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Sample records for hiv serologic testing

  1. Diagnostic Value of Culture and Serological Tests in the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis in HIV and non-HIV Colombian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arango-Bustamante, Karen; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz Elena; de Bedout, Catalina; Tobón, Angela Maria; González, Angel

    2013-01-01

    We determined the value of culture and serological tests used to diagnose histoplasmosis. The medical records of 391 histoplasmosis patients were analyzed. Diagnosis of the mycosis was assessed by culture, complement fixation, and immunodiffusion tests; 310 patients (79.5%) were male, and 184 patients (47.1%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Positivity value for cultures was 35.7% (74/207), reactivity of serological tests was 95.2% (160/168), and a combination of both methodologies was 16.9% (35/207) for non-HIV patients. Positivity value for cultures was 75.0% (138/184), reactivity of serological tests was 92.4% (85/92), and a combination of both methodologies was 26.0% (48/184) for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients; 48.1% (102/212) of extrapulmonary samples from HIV/AIDS patients yielded positive cultures compared with 23.1% (49/212) in non-HIV patients. Lymphocyte counts made for 33.1% (61/184) of HIV/AIDS patients showed a trend to low CD4+ numbers and higher proportion of positive cultures. These results indicate that culture is the most reliable fungal diagnostic method for HIV/AIDS patients, and contrary to what is generally believed, serological assays are useful for diagnosing histoplasmosis in these patients. PMID:24043688

  2. Diagnostic value of culture and serological tests in the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in HIV and non-HIV Colombian patients.

    PubMed

    Arango-Bustamante, Karen; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz Elena; de Bedout, Catalina; Tobón, Angela Maria; González, Angel

    2013-11-01

    We determined the value of culture and serological tests used to diagnose histoplasmosis. The medical records of 391 histoplasmosis patients were analyzed. Diagnosis of the mycosis was assessed by culture, complement fixation, and immunodiffusion tests; 310 patients (79.5%) were male, and 184 patients (47.1%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Positivity value for cultures was 35.7% (74/207), reactivity of serological tests was 95.2% (160/168), and a combination of both methodologies was 16.9% (35/207) for non-HIV patients. Positivity value for cultures was 75.0% (138/184), reactivity of serological tests was 92.4% (85/92), and a combination of both methodologies was 26.0% (48/184) for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients; 48.1% (102/212) of extrapulmonary samples from HIV/AIDS patients yielded positive cultures compared with 23.1% (49/212) in non-HIV patients. Lymphocyte counts made for 33.1% (61/184) of HIV/AIDS patients showed a trend to low CD4+ numbers and higher proportion of positive cultures. These results indicate that culture is the most reliable fungal diagnostic method for HIV/AIDS patients, and contrary to what is generally believed, serological assays are useful for diagnosing histoplasmosis in these patients.

  3. Field Evaluation of a Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Serial Serologic Testing Algorithm for Diagnosis and Differentiation of HIV Type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and Dual HIV-1-HIV-2 Infections in West African Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Rouet, François; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Inwoley, André; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Burgard, Marianne; Bequet, Laurence; Viho, Ida; Leroy, Valériane; Simon, François; Dabis, François; Rouzioux, Christine

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a two-rapid-test serial algorithm using the Determine and Genie II rapid assays, performed on-site in four peripheral laboratories during the French Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA (ANRS) 1201/1202 Ditrame Plus cohort developed for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Côte d'Ivoire. A total of 1,039 specimens were retested by two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The following specimens were tested: 315 specimens found on-site to be infected with HIV type 1 (HIV-1), 8 specimens found on-site to be infected with HIV-2, 71 specimens found on-site to be infected with both HIV-1 and HIV-2, 40 specimens found on-site to have indeterminate results for HIV infection, and 605 specimens taken during a quality assurance program. For HIV discrimination, 99 positive serum samples (20 with HIV-1, 8 with HIV-2, and 71 with HIV-1 and HIV-2 on the basis of our rapid test algorithm) were retested by the Peptilav test, Western blot (WB) assays, and homemade monospecific ELISAs. Real-time DNA PCRs for the detection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 were performed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35 women diagnosed on-site with HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. Compared to the results of the ELISAs, the sensitivities of the Determine and Genie II assays were 100% (95% lower limit [95% LL], 99.1%) and 99.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 98.2 to 99.9%), respectively. The specificities were 98.4% (95% CI, 96.9 to 99.3%) and 100% (95% LL, 99.3%), respectively. All serological assays gave concordant results for infections with single types. By contrast, for samples found to be infected with dual HIV types by the Genie II assay, dual reactivity was detected for only 37 samples (52.1%) by WB assays, 34 samples (47.9%) by the Peptilav assay, and 23 samples (32.4%) by the monospecific ELISAs. For specimens with dual reactivity by the Genie II assay, the rates of concordance between the real

  4. Electroaddressed immobilization of recombinant HIV-1 P24 capsid protein onto screen-printed arrays for serological testing.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-05-01

    A serological chemiluminescent biochip was designed based on screen-printed electrode arrays composed of nine 1-mm(2) electrodes. Arrays were shown to be produced with good batch-to-batch reproducibility (standard deviations of 4.4 and 12.0% for ferricyanide oxidation potential and current, respectively) and very good reproducibility within a particular array (2.0 and 7.5% standard deviations for the same controls). Electrode arrays were used to electroaddress various bioconjugate structures comprising a recombinant HIV-1 P24 capsid protein (RH24K) in polypyrrole film. Entrapment of RH24K preimmobilized onto maleic anhydride-alt-methyl vinyl ether copolymer was shown to be the more efficient immobilization procedure. This addressed sensing layer enabled the detection of anti-P24 antibodies at a concentration of 3.5 ng/ml through peroxidase-labeled anti-human immunoglobulin G reaction. The biochip was used to perform an HIV-1 serological test in human sera. HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative sera were easily discriminated using serum dilutions greater than 1/10,000.

  5. Deceased tissue donor serology and molecular testing for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses: a lack of cadaveric validated tests.

    PubMed

    Victer, Thayssa Neiva da Fonseca; Dos Santos, Cris Stéphany Rodrigues; Báo, Sônia Nair; Sampaio, Thatiane Lima

    2016-12-01

    Vital to patient safety is the accurate assessment and minimization of risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis C (HCV), and Hepatitis B (HBV) virus transmission by deceased donor organ and tissue transplantation. The pathogens are tested by serological kits based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chemiluminescence (CLIA) and eletrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) immunoassays. Organ transplantation is a highly successful life-saving treatment in Brazil, but the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency currently mandates that all deceased organ donors are screened for HIV, HCV and HBV following living donor policies. In this review, six ELISA (Wama(®), Bio-Rad(®), Biomerieux(®), DiaSorin(®), Acon Biotech(®) and Biokit(®)), three CLIA (Abbott(®), Siemens(®), Diasorin(®)) and one ECLIA (Roche(®)) were utilized for evaluating the effectiveness of those serological tests for deceased donors in Brazil according to manufacturer's guidelines. NAT for HIV, HCV and HBV can assist with detection of pre-seroconversion for those infections, and only Cobas(®) TaqScreen MPX(®) test, the Tigris System(®) Procleix Ultrio Assay(®) and the Bio-Manguinhos(®) HIV/HCV/HBV NAT are commercially available. Between all the tests, only the manufacturer Abbott(®) and Cobas(®) TaqScreen MPX(®) test are currently validated for cadaver samples.

  6. Serological diagnosis of HIV infection using oral fluid samples.

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, H.; Constantine, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    The serological identification of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in blood is the most widely used method to diagnose HIV infection. Recently, however, the use of oral fluid samples for the detection of antibodies to HIV has been suggested as an alternative. This review describes some basic information about oral fluids, the application of these samples for HIV testing, and summarizes results from many of the studies performed using HIV tests with oral fluids. The fluids obtained from the oral cavity include saliva and crevicular fluid, and can be collected directly (by dribbling) or by using commercially available devices. The immunoglobulin content of oral fluids is similar to that of blood, but their levels are less. However, the use of an HIV IgG antibody capture assay (GAC ELISA) designed specifically for testing oral fluids, and certain routine HIV blood tests that have been optimized for use with oral fluids, has produced encouraging results. A number of studies, including several in developing countries, report that the sensitivities and specificities of these optimized tests lie in the range 95-100% and 98-100%, respectively. Also, the performance of the GAC ELISA was consistent and in general, excellent. The article identifies several issues that need to be addressed before a recommendation on the routine use of oral fluid samples for HIV antibody detection can be made. PMID:8131250

  7. Serologic testing in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mohsin; Lee, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To address the questions and challenges commonly faced by primary care physicians when ordering serologic tests for celiac disease (CD) and provide practical clinical tips to help in the interpretation of test results. Sources of information MEDLINE was searched from 2000 to 2015 for English-language guidelines on the diagnosis and management of CD published by professional gastroenterological organizations. Main message To screen patients for CD, measurement of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) tissue transglutaminase antibody is the preferred test. Total serum IgA level should be measured to exclude selective IgA deficiency and to avoid false-negative test results. Patients with positive serologic test results should be referred to a gastroenterologist for endoscopic small intestinal biopsies to confirm the diagnosis. Testing for human leukocyte antigens DQ2 and DQ8 can help exclude the diagnosis. A gluten-free diet should not be started before confirming the diagnosis of CD. Conclusion Serologic testing is very useful for screening patients with suspected CD. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent complications of CD. PMID:26796833

  8. Campylobacter serology test

    MedlinePlus

    ... time the skin is broken) Images Blood test Campylobacter jejuni organism References Allos BM. Campylobacter infections. In: Goldman ... chap 303. Allos BM, Iovine NM, Blaser MJ. Campylobacter jejuni and related species. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, ...

  9. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is performed that detects the genetic material ( RNA ) of the virus. An HIV RNA test will detect HIV in most people by ... next test to perform is an HIV-1 RNA test (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT). If the ...

  10. HIV Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right way, every day. If you have health insurance, your insurer is required to cover some medicines ... to treat HIV. If you don’t have health insurance, or you’re unable to afford your co- ...

  11. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  12. Direct agglutination test for serologic diagnosis of Neospora caninum infection.

    PubMed

    Romand, S; Thulliez, P; Dubey, J P

    1998-01-01

    A direct agglutination test was evaluated for the detection and quantitation of IgG antibodies to Neospora caninum in both experimental and natural infections in various animal species. As compared with results obtained by the indirect fluorescent antibody test, the direct agglutination test appeared reliable for the serologic diagnosis of neosporosis in a variety of animal species. The direct agglutination test should provide easily available and inexpensive tools for serologic testing for antibodies to N. caninum in many host species.

  13. Smart HIV testing system.

    PubMed

    El Kateeb, Ali; Law, Peter; Chan, King

    2005-06-01

    The quick HIV testing method called "MiraWell Rapid HIV Test" uses a specialized testing kit to determine whether an individual's blood is contaminated with the HIV virus or not. When a drop of blood is placed on the center of the testing kit, a simple pattern will appear in the middle of the kit to indicate the test status, i.e., positive or negative. This HIV test should be done in a small clinic or in a lab and the test must be conducted by a trained technician. A smart HIV testing system was developed through this research to eliminate the human error that is associated with the use of the quick HIV testing kits. Also, the smart HIV system will improve the testing productivity in comparison to those achieved by the trained technicians. In this research, we have developed a cost-effective system that analyzes the image produced by the HIV kits. We have used a System-On-Chip (SOC) design approach based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology and the Xilinx Virtex SOC chip in building the system's prototype. The system used a CMOS digital camera to capture the image and an FPGA chip to process the captured image and send the testing results to the display unit. The system can be used in small clinics and pharmacies and eliminates the need for trained technicians. The system has been tested successfully and 98% of the tests were correct.

  14. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover HIV testing. HIV counseling is covered for women who are sexually active. Talk to your insurance company to find out more. To learn about other ...

  15. Posttherapeutic Cure Criteria in Chagas' Disease: Conventional Serology followed by Supplementary Serological, Parasitological, and Molecular Tests

    PubMed Central

    Silva, A. R.; Do Bem, V. A. L.; Bahia, M. T.; Martins-Filho, O. A.; Dias, J. C. P.; Albajar-Viñas, P.; Torres, R. M.; Lana, M.

    2012-01-01

    We performed a critical study of conventional serology, followed by supplementary serological, parasitological, and molecular tests, to assess the response to etiologic treatment of Chagas' disease. A group of 94 Chagas' disease patients treated with benznidazole at least 10 years earlier were evaluated from the laboratory and clinical points of view. When conventional serology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], indirect immunofluorescence [IIF], and indirect hemagglutination [IHA]) and classic criteria (consistent results with any two of the three tests) or more rigorous criteria (consistent results from the three tests) were used, 10.6% and 8.5% of patients were considered treated and cured (TC) by classic and rigorous criteria, respectively. Patients were then evaluated using supplementary (recombinant ELISA and Trypanosoma cruzi excreted-secreted antigen blotting [TESA-blot]), parasitological (hemoculture), and molecular (PCR) tests. The results of recombinant ELISA were similar to those with the rigorous criterion (three consistent test results). The TESA-blot group showed a higher percentage (21.3%) of negative results than the groups defined by either cure criterion. Hemoculture and PCR gave negative results for all treated and cured (TC) patients, regardless of the criterion used. Recombinant ELISA and TESA-blot tests showed negative results for 70% and 87.5% of the patients categorized as TC by the classic and three-test criteria, respectively. For patients with discordant conventional serology, the supplementary serological and molecular tests were the decisive factor in determining therapeutic failure. Clinical evaluation showed that 62.5% of TC patients presented with the indeterminate form of the disease. Additionally, treated patients with negative TESA-blot results should be reevaluated later with all methodologies used here to verify whether TESA-blot is a reliable way to determine early parasitological cure of Chagas' disease. PMID

  16. Performance of routine syphilis serology in the Ethiopian cohort on HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dorigo-Zetsma, J; Belewu, D; Meless, H; Sanders, E; Coutinho, R; Schaap, A; Wolday, D

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the performance of routine syphilis screening during 5 year follow up of Ethiopian factory workers, participating in a cohort study on HIV/AIDS. Methods: Syphilis serology test results of factory workers, who each donated at least six blood samples were evaluated. Screening in 1997–8 had been performed by the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay and in 1999–2001 by the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test. TPPA had been followed by RPR or RPR by TPPA, in case of a positive screening result. Samples of study subjects showing inconsistent sequential TPPA and/or RPR results were retested independently by three laboratory technicians. Results: A total of 540 cohort participants (8.3% HIV positive at enrolment) donated 4376 blood samples (mean 8.3 per subject). From 93 of the 176 participants with at least one positive TPPA result during follow up, 152 samples were retested by RPR and/or TPPA. Based on the revised syphilis test results, the 540 cohort participants were classified as having no (70.5%), past (20.6%), prevalent (6.9%), or incident (2.0%) syphilis. The RPR screening test was difficult to interpret and yielded 8.2% biological false positive (BFP) RPR results, or 3.2% if weak positive results were excluded. There was no correlation between HIV infection and BFP RPR reactions. Sample mix-ups were detected in 1.2%. Conclusion: Evaluation of routine syphilis screening as performed in a long term cohort study on HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia showed difficulties encountered in syphilis screening programmes such as a high percentage of BFP RPR, inconsistencies in interpretation of the RPR test, and sample mix ups. The findings stress the need to develop a syphilis screening assay that is easy to perform and interpret and to implement quality assurance programmes. PMID:15054167

  17. Predictors of Serological Cure and Serofast State After Treatment in HIV-Negative Persons With Early Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Seña, Arlene C.; Wolff, Mark; Martin, David H.; Behets, Frieda; Van Damme, Kathleen; Leone, Peter; Langley, Carol; McNeil, Linda; Hook, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Syphilis management requires serological monitoring after therapy. We compared factors associated with serological response after treatment of early (ie, primary, secondary, or early latent) syphilis. Methods. We performed secondary analyses of data from a prospective, randomized syphilis trial conducted in the United States and Madagascar. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative participants aged ≥18 years with early syphilis were enrolled from 2000–2009. Serological testing was performed at baseline and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. At 6 months, serological cure was defined as a negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test or a ≥4-fold decreased titer, and serofast status was defined as a ≤2-fold decreased titer or persistent titers that did not meet criteria for treatment failure. Results. Data were available from 465 participants, of whom 369 (79%) achieved serological cure and 96 (21%) were serofast. In bivariate analysis, serological cure was associated with younger age, fewer sex partners, higher baseline RPR titers, and earlier syphilis stage (P ≤ .008). There was a less significant association with Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction after treatment (P = .08). Multivariate analysis revealed interactions between log-transformed baseline titer with syphilis stage, in which the likelihood of cure was associated with increased titers among participants with primary syphilis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for 1 unit change in log2 titer, 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25–2.70), secondary syphilis (AOR, 3.15; 95% CI, 2.14–4.65), and early latent syphilis (AOR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.44–2.40). Conclusions. Serological cure at 6 months after early syphilis treatment is associated with age, number of sex partners, Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction, and an interaction between syphilis stage and baseline RPR titer. PMID:21998287

  18. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective of Analysis The objective of this evidence-based evaluation is to assess the accuracy of serologic tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease in subjects with symptoms consistent with this disease. Furthermore the impact of these tests in the diagnostic pathway of the disease and decision making was also evaluated. Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that develops in genetically predisposed individuals. The immunological response is triggered by ingestion of gluten, a protein that is present in wheat, rye, and barley. The treatment consists of strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Patients with celiac disease may present with a myriad of symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, iron deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, among others. Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests used in the diagnosis of celiac disease. Anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) Anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) Anti-deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies (DGP) Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the EMA test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. For each serologic test, both immunoglobulin A (IgA) or G (IgG) can be measured, however, IgA measurement is the standard antibody measured in celiac disease. Diagnosis of Celiac Disease According to celiac disease guidelines, the diagnosis of celiac disease is established by small bowel biopsy. Serologic tests are used to initially detect and to support the diagnosis of celiac disease. A small bowel biopsy is indicated in individuals with a positive serologic test. In some cases an endoscopy and small bowel biopsy may be required even with a negative serologic test. The diagnosis of celiac disease must be performed on a gluten-containing diet since the small intestine abnormalities and the serologic antibody levels may resolve or improve

  19. Serological Response to Treatment of Syphilis with Doxycycline Compared with Penicillin in HIV-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Hoffmann, Steen; Cowan, Susan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Benfield, Thomas; Gerstoft, Jan; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2016-08-23

    Serological response to treatment of syphilis with orally administered doxycycline or intramuscularly administered penicillin was assessed in patients with concurrent HIV. All HIV-infected individuals diagnosed with syphilis attending 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark were included. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with serological outcome were modelled using propensity-score-adjusted logistic regression analysis. In total, 202 cases were treated with doxycycline or intramuscular penicillin. At 12 months, serological failure was observed in 12 cases (15%) treated with doxycycline and in 8 cases (17%) treated with penicillin (OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.16-3.88), p = 0.76). The serological cure rate at 12 months was highest in patients with primary syphilis (100%), followed by patients with secondary (89%), early latent (71%) and late latent (67%) syphilis (p = 0.006). In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the use of doxycycline as a treatment option when treating a HIV-infected population for syphilis.

  20. Evaluation of Commercially Available Serologic Diagnostic Tests for Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Flusin, Olivier; Panella, Amanda; Tenebray, Bernard; Lanciotti, Robert; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is present or emerging in dengue virus–endemic areas. Infections caused by these viruses share some common signs/symptoms, but prognosis, patient care, and persistent symptoms differ. Thus, accurate diagnostic methods are essential for differentiating the infections. We evaluated 4 CHIKV serologic diagnostic tests, 2 of which showed poor sensitivity and specificity. PMID:25418184

  1. An appraisal of thoracic procedures performed in patients with HIV-positive serology.

    PubMed

    Canver, C C

    1995-08-01

    Patients who have contracted the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often require a diagnostic or therapeutic thoracic procedure. To determine the clinical benefits of a noncardiac pulmonary intervention in the treatment of HIV-positive individuals, 82 patients with HIV-positive serology who underwent a thoracic procedure for illnesses related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) between 1987 and 1990 were reviewed. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was the most common opportunistic infection and was the initial manifestation for establishing the HIV-positive serology in 54 patients (66%). Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 74 patients (90%), closed tube thoracostomy in 9 (11%), thoracentesis in 3 (4%), thoracostomy and lung resection in 2 (2.4%), pericardial window in 1 (1.2%), and tracheostomy in 1 (1.2%). The operation was useful in 46 patients (56%) and improved the clinical short-term outcome of 53 patients (64%). Nonfatal complications occurred in only two patients (2.4%). There were no deaths directly caused by the thoracic procedure within the first 30 days. However, overall 8 patients (10%ZZ) succumbed to infectious complications of AIDS. We conclude that thoracic procedures directed toward pulmonary opportunistic infections and their complications in HIV-positive patients are beneficial and may offer an improved short-term outcome.

  2. Evaluation of Eight Serological Tests for Diagnosis of Imported Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Sabine; Bäumer, Britta

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of schistosomiasis in individuals from countries where the disease is not endemic is challenging, and few data are available on the accuracy of serological diagnosis in those patients. We evaluated the performance of eight serological assays, including four commercial kits, in the diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis in individuals from areas where the disease is not endemic, including six enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using three different antigens, an indirect hemagglutination assay, and an indirect immunofluorescent-antibody test. To analyze the assays, we used a total of 141 serum samples, with 121 derived from patients with various parasitic infections (among which were 37 cases of schistosomiasis) and 20 taken from healthy volunteers. The sensitivity values for detection of schistosomiasis cases ranged from 41% to 78% and were higher for Schistosoma mansoni than for S. haematobium infections. Specificity values ranged from 76% to 100%; false-positive results were most frequent for samples from patients with cestode infections. By combining two or more tests, sensitivity improved markedly and specificity decreased only moderately. Serological tests are useful instruments for diagnosing imported schistosomiasis in countries where the disease is not endemic, but due to limitations in test sensitivities, we recommend the use of two or more assays in parallel. PMID:22441394

  3. Serologic Testing for Salmonella Infections in Poultry Flocks: Limitations and Opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse serologic methods have been developed and applied to successfully detect Salmonella infections in poultry with both sensitivity and consistency. However, the field application of serology has been limited by several inherent characteristics of antibody detection tests: (1) infections without...

  4. [The detection of antibodies against HIV-1 24-kd protein. A clinico-serological correlation].

    PubMed

    Díaz Torres, H; Silva Cabrera, E; Rodríguez García, O; Bárcenas Moses, J; Lubián Caballero, A L

    1996-01-01

    The presence of antibodies against the HIV protein of 24 kd was studies by the parallel use of the DAVIH BLOT western blot and of the DAVIH AC P24 ELISA in serum samples from 176 patients at different HIV-1 infection stages. The results were correlated with the clinical classification of the patient at the moment of taking the sample and with the further evolution during 6 months. 57% of the patients with opportunistic minor infections and 96% of AIDS patients had low antibodies titres. Dead patients showed no reactivity or presented very low titres in samples taken before dying. Different titrations were observed in serum groups with an apparently uniform reactivity in the western blot. The results show and adequate clinical and serological correlation. Therefore, the DAVIH AC P24 ELISA could be useful in the clinical follow-up of HIV-1 infected persons.

  5. Establishment of serological test to detect antibody against ferret coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    MINAMI, Shohei; TERADA, Yutaka; SHIMODA, Hiroshi; TAKIZAWA, Masaki; ONUMA, Mamoru; OTA, Akihiko; OTA, Yuichi; AKABANE, Yoshihito; TAMUKAI, Kenichi; WATANABE, Keiichiro; NAGANUMA, Yumiko; KANAGAWA, Eiichi; NAKAMURA, Kaneichi; OHASHI, Masanari; TAKAMI, Yoshinori; MIWA, Yasutsugu; TANOUE, Tomoaki; OHWAKI, Masao; OHTA, Jouji; UNE, Yumi; MAEDA, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Since there is no available serological methods to detect antibodies to ferret coronavirus (FRCoV), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant partial nucleocapsid (N) proteins of the ferret coronavirus (FRCoV) Yamaguchi-1 strain was developed to establish a serological method for detection of FRCoV infection. Many serum samples collected from ferrets recognized both a.a. 1–179 and a.a. 180–374 of the N protein, but two serum samples did not a.a. 180–374 of the N protein. This different reactivity was also confirmed by immunoblot analysis using the serum from the ferret.Therefore, the a.a. 1–179 of the N protein was used as an ELISA antigen. Serological test was carried out using sera or plasma of ferrets in Japan. Surprisingly, 89% ferrets in Japan had been infected with FRCoV. These results indicated that our established ELISA using a.a. 1–179 of the N protein is useful for detection of antibody to FRCoV for diagnosis and seroepidemiology of FRCoV infection. PMID:26935842

  6. Evaluation of four serological tests for bovine paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sockett, D C; Conrad, T A; Thomas, C B; Collins, M T

    1992-01-01

    The standard complement fixation (CF) test, a commercial agarose gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test (ImmuCell Corporation, Portland, Maine), and two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs; Allied Laboratories, Glenwood Springs, Colo. [Allied ELISA], and the CSL, Limited, [Parkville, Victoria, Australia] enzyme immunoassay [CSL ELISA]) were evaluated by using sera from the Repository for Paratuberculosis Specimens. The case definition of subclinical bovine paratuberculosis was isolation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis from fecal samples or internal organs of dairy cattle without diarrhea or weight loss. Animals designated as free of the disease originated exclusively from certified paratuberculosis-free herds in Wisconsin. None of the cattle evaluated had been vaccinated for paratuberculosis. Among 177 M. paratuberculosis-infected cattle, the CF test, the AGID test, the Allied ELISA, and the CSL ELISA had test sensitivities of 38.4, 26.6, 58.8, and 43.4%, respectively, and specificities of 99.0, 100.0, 95.4, and 99.0%, respectively. Only 108 of the infected cattle were confirmed by culture or by a commercial DNA probe (IDEXX Corporation, Portland, Maine) to be shedding the organism in fecal samples at the time of serological testing. Among the 108 M. paratuberculosis fecal shedders, the CF test, the AGID test, the Allied ELISA, and the CSL ELISA were positive for 54.6, 40.7, 65.7, and 56.5% of the cows, respectively; and among the 69 cows that were nonshedders, the tests were positive for 14.5, 4.3, 47.8, and 24.6% of the cows, respectively. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in the rate of positive test results for all four tests between these two groups of animals. The CF test performed well when it was compared with the other serological tests if a titer of >/- 1.8 was classified as a positive test result. PMID:1583110

  7. Evaluation of cross-reactions in Histoplasma capsulatum serologic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, J; French, M L; Kamel, S; Tewari, R P

    1986-01-01

    Cross-reactivity in Histoplasma serologic tests was evaluated by using sera from patients with histoplasmosis and other infections. Serum samples from 127 of 134 (95%) patients with histoplasmosis were judged positive by complement fixation tests, and 121 (90%) showed H bands, M bands, or both by immunodiffusion. Of these 134 patients, cross-reactions were seen to Blastomyces dermatitidis in 53 patients (40%), to Coccidioides immitis in 20 patients (16%), and to Aspergillus fumigatus in 3 patients (2%) by complement fixation. Serum samples from 5 of 99 patients (5%) with other fungal infections and from 5 of 46 patients (11%) with tuberculosis had M precipitin bands by the Histoplasma immunodiffusion test, whereas none of the 123 sera from patients with other bacterial, Mycoplasma, or viral infections showed H or M precipitin bands. In the complement fixation test, positive reactions were observed in 16 of 90 patients (18%) with other fungal infections, in 14 of 41 patients (34%) with tuberculosis, and in 18 of 105 patients (17%) with other bacterial, Mycoplasma, or viral infections. Positive reactions were seen by radioimmunoassay in 54 of 110 patients (49%) with other fungal infections, in 23 of 46 patients (50%) with tuberculosis, and in 35 of 123 patients (28%) with with other bacterial, Mycoplasma, or viral infections. These results demonstrate a wider range of cross-reactions in Histoplasma serology than has been previously recognized, and the cross-reactivity was greatest when observed by radioimmunoassay. Caution should be exercised in the interpretation of serologic data from patients with suspected fungal infections. PMID:2420821

  8. Diagnostic performance of serological tests for swine brucellosis in the presence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Blasco, J M; de Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; Muñoz, P M

    2015-04-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in Europe. Currently used diagnostic tests for swine brucellosis detect antibodies to the O-polysaccharide (O-PS) of Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) but their specificity is compromised by false-positive serological reactions (FPSRs) when bacteria carrying cross-reacting O-PS infect pigs. FPSRs occur throughout Europe, and the only tool available for a specific B. suis diagnosis is the intradermal test with Brucella protein extracts free of O-PS or S-LPS. Using sera of 162 sows naturally infected by B. suis biovar 2, 406 brucellosis-free sows, and 218 pigs of brucellosis-free farms affected by FPSR, we assessed the diagnostic performance of an indirect ELISA with rough LPS (thus devoid of O-PS) and of gel immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and indirect ELISA with O-PS free proteins in comparison with several S-LPS tests (Rose Bengal, complement fixation, gel immunodiffusion and indirect ELISA). When adjusted to 100% specificity, the sensitivity of the rough LPS ELISA was very low (30%), and adoption of other cut-offs resulted in poor specificity/sensitivity ratios. Although their specificity was 100%, the sensitivity of protein tests (ELISA, latex agglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and gel immunodiffusion) was only moderate (45, 58, 61 and 63%, respectively). Among S-LPS tests, gel immunodiffusion was the only test showing acceptable sensitivity/specificity (68 and 100%, respectively). Despite these shortcomings, and when the purpose is to screen out FPSR at herd level, gel immunodiffusion tests may offer a technically simple and practical alternative to intradermal testing.

  9. HIV Testing among Detained Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Yarber, William L.; Staples-Horne, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Published reports have not investigated the issue of voluntary HIV testing among detained youth, a population disproportionately infected with HIV compared to other adolescent groups. Data were collected from 467 sexually active detained adolescents in Georgia on demographic, environmental, and drug and sexual history variables, to explore…

  10. [Sensitivity of the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 test v1.5 for HIV-1 detection].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Lucía P; Balangero, Marcos C; Castro, Gonzalo; Kademian, Silvia; Mangeaud, Arnaldo; Barbas, María G; Cudolá, Analía; de León, Juan F; Carrizo, Horacio; Gallego, Sandra V

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT) in blood banks was intended to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. Co-circulation of a great diversity of HIV-1 variants in Argentina portrays the need to assess the sensitivity of serological and molecular assays available for their detection. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 Test, version 1.5 (Roche) for the detection of HIV-1 RNA in plasma samples of infected individuals from Argentina. The results of this study reveal that this technique has high sensitivity for the detection of HIV-1 RNA under assay conditions: using mini-pool testing, pools ≥ 50 RNA copies per ml achieved ≥ 92 % sensitivity, whereas in the standard procedure, samples ≥ 207 RNA copies/ml achieved 100 % sensitivity. Moreover, the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 Test, version 1.5 (Roche) is suitable for detecting prevailing HIV-1 variants.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Serological diagnosis of human immuno-deficiency virus in Burkina Faso: reliable, practical strategies using less expensive commercial test kits.

    PubMed Central

    Meda, N.; Gautier-Charpentier, L.; Soudré, R. B.; Dahourou, H.; Ouedraogo-Traoré, R.; Ouangré, A.; Bambara, A.; Kpozehouen, A.; Sanou, H.; Valéa, D.; Ky, F.; Cartoux, M.; Barin, F.; Van de Perre, P.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of a cross-sectional survey in Burkina Faso to identify reliable, practical strategies for the serological diagnosis of HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infections, using less-expensive commercial test kits in various combinations, as an alternative to the conventional Western blot (WB) test, which costs US$ 60. Serum samples, collected from blood donors, patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and pregnant women, were tested between December 1995 and January 1997. Twelve commercial test kits were available: five Mixt enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), three Mixt rapid tests, and four additional tests including monospecific HIV-1 and HIV-2 ELISA. The reference strategy utilized a combination of one ELISA or one rapid test with WB, and was conducted following WHO criteria. A total of 768 serum samples were tested; 35 were indeterminate and excluded from the analysis. Seroprevalence of HIV in the remaining 733 sera was found to be 37.5% (95% confidence interval: 34.0-41.1). All the ELISA tests showed 100% sensitivity, but their specificities ranged from 81.4% to 100%. GLA (Genelavia Mixt) had the highest positive delta value, while ICE HIV-1.0.2 (ICE) produced the most distinct negative results. Among the rapid tests, COM (CombAIDS-RS) achieved 100% sensitivity and SPO (HIV Spot) 100% specificity. Various combinations of commercial tests, according to recommended WHO strategies I, II, III, gave excellent results when ICE was included in the sequence. The best combination of tests for strategy II, which achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity, was to use ICE and COM, the cost of which was US$ 2.10, compared with US$ 55.60 for the corresponding conventional strategy. For strategy III, the best combination, which achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity, was to use ICE, ZYG (Enzygnost Anti HIV-1/HIV-2 Plus) and COM, the cost of which was US$ 2.90 (19.2 times lower than the corresponding strategy requiring WB). No rapid test

  13. Rapid and simple screening and supplemental testing for HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in west Africa.

    PubMed

    Brattegaard, K; Kouadio, J; Adom, M L; Doorly, R; George, J R; De Cock, K M

    1993-06-01

    Researchers from an AIDS research project took blood samples from 1000 consecutive women during childbirth at a maternal and child health center in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire, and from 185 hospitalized patients to compare the results of a combination of synthetic peptide-based rapid tests (product names, Testpack and Genie), which check for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies, with those of the Western Blot-based test. They also wanted to see whether the rapid test-based strategy could replace the Western Blot-based test as a supplemental test. The Western Blot indicated the HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 prevalence to be 13% among the new mothers and 78% among the hospitalized patients for an overall prevalence of 23%. 3.3% of all people were positive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. 17.4% tested positive for just HIV-1. 2.1% were positive for HIV-2. The rapid tests had a sensitivity of 99.6% and a specificity of 99.9%. The positive predictive value was 99.6% and the negative predictive value was 99.9%. The rapid tests identified 4% of the HIV-2 positive samples and 1% of the HIV-1 samples to be dually reactive. These findings demonstrated that rapid synthetic peptide-based assays reliably detect HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies and can be supplemental tests. High quality HIV serology can be performed in a setting without running water and electricity which was the case in this study. A further advantage of this strategy is that each test takes only 10 minutes. These tests would have significant effects on HIV testing and counseling, diagnosis, and screening of blood for transfusion in rural areas of developing countries.

