therapy rarely achieve a SVR, or the theoretical benefits of maintenance therapy in those without viral responses. The same adverse treatment effects can occur in HIV-infected and uninfected persons, but treatment of HIV-infected persons is complicated by interactions between ribavirin and antiretroviral medications and effects of HCV treatment on the course of HIV. The optimal treatment doses and durations are not known for HIV-infected persons, who are also less likely to achieve a SVR. A final difference is that the benefits of HCV treatment breakthroughs are usually realized in patients without HIV years before those with HIV. Future research must focus both on improving outcomes with currently available medications and rapidly evaluating the safety and efficacy of forthcoming antiviral compounds in HIV/HCV coinfected persons.

  8. Use of dried-blood-spot samples and in-house assays to identify antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-infected children in resource-constrained settings.

    PubMed

    Ziemniak, Carrie; Mengistu, Yohannes; Ruff, Andrea; Chen, Ya-Hui; Khaki, Leila; Bedri, Abubaker; Simen, Birgitte B; Palumbo, Paul; Eshleman, Susan H; Persaud, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring HIV drug resistance is an important component of the World Health Organization's global HIV program. HIV drug resistance testing is optimal with commercially available clinically validated test kits using plasma; however, that type of testing may not be feasible or affordable in resource-constrained settings. HIV genotyping from dried blood spots (DBS) with noncommercial (in-house) assays may facilitate the capture of HIV drug resistance outcomes in resource-constrained settings but has had varying rates of success. With in-house assays for HIV reverse transcriptase, we evaluated the yield of genotyping DBS samples collected from HIV-infected children who were enrolled in two clinical trials conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (median HIV viral load, 5.88 log(10) HIV RNA copies/ml; range, 4.04 to 6.99). Overall, HIV genotypes were obtained for 94 (89.5%) of 105 samples tested (95% and 84% from clinical trials #1 and #2, respectively); however, successful analysis of 15 (16.1%) of the 94 samples required repeat testing using a different set of primers on previously synthesized cDNA. The yield of genotyping was lower on the DBS that were stored suboptimally from clinical trial #2 (56% versus 88% for optimally stored). Concordance with plasma genotypes derived using a clinically validated, commercial kit-based assay (ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system) was also assessed in a subset of children with paired testing. For 34 samples with paired DBS and plasma genotypes, there was 100% concordance for major drug resistance mutations. DBS genotyping using in-house assays provides an alternative for antiretroviral drug resistance testing in children in resource-constrained regions but may require region-specific optimization before widespread use.

  9. The effects of early syphilis on CD4 counts and HIV-1 RNA viral loads in blood and semen

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, S; McSorley, J; Copas, A; Bennett, J; Edwards, S; Kaye, S; Kirk, S; French, P; Weller, I

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of early syphilis on blood and semen plasma HIV-1 viral loads and CD4 counts. Methods: In a retrospective case-control study, blood plasma HIV-1 viral loads and CD4 counts in cases during early syphilis (n = 63, 27 receiving antiretroviral therapy) were compared to those before and after syphilis and with controls with non-systemic acute sexually transmitted infections (STI) (n = 104, 39 receiving antiretroviral therapy). In a prospective substudy in those not receiving antiretroviral therapy, semen plasma viral loads during early syphilis (n = 13) were compared with those 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment for syphilis and with controls with no STIs (n = 20). Results: Retrospective study: CD4 counts were similar in cases (median 410, n = 139 counts) during early syphilis compared to before (485, n = 80) and after (475, n = 88). In a secondary analysis, a drop in CD4 count (21%) among those with early latent syphilis was observed compared with controls. Blood plasma viral loads did not change significantly overall or in those with primary, secondary, or early latent syphilis. Effects were similar on or off antiretroviral therapy. Prospective study: blood and semen viral loads were slightly higher in cases compared with controls but treatment of early syphilis did not reduce either. Conclusions: We detected no association between early syphilis and changes in blood or semen viral load or CD4 count. Increased HIV-1 infectivity associated with early syphilis is unlikely to be associated with increased levels of HIV-1 RNA in blood or semen. PMID:16199736

  10. Exosome-mediated shuttling of microRNA-29 regulates HIV Tat and morphine-mediated Neuronal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, G; Yao, H; Chaudhuri, A D; Duan, M; Yelamanchili, S V; Wen, H; Cheney, P D; Fox, H S; Buch, S

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal damage is a hallmark feature of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HANDs). Opiate drug abuse accelerates the incidence and progression of HAND; however, the mechanisms underlying the potentiation of neuropathogenesis by these drugs remain elusive. Opiates such as morphine have been shown to enhance HIV transactivation protein Tat-mediated toxicity in both human neurons and neuroblastoma cells. In the present study, we demonstrate reduced expression of the tropic factor platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B with a concomitant increase in miR-29b in the basal ganglia region of the brains of morphine-dependent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques compared with the SIV-infected controls. In vitro relevance of these findings was corroborated in cultures of astrocytes exposed to morphine and HIV Tat that led to increased release of miR-29b in exosomes. Subsequent treatment of neuronal SH-SY5Y cell line with exosomes from treated astrocytes resulted in decreased expression of PDGF-B, with a concomitant decrease in viability of neurons. Furthermore, it was shown that PDGF-B was a target for miR-29b as evidenced by the fact that binding of miR-29 to the 3′-untranslated region of PDGF-B mRNA resulted in its translational repression in SH-SY5Y cells. Understanding the regulation of PDGF-B expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for neuronal loss in HIV-1-infected opiate abusers. PMID:22932723

  11. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  12. Integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA paired expression profiling of prenatal skeletal muscle development in three genotype pigs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhonglin; Yang, Yalan; Wang, Zishuai; Zhao, Shuanping; Mu, Yulian; Li, Kui

    2015-10-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in muscle development by binding to messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Based on prenatal skeletal muscle at 33, 65 and 90 days post-coitus (dpc) from Landrace, Tongcheng and Wuzhishan pigs, we carried out integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling. We identified 33, 18 and 67 differentially expressed miRNAs and 290, 91 and 502 mRNA targets in Landrace, Tongcheng and Wuzhishan pigs, respectively. Subsequently, 12 mRNAs and 3 miRNAs differentially expressed were validated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and 5 predicted miRNA targets were confirmed via dual luciferase reporter or western blot assays. We identified a set of miRNAs and mRNA genes differentially expressed in muscle development. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis suggests that the miRNA targets are primarily involved in muscle contraction, muscle development and negative regulation of cell proliferation. Our data indicated that more mRNAs are regulated by miRNAs at earlier stages than at later stages of muscle development. Landrace and Tongcheng pigs also had longer phases of myoblast proliferation than Wuzhishan pigs. This study will be helpful to further explore miRNA-mRNA interactions in myogenesis and aid to uncover the molecular mechanisms of muscle development and phenotype variance in pigs.

  13. Incarceration is associated with used syringe lending among active injection drug users with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informed by recent studies demonstrating the central role of plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) on HIV transmission, interventions to employ HIV antiretroviral treatment as prevention (TasP) are underway. To optimize these efforts, evidence is needed to identify factors associated with both non-suppressed VL and HIV risk behaviours. Thus, we sought to assess the possible role played by exposure to correctional facilities on VL non-suppression and used syringe lending among HIV-seropositive people who use injection drugs (PWID). Methods We used data from the ACCESS study, a community-recruited prospective cohort. We used longitudinal multivariate mixed-effects analyses to estimate the relationship between incarceration and plasma HIV-1 RNA > 500 copies/mL among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed active PWID and, during periods of non-suppression, the relationship between incarceration and used syringe lending. Results Between May 1996 and March 2012, 657 ART-exposed PWID were recruited. Incarceration was independently associated with higher odds of VL non-suppression (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.54, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 1.10, 2.16). In a separate multivariate model restricted to periods of VL non-suppression, incarceration was independently associated with lending used syringes (AOR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.03, 3.18). Conclusions The current findings demonstrate that incarceration is associated with used syringe lending among active PWID with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. Our results provide a possible pathway for the commonly observed association between incarceration and increased risk of HIV transmission. Our results suggest that alternatives to incarceration of non-violent PWID and evidence-based combination HIV prevention interventions for PWID within correctional facilities are urgently needed. PMID:24289651

  14. The amino terminal domain of HIV-1 Rev is required for discrimination of the RRE from nonspecific RNA.

    PubMed

    Daly, T J; Doten, R C; Rusche, J R; Auer, M

    1995-10-20

    The ability of HIV-1 Rev to successfully discriminate between specific Rev-responsive elements (RRE) and nonspecific binding sites in the presence of excess nonspecific RNA was examined using filter binding, gel shift, and gel filtration techniques, using purified M4 Rev mutant protein and endoproteinase Lys-C cleaved wild-type Rev. The M4 Rev displayed a slightly reduced binding affinity to the RRE, as well as a tenfold decrease in its ability to discriminate the RRE from non-specific RNA compared to the wild-type Rev. Gel shift and gel filtration chromotography data also showed decreased ability of the mutant to multimerize in the absence or presence of the RRE. The Lys-C cleaved Rev, which lacks the amino-terminal 20 amino acids of the protein, displayed less ability to discriminate the RRE from nonspecific RNA compared to either the wild-type or the M4 mutant Rev and appeared unable to form protein-protein interactions, yet still bound sense and antisense RNA species with high affinity (Kd was in the nanomolar concentration range). A 40 amino acid peptide containing the arginine-rich RRE binding domain of Rev was also observed to interact with both the RRE and antisense RNA fragments with a binding constant of about 1 x 10(-9) M. However, the peptide displayed almost no ability to discriminate between the RRE and a comparably sized antisense RRE. The loss in ability to discriminate correct from incorrect binding sites correlates with overall decreases in the alpha-helical character of the protein and perturbations within the amino terminus. The amino terminus of Rev is likely to maintain the conformational integrity of the arginine rich RRE binding domain which is required for specific RNA binding site discrimination or stabilization of specific Rev-RRE interactions.

  15. Prevalence and Clinical Impact of Human Pegivirus-1 Infection in HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhijiang; Gao, Li; Song, Yindi; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Mi; Lou, Jincheng; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Xicheng; Feng, Yue; Dong, Xingqi; Xia, Xueshan

    2017-01-01

    Human Pegivirus-1 (HPgV-1) may have a beneficial impact on disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection. However, analysis of the genotypic diversity of HPgV-1 and its relevance to the progression of HIV-1 disease remains limited. A total of 1062 HIV-1-infected individuals were recruited in all sixteen prefectures of Yunnan province, China. The reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR), phylogenetic analyses, and clinical data analyses were used to detect HPgV-1 infection, determine genotype, and analyze HPgV-1 genotype impact on HIV-1 disease progression. The overall positive rate of HPgV-1 RNA was 23.4% (248/1062), and the frequency of HPgV-1 infection in injecting drug users (IDUs) (28.5%, 131/460) was significantly higher than in heterosexuals (19.4%, 117/602). Multiple genotypes were identified in 212 subjects with successful sequencing for the E2 gene, including genotype 7 (55.7%), genotype 3 (34.9%), genotype 4 (4.7%), genotype 2 (3.3%), and an unclassified group (1.4%). Moreover, genotype 7 predominated in IDUs, whereas genotype 3 was the most common in heterosexuals. Our results revealed that HPgV-1 genotype 7 groups exhibited significantly lower HIV-1 viral load and higher CD4+ cell counts. This finding suggests that HPgV-1 genotype 7 may be associated with a better progression of HIV-1 disease. PMID:28212298

  16. Impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on plasma HIV-1 RNA Quantification: usefulness of the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation long terminal repeat-based real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test.

    PubMed

    Rouet, François; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Burgard, Marianne; Peeters, Martine; Damond, Florence; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Msellati, Philippe; Ferradini, Laurent; Rukobo, Sandra; Maréchal, Valérie; Schvachsa, Nilda; Wakrim, Lahcen; Rafalimanana, Christian; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Viard, Jean-Paul; Seigneurin, Jean-Marie; Rouzioux, Christine

    2007-08-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 has a major impact on the quantification of plasma HIV-1 RNA, representing an increasingly difficult challenge. A total of 898 plasma specimens positive for HIV-1 RNA by commercial assays (Amplicor v1.5; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Alameda, CA or Versant v3.0; Bayer Diagnostics, Emeryville, CA) were tested using the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation (G2) real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test: 518 samples containing HIV-1 of known subtype, including 88 from 2 subtype panels and 430 harboring B (n = 266) and non-B (n = 164) group M HIV-1 subtypes from patients followed up in 2002 through 2005 at Necker Hospital (Paris, France), and 380 samples from 10 different countries (Argentina, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, France, Ivory Coast, Madagascar, Morocco, Thailand, and Zimbabwe). HIV-1 RNA values obtained by G2 real-time PCR were highly correlated with those obtained by the Amplicor v1.5 for B and non-B subtypes (R = 0.892 and 0.892, respectively) and for samples from diverse countries (R = 0.867 and 0.893 for real-time PCR vs. Amplicor v1.5 and real-time PCR vs. Versant v3.0, respectively). Approximately 30% of specimens harboring non-B subtypes were underquantified by at least -0.51 log10 in Amplicor v1.5 versus 5% underquantified in G2 real-time PCR. Discrepant results were also obtained with subtype B samples (14% underquantified by Amplicor v1.5 vs. 7% by G2 real-time PCR). Similar percentages were observed when comparing results obtained with the G2 real-time PCR assay with those obtained using the Versant assay. Addressing HIV-1 diversity, continual monitoring of HIV-1 RNA assays, together with molecular epidemiology studies, is required to improve the accuracy of all HIV RNA assays.

  17. Functional and structural analysis of the internal ribosome entry site present in the mRNA of natural variants of the HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Carvajal, Felipe; Pino, Karla; Navarrete, Camilo; Ferres, Marcela; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The 5'untranslated regions (UTR) of the full length mRNA of the HIV-1 proviral clones pNL4.3 and pLAI, harbor an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). In this study we extend this finding by demonstrating that the mRNA 5'UTRs of natural variants of HIV-1 also exhibit IRES-activity. Cap-independent translational activity was demonstrated using bicistronic mRNAs in HeLa cells and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The possibility that expression of the downstream cistron in these constructs was due to alternative splicing or to cryptic promoter activity was ruled out. The HIV-1 variants exhibited significant 5'UTR nucleotide diversity with respect to the control sequence recovered from pNL4.3. Interestingly, translational activity from the 5'UTR of some of the HIV-1 variants was enhanced relative to that observed for the 5'UTR of pNL4.3. In an attempt to explain these findings we probed the secondary structure of the variant HIV-1 5'UTRs using enzymatic and chemical approaches. Yet subsequent structural analyses did not reveal significant variations when compared to the pNL4.3-5'UTR. Thus, the increased IRES-activity observed for some of the HIV-1 variants cannot be ascribed to a specific structural modification. A model to explain these findings is proposed.

  18. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site Present in the mRNA of Natural Variants of the HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Carvajal, Felipe; Pino, Karla; Navarrete, Camilo; Ferres, Marcela; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The 5′untranslated regions (UTR) of the full length mRNA of the HIV-1 proviral clones pNL4.3 and pLAI, harbor an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). In this study we extend this finding by demonstrating that the mRNA 5′UTRs of natural variants of HIV-1 also exhibit IRES-activity. Cap-independent translational activity was demonstrated using bicistronic mRNAs in HeLa cells and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The possibility that expression of the downstream cistron in these constructs was due to alternative splicing or to cryptic promoter activity was ruled out. The HIV-1 variants exhibited significant 5′UTR nucleotide diversity with respect to the control sequence recovered from pNL4.3. Interestingly, translational activity from the 5′UTR of some of the HIV-1 variants was enhanced relative to that observed for the 5′UTR of pNL4.3. In an attempt to explain these findings we probed the secondary structure of the variant HIV-1 5′UTRs using enzymatic and chemical approaches. Yet subsequent structural analyses did not reveal significant variations when compared to the pNL4.3-5′UTR. Thus, the increased IRES-activity observed for some of the HIV-1 variants cannot be ascribed to a specific structural modification. A model to explain these findings is proposed. PMID:22496887

  19. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  20. From clinical sample to complete genome: Comparing methods for the extraction of HIV-1 RNA for high-throughput deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Marion; Gall, Astrid; Vink, Monique; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Binter, Špela; Edwards, Stephanie; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Bakker, Margreet; Ong, Swee Hoe; Gras, Luuk; van Sighem, Ard; Bezemer, Daniela; de Wolf, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Kellam, Paul; Berkhout, Ben; Fraser, Christophe; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C

    2016-08-04

    The BEEHIVE (Bridging the Evolution and Epidemiology of HIV in Europe) project aims to analyse nearly-complete viral genomes from >3000 HIV-1 infected Europeans using high-throughput deep sequencing techniques to investigate the virus genetic contribution to virulence. Following the development of a computational pipeline, including a new de novo assembler for RNA virus genomes, to generate larger contiguous sequences (contigs) from the abundance of short sequence reads that characterise the data, another area that determines genome sequencing success is the quality and quantity of the input RNA. A pilot experiment with 125 patient plasma samples was performed to investigate the optimal method for isolation of HIV-1 viral RNA for long amplicon genome sequencing. Manual isolation with the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini Kit (Qiagen) was superior over robotically extracted RNA using either the QIAcube robotic system, the mSample Preparation Systems RNA kit with automated extraction by the m2000sp system (Abbott Molecular), or the MagNA Pure 96 System in combination with the MagNA Pure 96 Instrument (Roche Diagnostics). We scored amplification of a set of four HIV-1 amplicons of ∼1.9, 3.6, 3.0 and 3.5kb, and subsequent recovery of near-complete viral genomes. Subsequently, 616 BEEHIVE patient samples were analysed to determine factors that influence successful amplification of the genome in four overlapping amplicons using the QIAamp Viral RNA Kit for viral RNA isolation. Both low plasma viral load and high sample age (stored before 1999) negatively influenced the amplification of viral amplicons >3kb. A plasma viral load of >100,000 copies/ml resulted in successful amplification of all four amplicons for 86% of the samples, this value dropped to only 46% for samples with viral loads of <20,000 copies/ml.

  1. Identification and comparative analysis of the microRNA transcriptome in roots of two contrasting tobacco genotypes in response to cadmium stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Weite; Cao, Fangbin; Wu, Feibo

    2016-09-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) is more acclimated to cadmium (Cd) uptake and preferentially enriches Cd in leaves than other crops. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in regulating expression of various stress response genes in plants. However, genome-wide expression of miRNAs and their target genes in response to Cd stress in tobacco are still unknown. Here, miRNA high-throughput sequencing technology was performed using two contrasting tobacco genotypes Guiyan 1 and Yunyan 2 of Cd-sensitive and tolerance. Comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in control and Cd treated plants identified 72 known (27 families) and 14 novel differentially expressed miRNAs in the two genotypes. Among them, 28 known (14 families) and 5 novel miRNAs were considered as Cd tolerance associated miRNAs, which mainly involved in cell growth, ion homeostasis, stress defense, antioxidant and hormone signaling. Finally, a hypothetical model of Cd tolerance mechanism in Yunyan 2 was presented. Our findings suggest that some miRNAs and their target genes and pathways may play critical roles in Cd tolerance.

  2. Identification and comparative analysis of the microRNA transcriptome in roots of two contrasting tobacco genotypes in response to cadmium stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Weite; Cao, Fangbin; Wu, Feibo

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) is more acclimated to cadmium (Cd) uptake and preferentially enriches Cd in leaves than other crops. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in regulating expression of various stress response genes in plants. However, genome-wide expression of miRNAs and their target genes in response to Cd stress in tobacco are still unknown. Here, miRNA high-throughput sequencing technology was performed using two contrasting tobacco genotypes Guiyan 1 and Yunyan 2 of Cd-sensitive and tolerance. Comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in control and Cd treated plants identified 72 known (27 families) and 14 novel differentially expressed miRNAs in the two genotypes. Among them, 28 known (14 families) and 5 novel miRNAs were considered as Cd tolerance associated miRNAs, which mainly involved in cell growth, ion homeostasis, stress defense, antioxidant and hormone signaling. Finally, a hypothetical model of Cd tolerance mechanism in Yunyan 2 was presented. Our findings suggest that some miRNAs and their target genes and pathways may play critical roles in Cd tolerance. PMID:27667199

  3. HIV-1 Viral RNA Dynamics at the Plasma Membrane May Provide Insight into Viral Assembly | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Many aspects of how infectious viruses assemble in cells have yet to be completely deciphered. However, as reported in a recent Journal of Virology paper, researchers may be one step closer to understanding how HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, assembles and replicates.

  4. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  5. CCR5 gene disruption via lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and single guided RNA renders cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Ye, Chaobaihui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1.

  6. Modelling, synthesis and biological evaluation of an ethidium-arginine conjugate linked to a ribonuclease mimic directed against TAR RNA of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Patino, Nadia; Di Giorgio, Christophe; Dan-Covalciuc, Cristina; Peytou, Valérie; Terreux, Raphaël; Cabrol-Bass, Daniel; Bailly, Christian; Condom, Roger

    2002-07-01

    Using molecular modelling studies, an active anti-HIV ethidium-arginine conjugate targeted against the viral TAR RNA sequence has been linked to an artificial ribonuclease, with the aim to obtain an irreversible inhibitor. The ribonuclease moiety consists of an N-[N-(3-aminopropyl)-3-aminopropyl] glycine and has been constructed via two successive N-alkylations following the Fukuyama procedure.

  7. The prevalence of HTLV-1 and its Co-Infection with HCV, HBV and HIV in Hemophilic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ziaee, Masood; Namaei, Mohammad Hassan; Azarkar, Ghodseh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Blood-borne infections, such as the HIV virus and hepatitis B and C, are major problems in patients receiving blood products. Here we examined the prevalence of HTLV-1, HCV, HBV, and HIV in hemophilic patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study on 108 hemophilic patients (101 males and 7 females) involved detection of HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV-1 infections using immunoassays for HBsAg, hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBc), hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV), HIV antibodies (anti-HIV) and Anti-HTLV-1. Real-time PCR was used to measure HCV RNA, and HCV genotyping was performed by direct sequencing of the 5’ noncoding region. Results: Hemophilia A was reported in 93 (86%) patients with severe symptoms in 8 cases. The seroprevalence of anti-HCV and anti-HTLV-1 antibodies was 20% and 3% respectively. One patient with severe hemophilia had a HCV/HTLV-1 co-infection. HCV-RNA was detected in 82% of patients. In terms of genotyping prevalence was 56% HCV genotype 3a, 39% HCV genotype 1a, and 6% HCV genotype2. Anti HIV and HBsAg were not detected in any patient. HTLV1 prevalence was higher, HCV lower in South Khorasan than other regions in Iran or elsewhere. Conclusion: Management of transfusion of blood and blood products should account for the underlying prevalence of infectious agents. PMID:26649023

  8. Changes in CD4+ T-cells and HIV RNA resulting from combination of anti-TB therapy with Dzherelo in TB/HIV dually infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Lyudmila G; Maystat, Tatyana V; Masyuk, Lilia A; Pylypchuk, Volodymyr S; Volyanskii, Yuri L; Kutsyna, Galyna A

    2008-01-01

    The open-label, phase II clinical trial of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) with or without oral immunomodulator Dzherelo (Immunoxel) was conducted in TB/HIV coinfected, antiretroviral therapy naïve patients to evaluate the effect on CD4 T-lymphocyte counts and viral load. The arm A (n = 20) received isoniazid (H); rimfapicin (R); pyrazinamide (Z); streptomycin (S); and ethambutol (E), and arm B (n = 20) received 50 drops of Dzherelo twice per day in addition to HRZSE. After 2 months in 90% of Dzherelo patients the population of absolute CD4 T-cells expanded by an average of 71.2% (from 174 to 283 cells/μl; P = 0.00003), but declined in ATT-alone patients (182 to 174; P = 0.34). The ratio between CD4/CD8 cells deteriorated in 80% of individuals in arm A (1.213 > 0.943; P = 0.002), but improved in the same proportion of patients in arm B (1.244 > 1.536; P = 0.007). The number of total CD3+ lymphocytes rose from 728 to 921 cells in arm B (P = 0.025) whereas it fell from 650 to 585 cells in arm A (P = 0.25). The viral load, as measured by plasma RNA-PCR, decreased in 70% of Dzherelo recipients (2.174 > 1.558 copies/ml; P = 0.002), but increased in 70% of HRZSE only receivers (1.907 > 2.076 copies/ml; P = 0.03). Dzherelo has a favorable effect on the immune status and viral burden in TB/HIV patients when given as an immunomodulating adjunct to ATT. PMID:19920896

  9. Variability of the preC/C region of hepatitis B virus genotype A from a South African cohort predominantly infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H; Martin, Desmond J; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T; Bowyer, Sheila M

    2013-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a serious global health problem, and HBV genotype is an important determinant of disease progression and treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to assess variations of the precore/core (preC/C) region in HBV genotype A. Sequencing of the preC/C and surface (S) genes of HBV was performed on plasma samples from 20 HBV/HIV co-infected and 5 HBV mono-infected individuals. All preC/C study sequences clustered with subgenotype A1, except for two which clustered with subgenotype D4 reference strains. The nucleotide and amino acid variability was far higher in the preC/C region than in the S region. Mutations associated with reduction or failure of HBV e-antigen (HBeAg) production were observed, with a preC start codon mutation being common (24%). Other mutations (e.g., P5H/L and I97L) associated with severe liver disease were also noticed, some of which were located in the major histocompatibility restricted sites. PreC/C intergenotype nucleotide divergence was >7%, while subgenotypes differed by 2.5-7%. Several study sequences were highly divergent from other African subgenotype A1 strains. This study showed that HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B is underestimated in subgenotype A1, and also highlighted the variant South African A1 strains. The major advantage of preC/C sequencing is that it informs patient management as HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B responds poorly to conventional interferon-α therapy, and some guidelines treat HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B differently from HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B. These data suggest that subgenotype A1 may be more involved in severe HBV-related diseases.

  10. Silencing sexually transmitted infections: topical siRNA-based interventions for the prevention of HIV and HSV.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lee Adam

    2014-01-01

    The global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is significant. The sexual transmission of viruses such as herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) and the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), has been especially difficult to control. To date, no effective vaccines have been developed to prevent the transmission of these STIs. Although antiretroviral drugs have been remarkably successful in treating the symptoms associated with these viral infections, the feasibility of their widespread use for prevention purposes may be more limited. Microbicides might provide an attractive alternative option to reduce their spread. In particular, topically applied small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs) have been shown to not only block transmission of viral STIs to mucosal tissues both in vitro and in vivo, but also confer durable knockdown of target gene expression, thereby circumventing the need to apply a microbicide around the time of sexual encounter, when compliance is mostly difficult. Despite numerous clinical trials currently testing the efficacy of siRNA-based therapeutics, they have yet to be approved for use in the treatment of viral STIs. While several obstacles to their successful implementation in the clinic still exist, promising preclinical studies suggest that siRNAs are a viable modality for the future prevention and treatment of HSV and HIV.

  11. A study of financial incentives to reduce plasma HIV RNA among patients in care.

    PubMed

    Farber, Steven; Tate, Janet; Frank, Cyndi; Ardito, David; Kozal, Michael; Justice, Amy C; Scott Braithwaite, R

    2013-09-01

    The role of financial incentives in HIV care is not well studied. We conducted a single-site study of monetary incentives for viral load suppression, using each patient as his own control. The incentive size ($100/quarter) was designed to be cost-neutral, offsetting estimated downstream costs averted through reduced HIV transmission. Feasibility outcomes were clinic workflow, patient acceptability, and patient comprehension. Although the study was not powered for effectiveness, we also analyzed viral load suppression. Of 80 eligible patients, 77 consented, and 69 had 12 month follow-up. Feasibility outcomes showed minimal impact on patient workflow, near-unanimous patient acceptability, and satisfactory patient comprehension. Among individuals with detectable viral loads pre-intervention, the proportion of undetectable viral load tests increased from 57 to 69 % before versus after the intervention. It is feasible to use financial incentives to reward ART adherence, and to specify the incentive by requiring cost-neutrality and targeting biological outcomes.

  12. Fatal Cryptococcus gattii genotype AFLP6/VGII infection in a HIV-negative patient: case report and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Favalessa, Olivia Cometti; Lázera, Márcia dos Santos; Wanke, Bodo; Trilles, Luciana; Takahara, Doracilde Terumi; Tadano, Tomoko; Dias, Luciana Basili; Vieira, Ananda Castro; Novack, Glaúcia Vanessa; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2014-10-01

    Cryptococcus gattii, a species belonging to the Cryptococcus complex which occurs endemically in tropical and subtropical regions, has been reported as a causative agent of cryptococcosis in healthy individuals. We report a case of meningitis in HIV-negative patient from Cuiaba, MT, in the Midwestern region of Brazil. Cryptococcus gattii AFLP6/VGII was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid and molecular typing was performed by URA5-RFLP. The in vitro susceptibility profile was determined using the standard method according to the document M27A3, CLSI 2008. C. gattii AFLP6/VGII was shown to be susceptible to the antifungals tested. Treatment with 0.8 mg/kg of amphotericin B was initiated; however, the patient died 2 days after the onset of therapy.

  13. [Prevalence of the genotypes of the hepatitis C virus in Spanish drug addicts with chronic hepatitis C. Spanish Group for the Study of Viral Hepatitis in HIV Positive Patients].

    PubMed

    Bravo, R; Soriano, V; García-Samaniego, J; González, J; Castro, A; Colmenero, M; Carballo, E; Mas, A; González-Lahoz, J

    1996-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows a wide genetic variability. The different variants of HCV have been classified into 9 types and different subtypes. Some genotypes have a characteristic geographic distribution and seem to be associated with precise ways of contagion. Serum samples from 107 spanish patients with chronic hepatitis C were studied, which were distributed as follows: 88 parenteral drug addicts (PDA) and a control group of 19 subjects made up by 4 transfused, 5 probably sexually infected and 10 with unknown contagion source (sporadic cases). HCV typing was made by means of the PCR method and later hybridization analysis with complementary probes of different types and subtypes of HCV exposed on a smooth surface (Inno-LiPA). A total to 105 (98.4%) patients had their viruses genotypes. There was more than one genotype in the same subject (co-infection) in 43.8% of cases and co-infection 1a + 1b was the most common (82.7%). While not reaching a statistic significance, co-infections were more frequent in PDA (47.1%) than in the remaining patients (27.8%). In the infected patients with only one genotype, the most common genotype was 1a, both in PDA (22.9%) and in subjects with transfusional HCV, sexual or sporadic (38.9%). In decreasing frequency came genotypes 1b (13.3%) and 3a (11.4%). Other genotypes were very uncommon (2a and 4) or were absent (2b and 5) as unique infections. In conclusion, genotypes non-1b of HCV, mainly 1a and to a lesser extent 3a, are the most common in a spanish population made up mainly by young persons with risk antecedents for HIV infection, particularly PDA. Furthermore, co-infection with HCV genotypes is frequent in this population.

  14. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 substitutes for the cap-binding protein eIF4E to promote compartmentalized translation initiation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-01-01

    Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism promoted by the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 for translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA. This occurs through the adenosine triphosphate-dependent formation of a translation initiation complex that is assembled at the 5′ m7GTP cap of the HIV-1 mRNA. This is due to the property of DDX3 to substitute for the initiation factor eIF4E in the binding of the HIV-1 m7GTP 5′ cap structure where it nucleates the formation of a core DDX3/PABP/eIF4G trimeric complex on the HIV-1 genomic RNA. By using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to indirect immunofluorescence, we further show that this viral ribonucleoprotein complex is addressed to compartmentalized cytoplasmic foci where the translation initiation complex is assembled. PMID:23630313

  15. A motif unique to the human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is important for nucleic acid binding, ATP hydrolysis, RNA/DNA unwinding and HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Garbelli, Anna; Beermann, Sandra; Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-05-12

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication.

  16. Multilevel analysis of neuropathogenesis of neurocognitive impairment in HIV.

    PubMed

    Levine, Andrew J; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Achim, Cristian L; Masliah, Eliezer; Gelman, Benjamin B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Singer, Elyse J; Moore, David J

    2016-08-01

    The neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains puzzling. We interrogated several levels of data (host genetic, histopathology, brain viral load, and neurocognitive) to identify histopathological changes most relevant to HAND. The design of the study is a clinicopathological study employing genetic association analyses. Data and brain tissue from 80 HIV-infected adults were used. Markers in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 1-alpha (IL1-α), macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha (MIP1-α), DRD3, DRD2, and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) were genotyped. Microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin (SYP), human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), amyloid beta (A-Beta), and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) immunoreactivity were quantified in the frontal cortex, putamen, and hippocampus. A composite score for each marker (mean of the three brain regions) was used. Neurocognitive functioning and other clinical variables were determined within 1 year of death. Brain HIV RNA viral load was available for a subset of cases. MAP2 and SYP proved most relevant to neurocognitive functioning. Immunoreactivity of these markers, as well as A-Beta and Iba-1, was correlated with brain HIV RNA viral load. Several genetic markers in combination with other factors predicted histopathology: HIV blood viral load, MIP1-α genotype, and DRD3 genotype predicted Iba-1 immunoreactivity; the duration of infection and IL1-α genotype predicted GFAP immunoreactivity; ApoE genotype and age at death predicted A-Beta immunoreactivity. These data indicate that HIV replication in the brain is the primary driving force leading to neuroinflammation and dysfunctional protein clearance, as reflected by A-Beta and Iba-1. Downstream to these changes are synaptodendritic degeneration, which is the immediate histopathological substrate of the neurocognitive impairment characteristic of HAND. These

  17. Higher specificity of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification isothermal technology than of real-time PCR for quantification of HIV-1 RNA on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Mercier-Delarue, Severine; Vray, Muriel; Plantier, Jean Christophe; Maillard, Theodora; Adjout, Zidan; de Olivera, Fabienne; Schnepf, Nathalie; Maylin, Sarah; Simon, Francois; Delaugerre, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are widely proposed as a plasma surrogate for monitoring antiretroviral treatment efficacy based on the HIV-1 RNA level (viral load [VL]) in resource-limited settings. Interfering coamplification of cell-associated HIV-1 DNA during reverse transcription (RT)-PCR can be avoided by using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) technology, which is based on an RNA template and isothermic conditions. We analyzed VL values obtained with DBS and plasma samples by comparing isothermic NASBA (NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 V2.0; bioMérieux) with real-time RT-PCR (Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 V2.0; Roche). Samples from 197 HIV-1-infected patients were tested (non-B subtypes in 51% of the cases). Nucleic acid extractions were performed by use of NucliSENS EasyMAG (bioMérieux) and Cobas AmpliPrep (Roche) before the NASBA and RT-PCR quantifications, respectively. Both quantification assays have lower limits of detection of 20 (1.3) and 800 (2.9) log10 copies/ml (log) in plasma and DBS, respectively. The mean (DBS minus plasma) differences were -0.39 and -0.46 log, respectively, for RT-PCR and NASBA. RT-PCR on DBS identified virological failure in 122 of 126 patients (sensitivity, 97%) and viral suppression in 58 of 70 patients (specificity, 83%), yielding 12 false-positive results (median, 3.2 log). NASBA on DBS identified virological failure in 85 of 96 patients (sensitivity, 89%) and viral suppression in 95 of 97 patients (specificity, 98%) and yielded 2 false-positive results (3.0 log for both). Both technologies detected HIV-1 RNA in DBS at a threshold of 800 copies/ml. This higher specificity of NASBA technology could avoid overestimation of poor compliance or the emergence of resistance when monitoring antiretroviral efficacy with the DBS method.