  14. HIV Testing Characteristics Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mindy; Malcolm, Lydia; Diaz-Albertini, Kristine; Klinoff, Vera A

    2016-02-01

    Hispanic adolescents are disproportionally impacted by HIV/AIDS. Among Hispanic people living with HIV, delayed testing and late entry into HIV care have been documented. The current study examined Hispanic adolescents' HIV testing characteristics and factors related to testing. Adolescents aged 13-16 (N = 223) completed a survey on HIV testing motivation, perceptions, and experience, sexual behavior, and substance use. Results indicate few adolescents (9%) had taken an HIV test. Among those who have not been tested, 32.5% expressed interest in testing. HIV testing was favorably perceived with 82.4% reported testing should be done with all youth or those are sexually active. Adolescents who had engaged in high risk behaviors (history of sexual intercourse, substance use) were more likely to have been tested or to express interest in testing. Given that HIV testing is positively perceived by Hispanic adolescents, prevention efforts should focus on minimizing barriers and enhancing accessibility to HIV screening.

  15. The importance of serological tests implementation in disseminated candidiasis diagnose.

    PubMed

    Gegić, Merima; Numanović, Fatima; Delibegović, Zineta; Tihić, Nijaz; Nurkić, Mahmut; Hukić, Mirsada

    2013-03-01

    Candidiasis is defined as an infection or disease caused by a fungus of the genus Candida. Rate of disseminated candidiasis increases with the growth of the number of immunocompromised patients. In the the last few decades the incidence of disseminated candidiasis is in growth as well as the mortality rate. The aim of this survey is to show the importance of serological tests implementation in disseminated candidiasis diagnose. This is a prospective study involving 60 patients with malign diseases with and without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis and 30 healthy people who represent the control group. Apart from hemoculture, detection of circulating mannan antigen and adequate antibodies of Candida species applying comercial ELISA test was determined in each patient. This survey deals with relevant factors causing disseminated candidiasis. This survey showed that the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis had more patients with positive hemoculture to Candida species, then the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis. The number of patients being examined and positive to antigens and antibodies was higher (p < 0.01) in the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis (7/30; 23.3%), then in the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis (0/30; 0%): Average value of titra antigen was statistically higher (p < 0.001) in patients with Candida spp. positive hemocultures rather then in patients with Candida spp. negative hemocultures. In the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis 6/30 (20%) of patients had Candida spp.positive hemocultures while in the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis 1/30 (3.3%) of patients had Candida spp. positive hemocultures, which was considerably higher (p < 0.05). Correlation of results of hemoculture and mannan antigens and antibodies in patients with disseminated

  16. 21 CFR 866.3390 - Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents. 866.3390 Section 866.3390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3390 - Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents. 866.3390 Section 866.3390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3390 - Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents. 866.3390 Section 866.3390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3390 - Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents. 866.3390 Section 866.3390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3390 - Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents. 866.3390 Section 866.3390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. A proficiency testing method for detecting antibodies against Brucella abortus in quantitative and qualitative serological tests.

    PubMed

    Gall, D; Nielsen, K; Nicola, A; Renteria, T

    2008-12-01

    A proficiency testing panel for detecting antibodies against Brucella abortus was developed and evaluated by both primary binding and conventional serological tests, using the guidelines of the World Organisation for Animal Health and the International Organization for Standardization Guide 43-1. All serological tests were judged satisfactory. Among the primary binding tests, the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA 2) and the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA 1), with standard deviation indices (z-scores) of -0.06 and 0.10, respectively, performed best. Similarly, E(n) numbers (i.e. a way of comparing different measurements of performance) of 0 for both the competitive ELISA 2 and the indirect ELISA 1 indicated that these tests performed best in the initial round of proficiency testing. The conventional serological tests all passed the panel. Comparing data from both the quantitative and qualitative tests demonstrated that this proficiency testing scheme was fit for the purpose for which it was designed.

  2. HIV serology among Italian male military recruits at entrance and discharge.

    PubMed

    Carducci, A; Giorgi, M; Benedettini, G; Avio, C M; Bendinelli, M

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of anti-HIV mass screenings, we examined 662 new military recruits and 1353 soldiers being discharged. None of the former and only one of the latter (0.07%) resulted seropositive on repeated ELISA and Western-blot. For comparison we also report the results of routine anti-HIV antibody testing in our diagnostic laboratory: the highest proportion of seropositive subjects was found among symptomatic patients (79%), followed by haemophiliac patients (31%), drug addicts (24%), sexual partners of seropositive subjects (21%), prisoners (5%) and homosexual men (5%). Health care personnel and prison guards were all negative. These data confirm that in Italy HIV infection is still relatively confined to the classic risk groups. While generalized screening during military service seems to be excessive, periodic sample surveys could be very useful to follow the evolution of HIV epidemiology.

  3. HIV Testing on Campus: The Next Step.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Joanna

    1994-01-01

    Sees first phase in human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) prevention on many campuses to be focused on education. Calls second phase HIV testing for early diagnosis. Explains steps taken to implement HIV testing program on suburban campus and discusses student program evaluation. (Author/NB)

  4. Serological Analysis of Tuberculosis in Goats by Use of the Enferplex Caprine TB Multiplex Test.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Amanda; Whelan, Clare; Clarke, John B; Hayton, Alastair; Watt, Neil J; Harkiss, Gordon D

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis in goats is usually diagnosed clinically, at postmortem, or by a positive skin test. However, none of these approaches detects all infected animals. Serology offers an additional tool to identify infected animals missed by current tests. We describe the use of the Enferplex Caprine TB serology test to aid the management of a large dairy goat herd undergoing a tuberculosis breakdown. Initial skin and serology testing showed that IgG antibodies were present in both serum and milk from 100% of skin test-positive animals and in serum and milk from 77.8 and 95.4% of skin test-negative animals, respectively. A good correlation was observed between serum and milk antibody levels. The herd had been vaccinated against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, but no direct serological cross-reactions were found. Subsequent skin testing revealed 13.7% positive animals, 64.9% of which were antibody positive, while 42.1% of skin test-negative animals were seropositive. Antibody responses remained high 1 month later (57.1% positive), and the herd was slaughtered. Postmortem analysis of 20 skin test-negative goats revealed visible lesions in 6 animals, all of which had antibodies to six Mycobacterium bovis antigens. The results provide indirect evidence that serology testing with serum or milk could be a useful tool in the diagnosis and management of tuberculosis in goats.

  5. Development of a rapid equine serological test (REST) by modified agar-gel immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Cutrufelli, M E; Mageau, R P; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1991-01-01

    A rapid equine serological test (REST) has been developed for detection of horse meat in a wide variety of raw meat products. The test is an adaptation of previously developed field screening immunodiffusion tests for beef, poultry, pork, and sheep detection. Results show that the REST test was specific, sensitive, and accurate in the analysis of 101 samples.

  6. Timing of HIV Seroreversion Among HIV-Exposed, Breastfed Infants in Malawi: Type of HIV Rapid Test Matters.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily R; Hudgens, Michael; Sheahan, Anna D; Miller, William C; Wheeler, Stephanie; Nelson, Julie A E; Dube, Queen; Van Rie, Annelies

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Rapid HIV serological tests are a cost-effective, point-of-care test among HIV exposed infants but cannot distinguish between maternal and infant antibodies. The lack of data on the timing of decay of maternal antibodies in young infants hinders the potential use of rapid tests in exposed infants. We aimed to determine the time to seroreversion for two commonly used rapid tests in a prospective cohort of HIV-exposed breastfeeding infants ages 3-18 months of life. Methods We collected data on the performance of two commonly used rapid tests (Determine and Unigold) in Malawi between 2008 and 2012 or at the University of North Carolina between 2014 and 2015. Time to seroreversion was estimated for both rapid tests using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator which allows for interval censored data. Results At 3 months of age, 3 % of infants had seroreverted according to Determine and 7 % had seroreverted according to Unigold. About one in four infants had achieved seroreversion by 4 months using Unigold, but only about one in twelve infants by 4 months when using Determine. More than 95 % of all infants had seroverted by 7 months according to Unigold and by 12 months according to the Determine assay. Discussion We show that the time of seroreversion depends greatly on the type of test used. Our results highlight the need for recommendations to specify the timing and type of test used in the context of infant HIV detection in resource-poor settings, and base the interpretation of test result on knowledge of time to seroreversion of the selected test.

  7. Risk factors for HIV seropositivity among people consulting for HIV antibody testing: a pilot surveillance study in Quebec.

    PubMed Central

    Alary, M; Castel, J

    1990-01-01

    The surveillance of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) through case reporting only reflects the epidemiologic features of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) transmission a few years earlier and not the prevalence of HIV seropositivity. HIV infection is not a notifiable condition in Quebec. We were asked by the ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec to perform a pilot project for the surveillance of HIV seropositivity using a network of sentinel physicians. From May 15, 1988, to Sept. 30, 1989, physicians from four collaborating centres collected data on the serologic status, demographic characteristics and risk factors for 4209 patients who underwent HIV antibody testing. Of the 3899 subjects included in the study 7.9% were HIV positive. Through logistic regression analysis the following variables were found to be significantly associated with HIV seropositivity: presence of HIV-related symptoms (prevalence odds ratio [POR] 36.5), origin from an endemic area (POR 9.1), homosexuality or bisexuality (POR 8.4), intravenous drug use (POR 4.2), male sex (POR 2.8), previous HIV antibody testing (POR 2.5) and previous sexually transmitted disease (POR 1.8). Over the study period we found a large increase in HIV seroprevalence among intravenous drug users (4.2% in 1988 to 19.0% in 1989) (p = 0.02). This increase might reflect a recent change in the epidemiologic pattern of HIV transmission in Quebec. Surveillance of HIV seropositivity through a network of sentinel physicians may be a reasonable alternative to mandatory reporting. PMID:2357678

  8. Heterogeneity of Leishmania donovani parasites complicates diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis: comparison of different serological tests in three endemic regions.

    PubMed

    Abass, Elfadil; Kang, Cholho; Martinkovic, Franjo; Semião-Santos, Saul J; Sundar, Shyam; Walden, Peter; Piarroux, Renaud; El Harith, Abdallah; Lohoff, Michael; Steinhoff, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic tests for visceral leishmaniasis that are based on antigens of a single Leishmania strain can have low diagnostic performance in regions where heterologous parasites predominate. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the performance of five serological tests, based on different Leishmania antigens, in three endemic countries for visceral leishmaniasis. A total number of 231 sera of symptomatic and asymptomatic cases and controls from three endemic regions of visceral leishmaniasis in East Sudan, North India and South France were evaluated by following serological tests: rKLO8- and rK39 ELISA, DAT (ITMA-DAT) and two rapid tests of rK39 (IT LEISH) and rKE16 (Signal-KA). Overall, rKLO8- and rK39 ELISA were most sensitive in immunocompetent patients from all endemic regions (96-100%) and the sensitivity was reduced to 81.8% in HIV co-infected patients from France. Sera of patients from India demonstrated significantly higher antibody responses to rKLO8 and rK39 compared with sera from Sudan (p<0.0001) and France (p<0.0037). Further, some Indian and Sudanese patients reacted better with rKLO8 than rK39. Sensitivity of DAT (ITMA-DAT) was high in Sudan (94%) and India (92.3%) but low in France being 88.5% and 54.5% for VL and VL/HIV patients, respectively. In contrast, rapid tests displayed high sensitivity only in patients from India (96.2%) but not Sudan (64-88%) and France (73.1-88.5% and 63.6-81.8% in VL and VL/HIV patients, respectively). While the sensitivity varied, all tests showed high specificity in Sudan (96.7-100%) and India (96.6%).Heterogeneity of Leishmania parasites which is common in many endemic regions complicates the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Therefore, tests based on homologous Leishmania antigens are required for particular endemic regions to detect cases which are difficult to be diagnosed with currently available tests.

  9. [Rapid diagnosis in serology].

    PubMed

    García-Bermejo, Isabel; de Ory, Fernando

    2017-02-06

    Serological diagnosis of acute phase infections implies the detection of IgM specific response, an effective marker of primary infection, but with less clinical significance in reactivations or reinfections. The aim of this article is to provide an updated view of the rapid diagnosis in serology by detecting the IgM isotype and reviewing its applications and limitations. Point-of-care (PoC) tests are analyzed. PoC tests are used in geographical areas where traditional tests are not available, as well as in other circumstances where their use brings the diagnosis directly to the target population. Likewise, their use reduces the response time between taking the sample and the diagnosis, making it easier to make clinical decisions. PoC assays have proven cost-effective, especially in preventing vertical transmission of syphilis and HIV infection.

  10. Barriers and missed opportunities to HIV testing among injection drug users in two Mexico – US border cities

    PubMed Central

    MOYER, L. B.; BROUWER, K. C.; BRODINE, S. K.; RAMOS, R.; LOZADA, R.; CRUZ, M. FIRESTONE; MAGIS-RODRIGUEZ, C.; STRATHDEE, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Despite increasing HIV prevalence in cities along the Mexico – US border, HIV testing among high-risk populations remains low. We sought to identify barriers associated with HIV testing among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, the two largest Mexican border cities located across from San Diego, California and El Paso, Texas, respectively. Design and Methods In 2005, 222 IDUs in Tijuana and 205 IDUs in Ciudad Juarez were recruited by respondent-driven sampling and administered a questionnaire to collect socio-demographic, behavioural and HIV testing history data. Blood samples were provided for serological testing of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis. Results Only 38% and 30% of respondents in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, respectively, had ever had an HIV test. The factors associated independently with never having been tested for HIV differed between the two sites, except for lack of knowledge on HIV transmission, which was associated independently in both locales. Importantly, 65% of those who had never been tested for HIV in both cities experienced at least one missed opportunity for voluntary testing, including medical visits, drug treatment and spending time in jail. Discussion and Conclusions Among this high-risk IDU population we found HIV testing to be low, with voluntary testing in public and private settings utilised inadequately. These findings underscore the need to expand voluntary HIV education and testing and to integrate it into services and locales frequented by IDUs in these Mexico –US border cities. PMID:18034380

  11. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  12. Comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays for detecting HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Campos, Karoline Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Costa, Nadia Aparecida; Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele

    2017-03-23

    The present study evaluated several techniques currently available (commercial kits and in-house assays) for diagnosing human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/-2) in two groups of patients enrolled at HIV/AIDS specialized care services in São Paulo: Group 1 (G1), n=1608, 1237 male/371 female, median age 44.3 years old, majority using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); G2, n=1383, 930 male/453 female, median age of 35.6 years old, majority HAART naïve. Enzyme immunoassays [(EIA) Murex and Gold ELISA] were employed for HTLV-1/-2 screening; Western blotting (WB), INNO-LIA (LIA), real-time PCR pol (qPCR), and nested-PCR-RFLP (tax) were used to confirm infection. Samples were considered HTLV-1/-2 positive when there was reactivity using at least one of the four confirmatory assays. By serological screening, 127/2991 samples were positive or borderline, and HTLV infection was confirmed in 108 samples (three EIA-borderline): 56 HTLV-1 [G1 (27)+G2 (29)]; 45 HTLV-2 [G1 (21)+G2 (24)]; one HTLV-1+HTLV-2 (G2); six HTLV [G1 (2)+G2 (4)]. Although there were differences in group characteristics, HTLV-1/-2 prevalence was similar [3.1% (G1) and 4.2% (G2), p=0.113]. The overall sensitivities of LIA, WB, qPCR, and PCR-RFLP were 97.2%, 82.4%, 68.9%, and 68.4%, respectively, with some differences among groups, likely due to the stage of HTLV infection and/or HAART duration. Indeterminate immunoblotting results were detected in G2, possibly due to the seroconversion period. Negative results in molecular assays could be explained by the use of HAART, the occurrence of defective provirus and/or the low circulating proviral load. In conclusion, when determining the HTLV infection, the findings highlight the need to consider the blood samples with borderline results in screening assays. Out of the tested assays, LIA was the assay of choice for detecting HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in HIV-1-infected patients.

  13. HIV incidence estimate combining HIV/AIDS surveillance, testing history information and HIV test to identify recent infections in Lazio, Italy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The application of serological methods in HIV/AIDS routine surveillance systems to identify persons with recently acquired HIV infection has been proposed as a tool which may provide an accurate description of the current transmission patterns of HIV. Using the information about recent infection it is possible to estimate HIV incidence, according to the model proposed by Karon et al. in 2008, that accounts for the effect of testing practices on the number of persons detected as recently infected. Methods We used data from HIV/AIDS surveillance in the period 2004-2008 to identify newly diagnosed persons. These were classified with recent/non-recent infection on the basis of an avidity index result, or laboratory evidence of recently acquired infection (i.e., previous documented negative HIV test within 6 months; or presence of HIV RNA or p24 antigen with simultaneous negative/indeterminate HIV antibody test). Multiple imputation was used to impute missing information. The incidence estimate was obtained as the number of persons detected as recently infected divided by the estimated probability of detection. Estimates were stratified by calendar year, transmission category, gender and nationality. Results During the period considered 3,633 new HIV diagnoses were reported to the regional surveillance system. Applying the model, we estimated that in 2004-2008 there were 5,465 new infections (95%CI: 4,538-6,461); stratifying by transmission category, the estimated number of infections was 2,599 among heterosexual contacts, 2,208 among men-who-have-sex-with-men, and 763 among injecting-drug-users. In 2008 there were 952 (625-1,229) new HIV infections (incidence of 19.9 per 100,000 person-years). In 2008, for men-who-have-sex-with-men (691 per 100,000 person-years) and injecting drug users (577 per 100,000 person-years) the incidence remained comparatively high with respect to the general population, although a decreasing pattern during 2004-2008 was observed

  14. 9 CFR 130.16 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. 130.16 Section 130.16 Animals... USER FEES § 130.16 User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL...

  15. Serological evidence of Leishmania donovani infection in apparently healthy dogs using direct agglutination test (DAT) and rk39 dipstick tests in Kafta Humera, north-west Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kalayou, S; Tadelle, H; Bsrat, A; Abebe, N; Haileselassie, M; Schallig, H D F H

    2011-06-01

    Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) are protozoan parasites of significant medical and veterinary importance. Over the last decade, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has emerged as a major opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS in North Western Ethiopia. This paper reports on serological evidence of possible Leishmania donovani (L. donovani) infection in dogs using two serological tests: direct agglutination test (DAT) and Kalazar detect rapid test (KDRT). Two hundred and seventeen asymptomatic local breed dogs were examined for L. donovani antibodies. Performance of the DAT and KDRT was assessed in 162 matching samples of blood collected on filter paper and serum, respectively. Using DAT and KDRT testing in parallel, the overall seroprevalence of L. donovani infection was 27.7% and 14.8%, respectively. The degree of agreement was found to be fair (68.8%, k = 0.234). Univariable logistic regression analysis of some risk factors for L. donovani infection in dogs using DAT indicates that place of residence, sex, age, dog keeping purpose and dog housing condition were not significantly associated with seropositivity. The high proportion of positive dogs suggests the exposure of these animals to L. donovani infection and needs further investigation. Isolation and typing of the parasite aiming at confirming the role of these animals in maintenance and transmission of kala-azar is advocated.

  16. Seroprevalence and comparison of different serological tests for brucellosis detection in small ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Sadhu, Dashrath B.; Panchasara, H. H.; Chauhan, H. C.; Sutariya, D. R.; Parmar, V. L.; Prajapati, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to study the seroprevalence and efficacy of the different serological tests used for detection of antibody against Brucella species in small ruminants of Banaskantha district of North-Gujarat. Materials and Methods: Total 1000 serum samples comprising of 485 from sheep and 515 from goat tested for detection of antibodies against the Brucella species by three different serological tests viz., Rose bengal plate test (RBPT), Standard tube agglutination test (STAT), and Indirect Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of brucellosis in small ruminants was 11.30%, 11.10%, and 8.80% by RBPT, STAT, and I-ELISA, respectively. The seroprevalence of brucellosis was found to be higher in sheep than goats. The sensitivity of RBPT was found slight more than STAT, but the specificity of both tests was same. In this study, the overall agreement of RBPT and STAT with I-ELISA was found 92.50% and 92.30% in small ruminants, respectively. Conclusion: I-ELISA was a better serological test as compared to RBPT and STAT in the sense of sensitivity, specificity, and rapidity and it could be advocated for screening of brucellosis in sheep and goats. PMID:27047135

  17. [Standardization of serological tests for Chagas disease: an immunoenzymatic test for blood donors triage].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A W; Belem, Z R; Moura, M E; Camargo, M E

    1991-01-01

    In the serological diagnosis of Chagas disease large divergences may be found even between laboratories with experience, as a consequence of different criteria for the standardization of the tests. To standardize a immunoenzymatic test developed primarily for screening blood donors, serum panels were carefully chosen so as to best represent chagasic and non-chagasic populations. Produced for the highest sensibility and stability, the new reagent (bioELISA cruzi, Biolab Diagnóstica S/A, Brasil), was tested in serum from 1648 patients 219 with Chagas disease and 104 with other diseases, plus a comparison with well standardized immunofluorescence and hemagglutination tests in 1325 sera. In the immunoenzymatic assays, the cut off was indicated by the absorbance value of a chagasic serum showing a minimal reactivity. ELISA sensibility was 0.9954 and specificity 0.9969, as co-negativity. False positive results were absent with sera from syphilis, toxoplasmosis, mononucleosis and high titered sera for antistreptolysin 0 antibodies. However they were seen in 5 to 15 cases of tegumentar leishmaniasis, 1 of 12 Kala-azar 1 of 15 rheumatoid arthritis and 1 of 12 systemic lupus erythematosus. The high sensibility in chagasics and high specificity in the general population indicate the confiability of the immunoenzymatic assay for screening blood donors and even to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

  18. Evaluation of Four Whole-Cell Leptospira-Based Serological Tests for Diagnosis of Urban Leptospirosis▿

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Alan J. A.; Santos, Balbino L.; Queiroz, Adriano; Santos, Andréia C.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.

    2007-01-01

    Four serologic assays for leptospirosis had sensitivities of 72 to 88% and specificities of 88 to 100% in the setting of highly endemic urban transmission, indicating that assays using enzyme-linked immunosorbency and rapid formats may be used as alternatives to the microscopic agglutination test for diagnosing urban leptospirosis. Testing a second sample will be required in cases with an initial negative result, since sensitivity was low (46 to 68%) during the first week of illness. PMID:17652521

  19. HIV Testing Rates and Testing Locations, by Race and Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Michele A.; Chen Lynn; Brown Adama; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the HIV testing rates among white Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans and to identify the frequency of use of HIV testing locations according to a variety of sociodemographic variables. Data for this study came from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Participants in…

  20. HIV: seek, test, treat, and retain.

    PubMed

    Normand, Jacques; Montaner, Julio; Fang, Chi-Tai; Wu, Zunyou; Chen, Yi-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The "HIV: Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain" session was chaired by Dr. Jacques Normand, the Director of AIDS Research at the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Yi-Ming Chen served as the discussant. The three presenters (and their presentation topics) were: Dr. Julio Montaner (Treatment as Prevention-The Key to an AIDS-free Generation), Dr. Chi-Tai Fang (Population-level Effect of Free Access to HAART on Reducing HIV Transmission in Taiwan), and Dr. Zunyou Wu (Challenges in Promoting HIV Test & Treat Strategy in China).

  1. Accuracy of Herdsmen Reporting versus Serologic Testing for Estimating Foot-and-Mouth Disease Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Ian G.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Hamman, Saidou M.; Nfon, Charles; Bergman, Ingrid E.; Malirat, Viviana; Sorensen, Karl J.; Bronsvoort, Barend M. de C.

    2014-01-01

    Herdsman-reported disease prevalence is widely used in veterinary epidemiologic studies, especially for diseases with visible external lesions; however, the accuracy of such reports is rarely validated. Thus, we used latent class analysis in a Bayesian framework to compare sensitivity and specificity of herdsman reporting with virus neutralization testing and use of 3 nonstructural protein ELISAs for estimates of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) prevalence on the Adamawa plateau of Cameroon in 2000. Herdsman-reported estimates in this FMD-endemic area were comparable to those obtained from serologic testing. To harness to this cost-effective resource of monitoring emerging infectious diseases, we suggest that estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of herdsmen reporting should be done in parallel with serologic surveys of other animal diseases. PMID:25417556

  2. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by ionizing radiation in body fluids and serological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, P.D.; Sarin, P.S.; Humphreys, J.C.; Eubanks, W.G.; Sun, D.; Hocken, D.G.; Thornton, A.; Adams, D.E.; Simic, M.G. )

    1989-11-01

    A method to use ionizing radiation to inactivate HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in human body fluids was studied in an effort to reduce the risk of accidental infection to forensic science laboratory workers. Experiments conducted indicate that an X-ray absorbed dose of 25 krad was required to completely inactivate HIV. This does not alter forensically important constituents such as enzymes and proteins in body fluids. This method of inactivation of HIV cannot be used on body fluids which will be subjected to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) typing.

  3. Integrative literature review of the reported uses of serological tests in leprosy management.

    PubMed

    Fabri, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira Coelho; Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Vieira, Nayara Figueiredo; Bueno, Isabela de Caux; Rodrigues, Rayssa Nogueira; Monteiro, Thayenne Barrozo Mota; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Duthie, Malcolm S; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2016-04-01

    An integrative literature review was conducted to synthesize available publications regarding the potential use of serological tests in leprosy programs. We searched the databases Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Índice Bibliográfico Espanhol em Ciências da Saúde, Acervo da Biblioteca da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Hanseníase, National Library of Medicine, Scopus, Ovid, Cinahl, and Web of Science for articles investigating the use of serological tests for antibodies against phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I), ML0405, ML2331, leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (LID-1), and natural disaccharide octyl-leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (NDO-LID). From an initial pool of 3.514 articles, 40 full-length articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on these papers, we concluded that these antibodies can be used to assist in diagnosing leprosy, detecting neuritis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring household contacts or at-risk populations in leprosy-endemic areas. Thus, available data suggest that serological tests could contribute substantially to leprosy management.

  4. HIV antibody testing in young, urban adults.

    PubMed

    Berrios, D C; Hearst, N; Perkins, L L; Burke, G L; Sidney, S; McCreath, H E; Hulley, S B

    1992-02-01

    We surveyed men and women aged 21 to 34 years to determine the rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing in blacks and whites of diverse education levels in four US cities. Responses to the anonymous, mailed questionnaire were received from 90% of 777 white women, 64% of 734 black women, 79% of 677 white men, and 48% of 541 black men. The percentages reporting HIV testing for these four race-gender groups were 29%, 22%, 30%, and 38%, respectively. The percentages reporting testing that was voluntarily sought (ie, not in connection with blood donation, military service) were 16%, 14%, 18%, and 22%, respectively. In each race-gender group, roughly half of those who had not been tested said they "might have a blood test for the AIDS virus in the future". Education level was not correlated with HIV-testing frequency. Blacks were significantly less likely than whites to be aware of "a blood test that can detect the AIDS virus infection" (58% vs 77%), but blacks who knew of the test were more likely than whites to have been tested (47% vs 37%). Eleven percent of subjects reported at least one major risk factor for HIV infection. In these people, HIV testing was most common among homosexually active men (56% tested; 52% voluntarily sought), intermediate among injection drug users (40% tested; 31% voluntarily sought), and least common among the sexual partners of injection-drug users (21% tested; 11% voluntarily sought). Health education programs need to communicate the availability of, and need for, anonymous HIV testing.

  5. Counselling about HIV serological status disclosure: nursing practice or law enforcement? a Foucauldian reflection.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Holmes, Dave; Roy, Marie

    2015-06-01

    Recently, focus groups and qualitative interviews with nurses who provide frontline care for persons living with HIV highlighted the contentiousness surrounding the seemingly innocuous activity of counselling clients about HIV-status disclosure, hereafter disclosure counselling. These empirical studies highlighted that while some nurses felt they should instruct clients to disclose their HIV-positive status if HIV transmission were possible, other nurses were equally adamant that such counselling was outside the nursing scope of practice. A review of these opposing perceptions about disclosure counselling, including an examination of the empirical evidence which supports each point, revealed that the dichotomous arguments needed to be nuanced. The empirical evidence about serostatus disclosure neither supported nor refuted either of these assertions; rather, it substantiated parts of each. To create this understanding, both empirical and theoretical works are used. First, the results of empirical studies about serostatus disclosure, or lack thereof and HIV transmission is presented; as part of this, Marks and Crepaz's HIV disclosure and exposure framework is examined. Second, the work of Michel Foucault on disciplinary and pastoral power is drawn from. The outcome is a nuanced understanding about the interrelationships between disclosure counselling and nursing practice and a final interpretation about what this understanding means for public health practice.

  6. Relationship of phospholipid chemistry to serological reactivity in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory slide test antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, M W; McGrew, B E; McLaurin, B; Pine, L

    1981-01-01

    A total of 13 egg lecithins, 12 beef heart lecithins, and 15 beef heart cardiolipins were assayed for the ability to function in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory microflocculation test, as well as for purity, fatty acid composition, free amines, metals, and products of oxidation. We found that the presence of peroxides and oxidation-related ultraviolet-absorbing chromophores showed a close inverse relationship to acceptable serological activity. The degree of purity of the lipids had only a slight influence on serological activity, whereas fatty acid composition, saturation, and configuration had none at all. We did not detect contaminating iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, or free amines in these lipids. We discuss the implications of our findings for improving the chemical standards for these lipids. Images PMID:7263853

  7. Using HIV resistance tests in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephen; Jayasuriya, Ashini; Smit, Erasmus

    2009-08-01

    Genotypic resistance testing is now a standard of care in HIV management. Although there are clear, published guidelines to recommend the appropriate use of these tests, clinicians and scientists still struggle to determine the optimal use of resistance tests given the finite budgets and time constraints under which they work. In this article we discuss some 'real-life' clinical situations and aim to provide a useful insight into when and where genotypic resistance testing can be optimally applied in the management of HIV-positive adults.

  8. [Serological investigation of Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV positive cases in Dali and Dehong of Yunnan].

    PubMed

    You, Ying-Xia; Li, Wei; Shen, Li-Jie; Nie, Da-Ping

    2012-10-30

    Serum samples were collected from HIV positive cases (927) and HIV, negative ones (80) from June 2010 to August 2011 in Dali and Dehong Prefectures of Yunnan. Serum anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG was detected by ELISA. The overall anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG positive rate among HIV positive cases and HIV negative ones was 35.1% (325/927) and 23.8% (19/80), respectively. In HIV positive cases, the seropositive rate was 30.3% (178/588) in Dali and 43.4% (147/339) in Dehong. The seropositive rate was significantly different among ethnic groups (chi2 = 28.433, P < 0.05). No significant difference was found among age groups (chi2 = 4.248, P > 0.05), and the age group of 41-60 showed the highest positive rate (36.1%, 103/285). The seropositive rate was 35.6% (203/571) in males and 34.3% (122/356) in females (chi2 = 0.158, P > 0.05).

  9. HIV Testing among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Daryl L.; And Others

    An increase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) throughout the world cuts across age, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation groups. It is imperative that people find out if they are carrying the disease. Many still continue to engage in high risk behaviors in ignorance, putting themselves and their partners at risk. The relationships among fear…

  10. Consequences of HIV testing without consent.

    PubMed

    Obi, Samuel N; Ifebunandu, Ngozi A

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the HIV-infected individuals' experience with HIV testing, counselling, disclosure of diagnosis and subsequent life events following diagnosis. The method used is a questionnaire survey of 340 consecutive HIV-positive victims, seen in two health institutions in southeast Nigeria within a one-year-period, November 2003 to October 2004. Three hundred and twenty respondents answered the questionnaire, 121 were men and 199 women, with 79% in the age range 20-39 years. Most respondents had known their HIV status for 3.2 (+/-1.1) years and the majority are in the lower social class. About 80% reported that their consent for HIV test was not asked for, resulting in feelings of fear, disbelief, shock and embarrassment on learning about their HIV status. Despite the initial reaction to the diagnosis, majority (81.9%) expressed satisfaction with the pattern of disclosure of diagnosis. There was some reluctance to inform spouse/partner of the diagnosis especially among asymptomatic, unmarried, childless or divorced victims. A serodiscordant couple resulted in mistrust and increased incidence of abandonment. Apart from spouse/partner the respondents are more likely to inform their siblings of the diagnosis than parents, children or friends. Despite being supportive, the respondents are more likely to suffer more neglect from siblings than their spouse (P<0.05) but the risk of being abandoned was more with the spouse than with siblings (P<0.05). Only 32.6% of the 129 respondents on antiretroviral therapy are regular with it mainly because of cost and non-availability of drugs. Default in treatment was more evident among the unmarried, those with low educational status and treatment with antiretroviral drugs for more than two years. Proper pre- and post-test counselling, promotion of behavioural change among the society about HIV/AIDS and provision of support and cost-effective care for HIV victims is advocated.

  11. Evaluation of three serological tests manufactured in Belarus for the diagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Shimanskaya, Iryna; Zhurauskaya, Larisa; Pankratov, Oleg; Unemo, Magnus; Ballard, Ronald C; Domeika, Marius

    2011-05-01

    The performance of three serological tests manufactured in Belarus for the diagnosis of syphilis, i.e. a microprecipitation reaction (MPR) and two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were compared with internationally recognized assays, namely the rapid plasma reagin test and the Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination assay (TPPA). Sera from 392 consecutive patients attending Brest (Belarus) regional dermatovenereological dispensaries were tested. The sensitivity of the MPR test was low (77.3%) compared with the rapid plasma reagin test, while the specificity was high (100%). In contrast, both Belarusian ELISAs performed well when compared with the TPPA (sensitivities of 99.2% and 100%, specificities of 98.7% and 99.0%, respectively). There is a clear need to improve the sensitivity of the existing Belarusian MPR test or to use a more sensitive screening test in order to improve diagnosis of the disease in Belarus.

  12. Comparison of a recombinant-antigen enzyme immunoassay with Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test for serological confirmation of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Islay; Alvarez, Elvio L; Fernández, Carmen; Miranda, Alina

    2002-04-01

    A recombinant-antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA), BioSCREEN anti-Treponema pallidum, was compared favorably with the T. pallidum hemagglutination test, in the detection of specific antibodies in different groups of sera from patients with primary (n = 38), secondary (n = 10), early latent (n = 28) and congenital syphilis (n = 2), patients with leptospirosis ( n= 8), infectious mononucleosis (n = 7), hepatitis (n = 9), diabetes mellitus (n = 11), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 13), leprosy (n = 11), tuberculosis (n = 9), HIV/Aids ( n= 12), systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 4), rheumatic fever (n = 3), old-persons (n = 9), pregnant women (n = 29) and blood donors (n = 164). The coincidence between them was 95.1%. The sensitivity and specificity of the EIA were 93.3% and 95.5%, respectively. Fifteen serum specimens belonging to old-persons, pregnant women, blood donors, and patients with human leptospirosis, hepatitis, diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and rheumatic fever gave false-positive results by Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and/or Rapid Plasma Reagin. The EIA can be used as alternative method for the serological confirmation of syphilis.