  18. HIV-1 Tat-associated RNA polymerase C-terminal domain kinase, CDK2, phosphorylates CDK7 and stimulates Tat-mediated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nekhai, Sergei; Zhou, Meisheng; Fernandez, Anne; Lane, William S; Lamb, Ned J C; Brady, John; Kumar, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression is regulated by a viral transactivator protein (Tat) which induces transcriptional elongation of HIV-1 long tandem repeat (LTR). This induction requires hyperphosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) repeats of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). To achieve CTD hyperphosphorylation, Tat stimulates CTD kinases associated with general transcription factors of the promoter complex, specifically TFIIH-associated CDK7 and positive transcription factor b-associated CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9). Other studies indicate that Tat may bind an additional CTD kinase that regulates the target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II CTD. We previously reported that Tat-associated T-cell-derived kinase (TTK), purified from human primary T-cells, stimulates Tat-dependent transcription of HIV-1 LTR in vivo [Nekhai, Shukla, Fernandez, Kumar and Lamb (2000) Virology 266, 246-256]. In the work presented here, we characterized the components of TTK by biochemical fractionation and the function of TTK in transcription assays in vitro. TTK uniquely co-purified with CDK2 and not with either CDK9 or CDK7. Tat induced the TTK-associated CDK2 kinase to phosphorylate CTD, specifically at Ser-2 residues. The TTK fraction restored Tat-mediated transcription activation of HIV-1 LTR in a HeLa nuclear extract immunodepleted of CDK9, but not in the HeLa nuclear extract double-depleted of CDK9 and CDK7. Direct microinjection of the TTK fraction augmented Tat transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in human primary HS68 fibroblasts. The results argue that TTK-associated CDK2 may function to maintain target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II that is essential for Tat transactivation of HIV-1 promoter. They are also consistent with the observed cell-cycle-specific induction of viral gene transactivation. PMID:12049628

  19. Setting the stage for bench-to-bedside movement of anti-HIV RNA inhibitors-gene therapy for AIDS in macaques.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stephen E; Johnson, R Paul

    2006-01-01

    Despite significant progress over the last two decades, treatment of HIV infection remains a tremendous challenge. Although antiretroviral therapy has proved quite effective in most HIV-infected patients, increasing recognition of toxicity and the emergence of multidrug resistant HIV strains has fueled the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Introduction of genes to inhibit HIV replication into CD4+ T lymphocytes or hematopoietic stem cells represents a potentially attractive but still unproven strategy. Despite the availability of a diverse range of molecular strategies that are able to provide potent inhibition of HIV replication in the laboratory, translation of these in vitro successes to in vivo therapies has been difficult. Fundamental challenges facing AIDS gene therapy at the present time includes the need to increase the efficiency of gene transfer in vivo, to confer upon genetically-modified T cells the ability to have a selective growth advantage in vivo, and the development of additional techniques to decrease the probability of emergence of resistant viruses. As one of the leading animal models for AIDS and for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy, nonhuman primates are ideally suited to help address many of these basic questions. This review will provide a general overview of RNA-based genetic strategies for inhibition of HIV and SIV replication, criteria to be considered in the selection of promising inhibitory strategies for in vivo use, and key questions that can be addressed in the macaque model.

  20. The multimerization state of retroviral RNA is modulated by ammonium ions and affects HIV-1 full-length cDNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S; Häusl, G; Famulok, M; König, B

    1993-01-01

    Genomic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA fragments containing the dimer linkage structure (DLS) can be dimerized and multimerized in the presence of NH4+ and in the absence of any other cation and any viral or cellular protein. This effect strongly supports the notion that dimerization and multimerization of genomic RNA occurs via purine-quartet formation in quadruple helical RNA structures. The efficiency of RNA dimerization and multimerization in the presence of ammonium ions is about 400 fold increased as compared to alkali metal ions such as potassium. Dimerized retroviral RNA representing a pseudodiploid genome could account for genetic recombination within the virion and during reverse transcription. Application of a novel South-Northern-Blotting procedure with biotinylated RNA and digoxigenin-labelled cDNA in vitro reveals that efficient human- and bovine tRNA(Lys3) primed full-length cDNA-synthesis only takes place with a predominantly monomerized RNA template. Dimerization and multimerization of the RNA significantly reduces full-length cDNA-synthesis. This suggests that monomerization of the dimerized RNA, effected by deionization in vitro, is essential for efficient retroviral reverse transcription in vivo. Images PMID:8177734

  1. Recognition of HIV-TAR RNA using neomycin-benzimidazole conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Nihar; Kumar, Sunil; Watkins, Derrick; Wang, Deyun; Appella, Daniel H; Arya, Dev P

    2013-10-15

    Synthesis of a novel class of compounds and their biophysical studies with TAR-RNA are presented. The synthesis of these compounds was achieved by conjugating neomycin, an aminoglycoside, with benzimidazoles modeled from a B-DNA minor groove binder, Hoechst 33258. The neomycin-benzimidazole conjugates have varying linkers that connect the benzimidazole and neomycin units. The linkers of varying length (5-23 atoms) in these conjugates contain one to three triazole units. The UV thermal denaturation experiments showed that the conjugates resulted in greater stabilization of the TAR-RNA than either neomycin or benzimidazole used in the synthesis of conjugates. These results were corroborated by the FID displacement and tat-TAR inhibition assays. The binding of ligands to the TAR-RNA is affected by the length and composition of the linker. Our results show that increasing the number of triazole groups and the linker length in these compounds have diminishing effect on the binding to TAR-RNA. Compounds that have shorter linker length and fewer triazole units in the linker displayed increased affinity towards the TAR RNA.

  2. Duplex structural differences and not 2′-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA–DNA versus DNA–DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3′ recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA–DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA–DNA. Replacing 2′- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2′-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hydroxyls and RT amino acids do not stabilize binding. RT’s Kd (koff/kon) for DNA–DNA and RNA–DNA were similar, although koff differed almost 40-fold, suggesting a faster kon for DNA–DNA. Avian myeloblastosis and Moloney murine leukemia virus RTs also bound more stably to RNA–DNA, but the difference was less pronounced than with HIV-RT. We propose that the H- versus B-form structures of RNA–DNA and DNA–DNA, respectively, allow the former to conform more easily to HIV-RT’s binding cleft, leading to more stable binding. Biologically, the ability of RT to form a more stable complex on RNA–DNA may aid in degradation of RNA fragments that remain after DNA synthesis. PMID:20338878

  3. Impact of HIV infection on sustained virological response to treatment against hepatitis C virus with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Monje-Agudo, P; Castro-Iglesias, A; Rivero-Juárez, A; Martínez-Marcos, F; Ortega-González, E; Real, L M; Pernas, B; Merchante, N; Cid, P; Macías, J; Merino, M D; Rivero, A; Mena, A; Neukam, K; Pineda, J A

    2015-10-01

    It is commonly accepted that human immunodeficiency (HIV) coinfection negatively impacts on the rates of sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR). However, this hypothesis is derived from comparing different studies. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HIV coinfection on SVR to PR in one single population. In a multicentric, prospective study conducted between 2000 and 2013, all previously naïve hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who started PR in five Spanish hospitals were analyzed. SVR was evaluated 24 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy. Of the 1046 patients included in this study, 413 (39%) were coinfected with HIV. Three hundred and forty-one (54%) HCV-monoinfected versus 174 (42%) HIV/HCV-coinfected patients achieved SVR (p < 0.001). The corresponding figures for undetectable HCV RNA at treatment week 4 were 86/181 (47%) versus 59/197 (30%), p < 0.001. SVR was observed in 149 (69%) HCV genotype 2/3-monoinfected subjects versus 91 (68%) HIV/HCV genotype 2/3-coinfected subjects (p = 0.785). In the HCV genotype 1/4-infected population, 188 (46%) monoinfected patients versus 82 (30%) with HIV coinfection (p < 0.001) achieved SVR. In this subgroup, absence of HIV coinfection was independently associated with higher SVR [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.127 (1.135-3.988); p = 0.019] in a multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, baseline HCV RNA load, IL28B genotype, fibrosis stage, and type of pegylated interferon. HIV coinfection impacts on the rates of SVR to PR only in HCV genotype 1/4-infected patients, while it has no effect on SVR in the HCV genotype 2/3-infected subpopulation.

  4. The allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitor BI-D affects virion maturation but does not influence packaging of a functional RNA genome.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; van der Velden, Yme; Bonnard, Damien; Le Rouzic, Erwann; Das, Atze T; Benarous, Richard; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The viral integrase (IN) is an essential protein for HIV-1 replication. IN inserts the viral dsDNA into the host chromosome, thereby aided by the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75. Recently a new class of integrase inhibitors was described: allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs). Although designed to interfere with the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction to block HIV DNA integration during the early phase of HIV-1 replication, the major impact was surprisingly found on the process of virus maturation during the late phase, causing a reverse transcription defect upon infection of target cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of an ALLINI are misformed with the ribonucleoprotein located outside the virus core. Virus assembly and maturation are highly orchestrated and regulated processes in which several viral proteins and RNA molecules closely interact. It is therefore of interest to study whether ALLINIs have unpredicted pleiotropic effects on these RNA-related processes. We confirm that the ALLINI BI-D inhibits virus replication and that the produced virus is non-infectious. Furthermore, we show that the wild-type level of HIV-1 genomic RNA is packaged in virions and these genomes are in a dimeric state. The tRNAlys3 primer for reverse transcription was properly placed on this genomic RNA and could be extended ex vivo. In addition, the packaged reverse transcriptase enzyme was fully active when extracted from virions. As the RNA and enzyme components for reverse transcription are properly present in virions produced in the presence of BI-D, the inhibition of reverse transcription is likely to reflect the mislocalization of the components in the aberrant virus particle.

  5. Thermodynamic studies of a series of homologous HIV-1 TAR RNA ligands reveal that loose binders are stronger Tat competitors than tight ones

    PubMed Central

    Pascale, Lise; Azoulay, Stéphane; Di Giorgio, Audrey; Zenacker, Laura; Gaysinski, Marc; Clayette, Pascal; Patino, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    RNA is a major drug target, but the design of small molecules that modulate RNA function remains a great challenge. In this context, a series of structurally homologous ‘polyamide amino acids’ (PAA) was studied as HIV-1 trans-activating response (TAR) RNA ligands. An extensive thermodynamic study revealed the occurence of an enthalpy–entropy compensation phenomenon resulting in very close TAR affinities for all PAA. However, their binding modes and their ability to compete with the Tat fragment strongly differ according to their structure. Surprisingly, PAA that form loose complexes with TAR were shown to be stronger Tat competitors than those forming tight ones, and thermal denaturation studies demonstrated that loose complexes are more stable than tight ones. This could be correlated to the fact that loose and tight ligands induce distinct RNA conformational changes as revealed by circular dichroism experiments, although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments showed that the TAR binding site is the same in all cases. Finally, some loose PAA also display promising inhibitory activities on HIV-infected cells. Altogether, these results lead to a better understanding of RNA interaction modes that could be very useful for devising new ligands of relevant RNA targets. PMID:23605042

  6. Comparison of the artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ and VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Roee; Canducci, Filippo; Racca, Sara; Rolla, Serena; Stucchi, Sonia; Clementi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Several integrated diagnostic platforms to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type-1 viremia have been developed in recent years. We evaluated the performances of the Artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ assay, using the complete QIAsymphony RGQ workflow. 192 clinical plasma specimens and external control panel samples were analyzed, using the Artus assay and the routine Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 assay. Three samples were excluded due to amplification inhibition. Among the remaining 189 specimens, 130 samples were detected as positive (above the limit of detection by both assays; median log10 difference: 0.01) and 18 samples were detected as negative. Eight samples (4.2%), all slightly above the limit of detection of the Versant assay, were negative with the Artus assay. The remaining 33 samples (beside 3 negative by Artus assay) were positive by both assays, but below the limit of detection at least in one of them. Results from the external panel samples showed a mean Log10 variation of -0.18 and -0.45 for the Versant and the Artus assays, respectively. As both assays showed highly correlated results, the QIAsymphony RGQ system, using the Artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ assay, could be considered a potential platform for HIV-1 RNA quantification in plasma.

  7. Lipid Profiles and APOE4 Allele Impact Midlife Cognitive Decline in HIV-Infected Men on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Locascio, Joseph J.; Misra, Vikas; Lorenz, David R.; Holman, Alex; Dutta, Anupriya; Penugonda, Sudhir; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dyslipidemia and apolipoprotein E4 (APOE ϵ4) allele are risk factors for age-related cognitive decline, but how these risks are modified by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is unclear. Methods. In a longitudinal nested study from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, 273 HIV type 1–infected (HIV+) men aged 50–65 years with baseline HIV RNA <400 copies/mL and on continuous antiretroviral therapy (ART) in ≥95% of follow-up visits were matched by sociodemographic variables to 516 HIV-uninfected (HIV–) controls. The association between lipid markers (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], and triglycerides), APOE genotype, and cognitive decline in HIV infection was examined using mixed-effects models. Results. The median baseline age of participants was 51, 81% were white, and 89% had education >12 years. HIV+ men had similar baseline total cholesterol and LDL-C, but lower HDL-C and higher triglycerides than controls (P < .001). Higher total cholesterol and LDL-C were associated with faster rates of cognitive decline (P < .01), whereas higher HDL-C attenuated decline (P = .02) in HIV+ men. In HIV+ men with elevated cholesterol, statin use was associated with a slower estimated rate of decline (P = .02). APOE ϵ4 genotype accelerated cognitive decline in HIV+ but not HIV– men (P = .01), with trajectories diverging from HIV– ε4 carriers after age 50. Total cholesterol levels did not modify the association of ϵ4 genotype with decline (P = .9). Conclusions. Elevated cholesterol and APOE ϵ4 genotype are independent risk factors for cognitive decline in ART-adherent HIV+ men aged >50 years. Treatment of dyslipidemia may be an effective strategy to reduce cognitive decline in older HIV+ individuals. PMID:27448678

  8. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes, assessment of HPV 16 and 18 viral load and anal related lesions in HIV positive patients: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Tamalet, Catherine; Obry-Roguet, Veronique; Ressiot, Emmanuelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Del Grande, Jean; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle

    2014-03-01

    Natural history of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer is not fully understood. Factors associated with cytological abnormalities and predictors of progression to high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia still deserve investigation. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of HPV types, the relationship between HPV genotypes, HPV 16/18 viral load and cytological abnormalities in male and female HIV-infected patients. One hundred and twenty-two (72.6%) patients were infected with HPV, 75 (61%) had multiple HPV infection, and 94 (77%) had high-risk HPV infection. The most frequently identified HPV types were HPV 16 (64%), HPV 6 (39%), HPV 18 (31%), HPV 53 (14.7%), HPV 33 (10.6%), HPV 11 (8.2%), HPV 70 (5.7%), and HPV 61 (4.9%). The HPV types which were most frequently found in combination were HPV 6 + 16 (9.8%), 6 + 16 + 18 (8.2%), 16 + 18 (6.6%), 6 + 18 (4.9%), 16 + 33 (3.3%), 16 + 53 (3.3%). Median HPV16 and 18 viral loads were 6.1 log10 copies/10(6) cells [IQR 5.0-7.3] and 6.1 log10 copies/10(6) cells [IQR 5.7-6.0], respectively. Male gender (P = 0.03, OR: 1.2 [1.0-1.4]) and homo/bisexual transmission routes (P = 0.044, OR: 1.4 [1.0-1.9]) were associated with HPV 16 infection. An HPV 16 viral load cut-off ≥5.3 log10 copies/10(6) cells and a CD4+ cell count ≤200/µl were independent factors associated with abnormal cytology. In the absence of national consensus guidelines, a strict regular follow-up at shorter intervals is recommended for HIV-infected patients with abnormal cytology, especially low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, an HPV 16 viral load ≥5.3 log/10(6) cells and a CD4+ cell count ≤200/µl.

  9. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  10. Baseline characteristics of HIV & hepatitis B virus (HIV/HBV) co-infected patients from Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jayeeta; Saha, Debraj; Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Saha, Bibhuti; Kedia, Deepika; Guha Mazumder, D.N.; Chakravarty, Runu; Guha, Subhasish Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV co-infection has variable prevalence worldwide. In comparison to HBV mono-infection, the course of chronic HBV infection is accelerated in HIV/HBV co-infected patients. The present study was carried out to analyse the baseline characteristics (clinical, biochemical, serological and virological) of treatment naïve HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients. Methods: Between July 2011 and January 2013, a total number of 1331 HIV-seropositive treatment naïve individuals, enrolled in the ART Centre of Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India, were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A total of 1253 HIV mono-infected and 78 HIV/HBV co-infected patients were characterized. The co-infected patients were evaluated for HBeAg and anti-HBe antibody by ELISA. HIV RNA was quantified for all co-infected patients. HBV DNA was detected and quantified by real time-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination. Results: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had proportionately more advanced HIV disease (WHO clinical stage 3 and 4) than HIV mono-infected individuals (37.1 vs. 19.9%). The co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase and ALT/platelet ratio index (APRI). CD4 count was non-significantly lower in co-infected patients. Majority (61.5%) were HBeAg positive with higher HIV RNA (P<0.05), HBV DNA (P<0.001) and APRI (P<0.05) compared to those who were HBeAg negative. HBV/D was the predominant genotype (73.2%) and D2 (43.7%) was the commonest subgenotype. Interpretation & conclusions: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, ALT, alkaline phosphatase and lower platelet count. HBeAg positive co-infected patients had higher HIV RNA and HBV DNA compared to HBeAg negative co-infected patients. Prior to initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) all patients should be screened for HBsAg to

  11. Large-Scale SNP Discovery through RNA Sequencing and SNP Genotyping by Targeted Enrichment Sequencing in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Shearman, Jeremy R.; Ruang-areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Yoocha, Thippawan; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crop species being the main source of dietary energy in several countries. Marker-assisted selection has become an essential tool in plant breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery via transcriptome sequencing is an attractive strategy for genome complexity reduction in organisms with large genomes. We sequenced the transcriptome of 16 cassava accessions using the Illumina HiSeq platform and identified 675,559 EST-derived SNP markers. A subset of those markers was subsequently genotyped by capture-based targeted enrichment sequencing in 100 F1 progeny segregating for starch viscosity phenotypes. A total of 2,110 non-redundant SNP markers were used to construct a genetic map. This map encompasses 1,785 cM and consists of 19 linkage groups. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling starch pasting properties was identified and shown to coincide with the QTL previously reported for this trait. With a high-density SNP-based linkage map presented here, we also uncovered a novel QTL associated with starch pasting time on LG 10. PMID:25551642

  12. Large-scale SNP discovery through RNA sequencing and SNP genotyping by targeted enrichment sequencing in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Shearman, Jeremy R; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Yoocha, Thippawan; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crop species being the main source of dietary energy in several countries. Marker-assisted selection has become an essential tool in plant breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery via transcriptome sequencing is an attractive strategy for genome complexity reduction in organisms with large genomes. We sequenced the transcriptome of 16 cassava accessions using the Illumina HiSeq platform and identified 675,559 EST-derived SNP markers. A subset of those markers was subsequently genotyped by capture-based targeted enrichment sequencing in 100 F1 progeny segregating for starch viscosity phenotypes. A total of 2,110 non-redundant SNP markers were used to construct a genetic map. This map encompasses 1,785 cM and consists of 19 linkage groups. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling starch pasting properties was identified and shown to coincide with the QTL previously reported for this trait. With a high-density SNP-based linkage map presented here, we also uncovered a novel QTL associated with starch pasting time on LG 10.

  13. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A.; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3′ end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  14. Structural domains within the HIV-1 mRNA and the ribosomal protein S25 influence cap-independent translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Felipe; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Walters, Beth; Contreras, Nataly; Hertz, Marla I; Olivares, Eduardo; Cáceres, Carlos J; Pino, Karla; Letelier, Alejandro; Thompson, Sunnie R; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is a multifunctional region that folds into secondary/tertiary structures that regulate multiple processes during viral replication including translation initiation. In this work, we examine the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located in the 5' leader that drives translation initiation of the viral Gag protein under conditions that hinder cap-dependent translation initiation. We show that activity of the HIV-1 IRES relies on ribosomal protein S25 (eS25). Additionally, a mechanistic and mutational analysis revealed that the HIV-1 IRES is modular in nature and that once the 40S ribosomal subunit is recruited to the IRES, translation initiates without the need of ribosome scanning. These findings elucidate a mechanism of initiation by the HIV-1 IRES whereby a number of highly structured sites present within the HIV-1 5' leader leads to the recruitment of the 40S subunit directly at the site of initiation of protein synthesis.

  15. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  16. Interrelationship of hepatitis C virus genotypes with patient characteristics in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Maheeba A; Murad, Eman A; Aljenaidi, Hend A; Aljowder, Duha R; Aljeeran, Omar IK; Farid, Eman; Al Qamish, Jehad R

    2017-01-01

    Aim Hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows genotype-based variation in prevalence across geographical regions. This study was conducted to understand the clinical interrelationship of HCV genotypes with patient characteristics. Methods Medical records of 122 patients positive for HCV RNA test collected during 2013 and 2014 were included for analysis. Only adults were included in the study. HCV RNA extraction and genotyping was done as part of the routine diagnostic requirements. The association of continuous and categorical variables with genotypes was analyzed through analysis of variance and chi-square tests, respectively. Results Of the 122 patients selected, 103 were Bahrainis, 18 non-Bahrainis, and 1 was unregistered. Genotype 1 was the predominant (53%) one, followed by types 3 (23%) and 4 (20%). Classical symptoms, clinical signs, liver function test, and ultrasonographic results were recorded. Cirrhosis and ascites showed significant variation across genotypes. Although alanine transaminase, total bilirubin, and albumin levels were increased, gamma-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal. About 12% of the subjects were alcohol users, 4% were positive for HIV infection and 2.4% were positive for hepatitis B virus infection. The circulating HCV RNA load was at medium-level in the study cohort and showed significant association with the HCV genotypes and subtypes. Patients with genotype 1a had 6 times more load than patients with type 4 (P<0.05). Conclusion This study reconfirmed the incidence and distribution of different genotypes in Bahrain population, and delineated the relationship of HCV RNA viral load with the severity of liver disease in our cohort. PMID:28280398

  17. Construction of peptides with nucleobase amino acids: design and synthesis of the nucleobase-conjugated peptides derived from HIV-1 Rev and their binding properties to HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hamasaki, K; Ueno, A; Mihara, H

    2001-04-01

    In order to develop a novel molecule that recognizes a specific structure of RNA, we have attempted to design peptides having L-alpha-amino acids with a nucleobase at the side chain (nucleobase amino acid (NBA)), expecting that the function of a nucleobase which can specifically recognize a base in RNA is regulated in a peptide conformation. In this study, to demonstrate the applicability of the NBA units in the peptide to RNA recognition, we designed and synthesized a variety of NBA-conjugated peptides, derived from HIV-1 Rev. Circular dichroism study revealed that the conjugation of the Rev peptide with an NBA unit did not disturb the peptide conformation. RNA-binding affinities of the designed peptides with RRE IIB RNA were dependent on the structure of the nucleobase moieties in the peptides. The peptide having the cytosine NBA at the position of the Asn40 site in the Rev showed a higher binding ability for RRE IIB RNA, despite the diminishing the Asn40 function. Furthermore, the peptide having the guanine NBA at the position of the Arg44 site, which is the most important residue for the RNA binding in the Rev, bound to RRE IIB RNA in an ability similar to Rev34-50 with native sequence. These results demonstrate that an appropriate NBA unit in the peptide plays an important role in the RNA binding with a specific contact such as hydrogen bonding, and the interaction between the nucleobase in the peptide and the base in the RNA can enhance the RNA-binding affinity and specificity.

  18. Quantification of Residual Germinal Center Activity and HIV-1 DNA and RNA Levels Using Fine Needle Biopsies of Lymph Nodes During Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hey-Nguyen, William J; Xu, Yin; Pearson, Chester F; Bailey, Michelle; Suzuki, Kazuo; Tantau, Robyn; Obeid, Solange; Milner, Brad; Field, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Bloch, Mark; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D; Zaunders, John J; Koelsch, Kersten K

    2017-03-13

    HIV-1 reservoirs are most often studied in peripheral blood (PB), but not all lymphocytes recirculate, particularly T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4(+) T cells, as well as germinal center (GC) B cells, in lymph nodes (LNs). Ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsies (FNBs) from inguinal LNs and PB samples were obtained from 10 healthy controls (HCs) and 21 HIV-1-infected subjects [11 antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive and 10 on ART]. Tfh cells and GC B cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. HIV-1 DNA and cell-associated (CA) RNA levels in LNs and PB were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. FNBs were obtained without adverse events. Tfh cells and GC B cells were highly elevated in ART-naive subjects, with a median GC B cell count >300-fold higher than HCs, but also remained higher in 4 out of the 10 subjects on ART. GC B cell counts and Tfh cell counts were highly correlated with each other, and also with activated T cells in LNs but not in blood. Levels of HIV-1 DNA and CA RNA viral burden in highly purified CD4(+) T cells from FNBs were significantly elevated compared with those in CD4(+) T cells from PB in the ART-naive group, but only trended toward an increase in the ART patients. FNBs enabled minimally invasive access to, and parallel measurement of residual activated T and B cells and viral burden within LNs in HIV-1-infected patients. These FNBs revealed significant GC activity that was not apparent from corresponding PB samples.

  19. MicroRNA regulation of viral immunity, latency, and carcinogenesis of selected tumor viruses and HIV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Li, Guangyu; Yao, Zhi Q; Moorman, Jonathan P; Ning, Shunbin

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function as key regulators in immune responses and cancer development. In the contexts of infection with oncogenic viruses, miRNAs are engaged in viral persistence, latency establishment and maintenance, and oncogenesis. In this review, we summarize the potential roles and mechanisms of viral and cellular miRNAs in the host-pathogen interactions during infection with selected tumor viruses and HIV, which include (i) repressing viral replication and facilitating latency establishment by targeting viral transcripts, (ii) evading innate and adaptive immune responses via toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, T-cell receptor, and B-cell receptor pathways by targeting signaling molecules such as TRAF6, IRAK1, IKKε, and MyD88, as well as downstream targets including regulatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 10, and transforming growth factor β, (iii) antagonizing intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways by targeting pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic gene transcripts such as the Bcl-2 family and caspase-3, (iv) modulating cell proliferation and survival through regulation of the Wnt, PI3K/Akt, Erk/MAPK, and Jak/STAT signaling pathways, as well as the signaling pathways triggered by viral oncoproteins such as Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1, by targeting Wnt-inhibiting factor 1, SHIP, pTEN, and SOCSs, and (v) regulating cell cycle progression by targeting cell cycle inhibitors such as p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1. Further elucidation of the interaction between miRNAs and these key biological events will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of viral latency and oncogenesis and may lead to the identification of miRNAs as novel targets for developing new therapeutic or preventive interventions.

  20. Evaluation of performance across the dynamic range of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay as compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 using serial dilutions of 39 group M and O viruses.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Priscilla; Huang, Shihai; Abravaya, Klara; de Mendoza, Carmen; Soriano, Vincent; Devare, Sushil G; Hackett, John

    2007-04-01

    Performance of the Abbott m2000 instrument system and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay was evaluated using a panel of 37 group M (subtypes A-D, F, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG and unique recombinant forms) and 2 group O virus isolates. Testing was performed on 273 sample dilutions and compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA) and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 (Monitor v1.5) test results. RealTime HIV-1, bDNA, and Monitor v1.5 tests quantified 87%, 78%, and 81% of samples, respectively. RealTime HIV-1 detected an additional 31 samples at < 40 copies/mL. For group M, RealTime HIV-1 dilution profiles and viral loads were highly correlated with bDNA and Monitor v1.5 values; 87% and 89% of values were within 0.5 log(10) copies/mL. In contrast, the group O viruses were not detected by Monitor v1.5 and were substantially underquantified by approximately 2 log(10) copies/mL in bDNA relative to the RealTime HIV-1 assay. Sequence analysis revealed that RealTime HIV-1 primer/probe binding sites are highly conserved and exhibit fewer nucleotide mismatches relative to Monitor v1.5. The automated m2000 system and RealTime HIV-1 assay offer the advantages of efficient sample processing and throughput with reduced "hands-on" time while providing improved sensitivity, expanded dynamic range and reliable quantification of genetically diverse HIV-1 strains.

  1. Comparative structural effects of HIV-1 Gag and nucleocapsid proteins in binding to and unwinding of the viral RNA packaging signal.

    PubMed

    Bell, Neil M; Kenyon, Julia C; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Lever, Andrew M L

    2012-04-17

    The major RNA binding region of the HIV-1 Gag polyprotein is the nucleocapsid (NC) domain, which is responsible for the specific capture of the genomic RNA genome during viral assembly. The Gag polyprotein has other RNA chaperone functions, which are mirrored by the isolated NC protein after physiological cleavage from Gag. Gag, however, is suggested to have superior nucleic acid chaperone activity. Here we investigate the interaction of Gag and NC with the core RNA structure of the HIV-1 packaging signal (Ψ), using 2-aminopurine substitution to create a series of modified RNAs based on the Ψ helix loop structure. The effects of 2-aminopurine substitution on the physical and structural properties of the viral Ψ were characterized. The fluorescence properties of the 2-aminopurine substitutions showed features consistent with the native GNAR tetraloop. Dissociation constants (K(d)) of the two viral proteins, measured by fluorescence polarization (FP), were similar, and both NC and Gag affected the 2-aminopurine fluorescence of bases close to the loop binding region in a similar fashion. However, the influence of Gag on the fluorescence of the 2-aminopurine nucleotides at the base of the helix implied a much more potent helix destabilizing action on the RNA stem loop (SL) versus that seen with NC. This was further supported when the viral Ψ SL was tagged with a 5' fluorophore and 3' quencher. In the absence of any viral protein, minimal fluorescence was detected; addition of NC yielded a slight increase in fluorescence, while addition of the Gag protein yielded a large change in fluorescence, further suggesting that, compared to NC, the Gag protein has a greater propensity to affect RNA structure and that Ψ helix unwinding may be an intrinsic step in RNA encapsidation.

  2. Deconvoluting the Composition of Low-Frequency Hepatitis C Viral Quasispecies: Comparison of Genotypes and NS3 Resistance-Associated Variants between HCV/HIV Coinfected Hemophiliacs and HCV Monoinfected Patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ode, Hirotaka; Sugiura, Wataru; Moriya, Kyoji; Oka, Shinichi; Kimura, Satoshi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pre-existing low-frequency resistance-associated variants (RAVs) may jeopardize successful sustained virological responses (SVR) to HCV treatment with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, the potential impact of low-frequency (∼0.1%) mutations, concatenated mutations (haplotypes), and their association with genotypes (Gts) on the treatment outcome has not yet been elucidated, most probably owing to the difficulty in detecting pre-existing minor haplotypes with sufficient length and accuracy. Herein, we characterize a methodological framework based on Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) coupled with bioinformatics of quasispecies reconstruction (QSR) to realize highly accurate variant calling and genotype-haplotype detection. The core-to-NS3 protease coding sequences in 10 HCV monoinfected patients, 5 of whom had a history of blood transfusion, and 11 HCV/HIV coinfected patients with hemophilia, were studied. Simulation experiments showed that, for minor variants constituting more than 1%, our framework achieved a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and sensitivities of 91.7–100% for genotyping and 80.6% for RAV screening. Genotyping analysis indicated the prevalence of dominant Gt1a infection in coinfected patients (6/11 vs 0/10, p = 0.01). For clinical samples, minor genotype overlapping infection was prevalent in HCV/HIV coinfected hemophiliacs (10/11) and patients who experienced whole-blood transfusion (4/5) but none in patients without exposure to blood (0/5). As for RAV screening, the Q80K/R and S122K/R variants were particularly prevalent among minor RAVs observed, detected in 12/21 and 6/21 cases, respectively. Q80K was detected only in coinfected patients, whereas Q80R was predominantly detected in monoinfected patients (1/11 vs 7/10, p < 0.01). Multivariate interdependence analysis revealed the previously unrecognized prevalence of Gt1b-Q80K, in HCV/HIV coinfected hemophiliacs [Odds ratio = 13.4 (3.48–51.9), p < 0.01]. Our study

  3. Low-level Viremia Early in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Cummings, Vanessa; Fogel, Jessica M.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Connor, Matthew B.; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    HIV RNA levels are usually high early in HIV infection. In the HPTN 061 study, men were tested for HIV infection every six months; six (21.4%) of 28 men who acquired HIV infection during the study had low or undetectable HIV RNA at the time of HIV diagnosis. Antiretroviral drugs were not detected at the time of HIV diagnosis. False-negative HIV test results were obtained for two men using multiple assays. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in HIV from one man. Additional studies are needed to identify factors associated with low HIV RNA levels during early HIV infection. PMID:25140905

  4. Administration of Panobinostat Is Associated with Increased IL-17A mRNA in the Intestinal Epithelium of HIV-1 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bjerg Christensen, Ane; Dige, Anders; Vad-Nielsen, Johan; Brinkmann, Christel R.; Bendix, Mia; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S.; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Randel Nyengaard, Jens; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal CD4+ T cell depletion is rapid and profound during early HIV-1 infection. This leads to a compromised mucosal barrier that prompts chronic systemic inflammation. The preferential loss of intestinal T helper 17 (Th17) cells in HIV-1 disease is a driver of the damage within the mucosal barrier and of disease progression. Thus, understanding the effects of new therapeutic strategies in the intestines has high priority. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (e.g., panobinostat) are actively under investigation as potential latency reversing agents in HIV eradication studies. These drugs have broad effects that go beyond reactivating virus, including modulation of immune pathways. We examined colonic biopsies from ART suppressed HIV-1 infected individuals (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01680094) for the effects of panobinostat on intestinal T cell activation and on inflammatory cytokine production. We compared biopsy samples that were collected before and during oral panobinostat treatment and observed that panobinostat had a clear biological impact in this anatomical compartment. Specifically, we observed a decrease in CD69+ intestinal lamina propria T cell frequency and increased IL-17A mRNA expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results suggest that panobinostat therapy may influence the restoration of mucosal barrier function in these patients. PMID:26696749

  5. Comparison of Sanger and next generation sequencing performance for genotyping Cryptosporidium isolates at the 18S rRNA and actin loci.