  13. Serological Diagnosis of Acute Scrub Typhus in Southern India: Evaluation of InBios Scrub Typhus Detect IgM Rapid Test and Comparison with other Serological Tests

    PubMed Central

    Anitharaj, Velmurugan; Pradeep, Jothimani; Park, Sungman; Kim, Seung-Han; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Eun-Ye; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Scrub Typhus (ST) is being reported from different parts of India in the recent past. However, the diagnosis and confirmation of ST cases require specific serological and molecular diagnostic tests. Both rapid and conventional ELISA tests need to be properly evaluated. Aim Evaluation of a new ST IgM Immunochromatography (ICT) test kit (InBios Scrub Typhus Detect IgM Rapid Test) and compare it with another rapid kit, conventional ELISA kit and Weil-Felix (WF) test. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out in Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Puducherry, during November 2015 to June 2016. Clinically suspected 220 ST patients were examined by a new kit, InBios Scrub Typhus Detect IgM Rapid Test, taking the conventional InBios Scrub Typhus Detect IgM ELISA as reference. Additional comparison was made with ImmuneMed Scrub Typhus Rapid, and WF test (single OXK titers ≥1:320). Statistical analysis was performed (Chi-square, Spearman’s correlation and Kappa) using IBM SPSS Statistics 17 for Windows (SPSS Inc; Chicago, USA). Results Percentage Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive and Negative Predictive Values for InBios, ImmuneMed and WF were 99.25, 93.02, 95.68, 98.77; 94.87, 94.19, 96.21, 92.05 and 50.38, 95.51, 94.29, 56.67 respectively. A total of 134 patients were positive in reference standard InBios IgM ELISA. Conclusion This new rapid ST IgM kit validated for the first time in India, showed good sensitivity and specificity. As a Point-of-Care (PoC) test, the kit would be helpful in both urban and remote rural parts of India. PMID:28050364

  14. Serological, intradermal and live flea challenge tests in the assessment of hypersensitivity to flea antigens in cats (Felis domesticus).

    PubMed

    Bond, Ross; Hutchinson, Melanie J; Loeffler, Anette

    2006-09-01

    The results of intradermal testing with three commercial flea antigens and a serological test for IgE antibodies to flea antigens were compared with live flea challenge in cats. Eight control cats with no prior flea exposure had negative serological test and flea challenge results. By contrast, 17 out of 27 cats with previous flea exposure showed immediate reactivity to flea challenge; reactivity at 6, 24 and 48 h after flea exposure was noted in 12, 16 and 21 cats, respectively. Seventeen of these cats had positive serological test results. Seven cats showed immediate intradermal test reactions to the ARTU allergen, six reacted to the Biophady allergen, and six reacted to the Greer allergen. Intradermal test reactivity was less frequent at the other time points. Using the results of the flea challenge as the 'gold standard' for the presence or absence of sensitisation to fleas, the sensitivity and specificity of the serological test was 0.88 and 0.77, respectively. Sensitivities of the intradermal tests at the four time points ranged from 0 to 0.33, whereas the specificities ranged from 0.78 to 1.0. Live flea challenge is better able to detect cats with hypersensitivity to fleas than either intradermal or serological testing.

  15. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  16. Serological findings in leprosy and tuberculosis with the Wassermann, Meinicke, and VDRL tests

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, H.

    1955-01-01

    In the course of a venereal disease survey in Egypt, 820 cases of leprosy and 720 cases of tuberculosis were serologically examined with the Wassermann, Meinicke (MKR II), and VDRL tests; the results are reported in this paper. On serological and anamnestic evidence, 31 cases of syphilis were discovered among the leprosy cases and 37 among the tuberculosis cases. Apparently false positive reactions were seen in 203 cases of leprosy (25%) and in 38 cases of tuberculosis (5%). The author discusses the probability that a fairly high proportion of these reactions were in fact caused by otherwise undetected syphilis or were non-specific. The Meinicke test proved the most specific of the three, followed, in that order, by the Wassermann and the VDRL tests. It was found that syphilis was more frequent among males with tuberculosis than among those with leprosy; this is attributed to the fact that leprosy patients are kept in greater isolation. Less easily explicable is the fact that more females than males with leprosy were found to have syphilis, whereas in tuberculous persons the difference in syphilis incidence between male and female patients was not very great. PMID:13284561

  17. Genomic detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by nucleic acid amplification test in a frequent platelet donor during the pre-seroconversion period.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-11-01

    Since serological donor-screening tests for HIV were introduced in 1985, the safety of donated blood components has improved dramatically. However, these tests do not completely prevent the risk of transfusion-associated HIV infection related to the use of blood donated during the pre-seroconversion window period. Testing based on nucleic acid amplification is being implemented to screen for HIV-infected blood donated during this period, which has reduced the probability of transmitting HIV through transfusion by shortening the window period. This article describes a case of acute HIV-1 infection, detected using a nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) in a repeat blood donor who donated during the pre-seroconversion window period and whose antigen and anti-HIV antibody expression was observed after molecular marker detection. In addition, the possible route of infection is discussed based on the patient's history, and finally, the need for NAT technology for blood donor screening is emphasized.

  18. HIV Testing Services in Africa: Are They Sustainable?

    PubMed

    Marum, Elizabeth; Conkling, Martha; Kanyanda, Jabez; Gandi, Sheila Birungi; Byaruhanga, Raymond; Alwano, Mary Grace

    2016-10-01

    HIV testing services (HTS) are an essential component of a national response to the HIV epidemic, and in lower and middle income countries, at least 150 million persons are tested annually. HIV testing is necessary to identify persons in need of antiretroviral treatment, which has been documented to be highly effective not only for treatment but also for prevention of HIV transmission to both adults and children. An assessment of the recent literature on sustainability of health and HIV services suggests that organizational performance, flexibility, and integration with other health interventions contribute to sustainability of HIV services and programs. This article describes the experiences of two HIV testing service providers in Uganda and Zambia as well as the track record of services to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission to illustrate the factors of performance, flexibility, adaptability, and integration which are key to the sustainability of HIV testing services.

  19. Assessment of milk ring test and some serological tests in the detection of Brucella melitensis in Syrian female sheep.

    PubMed

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Ramadan, Lila; Akel, Rand

    2011-04-01

    Brucella melitensis infection prevalence among Syrian female sheep, to evaluate a number of serological tests and to discuss some epidemiological aspects of brucellosis, was studied. A total of 2,580 unvaccinated Syrian female sheep sera samples were tested for B. melitensis antibodies detection using four serological methods: the Rose Bengal test (RBT), the serum agglutination test (SAT), the complement fixation test (CFT) and an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA). In addition, 2,375 milk samples were collected, then milk ring test (MRT) and bacterial isolation test were employed to evaluate the natural organism shedding. The samples were considered positive in 66%, 64%, and 60% when we employed the RBT, SAT, and iELISA tests, respectively. Whereas, the CFT test revealed the smallest number of positive samples. By using the MRT, the total prevalence of brucellosis was nearly 38% of samples. A large variation was observed concerning the studied areas, ranging from 24% in Tartous to 44% in both Damascus and Damascus rural areas. Brucella was isolated from only 677 samples out of the 2,375 female sheep milk samples.

  20. Seroprevalence of human brucellosis in and around Jammu, India, using different serological tests

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H. K.; Kotwal, S. K.; Singh, D. K.; Malik, M. A.; Kumar, Arvind; Rajagunalan; Singh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Brucellosis is a disease of zoonotic importance as it affects both human as well as animal’s health, and therefore, directly affects animal productivity and human efficiency. Therefore, a study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of brucellosis in humans in Jammu and surrounding areas. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 sera samples from humans occupied with professional related to animals were collected and tested for anti-Brucella antibodies by Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT), modified RBPT (mRBPT), standard tube agglutination test (STAT), and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA). Sampling was done keeping in view with the occupation, sex, and age. Results: The overall seroprevalence of brucellosis recorded was 4.96%. The test-wise seroprevalence was 9.91% by RBPT, 9.91% by mRBPT, 9.09% by STAT, and 16.52% by I-ELISA. The prevalence of brucellosis was higher in >35-50 years age group compared to >20-35 years and >50-65 years. Sex-wise seroprevalence was higher in males than females. Taking I-ELISA as standard, the relative sensitivities of mRBPT, RBPT, and I-ELISA were in the order of mRBPT=RBPT>STAT. All the tests revealed high specificity values; however, among different serological tests, I-ELISA detected a maximum number of positive sera samples. Conclusions: The prevalence of brucellosis was found to be approximately 5%. The adult (>35-50 years) age male group was most vulnerable. The routine diagnosis of brucellosis involved the conventional serological tests, viz., RBPT and STAT, but each was associated with drawbacks which could give either false-positive or false-negative interpretation. Therefore, it is always recommended to use a battery of tests in the diagnosis of brucellosis. PMID:27536036

  1. Preferred HIV testing services and programme characteristics among clients of a rapid HIV testing programme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the current context of diversity and coexistence of HIV testing approaches, limited information exists on test recipient’s views of HIV testing services and programme attributes that could ease the testing process and make it more appealing for at risk individuals who don’t know their HIV status. This study analyzed ratings given to different testing sites and programme characteristics that might facilitate testing. Methods We analyzed data from 3120 persons attending a mobile HIV testing programme located on a central street in the gay district of Madrid. Results 64% were men (of which, 55% had had sex with other men), 59.5% were <30 years, 35.4% foreigners, 50.6% had a university degree,71.7% a regular employment, 59.3% reported multiple partners and inconsistent condom use and 56.5% had been tested for HIV. Non Governmental Organizations and specific HIV/STI centres received the maximum rating from over 60% of participants, followed by self-testing (38.9%). Pharmacies (20.8%) and hospital emergency departments (14.2%) were the worst valued testing sites. Over 80% gave the highest rating to having immediate test results, not needing a previous appointment, and free testing, while less than 50% gave the maximum rating to privacy and anonymity. Conclusions HIV testing services that don’t require an appointment, based on free tests with rapid results are most valued by a young, not socially marginalized but high risk sexual exposure population. On the contrary, issues traditionally highly valued by health care providers or AIDS social organizations (privacy and anonymity) are much less valued. PMID:23987230

  2. RhCE protein variants in Southwestern Germany detected by serologic routine testing

    PubMed Central

    Bugert, Peter; Scharberg, Erwin A.; Geisen, Christof; von Zabern, Inge; Flegel, Willy A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Variant RHCE alleles with diminished expression of C, c, E, and e antigens have been described and indicate the genetic diversity of this gene locus in several populations. In this study the molecular background of variant RhCE antigens identified by standard serologic routine testing in German blood donors and patients was determined. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Samples from blood donors and patients were routinely analyzed for RhCE phenotype using the PK7200 analyzer with two sets of monoclonal anti-C, -c, -E, and -e reagents. Samples with confirmed variant RhCE antigens were analyzed by nucleotide sequencing of the 10 RHCE exons. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming (PCR-SSP) method was established for rapid typing of the rare RHCE alleles. RESULTS We identified 43 samples with serologic RhCE variants. Molecular analysis revealed variant RHCE alleles in 34 samples. Altogether 22 RHCE alleles were detected; 10 have not been published before. Twenty alleles harbored distinct single-nucleotide substitutions, 18 of which encoded amino acid changes and 2 of which occurred in noncoding regions. Two samples represented RHCE-D-CE hybrid alleles involving different segments of the RHCE Exon 5. A multiplex PCR-SSP screening for 17 RHCE alleles was negative in 1344 samples of the DNA bank GerBS. The cumulative phenotype frequency was estimated between 1 in 488 (0.20%) and 1 in 8449 (0.012%). CONCLUSION Single-amino-acid substitutions were the molecular basis for variant RhCE antigen expression in most samples. Nucleotide substitutions in RHCE exons were excluded as possible mechanism of diminished RhCE antigen expression in one-fifth of the serologically identified samples. PMID:19453980

  3. Comparison of counter-immunoelectrophoresis with other serological tests in the diagnosis of human brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, R.; Maravi-Poma, E.; Rivero, A.

    1976-01-01

    Sera from 65 persons with clinical brucellosis were employed in a comparison of standard and rapid serological tests. The results obtained with the Rose Bengal test correlated very well with those of the standard tube agglutination test, whereas results with the rapid plate agglutination test and the Coombs (antiglobulin) test were inferior. Absorption of patients' sera with specific anti-human immunoglobulin sera showed that IgM was active in the Rose Bengal test but not in the Coombs test, whereas IgG and IgA were active in both tests. In addition to the A & M antigen, which plays the most important role in the agglutination, Rose Bengal, and Coombs tests, other antigenic fractions of Brucella were examined in precipitation tests. A protein antigen reacted with 94% of the sera in counter-immunoelectrophoresis. On the basis of the results with both groups of sera, the Rose Bengal test and counter-immunoelectrophoresis appear to be the most promising methods for diagnosing clinical brucellosis. The tests differ qualitatively since different Brucella antigens are employed. PMID:791532

  4. Prenatal HIV tests. Routine testing or informed choice?

    PubMed Central

    Guenter, Dale; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Carroll, June; Sellors, John

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how prenatal care providers responded to a new provincial policy of offering HIV testing to all prenatal patients, and to determine factors associated with self-reported high testing rates. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Outpatient practices in three Ontario health-planning regions. PARTICIPANTS: Prenatal care providers: 784 family physicians, 200 obstetricians, and 103 midwives were sent questionnaires and were eligible to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported testing of 80% or more prenatal patients ("high testers") and associated practice characteristics, attitudes, and counseling practices. RESULTS: Response rate was 57% (622/1087): 43% of respondents were high testers. Family physicians were most likely and midwives least likely to be high testers. High testers tended to report that they had adequate knowledge of HIV testing, that HIV risk among their patients warranted testing all of them, and that testing should be routine. Encouraging women to test and not providing written information or choice were independently associated with high testing rates. CONCLUSION: Strongest predictors of high prenatal HIV testing rates were attitudes and practices that favoured a routine approach to testing and that placed little emphasis on informed consent. PMID:14594102

  5. Evaluating the validity of the serologic test for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Yu, Fang-Jung; Tsai, Pei-Yun; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Chang, Lin-Li; Jan, Chang-Ming; Wang, Wen-Ming; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2007-11-01

    A strong correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer has been reported. Mongolian gerbils are regarded as the most suitable animal model in which to study carcinogenesis associated with H. pylori. The aim of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of the serologic test for detecting H. pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils. The model was developed as follows: the H. pylori colony (vacuolating cytotoxin A (+)/cytotoxin-associated gene A (+)) was cultured from the mucosas of previously H. pylori-fed gerbils. These colonies were cultured in broth. Then,we fed the gerbils with 0.5-1 mL of broth (about 10(9) CFU/mL) (intragastric administration) twice within a 3-day period. After inoculation for 6 or 26 weeks, the gerbils were sacrificed and their gastric mucosas were sampled for a series of examinations. Blood samples for serologic testing (STAT-PAK) were collected. H. pylori infection was confirmed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test. Differences were regarded as significant when the p value was less than 0.05. A total of 50 gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori and the success rate reached 88%. All 10 gerbils in the control group showed a negative result. Damage to the mucosas was more obvious following increasing periods of inoculation. The rates of sensitivity and specificity, as determined by the STAT-PAK test, were 90.9% and 100%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 60%, respectively. The STAT-PAK test seemed to be more sensitive and accurate (p < 0.05) in high H. pylori densities. In conclusion, the STAT-PAK test (blood-sampling) showed acceptable results and was suitable for long-term observation of H. pylori infection.

  6. Adjunctive Tests for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis: Serology, ELISPOT for Site-Specific Lymphocytes, Urinary Lipoarabinomannan, String Test, and Fine Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Lawn, Stephen D.; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S.; Wright, Colleen A.; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic gold standard for active tuberculosis (TB) is the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) by culture or molecular methods. However, despite its limited sensitivity, sputum smear microscopy is still the mainstay of TB diagnosis in resource-limited settings. Consequently, diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB remains challenging in such settings. A number of novel or alternative techniques could provide adjunctive diagnostic use in the context of difficult-to-diagnose TB. These may be especially useful in certain patient groups such as persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and children, who are disproportionably affected by smear-negative and extrapulmonary disease and who are also most adversely affected by delays in TB diagnosis and treatment. We review a selection of these methods that are independent of nucleic acid amplification techniques and could largely be implemented in resource-limited settings in current or adapted versions. Specifically, we discuss the diagnostic use and potential of serologic tests based on detection of antibodies to MTB antigens; interferon gamma release assays using site-specific lymphocytes; detection of lipoarabinomannan, a glycolipid of MTB, in urine; the string test, a novel technique to retrieve lower respiratory tract samples; and fine needle aspiration biopsy of lymph nodes. PMID:21996695

  7. Performances of HTLV serological tests in diagnosing HTLV infection in high-risk population of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Fabrício; Santos-Fortuna, Elizabeth de los; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele

    2007-01-01

    Testing problems in diagnosing human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection, mostly HTLV-II, have been documented in HIV/AIDS patients. Since December 1998, the Immunology Department of Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL) offers HTLV-I/II serology to Public Health Units that attend HTLV high-risk individuals. Two thousand, three hundred and twelve serum samples: 1,393 from AIDS Reference Centers (Group I), and 919 from HTLV out-patient clinics (Group II) were sent to IAL for HTLV-I/II antibodies detection. The majority of them were screened by two enzyme immunoassays (EIAs), and confirmed by Western Blot (WB 2.4, Genelabs). Seven different EIA kits were employed during the period, and according to WB results, the best performance was obtained by EIAs that contain HTLV-I and HTLV-II viral lysates and rgp21 as antigens. Neither 1st and 2nd, nor 3rd generation EIA kits were 100% sensitive in detecting truly HTLV-I/II reactive samples. HTLV-I and HTLV-II prevalence rates of 3.3% and 2.5% were detected in Group I, and of 9.6% and 3.6% in Group II, respectively. High percentages of HTLV-seroindeterminate WB sera were detected in both Groups. The algorithm testing to be employed in HTLV high-risk population from São Paulo, Brazil, needs the use of two EIA kits of different formats and compounds as screening, and because of high seroindeterminate WB, may be another confirmatory assay.

  8. A Comprehensive Sex Education Approach for HIV Testing and Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colpin, Hilde

    2006-01-01

    Despite huge prevention efforts the number of HIV infections worldwide continues to increase dramatically. Among other strategies, the HIV test offers an important chance for targeted prevention, provided quality counselling is offered. Several studies have revealed that HIV testing is often performed in less than optimal conditions and is often…

  9. HIV Testing Patterns among Urban YMSM of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Rajan, Sonali; Gwadz, Marya V.; Aregbesola, Temi

    2014-01-01

    The heightened level of risk for HIV infection among Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is driven by multilevel influences. Using cross-sectional data, we examined HIV testing patterns among urban YMSM of color in a high-HIV seroprevalence area (ages 16 to 21 years). Self-reported frequency of testing was high, with 42% of…

  10. Evaluation of five serological tests for the diagnosis of porcine brucellosis in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Praud, Anne; Gimenez, Olivier; Zanella, Gina; Pozzi, Nathalie; Antras, Valérie; Meyer, Laurence; Garin-Bastuji, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Porcine brucellosis due to Brucella suis biovar 1 raises important issues for pig breeders in French Polynesia. In this region, the disease is enzootic, spreads silently and engenders economic losses in infected farms as well as sporadic human cases. While serological tests are essential in surveillance and control programmes of animal diseases, to date none of the available tests have been shown to be reliable enough to be used as a gold standard in routine individual diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. Few studies about the estimation of the sensitivity and the specificity of porcine brucellosis screening tests have been published, none of them dealing with French Polynesia. The studied population included 1,595 pigs from French Polynesia. Five tests were evaluated: Rose Bengal test, fluorescence polarisation assay, indirect ELISA, and two competitive ELISAs (C-ELISA). The sensitivity and the specificity of each test were estimated. C-ELISA2 was the most sensitive test (Se C-ELISA2=0.954 [0.889; 0.992] 95% credibility interval (CrI)) while both C-ELISA and Rose Bengal test (RBT) were the most specific ones (Sp C-ELISA1=0.856 [0.806; 0.915] 95% CrI; Sp C-ELISA2=0.849 [0.817; 0.879] 95% CrI; Sp RBT=0.853 [0.812; 0.898] 95% CrI).

  11. HIV risk behavior and access to services: what predicts HIV testing among heterosexually active homeless men?

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-06-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV testing behavior of homeless men. This study examined the association between individual (HIV risk) and structural (service access) factors and past year HIV testing. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles. Logistic regression examined the association between past year HIV testing and demographic characteristics, HIV risk behavior, and access to other services in the Skid Row area in the past 30 days. Despite high rates of past year HIV testing, study participants also reported high rates of HIV risk behavior, suggesting there is still significant unmet need for HIV prevention among homeless men. Having recently used medical/dental services in the Skid Row area (OR: 1.91; CI: 1.09, 3.35), and being a military veteran (OR: 2.10; CI: 1.01-4.37) were significantly associated with HIV testing service utilization. HIV testing was not associated with HIV risk behavior, but rather with access to services and veteran status, the latter of which prior research has linked to increased service access. We suggest that programs encouraging general medical service access may be important for disseminating HIV testing services to this high-risk, vulnerable population.

  12. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abati, Paulo Afonso Martins; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002), P2 (2003-2006), and P3 (2007-2010) – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country. PMID:25741647

  13. Collaborative study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of diphtheria toxoid vaccines - extended study: correlation of serology with in vivo toxin neutralisation.

    PubMed

    Sesardic, D; Winsnes, R; Rigsby, P; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2004-01-01

    Phase I of BSP034 collaborative study was extended in two laboratories to include correlation of serology with in vivo toxin neutralisation test (TNT) using 2 separate sets of 20 serum pools, produced in-house. The study investigated the extent to which the in vitro methods for diphtheria antibodies, Vero cell assay and diphtheria enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diphtheria antitoxin (D-ELISA), can detect neutralising antibodies by comparison with TNT in guinea pigs. The study was also performed to compare the antibody neutralising potency obtained in relation to guinea pig (GP) or equine (DI) antitoxin standard. In addition, the study provided an opportunity to compare ELISA for tetanus antitoxin (T-ELISA) and TNT assay for detection of anti-tetanus antibodies, from the same set of serum pools. The data obtained show that antitoxin potency obtained by Vero cell assay, D-ELISA and T-ELISA using the same GP standard, highly correlated with neutralising potency as determined in respective TNT assays. Vero cell assay with DI provided estimates that also correlated with neutralising potency, but were of significantly lower titre. Since reference to DI standard is widely used in serodiagnosis, as well as in clinical studies where diphtheria antitoxin titres obtained in the Vero cell method are taken as surrogate markers for vaccine efficacy, it should be investigated if a similar difference is also observed for human serology.

  14. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mauro Maciel de; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused by Leishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL.

  15. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P.; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A.; Michels, Paul A.; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R.; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung’u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Background Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. Methodology/Principal Findings The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. Conclusions This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease. PMID:27936225

  16. Determinants and prevalence of late HIV testing in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa, Claudia M; Blumberg, Elaine J; Hovell, Melbourne F; Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Garcia-Gonzalez, Gregorio; Lozada, Remedios; Kelley, Norma J; Hofstetter, C Richard; Sipan, Carol L

    2010-05-01

    Timely diagnosis of HIV is essential to improve survival rates and reduce transmission of the virus. Insufficient progress has been made in effecting earlier HIV diagnoses. The Mexican border city of Tijuana has one of the highest AIDS incidence and mortality rates in all of Mexico. This study examined the prevalence and potential correlates of late HIV testing in Tijuana, Mexico. Late testers were defined as participants who had at least one of: (1) an AIDS-defining illness within 1 year of first positive HIV test; (2) a date of AIDS diagnosis within 1 year of first positive HIV test; or (3) an initial CD4 cell count below 200 cells per microliter within 1 year of first positive HIV test. Medical charts of 670 HIV-positive patients from two HIV/AIDS public clinics in Tijuana were reviewed and abstracted; 362 of these patients were interviewed using a cross-sectional survey. Using multivariate logistic regression, we explored potential correlates of late HIV testing based on the Behavioral Ecological Model. From 342 participants for whom late testing could be determined, the prevalence of late testing was 43.2%. Multivariate logistic regression results (n = 275) revealed five significant correlates of late testing: "I preferred not to know I had HIV" (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.78, 1.46-5.31); clinic (AOR = 1.90, 1.06-3.41); exposure to peers engaging in high-risk sexual behavior (AOR = 1.14, 1.02-1.27); stigma regarding HIV-infected individuals (AOR = 0.65, 0.47-0.92); and stigma regarding HIV testing (AOR = 0.66, 0.45-0.97). These findings may inform the design of interventions to increase timely HIV testing and help reduce HIV transmission in the community at large.

  17. DO COMMERCIAL SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI INFECTION DETECT MEXICAN STRAINS IN WOMEN AND NEWBORNS?

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-León, Rubi; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Claudia; Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolas; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Caamal-Kantun, Alejandra; Buekens, Pierre; Dumonteil, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine the serological test that could be used for Trypanosoma cruzi seroprevalence studies in Mexico, where lineage I predominates. In a previous study among pregnant women and their newborns in the states of Yucatan and Guanajuato, we reported a 0.8–0.9% of prevalence for T. cruzi–specific antibodies by Stat-Pak and Wiener ELISA. We have expanded this study here by performing an additional non-commercial ELISA and confirming the seropositives with Western blot, using whole antigens of a local parasite strain. We found a seroprevalence of 0.6% (3/500) in Merida and 0.4% in Guanajuato (2/488). The 5 seropositive umbilical cord samples reacted to both non-commercial ELISA and Western blot tests, and only 1 of the maternal samples was not reactive to non-commercial ELISA. A follow-up of the newborns at 10 mo was performed in Yucatan to determine the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in children as evidence of congenital infection. None of the children was seropositive. One newborn from an infected mother died at 2 wk of age of cardiac arrest, but T. cruzi infection was not confirmed. The T. cruzi seroprevalence data obtained with both commercial tests (Stat-Pak and ELISA Wiener) are similar to those from non-commercial tests using a local Mexican strain of T. cruzi. PMID:21506787

  18. Do commercial serologic tests for Trypanosoma cruzi infection detect Mexican strains in women and newborns?

    PubMed

    Gamboa-León, Rubi; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Claudia; Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolas; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Caamal-Kantun, Alejandra; Buekens, Pierre; Dumonteil, Eric

    2011-04-01

    We sought to determine the serological test that could be used for Trypanosoma cruzi seroprevalence studies in Mexico, where lineage I predominates. In a previous study among pregnant women and their newborns in the states of Yucatan and Guanajuato, we reported a 0.8-0.9% of prevalence for T. cruzi -specific antibodies by Stat-Pak and Wiener ELISA. We have expanded this study here by performing an additional non-commercial ELISA and confirming the seropositives with Western blot, using whole antigens of a local parasite strain. We found a seroprevalence of 0.6% (3/500) in Merida and 0.4% in Guanajuato (2/488). The 5 seropositive umbilical cord samples reacted to both non-commercial ELISA and Western blot tests, and only 1 of the maternal samples was not reactive to non-commercial ELISA. A follow-up of the newborns at 10 mo was performed in Yucatan to determine the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in children as evidence of congenital infection. None of the children was seropositive. One newborn from an infected mother died at 2 wk of age of cardiac arrest, but T. cruzi infection was not confirmed. The T. cruzi seroprevalence data obtained with both commercial tests (Stat-Pak and ELISA Wiener) are similar to those from non-commercial tests using a local Mexican strain of T. cruzi.

  19. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach.

  20. Comparison of serological tests for the detection of ovine and caprine antibody to Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K; Gall, D; Smith, P; Balsevicius, S; Garrido, F; Ferrer, M Durán; Biancifiori, F; Dajer, A; Luna, E; Samartino, L; Bermudez, R; Moreno, F; Renteria, T; Corral, A

    2004-12-01

    The indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IELISA), the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) and the fluorescence polarisation assay (FPA) were evaluated with sera from sheep experimentally infected with Brucella melitensis and negative Canadian sheep. The sensitivity and specificity of the assays were as follows: IELISA: 91.7% and 97.6%, CELISA: 75.0% and 99.8% and FPA: 91.7% and 89.5%. Sera from the same experimental population were divided according to serological reaction in the rose bengal agglutination test (RBT) and the complement fixation test (CFT). Reactivity relative to the RBT positive and CFT positive sera were as follows: IELISA: 99.7%, CELISA: 93.2% and FPA: 99.1%. Since sera from goats with proven B. melitensis infection were not available, 699 sera from goats judged positive in the buffered antigen plate agglutination test (BPAT) and CFT and 982 BPAT/CFT negative Canadian goats were used. The sensitivity and specificity of the assays relative to the BPAT and CFT positive sera were: IELISA: 99.4% and 98.0%, CELISA: 95.4% and 97.1% and FPA: 92.7% and 99.8%.

  1. Serology with ML Flow test in health professionals from three different states of Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Karla Lucena Sampaio; Magnanini, Mônica Maria Ferreira; de Moura, Rodrigo Scaliante; Gallo, Maria Eugenia Noviski; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; de Oliveira, Maria Leide Wand-Del-Rey

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In highly endemic countries, transmission and sub-clinical infection of leprosy are likely and the disease manifests itself in individuals without any known close contact with a leprosy patient. Health workers are social contacts belonging to the same network (the Health System) and some of them share the same social environment (nursing assistants) as patients with known patients and / or carriers. OBJECTIVE To identify ML Flow seropositivity among health professionals. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study using a serological survey with the ML Flow test in 450 health professionals (doctors, nurses and nursing assistants), in order to detect seropositivity in areas of high and low endemicity in municipalities from three Brazilian states (RJ, MS and RS). RESULTS The results showed general 16% seropositivity, higher in low endemic areas, regardless of whether there was direct care for leprosy patients. Paradoxically, a statistical association was observed between the area studied and seropositivity, as the place with the lowest endemicity (CA) had the highest seropositivity rate (p = 0.033). CONCLUSION The authors suggest these results are associated with a presence of an unspecified link to bovine serum albumin (BSA), carrier of PGL-1 in the ML Flow test, and recommend expanded seroepidemiological research utilizing tests with human and bovine albumin. PMID:24474100

  2. Rapid quantitative serological test for detection of infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Balagon, Marivic F; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G

    2014-02-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections.

  3. Validation of Serological Tests for the Detection of Antibodies Against Treponema pallidum in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K.; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  4. Validation of serological tests for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test.

  5. Decisional balance, perceived risk and HIV testing practices.

    PubMed

    Lauby, Jennifer L; Bond, Lisa; Eroğlu, Dogan; Batson, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Improving our understanding of how individuals decide to take an HIV test is essential for designing effective programs to increase testing. This paper assesses the relationship of decisional balance and perceived risk to HIV testing history in a cross-sectional community sample of 1523 HIV-negative men and women at risk due to drug use or sexual behavior. We developed scales to measure perceived advantages (pros) and perceived disadvantages (cons) of taking an HIV test and assessed their content using factor analysis. Perceived risk was highly related to the pros and cons scales. Multivariate analyses revealed that the pros scale had positive associations with having ever tested and the number of tests taken, while the cons scale had negative associations with these testing measures. Perceived risk was not related to testing practices. These results suggest that interventions to increase HIV testing need to address anticipated positive and negative outcomes of getting tested.

  6. Application of Mycobacterium Leprae-specific cellular and serological tests for the differential diagnosis of leprosy from confounding dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Aline Araújo; Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Costa, Maurício Barcelos; Sousa, Ana Lúcia Osório Maroccolo; Castilho, Mirian Lane Oliveira; Gonçalves, Heitor Sá; Pontes, Maria Araci Andrade; Duthie, Malcolm S; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae-specific serological and cell-mediated-immunity/CMI test were evaluated for the differential diagnosis of multibacillary/MB, and paucibacillary/PB leprosy from other dermatoses. Whole-blood assay/WBA/IFNγ stimulated with LID-1 antigen and ELISA tests for IgG to LID-1 and IgM to PGL-I were performed. WBA/LID-1/IFNγ production was observed in 72% PB, 11% MB leprosy, 38% dermatoses, 40% healthy endemic controls/EC. The receiver operating curve/ROC for WBA/LID-1 in PB versus other dermatoses showed 72.5% sensitivity, 61.5% specificity and an area-under-the-curve/AUC=0.75; 74% positive predictive value/PPV, 59% negative predictive value/NPV. Anti PGL-I serology was positive in 67% MB, 8% PB leprosy, 6% of other dermatoses; its sensitivity for MB=66%, specificity=93%, AUC=0.89; PPV=91%, NPV=72%. Anti-LID-1 serology was positive in 87% MB, 7% PB leprosy, all other participants were seronegative; 87.5% sensitivity for MB, 100% specificity, AUC=0.97; PPV=100%, NPV=88%. In highly endemic areas anti-LID-1/PGL-I serology and WBA/LID-1-represent useful tools for the differential diagnosis of leprosy from other confounding dermatoses.

  7. The ethics of feedback of HIV test results in population-based surveys of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Maher, Dermot

    2013-12-01

    Population-based disease prevalence surveys raise ethical questions, including whether participants should be routinely told their test results. Ethical guidelines call for informing survey participants of any clinically relevant finding to enable appropriate management. However, in anonymous surveys of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, participants can "opt out" of being given their test results or are offered the chance to undergo voluntary HIV testing in local counselling and testing services. This is aimed at minimizing survey participation bias. Those who opt out of being given their HIV test results and who do not seek their results miss the opportunity to receive life-saving antiretroviral therapy. The justification for HIV surveys without routine feedback of results to participants is based on a public health utility argument: that the benefits of more rigorous survey methods - reduced participation bias - outweigh the benefits to individuals of knowing their HIV status. However, people with HIV infection have a strong immediate interest in knowing their HIV status. In consideration of the ethical value of showing respect for people and thereby alleviating suffering, an argument based on public health utility is not an appropriate justification. In anonymous HIV surveys as well as other prevalence surveys of treatable conditions in any setting, participation should be on the basis of routine individual feedback of results as an integral part of fully informed participation. Ensuring that surveys are ethically sound may stimulate participation, increase a broader uptake of HIV testing and reduce stigmatization of people who are HIV-positive.

  8. HIV testing, risk perception, and behaviour in the British population

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Soazig; Nardone, Anthony; Field, Nigel; Mercer, Catherine H.; Tanton, Clare; Macdowall, Wendy; Johnson, Anne M.; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between HIV risk behaviour, risk perception and testing in Britain. Design: A probability sample survey of the British population. Methods: We analyzed data on sexual behaviour, self-perceived HIV risk and HIV testing (excluding testing because of blood donation) from 13 751 sexually experienced men and women aged 16–74, interviewed between 2010 and 2012 using computer-assisted face-to-face and self-interviewing. Results: Altogether, 3.5% of men and 5.4% of women reported having an HIV test in the past year. Higher perceived risk of HIV was associated with sexual risk behaviours and with HIV testing. However, the majority of those rating themselves as ‘greatly’ or ‘quite a lot’ at risk of HIV (3.4% of men, 2.5% of women) had not tested in the past year. This was also found among the groups most affected by HIV: MSM and black Africans. Within these groups, the majority reporting sexual risk behaviours did not perceive themselves as at risk and had not tested for HIV. Overall, 29.6% of men and 39.9% of women who tested for HIV in the past year could be classified as low risk across a range of measures. Conclusion: Most people who perceive themselves as at risk of HIV have not recently tested, including among MSM and black Africans. Many people tested in Britain are at low risk, reflecting current policy that aims to normalize testing. Strategies to further improve uptake of testing are needed, particularly in those at greatest risk, to further reduce undiagnosed HIV infection at late diagnoses. PMID:26963528

  9. HIV testing attitudes, AIDS stigma, and voluntary HIV counselling and testing in a black township in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, S; Simbayi, L

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: A cornerstone of HIV prevention in South Africa is voluntary HIV antibody counselling and testing (VCT), but only one in five South Africans aware of VCT have been tested. This study examined the relation between HIV testing history, attitudes towards testing, and AIDS stigmas. Methods: Men (n = 224) and women (n = 276) living in a black township in Cape Town completed venue intercept surveys; 98% were black, 74% age 35 or younger. Results: 47% of participants had been tested for HIV. Risks for exposure to HIV were high and comparable among people tested and not tested. Comparisons on attitudes toward VCT, controlling for demographics and survey venue, showed that individuals who had not been tested for HIV and those tested but who did not know their results held significantly more negative testing attitudes than individuals who were tested, particularly people who knew their test results. Compared to people who had been tested, individuals who were not tested for HIV demonstrated significantly greater AIDS related stigmas; ascribing greater shame, guilt, and social disapproval to people living with HIV. Knowing test results among those tested was not related to stigmatising beliefs. Conclusions: Efforts to promote VCT in South Africa require education about the benefits of testing and, perhaps more important, reductions in stigmatising attitudes towards people living with AIDS. Structural and social marketing interventions that aim to reduce AIDS stigmas will probably decrease resistance to seeking VCT. PMID:14663117

  10. The association between HIV media campaigns and number of patients coming forward for HIV antibody testing.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J D; Scott, G R

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To assess the relationship between national and local media campaigns with respect to the number of patients requesting HIV antibody tests as a surrogate marker of the effectiveness of different campaign strategies. METHODS--Analysis by month of the numbers of HIV tests performed in the regional genitourinary (GUM) clinic for Lothian over a 5 year period and in the whole of Lothian Region, Scotland over a 3 year period. Changes in testing rates were monitored with respect to media campaigns over the same time period. RESULTS--Television based media campaigns produced the greatest increase in testing rates (average 46% increase over 2 months) compared with newspapers and poster campaigns (average 6% increase over 2 months). Regional HIV testing rates correlated significantly with GUM clinic testing rates. No increase in positive HIV tests was seen following media campaigns. CONCLUSIONS--Using HIV testing rates as a surrogate marker, television based media campaigns appear to be the most effective way of increasing awareness of HIV. The effect of media campaigns is short-lived indicating a need for constant reminder of the dangers of HIV infection. The increase in HIV testing occurs largely in the "worried well" with few additional HIV positive patients being identified. PMID:8335311

  11. Dengue antibodies in Polish travellers returning from the tropics. Evaluation of serological tests.

    PubMed

    Goljan, Jolanta; Myjak, Przemysław; Nahorski, Wacław; Kubica-Biernat, Beata; Felczak-Korzybska, Iwona; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Kuna, Anna; Kotłowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Dengue is a viral disease caused by an RNA virus of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae, occurring as four serotypes (DEN-1, -2, -3, -4). It is transmitted to humans by the Aedes mosquitoes, mainly A. aegypti. The occurrence of dengue is strictly related with their preferred breeding areas. Dengue endemic regions are inhabited by some 2.5 billion people. 50-100 million cases of dengue fever and up to 1 million cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever are noted worldwide in more than 100 countries every year. The aim of the reported examinations was to diagnose dengue virus infections in returning travellers. In the years 2006-2009 serological tests were performed in 753 persons. In the diagnostics we used ELISA to find IgM and/or IgG class of antibodies against dengue virus, rapid immunochromatographic (cassette) test, NS1 viral antigen detection by ELISA, and virus RNA detection by RT-PCR method. IgM or IgG class antibodies, and both classes simultaneously, were detected in 19.8% of the examined cases. The greatest number of infections came from India and the Far East, next from South and Central America, and the smallest number from Africa. Sixteen patients with diagnosed dengue, including three cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever, were hospitalized.

  12. Alternative HIV testing methods among populations at high risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Greensides, Dawn R.; Berkelman, Ruth; Lansky, Amy; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of awareness and use of alternative HIV tests (home collection kit, oral mucosal transudate collection kit, and rapid tests) among people at high risk for HIV infection. METHODS: Data were collected as part of an anonymous, cross-sectional interview study--the HIV Testing Survey (HITS)--conducted in seven states from September 2000 to February 2001. Three high-risk populations were recruited: men who have sex with men, injection drug users, and high-risk heterosexuals. Respondents were asked about their awareness and use of alternative HIV tests. RESULTS: The overall awareness and use of the alternative tests was limited: 54% of respondents were aware of the home collection kit, 42% were aware of the oral mucosal transudate collection kit test, and 13% were aware of rapid tests. Among those aware of alternative tests, self-reported use of the tests was also low. The most common reasons given for not using alternative HIV tests were: preference for the standard test; concern that the results could be less accurate; and that alternative tests were not offered. CONCLUSIONS: The low levels of awareness and use of alternative HIV tests suggest that the potential for promoting testing among individuals at high risk for HIV by encouraging use of alternative HIV tests has not been fully realized. Alternative tests should be made more broadly available and should be accompanied by education about these tests for physicians and people at risk. Educational efforts should be evaluated to determine if promoting alternative HIV tests increases the numbers of people at risk for HIV who are tested. PMID:14563910

  13. Comparison of the serological tests ICT and ELISA for the diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in France.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Jenny; Sako, Yasuhito; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Richou, Carine; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Ito, Akira; Millon, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Serological diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a key element for efficient patient treatment management. A rapid immunochromatography test kit (ICT) using the recombinant Em18 antigen (rEm18) was recently developed. The aim of our study was to assess this test on a panel of sera from French patients with alveolar echinococcosis and control patients. In a blind test, a total of 112 serum samples were tested including samples of AE (n = 30), cystic echinococcosis [CE] (n = 15), and polycystic echinococcosis [PE] (n = 1). For the comparison, 66 sera from patients with hepatocarcinoma, fascioliasis, toxocariasis, Caroli's disease, or autoimmune chronic active hepatitis were used. The diagnostic test sets we used were the rEm18-ICT and two validated ELISAs with rEm18 and Em2-Em18 antigens, respectively. For the ICT, 27/30 sera from AE patients, 4/15 sera from CE patients and the PE patient serum were positive. One serum from the control panel (toxocariasis) was positive for the ICT. The rEm18-ICT sensitivity (90.0%) and specificity (92.7%) for detection of Em18-specific antibodies confirmed it as a relevant tool for AE diagnosis. The rEm18-ELISA had a sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 91.5%, and the Em2-Em18-ELISA had a sensitivity of 96.7% and specificity of 87.8%. However, when AE patient sera are recorded as weak in intensity with the ICT, we recommend a double reading and use of a reference sample if the ICT is used for patient follow-up.

  14. Screening for sexually transmitted diseases in an HIV testing clinic; uptake and prevalence.

    PubMed Central

    Madge, S; Elford, J; Lipman, M C; Mintz, J; Johnson, M A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the acceptability of STD screening among people seeking an HIV antibody test in an established free standing HIV testing clinic. DESIGN: A 9 month period prevalence study conducted between August 1993 and April 1994. SETTING: The Same Day Testing Clinic (SDTC) for HIV antibodies at the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust Hospital, London. SUBJECTS: 242 males and 160 females attending the Same Day Testing Clinic. OUTCOME MEASURES: The prevalence of STDs including gonorrhoea, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis B and the percentage of clinic attenders accepting an STD screen. RESULTS: Of those invited to take part in the study 69% of the males (242/350) and 59% (160/269) of the females agreed to be screened although for a variety of reasons not everyone agreed to a full screen. Two cases of untreated syphilis, no cases of gonorrhoea and six cases of chlamydia were detected. Four people had active, previously undiagnosed herpes while three had genital warts. Evidence of previously unknown hepatitis B infection was found in 26 people. Despite a high level of previous contact with genitourinary medicine services, uptake of hepatitis B vaccination among those homosexual men eligible for immunisation was low (28%; 23/83). Nine (4%) of the males, but none of the females screened for STD were found to be HIV antibody positive. CONCLUSION: Among people seeking an HIV antibody test in an established free standing HIV testing clinic, the prevalence of acute STDs was low. However, evidence of previously undiagnosed hepatitis B infection was found in a number of subjects and uptake of vaccination among those most at risk had been low. While opportunistic screening for STD was acceptable to almost two thirds of HIV testing clinic attenders, a substantial minority nonetheless declined this offer. Selective STD screening could be offered to those people seeking an HIV test who report never having been

  15. HIV testing practices among New England college health centers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to increase among certain populations including young men who have sex with men (MSM). College campuses represent a potential setting to engage young adults and institute prevention interventions including HIV testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate testing practices for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on college campuses. Methods Medical directors at four-year residential baccalaureate college health centers in New England were surveyed from June, 2011 to September, 2011. Thirty-one interviews were completed regarding experiences with HIV testing, acute HIV infection, other STI testing, and outreach efforts targeting specific at-risk groups such as MSM. Results Among schools that responded to the survey, less than five percent of students were tested for HIV at their local college health center in the past academic year (2010–2011). Significant barriers to HIV testing included cost and availability of rapid antibody testing. One-third of college health medical directors reported that their practitioners may not feel comfortable recognizing acute HIV infection. Conclusions Improved HIV testing practices are needed on college campuses. Programs should focus on outreach efforts targeting MSM and other at-risk populations. PMID:23496891

  16. Review of HIV Testing Efforts in Historically Black Churches

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Latrice Crystal; Powell, Terrinieka Williams

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to critically assess the state of HIV testing in African American churches. A comprehensive review of peer-reviewed publications on HIV testing in church-based settings was conducted by two independent coders. Twenty-six papers published between 1991 and 2015, representing 24 unique projects, were identified addressing at least one dimension of HIV testing. Thirteen faith-based projects have implemented HIV testing events or had clergy promote the importance of testing and knowing one’s HIV status, but empirical data and rigorous study designs were limited. Only eight papers reported onsite HIV testing in churches. Less than 5% of the studies reported the percentage of congregants who returned for their test results. Finally, no study has examined at baseline or post-intervention behavioral intentions to be screened for HIV. Future research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of HIV testing in churches and to explore the possibilities of the role of the church and leadership structure in the promotion of HIV treatment and care. PMID:26030470

  17. Seroprevalence of HCV and HIV Infections by Year of Birth in Spain: Impact of US CDC and USPSTF Recommendations for HCV and HIV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Meijide, Héctor; Cañizares, Angelina; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Delgado, Manuel; Pértega, Sonia; Pedreira, José; Bou, Germán; Poveda, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently add the advice of one-time testing of HCV infection in persons born during 1945–1965. Moreover, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) newly recommended one-time HIV testing for persons aged 15–65. Herein, we evaluate the potential impact of these recommendations in a reference medical area of Spain. Methods All assays results entries for HCV and HIV serological markers ordered at a reference lab from primary care and specialized physicians between 2008 and 2012 were recorded in a medical area which covers 501,526 citizens in Northern Spain. The year of birth were also documented. Results A total of 108,159 anti-HCV-Ab results were generated during the study period. The global rate of anti-HCV-Ab+ was 7.7% (95% CI: 7.6%–7.9%), being more prevalent in men than women (8.6% vs. 4.5%). By year of birth, the highest prevalence was found in persons born between 1955 and 1970. HCV genotype 1 was the most prevalent (59.7%) followed by genotype 3 (22.7%). Regard HIV infection, among 65,279 anti-HIV results generated the prevalence of anti-HIV+ was 1.1% (95% CI: 1.0%–1.2%), being more frequent in men (2% vs 0.5%). The years of birth with highest rates of HIV infection exactly match with those for HCV infection. Conclusions The highest rates of HCV and HIV infections are found between 1960 and 1965. Different historical and social circumstances such as the huge intravenous drug use epidemic in the eighties in Spain, might explain it. Therefore, each country needs to determine its own HCV and HIV seroprevalences by year of birth to establish the proper recommendations for the screening of both infections. PMID:25436642

  18. "There's No Place Like Home": Perceptions of Home-Based HIV Testing in Lesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantell, J. E.; DiCarlo, A. L.; Remien, R. H.; Zerbe, A.; Morris, D.; Pitt, B.; Nkonyana, J. P.; Abrams, E. J.; El-Sadr, W.

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing has the potential to reduce HIV transmission by identifying and counseling individuals with HIV, reducing risk behaviors, linking persons with HIV to care and earlier treatment, and reducing perinatal transmission. In Lesotho, a high HIV prevalence country in which a large proportion of the population has never tested for HIV,…

  19. Comparison of serological and molecular test for diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Hassan; Salehi, Marziyeh; Roghanian, Rasoul; Bozari, Majid; Taleifard, Shirin; Salehi, Mohamad Mahdi; Salehi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) is the main etiology of infectious mononucleosis (IM) syndrome that is characterized by fever, sore throat, and lymph adenopathy. Since, this virus could be associated with a number of malignancies, some hematologic disorders, and chronic fatigue syndrome, identification of IM is very important. The aim of study was to evaluate the specificity, as well as sensitivity of the two different methods that is, serology versus molecular diagnosis that are currently used for diagnosis of IM. Materials and Methods: In this study, during a period of 3.5 years, 100 suspected patients as case group and 100 healthy individuals as a control group were studied. Fifty samples in each group were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and all the samples including case group and control group were carried out by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In 76% of patients and in 20% of the healthy individuals, samples were detected EBV DNA by PCR. On the other hand, 68.5% of the samples belong to the case group and 46% in the control group showed positivity by ELISA. Conclusion: By comparing the two methods, since PCR is very expensive and time consuming, and the percentages of difference ranges are narrow, ELISA could be applied as a first, easiest, and preliminary diagnostic test for IM. In addition, this test could be applied in various phases of the disease with a higher sensitivity comparing to PCR. Although PCR is routinely used for diagnosis of various infectious agents, it is considered as an expensive test and merely could be used after 1-2 weeks from the onset of the illness. PMID:27308267

  20. Ethnicity and HIV risk behaviour, testing and knowledge in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tory M.; Hembling, John; Bertrand, Jane T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To describe levels of risky sexual behaviour, HIV testing and HIV knowledge among men and women in Guatemala by ethnic group and to identify adjusted associations between ethnicity and these outcomes. Design. Data on 16,205 women aged 15–49 and 6822 men aged 15–59 from the 2008–2009 Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil were used to describe ethnic group differences in sexual behaviour, HIV knowledge and testing. We then controlled for age, education, wealth and other socio-demographic factors in a multivariate logistic regression model to examine the effects of ethnicity on outcomes related to age at sexual debut, number of lifetime sex partners, comprehensive HIV knowledge, HIV testing and lifetime sex worker patronage (men only). Results. The data show low levels of risky sexual behaviour and low levels of HIV knowledge among indigenous women and men, compared to other respondents. Controlling for demographic factors, indigenous women were more likely than other women never to have been tested for HIV and to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge. They were less likely to report early sexual debut and three or more lifetime sexual partners. Indigenous men were more likely than other men to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge and demonstrated lower odds of early sexual debut, 10 or more lifetime sexual partners and sex worker patronage. Conclusions. The Mayan indigenous population in Guatemala, while broadly socially vulnerable, does not appear to be at elevated risk for HIV based on this analysis of selected risk factors. Nonetheless, low rates of HIV knowledge and testing may be cause for concern. Programmes working in indigenous communities should focus on HIV education and reducing barriers to testing. Further research into the factors that underlie ethnic self-identity and perceived ethnicity could help clarify the relative significance of these measures for HIV risk and other health outcomes. PMID:24834462

  1. Further standardization of the agglutinin-absorption test in the serology of leptospires*

    PubMed Central

    Kmety, Emil; Galton, Mildred M.; Sulzer, Catherine R.

    1970-01-01

    Four factors, suspected of influencing the final results of agglutinin-absorption tests used in the diagnosis and classification of leptospires, were investigated in comparative studies: (1) the time required for adequate absorption, (2) the quantitative relationship between antibody titres and amounts of antigen needed for absorption, (3) the possible effect of the Danysz phenomenon, and (4) the absorptive potency of live and formol-treated antigen. It was found that a 90-minute absorption time was adequate and that with increasing amounts of antigen, titres were continuously reduced, indicating a certain degree of non-specific absorption. The Danysz phenomenon was found to occur in leptospiral serology and the addition of antigen to serum in 3 equal parts at 10-minute intervals is recommended. The titres of sera absorbed with formol-treated antigen were often found to be lower than titres of sera absorbed with the same amounts of live antigen and some damaging effect of formol on antibody is suspected. PMID:5311059

  2. 'Men usually say that HIV testing is for women': gender dynamics and perceptions of HIV testing in Lesotho.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, Abby L; Mantell, Joanne E; Remien, Robert H; Zerbe, Allison; Morris, Danielle; Pitt, Blanche; Abrams, Elaine J; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2014-01-01

    In Lesotho, men have lower HIV testing rates, less contact with HIV clinical settings and less knowledge of HIV prevention than women. However, women's HIV prevalence has consistently remained higher than men's. This paper explores gender norms, sexual decision-making and perceptions of HIV among a sample of Basotho men and women in order to understand how these factors influence HIV testing and prevention. A total of 200 women and 30 men were interviewed in Lesotho between April and July 2011. Participants reported reluctance among women to share information about HIV prevention and testing with men, and resistance of men to engage with testing and/or prevention services. Findings demonstrate a critical need for educational initiatives for men, among other strategies, to engage men with HIV testing and prevention. This study highlights how gender issues shape perceptions of HIV and sexual decision-making and underlines the importance of engaging men along with women in HIV prevention efforts. More studies are needed to determine the most effective strategies to inform and engage men.

  3. A Review of Serological Tests to Assist Diagnosis of Reactive Arthritis: Critical Appraisal on Methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Tuuminen, Tamara; Lounamo, Kari; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta

    2013-01-01

    On a population-based level, the incidence of reactive arthritis (ReA) is 0.6–27/100,000. The definition of ReA varies and its pathogenesis is not yet clear. Attempts in basic immunology to suggest hypotheses for proliferation of forbidden B cell clones, molecular mimicry, and involvement of cross-reactive antibodies are helpful but not sufficient. Importantly, for the clinical diagnosis of the preceding infection, serology is widely used. Unfortunately, the accuracy of associations between serologic findings and clinical conclusions is plagued by poor standardization of methods. So far, few attempts have been done to examine the pitfalls of different approaches. Here, we review several serologic techniques, their performance and limitations. We will focus on serology for Yersinia, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, and Chlamydia trachomatis because these bacteria have a longer history of being associated with ReA. We also address controversies regarding the role of serology for some other bacteria linked to autoimmune disorders. PMID:24363655

  4. The UK national external quality assessment scheme in blood group serology. Compatibility testing 1981-1982: performance and practice.

    PubMed

    Holburn, A M; Prior, D

    1984-01-01

    The design of exercises of compatibility testing was modified in 1981 in order better to accommodate participants' serological practices. Ten reference laboratories were also enrolled in order to determine the 'correct' results for each exercise. In 1981-1982 3.5 to 36% of participants missed incompatibilities in exercises in which undiluted antibodies were issued and this did not represent an improvement over performance obtained in 1979-1980. Surveys were undertaken of antiglobulin test procedures and revealed that serological practices continue to change, old techniques are being modified, new techniques are being employed but standardization shows little overall improvement. Surveys of quality control procedures and of cross-match procedures for agglutination in albumin and for agglutination of enzyme treated cells show equal lack of standardization.

  5. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying…

  6. HIV Testing in Recent College Students: Prevalence and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Singer, Barbara J.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence and correlates of HIV testing were examined in a sample of 957 unmarried recent college students in the United States. Participants were asked about HIV testing, past-six-months sexual activities, lifetime treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STI), past-year health service utilization, and DSM-IV criteria for alcohol and other…

  7. Behavioural Precursors and HIV Testing Behaviour among African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrig, Jennifer D.; Davis, Kevin C.; Rupert, Doug; Fraze, Jami

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether there is an association between knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, reported intentions to get an HIV test, and reported HIV testing behaviour at a later date among a sample of African American women. Design: Secondary analysis of data collected from October 2007 through March 2008 for a randomized controlled experiment…

  8. Low HIV testing among persons who inject drugs—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 20 U.S. cities, 2012✩

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Spiller, Michael W.; Broz, Dita; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Persons who inject drugs (PWID) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. HIV testing is key to reducing HIV transmission by increasing awareness of HIV status and linking HIV-positive persons to care. Using data from PWID participating in CDC’s National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) system, we examined prevalence of recent HIV testing among PWID by certain characteristics to guide interventions to increase HIV testing. Methods We analyzed NHBS data from PWID 18 years or older recruited via respondent-driven sampling in 20 US cities in 2012. We examined demographic and behavioral factors associated with recent HIV testing (within 12 months before interview) using a Poisson model to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs). Results Of 9555 PWID, 53% had recently tested for HIV. In multivariable analysis, HIV testing was more frequent among participants who visited a healthcare provider (aPR 1.50, P < 0.001), participated in alcohol or drug treatment (aPR 1.21, P < 0.001), or received an HIV prevention intervention (aPR 1.26, P < 0.001). HIV testing was also more frequent among participants who received free sterile syringes (aPR 1.12, P < 0.001). Discussion Only half of PWID participating in NHBS in 2012 reported recent HIV testing. HIV testing was more frequent among participants who accessed health and HIV prevention services. To increase HIV testing among PWID, it is important for providers in healthcare and HIV prevention settings to proactively assess risk factors for HIV, including injection drug use, and offer a wide range of appropriate interventions, such as HIV testing. PMID:27323649

  9. HIV Stigma and the Experiences of Young Men with Voluntary and Routine HIV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Rod; Small, Will; Shoveller, Jean A.

    2015-01-01

    As routine HIV testing approaches are implemented to enhance participation rates in HIV testing, it is often widely believed that these approaches are socially and ethically justifiable given the underlying assumption that these practices will result in the widespread reduction of HIV-related stigma. Nonetheless, a variety of empirical and theoretical gaps regarding how HIV testing practices may impact HIV stigma remain, raising questions about the social underpinnings of the public health rationale. We draw on 50 interviews with 18-24-year-old men to determine how HIV-related stigma is experienced differentially across subgroups of young men in relation to both voluntary and routine testing practices. Men's experiences with routine testing highlight how (mis)interpretations of universal, routine testing practices may serve to (unintentionally) burden disadvantaged population subgroups of men; however, when sufficiently explicated, the universal dimension of a routine offer greatly diminished these concerns. These findings also highlight that, under the right conditions, a routine offer can provide transformative opportunities for individuals to reconceptualise expectations pertaining to HIV and HIV-related stigma. PMID:26382632

  10. HIV Status among Patients with Tuberculosis and HIV Testing Practices by Connecticut Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian T.; Lobato, Mark N.; Gutierrez, Jesus; Sosa, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status of persons infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is important for individual treatment and preventing transmission. This evaluation analyzed surveillance data and surveyed health care providers who care for patients with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) to understand the factors contributing to suboptimal levels of Connecticut patients with TB having a known HIV status. During 2008 to 2010, 208 (76.2%) of 273 patients had a known HIV status; 12 (5.8%) were HIV-positive. Patients who were more likely to have a known HIV status were younger (40.5 vs 54.6 years, P < .001) or received care in a TB clinic (risk ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–1.42). Among 77 providers, 48 (62.3%) completed the survey, 42 (87.5%) reported routinely offering HIV testing to patients with TB, and 26 (54.2%) reported routinely offering HIV testing to patients with latent TB infection (LTBI). We conclude that interventions for improving HIV testing should focus on non-TB clinic providers and patients with LTBI. PMID:23442493

  11. A Recombinant Positive Control for Serology Diagnostic Tests Supporting Elimination of Onchocerca volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Allison; Stevens, Eric J.; Yokobe, Lindsay; Faulx, Dunia; Kalnoky, Michael; Peck, Roger; Valdez, Melissa; Steel, Cathy; Karabou, Potochoziou; Banla, Méba; Soboslay, Peter T.; Adade, Kangi; Tekle, Afework H.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Fischer, Peter U.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; de los Santos, Tala; Domingo, Gonzalo J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Serological assays for human IgG4 to the Onchocerca volvulus antigen Ov16 have been used to confirm elimination of onchocerciasis in much of the Americas and parts of Africa. A standardized source of positive control antibody (human anti-Ov16 IgG4) will ensure the quality of surveillance data using these tests. Methodology/Principal Findings A recombinant human IgG4 antibody to Ov16 was identified by screening against a synthetic human Fab phage display library and converted into human IgG4. This antibody was developed into different positive control formulations for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and rapid diagnostic test (RDT) platforms. Variation in ELISA results and utility as a positive control of the antibody were assessed from multiple laboratories. Temperature and humidity conditions were collected across seven surveillance activities from 2011–2014 to inform stability requirements for RDTs and positive controls. The feasibility of the dried positive control for RDT was evaluated during onchocerciasis surveillance activity in Togo, in 2014. When the anti-Ov16 IgG4 antibody was used as a standard dilution in horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) ELISAs, the detection limits were approximately 1ng/mL by HRP ELISA and 10ng/mL by AP ELISA. Positive control dilutions and spiked dried blood spots (DBS) produced similar ELISA results. Used as a simple plate normalization control, the positive control antibody may improve ELISA data comparison in the context of inter-laboratory variation. The aggregate temperature and humidity monitor data informed temperature parameters under which the dried positive control was tested and are applicable inputs for testing of diagnostics tools intended for sub-Saharan Africa. As a packaged positive control for Ov16 RDTs, stability of the antibody was demonstrated for over six months at relevant temperatures in the laboratory and for over 15 weeks under field conditions. Conclusions The

  12. Using a Multitest Algorithm to Improve the Positive Predictive Value of Rapid HIV Testing and Linkage to HIV Care in Nonclinical HIV Test Sites

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Kevin P.; Rurangirwa, Jacqueline; Facente, Shelley; Dowling, Teri; Janson, Mike; Knoble, Thomas; Vu, Annie; Hu, Yunyin W.; Kerndt, Peter R.; King, Jan; Scheer, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of a rapid HIV testing algorithm (RTA) in which all tests are conducted within one client appointment could eliminate off-site confirmatory testing and reduce the number of persons not receiving confirmed results. Methods An RTA was implemented in 9 sites in Los Angeles and San Francisco; results of testing at these sites were compared with 23 sites conducting rapid HIV testing with off-site confirmation. RTA clients with reactive results on more than 1 rapid test were considered HIV+ and immediately referred for HIV care. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of a single rapid HIV test and the RTA were calculated compared with laboratory-based confirmatory testing. A Poisson risk regression model was used to assess the effect of RTA on the proportion of HIV+ persons linked to HIV care within 90 days of a reactive rapid test. Results The PPV of the RTA was 100% compared with 86.4% for a single rapid test. The time between testing and receipt of RTA results was on average 8 days shorter than laboratory-based confirmatory testing. For risk groups other than men who had sex with men, the RTA increased the probability of being in care within 90 days compared with standard testing practice. Conclusions The RTA increased the PPV of rapid testing to 100%, giving providers, clients, and HIV counselors timely information about a client’s HIV-positive serostatus. Use of RTA could reduce loss to follow-up between testing positive and confirmation and increase the proportion of HIV-infected persons receiving HIV care. PMID:26284530

  13. Quality of HIV laboratory testing in Tanzania: a situation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mfinanga, G S; Mutayoba, B; Mbogo, G; Kahwa, A; Kimaro, G; Mhame, P P; Mwangi, C; Malecela, M N; Kitua, A Y

    2007-01-01

    Tanzania is scaling up prevention, treatment, care and support of individuals affected with HIV. There is therefore a need for high quality and reliable HIV infection testing and AIDS staging. The objective of this study was to assess laboratories capacities of services in terms of HIV testing and quality control. A baseline survey was conducted from December 2004 to February 2005 in 12 laboratories which were conveniently selected to represent all the zones of Tanzania. The questionnaires comprised of questions on laboratory particulars, internal and external quality control for HIV testing and quality control of reagents. Source and level of customer satisfaction of HIV test kits supply was established. Of 12 laboratories, nine used rapid tests for screening and two used rapid tests for diagnosis. In the 12 laboratories, four used double ELISA and five used single ELISA and three did not use ELISA. Confirmatory tests observed were Western Blot in three laboratories, DNA PCR in two laboratories, CD4 counting in seven laboratories, and viral load in two laboratories. Although all laboratories conducted quality control (QC) of the HIV kits, only two laboratories had Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Internal and external quality control (EQC) was done at varied proportions with the highest frequency of 55.6% (5/9) for internal quality control (IQC) for rapid tests and EQC for ELISA, and the lowest frequency of 14.3% (1/ 7) for IQC for CD4 counting. None of the nine laboratories which conducted QC for reagents used for rapid tests and none of the five which performed IQC and EQC had SOPs. HIV kits were mainly procured by the Medical Store Department and most of laboratories were not satisfied with the delay in procurement procedures. Most of the laboratories used rapid tests only, while some used both rapid tests and ELISA method for HIV testing. In conclusion, the survey revealed inadequacy in Good Laboratory Practice and poor laboratory quality control process

  14. [Return for HIV test results after voluntary screening in Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Ngangue, Patrice-Alain; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Bedard, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to identify beliefs, perceptions and attitudes that may influence the return for test results after voluntary HIV testing in six district hospitals of the city of Douala in Cameroon.Methods: A qualitative study based on theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and using semi-structured interviews (N = 33) was conducted among individuals who underwent a voluntary HIV test in the prevention and voluntary testing and counselling centres (PVTCCs) located in six district hospitals of the city of Douala in Cameroon.Results: Participants identified a) seven advantages to return for their results (e.g., “knowing about my health condition,” “take the medication in the case of a positive result “and four disadvantages (e.g., fear of positive result); b) four groups of people that may influence their decision to return for HIV test results (e.g., family, friends/colleagues; c) one barrier (lack of time) and four factors that can facilitate return for the results after an HIV testing (e.g., the career project).Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that individuals who voluntarily undergo an HIV test in PVTCCs of the Douala district hospitals in Cameroon perceived real advantages and very few disadvantages and barriers to know their HIV status. Particular attention should be given to organizational factors that may be responsible for failure to return for HIV test results and post-test counselling.

  15. Repeat HIV Testing at Voluntary Testing and Counseling Centers in Croatia: Successful HIV Prevention or Failure to Modify Risk Behaviors?

    PubMed Central

    Matković Puljić, Vlatka; Kosanović Ličina, Mirjana Lana; Kavić, Marija; Nemeth Blažić, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing plays a critical role in preventing the spread of the virus and identifying infected individuals in need of care. Voluntary counseling and testing centers (VCTs) not only conduct testing but they also provide counseling. Since a proportion of people who test negative for HIV on their previous visit will return for retesting, the frequency of retesting and the characteristics of those who retest may provide insights into the efficacy of testing and counseling strategies. In this cross-sectional, retrospective study of 1,482 VCT clients in Croatia in 2010, 44.3% had been tested for HIV before. The rate of repeat HIV testing is lower in Croatia than in other countries. Men who have sex with men (MSM) clients, those with three or more sexual partners in the last 12 months, consistent condom users with steady partners, and intravenous drug users were more likely to be repeat testers. This finding suggests that clients presenting for repeat HIV testing are those who self-identify as being at a higher risk of infection. Our data showed that testing positive for HIV was not associated with repeat testing. However, the effects of repeat testing on HIV epidemiology needs to be explored. PMID:24705595

  16. HIV Testing, Subjective Beliefs and Economic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Rebecca L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of learning HIV status on economic behavior among rural Malawians. According to economic life-cycle models, if learning HIV results is informative about additional years of life, being diagnosed HIV-positive or negative should predict changes in consumption, investment and savings behavior with important micro and macro-economic implications. Using an experiment that randomly assigned incentives to learn HIV results, I find that while learning HIV results had short term effects on subjective belief of HIV infection, these differences did not persist after two years. Consistent with this, there were relatively few differences two years later in savings, income, expenditures, and employment between those who learned and did not learn their status. PMID:24369439

  17. Serological assays as alternatives to the Ph Eur challenge test for batch release of tetanus vaccines for human use.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Hendriksen, C; Sesardic, D; Akkermans, A; Daas, A

    1999-01-01

    According to the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph Eur) monograph on Tetanus Vaccine (adsorbed) (1997: 0452), assessment of potency is based on a challenge test in guinea pigs or mice. The end-point is taken as paralysis or death. The test requires a large number of animals and causes severe distress. The aim of the present study was to refine the test, and reduce the number of animals needed, for batch release purposes. Serological assays having the potential of being internationally accepted, have been compared with Ph Eur assays. The study included five tetanus vaccines of various combinations and produced by different manufacturers. The results indicated an excellent correlation between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the challenge test (about 93% predictive value), as well as between the toxin binding inhibition (ToBI) test and the challenge test (about 95% predictive value) and between ELISA and the ToBI test (r = 0.92). Antitoxin concentrations determined by ELISA and ToBI were generally in the same range. An overall good correlation was also seen for serum pools of the guinea pigs injected with equal vaccine doses, between toxin neutralisation test in mice (TNT) and ELISA (r = 0.93) as well as between TNT and ToBI (r = 0.97). The ultimate goal of this project was to determine whether serological assays can be used for testing combined vaccines, particularly for tetanus and diphtheria components, using sera from the same animals.