    PubMed

    Paparini, Andrea; Gofton, Alexander; Yang, Rongchang; White, Nicole; Bunce, Michael; Ryan, Una M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important enteric pathogen that infects a wide range of humans and animals. Rapid and reliable detection and characterisation methods are essential for understanding the transmission dynamics of the parasite. Sanger sequencing, and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) on an Ion Torrent platform, were compared with each other for their sensitivity and accuracy in detecting and characterising 25 Cryptosporidium-positive human and animal faecal samples. Ion Torrent reads (n = 123,857) were obtained at both 18S rRNA and actin loci for 21 of the 25 samples. Of these, one isolate at the actin locus (Cattle 05) and three at the 18S rRNA locus (HTS 10, HTS 11 and HTS 12), suffered PCR drop-out (i.e. PCR failures) when using fusion-tagged PCR. Sanger sequences were obtained for both loci for 23 of the 25 samples and showed good agreement with Ion Torrent-based genotyping. Two samples both from pythons (SK 02 and SK 05) produced mixed 18S and actin chromatograms by Sanger sequencing but were clearly identified by Ion Torrent sequencing as C. muris. One isolate (SK 03) was typed as C. muris by Sanger sequencing but was identified as a mixed C. muris and C. tyzzeri infection by HTS. 18S rRNA Type B sequences were identified in 4/6 C. parvum isolates when deep sequenced but were undetected in Sanger sequencing. Sanger was cheaper than Ion Torrent when sequencing a small numbers of samples, but when larger numbers of samples are considered (n = 60), the costs were comparative. Fusion-tagged amplicon based approaches are a powerful way of approaching mixtures, the only draw-back being the loss of PCR efficiency on low-template samples when using primers coupled to MID tags and adaptors. Taken together these data show that HTS has excellent potential for revealing the "true" composition of species/types in a Cryptosporidium infection, but that HTS workflows need to be carefully developed to ensure sensitivity, accuracy and contamination are

  6. A peptide nucleic acid-aminosugar conjugate targeting transactivation response element of HIV-1 RNA genome shows a high bioavailability in human cells and strongly inhibits tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Das, Indrajit; Désiré, Jérôme; Manvar, Dinesh; Baussanne, Isabelle; Pandey, Virendra N; Décout, Jean-Luc

    2012-07-12

    The 6-aminoglucosamine ring of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B (ring II) was conjugated to a 16-mer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA. For this purpose, we prepared the aminoglucosamine monomer 15 and attached it to the protected PNA prior to its cleavage from the solid support. We found that the resulting PNA-aminoglucosamine conjugate is stable under acidic conditions, efficiently taken up by the human cells and fairly distributed in both cytosol and nucleus without endosomal entrapment because cotreatment with endosome-disrupting agent had no effect on its cellular distribution. The conjugate displayed very high target specificity in vitro and strongly inhibited Tat mediated transactivation of HIV-1 LTR transcription in a cell culture system. The unique properties of this new class of PNA conjugate suggest it to be a potential candidate for therapeutic application.

  7. APOBEC3G mRNA expression in exposed seronegative and early stage HIV infected individuals decreases with removal of exposure and with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Pérez, Joel A; Ormsby, Christopher E; Hernández-Juan, Ramón; Torres, Klintsy J; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Background APOBEC3G is an antiretroviral factor that acts by inducing G to A mutations. In this study, we examined the expression of APOBEC3G in uninfected HIV-1 exposed individuals at the time of their partner's diagnosis and one year later. We then compared this expression with that of infected individuals at different disease stages. APOBEC3G mRNA was measured in PBMCs from three groups: healthy controls with no known risk factor to HIV infection (n = 26), exposed uninfected individuals who had unprotected sex with their HIV+ partners for at least 3 months (n = 37), and HIV infected patients at various disease stages (n = 45), including 8 patients with low HIV viral loads < 10,000 copies/mL (LVL) for at least 3 years. Additionally, we obtained sequences from the env, gag, pol, nef, vif and the LTR of the patients' virus. Results Exposed uninfected individuals expressed higher APOBEC3G than healthy controls (3.86 vs. 1.69 relative expression units), and their expression significantly decreased after a year from the HIV diagnosis and subsequent treatment of their partners. Infected individuals showed a positive correlation (Rho = 0.57, p = 0.00006) of APOBEC3G expression with CD4+ T cell count, and a negative correlation with HIV viremia (Rho = -0.54, p = 0.00004). The percentage of G to A mutations had a positive correlation (Rho = 0.43, p = 0.0226) with APOBEC3G expression, and it was higher in LVL individuals than in the other patients (IQR 8.27 to 9.64 vs. 7.06 to 8.1, p = 0.0084). Out of 8 LVLs, 3 had hypermutations, and 4 had premature stop codons only in viral vif. Conclusion The results suggest that exposure to HIV may trigger APOBEC3G expression in PBMCs, in the absence of infection. Additionally, cessation of exposure or advanced disease is associated with decreased APOBEC3G expression. PMID:19254362

  8. Ligand-induced changes in 2-aminopurine fluorescence as a probe for small molecule binding to HIV-1 TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    BRADRICK, THOMAS D.; MARINO, JOHN P.

    2004-01-01

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is regulated in part through an interaction between the virally encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the trans-activator responsive region (TAR) of the viral RNA genome. Because TAR is highly conserved and its interaction with Tat is required for efficient viral replication, it has received much attention as an antiviral drug target. Here, we report a 2-aminopurine (2-AP) fluorescence-based assay for evaluating potential TAR inhibitors. Through selective incorporation of 2-AP within the bulge (C23 or U24) of a truncated form of the TAR sequence (Δ TAR-ap23 and Δ TAR-ap24), binding of argininamide, a 24-residue arginine-rich peptide derived from Tat, and Neomycin has been characterized using steady-state fluorescence. Binding of argininamide to the 2-AP ΔTAR constructs results in a four- to 11-fold increase in fluorescence intensity, thus providing a sensitive reporter of that interaction (KD ~ 1 mM). Similarly, binding of the Tat peptide results in an initial 14-fold increase in fluorescence (KD ~ 25 nM), but is then followed by a slight decrease that is attributed to an additional, lower-affinity association(s). Using the ΔTAR-ap23 and TAR-ap24 constructs, two classes of Neomycin binding sites are detected; the first molecule of antibiotic binds as a noncompetitive inhibitor of Tat/argininamide (KD ~ 200 nM), whereas the second, more weakly bound molecule(s) becomes associated in a presumably nonspecific manner (KD ~ 4 μM). Taken together, the results demonstrate that the 2-AP fluorescence-detected binding assays provide accurate and general methods for quantitatively assessing TAR interactions. PMID:15273324

  9. DNA-dependent protein kinase interacts functionally with the RNA polymerase II complex recruited at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat and plays an important role in HIV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shilpi; Ochem, Alex; Tyagi, Mudit

    2011-07-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a nuclear protein kinase that specifically requires association with DNA for its kinase activity, plays important roles in the regulation of different DNA transactions, including transcription, replication and DNA repair, as well as in the maintenance of telomeres. Due to its large size, DNA-PK is also known to facilitate the activities of other factors by providing the docking platform at their site of action. In this study, by running several chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate the parallel distribution of DNA-PK with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) along the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus before and after activation with tumour necrosis factor alpha. The association between DNA-PK and RNAP II is also long-lasting, at least for up to 4 h (the duration analysed in this study). Knockdown of endogenous DNA-PK using specific small hairpin RNAs expressed from lentiviral vectors resulted in significant reduction in HIV gene expression and replication, demonstrating the importance of DNA-PK for HIV gene expression. Sequence analysis of the HIV-1 Tat protein revealed three potential target sites for phosphorylation by DNA-PK and, by using kinase assays, we confirmed that Tat is an effective substrate of DNA-PK. Through peptide mapping, we found that two of these three potential phosphorylation sites are recognized and phosphorylated by DNA-PK. Mutational studies on the DNA-PK target sites of Tat further demonstrated the functional significance of the Tat-DNA-PK interaction. Thus, overall our results clearly demonstrate the functional interaction between DNA-PK and RNAP II during HIV transcription.

  10. When to Monitor CD4 Cell Count and HIV RNA to Reduce Mortality and AIDS-Defining Illness in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Positive Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy in High-Income Countries: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Caniglia, Ellen C.; Sabin, Caroline; Robins, James M.; Logan, Roger; Cain, Lauren E.; Abgrall, Sophie; Mugavero, Michael J.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; Drozd, Daniel R.; Seage, George R.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Dabis, Francois; Moore, Richard R.; Reiss, Peter; van Sighem, Ard; Mathews, William C.; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.; Muga, Roberto; Boswell, Stephen L.; Ferrer, Elena; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Jose, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Justice, Amy C.; Tate, Janet P.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Egger, Matthias; Touloumi, Giota; Sterne, Jonathan A.; Costagliola, Dominique; Saag, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To illustrate an approach to compare CD4 cell count and HIV-RNA monitoring strategies in HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design: Prospective studies of HIV-positive individuals in Europe and the USA in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and The Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems. Methods: Antiretroviral-naive individuals who initiated ART and became virologically suppressed within 12 months were followed from the date of suppression. We compared 3 CD4 cell count and HIV-RNA monitoring strategies: once every (1) 3 ± 1 months, (2) 6 ± 1 months, and (3) 9–12 ± 1 months. We used inverse-probability weighted models to compare these strategies with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Results: In 39,029 eligible individuals, there were 265 deaths and 690 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths. Compared with the 3-month strategy, the mortality hazard ratios (95% CIs) were 0.86 (0.42 to 1.78) for the 6 months and 0.82 (0.46 to 1.47) for the 9–12 month strategy. The respective 18-month risk ratios (95% CIs) of virologic failure (RNA >200) were 0.74 (0.46 to 1.19) and 2.35 (1.56 to 3.54) and 18-month mean CD4 differences (95% CIs) were −5.3 (−18.6 to 7.9) and −31.7 (−52.0 to −11.3). The estimates for the 2-year risk of AIDS-defining illness or death were similar across strategies. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that monitoring frequency of virologically suppressed individuals can be decreased from every 3 months to every 6, 9, or 12 months with respect to clinical outcomes. Because effects of different monitoring strategies could take years to materialize, longer follow-up is needed to fully evaluate this question. PMID:26895294

  11. CYP2B6*6 genotype and high efavirenz plasma concentration but not nevirapine are associated with low lumefantrine plasma exposure and poor treatment response in HIV-malaria-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Maganda, B A; Minzi, O M S; Ngaimisi, E; Kamuhabwa, A A R; Aklillu, E

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the influence of efavirenz (EFV)- or nevirapine (NVP)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) on lumefantrine plasma exposure in HIV-malaria-coinfected patients and implication of pharmacogenetic variations. A total of 269 HIV patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria on NVP-based ART (NVP-arm), EFV-based ART (EFV-arm) or not receiving ART (control-arm) were enrolled and treated with artemether-lumefantrine. Day-7 lumefantrine, baseline EFV and NVP plasma concentrations, and CYP2B6*6,*18, CYP3A4*1B, CYP3A5*3,*6,*7, ABCB1 c.3435C>T and ABCB1 c.4036A>G genotypes were determined. The median day-7 lumefantrine plasma concentration was significantly lower in the EFV-arm compared with that in NVP- and control-arm. High EFV plasma concentrations and CYP2B6*6/*6 genotype significantly correlated with low lumefantrine plasma concentrations and high rate of recurrent parasitemia. No significant effect of NVP-based ART on lumefantrine exposure was observed. In conclusion, owing to long-term CYP3A induction, EFV-based ART cotreatment significantly reduces lumefantrine plasma exposure leading to poor malaria treatment response, which is more pronounced in CYP2B6 slow metabolizers.

  12. Genotypes of ITS region of rRNA in Microcystis (Cyanobacteria) populations in Erhai Lake (China) and their correlation with eutrophication level.

    PubMed

    Song, Gaofei; Jiang, Yongguang; Yu, Gongliang; Li, Renhui

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies on spatiotemporal changes of Microcystis genotypes have shown that the existence and succession of dominant genotypes always occur in eutrophicated freshwater bodies. However, few studies have focused on the correlation between genotype composition and eutrophication level. In the present study, clone libraries of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of rrn operon were sequenced from Microcystis populations in Erhai Lake, a subtropical plateau lake in the preliminary eutrophication stage. The genotype composition of the Microcystis populations was highly variable at spatiotemporal scales, and 473 ITS genotypes were identified from the 800 ITS sequences obtained. However, no significantly dominant ITS genotypes existed in the lake. Comparison of Erhai Lake with four major lakes in China, namely, Taihu, Chaohu, Gucheng, and Shijiu Lakes, showed that the Microcystis ITS genotypes and genetic diversity were negatively correlated with eutrophication level. Extensive comparison of the Microcystis ITS genotypes from waters worldwide revealed that 440 ITS genotypes were unique to Erhai Lake, and no obvious phylogenetic correlations can be detected among the dominant genotypes from different water bodies. The high genetic diversity of the Microcystis populations in Erhai Lake may have resulted from the effect of the early stage of eutrophication.

  13. The presence of the TAR RNA structure alters the programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift efficiency of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by modifying the rate of translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Karine; Charbonneau, Johanie; Dulude, Dominic; Heveker, Nikolaus; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 uses a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift to synthesize the precursor of its enzymes, Gag-Pol. The frameshift efficiency that is critical for the virus replication, is controlled by an interaction between the ribosome and a specific structure on the viral mRNA, the frameshift stimulatory signal. The rate of cap-dependent translation initiation is known to be altered by the TAR RNA structure, present at the 5′ and 3′ end of all HIV-1 mRNAs. Depending upon its concentration, TAR activates or inhibits the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We investigated here whether changes in translation initiation caused by TAR affect HIV-1 frameshift efficiency. CD4+ T cells and 293T cells were transfected with a dual-luciferase construct where the firefly luciferase expression depends upon the HIV-1 frameshift. Translation initiation was altered by adding TAR in cis or trans of the reporter mRNA. We show that HIV-1 frameshift efficiency correlates negatively with changes in the rate of translation initiation caused by TAR and mediated by PKR. A model is presented where changes in the rate of initiation affect the probability of frameshifting by altering the distance between elongating ribosomes on the mRNA, which influences the frequency of encounter between these ribosomes and the frameshift stimulatory signal. PMID:17984074

  14. Socio-economic marginalization and plasma HIV-1 RNA non-detectability among individuals who use illicit drugs in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    RICHARDSON, Lindsey A.; KERR, Thomas H.; DOBRER, Sabina; PUSKAS, Cathy M.; GUILLEMI, Silvia A.; MONTANER, Julio S. G.; WOOD, Evan; MILLOY, M-J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Given that people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) often engage in prohibited income generation to support their basic needs, we sought to examine the role of these activities in shaping antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and plasma HIV RNA-1 viral load suppression among HIV-infected PWUD. Design Longitudinal analyses among HIV-positive, ART exposed PWUD in the AIDS Care Cohort to evaluate Exposure to Survival Services prospective cohort study (2005–2013). Methods Generalized linear mixed effects and mediation analyses examined the relationship between prohibited income generation (e.g. sex work, drug dealing, theft, street-based income) and virologic suppression (plasma viral load ≤ 50 copies/mL plasma) adjusting for adherence and potential confounders. Results Among 687 HIV-infected PWUD, 391 (56.9%) individuals reported prohibited income generation activity during the study period. In multivariate analyses, prohibited income generation remained independently and negatively associated with virologic suppression (adjusted odds ratio: 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.52–0.88) following adjustment for hypothesized confounders, including high-intensity drug use, ART adherence and homelessness. While partially mediated by ART adherence, the relationship between prohibited income generation and virologic suppression was maintained in mediation analyses (Sobel statistic = −1.95, p=0.05). Conclusions Involvement in prohibited income generation decreases the likelihood of virologic suppression directly and indirectly through its negative association with ART adherence. These findings suggest that linkages between socio-economic marginalization, the criminalization of illicit drug use and insufficient employment opportunities may produce barriers to access and retention in care. Programmatic and policy interventions that decrease socio-economic vulnerability may therefore reduce HIV-related morbidity, mortality and onward transmission. PMID:26558546

  15. Persistent hepatitis C virus RNA replication in haemophiliacs: role of co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Chambost, H; Gerolami, V; Halfon, P; Thuret, I; Michel, G; Sicardi, F; Rousseau, S; Perrimond, H; Cartouzou, G

    1995-11-01

    In order to evaluate the evolution of transfusional hepatitis C in haemophiliacs, we performed a retrospective study of ALT levels and HCV viraemia with a RNA PCR assay in 57 patients. We found that the vast majority of HCV-infected patients remained viraemic (43/57 = 75%) and higher ALT levels correlated with HCV viraemia. Although indicators of the transfusional viral load (age, severity of haemophilia) and HBV co-infection did not correlate with HCV RNA replication, HIV seropositivity was strongly associated with persistence of HCV viraemia (23/25 = 92% in HIV-positive versus 20/32 = 62% in HIV-negative patients), without any correlation with CD4 counts. Genotyping of HCV in the 43 viraemic patients shows more frequent genotype 1 in the HIV-seropositive group (14/23) than in the seronegative group (6/20). Our data emphasize that besides the role of the immunodeficiency status, the genotypes of HCV might be involved in the differences observed in terms of HCV RNA replication between the HIV-seropositive and seronegative haemophiliacs.