  18. Correlates of HIV testing among abused women in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie L; Hansen, Nathan B; Fox, Ashley M; Taylor, Baishakhi B; van Rensburg, Madri Jansen; Mohlahlane, Rakgadi; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2011-08-01

    Gender-based violence increases a woman's risk for HIV but little is known about her decision to get tested. We interviewed 97 women seeking abuse-related services from a nongovernmental organization (NGO) in Johannesburg, South Africa. Forty-six women (47%) had been tested for HIV. Caring for children (odds ratio [OR] = 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.07, 1.00]) and conversing with partner about HIV (OR = 0.13, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.85]) decreased odds of testing. Stronger risk-reduction intentions (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = [1.01, 1.60]) and seeking help from police (OR = 5.51, 95% CI = [1.18, 25.76]) increased odds of testing. Providing safe access to integrated services and testing may increase testing in this population. Infection with HIV is highly prevalent in South Africa where an estimated 16.2% of adults between the ages of 15 and 49 have the virus. The necessary first step to stemming the spread of HIV and receiving life-saving treatment is learning one's HIV serostatus through testing. Many factors may contribute to someone's risk of HIV infection and many barriers may prevent testing. One factor that does both is gender-based violence.

  19. People who Inject Drugs, HIV Risk, and HIV Testing Uptake in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Alice K.; Hahn, Judith A.; Couture, Marie-Claude; Maher, Kelsey; Page, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic rises in injection drug use (IDU) in sub-Saharan Africa account for increasingly more infections in a region already overwhelmed by the HIV epidemic. There is no known estimate of the number of people who inject drugs (PWID) in the region, or the associated HIV prevalence in PWID. We reviewed literature with the goal of describing high-risk practices and exposures in PWID in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as current HIV prevention activities aimed at drug use. The literature search looked for articles related to HIV risk, injection drug users, stigma, and HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa. This review found evidence demonstrating high rates of HIV in IDU populations in sub-Saharan Africa, high-risk behaviors of the populations, lack of knowledge regarding HIV, and low HIV testing uptake. There is an urgent need for action to address IDU in order to maintain recent decreases in the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23164598

  20. HIV and family planning service integration and voluntary HIV counselling and testing client composition in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, H; Bedada, A; Tsui, A; Brahmbhatt, H; Gillespie, D; Kidanu, A

    2008-01-01

    Integrating voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) with family planning and other reproductive health services may be one effective strategy for expanding VCT service delivery in resource poor settings. Using 30,257 VCT client records with linked facility characteristics from Ethiopian non-governmental, non-profit, reproductive health clinics, we constructed multi-level logistic regression models to examine associations between HIV and family planning service integration modality and three outcomes: VCT client composition, client-initiated HIV testing and client HIV status. Associations between facility HIV and family planning integration level and the likelihood of VCT clients being atypical family planning client-types, versus older (at least 25 years old), ever-married women were assessed. Relative to facilities co-locating services in the same compound, those offering family planning and HIV services in the same rooms were 2-13 times more likely to serve atypical family planning client-types than older, ever-married women. Facilities where counsellors jointly offered HIV and family planning services and served many repeat family planning clients were significantly less likely to serve single clients relative to older, married women. Younger, single men and older, married women were most likely to self-initiate HIV testing (78.2 and 80.6% respectively), while the highest HIV prevalence was seen among older, married men and women (20.5 and 34.2% respectively). Compared with facilities offering co-located services, those integrating services at room- and counsellor-levels were 1.9-7.2 times more likely to serve clients initiating HIV testing. These health facilities attract both standard material and child health (MCH) clients, who are at high risk for HIV in these data, and young, single people to VCT. This analysis suggests that client types may be differentially attracted to these facilities depending on service integration modality and other facility

  1. HIV and Hepatitis Testing: Global Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Johnson, Cheryl; Figueroa, Carmen; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and viral hepatitis due to HBV and HCV infection are major causes of chronic disease worldwide, and share some common routes of transmission, epidemiology, initial barriers faced in treatment access, and in strategies for a global public health response. Testing and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection is the gateway for access to both care and treatment and prevention services, and crucial for an effective HIV and hepatitis epidemic response. In this review article, we first summarize the common goals and guiding principles in a public health approach to HIV and hepatitis testing. We summarize the impressive global progress in HIV testing scale-up and evolution of approaches, with expansion of provider-initiated testing and counseling in clinical settings (particularly antenatal and tuberculosis clinics), the introduction of more community based testing services, and use of rapid diagnostic tests enabling provision of same-day test results. However, 46% of all people living with HIV are still unaware of their serostatus, and many continue to be diagnosed and start antiretroviral therapy late. As testing and treatment scale-up accelerates for an "treat all" approach, other challenges to address include how to better focus testing and reach those yet undiagnosed and most at risk, especially key populations, men, adolescents, and children. We summarize future directions in HIV testing to speed scale-up and close gaps that are addressed in the WHO 2015 consolidated HIV testing guidelines. In contrast to HIV, action in hepatitis testing and treatment has been fragmented and limited to a few countries, and there remains a large burden of undiagnosed cases globally. We summarize key challenges in the hepatitis testing response, including lack of simple, reliable, and low-cost diagnostic tests, laboratory capacity, and testing facilities; inadequate data to guide country specific hepatitis testing approaches and who to screen; stigmatization and social

  2. Predictors of First Follow-Up HIV Testing for Couples’ Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing in Ndola, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Czaicki, Nancy L; Davitte, Jonathan; Siangonya, Bella; Kastner, Randee; Ahmed, Nurilign; Khu, Naw Htee; Kuo, Wan Hsuan; Abdallah, Joseph; Wall, Kristin M; Tichacek, Amanda; Inambao, Mubiana; Simpungwe, Kakungu; Thior, Ibou; Allen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We describe predictors of first follow-up testing for concordant negative and discordant couples seeking joint voluntary HIV counseling and testing in Ndola, Zambia, where cohabiting couples account for an estimated two-thirds of incident HIV infections. Methods Demographic and serostatus data were collected from couples’ voluntary HIV testing and counseling (CVCT) and follow-up testing services implemented in government clinics. We calculated follow-up testing rates by serostatus and compared rates before and after the introduction of a Good Health Package (GHP). Results The follow-up testing rate from May 2011 to December 2012 was 12.2% for concordant negative (M−F−) couples and 24.5% for discordant (M+F− or M−F+) couples. Significant predictors of follow-up testing in multivariate analyses included increasing man’s (aOR=1.02 per year) and woman’s (aOR=1.02) age, the man being HIV+ (aOR=2.57), and the woman being HIV+ (aOR=1.89). The man (aOR=1.29) and the couple (aOR=1.22) having been previously tested for HIV were predictive of follow-up testing among concordant negative couples. Introduction of a GHP increased follow-up testing among discordant (aOR=2.93) and concordant negative (aOR=2.06) couples. Conclusion A low-cost GHP including prevention, screening, and treatment for common causes of morbidity and mortality resulted in increased follow-up testing rates among HIV discordant and concordant negative couples. Overall follow-up testing rates remain low and efforts to increase these rates are necessary in order to ensure linkage to combination prevention, reduce HIV transmission within couples and identify seroconversions promptly. Further investigation of low-cost sustainable incentives and other factors influencing follow-up HIV testing for couples is needed. PMID:24326600

  3. Serology of treponematoses

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Charles R.; Reyn, Alice

    1956-01-01

    In this general review of the serology of the treponematoses and of syphilis in particular, the authors first consider recent technical improvements in the materials used by serological laboratories and in the tests they perform. Special stress is laid on the new tests using treponemal antigens; but it is pointed out that the more commonly used tests should not be discarded in routine testing, the particular value of the newer tests residing in their use on doubtful sera. Mass blood testing—whether as a result of legal requirement and regulation or in the routine testing of patients and industrial workers—is extremely valuable where there is much syphilis among the population tested but becomes very costly when the number of positive reactors found is small. In a section on the clinical implications of serological findings, the authors deal with the problems presented by seropositive pregnant women and newborn children, with quantitative serological tests for syphilis, with the serological response in penicillin-treated syphilis, and with the serology of asymptomatic reinfection and serorelapse. PMID:13329846

  4. Early and complete detection of HIV exposure.

    PubMed

    Jehuda-Cohen, T

    1993-10-01

    Currently, HIV diagnosis relies on serology. Yet in groups at high risk for HIV serology is not sufficient because of the window period between infection and seroconversion. There is a growing body of reports on HIV-infected yet seronegative individuals. Some tests have been developed to identify exposure to HIV by its effect on the cells of the immune system that would differentiate following exposure to the foreign antigens. Detection, in vitro, of HIV-specific B and T cells in seronegative, at risk individuals has been reported. In only some of these individuals was an HIV infection confirmed by other methods. These new assays to detect HIV immunity enable us to identify two new groups among seronegative, at risk individuals; namely those with immunity to HIV and a detectable HIV infection (silent carriers), and those with immunity and no proof of infection. Both groups have been exposed to HIV yet are not being detected by serology. Both might hold information on other forms of HIV immunity, possibly a protective one. Thus there could be an important role for other immunological assays in early detection of HIV exposure.

  5. Determinants and Prevalence of Late HIV Testing in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Carrizosa, Claudia M.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Gregorio; Lozada, Remedios; Kelley, Norma J.; Hofstetter, C. Richard; Sipan, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Timely diagnosis of HIV is essential to improve survival rates and reduce transmission of the virus. Insufficient progress has been made in effecting earlier HIV diagnoses. The Mexican border city of Tijuana has one of the highest AIDS incidence and mortality rates in all of Mexico. This study examined the prevalence and potential correlates of late HIV testing in Tijuana, Mexico. Late testers were defined as participants who had at least one of: (1) an AIDS-defining illness within 1 year of first positive HIV test; (2) a date of AIDS diagnosis within 1 year of first positive HIV test; or (3) an initial CD4 cell count below 200 cells per microliter within 1 year of first positive HIV test. Medical charts of 670 HIV-positive patients from two HIV/AIDS public clinics in Tijuana were reviewed and abstracted; 362 of these patients were interviewed using a cross-sectional survey. Using multivariate logistic regression, we explored potential correlates of late HIV testing based on the Behavioral Ecological Model. From 342 participants for whom late testing could be determined, the prevalence of late testing was 43.2%. Multivariate logistic regression results (n = 275) revealed five significant correlates of late testing: “I preferred not to know I had HIV” (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.78, 1.46–5.31); clinic (AOR = 1.90, 1.06–3.41); exposure to peers engaging in high-risk sexual behavior (AOR = 1.14, 1.02–1.27); stigma regarding HIV-infected individuals (AOR = 0.65, 0.47–0.92); and stigma regarding HIV testing (AOR = 0.66, 0.45–0.97). These findings may inform the design of interventions to increase timely HIV testing and help reduce HIV transmission in the community at large. PMID:20438374

  6. Public readiness for HIV self-testing in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Anna C.; Brown, Annette N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High interest and a growing body of evidence suggest that HIV self-testing could help fill the HIV testing gap for populations who have been hesitant to access testing services through current mechanisms. Evidence from five of six studies funded by 3ie answers questions posed by the Kenyan government to understand the readiness of Kenyans for HIV self-testing. The findings suggest that Kenyans are generally ready for HIV self-testing. Most people would not only like to obtain self-test kits through public health facilities but also expect to be able to obtain them from pharmacies – easy access being a key factor for a distribution outlet. Respondents across the studies seem to understand the importance of counseling and confirmatory testing, although the decision to access services after an HIV self-test will certainly be influenced by the results of the test. Respondents do have some concerns about potential harms and abuses from HIV self-tests. These concerns are focused on what they expect others would do, rather than reflections of what they say they would do themselves. Additionally, most people believe that such concerns were mostly unwarranted and/or could be addressed. PMID:27256543

  7. Knowledge-based interpretation of toxoplasmosis serology test results including fuzzy temporal concepts--the ToxoNet system.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, D; Hayde, M; Prusa, A R; Adlassnig, K P

    2001-01-01

    Transplacental transmission of Toxoplasma gondii from an infected, pregnant woman to the unborn that occurs with a probability of about 60 percent [1] results in fetal damage to a degree depending on the gestational age. The computer system ToxoNet processes the results of serological antibody tests having been performed during pregnancy by means of a knowledge base containing medical knowledge on the interpretation of Toxoplasmosis serology tests. By applying this knowledge ToxoNet generates interpretive reports consisting of a diagnostic interpretation and recommendations for therapy and further testing. For that purpose it matches the results of all serological investigations of maternal blood with the content of the knowledge base returning complete textual interpretations for all given findings. The interpretation algorithm derives the stage of maternal infection from these that is used to infer the degree of fetal threat. To consider varying immune responses of particular patients, certain time intervals have to be kept between two subsequent tests in order to guarantee a correct interpretation of the test results. These time intervals are modelled as fuzzy sets, since they allow the formal description of the temporal uncertainties. ToxoNet comprises the knowledge base, an interpretation system, and a program for the creation and modification of the knowledge base. It is available from the World Wide Web by starting a standard browser like the Internet Explorer or the Netscape Navigator. Thus ToxoNet supports the physician in Toxoplasmosis diagnostics and in addition allows to adopt the way of making decisions to the characteristics of the particular laboratory by modifying the underlying knowledge base.

  8. Comparison of different commercial serological tests for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum of naturally exposed pigs.

    PubMed

    Steinparzer, R; Reisp, K; Grünberger, B; Köfer, J; Schmoll, F; Sattler, T

    2015-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the aetiological agent of the zoonotic disease toxoplasmosis and transmitted among other ways by chemically and physically untreated, that is, raw pork to humans. The detection of Toxoplasma gondii is impossible by currently practiced meat inspection, but serological tests can be used to detect Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in pig herds and can consequently be helpful to identify potentially contaminated pork. Therefore, appropriate serological tests are required. In this study, serum samples of 1368 naturally exposed slaughter pigs from 73 Austrian farms were collected. Serum samples of at least 16 slaughter pigs per farm were tested. The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum was measured by a commercial available modified agglutination test (MAT) and compared to three different commercial available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The MAT detected 6.5%, ELISA I 6.7%, ELISA II 4.8% and ELISA III 4.3% of the pigs as Toxoplasma gondii antibody positive. The agreement, according to the kappa coefficient (κ), was substantial between the MAT and ELISA I (κ = 0.62), II (κ = 0.64) and III (κ = 0.67). A better agreement was determined between ELISA I and II (κ = 0.715), ELISA I and III (κ = 0.747) and ELISA II and III (κ = 0.865). At least one pig per farm was detected Toxoplasma gondii antibody positive in 17 (23.3%) farms by the MAT, 26 (35.6%) farms by ELISA I, 16 (21.9%) farms by ELISA II and 11 (15.1%) farms by ELISA III. Pig farms with a high number of Toxoplasma gondii antibody-positive pigs or high antibody titres were identified by all of the four used serological tests. Concerning the occurrence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in Austrian pig farms, a monitoring and surveillance programme would be reasonable to find high-risk farms.

  9. Rapid HIV testing for developing countries: the challenge of false-negative tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogev, Ram

    2012-06-01

    It is a common practice in resource-constrained countries to accept two positive rapid HIV antibody test results as diagnostic for HIV infection. Because these tests are inexpensive and results are obtained quickly, they are recommended by the WHO to "scale-up" HIV testing to increase the number of people tested. The negative predictive value of rapid HIV tests is so high that negative results are considered conclusive despite the fact that false-negative results can occur in several situations. While the specificity and sensitivity of rapid HIV tests in resource-rich countries is acceptable, there are only limited data about their performance in resource-constrained countries. The challenges of rapid HIV testing in these situations will be discussed.

  10. HIV self-testing practices among Health Care Workers: feasibility and options for accelerating HIV testing services in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Bekana; Abate, Tatek; Mekonnen, Desalew

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV is still an enormous global burden and it is also causing loss of huge health care workers (HCWs) on the already limited human resource capacity in health care services in Sub-Saharan Africa. Variety of methods of accelerating HIV testing is required to increase the rate of HIV testing and expand treatment services. Therefore, this study was aimed to find out the prevalence, feasibility and options of HIV self-testing practices in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study design triangulated with qualitative method was conducted from February to May, 2012. The data was collected using a semi-structured pretested questionnaire and in-depth interview, at government and private health centers or clinics and hospitals. During the data collection all the available healthcare workers (HCWs) which encompass the internship students including: Medical, Health Officer, Nurses, Midwives and Laboratory students, and health professionals working in the selected health institutions were involved. Results A total of 307 HCWs were included in the analysis and we found that 288(94.4%) of them were ever tested for HIV, of which majority 203 (70.5%) were tested by themselves though 244(80%) of the HCWs had motivation or interest to be tested by themselves. Generally, of the ever tested only 85(29.5%) were tested by the help of health care providers/counselors other than self. Regarding the place where the HCWs had the test, majority 136 (69.4%) tested by themselves at the health facility and the rest were tested at their home, office, market and church. The main reason stated for self-testing was the need for confidentiality for the test result, which was mentioned by 205(82%). Moreover, 35(14.0%) claims lack of time to access the ordinary counseling and testing services. Conclusion This study depicts high rate of HIV self-testing practice among HCWs. This shows that HIV self-testing can be considered as one pillar to increase the HIV-testing services and a means for

  11. Accounting for False Positive HIV Tests: Is Visceral Leishmaniasis Responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Leslie; Ritmeijer, Koert; Piriou, Erwan; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Muluneh, Libsework; Masiga, Johnson; Abebe, Almaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Co-infection with HIV and visceral leishmaniasis is an important consideration in treatment of either disease in endemic areas. Diagnosis of HIV in resource-limited settings relies on rapid diagnostic tests used together in an algorithm. A limitation of the HIV diagnostic algorithm is that it is vulnerable to falsely positive reactions due to cross reactivity. It has been postulated that visceral leishmaniasis (VL) infection can increase this risk of false positive HIV results. This cross sectional study compared the risk of false positive HIV results in VL patients with non-VL individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants were recruited from 2 sites in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian algorithm of a tiebreaker using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was used to test for HIV. The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing. Every RDT screen positive individual was included for testing with the gold standard along with 10% of all negatives. The final analysis included 89 VL and 405 non-VL patients. HIV prevalence was found to be 12.8% (47/ 367) in the VL group compared to 7.9% (200/2526) in the non-VL group. The RDT algorithm in the VL group yielded 47 positives, 4 false positives, and 38 negatives. The same algorithm for those without VL had 200 positives, 14 false positives, and 191 negatives. Specificity and positive predictive value for the group with VL was less than the non-VL group; however, the difference was not found to be significant (p = 0.52 and p = 0.76, respectively). Conclusion The test algorithm yielded a high number of HIV false positive results. However, we were unable to demonstrate a significant difference between groups with and without VL disease. This suggests that the presence of endemic visceral leishmaniasis alone cannot account for the high number of false positive HIV results in our study. PMID:26161864

  12. Costs of Expanded Rapid HIV Testing in Four Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Eggman, Ashley A.; Leff, Jared A.; Braunlin, Megan; Felsen, Uriel R.; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Telzak, Edward E.; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Branson, Bernard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 065 trial sought to expand HIV screening of emergency department (ED) patients in Bronx, New York, and Washington, D.C. This study assessed the testing costs associated with different expansion processes and compared them with costs of a hypothetical optimized process. Methods Micro-costing studies were conducted in two participating EDs in each city that switched from point-of-care (POC) to rapid-result laboratory testing. In three EDs, laboratory HIV testing was only conducted for patients having blood drawn for clinical reasons; in the other ED, all HIV testing was conducted with laboratory testing. Costs were estimated through direct observation and interviews to document process flows, time estimates, and labor and materials costs. A hypothetical optimized process flow used minimum time estimates for each process step. National wage and fringe rates and local reagent costs were used to determine the average cost (excluding overhead) per completed nonreactive and reactive test in 2013 U.S. dollars. Results Laboratory HIV testing costs in the EDs ranged from $17.00 to $23.83 per completed nonreactive test, and POC testing costs ranged from $17.64 to $37.60; cost per completed reactive test ranged from $89.29 to $123.17. Costs of hypothetical optimized HIV testing with automated process steps were approximately 45% lower for nonreactive tests and 20% lower for reactive tests. The cost per ED visit to conduct expanded HIV testing in each hospital ranged from $1.21 to $3.96. Conclusion An optimized process could achieve additional cost savings but would require an investment in electronic system interfaces to further automate testing processes. PMID:26862232

  13. Can we do more with HIV testing?

    PubMed

    Nathan, Mayura

    2017-03-23

    In 2015, an estimated 0.8% of adults aged 15 - 49 years world-wide are living with HIV infection, though the rates have been variable between countries and regions (www.who.int/gho/hiv/en/). The rates in Europe has been estimated to be around 0.4%. The diagnosed HIV prevalence rate in London in 2015 was 5.8 per 1000 residents aged 15 - 59 years (https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment data/ file/594779 /). But the rates were much higher (~27) in Black African populations than in the White population (~5). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Supporting the Integration of HIV Testing Into Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Bradley-Springer, Lucy; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Koester, Kimberly A.; Beane, Stephanie; Warren, Nancy; Beal, Jeffrey; Frank, Linda Rose

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the efforts of the US network of AIDS Education and Training Centers (AETCs) to increase HIV testing capacity across a variety of clinical settings. Methods. We used quantitative process data from 8 regional AETCs for July 1, 2008, to June 30, 2009, and qualitative program descriptions to demonstrate how AETC education helped providers integrate HIV testing into routine clinical care with the goals of early diagnosis and treatment. Results. Compared with other AETC training, HIV testing training was longer and used a broader variety of strategies to educate more providers per training. During education, providers were able to understand their primary care responsibility to address public health concerns through HIV testing. Conclusions. AETC efforts illustrate how integration of the principles of primary care and public health can be promoted through professional training. PMID:22515867

  15. Many with Mental Illness Miss Out on HIV Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163139.html Many With Mental Illness Miss Out on HIV Tests Rates of infection ... Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with severe mental illness are only slightly more likely to be screened ...

  16. HIV Risk Behaviors Among Latina Women Tested for HIV in Florida by Country of Birth, 2012.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Janelle; Trepka, Mary Jo; Khan, Hafiz; Madhivanan, Purnima; Gollub, Erica L; Devieux, Jessy

    2016-10-01

    Latina women in the United States (US) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Data are limited on the risk differences in HIV among Latinas by country of birth. This paper describes the risk behaviors among Latina women tested for HIV at public sites in Florida. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the demographic characteristics associated with the report of specific risk behaviors. Results indicate that foreign-born Latina women were 54 % less likely to report partner risk [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.40, 0.54] than US-born Latina women. Reported risk behaviors varied by race/ethnicity, US-born versus foreign-born status, and by Latina country of origin. Knowledge of these differences can aid in targeting HIV prevention messaging, program decision-making, and allocation of resources, corresponding to the central approach of High Impact Prevention and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.

  17. Failure to Identify HIV-Infected Individuals in a Clinical Trial Using a Single HIV Rapid Test for Screening

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Fogel, Jessica M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wolf, Shauna; Cummings, Vanessa; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Breaud, Autumn; Wendel, Sarah; Wang, Lei; Swanson, Priscilla; Hackett, John; Mannheimer, Sharon; del Rio, Carlos; Kuo, Irene; Harawa, Nina T.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Moore, Richard; Blankson, Joel N.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 061 study, 8 (2.3%) of 348 HIV-infected participants identified as HIV uninfected at study enrollment using a single HIV rapid test for screening were found to be HIV infected after additional testing. Objectives To evaluate the performance of different HIV assays for detection of HIV infection in HPTN 061 participants with missed infection and individuals with viral suppression. Methods Plasma samples from 8 HPTN 061 participants, 17 elite controllers, and 101 individuals on antiretroviral treatment (ART) were tested for HIV with 3 rapid tests, 2 laboratory-based immunoassays, and a Western blot assay. The HPTN 061 samples were also tested with 2 HIV RNA assays and an antiretroviral drug assay. Results Of the 8 HPTN 061 participants with missed infection, 1 was an elite controller, 1 was taking ART, 2 were missed because of testing or clerical errors, 1 had recent HIV infection (identified using a multi-assay algorithm), and 3 had acute HIV infection. Two (1.7%) of 118 individuals with viral suppression (both taking ART) had at least 1 false-negative test. Conclusions In clinical trials, HIV infections can be missed for a variety of reasons. Using more than one assay to screen for HIV infection may reduce the number of missed infections. PMID:24710920

  18. Experience of sexual violence among women in HIV discordant unions after voluntary HIV counselling and testing

    PubMed Central

    Emusu, Donath; Ivankova, Nataliya; Jolly, Pauline; Kirby, Russell; Foushee, Herman; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Katongole, Drake; Ehiri, John

    2009-01-01

    HIV-serodiscordant relationships are those in which one partner is infected with HIV while the other is not. We investigated experiences of sexual violence among women in HIV discordant unions attending HIV post-test club services in Uganda. A volunteer sample of 26 women from three AIDS Information Centres in Uganda who reported having experienced sexual violence in a larger epidemiological study were interviewed, using the qualitative critical incident technique. Data were analysed using TEXTPACK, a software application for computer-assisted content analysis. Incidents of sexual violence narrated by the women included use of physical force and verbal threats. Overall, four themes that characterise the women’s experience of sexual violence emerged from the analysis: knowledge of HIV test results, prevalence of sexual violence, vulnerability and proprietary views and reactions to sexual violence. Alcohol abuse by the male partners was an important factor in the experience of sexual violence among the women. Their experiences evoked different reactions and feelings, including concern over the need to have children, fear of infection, desire to separate from their spouses/partners, helplessness, anger and suicidal tendencies. HIV counselling and testing centres should be supported with the capacity to address issues related to sexual violence for couples who are HIV discordant. PMID:20024712

  19. Information Behavior and HIV Testing Intentions Among Young Men at Risk for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Meadowbrooke, Chrysta C; Veinot, Tiffany C; Loveluck, Jimena; Hickok, Andrew; Bauermeister, José A

    2014-03-01

    Health research shows that knowing about health risks may not translate into behavior change. However, such research typically operationalizes health information acquisition with knowledge tests. Information scientists who investigate socially embedded information behaviors could help improve understanding of potential associations between information behavior-as opposed to knowledge-and health behavior formation, thus providing new opportunities to investigate the effects of health information. We examine the associations between information behavior and HIV testing intentions among young men who have sex with men (YMSM), a group with high rates of unrecognized HIV infection. We used the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict intentions to seek HIV testing in an online sample of 163 YMSM. Multiple regression and recursive path analysis were used to test two models: (a) the basic TPB model and (b) an adapted model that added the direct effects of three information behaviors (information exposure, use of information to make HIV-testing decisions, prior experience obtaining an HIV test) plus self-rated HIV knowledge. As hypothesized, our adapted model improved predictions, explaining more than twice as much variance as the original TPB model. The results suggest that information behaviors may be more important predictors of health behavior intentions than previously acknowledged.

  20. Socio-economic inequity in HIV testing in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Wook; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Pulkki-Brännström, Anni-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a significant contributor to Malawi's burden of disease. Despite a number of studies describing socio-economic differences in HIV prevalence, there is a paucity of evidence on socio-economic inequity in HIV testing in Malawi. Objective To assess horizontal inequity (HI) in HIV testing in Malawi. Design Data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHSs) 2004 and 2010 in Malawi are used for the analysis. The sample size for DHS 2004 was 14,571 (women =11,362 and men=3,209), and for DHS 2010 it was 29,830 (women=22,716 and men=7,114). The concentration index is used to quantify the amount of socio-economic-related inequality in HIV testing. The inequality is a primary method in this study. Corrected need, a further adjustment of the standard decomposition index, was calculated. Standard HI was compared with corrected need-adjusted inequity. Variables used to measure health need include symptoms of sexually transmitted infections. Non-need variables include wealth, education, literacy and marital status. Results Between 2004 and 2010, the proportion of the population ever tested for HIV increased from 15 to 75% among women and from 16 to 54% among men. The need for HIV testing among men was concentrated among the relatively wealthy in 2004, but the need was more equitably distributed in 2010. Standard HI was 0.152 in 2004 and 0.008 in 2010 among women, and 0.186 in 2004 and 0.04 in 2010 among men. Rural–urban inequity also fell in this period, but HIV testing remained pro-rich among rural men (HI 0.041). The main social contributors to inequity in HIV testing were wealth in 2004 and education in 2010. Conclusions Inequity in HIV testing in Malawi decreased between 2004 and 2010. This may be due to the increased support to HIV testing by global donors over this period. PMID:27790970

  1. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in horse meat from supermarkets in France and performance evaluation of two serological tests

    PubMed Central

    Aroussi, Abdelkrim; Vignoles, Philippe; Dalmay, François; Wimel, Laurence; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Mercier, Aurélien; Ajzenberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In France, some cases of severe toxoplasmosis have been linked to the consumption of horse meat that had been imported from the American continent where atypical strains of Toxoplasma gondii are more common than in Europe. Many seroprevalence studies are presented in the literature but risk assessment of T. gondii infection after horse meat consumption is not possible in the absence of validated serological tests and the unknown correlation between detection of antibodies against T. gondii and presence of tissue cysts. We performed magnetic-capture polymerase chain reaction (MC-PCR) to detect T. gondii DNA in 231 horse meat samples purchased in supermarkets in France and evaluated the performance and level of agreement of the modified agglutination test (MAT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the meat juices. The serological tests lacked sensitivity, specificity, and agreement between them, and there was no correlation with the presence of T. gondii DNA in horse meat, raising concerns about the reliability of T. gondii seroprevalence data in horses from the literature. T. gondii DNA was detected in 43% of horse meat samples but the absence of strain isolation in mice following inoculation of more than 100 horse meat samples suggests a low distribution of cysts in skeletal muscles and a low risk of T. gondii infection associated with horse meat consumption. However, to avoid any risk of toxoplasmosis, thorough cooking of horse meat is recommended. PMID:25809058

  2. Opt-out HIV testing in prison: informed and voluntary?

    PubMed

    Rosen, David L; Golin, Carol E; Grodensky, Catherine A; May, Jeanine; Bowling, J Michael; DeVellis, Robert F; White, Becky L; Wohl, David A

    2015-01-01

    HIV testing in prison settings has been identified as an important mechanism to detect cases among high-risk, underserved populations. Several public health organizations recommend that testing across health-care settings, including prisons, be delivered in an opt-out manner. However, implementation of opt-out testing within prisons may pose challenges in delivering testing that is informed and understood to be voluntary. In a large state prison system with a policy of voluntary opt-out HIV testing, we randomly sampled adult prisoners in each of seven intake prisons within two weeks after their opportunity to be HIV tested. We surveyed prisoners' perception of HIV testing as voluntary or mandatory and used multivariable statistical models to identify factors associated with their perception. We also linked survey responses to lab records to determine if prisoners' test status (tested or not) matched their desired and perceived test status. Thirty-eight percent (359/936) perceived testing as voluntary. The perception that testing was mandatory was positively associated with age less than 25 years (adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 1.71) and preference that testing be mandatory (aRR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.41, 2.31) but negatively associated with entry into one of the intake prisons (aRR: 0.41 95% CI: 0.27, 0.63). Eighty-nine percent of prisoners wanted to be tested, 85% were tested according to their wishes, and 82% correctly understood whether or not they were tested. Most prisoners wanted to be HIV tested and were aware that they had been tested, but less than 40% understood testing to be voluntary. Prisoners' understanding of the voluntary nature of testing varied by intake prison and by a few individual-level factors. Testing procedures should ensure that opt-out testing is informed and understood to be voluntary by prisoners and other vulnerable populations.

  3. Lack of HIV Testing and Awareness of HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men, Beijing, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Lui, Hui; Guo, Yaqi; Han, Lei; Mandel, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    In China, men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for HIV. However, little is known about their HIV testing behavior. From September 2001 to January 2002, we recruited 482 men through social networks and MSM venues. We conducted HIV testing and counseling, and anonymous, standardized face-to-face interviews. Eighty-two percent of…

  4. Multi-Centre Evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo Assay when Used for Point of Care Testing in a High Risk Clinic-Based Population

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Damian P.; Holt, Martin; McNulty, Anna; Couldwell, Deborah L.; Smith, Don E.; Davies, Stephen C.; Cunningham, Philip; Keen, Phillip; Guy, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Background Determine HIV Combo (DHC) is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. Methods We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection) with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests) when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. Results Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection) and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive) and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022). Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. Conclusions The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population. PMID:24714441

  5. Choice in HIV testing: the acceptability and anticipated use of a self-administered at-home oral HIV test among South Africans.

    PubMed

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Cheruvillil, Sonia; Christian, Stephanie; Mantell, Joanne E; Milford, Cecilia; Rambally-Greener, Letitia; Mosery, Nzwakie; Greener, Ross; Smit, Jennifer A

    2016-07-01

    Combination HIV prevention is being widely promoted by funders. This strategy aims to offer HIV prevention choices that can be selected and combined to decrease HIV risk in ways that fit with each individual's situation. Treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis are two new evidence-based strategies to decrease HIV incidence, both of which require high HIV testing rates to be effective, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a goal of 90% of HIV-positive individuals knowing their status by 2030. However, HIV testing rates in many countries remain suboptimal. Just as no single HIV prevention method is ideal for all people in all situations, no single HIV testing modality is likely to be acceptable to everyone. By offering HIV testing choices, we may be able to increase testing rates. However, many low-resourced countries have been slow to take up new HIV testing options such as the self-administered at-home oral HIV test that is currently available in the United States. In this paper, we present findings from 20 in-depth interviews, conducted in 2010, documenting opinions about self-administered at-home oral HIV testing, a testing modality still largely unavailable in Africa. Participants were clients of three primary healthcare clinics in South Africa. Self-testing was seen as enabling confidentiality/privacy, saving time, and facilitating testing together with partners. However, concerns were raised about psychological distress when testing at home without a counsellor. Some suggested this concern could be minimised by having experienced clinic-based HIV testing and counselling before getting self-testing kits for home use. Thus, self-administered HIV testing could be an option added to the current testing modalities to address some important barriers to testing.