  16. Development of an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the Mycoplasma pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and distinguish the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Seto, Junji; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Yahagi, Kazue; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Hongo, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae harboring a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is increasing, and rapid detection assays are needed for clinical management. We developed an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and determine the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063 (A2063G, A2063T and A2063C mutations). This A2063B genotyping assay detected more than 50 copies/reaction of the M. pneumoniae gene in every nucleotide mutation at position 2063. Of 42 clinical specimens, 3 were positive without mutation, 6 were positive with the A2063G mutation, and 33 were negative. The results were confirmed using nested PCR with the sequencing of the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene, and a high sensitivity (90%), specificity (100%), and coincidence ratio (kappa coefficient=0.93) were obtained. Therefore, the A2063B genotyping assay is useful for the rapid discrimination of macrolide resistance mutations at position 2063.

  17. HIV-1 Tat protein enhances the intracellular growth of Leishmania amazonensis via the ds-RNA induced protein PKR

    PubMed Central

    Vivarini, Áislan de Carvalho; Santos Pereira, Renata de Meirelles; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Temerozo, Jairo Ramos; Soares, Deivid C.; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 co-infection with human parasitic diseases is a growing public health problem worldwide. Leishmania parasites infect and replicate inside macrophages, thereby subverting host signaling pathways, including the response mediated by PKR. The HIV-1 Tat protein interacts with PKR and plays a pivotal role in HIV-1 replication. This study shows that Tat increases both the expression and activation of PKR in Leishmania-infected macrophages. Importantly, the positive effect of Tat addition on parasite growth was dependent on PKR signaling, as demonstrated in PKR-deficient macrophages or macrophages treated with the PKR inhibitor. The effect of HIV-1 Tat on parasite growth was prevented when the supernatant of HIV-1-infected macrophages was treated with neutralizing anti-HIV-1 Tat prior to Leishmania infection. The addition of HIV-1 Tat to Leishmania-infected macrophages led to inhibition of iNOS expression, modulation of NF-kB activation and enhancement of IL-10 expression. Accordingly, the expression of a Tat construct containing mutations in the basic region (49–57aa), which is responsible for the interaction with PKR, favored neither parasite growth nor IL-10 expression in infected macrophages. In summary, we show that Tat enhances Leishmania growth through PKR signaling. PMID:26608746

  18. HCV core antigen as an alternate test to HCV RNA for assessment of virologic responses to all-oral, interferon-free treatment in HCV genotype 1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Feld, Jordan J; Chevaliez, Stéphane; Cheng, Kevin; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sarrazin, Christoph; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Herman, Christine; Hackett, John; Cohen, Daniel E; Dawson, George J; Cloherty, Gavin; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-27

    In light of the advances in HCV therapy, simplification of diagnosis confirmation, pre- treatment diagnostic workup and treatment monitoring is required to ensure broad access to interferon-free therapies. HCV core antigen (HCV cAg) testing is rapid, giving results in approximately 60min, and less expensive than HCV RNA methods. While extensive data on the analytical performance of HCV cAg relative to RNA or comparisons in longitudinal studies of patients on interferon based (response guided) therapy there is very limited data on the relative performance of HCV cAg in diagnosis and monitoring patients receiving all-oral interferon free regimens. Furthermore, there is no data in the literature that describes the specificity of HCV cAg in patients with resolved HCV infection i.e. anti-HCV positive/HCV RNA negative. In this study a total of 1201 plasma samples from the 411 HCV genotype 1 subjects with a HCV RNA viral load >50,000IU/ml who enrolled in a clinical trial with ombitasvir, ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir and dasabuvir, with or without ribavirin were retrospectively tested in a blinded fashion with HCV cAg test and results were compared to HCV RNA levels. The specificity of the HCV cAg test was also evaluated in anti-HCV positive but HCV RNA negative samples. Overall concordance between HCV cAg and HCV RNA was 98.6% while concordance in pre-treatment samples was 99.5% (409/411; n=2 HCV RNA pos. with viral loads>3 Mill IU/ml but HCV cAg neg.) and 99.24% in post treatment week 12 samples (391/394; n=2 HCV RNA pos.<25IU/ml and n=1 HCV RNA pos. 2180IU/ml). Specificity in anti-HCV positive HCV RNA negative samples tested was 100%.

  19. HIV-2 encephalitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brian R; Klein, Joshua P; Lyons, Jennifer L; Milner, Danny A; Phillips, Richard E; Schutten, Martin; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Ciarlini, Pedro; Henrich, Timothy J; Johnson, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old man who moved from Cape Verde to Massachusetts at the age of 29. He had multiple sexual contacts with female partners in Cape Verde and with West African women in Massachusetts, as well as multiple past indeterminate HIV-1 antibody tests. He presented to our facility with 2-3 months of inappropriate behaviors, memory impairment, weight loss, and night sweats, at which time he was found to have an abnormal enhancing lesion of the corpus collosum on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laboratory testing revealed a CD4 count of 63 cells/mm(3), positive HIV-2 Western blot, serum HIV-2 RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 1160 copies per milliliter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-2 RNA PCR of 2730 copies per milliliter. Brain biopsy demonstrated syncytial giant cells centered around small blood vessels and accompanied by microglia, which correlated with prior pathologic descriptions of HIV-2 encephalitis and with well-described findings of HIV-1 encephalitis. Based on genotype resistance assay results, treatment guidelines, and prior studies validating success with lopinavir-ritonavir, he was treated with tenofovir-emtricitabine and lopinavir-ritonavir, which has led to virologic suppression along with steady neurologic and radiologic improvement, although he continues to have deficits.

  20. Cloning of a long HIV-1 readthrough transcript and detection of an increased level of early growth response protein-1 (Egr-1) mRNA in chronically infected U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Hameau, L; Benboudjema, L; Guymarho, J; Cajean-Feroldi, C; Rizza, P; Godard, C; Jasmin, C; Tovey, M G; Lang, M C

    1999-01-01

    To identify the pathways involved in HIV-1 modification of cellular gene expression, chronically infected U937 cells were screened by mRNA differential display. A chimeric transcript consisting of the 3' end of the LTR of a HIV-1 provirus, followed by 3.7 kb of cellular RNA was identified suggesting that long readthrough transcription might be one of the mechanisms by which gene expression could be modified in individual infected cells. Such a phenomenon may also be the first step towards the potential transduction of cellular sequences. Furthermore, the mRNA encoding for the transcription factor Egr-1 was detected as an over-represented transcript in infected cells. Northern blot analysis confirmed the increase of Egr-1 mRNA content in both HIV-1 infected promonocytic U937 cells and T cell lines such as Jurkat and CEM. Interestingly a similar increase of Egr-1 mRNA has previously been reported to occur in HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infected T cell lines. Despite the consistent increase in the level of Egr-1 mRNA, the amount of the encoded protein did not appear to be modified in HIV-1 infected cells, suggesting an increased turn over of the protein in chronically infected cells.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime™ assay with the Standard Roche COBAS® Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor® Test, v1.5 for determining HIV-1 RNA levels in plasma specimens from Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Khopkar, Priyanka; Mallav, Vikas; Chidrawar, Shweta; Kulkarni, Smita

    2013-07-01

    The implementation of cost effective HIV-1 viral load assays in resource-limited settings have been an impediment for monitoring HIV-1 therapy. A study involving the comparative analytical performance of two HIV-1 viral load assays - Standard Roche COBAS(®) Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor(®) Test, version 1.5 (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland) and Abbott HIV-1 RealTime™ assay (Abbott Molecular, Wiesbaden, Germany) was performed using 125 specimens in Pune, India. A strong correlation was observed between the manual endpoint reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay and the recent real time polymerase chain reaction assay (r=0.989, p value<0.0001) and agreement was 94.4%. Results of the study indicate a higher sensitivity of the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime™ assay for HIV-1 Virology Quality Assurance copy controls as compared to the Standard Roche COBAS(®) Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor(®) Test, version 1.5. Furthermore, features of the Abbott m2000rt RealTime™ PCR assay platform such as higher analytical sensitivity, automated/manual extraction platforms for high/low sample throughputs and ability to quantify a variety of infectious agents (Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, Human Papillomavirus and Neisseria gonorrhoeae/Chlamydia trachomatis) justify its suitability in resource-limited Indian settings. Besides, the study also highlights utility of the precise Virology Quality Assurance validation template in performance evaluation of various quantitative viral load assays.

  2. Women with Cervicovaginal Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Have Lower Genital HIV-1 RNA Loads

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Pratip; Kim, Jenney; Sapiega, Vytautas; Landay, Alan L.; Bremer, James W.; Mestecky, Jiri; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Kovacs, Andrea; Cohn, Jonathan; Weiser, Barbara; Baum, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies that mediate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) are present in the cervical fluid of many HIV-positive women; however, the role that these antibodies play in host defense against HIV is not known. To understand the contribution of ADCC in cervical secretions as a protective mechanism against HIV, we evaluated ADCC titers in paired serum and cervical-lavage (CVL) samples from >300 HIV-1–positive women who participated in the multicenter Division of AIDS Treatment Research Initiative Study 009. The present study demonstrates that women with CVL ADCC activity had lower genital viral loads than did women with serum ADCC activity only. Women with CVL ADCC activity were likely to have HIV-1 gp120–specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G, but not IgA, in their cervical fluid. This finding suggests that specific IgG in cervical fluid can mediate ADCC activity that inversely correlates with genital viral load. PMID:15529262

  3. Fluorescently-labeled RNA packaging into HIV-1 particles: Direct examination of infectivity across central nervous system cell types

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruqiang; El-Hage, Nazira; Dever, Seth M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV penetrates the central nervous system (CNS), and although it is clear that microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes are infected, whether certain other cell types such as neurons are infected remains unclear. Here, we confirmed the finding that RNAs of both cellular and viral origins are present in native HIV-1 particles and exploited this phenomenon to directly examine HIV-1 infectivity of CNS cell types. Using in vitro transcribed mRNAs that were labeled with a fluorescent dye, we showed that these fluorescent mRNAs were packaged into HIV-1 particles by directly examining infected cells using fluorescence microscopy. Cells in culture infected with these labeled HIV-1 particles showed the fluorescent signals of labeled mRNAs by a distinct pattern of punctate, focal signals within the cells which was used to demonstrate that the CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 strain was able to enter microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes, but not neurons. The strategy used in the present study may represent a novel approach of simplicity, robustness and reliability for versatile applications in HIV studies, such as the determination of infectivity across a broad range of cell types and within subpopulations of an individual cell type by direct visualization of viral entry into cells. PMID:26272129

  4. Sex-associated Differences in Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Plasma HIV-1 RNA in Diverse Areas of the World Vary by CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Smeaton, Laura; Barnett, Ronald; Klingman, Karin; Hakim, James; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, N; Campbell, Thomas; Currier, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Background Sex differences in the natural history of HIV infection may vary between resource-rich and resource-limited settings. Objective Baseline characteristics from a randomized clinical trial of treatment naïve subjects conducted at sites in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and North and South America were analyzed to determine if there were significant differences by sex. Results Of the 1571 participants, 740 (47.1%) were women. Women had higher mean screening CD4 cell counts (average 15 cells higher, (p<0.001), lower mean hemoglobin and creatinine clearance, a lower mean baseline HIV-1 viral load (4.85 log10 vs. 5.05 log10 copies/mL (P<0.001)) and were less likely to have a prior AIDS diagnosis than men. The sex difference in viral load difference was related to CD4 cell count, however it was independent of country and persisted within the strata with CD4 < 200 cells/mm3. Conclusion Women in resource limited settings have lower levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA and appear to present for enrollment into a clinical trials at an earlier stage of disease than men. The biologic basis for lower viral in women compared to men remains unexplained. It will be important to determine if the sex differences observed at baseline impact clinical outcomes once the PEARLS clinical trial is completed. PMID:22024521

  5. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  6. Nuclear Exclusion of the HIV-1 host defense factor APOBEC3G requires a novel cytoplasmic retention signal and is not dependent on RNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ryan P; Presnyak, Vladimir; Wedekind, Joseph E; Smith, Harold C

    2008-03-21

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is a host factor that defends against HIV-1 as well as other exogenous retroviruses and endogenous retroelements. To this end, hA3G is restricted to the cytoplasm of T lymphocytes where it interacts with viral RNA and proteins to assemble with viral particles causing a post-entry block during reverse transcription. hA3G also exhibits a mechanism to inhibit the reverse transcription of retroelements by RNA binding and sequestration into mRNA processing centers in the cytoplasm. We have determined that the molecular basis for this specialized property of hA3G is a novel cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) that is necessary and sufficient to restrict wild-type hA3G and chimeric constructs to the cytoplasm. The CRS resides within amino acids 113-128 and is embedded within a basic flanking sequence and does not require RNA binding to retain hA3G in the cytoplasm. Paralogs of hA3G that have nuclear or cytoplasmic distributions differ from hA3G within the region encompassing the CRS motif with respect to charge and amino acid composition. We propose that the CRS enables hA3G to interact with cytoplasmic factors, and thereby enables hA3G to serve in host cell defense by restricting an antiviral sentinel to the cytoplasm. The CRS lies in a region involved in both Gag and Vif interactions; therefore, identification of this motif has important implications for the design of therapeutics that target HIV-1 while maintaining antiviral and cellular functions.

  7. Occurrence of occult HCV infection among Hiv infected patients in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gatserelia, L; Sharvadze, L; Karchava, M; Dolmazashvili, E; Tsertsvadze, T

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C (OCI) infection has been known as detectable HCV-RNA in the liver or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable serum or plasma HCV-RNA. OCI has been detected among different patients groups worldwide, it has been found not only in chronic hepatitis patients of unknown origin, but also among several groups at risk for HCV infection (hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV). This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Prevalence of occult Hepatitis C virus has not been investigated in Georgian population, where a rate of HCV infection is highest (6.7%) among Eastern European Countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of occult HCV infection among HIV infected individuals in Georgia. As a pilot study, we have selected three groups of HIV infected patients for analyses: Group 1- HIV infected patients without evidence of liver disease (n=98), group 2- HIV infected patients with cryptogenic liver disease (n=34) and group 3- HIV/HBV co infected patients (n=29). HCV RNA was tested in PBMCs samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by Line-probe assay based on reverse-hybridization technology. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by transient elastography (FibroScan®). HCV-RNA was detected in PBMCs specimens among 2 (2%) subjects from group 1, 4 (12%) subjects from group 2, and 9 (31%) subjects from group 3. HCV genotypes were determined for 14 of 15 OCI subjects resulting following genotype distribution: 6 (46%) - 1b, 3 (23%) - 2a/2c and 5 (38%) - 3a. One samples failed to be genotyped due to extremely low HCV viral load. Our data revealed the occurrence of occult HCV infection in HIV infected patients. No single HCV genotype was predominant in the present study. Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in OCI patients versus negative ones

  8. High-intensity cannabis use associated with lower plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load among recently-infected people who use injection drugs

    PubMed Central

    Milloy, M-J; Marshall, Brandon; Kerr, Thomas; Richardson, Lindsey; Hogg, Robert; Guillemi, Silvia; Montaner, Julio SG; Wood, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Cannabis use is common among people who are living with HIV/AIDS. While there is growing pre-clinical evidence of the immunomodulatory and anti-viral effects of cannabinoids, their possible effects on HIV disease parameters in humans is largely unknown. Thus, we sought to investigate the possible effects of cannabis use on plasma HIV-1 RNA viral loads among recently-seroconverted illicit drug users. Design and Methods We used data from two linked longitudinal observational cohorts of people who use injection drugs. Using multivariable linear mixed-effects modeling, we analysed the relationship between pVL and high-intensity cannabis use among participants who seroconverted following recruitment. Results Between May, 1996 and March, 2012, 88 individuals seroconverted after recruitment and were included in these analyses. Median pVL in the first 365 days among all seroconverters was 4.66 log10 c/mL. In a multivariable model, at least daily cannabis use was associated with 0.51 log10 c/mL lower pVL (β = −0.51, Standard Error = 0.170, p-value = 0.003). Discussion Consistent with the findings from recent in vitro and in vivo studies, including one conducted among lentiviral-infected primates, we observed a strong association between cannabis use and lower pVL following seroconversion among illicit drug-using participants. Conclusion Our findings support the further investigation of the immunomodulatory or anti-viral effects of cannabinoids among individuals living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25389027

  9. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing pre-integration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin.