  6. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit. Methods: Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control) and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Results: The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; p<0.05, accuracy = 86.4%), followed by EIA IgG (AUC = 0.75; p<0.05, accuracy = 75.2%). The Rapid Hexagon and EIA IgA kits had relatively poor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value. Conclusion: The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration. PMID:27736910

  7. The search for an appropriate, affordable HIV test for Africa.

    PubMed

    Tam, M

    1990-07-01

    In comparison with the commercially available ELISA test for HIV, new more appropriate tests for use in African locales are being supported by USAID, PATH, the International Development Research Center of Canada and the Rockefeller Foundation. ELISA tests are suited for high volume, high technology, automation, data management, accuracy, and cost about US$1 per test. In contrast, tests for African laboratories must be inexpensive, suitable for small numbers of tests, possibly no refrigeration or electricity, and unsophisticated technicians. a series of 5 prototype tests designed for african laboratories been evaluated at the Mama Yemo Hospital, Kinshasa, Zaire, under the auspices of Diagnostic Technology for Community Health (USAID-funded) and managed by PATH. Results comparable to those with ELISA could be achieved with duplicate testing, but the cost remained about the same. to lower final costs, development and overhead for the supplier must be carried by donor funds. With there criteria in mind, PATH is working on a public sector HIV test taking 30 minutes, costing US$.25 per test, requiring minimal equipment and training. A test using an 8-well blank with a comb containing solid phase HIV gp41 peptide, and read by color development, has shown promise. If it can be produced locally, it will cost about $US.14 per test. Such low-cost test kits may even cause the price of commercially available HIV tests to decline.

  8. Factors Associated with HIV Prevalence and HIV Testing in Sierra Leone: Findings from the 2008 Demographic Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Brima, Nataliya; Burns, Fiona; Fakoya, Ibidun; Kargbo, Brima; Conteh, Suleiman; Copas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background The Sierra Leone Demographic Health Survey 2008 found an HIV prevalence of 1.5%. This study investigates associations with HIV infection and HIV testing. Methods Households were selected using stratified multi-stage sampling. In all selected households women aged 15–49 were eligible. In every second household men aged 15–59 were also eligible. Participants were asked to consent for anonymous HIV testing. All participants interviewed and tested were analysed. Multiple logistic regression identified associations with HIV infection, undiagnosed infection and with ever having a voluntary HIV test among sexually active participants. Results Of 7495 invited 86% (6,475) agreed to an interview and HIV test. Among 96 HIV positive participants, 78% had never taken a voluntary HIV test so were unaware of their serostatus, and 86% were sexually active in the last 12 months among whom 96% did not use a condom at last intercourse. 11% of all participants had previously voluntarily tested. Among women who had tested, 60% did so in antenatal care. We found that those living in an urban area, and those previously married, were more likely to be HIV infected. Voluntary HIV testing was more common in those aged 25–44, living in an urban area, females, having secondary or higher education, having first sexual intercourse at age 17 years or older, and using condoms at last sex. Although 82% of men and 69% of women had heard of HIV, only 35% and 29% respectively had heard of antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions The HIV prevalence in Sierra Leone has been stable. HIV testing, however, is uncommon and most infected individuals are unaware of their serostatus. This could allow the epidemic to escalate as individuals with undiagnosed infection are unlikely to change their behaviour or access treatment. Improving knowledge and increasing testing need to remain central to HIV prevention interventions in Sierra Leone. PMID:26452051

  9. The histrionic push for mandatory perinatal HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Hansen, E

    1997-01-01

    Voluntary HIV testing of newborns is driving down the rate of maternal-fetal transmission, although mandatory testing in other populations continues to be controversial. An amendment to the Ryan White CARE Act that encourages mandatory HIV testing of newborns, to be phased in over a four-year period, is being met with resistance from AIDS activists. The justification for mandatory testing is from a single trial, ACTG 076, that shows that HIV infection rates could be decreased two-thirds in newborns through the use of AZT during pregnancy and immediately after delivery. However, there has been no testing of AZT's potential toxicity in mothers or the long-term effects on babies. This also means that AZT monotherapy, much less effective than combination therapy, is only prescribed for pregnant women. Activists call for strategy sessions and grassroots organizations to defeat the trend toward mandatory testing in any population.

  10. Evaluation of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and other serological tests for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Y.; Bout, D.; Dessaint, J. P.; Capron, A.; Van Knapen, F.; Ruitenberg, E. J.; Bergquist, R.; Huldt, G.

    1980-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated in human toxoplasmosis in three laboratories using their own procedures. The same batch of serum samples was investigated in the three laboratories. ELISA results were compared by statistical analysis both with one another and with those of the dye test (DT), immunofluorescence (IF), complement fixation test (CFT), and indirect haemagglutination (IHA). Highly significant correlations were obtained between the three laboratories with ELISA using two different antigens and enzyme conjugates. The correlations between ELISA and the other serological tests showed the following sequence: CFT>IF>IHA>DT. Highly significant correlations were obtained between ELISA using anti-γ-chain and anti-total immunoglobulin conjugates. The agreement in discrimination between sera with low and high antibody levels was good for all the different ELISA techniques but discrimination between positive and negative sera depended rather on the ELISA procedure used. PMID:6991147

  11. [Impediments to HIV testing in HIV-infected children and teenagers in Africa: look for them where they are!].

    PubMed

    Msellati, P; Ateba Ndongo, F; Hejoaka, F; Nacro, B

    2016-01-01

    A huge number of HIV-infected children and teenagers have no access to care or receive it very late. Of the 3.2 million infected children, 2.8 million should be receiving highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) but only around 700,000 actually are. The first reason for this failure is the lack of HIV testing among HIV-exposed infants and thus early diagnosis or, even more frequently, the lack of testing among older children and teenagers. The objectives of this article are twofold: to review the current situation and to advocate routine offers of HIV testing to HIV-exposed children and teenagers (exposed either through mother-to-child transmission or repeated transfusions) and those suspected to be HIV-infected (because of malnutrition, tuberculosis, or other associated diseases). Finally, adults living with HIV should be made aware of the need for routine HIV screening of their children, even when asymptomatic.

  12. Predictors of HIV Testing and Intention to Test Among Hispanic Farmworkers in South Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, M. Isabel; Collazo, Jose B.; Bowen, G. Stephen; Varga, Leah M.; Hernandez, Nilda; Perrino, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context and Purpose: This study examined the predictors of HIV testing and factors associated with intention to accept a free HIV test among 244 Hispanic migrant/seasonal farmworkers in South Florida. Methods: Time and space sampling procedures were used to recruit participants in public venues. Bilingual staff interviewed eligible respondents in…

  13. Assessment of linkages from HIV testing to enrolment and retention in HIV care in Central Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Inguane, Celso Azarias; Gloyd, Stephen; Manuel, João Luis; Brown, Charlene; Wong, Vincent; Augusto, Orvalho; Hassan, Wisal Mustafa; Vieira, Lúcia; Afonso, Pires; Jamnadás, Mehol; Bernard, Jama Joy; Cowan, James; Kalibala, Samuel; Pfeiffer, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Effectiveness of the rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) throughout sub-Saharan Africa is highly dependent on adequate enrolment and retention in HIV care. However, the measurement of both has been challenging in these settings. This study aimed to assess enrolment and retention in HIV care (pre-ART and ART) among HIV-positive adults in Central Mozambique, including identification of barriers and facilitators. Methods We assessed linkages to and retention in HIV care using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach in six districts of Manica and Sofala provinces. We analyzed routine district and health facility monthly reports and HIV care registries from April 2012 to March 2013 and used single imputation and trimmed means to adjust for missing values. In eight health facilities in the same districts and period, we assessed retention in HIV care among 795 randomly selected adult patient charts (15 years and older). We also conducted 25 focus group discussions and 53 in-depth interviews with HIV-positive adults, healthcare providers and community members to identify facilitators and barriers to enrolment and retention in HIV care. Results Overall, 46% of the monthly HIV testing reports expected at the district level were missing, compared to 6.4% of the pre-ART registry reports. After adjustment for missing values, we estimated that the aggregate numbers of adults registered in pre-ART was 75% of the number of persons tested HIV-positive in the six districts. In the eight health facilities, 40% of the patient charts for adults enrolled in pre-ART and 44% in ART were missing. Of those on ART for whom charts were found, retention in treatment within 90 and 60 days prior to the study team visit was 34 and 25%, respectively. Combining these multiple data sources, the overall estimated retention was 18% in our sample. Individual-level factors were perceived to be key influences to enrolment in HIV care, while health facility and structural

  14. A TEST OF TWO HIV DISCLOSURE THEORIES

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine two theories of HIV disclosure. The first is a disease progression theory and the second is the theory of competing consequences. Participants were 138 HIV-positive gay men involved in a larger study of HIV disclosure. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze each model, with the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) and the nonnormed fit index (NNFI) used to evaluate goodness of fit. The RMSEA for the disease progression model was .031 and the NNFI was .932. The RMSEA for the consequences model was .018 and NNFI was .978. Both indices are considered to be a close fit; however, the parameter estimates for disease progression to disclosure in the disease model and disease progression to consequences in the consequences model were nonsignificant, suggesting that disease progression may not play a role in the decision to disclose an HIV diagnosis. Researchers may want to focus on the intentions and possible outcomes from disclosure as predictive factors. PMID:11565594

  15. HIV Testing in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... November 2008. ← Return to text U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, HIV in Prisons, 2007-2008 ; December 2009. ← ... issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in Menlo Park, California. Post to Cancel

  16. Value of serological tests in the diagnosis of viral acute respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Căruntu, F; Dogaru, D; Stefan, D; Căruntu, V; Angelescu, C; Streinu-Cercel, A; Colţan, G; Petrescu, A L; Tarţă, D; Bârnaure, F

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the antibody response to influenza viruses A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and B, to parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, to adenoviruses and respiratory syncytial virus was studied in paired serum samples collected from 110 patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and in 40 patients suffering from other diseases. Rises in serum antibody titers to 1--5 of the above mentioned antigens were detected in many of the patients of both groups. The fact is most likely due to the presence of some epidemiologically and clinically uncharacteristic viral ARI (influenza included); simultaneous or successive infections with influenza virus and different other viruses were very frequent. A greater efficiency of the etiological diagnosis of viral ARI can be achieved only by the association of epidemiological and clinical criteria with serological data, the visualization of viral antigens and virus isolation.

  17. Serological cross-reaction between Legionella pneumophila and campylobacter in the indirect fluorescent antibody test.

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, T. C.; Kudesia, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sera from 50 patients with culture-proven campylobacter gastroenteritis were examined for the presence of antibodies to Legionella pneumophila. Ten patients (20%) had a positive titre (> or = 16) as measured by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibodies were detected in only 1 of 36 acute sera but in 10 of 14 (71%) sera obtained more than 10 days after the onset of symptoms. All positive sera contained specific IgM antibodies but specific IgG or IgA could not be detected in any sample. No legionella antibodies could be detected in sera from 42 similar patients with salmonella gastroenteritis. These results were shown to be due to serological cross-reaction between L. pneumophila and campylobacter. PMID:1397117

  18. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis among individuals attending anonymous testing for HIV in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Guimarães Nebenzahl, H; Lopes, A; Castro, R; Pereira, F

    2013-01-24

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola there are about 166 000 individuals living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% of pregnant women had antibodies to HIV and 8.1% to HBV, and 5.4% were infected with Treponema pallidum. Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 and 2, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum serological markers, and hence the prevalence of these infections, in individuals attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Luanda, Angola, and the burden of these infections in the Angolan population. Methods. Individuals attending a centre for anonymous testing for HIV were randomly included in the study. All samples were tested for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV and anti-HIV-1 and 2 antibodies and antibodies to T. pallidum. Results. A total of 431 individuals (262 women and 169 men) were studied, of whom 10.0% (43/431) were seropositive for T. pallidum and 4.6% had active syphilis; 8.8% (38/431) were seropositive for HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 (of these, 78.9% were HIV-1-positive, 2.6% HIV-2-positive and 18.4% co-infected); 9.3% (40/431) were HBsAg-positive, while 8.1% (35/431) had antibodies to HCV. Of 102 patients with positive results, 26 (25.5%, or 6.0% of the total of 431 patients) were positive for more than one of the organisms studied. Rates of co-infection were as follows: 2.3% (10/431) for HIV/HBV, 0.9% (4/431) for HIV/HCV, and 0.9% (4/431) for HCV/HBV. Three individuals with active syphilis had viral co-infection, hepatitis B in 1 case and HIV in 2. Five individuals (1.2% of the total) were seropositive for three infections, HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C in 3 cases and HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis in 2. Conclusions. A high prevalence of co-infection with the infections studied was found in this population, including HIV

  19. HIV Testing, HIV Positivity, and Linkage and Referral Services in Correctional Facilities in the United States, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Puja; Figueroa, Argelia; Wang, Guoshen; Reid, Laurie; Belcher, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Because of health disparities, incarcerated persons are at higher risk for multiple health issues, including HIV. Correctional facilities have an opportunity to provide HIV services to an underserved population. This article describes Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)–funded HIV testing and service delivery in correctional facilities. Methods Data on HIV testing and service delivery were submitted to CDC by 61 health department jurisdictions in 2013. HIV testing, HIV positivity, receipt of test results, linkage, and referral services were described, and differences across demographic characteristics for linkage and referral services were assessed. Finally, trends were examined for HIV testing, HIV positivity, and linkage from 2009 to 2013. Results Of CDC-funded tests in 2013 among persons 18 years and older, 254,719 (7.9%) were conducted in correctional facilities. HIV positivity was 0.9%, and HIV positivity for newly diagnosed persons was 0.3%. Blacks accounted for the highest percentage of HIV-infected persons (1.3%) and newly diagnosed persons (0.5%). Only 37.9% of newly diagnosed persons were linked within 90 days; 67.5% were linked within any time frame; 49.7% were referred to partner services; and 45.2% were referred to HIV prevention services. There was a significant percent increase in HIV testing, overall HIV positivity, and linkage from 2009 to 2013. However, trends were stable for newly diagnosed persons. Conclusions Identification of newly diagnosed persons in correctional facilities has remained stable from 2009 to 2013. Correctional facilities seem to be reaching blacks, likely due to higher incarceration rates. The current findings indicate that improvements are needed in HIV testing strategies, service delivery during incarceration, and linkage to care postrelease. PMID:26462190

  20. The relationships between the HIV test interval, demographic factors and HIV disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Individuals developing an HIV seroconversion illness may experience rapid disease progression. Information on seroconversion illness is rarely collected in most cohort studies, thus the aim of this study was to assess the value of the HIV test interval (the time between last negative and first positive HIV tests) as a proxy for seroconversion illness. Among 8229 seroconverters, test intervals ranged from 0-5282 days, and varied by gender, risk group, age and calendar year of seroconversion. Those with intervals < or = 31 days had an increased hazard of AIDS (RH 1.42, P = 0.07), which was reduced slightly after adjusting for baseline factors, calendar year of follow-up, treatment and the declining CD4 count, but there was no effect on survival. Thus, it appears that if information on acute seroconversion illness is not available, then analyses of progression to AIDS in seroconverter studies could use a short test interval as a proxy measure. PMID:11561980

  1. HIV testing for HIV prevention: a comparative analysis of policies in Britain, Hungary and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Danziger, R

    1998-10-01

    This paper compares policies on named HIV testing in the context of HIV prevention in Britain, Hungary and Sweden, and considers the extent to which these policies are based on evidence of effectiveness or on other, more contextual, factors. In Britain, testing has not featured significantly as a prevention strategy, and named testing has generally been carried out only with the voluntary, informed consent of individuals. In Hungary, testing is central to HIV prevention, and is required by law of certain groups. HIV testing is carried out mainly on a voluntary basis in Sweden, but, unlike in Britain, it has been actively promoted by public health authorities. The paper contrasts the 'right not to know' one's HIV status which is widely respected in Britain, with the 'responsibility to find out' which is more pervasive in Hungary and Sweden. Although policy makers in all three countries appear convinced that their's is the right approach, there appears to be as yet a dearth of convincing evidence to support their arguments.

  2. Difficulties in the diagnosis of HTLV-2 infection in HIV/AIDS patients from Brazil: comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays, and detection of HTLV-2b subtype.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Morimoto, Arilson Akira; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Ueda, Luiz Toshio; Matsuo, Tiemi; Reiche, Fernando Vissoci; Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele

    2007-01-01

    The current diagnosis of human T-lymphotropic virus type-2 (HTLV-2) infection is based on the search of specific antibodies; nevertheless, several studies conducted in Brazil pointed deficiencies of the commercially available kits in detecting HTLV-2, mostly in HIV/AIDS patients. This study searched for the presence of HTLV-1 and -2 in 758 HIV/AIDS patients from Londrina, Paraná, Brazil. Serum samples were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies using two EIA kits (Vironostika and Murex), and confirmed by WB (HTLV Blot 2.4, Genelabs). The results obtained by EIA disclosed 49 (6.5%) reactive sera: 43 positive by both EIA kits, and six with discordant results. WB confirmed HTLV-1 infection in seven samples (0.9%) and HTLV-2 in 21 sera (2.8%). Negative and indeterminate results were detected in four (0.5%) and 16 (2.1%) sera, respectively. Blood from 47 out of 49 HTLV seroreactive patients were collected and analyzed for the presence of env, LTR and tax genomic segments of HTLVs by PCR. PCR confirmed six cases of HTLV-1 and 37 cases of HTLV-2 infection (14 out of 16 that were found to be WB indeterminate). Restriction analysis of the env PCR products of HTLV-2 disclosed 36 isolates of HTLV-2a/c subtype, and one of HTLV-2b subtype. These results emphasize the need of improving serologic tests for detecting truly HTLV-2 infected patients from Brazil, and confirm the presence of HTLV-2b subtype in the South of this country.

  3. Gender and care: access to HIV testing, care, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Remien, Robert H; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Mokhbat, Jacques E; Soliman, Cherif; Adawy, Maha El; El-Sadr, Wafaa

    2009-07-01

    HIV transmission and occurrence of AIDS in the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA) is increasing, while access to ART in the region lags behind most low to middle-income countries. Like in other parts of the world, there is a growing feminization of the epidemic, and men and women each confront unique barriers to adequate HIV prevention and treatment services, while sharing some common obstacles as well. This paper focuses on important gender dimensions of access to HIV testing, care and treatment in the MENA region, including issues related to stigma, religion and morality, gender power imbalances, work status, and migration. Culturally specific policy and programmatic recommendations for improving HIV prevention and treatment in the MENA region are offered.

  4. Collaborative study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of diphtheria toxoid vaccines-part 1.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Sesardic, D; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study on the evaluation of an alternative functional assay, the Vero cell method, to the Ph. Eur. in vivo challenge procedures for potency determination of diphtheria toxoid in 6 different combined vaccines was initiated in January 2001. The study was an extension of a previous study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of tetanus toxoid vaccines for human use. To allow interim evaluation of test results and to monitor study progress, the project was divided into three consecutive phases. The results of Phase I and II studies are presented in this report. Pre-validation (Phase I) study, performed in two laboratories, indicated that comparable diphtheria potency estimates were obtained in the Ph. Eur. direct intradermal challenge assay in guinea pigs, in Vero cell assay and in indirect ELISA for five vaccines of different potencies (range of estimates: ca. 20-200 IU/ml). The correlation coefficients between the challenge assay and the Vero cell assay corresponded to those between the challenge assay and ELISA, confirming that the antibodies play an important role in protection and that predominantly protective/neutralising antibodies are present in guinea pigs, at the time point investigated. It was observed, for Vero cell assays, that about 16-35 (9-28 in Phase II study) fold lower titre of individual serum samples were obtained when using equine, rather than guinea pig reference serum. The study also provided preliminary information that sera from the same guinea pigs may be used for potency determination of both diphtheria and tetanus toxoid components of vaccines. In Phase II, another five laboratories analysed a subset of the vaccines included in Phase I study plus an additional vaccine. Four laboratories performed the lethal challenge assay and one laboratory carried out the intradermal challenge assay. All laboratories also performed the Vero cell assay and both ELISA for diphtheria antitoxin and ELISA for tetanus

  5. TestMeEast: a campaign to increase HIV testing in hospitals and to reduce late diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bath, R; O'Connell, R; Lascar, M; Ferrand, R; Strachan, S; Matin, N; Bassnet, I; Orkin, C

    2016-01-01

    Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.

  6. Genital herpes testing among persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mark, Hayley D; Lucea, Marguerite; Nanda, Joy P; Farley, Jason E; Gilbert, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey explored the frequency of genital herpes testing among 110 people living with HIV (PLWH) and reported barriers and facilitators related to testing. Forty-four percent of the respondents had not been tested for genital herpes since receiving an HIV diagnosis, 34% had been tested, and 22% preferred not to say. Respondents' most frequently cited factors affecting a decision to not be tested were: (a) testing not being recommended by a provider, (b) not having herpes symptoms, and (c) not thinking they had herpes. Data from this study indicated that PLWH were not frequently tested for genital herpes; there was a limited understanding of the frequently subclinical nature of infection; and provider recommendations for testing, or lack thereof, affected testing decisions.

  7. Why Take an HIV Test? Concerns, Benefits, and Strategies to Promote HIV Testing among Low-Income Heterosexual African American Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Scyatta A.; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Harris, Muriel J.; Townsend, Tiffany G.; Miller, Kim S.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study examined perceptions of HIV testing and strategies to enhance HIV testing among HIV-negative African American heterosexual young adults (ages 18-25 years). Twenty-six focus groups (13 male groups, 13 female groups) were conducted in two low-income communities (urban and rural). All sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed.…

  8. Evaluation of a rapid serological test for the determination of Mycobacterium bovis infection in badgers (Meles meles) found dead.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Mark A; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; James, Eurig; Barker, Leslie; Jones, Jeff; Watkins, Gavin; Rolfe, Simon

    2010-03-01

    Between October 2005 and May 2006, a total of 727 badgers found dead in Wales were reported, and 550 were delivered to the Regional Laboratories of the Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA). Of the 459 carcasses suitable for examination, 55 were deemed to be infected with Mycobacterium bovis on the basis of culture, spoligotyping, and variable-number tandem repeat typing. Acid-fast bacteria were observed histologically in a further six badgers, but these bacteria were not confirmed as M. bovis by culture. A rapid serological test (BrockTB Stat-Pak) performed on thoracic blood showed a sensitivity of 35% and a specificity of 99%. Presence of M. bovis infection was 45 times more likely to be confirmed postmortem by culture in BrockTB Stat-Pak-reactive animals than in seronegative ones. Using visible carcass lesions as a marker of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection had a similar sensitivity (38%) but was significantly less specific (84%) than serology. The overall accuracy of the antibody detection was 93% (346 correct results from 374 tests), whereas the accuracy of regarding visible lesions as a marker for bTB infection was 78% (354 correct from 453 carcasses examined). Culture remains the gold standard method for detecting M. bovis infection in badgers. However, where resources are limited and/or an instant result is preferred, the BrockTB Stat-Pak could be used in field surveillance efforts to identify animals which should be examined further by only submitting test-negative animals to more detailed postmortem examination and culture.

  9. HIV testing in community pharmacies and retail clinics: A model to expand access to screening for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Weidle, Paul J.; Lecher, Shirley; Botts, Linda W.; Jones, LaDawna; Spach, David H.; Alvarez, Jorge; Jones, Rhondette; Thomas, Vasavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility of offering rapid, point-of-care human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing at community pharmacies and retail clinics. Design Pilot program to determine how to implement confidential HIV testing services in community pharmacies and retail clinics. Setting 21 community pharmacies and retail clinics serving urban and rural patients in the United States, from August 2011 to July 2013. Participants 106 community pharmacy and retail clinic staff members. Intervention A model was developed to implement confidential HIV counseling and testing services using community pharmacy and retail clinic staff as certified testing providers, or through collaborations with organizations that provide HIV testing. Training materials were developed and sites selected that serve patients from urban and rural areas to pilot test the model. Each site established a relationship with its local health department for HIV testing policies, developed referral lists for confirmatory HIV testing/care, secured a CLIA Certificate of Waiver, and advertised the service. Staff were trained to perform a rapid point-of-care HIV test on oral fluid, and provide patients with confidential test results and information on HIV. Patients with a preliminary positive result were referred to a physician or health department for confirmatory testing and, if needed, HIV clinical care. Main outcome measures Number of HIV tests completed and amount of time required to conduct testing. Results The 21 participating sites administered 1,540 HIV tests, with 1,087 conducted onsite by staff during regular working hours and 453 conducted at 37 different HIV testing events (e.g., local health fairs). The median amount of time required for pretest counseling/consent, waiting for test results, and posttest counseling was 4, 23, and 3 minutes, respectively. A majority of the sites (17) said they planned to continue HIV testing after the project period ended and would seek assistance or support

  10. HIV/AIDS stigma and refusal of HIV testing among pregnant women in rural Kenya: results from the MAMAS Study.

    PubMed

    Turan, Janet M; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Onono, Maricianah; Holzemer, William L; Miller, Suellen; Cohen, Craig R

    2011-08-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma is a common thread in the narratives of pregnant women affected by HIV/AIDS globally and may be associated with refusal of HIV testing. We conducted a cross-sectional study of women attending antenatal clinics in Kenya (N = 1525). Women completed an interview with measures of HIV/AIDS stigma and subsequently information on their acceptance of HIV testing was obtained from medical records. Associations of stigma measures with HIV testing refusal were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Rates of anticipated HIV/AIDS stigma were high-32% anticipated break-up of their relationship, and 45% anticipated losing their friends. Women who anticipated male partner stigma were more than twice as likely to refuse HIV testing, after adjusting for other individual-level predictors (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.15-3.85). This study demonstrated quantitatively that anticipations of HIV/AIDS stigma can be barriers to acceptance of HIV testing by pregnant women and highlights the need to develop interventions that address pregnant women's fears of HIV/AIDS stigma and violence from male partners.

  11. A hybrid mobile HIV testing approach for population-wide HIV testing in rural East Africa: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chamie, Gabriel; Clark, Tamara D; Kabami, Jane; Kadede, Kevin; Ssemmondo, Emmanuel; Steinfeld, Rachel; Lavoy, Geoff; Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Sang, Norton; Jain, Vivek; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Liegler, Teri; Balzer, Laura B; Petersen, Maya L; Cohen, Craig R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kamya, Moses R; Havlir, Diane V; Charlebois, Edwin D

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite large investments in HIV testing, only 45% of HIV-infected persons in sub-Saharan Africa are estimated to know their status. Optimal methods for maximizing population-level testing remain unknown. We sought to demonstrate the effectiveness at achieving population-wide testing coverage of a hybrid mobile HIV testing approach. Methods From 2013–2014, we enumerated 168,772 adult (≥15 years) residents of 32 communities in Uganda (N=20), and Kenya (N=12) using a door-to-door census. “Stable” residence was defined as living in community for ≥6 months over the past year. In each community we performed 2-week multi-disease community health campaigns (CHC) that included HIV testing, counseling, and referral to care if HIV-infected; CHC non-participants were approached for home-based testing (HBT) over 1–2 months. We determined population HIV testing coverage, and predictors of testing via HBT (vs. CHC) and non-testing. Findings HIV testing was achieved in 89% of stable adult residents (131,307/146,906). HIV prevalence was 9.6% (13,043/136,033 stable and non-stable adults); median CD4+ T-cell count was 514 cells/μL (IQR: 355–703). Among stable adults tested, 43% (56,106/131,307) reported no prior testing. Among HIV-infected adults, 38% (4,932/13,043) were unaware of their status. Among stable CHC attendees, 99.5% (104,635/105,170) accepted HIV testing. Of stable adults tested, 80% (104,635/131,307, range: 60–93%) tested via CHCs. In multivariable analyses of stable adults, predictors of non-testing included male gender (risk ratio [RR]: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.48–1.56), single marital status (RR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.66–1.75), Kenyan residence (RR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.41–1.50, vs. Ugandan), and out-of-community migration for ≥1 month in past year (RR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.53–1.68). Testing was more common among farmers (RR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.67–0.79) and adults with primary education (RR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.80–0.89). Interpretation High HIV testing

  12. A comparison of the complement fixation, indirect fluorescent antibody, and microagglutination tests for the serological diagnosis of rickettsial diseases.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, V F; Shepard, C C; Redus, M D; Tzianabos, T; McDade, J E

    1979-03-01

    Three techniques for the serological diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever were compared by testing 417 sera from 178 patients who very probably did not have rickettsial infections and 88 sera from 41 patients who very probably had Rocky Mountain spotted fever (SF). The techniques were complement fixation (CF), indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA), and microagglutination (MA). To avoid possible degradation during unnecessary purification, the antigens were prepared by methods that were as simple as possible. In the CF tests of 417 sera from patients with nonrickettsial diseases there was only one titer of 8 and none at higher dilutions, whereas with the IFA and MA tests 4-8% of the sera reacted with SF antigens and 4-20% reacted with murine typhus (MT) antigens; the evidence indicated that these reactions were not caused by specific rickettsial antibody. With the SF sera, it could be seen that the IFA test was the most sensitive and the MA test was the least sensitive at each interval after infection. Moreover, the IFA results showed the least number of confusing cross-reactions with MT antigens and the MA test showed the most. The relative advantages of the three tests in serodiagnosis of rickettsial diseases are discussed.

  13. Proximate context of HIV stigma and its association with HIV testing in Sierra Leone: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, J. Daniel; WEISER, Sheri D.; TSAI, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which HIV stigma at the community level remains a barrier to greater uptake is poorly understood. We used nationally representative data from the 2008 Sierra Leone Demographic and Health Survey. The primary outcome was HIV testing (past 12 months). Our explanatory variable was HIV stigmatizing attitudes (5-item scale). After multivariable adjustment, HIV testing had an inverse association with HIV stigmatizing attitudes measured at the individual (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=0.94; 95% CI, 0.87–1.01) and community level (AOR=0.70; 95% CI, 0.58–0.85). HIV stigma had a stronger negative association with HIV testing when modeled at the community rather than individual level. PMID:25771909

  14. Relationship between Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Knowledge, HIV-Related Stigma, and HIV Testing among Young Black Adults in a Southeastern City

    PubMed Central

    Okumu, Eunice; Jolly, David H.; Alston, Le’Marus; Eley, Natalie T.; Laws, Michelle; MacQueen, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    The southeast is identified as the epicenter of the nation’s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, accounting for nearly 44% of all persons living with a HIV diagnosis in the United States. HIV stigma and knowledge have been cited as some of the complex factors increasing risk of acquiring HIV within African-American communities. We sought to understand how HIV knowledge and HIV-related stigma impact HIV testing experience among young Black adults who completed a community-based participatory research survey in a Southeastern city. Survey measures were developed with active engagement among the research team and community members, with the goal of balancing community knowledge, interests and concerns with scientific considerations, and the realities of funding and the project timeline. A total of 508 of the 513 audio computer-assisted self-interview questionnaires completed were analyzed. Eighty-one percent of participants had ever tested and had an intention-to-test for HIV in the next 12 months. Overall, analyses revealed low HIV-related stigma and relatively moderate to high HIV knowledge among young Black adults in the Southeastern city. Logistic regression indicated that having ever tested for HIV was positively correlated with HIV knowledge [odds ratio (OR): 1.50; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23–1.84, p < 0.001], but inversely correlated with low HIV-related stigma (OR: 0.08; 95% CI: 0.01–0.76, p < 0.03). However, there were no significant relationships between HIV-related stigma, HIV knowledge, and intention-to test for HIV in the future. These findings suggest that reducing HIV-related stigma and increasing HIV knowledge are not sufficient in promoting HIV testing (i.e., intention-to-test) among young Black adults in this city, unless specific emphasis is placed on addressing internalized HIV-related stigma and misperceptions about HIV prevention and control. PMID:28349049

  15. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  16. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  17. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  18. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  19. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  20. Use of a commercial serologic test for Angiostrongylus vasorum for the detection of A. chabaudi in wildcats and A. daskalovi in badgers.

    PubMed

    Deak, Georgiana; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Ionică, Angela Monica; Daskalaki, Aikaterini Alexandra; Matei, Ioana Adriana; D'Amico, Gianluca; Domşa, Cristian; Pantchev, Nikola; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Cozma, Vasile

    2017-01-15

    Three species of the genus Angiostrongylus are known to infect European carnivores: A. vasorum (mainly in canids but also in other carnivores), A. chabaudi (in felids) and A. daskalovi (in mustelids). A. vasorum is responsible for clinically severe disease in domestic dogs, most commonly diagnosed based on fecal examination and serological detection of circulating antigens. Considering the poorly known host range and the challenging larval differentiation in the feces between the three species of Angiostrongylus infecting European carnivores, our aim was to evaluate the cross-reactivity of A. chabaudi and A. daskalovi with A. vasorum using a commercial serologic test developed for domestic dogs. Badgers (Meles meles) (n=10) and wildcats (Felis silvestris) (n=8) were examined between 2015 and 2016 by full parasitological necropsy with subsequent morphological and molecular identification of nematodes and by serology, using IDEXX Angio Detect™ tests. Five out of the ten badgers and two out of the eight wildcats were harboring nematodes in the pulmonary arteries. All nematodes were identified morphologically as A. daskalovi in badgers and A. chabaudi in wildcats, respectively. Serological examination of the plasma samples revealed the positivity of the same animals as found in necropsy. None of the animals negative at necropsy was positive at serology. The 100% correlation between the necropsy results and the serologic positivity to IDEXX Angio Detect™ in badgers infected with A. daskalovi and wildcats infected with A. chabaudi suggest that these rapid tests are able to identify circulating antigens of all species of Angiostrongylus found in European carnivores: A. vasorum, A. daskalovi and A. chabaudi. The possibility for future in-clinic use of this test in domestic cats should be further investigated.

  1. Serological differentiation of Brucella-vaccinated and -infected domesticated animals by the agar gel immunodiffusion test using Brucella polysaccharide in mongolia.

    PubMed

    Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Sugar, Sengee; Yondondorj, Agchbazar; Nagabayashi, Toshihiko; Syuto, Bunei; Watarai, Masahisa; Makino, Sou-Ichi; Shirahata, Toshikazu

    2002-09-01

    To investigate Brucella infection in cattle, sheep, goat, reindeer and yak in Mongolia, serological reactions of Brucella-infected and -vaccinated domestic animals were compared by the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test with a polysaccharide (poly-B) of the B. Abortus strain S-19. The sensitivity and specificity were compared with conventional serological tests that are commonly used in Mongolia, such as the rose Bengal test, the tube agglutination test and the compliment fixation test. A total of 73.3, 100, 100, 95.8 and 61.9% of the sera from suspected cattle, yak, goat, sheep and reindeer, respectively, that were positive in the compliment fixation test, were also positive in the AGID test. Sera from vaccinated cattle, sheep and goat were positive over 90% by conventional tests 3 months after vaccination, but were negative by the AGID. These results suggest that the AGID test may be useful to differentiate infected and vaccinated animals in the field.