  10. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of APOBEC3G with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and disease progression among men engaging in homosexual activity in northern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuyan; Qiao, Yuandong; Zhang, Guangfa; He, Ning; Zhang, Xuelong; Jia, Xueyuan; Sun, Haiming; Wang, Chuntao; Xu, Lidan

    2017-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of HIV infection. The APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide 3G) protein is a component of innate antiviral immunity that inhibits HIV-1 replication. In the present study, a total of 483 HIV-1 seropositive men and 493 HIV-1 seronegative men were selected to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the APOBEC3G gene and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and AIDS progression among MSM residing in northern China. Genotyping of four SNPs (rs5757465, rs3736685, rs8177832, and rs2899313) of the APOBEC3G was performed using the SNPscan™ Kit, while the rs2294367 polymorphism was genotyped using the SNaPshot multiplex system. Our results disclosed no association between the SNPs of APOBEC3G and susceptibility to HIV-1, or effects of these polymorphisms on the CD4(+) T cell count or clinical phase of disease. A meta-analysis of 1624 men with HIV-1 infection and 1523 controls suggested that the association between rs8177832 and susceptibility was not significant. However, we observed a trend towards association with HIV-1 infection for haplotype TTACA (p = 0.082). The potential role of variants of APOBEC3G in HIV-1/AIDS warrants further investigation.

  11. The Extent of mRNA Editing Is Limited in Chicken Liver and Adipose, but Impacted by Tissular Context, Genotype, Age, and Feeding as Exemplified with a Conserved Edited Site in COG3

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Pierre-François; Frésard, Laure; Boutin, Morgane; Leroux, Sophie; Klopp, Christophe; Djari, Anis; Esquerré, Diane; Martin, Pascal GP; Zerjal, Tatiana; Gourichon, David; Pitel, Frédérique; Lagarrigue, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a posttranscriptional process leading to differences between genomic DNA and transcript sequences, potentially enhancing transcriptome diversity. With recent advances in high-throughput sequencing, many efforts have been made to describe mRNA editing at the transcriptome scale, especially in mammals, yielding contradictory conclusions regarding the extent of this phenomenon. We show, by detailed description of the 25 studies focusing so far on mRNA editing at the whole-transcriptome scale, that systematic sequencing artifacts are considered in most studies whereas biological replication is often neglected and multi-alignment not properly evaluated, which ultimately impairs the legitimacy of results. We recently developed a rigorous strategy to identify mRNA editing using mRNA and genomic DNA sequencing, taking into account sequencing and mapping artifacts, and biological replicates. We applied this method to screen for mRNA editing in liver and white adipose tissue from eight chickens and confirm the small extent of mRNA recoding in this species. Among the 25 unique edited sites identified, three events were previously described in mammals, attesting that this phenomenon is conserved throughout evolution. Deeper investigations on five sites revealed the impact of tissular context, genotype, age, feeding conditions, and sex on mRNA editing levels. More specifically, this analysis highlighted that the editing level at the site located on COG3 was strongly regulated by four of these factors. By comprehensively characterizing the mRNA editing landscape in chickens, our results highlight how this phenomenon is limited and suggest regulation of editing levels by various genetic and environmental factors. PMID:26637431

  12. The Extent of mRNA Editing Is Limited in Chicken Liver and Adipose, but Impacted by Tissular Context, Genotype, Age, and Feeding as Exemplified with a Conserved Edited Site in COG3.

    PubMed

    Roux, Pierre-François; Frésard, Laure; Boutin, Morgane; Leroux, Sophie; Klopp, Christophe; Djari, Anis; Esquerré, Diane; Martin, Pascal G P; Zerjal, Tatiana; Gourichon, David; Pitel, Frédérique; Lagarrigue, Sandrine

    2015-12-04

    RNA editing is a posttranscriptional process leading to differences between genomic DNA and transcript sequences, potentially enhancing transcriptome diversity. With recent advances in high-throughput sequencing, many efforts have been made to describe mRNA editing at the transcriptome scale, especially in mammals, yielding contradictory conclusions regarding the extent of this phenomenon. We show, by detailed description of the 25 studies focusing so far on mRNA editing at the whole-transcriptome scale, that systematic sequencing artifacts are considered in most studies whereas biological replication is often neglected and multi-alignment not properly evaluated, which ultimately impairs the legitimacy of results. We recently developed a rigorous strategy to identify mRNA editing using mRNA and genomic DNA sequencing, taking into account sequencing and mapping artifacts, and biological replicates. We applied this method to screen for mRNA editing in liver and white adipose tissue from eight chickens and confirm the small extent of mRNA recoding in this species. Among the 25 unique edited sites identified, three events were previously described in mammals, attesting that this phenomenon is conserved throughout evolution. Deeper investigations on five sites revealed the impact of tissular context, genotype, age, feeding conditions, and sex on mRNA editing levels. More specifically, this analysis highlighted that the editing level at the site located on COG3 was strongly regulated by four of these factors. By comprehensively characterizing the mRNA editing landscape in chickens, our results highlight how this phenomenon is limited and suggest regulation of editing levels by various genetic and environmental factors.

  13. Interleukin 7 up-regulates CD95 protein on CD4+ T cells by affecting mRNA alternative splicing: priming for a synergistic effect on HIV-1 reservoir maintenance.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yue; Zhang, Shaoying; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Xu; Geng, Guannan; Li, Jun; Guo, Xuemin; Cai, Weiping; Li, Linghua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-02

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) has been used as an immunoregulatory and latency-reversing agent in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Although IL-7 can restore circulating CD4(+) T cell counts in HIV-1-infected patients, the anti-apoptotic and proliferative effects of IL-7 appear to benefit survival and expansion of HIV-1-latently infected memory CD4(+) T lymphocytes. IL-7 has been shown to elevate CD95 on CD4(+) T cells in HIV-1-infected individuals and prime CD4(+) T lymphocytes to CD95-mediated proliferative or apoptotic signals. Here we observed that through increasing microRNA-124, IL-7 down-regulates the splicing regulator polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), leading to inclusion of the transmembrane domain-encoding exon 6 of CD95 mRNA and, subsequently, elevation of CD95 on memory CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, IL-7 up-regulates cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and stimulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, which switches CD95 signaling to survival mode in memory CD4(+) T lymphocytes. As a result, co-stimulation through IL-7/IL-7R and FasL/CD95 signal pathways augments IL-7-mediated survival and expansion of HIV-1-latently infected memory CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Collectively, we have demonstrated a novel mechanism for IL-7-mediated maintenance of HIV-1 reservoir.

  14. Mutations of Conserved Residues in the Major Homology Region Arrest Assembling HIV-1 Gag as a Membrane-Targeted Intermediate Containing Genomic RNA and Cellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Motoko; Robinson, Bridget A.; Chutiraka, Kasana; Geary, Clair D.; Reed, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major homology region (MHR) is a highly conserved motif that is found within the Gag protein of all orthoretroviruses and some retrotransposons. While it is widely accepted that the MHR is critical for assembly of HIV-1 and other retroviruses, how the MHR functions and why it is so highly conserved are not understood. Moreover, consensus is lacking on when HIV-1 MHR residues function during assembly. Here, we first addressed previous conflicting reports by confirming that MHR deletion, like conserved MHR residue substitution, leads to a dramatic reduction in particle production in human and nonhuman primate cells expressing HIV-1 proviruses. Next, we used biochemical analyses and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that conserved residues in the MHR are required after assembling Gag has associated with genomic RNA, recruited critical host factors involved in assembly, and targeted to the plasma membrane. The exact point of inhibition at the plasma membrane differed depending on the specific mutation, with one MHR mutant arrested as a membrane-associated intermediate that is stable upon high-salt treatment and other MHR mutants arrested as labile, membrane-associated intermediates. Finally, we observed the same assembly-defective phenotypes when the MHR deletion or conserved MHR residue substitutions were engineered into Gag from a subtype B, lab-adapted provirus or Gag from a subtype C primary isolate that was codon optimized. Together, our data support a model in which MHR residues act just after membrane targeting, with some MHR residues promoting stability and another promoting multimerization of the membrane-targeted assembling Gag oligomer. IMPORTANCE The retroviral Gag protein exhibits extensive amino acid sequence variation overall; however, one region of Gag, termed the major homology region, is conserved among all retroviruses and even some yeast retrotransposons, although the reason for this conservation remains poorly understood. Highly

  15. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Genital Shedding of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Women Coinfected with HSV and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Legoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Grésenguet, Gérard; Weiss, Helen; Khonde, Nzambi; Hocini, Hakim; Désiré, Nathalie; Si-Mohamed, Ali; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Chemin, Cécile; Frost, Eric; Pépin, Jacques; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Mayaud, Philippe; Bélec, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy and usefulness of laboratory-developed real-time PCR procedures using a Light Cycler instrument (Roche Diagnostics) for detecting and quantifying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA as well as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)/HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions from women coinfected with HIV and HSV were evaluated. For HIV-1, the use of the NEC152 and NEC131 primer set and the NEC-LTR probe in the long terminal repeat gene allowed us to detect accurately the majority of HIV-1 subtypes of group M circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, including subtypes A, B, C, D, and G as well as circulating recombinant forms 02 and 11. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HIV in cervicovaginal lavage samples was 5 copies per assay for both RNA and DNA; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of CT values were 1.30% and 0.69% (HIV-1 RNA) and 1.84% and 0.67% (HIV-1 DNA), respectively. Real-time PCR for HSV using primers and probe targeting the HSV DNA polymerase gene allowed both detection and quantification of HSV DNA and also differentiation between HSV-1 and HSV-2 genotypes. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HSV was 5 copies per assay; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of CT values were 0.96% and 1.49%, respectively. Both manual and automated silica-based procedures were appropriate for combined extraction of HIV and HSV genomes from female genital secretions. Taken together, these findings indicate that real-time PCR may be used as a unique nucleic acid amplification procedure to detect and quantify HIV and HSV genomes in cervicovaginal secretions and thus to assess at reduced costs the genital shedding of both viruses in women included in intervention studies. PMID:16455895

  16. Real-time PCR quantification of genital shedding of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women coinfected with HSV and HIV.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Grésenguet, Gérard; Weiss, Helen; Khonde, Nzambi; Hocini, Hakim; Désiré, Nathalie; Si-Mohamed, Ali; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Chemin, Cécile; Frost, Eric; Pépin, Jacques; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Mayaud, Philippe; Bélec, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    The accuracy and usefulness of laboratory-developed real-time PCR procedures using a Light Cycler instrument (Roche Diagnostics) for detecting and quantifying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA as well as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)/HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions from women coinfected with HIV and HSV were evaluated. For HIV-1, the use of the NEC152 and NEC131 primer set and the NEC-LTR probe in the long terminal repeat gene allowed us to detect accurately the majority of HIV-1 subtypes of group M circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, including subtypes A, B, C, D, and G as well as circulating recombinant forms 02 and 11. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HIV in cervicovaginal lavage samples was 5 copies per assay for both RNA and DNA; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of C(T) values were 1.30% and 0.69% (HIV-1 RNA) and 1.84% and 0.67% (HIV-1 DNA), respectively. Real-time PCR for HSV using primers and probe targeting the HSV DNA polymerase gene allowed both detection and quantification of HSV DNA and also differentiation between HSV-1 and HSV-2 genotypes. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HSV was 5 copies per assay; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of C(T) values were 0.96% and 1.49%, respectively. Both manual and automated silica-based procedures were appropriate for combined extraction of HIV and HSV genomes from female genital secretions. Taken together, these findings indicate that real-time PCR may be used as a unique nucleic acid amplification procedure to detect and quantify HIV and HSV genomes in cervicovaginal secretions and thus to assess at reduced costs the genital shedding of both viruses in women included in intervention studies.

  17. [HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is transported into the cell nucleus and binds with genomic viral RNA].

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaia, A G; Vorkunova, G K; Tentsov, Iu Iu

    1993-01-01

    We have shown that gag polyprotein p55 is cleaved in cytosol rapidly after its synthesis, during 2 h, and p17 enters the nuclei while p24 resides in cytosol. To determine whether the nascent p17 is associated with viral genomic RNA in the nuclei, the cells were fractionated, the viral complexes were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibodies against gag proteins, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by slot and blot hybridization. Monoclonal antibodies against p17 precipitated all the viral RNA from the nuclei including full-size genomic RNA and essential part from membranes while monoclonal antibodies against p24 did not precipitate any viral RNA from the nuclei. These data suggest that matrix protein is linked to genomic RNA in the nuclei and rise the possibility that p17 may transfer viral nucleocapsids from the nuclei to plasma membranes, the site of virus assembly.

  18. HIV type 1 genetic variation in foreskin and blood from subjects in Rakai, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Galiwango, Ronald M; Lamers, Susanna L; Redd, Andrew D; Manucci, Jordyn; Tobian, Aaron A R; Sewankambo, Nelson; Kigozi, Godfrey; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Serwadda, David; Boaz, Iga; Nalugoda, Fred; Sullivan, David J; Kong, Xiangrong; Wawer, Maria J; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Laeyendecker, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The foreskin contains a subset of dendritic cells, macrophages, and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that may be targets for initial HIV infection in female-to-male sexual transmission of HIV-1. We present analyses comparing HIV-1 sequences isolated from foreskin DNA and serum RNA in 12 heterosexual men enrolled in an adult male circumcision trial performed in Rakai, Uganda. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated three topologies: (1) little divergence between foreskin and serum, (2) multiple genetic bottlenecks occurring in both foreskin and serum, and (3) complete separation of foreskin and serum populations. The latter tree topology provided evidence that foreskin may serve as a reservoir for distinct HIV-1 strains. Distance and recombination analysis also demonstrated that viral genotypes in the foreskin might segregate independently from the circulating pool of viruses.

  19. Hepatitis B, C, and D and HIV infections among immigrants from Equatorial Guinea living in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Pablo; Herrero, María D; Poveda, Eva; Madejón, Antonio; Treviño, Ana; Gutiérrez, Maite; Ladrón de Guevara, Concepción; Lago, Mar; de Mendoza, Carmen; Soriano, Vincent; Puente, Sabino

    2013-04-01

    A total of 1,220 subjects from Equatorial Guinea living in Spain (median age = 41 years; 453 male and 767 female) was examined for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B (HBV), C (HCV), and D (HDV) viruses. Extracted RNA and DNA from the positive samples were used to quantify viral load. The prevalence of HIV antibodies, HCV RNA, and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) was 10.8% (N = 132), 11.6% (N = 141), and 7.9% (N = 96), respectively. The most prevalent HIV variant was CRF02_AG (38.5%; N = 40). HCV genotype 4 (60%; N = 36) and HBV genotype A3 (32%; N = 8) were the hepatitis variants most frequently found. Superinfection with HDV was seen in 20.9% (N = 24) of HBsAg carriers. A control group of 276 immigrants from other sub-Saharan countries showed similar rates of HIV and HBsAg, although no HCV cases were found. Immigrants constitute a major source of HIV and hepatitis viruses in Spain; therefore, it is important that control measures are intensified.

  20. Human pegivirus molecular epidemiology in Argentina: potential contribution of Latin American migration to genotype 3 circulation.

    PubMed

    Trinks, Julieta; Maestri, Miriam; Oliveto, Fabián; Del Pino, Noemí; Weissenbacher, Mercedes; Torres, Oscar Walter; Oubiña, José Raúl

    2014-12-01

    In order to determine the human pegivirus (HPgV) genotypic diversity in Argentina taking into account the potential contribution of human migration from neighboring countries, samples from 130 Argentine injecting drug users, 116 Argentine- and 50 immigrant-pregnant women were analyzed. HPgV RNA prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive injecting drug users was similar to HIV-positive pregnant women, as was the case when comparing HIV-negative injecting drug users and HIV-negative pregnant women (P > 0.05). HPgV genotype 2 (HPgV/2) was prevalent among both Argentine injecting drug users and pregnant women, in contrast to HPgV/3 observed among pregnant women from Latin American countries with predominant indigenous populations and who had experienced their initial sexual intercourses--and possibly their source of infection--in those countries (P < 0.01). In addition, HPgV vertical and horizontal transmission was proven by molecular analysis of E2 gene and construction of identity matrixes with epidemiologically non-related isolates. This study shows that human migration from neighboring Latin American countries with predominant indigenous populations might contribute to HPgV/3 circulation in Argentina.

  1. Translational regulation of APOBEC3G mRNA by Vif requires its 5'UTR and contributes to restoring HIV-1 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Santiago; Libre, Camille; Batisse, Julien; Mercenne, Gaëlle; Richer, Delphine; Laumond, Géraldine; Decoville, Thomas; Moog, Christiane; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2016-12-20

    The essential HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells expressing cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by decreasing their cellular level, and preventing their incorporation into virions. Unlike the Vif-induced degradation of A3G, the functional role of the inhibition of A3G translation by Vif remained unclear. Here, we show that two stem-loop structures within the 5'-untranslated region of A3G mRNA are crucial for translation inhibition by Vif in cells, and most Vif alleles neutralize A3G translation efficiently. Interestingly, K26R mutation in Vif abolishes degradation of A3G by the proteasome but has no effect at the translational level, indicating these two pathways are independent. These two mechanisms, proteasomal degradation and translational inhibition, similarly contribute to decrease the cellular level of A3G by Vif and to prevent its incorporation into virions. Importantly, inhibition of A3G translation is sufficient to partially restore viral infectivity in the absence of proteosomal degradation. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 has evolved redundant mechanisms to specifically inhibit the potent antiviral activity of A3G.