  2. Measuring Health Literacy Among Adults with HIV Infection in Mozambique: Development and Validation of the HIV Literacy Test.

    PubMed

    Tique, José A; Howard, Leigh M; Gaveta, Sandra; Sidat, Mohsin; Rothman, Russell L; Vermund, Sten H; Ciampa, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    The role of health literacy on HIV outcomes has not been evaluated widely in Africa, in part because few appropriate literacy measures exist. We developed a 16-item scale, the HIV Literacy Test (HIV-LT) to assess literacy-related tasks needed to participate in HIV care. Items were scored as correct or incorrect; higher scores indicated higher literacy skill (range 0-100 %). We tested internal reliability (Kuder-Richardson coefficient) of the HIV-LT in a convenience sample of 319 Portuguese-speaking, HIV infected adults on antiretroviral treatment in Maputo, Mozambique. Construct validity was assessed by a hypothetical model developed a priori. The HIV-LT was reliable and valid to measure participants' literacy skills. The mean HIV-LT score was 42 %; literacy skills applicable to HIV care were challenging for many participants. The HIV-LT could be used to assess the relationship of literacy and HIV-related outcomes in diverse settings, and evaluate interventions to improve health communication for those in HIV care.

  3. FACTORS RELATED TO HIV TESTING AMONG AN AFRICAN AMERICAN CHURCH-AFFILIATED POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Moore, Erin W.; Hawes, Starlyn M.; Thompson, Carole Bowe; Bohn, Alexandria

    2014-01-01

    HIV continues to disproportionately impact communities of color, and more calls are being extended to African American churches to assist in HIV education and screening efforts. However, no studies have reported on the HIV testing practices of African American church-affiliated persons. This study examines demographic, social, and behavioral factors associated with ever receiving an HIV test and last 12-month HIV testing. Findings indicated not having insurance and condom use were predictors of ever receiving an HIV test. Predictors of HIV testing in the last 12 months included marital status (i.e., single, divorced, separated, or widowed) and intentions to get tested for HIV in the near future. These predictors should be considered when designing HIV education and screening interventions for African American church settings. PMID:22468975

  4. Impact on HIV test providers of giving a positive test result.

    PubMed

    Myers, Ted; Worthington, Catherine; Aguinaldo, Jeffrey P; Haubrich, Dennis J; Ryder, Karen; Rawson, Brian

    2007-09-01

    The provision of a positive HIV antibody test result and the direction and support given to the test recipient are critical components of care and prevention. There has been little research that describes what happens in such interactions between recipient and provider. The impact on the test provider of delivering the HIV test result is an important issue to consider. The discomfort experienced by some health providers in giving a positive test result may have adverse effects on the client interaction or may carry over into subsequent client interactions. Utilizing a thematic analysis on interview data from 24 HIV test providers, we describe the impact of delivering a positive test result on HIV test providers, identify the factors that influence this impact, and describe strategies used to manage the impact. As with other health care professionals communicating "bad news,"HIV test providers experience a variety of impacts. While a small number of providers indicated little or no impact of delivering the HIV positive test result because the diagnosis is ''not the end of the world,'' most indicated it was difficult as it was anticipated that the test recipient would (or did) find the news distressing. Several coping strategies were identified.

  5. HIV testing among teens attending therapeutic schools: Having a personal source of information about HIV/AIDS matters!

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Rebecca R.; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13 to 19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two U.S. cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends. PMID:25656380

  6. HIV Testing Among Teens Attending Therapeutic Schools: Having a Personal Source of Information About HIV/AIDS Matters!

    PubMed

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K

    2015-06-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13-19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two US cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends.

  7. Voluntary newborn HIV-1 antibody testing: a successful model program for the identification of HIV-1-seropositive infants.

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, E. J.; Bateman, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Harlem Hospital in New York City has one of the highest HIV-1 newborn seroprevalence rates in the United States. We report the results of a program introduced in 1993 and designed to identify HIV-1-seropositive (HIV+) newborns at birth. All new mothers, independent of risk, received HIV counseling that emphasized the medical imperative to know the infant's HIV status as well as their own. Consent was obtained to test the infant; discarded cord blood samples were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and when positive, Western Blot confirmation. We compared the number of HIV+ infants identified through voluntary testing with the number reported by the anonymous New York State Newborn HIV Seroprevalence Study. In 1993, 97.8% (91 of 93) of the number of HIV+ infants identified by the anonymous testing were identified through voluntary maternal and newborn testing programs. Eighty-five HIV+ infants were identified before nursery discharge: 50% (42/85) through newborn testing; 14% (12/85) through prenatal testing; 13% (11/85) presented to care knowing their status; 23% (20/85) were known because of a previous HIV+ child. Six additional HIV+ children were diagnosed after hospital discharge (mean age, 5.5 months; range 1.5 through 17 months); four presented with symptomatic disease. The optimal time for identification of the HIV+ pregnant woman is before or during pregnancy, but when this does not occur, voluntary newborn testing can identify many HIV+ infants who would otherwise be discharged undiagnosed from the nursery. PMID:10101381

  8. Determinants of HIV testing among Nigerian couples: a multilevel modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lépine, Aurélia; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Vickerman, Peter

    2015-06-01

    In this article we analyse the determinants of HIV testing among Nigerian couples using Demographic and Health Survey data set (2008). This study is motivated by the fact that although there is a strong willingness from the Nigerian Government to examine new HIV preventions approaches such as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP) and Treatment as Prevention (TasP) for HIV serodiscordant couples, the implementation of such policies would require the HIV status of each partner in the couple to be known. This is far to be achieved in the Nigerian context since in Nigeria only 6% of couples know their HIV status. In order to identify potential policies that are needed to increase HIV testing uptake, we use a three-level random intercept logistic model to separately explore the determinants of knowing HIV status among female and male partners. The use of the multilevel modelling allows including the unobserved heterogeneity at the village and state level that may affect HIV testing behaviours. Our results indicate that education, wealth, stigma, HIV knowledge and perceived risk are predictors of HIV testing among both partners while routine provider initiated testing appears to be very effective to increase HIV testing among women. The introduction of financial incentives as well as an increase in routine testing and home-based testing may be needed for large scale increase in HIV testing prior to the implementation of new HIV prevention technologies among discordant couples.

  9. "Inside These Fences Is Our Own Little World": Prison-Based HIV Testing and HIV-Related Stigma Among Incarcerated Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Rosen, David L; Farel, Claire E; White, Becky L; Filene, Eliza J; Wohl, David A

    2016-04-01

    Correctional facilities offer opportunities to provide comprehensive HIV services including education, testing, treatment, and coordination of post- release care. However, these services may be undermined by unaddressed HIV stigma. As part of a prison-based HIV testing study, we interviewed 76 incarcerated men and women from the North Carolina State prison system. The sample was 72% men, median age 31.5 years (range: 19 to 60). Thematic analysis revealed high levels of HIV-related fear and stigma, homophobia, incomplete HIV transmission knowledge, beliefs that HIV is highly contagious within prisons ("HIV miasma"), and the View of HIV testing as protective. Interviewees described social distancing behaviors and coping mechanisms they perceived to be protective, including knowing their HIV status and avoiding contact with others and shared objects. Interviewees endorsed universal testing, public HIV status disclosure, and segregation of HIV-positive inmates. Intensified education and counseling efforts are needed to ameliorate entrenched HIV-transmission fears and stigmatizing beliefs.

  10. HIV testing histories and risk factors among migrants and recent immigrants who received rapid HIV testing from three community-based organizations.

    PubMed

    Schulden, Jeffrey D; Painter, Thomas M; Song, Binwei; Valverde, Eduardo; Borman, Mary Ann; Monroe-Spencer, Kyle; Bautista, Greg; Saleheen, Hassan; Voetsch, Andrew C; Heffelfinger, James D

    2014-10-01

    Migrants and recent immigrants in the US constitute a large population that is vulnerable to HIV. From March 2005 to February 2007, three community-based organizations conducted rapid HIV testing among migrants in five states. Participants were asked to complete a survey on sociodemographics, HIV-risk behaviors, and HIV-testing histories with the aim of understanding factors associated with HIV testing. Among 5,247 persons tested, 6 (0.1 %) were HIV-positive. Among 3,135 persons who completed surveys, more than half had never been tested for HIV previously (59 %). Participants reported high levels of HIV-risk behaviors in the past year, including 2 or more sex partners (45 %), sex while high/drunk (30 %), and transactional sex (29 %). Multivariate analysis identified several factors independently associated with decreased likelihood of prior HIV testing, including poor spoken English. Continued efforts are needed to ensure that migrant populations have improved access to HIV testing and prevention services. Understanding factors associated with migrants' lack of previous HIV testing may help focus these efforts.

  11. Toward universal access to HIV counseling and testing and antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: looking beyond HIV testing and ART initiation.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Yibeltal; Van Damme, Wim; Mariam, Damen Haile; Kloos, Helmut

    2010-08-01

    Expanding access to HIV counseling and testing (HCT) and antiretroviral treatment (ART) has reduced morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV/AIDS. As a result, many countries are scaling up HIV/AIDS services. In this paper we discuss challenges experienced during the move toward universal access to HCT and ART services in Ethiopia. We reviewed routine reports from the Ministry of Health and implementing partners. We also had interviews, about linkage to and retention in care of patients, with 10 HIV/AIDS program managers, as well as 2 to 7 health care providers and 5 to 15 patients in each of 23 health centers and 32 hospitals in all regions of the country. We found that the number of people tested for HIV increased 10-fold from 435,854 in 2005 to 4,559,954 in 2008. Only 61% of the HIV-positive patients were linked to chronic care immediately after tested for HIV. The number of patients initiated on ART annually increased from 26,021 in 2005 to 53,696 in 2008. Attrition of patients increased from 18% in 2005 to 26% in 2008. Our interviews indicated that fear of stigma, transport cost, feeling healthy and opting for traditional medicines were the main reasons for poor linkage to and retention in care. Lack of nutrition and feeling better were also reasons for poor retention. In conclusion, in spite of the rapid scale-up of HCT and ART services in Ethiopia, linkage and retention were not adequate. Therefore, strategies should be developed and implemented to improve linkage and retention.

  12. Recent HIV Testing Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in Bangkok and Chiang Mai: HIV Testing and Prevention Strategies Must Be Enhanced in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa G; Steinhaus, Mara C; Sass, Justine; Sirinirund, Petchsri; Lee, Catherine; Benjarattanaporn, Patchara; Gass, Robert

    2016-09-01

    HIV infection among men who have sex with men, particularly in Thai urban settings and among younger cohorts, is escalating. HIV testing and counseling (HTC) are important for prevention and obtaining treatment and care. We examine data from a 2013 survey of males, 15-24 years, reporting past-year sex with a male and living in Bangkok or Chiang Mai. Almost three quarters of young MSM (YMSM) in Bangkok and only 27 % in Chiang Mai had an HIV test in the previous year. Associations for HIV testing varied between cities, although having employment increased the odds of HIV testing for both cities. In Bangkok, family knowledge of same sex attraction and talking to parents/guardians about HIV/AIDS had higher odds of HIV testing. Expanded HTC coverage is needed for YMSM in Chiang Mai. All health centers providing HTC, including those targeting MSM, need to address the specific needs of younger cohorts.

  13. Assessment of HIV-related stigma in a US faith-based HIV education and testing intervention

    PubMed Central

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette Y; Moore, Erin; Berman, Marcie; Simon, Stephen D; Thompson, Carole Bowe; Schleicher, Thomas; Hawes, Starlyn M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The African American church is a highly influential institution with the potential to greatly increase the reach of HIV prevention interventions and address HIV-related stigma in US African American communities. However, there are few studies on HIV-related stigma and African American church populations. This study explored HIV-related stigma among church and community members participating in an HIV education and testing intervention pilot study in African American churches, named Taking It to the Pews. Methods Four African American churches located in Kansas City, MO and KS, were randomized to either intervention or comparison groups. Churches assigned to the intervention group received religiously tailored HIV education, testing and compassion messages/activities (e.g., sermons, brochures/church bulletins, testimonials) via the Taking It to the Pews HIV Tool Kit. Comparison churches received non-religiously tailored HIV information. HIV-related stigma was assessed with 543 church members and with community members served through church outreach services (e.g., food/clothing pantries, social services) in the four churches. Participants completed surveys at baseline, 6 months and 12 months to assess their HIV-related stigma beliefs, exposure to intervention components and satisfaction with the study. Results At baseline, HIV-related stigma beliefs were similar across experimental groups and were quite low. Mean HIV-related stigma scores were not significantly different between experimental groups at 6 months (p=0.92) or at 12 months (p=0.70). However, mean HIV-related stigma scores within both groups showed decreasing trends at six months, which approached significance. Analysis of previously studied HIV-related stigma factors (e.g., age, gender, income, HIV knowledge, religiosity) did not yield changes in the null findings. Intervention group participants were highly exposed to several intervention components (sermons, HIV resource tables, posters

  14. Late Presentation of HIV Infection: Prevalence, Trends, and the Role of HIV Testing Strategies in Guangzhou, China, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Weibin; Tang, Weiming; Han, Zhigang; Tangthanasup, Thitikarn May; Zhong, Fei; Qin, Faju

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence, trends, and the role of different HIV testing strategies in late presentation of HIV infection in China were unknown. Methods. Data of newly reported HIV cases in Guangzhou between 2008 and 2013 was analyzed to examine the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of late presentation of HIV infection by three types of HIV testing strategies. Results. Overall, 53.2% (1412/2653) and 27.3% (724/2653) met the criteria of late presentation and presentation with advanced HIV disease. The overall trend of late presentation of HIV infection within the study period was declining. Late presentation was 62.9% in 2008 and dropped to 43.3% in 2013 (P < 0.001); presentation with advanced HIV disease was 40.3% in 2008 and dropped to 15.2% in 2013 (P < 0.001). Of the three testing strategies, PITC presented higher odds of both late presentation [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.37 (1.09, 1.73); PITC versus MHT: 3.09 (2.16, 4.42)] and presentation with advanced HIV disease [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.65 (1.29, 2.11); PITC versus MHT: 13.14 (8.47, 20.39)]. Conclusions. Although the late presentation of HIV infection was declining, it was still high in Guangzhou. The worse situation among PITC cases urges the policy adjustment in medical settings to increase early HIV diagnosis. PMID:27761466

  15. Late Presentation of HIV Infection: Prevalence, Trends, and the Role of HIV Testing Strategies in Guangzhou, China, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weibin; Tang, Weiming; Han, Zhigang; Tangthanasup, Thitikarn May; Zhong, Fei; Qin, Faju; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence, trends, and the role of different HIV testing strategies in late presentation of HIV infection in China were unknown. Methods. Data of newly reported HIV cases in Guangzhou between 2008 and 2013 was analyzed to examine the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of late presentation of HIV infection by three types of HIV testing strategies. Results. Overall, 53.2% (1412/2653) and 27.3% (724/2653) met the criteria of late presentation and presentation with advanced HIV disease. The overall trend of late presentation of HIV infection within the study period was declining. Late presentation was 62.9% in 2008 and dropped to 43.3% in 2013 (P < 0.001); presentation with advanced HIV disease was 40.3% in 2008 and dropped to 15.2% in 2013 (P < 0.001). Of the three testing strategies, PITC presented higher odds of both late presentation [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.37 (1.09, 1.73); PITC versus MHT: 3.09 (2.16, 4.42)] and presentation with advanced HIV disease [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.65 (1.29, 2.11); PITC versus MHT: 13.14 (8.47, 20.39)]. Conclusions. Although the late presentation of HIV infection was declining, it was still high in Guangzhou. The worse situation among PITC cases urges the policy adjustment in medical settings to increase early HIV diagnosis.

  16. Should HIV testing for all pregnant women continue? Cost-effectiveness of universal antenatal testing compared to focused approaches across high to very low HIV prevalence settings

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Naoko; Dalal, Shona; Johnson, Cheryl; Hogan, Daniel R; Shimbo, Takuro; Shaffer, Nathan; Pendse, Razia N; Lo, Ying-Ru; Ghidinelli, Massimo N; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV testing is the entry point for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Decreasing external funding for the HIV response in some low- and middle-income countries has triggered the question of whether a focused approach to HIV testing targeting pregnant women in high-burden areas should be considered. This study aimed at determining and comparing the cost-effectiveness of universal and focused HIV testing approaches for pregnant women across high to very low HIV prevalence settings. Methods We conducted a modelling analysis on health and cost outcomes of HIV testing for pregnant women using four country-based case scenarios (Namibia, Kenya, Haiti and Viet Nam) to illustrate high, intermediate, low and very low HIV prevalence settings. We used subnational prevalence data to divide each country into high-, medium- and low-burden areas, and modelled different antenatal and testing coverage in each. Results When HIV testing services were only focused in high-burden areas within a country, mother-to-child transmission rates remained high ranging from 18 to 23%, resulting in a 25 to 69% increase in new paediatric HIV infections and increased future treatment costs for children. Universal HIV testing was found to be dominant (i.e. more QALYs gained with less cost) compared to focused approaches in the Namibia, Kenya and Haiti scenarios. The universal approach was also very cost-effective compared to focused approaches, with $ 125 per quality-adjusted life years gained in the Viet Nam-based scenario of very low HIV prevalence. Sensitivity analysis further supported the findings. Conclusions Universal approach to antenatal HIV testing achieves the best health outcomes and is cost-saving or cost-effective in the long term across the range of HIV prevalence settings. It is further a prerequisite for quality maternal and child healthcare and for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. PMID:27978939

  17. The STI and HIV testing practices of primary care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Mitchell; Solorio, M. Rosa

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV testing practices of primary care providers (PCPs) practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. PCPs were identified by matching ZIP codes of physician directories with ZIP codes of Los Angeles County areas that have a population that is > 50% Hispanic (N = 191). PCPs were mailed a survey that assessed their frequencies for asking patients about sexual history, offering STI and safe sex advice, total number of HIV tests ordered in the past six months and their perceived barriers to STI counseling. The survey response rate was 45% (N = 85). RESULTS: Although 73% of PCPs took sexual histories from patients regularly (daily-to-weekly), only 41% offered STI or safe sex advice regularly. PCPs who were white were less likely than those who were Hispanic/Asian/African American/other to take sexual histories from their patients regularly (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The total number of HIV tests ordered for patients by PCPs at their practice locations in the past six months were: none (6%), 1-10 tests (27%), 11-20 tests (24%) and > 20 tests (36%). Thirty-six percent of PCPs reported > or = 1 positive HIV test in the past six months. PCPs' perceived barriers to STI counseling included patient's young age (< 16 years), language and presence of patient's relative/partner in consultation room at time of visit. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a need for interventions with PCPs practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities to improve their STI and HIV practice patterns. PMID:17393950

  18. Eliminating access to anonymous HIV antibody testing in North Carolina: effects on HIV testing and partner notification.

    PubMed

    Kassler, W J; Meriwether, R A; Klimko, T B; Peterman, T A; Zaidi, A

    1997-03-01

    Anonymous HIV testing may attract persons who might otherwise not be tested but may hinder partner notification. We evaluated the effects on North Carolina's HIV testing and partner notification programs of policy changes that eliminated and later restored anonymous testing in 82 counties. We used an interrupted time-series design to compare counties eliminating with counties retaining anonymous testing. We analyzed HIV testing and partner notification data from before, during, and after elimination of anonymous testing. After elimination of anonymous testing in 82 counties, the mean monthly level of testing (+/- SE) increased by 45%, or 548 (+/- 123) tests per month, while in 18 counties that retained anonymous testing, there was a 63% increase, or 802 (+/- 162) tests per month (p > .05). Among men of all races, testing increased by 16%, or 155 (+/- 35) tests per month, in counties that eliminated anonymous testing; and by 51%, or 305 (+/- 42) tests per month (p < .05), in counties that retained anonymous testing. After elimination of anonymous testing, both county types experienced similar increases in the rate of partners notified. However, partner notification was more successful if the index patient was tested confidentially; 2.7 times as many partners per index patient were notified and counseled. There was no effect on testing or on partner notification rates following restoration of anonymous testing. Substantial community opposition to eliminating anonymous testing was encountered. The policy change appeared to result in a slight decrease in testing among men and a slight increase in partners notified. Programs considering the elimination of anonymous testing should weigh these potential gains and losses, as well as the impact on relationships between the public health and advocacy communities

  19. "HIV Testing Is so Gay": The Role of Masculine Gender Role Conformity in HIV Testing among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Mike C.; Torrey, Carrie; Michaels, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) account for more than half of all new cases of HIV infection in the United States. Yet, many MSM are unaware of their HIV serostatus. Consistent with research indicating that gender role conformity impacts health behaviors, this study examined how masculine norms may influence HIV testing among MSM in the United…

  20. Multilevel stigma as a barrier to HIV testing in Central Asia: a context quantified.

    PubMed

    Smolak, Alex; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2013-10-01

    Central Asia is experiencing one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in the world, with some areas' infection rates doubling yearly since 2000. This study examines the impact of multilevel stigma (individual, family, and community) on uptake of HIV testing and receipt of HIV testing results among women in Central Asia. The sample consists of 38,884 ever-married, Central Asian women between the ages of 15 and 49. Using multilevel modeling (MLM), HIV stigma variables at the individual, family, and community levels were used to assess the significance of differences in HIV testing and receipt of HIV test results among participants while adjusting for possible confounding factors, such as age, wealth, and education. MLM results indicate that HIV stigma is significantly associated with decreased HIV testing uptake at the individual, family, and community levels and with a decrease in receipt at the community level. A one standard deviation increase in individual, family, and community level composite stigma score was associated with a respective 49 %, 59 %, and 94 % (p < 0.001) decrease in the odds of having been tested for HIV. A one standard deviation increase in community composite stigma score was associated with a 99 % (p < 0.001) decrease in the odds of test receipt. HIV stigma operates on the individual, family, and community levels to hinder HIV testing uptake and at the community level to hinder receipt. These findings have important interventions implications to improve uptake of HIV testing and receipt of HIV test results.

  1. Legal and ethical implications of opt-out HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Hanssens, Catherine

    2007-12-15

    New guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that opt-out screening for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) without written patient consent be part of routine clinical care and imply that state HIV-associated laws in conflict with this approach should be amended. However, HIV testing and treatment issues are governed by a range of federal and state laws, common law principles, constitutional provisions, and various codes of ethics. Patient testing protocols should satisfy the legal definition of informed consent, to reduce risk of liability for providers (i.e., health care professionals and facilities). Rigid application of the new guidelines may trigger legal claims, especially if there is no link to care for persons with a positive test result, no proof of informed consent, or inadequate counseling. Ensuring confidentiality, better test training for providers, and provider collaboration with HIV service organizations can reduce the risk of patient claims, but state and federal laws, codes of ethics, and concerns about provider liability should temper reflexive wholesale adoption of guidelines that recommend opt-out screening.

  2. Promoting HIV testing proves to be a challenging subject.

    PubMed

    Herreria, J

    1998-01-01

    BGM, a Los Angeles-based advertising agency, has created a campaign for the Pediatrics AIDS Foundation to promote awareness of the importance of HIV testing of all pregnant women. The agency is taking a personal stake in the campaign by offering its services pro bono.

  3. HIV testing and retention in care of infants born to HIV- infected women enrolled in 'Option B+', Thyolo, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pérez, G; Metcalf, C; Garone, D; Coulborn, R; Harries, A D; Hedt-Gauthier, B; Murowa, M; Mwenelupembe, G S; Van den Bergh, R; Triviño Durán, L

    2014-06-21

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission 'Option B+' originated in Malawi in 2011 to prevent new infections in infants exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We assessed 12-month programme retention and HIV testing uptake among infants born to HIV-infected mothers from September 2011 to June 2012 in Thyolo District Hospital. Of 513 infants, 368 (71.7%) remained in care at 12 months. Altogether, 412 (80.3%) underwent HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction testing, with 267 (52.0%) tested at 6-12 weeks, and 255 (49.7%) underwent rapid HIV testing, with 144 (28.1%) tested at 12 months. Eighty-eight (17.2%) infants had both tests as scheduled. Measures are needed to improve adherence to national testing protocols.

  4. HIV Testing for At-Risk Adolescents at Rhode Island Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Hyeon-Ju; Nazareth, Kristina; Chan, Philip A; Reinert, Steven E; Koster, Michael

    2015-08-03

    Early detection of HIV has great potential to reduce transmission, especially when newly diagnosed individuals are treated early. Early treatment and suppression of viral loads is known to effectively attenuate HIV transmission. However, little is known about whether persons at high risk for HIV are being appropriately tested during healthcare encounters according to national guidelines. Specifically, the at-risk adolescent population may be under tested and are not routinely monitored by state-level surveillance system. This study reviewed HIV testing rates for at-risk adolescents from 2005-2012 at the main tertiary care and pediatric center in Rhode Island. While the absolute number of HIV tests for at-risk adolescents continued to increase, the HIV testing rates for this population decreased during the seven year period. Increasing awareness of HIV testing for patients, their families, and physicians may improve the HIV testing rate among at-risk adolescents in Rhode Island.

  5. Utility of Serological Tests in the Era of Molecular Testing for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis in Endemic Area with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Sharada C.; Mutnal, Manohar B; Nagamoti, Mahantesh B; Patil, Chidanand S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The culture has always been the gold standard test for diagnosis of human brucellosis but the conventional Brucella diagnostic tests viz. serology and culture are often beset with poor specificity & sensitivity respectively. The culture positivity rates for Brucella vary from 92% for bone marrow to 10% for non-blood samples and also dependent on the type of sample. The primary immune-determinant for Brucella species is the cell wall surface lipopolysaccharide, which is antigenically similar to other gram-negative rods. Hence, Brucella serological tests cross react with Escherichia coli 0116 and 0157, Salmonella urbana, Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9, Vibrio cholerae, Xanthomonas maltophilia and Afipia clevellandensis infections, which are common in developing countries also having higher incidence of brucellosis. Aim The aim of the study was evaluation of conventional serological techniques and PCR for diagnosis of human brucellosis in and around north Karnataka which is endemic for brucellosis and patients often present with elevated base line antibody titers and confounding clinical manifestations. Materials and Methods Blood/serum samples of 400 patients suffering from acute undifferentiated fever (AUF) were subjected to culture, Brucella slide agglutination test (SAT), standard tube agglutination test (STAT coupled with 2 ME) and PCR. Results Of the 400 AUF patients, anti-Brucella antibodies were detected by SAT and STAT in serum of 35 and 34 patients respectively. IS711 gene for Brucella was identified in 32 patients by PCR. Twenty samples yielded Brucella in culture on biphasic medium with average incubation period of 9 days. All patients having titer of ≥ 160IU / ml in STAT were found positive by PCR also. Conclusion Brucella STAT corroborated well with PCR results in all those cases where antibodies were present at least one dilution above cut-off value of 80 IU/ml. We probably need to raise cut-off titers to ≥160 IU/ml because of endemic region

  6. Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing Positive for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat HIV infection is called antiretroviral therapy (ART) . ART involves taking a combination of HIV medicines (called an HIV regimen ) every day. ART can’t cure HIV, but it helps people ...

  7. Toward a Reconceptualization of Communication Cues to Action in the Health Belief Model: HIV Test Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Marifran

    1999-01-01

    Examines the persuasive communication of HIV test counselors as cues to action in clients' decisions to practice safer sex. Indicates hypothesized relationships inherent in the Health Belief Model were not supported for the pre-HIV test survey, but the post-HIV test survey reported compliance with safer-sex recommendations. Finds use of certain…

  8. Performance of commercially available serological diagnostic tests to detect Leishmania infantum infection on experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Ojeda, Ana; Todolí, Felicitat; Alberola, Jordi

    2013-01-31

    Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) is the etiological agent of a widespread serious zoonotic disease that affects both humans and dogs. Prevalence and incidence of the canine infection are important parameters to determine the risk and the ways to control this reemergent zoonosis. Unfortunately, there is not a gold standard test for Leishmania infection. Our aim was to assess the operative validity of commercial tests used to detect antibodies to Leishmania in serum samples from experimental infections. Three ELISA tests (LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test, INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA, and INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET), three immunochromatographic tests (INGEZIM(®) LEISHMACROM, SNAP(®) Leishmania, and WITNESS(®) Leishmania), and one IFAT were evaluated. LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA test achieved the highest sensitivity and accuracy (both 0.98). Specificity was 1 for all tests except for IFAT. All tests but IFAT obtained a positive predictive value of 1, while the maximum negative predictive value was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.93). The best positive likelihood ratio was obtained by INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET (30.26), while the best negative likelihood ratio was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.02). The highest diagnostic odds ratio was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (729.00). The largest area under the ROC curve was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.981). Quantitative ELISA based tests performmed better than qualitative tests ("Rapid Tests"), and the test best suited to detect Leishmania in infected dogs and to provide clinically useful information was LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test. This and other results point also to the need of revising the status of IFAT as a gold standard for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis.

  9. [Update on toxoplasmosis prevalence based on serological tests in pregnant women in Dakar, Senegal from 2002 to 2006].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, D; Sène, P D; Ndiaye, M; Faye, B; Ndiaye, J L; Ndir, O

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to update data on toxoplasmosis antibody prevalence based on antenatal surveillance tests in pregnant women in Dakar, Senegal. The study population consisted of 941 pregnant women referred for diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in the Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology at Le Dantec University Hospital Center from 2002 to 2006. Two tests using the solid-phase immunoenzymatic method were performed on venous blood samples collected at 3 weeks of interval (S1 and S2). This double testing technique was designed to detect increases in IgM and IgG antibody levels in order to confirm diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by ruling out immune response, acquired immunity or nonspecific antibody fixation. Comparison of S1 and S2 results in the 941 patients indicated a prevalence of 7.7% and 0% respectively for IgM+IgG- cases, 23.3% and 24.3% respectively for IgM+IgG-cases, and 11.3% and 10.2% respectively for IgM+IgG+ cases. The overall prevalence of toxoplasmosis antibodies was 34.5%. These data showing a high prevalence of toxoplasmosis among pregnant women in Dakar underscore the need to improve serological screening and follow up.

  10. [Optimisation and establishing of serological methods for the potency testing of immunglobulins against Clostridium tetani-toxin

    PubMed

    Ebert, Elvira; Abu Karim, Annett; Kayser, Tanja; Wenig, Renate; Weibetaer, Karin; Wirz, Maria; Pisani, Giulio; Schäffner, Gabriele; Cubetaler, Klaus

    1998-01-01

    The quality control of human tetanus immunglobulin requires animal experiments according to European Pharmacopoeia monograph 398. The potency estimation has to be done in a toxin neutralisation test in mice (MNT) or guinea pigs. Immunoassays could also be used if they show a suitable sensitivity and specificity. The first results of our study verify that an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a rocket immunelectrophoresis (RIE) and a toxin binding inhibition test (ToBI) could be used as serological alternativ methods to the MNT. Studies on the reproducibility of the in vitro methods resulted inter-assay coefficients of variation between 2 and 27%. The ELISA is more sensitive (limit of detectability: 0,005 IE/ml) than the ToBI (0,04 IE/ml) and the RIE (5 IE/ml). The transferability of the ELISA to other labs is proofed. The transferability of the RIE and the ToBI will be tested in the near future.

  11. Genotypic resistance testing in HIV by arrayed primer extension

    PubMed Central

    Bodem, Jochen; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Jacob, Anette; Fellenberg, Kurt; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of mutations that are associated with the occurrence of drug resistance is important for monitoring the antiretroviral therapy of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here, we describe the establishment and successful application of Arrayed Primer Extension (APEX) for genotypic resistance testing in HIV as a rapid and economical alternative to standard sequencing. The assay is based on an array of oligonucleotide primers that are immobilised via their 5′-ends. Upon hybridisation of template DNA, a primer extension reaction is performed in the presence of the four dideoxynucleotides, each labelled with a distinct fluorophore. The inserted label immediately indicates the sequence at the respective position. Any mutation changes the colour pattern. We designed a microarray for the analysis of 26 and 33 codons in the HIV protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively, which are of special interest with respect to drug resistance. The enormous genome variability of HIV represents a big challenge for genotypic resistance tests, which include a hybridisation step, both in terms of specificity and probe numbers. The use of degenerated oligonucleotides resulted in a significant reduction in the number of primers needed. For validation, DNA of 94 and 48 patients that exhibited resistance to inhibitors of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively, were analysed. The validation included HIV subtype B, prevalent in industrialised countries, as well as non-subtype B samples that are more common elsewhere. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00216-007-1775-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18202840

  12. The emotional wellbeing of lay HIV counselling and testing counsellors.

    PubMed

    Visser, Maretha; Mabota, Princess

    2015-01-01

    The HIV testing, treatment and care programme of the South African public healthcare system depends on HIV counselling and testing (HCT) that is primarily delivered by lay counsellors. Lay counsellors are expected to educate clients about HIV/AIDS, advocate behaviour change, convey test results and support those infected and affected to cope with the emotional and social challenges associated with HIV/AIDS. This research focuses on the emotional wellbeing of lay HCT counsellors because this influences the quality of services they provide. A mixed methods approach was used. The emotional wellbeing, level of burnout, depression and coping style of 50 lay HCT counsellors working at the City of Tshwane clinics were assessed. Additionally, five focus group discussions were conducted. The results showed that HCT counsellors reported average emotional wellbeing, high levels of emotional exhaustion and depression. They had a sense of personal accomplishment and positive coping skills. The results revealed that they may have difficulty dealing with clients' emotional distress without adequate training and supervision. This creates a dilemma for service delivery. In the light of the important role they play in service delivery, the role of the lay HCT counsellor needs to be reconsidered. HCT should develop as a profession with specific training and supervision to develop their emotional competencies to conduct effective counselling sessions.