  2. Translational regulation of APOBEC3G mRNA by Vif requires its 5′UTR and contributes to restoring HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Santiago; Libre, Camille; Batisse, Julien; Mercenne, Gaëlle; Richer, Delphine; Laumond, Géraldine; Decoville, Thomas; Moog, Christiane; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The essential HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells expressing cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by decreasing their cellular level, and preventing their incorporation into virions. Unlike the Vif-induced degradation of A3G, the functional role of the inhibition of A3G translation by Vif remained unclear. Here, we show that two stem-loop structures within the 5′-untranslated region of A3G mRNA are crucial for translation inhibition by Vif in cells, and most Vif alleles neutralize A3G translation efficiently. Interestingly, K26R mutation in Vif abolishes degradation of A3G by the proteasome but has no effect at the translational level, indicating these two pathways are independent. These two mechanisms, proteasomal degradation and translational inhibition, similarly contribute to decrease the cellular level of A3G by Vif and to prevent its incorporation into virions. Importantly, inhibition of A3G translation is sufficient to partially restore viral infectivity in the absence of proteosomal degradation. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 has evolved redundant mechanisms to specifically inhibit the potent antiviral activity of A3G. PMID:27996044

  3. Genotyping of the CCR5 chemokine receptor by isothermal NASBA amplification and differential probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Romano, J W; Tetali, S; Lee, E M; Shurtliff, R N; Wang, X P; Pahwa, S; Kaplan, M H; Ginocchio, C C

    1999-11-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectability of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems.

  4. Genotyping of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor by Isothermal NASBA Amplification and Differential Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Joseph W.; Tetali, Surya; Lee, Eun Mi; Shurtliff, Roxanne N.; Wang, Xue Ping; Pahwa, Savita; Kaplan, Mark H.; Ginocchio, Christine C.

    1999-01-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectibility of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems. PMID:10548593

  5. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  6. The Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 6 (CPSF6) Subunit of the Capsid-recruited Pre-messenger RNA Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) Complex Mediates HIV-1 Integration into Genes.

    PubMed

    Rasheedi, Sheeba; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Serrao, Erik; Sowd, Gregory A; Qian, Juan; Hao, Caili; Dasgupta, Twishasri; Engelman, Alan N; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-05-27

    HIV-1 favors integration into active genes and gene-enriched regions of host cell chromosomes, thus maximizing the probability of provirus expression immediately after integration. This requires cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA 3' end processing that binds HIV-1 capsid and connects HIV-1 preintegration complexes to intranuclear trafficking pathways that link integration to transcriptionally active chromatin. CPSF6 together with CPSF5 and CPSF7 are known subunits of the cleavage factor I (CFIm) 3' end processing complex; however, CPSF6 could participate in additional protein complexes. The molecular mechanisms underpinning the role of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection remain to be defined. Here, we show that a majority of cellular CPSF6 is incorporated into the CFIm complex. HIV-1 capsid recruits CFIm in a CPSF6-dependent manner, which suggests that the CFIm complex mediates the known effects of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection. To dissect the roles of CPSF6 and other CFIm complex subunits in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed virologic and integration site targeting properties of a CPSF6 variant with mutations that prevent its incorporation into CFIm We show, somewhat surprisingly, that CPSF6 incorporation into CFIm is not required for its ability to direct preferential HIV-1 integration into genes. The CPSF5 and CPSF7 subunits appear to have only a minor, if any, role in this process even though they appear to facilitate CPSF6 binding to capsid. Thus, CPSF6 alone controls the key molecular interactions that specify HIV-1 preintegration complex trafficking to active chromatin.

  7. DNA Mutagenic Activity and Capacity for HIV-1 Restriction of the Cytidine Deaminase APOBEC3G Depends on Whether DNA or RNA Binds to Tyrosine 315.

    PubMed

    Polevoda, Bogdan; Joseph, Rebecca; Friedman, Alan E; Bennett, Ryan P; Greiner, Rebecca; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Stewart, Ryan A; Smith, Harold C

    2017-04-05

    APOBEC3G (A3G) belongs to the AID/APOBEC protein family of cytidine deaminases (CDA) that bind to nucleic acids. A3G mutates the HIV genome by deamination of dC to dU, leading to accumulation of virus-inactivating mutations. Binding to cellular RNAs inhibits A3G binding to substrate single-stranded (ss) DNA and CDA activity. RNA and ssDNA bind to the same three A3G tryptic peptides (amino acids 181-194, 314-320, and 345-374) that form parts of a continuously exposed protein surface extending from the catalytic domain in the C-terminus of A3G to its N-terminus. We show here that the A3G tyrosines 181 and 315 directly cross-link ssDNA. Binding experiments showed that a Y315A mutation alone significantly reduced A3G binding to both ssDNA and RNA, whereas Y181A and Y182A mutations only moderately affected A3G nucleic acid binding. Consistent with these findings, the Y315A mutant exhibited little to no deaminase activity in an E. coli DNA mutator reporter, while Y181A and Y182A mutants retained ~50% of wild-type A3G activity. The Y315A mutant also showed a markedly reduced ability to assemble into viral particles and had reduced antiviral activity. In uninfected cells, the impaired RNA-binding capacity of Y315A was evident by a shift of A3G from high-molecular-mass ribonucleoprotein complexes to low-molecular-mass complexes. We conclude that Y315 is essential for coordinating ssDNA interaction with or entry to the deaminase domain and hypothesize that RNA bound to Y315 may be sufficient to competitively inhibit ssDNA deaminase-dependent antiviral activity.

  8. [Molecular characterization of complex recombinant HIV-1 CRF06_cpx subtype detected in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Kaptan, Figen; Ormen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin

    2014-01-01

    A major proportion of the global HIV infections is caused by group M of HIV-1 genotype and to date approximately nine subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K) and 50 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have been recognized. Recombinants between different HIV-1 group M subtypes are designated as CRF. The extension 'cpx', for complex, is given if the CRF consists of contributions from three or more different subtypes but the composition of the subtype is not given. The objective of this study was to present, for the first time an HIV-1 positive married couple infected with CRF06_cpx subtype in Izmir, Turkey. A 39-year-old male patient who admitted to hospital with the complaints of oral candidiasis and zona, was found to be anti-HIV positive. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was 21 cells/mm3 and plasma HIV-1 RNA level was 56.380 copies/ml. He reported unprotected heterosexual contact with multiple partners including African women during his stay in Saudi Arabia between 1996 and 2002. After his diagnosis, his 37-year-old wife was screened for HIV infection and she was also found anti-HIV positive, with CD4+ T cell count of 122 cells/mm3. However, her results of basal plasma HIV-1 RNA could not be obtained because of an internal control error. HIV-1 strains were analysed for subtyping, recombination and drug resistance mutations with pol gene region sequencing. HIV-1 sequences were subtyped as CRF06_cpx after phylogenetic analysis using neighbor-joining method. According to the recombination analysis, HIV-1 pol gene regions consisted of group M subtype G, A, D, and B in the male patient and G K, A, F, and D in the female patient. While L10I + L33F mutation associated with protease inhibitor (PI) resistance was detected in both of the patients, K219N mutation associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance was detected only in the male patient. In conclusion, HIV-1 molecular epidemiology studies are important tools for tracking transmission patterns and

  9. Analysis of Immunological, Viral, Genetic, and Environmental Factors That Might Be Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to HIV Infection in Serodiscordant Couples in Florianópolis, Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Íris M.; da Rosa, Elis A.; Gräf, Tiago; Ferreira, Luiz G. E.; Petry, Andrea; Cavalheiro, Fernanda; Reiche, Edna M.; Zanetti, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Individuals who have been exposed to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and have not been infected might possess natural resistance mechanisms. An understanding of the sociodemographic and immunological conditions that influence resistance to HIV is a challenge, and very little is known about the role of intrinsic antiviral factors that restrict HIV infection. The aim of this study was to analyze potential factors responsible for resistance to HIV infection in serodiscordant couples by comparing HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESN) to HIV-seropositive individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy (HIV-ART) along with healthy controls (HC). The results revealed one HLA-B*27 and two HLA-B*57 individuals among the HESN; a CCR5Δ32 heterozygous deletion was observed in one serodiscordant couple, while the homozygous genotype for this variant was not observed. There were no differences in the basal mRNA expression of APOBEC3G, CFLAR, TRIM5α, LEDGF/p75, BST-2, or SAMHD1 in CD4+ T lymphocyte- and monocyte-enriched populations among the three groups, and lower HBD-3 concentrations were observed in saliva from HIV-ART compared to HESN and HC. The most prevalent HIV-1 subtype was C or C-containing recombinant forms. Six HIV-ART individuals and one HIV-ART individual were infected with the R5 HIV and X4 HIV strains, respectively. The ability to control infection or delay disease progression is probably defined by a balance between viral and host factors, and further evaluation should be performed in larger cohorts. Our data suggest that susceptibility to HIV infection varies among individuals and strengthens the multifactorial characteristics underlying the resistance mechanisms in HIV. PMID:26389741

  10. Two Common Bean Genotypes with Contrasting Response to Phosphorus Deficiency Show Variations in the microRNA 399-Mediated PvPHO2 Regulation within the PvPHR1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Mario; Flores-Pacheco, Gerardo; Reyes, José Luis; Álvarez, Ana Luz; Drevon, Jean Jacques; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    Crop production of the important legume, the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is often limited by low phosphorus (P) in the soil. The genotypes, BAT477 and DOR364, of the common bean have contrasting responses to P starvation. Plants from the BAT477 P deficiency tolerant genotype showed higher phosphate content and root biomass as compared to the DOR364 plants under P starvation. The PvPHR1 transcription factor-signaling pathway plays an essential role in the response to P starvation. PvPHO2, a negative regulator of this pathway, encodes an ubiquitin E2 conjugase that promotes degradation of P-responsive proteins and is the target gene of PvmiR399. PvPHO2 is downregulated in BAT477 plants under P deficiency, while such a response is not observed in P-starved DOR364 plants. Five putative PvmiR399 binding sites were identified in the 5′ UTR region in both genotypes. While four sites showed an identical DNA sequence, the fifth (binding site of PvPHO2 one) showed three base changes and higher complementarity scores in DOR364 as compared to BAT477. Modified 5′RACE experiments indicated that PvmiR399 binding and/or processing was affected in DOR364 P-starved plants. We propose that a less efficient cleavage of the PvPHO2 mRNA directed by PvmiR399 would result in a higher PvPHO2-mediated degradation of P-responsive proteins in the DOR364 genotype with decreased P deficiency tolerance. PMID:23591845

  11. HIV-1 Vpr Inhibits Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication by Inducing MicroRNA miR-942-5p and Activating NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qin; Shen, Chenyou; Qin, Jie; Li, Wan; Hu, Minmin; Lu, Hongmei; Qin, Di; Zhu, Jianzhong; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is required for the development of several AIDS-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The high incidence of AIDS-KS has been ascribed to the interaction of KSHV and HIV-1. We have previously shown that HIV-1-secreted proteins Tat and Nef regulate the KSHV life cycle and synergize with KSHV oncogenes to promote angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here, we examined the regulation of KSHV latency by HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr). We found that soluble Vpr inhibits the expression of KSHV lytic transcripts and proteins, as well as viral particle production by activating NF-κB signaling following internalization into PEL cells. By analyzing the expression profiles of microRNAs combined with target search by bioinformatics and luciferase reporter analyses, we identified a Vpr-upregulated cellular microRNA (miRNA), miR-942-5p, that directly targeted IκBα. Suppression of miR-942-5p relieved the expression of IκBα and reduced Vpr inhibition of KSHV lytic replication, while overexpression of miR-942-5p enhanced Vpr inhibition of KSHV lytic replication. Our findings collectively illustrate that, by activating NF-κB signaling through upregulating a cellular miRNA to target IκBα, internalized HIV-1 Vpr inhibits KSHV lytic replication. These results have demonstrated an essential role of Vpr in the life cycle of KSHV. IMPORTANCE Coinfection by HIV-1 promotes the aggressive growth of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). In this study, we have shown that soluble HIV-1 Vpr inhibits KSHV lytic replication by activating NF-κB signaling following internalization into PEL cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that a cellular microRNA upregulated by Vpr, miR-942-5p, directly targeted IκBα. Suppression of miR-942-5p relieved IκBα expression and reduced Vpr inhibition

  12. Nitrate Starvation Induced Changes in Root System Architecture, Carbon:Nitrogen Metabolism, and miRNA Expression in Nitrogen-Responsive Wheat Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar; Rani, Manju; Bansal, Niketa; Gayatri; Venkatesh, K; Mandal, P K

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of nutrient use efficiency in cereal crops is highly essential not only to reduce the cost of cultivation but also to save the environmental pollution, reduce energy consumption for production of these chemical fertilizers, improve soil health, and ultimately help in mitigating climate change. In the present investigation, we have studied the morphological (with special emphasis on root system architecture) and biochemical responses (in terms of assay of the key enzymes involved in N assimilation) of two N-responsive wheat genotypes, at the seedling stage, under nitrate-optimum and nitrate-starved conditions grown in hydroponics. Expression profile of a few known wheat micro RNAs (miRNAs) was also studied in the root tissue. Total root size, primary root length, and first- and second-order lateral root numbers responded significantly under nitrate-starved condition. Morphological parameters in terms of root and shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots have also been observed to be significant between N-optimum and N-starved condition for each genotypes. Nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthatase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity significantly decreased under N-starved condition. Glutamine oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activity was found to be genotype dependent. Most of the selected miRNAs were expressed in root tissues, and some of them showed their differential N-responsive expression. Our studies indicate that one of the N-responsive genotype (NP-890) did not get affected significantly under nitrogen starvation at seedling stage.

  13. Short Communication: Atazanavir-Based Therapy Is Associated with Higher Hepatitis C Viral Load in HIV Type 1-Infected Subjects with Untreated Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Rivero-Juarez, Antonio; Mira, Jose A.; Santos-Gil, Ignacio; Lopez-Cortes, Luis F.; Girón-Gonzalez, Jose A; Marquez, Manuel; Merino, Dolores; Tellez, Francisco; Caruz, Antonio; Pineda, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We assessed the relationship between atazanavir (ATV)-based antiretroviral treatment (ART) and plasma hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load in a population of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients who received ART based on a protease inhibitor (PI) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) were included. Patients were stratified by ART drug [ATV/rtv, lopinavir (LPV/rtv), efavirenz (EFV), nevirapine (NVP), and other PIs], HCV genotype (1/4 and 2/3), and IL28B genotype (CC and non-CC). The Kruskal–Wallis test and chi-squared test were used to compare continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multivariate analysis consisted of a stepwise linear regression analysis. Six hundred and forty-nine HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were included. HCV genotype 1/4 patients who received ATV had higher HCV RNA levels [6.57 (5.9–6.8) log IU/ml] than those who received LPV [6.1 (5.5–6.5) log IU/ml], EFV [6.1 (5.6–6.4) log IU/ml], NVP [5.8 (5.5–5.9) log IU/ml], or other PIs [6.1 (5.7–6.4) log IU/ml] (p=0.014). This association held for the IL28B genotype (CC versus non-CC). The association was not found in patients carrying HCV genotypes 2/3. The linear regression model identified the IL28B genotype and ATV use as independent factors associated with HCV RNA levels. ATV-based therapy may be associated with a higher HCV RNA viral load in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. PMID:22966845

  14. Affordable in-house antiretroviral drug resistance assay with good performance in non-subtype B HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Carole L.; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Kamali, Anatoli; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Sanders, Eduard; Anzala, Omu; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Stevens, Gwynn; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Stevens, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy in resource-poor settings is effective in suppressing HIV-1 replication and prolonging life of infected individuals. This has led to a demand for affordable HIV-1 drug resistance assays, since treatment failure due to development of drug resistance is common. This study developed and evaluated an affordable “in–house” genotyping assay to monitor HIV-1 drug resistance in Africa, particularly South Africa. An “in-house” assay using automated RNA extraction, and subtype C specific PCR and sequencing primers was developed and successfully evaluated 396 patient samples (viral load ranges 1,000->1.6million RNA copies/ml). The “in-house” assay was validated by comparing sequence data and drug resistance profiles from 90 patient and 10 external quality control samples to data from the ViroSeqTM HIV-1 Genotyping kit. The “in-house” assay was more efficient, amplifying all 100 samples, compared to 91 samples using Viroseq. The “in house” sequences were 99.2%) homologous to the ViroSeq sequences, and identical drug resistance mutation profiles were observed in 96 samples. Furthermore, the “in-house” assay genotyped 260 of 295 samples from seven African sites, where 47% were non-subtype C. Overall, the newly validated “in-house” drug resistance assay is suited for use in Africa as it overcomes the obstacle of subtype diversity. PMID:19917318

  15. Specificity of RSG-1.2 peptide binding to RRE-IIB RNA element of HIV-1 over Rev peptide is mainly enthalpic in origin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT(m) = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a K(a) = 16.2±0.6×10(7) M(-1) where enthalpic change ΔH