  13. Serologic tests for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa).

    PubMed

    Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Reena; Esfandiari, Javan; Jaroso, Raquel; Carta, Tania; Garrido, Joseba M; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    New tools to detect exposure of free-range Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) to pathogenic mycobacteria would be valuable for improved disease surveillance and wildlife management. Two hundred sera from wild boar of known Mycobacterium bovis infection status were used to evaluate test suitability for the detection of antibodies against M. bovis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (or cross-reacting members of the M. avium complex). Two traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were evaluated using M. bovis purified protein derivative (bPPD) and paratuberculosis protoplasmatic antigen 3 (PPA3) as antigens, respectively, and a new point-of-care test format for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) that uses the innovative dual-path platform (DPP TB) test. The effect of individual factors (sex, age, lesions) on the diagnostic performance of the serologic tests was also determined. Although the DPP had a sensitivity of 89.6% and a specificity of 90.4%, for bPPD, the sensitivity was 79.2% and the specificity 100%. Both tests had a kappa agreement of 0.80. Sixty-five of 68 (95.6%) wild boar sera with antibodies against the PPA3 antigen corresponded to known M. bovis-infected wild boar. Significant differences were not observed in the bPPD and DPP readings among lesion categories or between age classes. A slight sex-related difference in sensitivity toward males in the DPP was found, but it was not detected in the bPPD enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results support the use of antibody-based diagnostic tests for both large-scale and individual bTB testing of Eurasian wild boar and suggest that wild boar cannot be used as sentinels for infections caused by M. avium complex members.

  14. Understanding HIV Testing Behaviors of Minority Adolescents: A Health Behavior Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schnall, Rebecca; Rojas, Marlene; Travers, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults are the fastest-growing age group of people living with HIVinfection in the United States. Yet many adolescents and young adults with high-risk behaviors for HIV are unaware of their HIV status and have never had an HIV test. The purpose of our work was to understand minority adolescents’ beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to HIV testing. We conducted focus group sessions with 41 minority adolescents to assess their perceptions about HIV testing. We triangulated the findings from our focus group data with data from a 125-question survey. Analysis of focus group data demonstrated that Perceived Susceptibility, Perceived Severity, Perceived Benefits, Perceived Barriers, and Cues to Action influenced adolescents’ decisions to get tested for HIV. Findings support the need to design interventions that address adolescents’ perceived barriers to HIV testing and increase access to and knowledge about HIV testing. PMID:25283353

  15. Optimizing Infant HIV Diagnosis in Resource-Limited Settings: Modeling the Impact of HIV DNA PCR Testing at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Alexander; Modi, Surbhi; Rivadeneira, Emilia D.; Koumans, Emilia H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in HIV-infected infants significantly improves survival but is often delayed in resource-limited settings. Adding HIV testing of infants at birth to the current recommendation of testing at age 4–6 weeks may improve testing rates and decrease time to ART initiation. We modeled the benefit of adding HIV testing at birth to the current 6-week testing algorithm. Methods Microsoft Excel was used to create a decision-tree model of the care continuum for the estimated 1,400,000 HIV-infected women and their infants in sub-Saharan Africa in 2012. The model assumed average published rates for facility births (42.9%), prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission utilization (63%), mother-to-child-transmission rates based on prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission regimen (5%–40%), return of test results (41%), enrollment in HIV care (52%), and ART initiation (54%). We conducted sensitivity analyses to model the impact of key variables and applied the model to specific country examples. Results Adding HIV testing at birth would increase the number of infants on ART by 204% by age 18 months. The greatest increase is seen in early ART initiations (543% by age 3 months). The increase would lead to a corresponding increase in survival at 12 months of age, with 5108 fewer infant deaths (44,550, versus 49,658). Conclusion Adding HIV testing at birth has the potential to improve the number and timing of ART initiation of HIV-infected infants, leading to a decrease in infant mortality. Using this model, countries should investigate a combination of HIV testing at birth and during the early infant period. PMID:27792684

  16. Antenatal Care and Couples' HIV Testing in Rural Northern Uganda: A Gender Relations Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudrum, Sarah; Oliffe, John L; Brown, Helen

    2015-09-23

    HIV rates continue to increase among heterosexual couples in many countries including Uganda. This article examines approaches to antenatal care and heterosexual partners' HIV testing in Amuru subcounty, northern Uganda, drawing on findings derived from fieldwork and interviews. The study findings reveal how institutional structures influence the uptake of HIV testing amid power dynamics, wherein many male partners refuse to be tested. Discussed are the coercive approaches to HIV testing in which couples' participation in HIV testing is leveraged by connecting testing to future maternity care. This article advances understandings about how heterosexual gender relations at the local, regional, and global levels affect the health of women, men, and families in Amuru subcounty.

  17. Impact of a confirmatory RhD test on the correct serologic typing of blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Castilho, Lilian; Vieira, Otavio Vinicius Neves; Sippert, Emília; Gaspardi, Ane Caroline; Martins, Marina Lobato; da Silva Malta, Maria Clara Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Background The RHD gene is highly polymorphic, which results in a large number of RhD variant phenotypes. Discrepancies in RhD typing are still a problem in blood banks and increase the risk of alloimmunization. In this study, the RhD typing strategy at a blood bank in Brazil was evaluated. Methods One-hundred and fifty-two samples typed as RhD negative and C or E positive by routine tests (automated system and indirect antiglobulin test using the tube technique) were reevaluated for RhD status by three methods. The method with the best performance was implemented and evaluated for a period of one year (n = 4897 samples). Samples that were D positive exclusively in the confirmatory test were submitted to molecular analysis. Results The gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-D immunoglobulin G (clone ESD1) presented the best results. Seventy samples (1.43%) previously typed as RhD negative showed reactivity in the gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing and were reclassified as D positive. D variants that may cause alloimmunization, such as weak D type 2 and partial DVI, were detected. Conclusion The confirmatory RhD test using the gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing represents a breakthrough in transfusion safety in this blood center. Our results emphasize the importance of assessing the blood group typing strategy in blood banks. PMID:26408363

  18. HIV Testing Patterns and Unrecognized HIV Infection among Young Asian and Pacific Islander Men Who Have Sex with Men in San Francisco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do, Tri D.; Chen, Sanny; McFarland, Willi; Secura, Gina M.; Behel, Stephanie K.; MacKellar, Duncan A.; Valleroy, Linda A.; Cho, Kyung-Hee

    2005-01-01

    The HIV epidemic is rising in Asian and Pacific Islander men who have sex with men (API MSM), who are often first diagnosed with HIV at a late stage of disease. We investigated the HIV testing patterns, correlates of prior testing, and awareness of HIV infection of 495 API MSM aged 18-29 years recruited from venues in San Francisco, using…

  19. Evaluation of allergic and serological tests for diagnosing Brucella melitensis infection in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, J M; Marín, C; Jiménez de Bagués, M; Barberán, M; Hernández, A; Molina, L; Velasco, J; Díaz, R; Moriyón, I

    1994-01-01

    A total of 291 unvaccinated sheep from Brucella melitenesis-infected flocks were examined for delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses with Brucellergene commercial allergen and with cold saline extract and cytosol from rough B. melitensis 115, and their sera were tested in the rose bengal test (RBT), complement fixation test (CFT), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with lipopolysaccharide. DTH reactions were maximal after 72 h, with no intensity differences among allergens, inoculation sites (eyelid and tail), and doses tested. There were no differences in the results recorded by visual inspection and palpation of inoculation sites, by measuring skin thickness with a caliper, or by microscopic examination of samples taken at necropsy. Six days after DTH testing, energy was observed in 100% of the animals, and 100% reactivity was recovered only after 24 days. All animals were necropsied, and thorough bacteriological searches were performed. The sensitivities found with the 140 animals from which B. melitensis was isolated were ELISA, 100%; DTH, 97.1%; RBT, 92.1%; and CFT, 88.6%. Those results put into question the value of RBT and CFT as screening and confirmatory tests for sheep brucellosis and at least indicate that their standardization should be modified. For 151 tested sheep from which B. melitensis was not isolated, the percentages of positive animals were ELISA, 100%; DTH, 94.0%; RBT, 57.6%; and CFT, 53.6%. All tests were negative for 100 tested sheep from Brucella-free flocks. The different results of bacteriological and immunological tests suggest the usefulness of developing indirect tests able to distinguish truly infected animals from those that have developed an immunological response. PMID:7989528

  20. Rapid HIV testing for individuals on probation/parole: outcomes of an intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; McKenzie, Michelle; Wilson, Monique E; Rich, Josiah D

    2013-07-01

    Many probationers and parolees do not receive HIV testing despite being at increased risk for obtaining and transmitting HIV. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted between April, 2011 and May, 2012 at probation/parole offices in Baltimore, Maryland and Providence/Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Male and female probationers/parolees were interviewed (n = 1,263) and then offered HIV testing based on random assignment to one of two conditions: (1) On-site rapid HIV testing conducted at the probation/parole office; or (2) Referral for rapid HIV testing off site at a community HIV testing clinic. Outcomes were: (1) undergoing HIV testing; and (2) receipt of HIV testing results. Participants were significantly more likely to be tested on-site at a probation/parole office versus off-site at a HIV testing clinic (p < 0.001). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of receiving HIV testing results. Findings indicate that probationers/parolees are willing to be tested on-site and, independent of testing location, are equally willing to receive their results. Implications for expanding rapid HIV testing to more criminal justice related locations and populations are discussed.

  1. Implementing HIV Testing in Substance Use Treatment Programs: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Claire A; Seal, Stella M; Savage, Christine

    People who use drugs are at increased risk for HIV acquisition, poor engagement in health care, and late screening for HIV with advanced HIV at diagnosis and increased HIV-related morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. This systematic review evaluates current evidence about the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing HIV testing in U.S. substance use treatment programs. The literature search identified 535 articles. Full text review was limited to articles that explicitly addressed strategies to implement HIV testing in substance use programs: 17 met criteria and were included in the review; nine used quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method designs to describe or quantify HIV testing rates, acceptance by clients and staff, and cost-effectiveness; eight organization surveys described barriers and facilitators to testing implementation. The evidence supported the effectiveness and feasibility of rapid, routine, and streamlined HIV testing in substance use treatment programs. Primary challenges included organizational support and sustainable funding.

  2. Performance of a Rapid Strip Test for the Serologic Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Thaveekarn, Wichit; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Skulpichetrat, Urailak; Saekhow, Orawan; Boonchang, Supatsorn; Bharnthong, Thipchuta; Sitprija, Visith

    2015-01-01

    Background: The serodiagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) present a high variability in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Data on patients with latent TB infection (LTBI) and children in high prevalence settings are still limited. The present study aimed to evaluate an in-house strip test for detection of anti-M. tuberculosis antibodies in TB patients, mostly children aged under 15 y, grouped into four diagnostic categories: active TB, LTBI, healthy TB contacts, and other non-TB diseases. Materials and Methods: The diagnostic performance of strip test was compared with the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Sensitivity and specificity were assessed for all three diagnostic tests. The detection accuracy among the tests was calculated by using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: TST and IGRA could diagnose the active TB cases correctly (100%). The sensitivity of strip test for active TB was 58.3% and 37.5% for LTBI, while the sensitivities of TST and IGRA for LTBI were 90.3% and 37.5%, respectively. The overall specificities of strip test and IGRA were 91.5% and 95.7%, respectively, which were superior to that of TST (68.1%). Conclusion: The strip test did not appear to be useful for diagnosis of active TB in comparison with the current diagnostic standard. The assay may be particularly significant in situations where TB is clinically difficult to diagnose like LTBI and could be a meaningful tool in terms of high specificity and simplicity for ruling in pediatric TB in countries with high TB infection rate. Further studies are needed to determine whether strip test can be improved in its sensitivity and should be implemented into routine clinical practice. PMID:25737986

  3. Which Psychological Factors are Related to HIV Testing? A Quantitative Systematic Review of Global Studies.

    PubMed

    Evangeli, Michael; Pady, Kirsten; Wroe, Abigail L

    2016-04-01

    Deciding to test for HIV is necessary for receiving HIV treatment and care among those who are HIV-positive. This article presents a systematic review of quantitative studies on relationships between psychological (cognitive and affective) variables and HIV testing. Sixty two studies were included (fifty six cross sectional). Most measured lifetime testing. HIV knowledge, risk perception and stigma were the most commonly measured psychological variables. Meta-analysis was carried out on the relationships between HIV knowledge and testing, and HIV risk perception and testing. Both relationships were positive and significant, representing small effects (HIV knowledge, d = 0.22, 95 % CI 0.14-0.31, p < 0.001; HIV risk perception, OR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.26-1.67, p < 0.001). Other variables with a majority of studies showing a relationship with HIV testing included: perceived testing benefits, testing fear, perceived behavioural control/self-efficacy, knowledge of testing sites, prejudiced attitudes towards people living with HIV, and knowing someone with HIV. Research and practice implications are outlined.

  4. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English Transmisión del VIH Recommend on ...

  5. Psychosocial impact of repeat HIV-negative testing: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Karen; Haubrich, Dennis J; Callà, Domenico; Myers, Ted; Burchell, Ann N; Calzavara, Liviana

    2005-12-01

    Continued sexual risk behavior following repeatedly testing HIV-negative in the Polaris HIV Seroconversion Study (Ontario, Canada) led to this follow-up study which identifies the impact of repeat negative testing among 64 men and women. Repeat HIV-negative testing frequently results in confusion as to what constitutes risk and occasionally to thoughts of HIV immunity. Narrative accounts include beliefs that monogamy constitutes safety from HIV, that psychosocial factors other than repeatedly testing negative leads to risk, and that sexual risk reduction is unsustainable. In conclusion, the repeat negative test experience for some neither clarifies risk behavior nor reinforces sustained risk reduction.

  6. Preliminary study of an immunochromatography test for serological diagnosis of canine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Wanke, M M; Cairó, F; Rossano, M; Laiño, M; Baldi, P C; Monachesi, N E; Comercio, E A; Vivot, M M

    2012-12-01

    The most widely used screening test for the diagnosis of brucellosis in the dog is the rapid slide agglutination test in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME-RSAT). The diagnosis is partially confirmed by the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID) and definitively confirmed by bacteriological isolation. Some chronic cases not detected by these tests may be detected by ELISA tests. The use of 2ME-RSAT in routine clinical practice requires a microscope and an experienced operator. An immunochromatographic diagnostic test for canine brucellosis (FASTest(®) Brucella c., Megacor, Hörbranz, Austria) has been recently released. In this study, we compared the diagnostic performance of the FASTest with those of 2ME-RSAT, AGID and ELISAs. Sera from 17 healthy dogs used as negative controls yielded negative results by FASTest, indicating a 100% specificity in this sample. Among 27 sera of dogs with acute or subacute brucellosis confirmed by B. canis isolation, all of which were positive by RSAT and ELISAs, the FASTest was positive in 24 cases and AGID in 23. In acute and subacute cases, the sensitivity of FASTest was 89%. Sera from six dogs with bacteriologically confirmed chronic brucellosis, which were positive by ELISAs but negative by 2ME-RSAT, were also tested; 1 was positive by FASTest and 4 were positive by AGID. These preliminary results indicate a good specificity of the FASTest (100% in this sample) but an unacceptable sensitivity as a screening test. In cases with chronic brucellosis, the sensitivity of the FASTest was lower than that of ELISAs but this assay could make a good intermediate test to be run after a positive RSAT and before running an AGID.

  7. Auditing HIV Testing Rates across Europe: Results from the HIDES 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Raben, D.; Mocroft, A.; Rayment, M.; Mitsura, V. M.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Sthoeger, Z. M.; Palfreeman, A.; Morris, S.; Kutsyna, G.; Vassilenko, A.; Minton, J.; Necsoi, C.; Estrada, V. P.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Johansson, V. Svedhem; Begovac, J.; Ong, E. L. C.; Cabié, A.; Ajana, F.; Celesia, B. M.; Maltez, F.; Kitchen, M.; Comi, L.; Dragsted, U. B.; Clumeck, N.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; d’Arminio Monforte, A.; Rockstroh, J.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Champenois, K.; Jakobsen, M. L.; Sullivan, A.; Lundgren, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    European guidelines recommend the routine offer of an HIV test in patients with a number of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS conditions believed to share an association with HIV; so called indicator conditions (IC). Adherence with this guidance across Europe is not known. We audited HIV testing behaviour in patients accessing care for a number of ICs. Participating centres reviewed the case notes of either 100 patients or of all consecutive patients in one year, presenting for each of the following ICs: tuberculosis, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, anal and cervical cancer, hepatitis B and C and oesophageal candidiasis. Observed HIV-positive rates were applied by region and IC to estimate the number of HIV diagnoses potentially missed. Outcomes examined were: HIV test rate (% of total patients with IC), HIV test accepted (% of tests performed/% of tests offered) and new HIV diagnosis rate (%). There were 49 audits from 23 centres, representing 7037 patients. The median test rate across audits was 72% (IQR 32–97), lowest in Northern Europe (median 44%, IQR 22–68%) and highest in Eastern Europe (median 99%, IQR 86–100). Uptake of testing was close to 100% in all regions. The median HIV+ rate was 0.9% (IQR 0.0–4.9), with 29 audits (60.4%) having an HIV+ rate >0.1%. After adjustment, there were no differences between regions of Europe in the proportion with >0.1% testing positive (global p = 0.14). A total of 113 patients tested HIV+. Applying the observed rates of testing HIV+ within individual ICs and regions to all persons presenting with an IC suggested that 105 diagnoses were potentially missed. Testing rates in well-established HIV ICs remained low across Europe, despite high prevalence rates, reflecting missed opportunities for earlier HIV diagnosis and care. Significant numbers may have had an opportunity for HIV diagnosis if all persons included in IC audits had been tested. PMID:26560105

  8. Auditing HIV Testing Rates across Europe: Results from the HIDES 2 Study.

    PubMed

    Raben, D; Mocroft, A; Rayment, M; Mitsura, V M; Hadziosmanovic, V; Sthoeger, Z M; Palfreeman, A; Morris, S; Kutsyna, G; Vassilenko, A; Minton, J; Necsoi, C; Estrada, V P; Grzeszczuk, A; Johansson, V Svedhem; Begovac, J; Ong, E L C; Cabié, A; Ajana, F; Celesia, B M; Maltez, F; Kitchen, M; Comi, L; Dragsted, U B; Clumeck, N; Gatell, J; Gazzard, B; d'Arminio Monforte, A; Rockstroh, J; Yazdanpanah, Y; Champenois, K; Jakobsen, M L; Sullivan, A; Lundgren, J D

    2015-01-01

    European guidelines recommend the routine offer of an HIV test in patients with a number of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS conditions believed to share an association with HIV; so called indicator conditions (IC). Adherence with this guidance across Europe is not known. We audited HIV testing behaviour in patients accessing care for a number of ICs. Participating centres reviewed the case notes of either 100 patients or of all consecutive patients in one year, presenting for each of the following ICs: tuberculosis, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, anal and cervical cancer, hepatitis B and C and oesophageal candidiasis. Observed HIV-positive rates were applied by region and IC to estimate the number of HIV diagnoses potentially missed. Outcomes examined were: HIV test rate (% of total patients with IC), HIV test accepted (% of tests performed/% of tests offered) and new HIV diagnosis rate (%). There were 49 audits from 23 centres, representing 7037 patients. The median test rate across audits was 72% (IQR 32-97), lowest in Northern Europe (median 44%, IQR 22-68%) and highest in Eastern Europe (median 99%, IQR 86-100). Uptake of testing was close to 100% in all regions. The median HIV+ rate was 0.9% (IQR 0.0-4.9), with 29 audits (60.4%) having an HIV+ rate >0.1%. After adjustment, there were no differences between regions of Europe in the proportion with >0.1% testing positive (global p = 0.14). A total of 113 patients tested HIV+. Applying the observed rates of testing HIV+ within individual ICs and regions to all persons presenting with an IC suggested that 105 diagnoses were potentially missed. Testing rates in well-established HIV ICs remained low across Europe, despite high prevalence rates, reflecting missed opportunities for earlier HIV diagnosis and care. Significant numbers may have had an opportunity for HIV diagnosis if all persons included in IC audits had been tested.

  9. Promoting Partner Testing and Couples Testing through Secondary Distribution of HIV Self-Tests: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Napierala Mavedzenge, Sue; Thirumurthy, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Background Achieving higher rates of partner HIV testing and couples testing among pregnant and postpartum women in sub-Saharan Africa is essential for the success of combination HIV prevention, including the prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We aimed to determine whether providing multiple HIV self-tests to pregnant and postpartum women for secondary distribution is more effective at promoting partner testing and couples testing than conventional strategies based on invitations to clinic-based testing. Methods and Findings We conducted a randomized trial in Kisumu, Kenya, between June 11, 2015, and January 15, 2016. Six hundred antenatal and postpartum women aged 18–39 y were randomized to an HIV self-testing (HIVST) group or a comparison group. Participants in the HIVST group were given two oral-fluid-based HIV test kits, instructed on how to use them, and encouraged to distribute a test kit to their male partner or use both kits for testing as a couple. Participants in the comparison group were given an invitation card for clinic-based HIV testing and encouraged to distribute the card to their male partner, a routine practice in many health clinics. The primary outcome was partner testing within 3 mo of enrollment. Among 570 participants analyzed, partner HIV testing was more likely in the HIVST group (90.8%, 258/284) than the comparison group (51.7%, 148/286; difference = 39.1%, 95% CI 32.4% to 45.8%, p < 0.001). Couples testing was also more likely in the HIVST group than the comparison group (75.4% versus 33.2%, difference = 42.1%, 95% CI 34.7% to 49.6%, p < 0.001). No participants reported intimate partner violence due to HIV testing. This study was limited by self-reported outcomes, a common limitation in many studies involving HIVST due to the private manner in which self-tests are meant to be used. Conclusions Provision of multiple HIV self-tests to women seeking antenatal and postpartum care was successful in promoting partner testing and

  10. Serologic testing for avian influenza viruses in wild birds: comparison of two commercial competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Elisa; Rodríguez, Vanessa; Sommer, Dagmar; Blanco, Juan Manuel; Acevedo, Pelayo; Heffels-Redmann, Ursula; Höfle, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Serologic testing of wild birds for avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance poses problems due to species differences and nonspecific inhibitors that may be present in sera of wild birds. Recently available competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) kits offer a new species-independent approach. In this study we compare two commercial competitive cELISAs, using a total of 184 serum and plasma samples from 23 species of wild birds belonging to 10 orders. Thirteen samples were from experimentally high pathogenicity AI and low pathogenicity AI infected red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa), 77 samples were from a flock of sentinel hybrid ducks confirmed infected by AI by real-time PCR, and 94 samples were from wild birds admitted to a rehabilitation center. Both ELISAs detected AI antibodies in the experimentally infected partridges, whereas hemagglutination inhibition (HI) was negative. Concordance in results between the two ELISAs was 51.5%. When specific subtype-H5/H7 HI-positive samples were considered for comparison, ELISA 1 appeared to perform better on ducks, whereas ELISA 2 appeared to perform better in other wild bird species. Overall, 68.2% of H5/H7 positive samples tested positive by ELISA 1 and 36% by ELISA 2. Both ELISAs detected AIV-antibody-positive samples negative by specific HI against 9 of the 16 existing hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. Presumably this reflects either higher sensitivity of cELISA when compared to HI, presence of antibodies against HA subtypes not tested, or unspecific reactions. Performance of ELISA 1 on ducks appears to be comparable to in-house cELISA previously used by other authors in wild birds, but requires a relatively large sample volume. Alternatively, although ELISA 2 required a smaller sample volume, it was less effective at identifying HI-positive samples. The results reflect the necessity of validation of cELISA tests for individual species or at least families, as required by the OIE.

  11. County-Level Correlates of CDC-Funded HIV Testing Events, United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Samah; Heitgerd, Janet L; Williams, Weston O; Krueger, Amy L; Dietz, Patricia M

    2015-10-01

    HIV prevalence and socio-demographic data were analyzed to assess the alignment of CDC-funded HIV testing activity in 2012 with its high-impact prevention approach. CDC-funded HIV-testing was conducted in counties with high HIV prevalence and in places potentially more affected by HIV as measured by urbanicity, percent black, percent poverty, and percent uninsured. The percent Hispanic/Latino was associated with a lower probability of HIV testing activity. Higher percentages of black and Hispanic/Latino in the population was positively associated with new HIV diagnoses. Analyzing county-level data confirmed the appropriateness of CDC-funded HIV testing activities under a high-impact prevention approach but also suggested areas for possible improvement.

  12. HIV testing men in the antenatal setting: understanding male non-disclosure

    PubMed Central

    Katz, David A.; Kiarie, James N.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John, Francis N.; Farquhar, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Summary Prevention of infant HIV is a powerful incentive for maternal HIV diagnosis and an opportunity to increase male HIV testing and disclosure of HIV status within couples. We examined male HIV disclosure in couples who attended a Nairobi antenatal clinic (ANC), had individual HIV testing, and were counseled to disclose to their partner. At 2-week follow-up, males and females independently reported HIV disclosure. Of 2,104 women, 1,993 requested partner attendance; 313 male partners came, of whom 183 chose individual HIV testing. Of 106 couples who followed-up, 93% of both partners reported disclosure by females vs. 71% by males (p<0.0001); 27% of men reported disclosure while their female partner reported not knowing partner HIV status. In these couples, male ANC HIV testing did not result in shared knowledge of HIV status. Couple counseling models that incorporate disclosure may yield greater HIV prevention benefits than offering individual partner HIV testing services at ANC. PMID:19833691

  13. HIV testing and counselling in Estonian prisons, 2012 to 2013: aims, processes and impacts.

    PubMed

    Kivimets, K; Uuskula, A

    2014-11-27

    We present data from an observational cohort study on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and control measures in prisons in Estonia to assess the potential for HIV transmission in this setting. HIV testing and retesting data from the Estonian prison health department were used to estimate HIV prevalence and incidence in prison. Since 2002, voluntary HIV counselling and testing has routinely been offered to all prisoners and has been part of the new prisoners health check. At the end of 2012, there were 3,289 prisoners in Estonia, including 170 women: 28.5% were drug users and 15.6% were infected with HIV. Of the HIV-positive inmates, 8.3% were newly diagnosed on prison entry. In 2012, 4,387 HIV tests (including retests) were performed in Estonian prisons. Among 1,756 initially HIV-negative prisoners who were in prison for more than one year and therefore tested for HIV twice within 12 months (at entry and annual testing), one new HIV infection was detected, an incidence of 0.067 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.025–5.572). This analysis indicates low risk of HIV transmission in Estonian prisons. Implementation of HIV management interventions could impact positively on the health of prisoners and the communities to which they return.

  14. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... How do you get HIV? How do you get tested for HIV? Is there are cure for HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. A person with HIV is called HIV positive (HIV+). HIV ...

  15. Use of Tunable, Pulsed Dye Laser for Quantitative Fluorescence in Syphilis Serology (FTA-ABS Test)

    PubMed Central

    Kasatiya, S. S.; Lambert, N. G.; Laurence, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A pulsed dye laser was used as an excitation source in a fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. A high precision in quantitative fluorescence was obtained with this high-power excitation source coupled to an electronic detection system and a storage oscilloscope by standardization of fluorescence evaluation and through elimination of human error. One 0.4-μs pulse exposure was sufficient to record fluorescence intensity data on the oscilloscope. Absence of fading of fluorescence after repeated excitation permitted multiple readings of the same microscope field. Almost 100% reproducible results were obtained for the FTA-ABS test with 40 samples. Electronic detection of fluorescence and the high sensitivity obtained with laser excitation raise doubts about the relative value of quantitative immunofluorescence in the FTA-ABS test. PMID:4598221

  16. Can the HIV home test promote access to care? Lessons learned from the in-home pregnancy test.

    PubMed

    Schnall, Rebecca; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Larson, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults are the fastest growing age group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals in the US, and many who are infected do not know their HIV status. The HIV home test has the potential to help curb the HIV epidemic by improving detection of persons living with HIV and enabling them to seek follow-up care but it has not yet been evaluated in adolescents. Analogous to the home pregnancy test, which was met with much resistance and only successfully marketed during a time of social change, the HIV home test has been met with resistance since its FDA approval. This commentary summarizes the need to systematically evaluate positive and untoward/unanticipated effects of HIV home testing, particularly in young adults. The overall incidence of HIV has been declining in the US, yet it continues to grow at alarming rates for adolescents and young adults [1]. Almost 40 % of new HIV infections in the US are in this age group [2]. Further, many HIV infected adolescents and young adults are unaware of their infection. Nationwide, only 22.6 % of sexually active high school students have ever been tested for HIV [3]. While advances in drug regimens have transformed HIV into a chronic disease, infected individuals need to be identified and subsequently engaged in care [4].

  17. a statistical model based on serological parameters for predicting occult HBV infection: implications for organ/ blood donations.

    PubMed

    Coen, Sabrina; Angeletti, Claudio; Piselli, Pierluca; Tronchin, Michele; Vincenti, Donatella; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Galli, Claudio; Menzo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of hepatitis B virus by donors with occult HBV infection (OBI) is a threat for blood transfusion and organ/tissue transplantation. The risk of carrying HBV DNA is currently not predictable by simple serologic markers, while HBV DNA testing is not universally deployed. This study evaluated an integrated serologic approach for assessing this risk. Anti-HBc positive subjects (461 HIV-negative, 262 HIV-positive) were selected for the study. Serology was analyzed by a commercial CMIA technique. HBV DNA was analyzed by both commercial and home-brew real-time amplification assays. A penalized maximum likelihood logistic approach was used to analyze the data. In HBsAg-negative subjects (HIV-negative), anti-HBc signal/cut off values, the presence of anti-HBc IgM, the absence of anti-HBsAg, and the absence of anti-HCV were correlated to the probability of finding circulating HBV DNA. A model for predicting HBV DNA presence by 4 serological parameters is therefore proposed. The predictive value of the logistic model based on simple serologic markers may represent a reasonable tool for the assessment of HBV transmission risk by transfusion or organ/tissue donation in the context of limited resources and where nucleic acid testing is not performed. In addition, it may be helpful for assessing the risk of reactivation in immunosuppressed OBI patients.

  18. Suboptimal HIV Testing Uptake Among Men Who Engage in Commercial Sex Work with Men in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Harry; Friedman, Mackey Reuel; Lim, Sin How; Guadamuz, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Men who have sex with men and are sex workers (MSMSW) are disproportionately affected by the growing and emerging HIV epidemic. As sex work and same-sex behavior are heavily stigmatized and often illegal in most Asian countries, HIV research focusing on MSMSW has been limited. The goal of this analysis is to examine HIV testing practices and identify correlates of HIV testing among MSMSW in Asia. Methods: The Asia Internet MSM Sex Survey, an online cross-sectional survey of 10,861 men who have sex with men (MSM), was conducted in 2010. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, HIV testing behaviors, and sexual behaviors were collected. Five hundred and seventy-four HIV-negative/unknown respondents reported receiving payment for sex with men at least once in the past 6 months and were included in this analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to identify independent correlates of HIV testing in the past year. Results: About half (48.6%) of the participants had been tested for HIV at least once within the past year, and 30.5% had never been tested. We also found that MSMSW participants who engaged in risky behaviors were less likely to be tested. Conclusion: While one might expect a high HIV testing rate among MSMSW due to the risks associated with engaging in sex work, we found that HIV testing uptake is suboptimal among MSMSW in Asia. These results suggest that targeted HIV prevention and testing promotion among MSMSW are needed. PMID:26982598

  19. Serologic test systems development. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Seawright, G.L.; Sanders, W.M.; Hollstein, U.; Butler, J.E.; Mills, K.W.; Despommier, D.D.; Zimmerman, W.J.; Martinez, E.; Hindman, K.R.; Payne, R.J.

    1980-12-01

    Work has continued on the development and automation of enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for detecting diseases and toxic agents in food animals. Further evaluations were made of the Technicon Autoanalyzer II(AAII) for conducting totally automated EIAs. The problems investigated were machine carryover and assay variation. Modifications greatly reduced or eliminated carryover and produced acceptable levels of test variation. The EIA for swine trichinosis was significantly improved by the use of a new, partially purified antigen preparation. The result was improved detection of early seroconversions and reduced probability for false negatives and false positives. The amplified EIA was adapted as a diagnostic test for bovine brucellosis and studies were initiated for differentiating vaccinated and infected animals. Preliminary data indicate that the IgG/sub 1/ response may be diagnostic but further studies are necessary. Development of the EIA for detecting low molecular weight contaminants and residues in food products was also initiated. Compounds studied were the antibiotics chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamicin; the mycotoxin, aflatoxin, and the shale oil toxin, 2-aminofluorene. Results indicate that chloramphenicol nonspecifically binds to antibody and interferes with antibody activity. Thus, the test is not yet satisfactory. Initial attempts to automate the gentamicin test were unsuccessful because of machine carryover but modifications of the AAII have produced encouraging preliminary data. Work is continuing on the development of EIAs for all of the compounds mentioned above. (ERB)

  20. Internalized homophobia and reduced HIV testing among men who have sex with men in China.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Thomas; Santos, Glenn-Milo; Arreola, Sonya; Do, Tri; Hebert, Pato; Beck, Jack; Makofane, Keletso; Wilson, Patrick A; Ayala, George

    2014-03-01

    Although previous research has examined barriers and facilitators of HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China, few studies have focused on social factors, including homophobia and internalized homophobia. This study utilized data from a global online survey to determine correlates of HIV testing as part of a subanalysis focused on Chinese MSM. Controlling for age, HIV knowledge, number of sexual partners, and other covariates, ever having tested for HIV was significantly correlated with lower internalized homophobia. This study suggests that stigma associated with sexual orientation may serve as a barrier to participation in HIV testing and other health-promoting behaviors.

  1. Serological Tests Do Not Predict Residual Fibrosis in Hepatitis C Cirrhotics with a Sustained Virological Response to Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Aghemo, Alessio; Fraquelli, Mirella; Lampertico, Pietro; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Facchetti, Floriana; Grassi, Eleonora; Casazza, Giovanni; Rosenberg, William; Bedossa, Pierre; Colombo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Liver biopsy (LB) has lost popularity to stage liver fibrosis in the era of highly effective anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy, yet diagnosis of persistent cirrhosis may have important implications following HCV eradication. As performance of serological non-invasive tests (NITs) to predict residual fibrosis in non-viremic HCV patients is unknown, we investigated accuracy of NITs to predict residual fibrosis in cirrhotics after a sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon (IFN). Methods Thirty-eight patients with a pre-treatment histological diagnosis of cirrhosis and a 48–104 months post-SVR LB were tested with APRI, CDS, FIB-4, FibroQ, Forns Score, GUCI Index, King Score, Lok Index, PLF, ELF. In 23 (61%) patients, cirrhosis had histologically regressed. Results All NITs values declined after SVR without any significant difference between regressors and non-regressors (AUROC 0.52–0.75). Using viremic cut-offs, PPV ranged from 34% to 100%, with lower NPV (63% - 68%). NITs performance did not improve using derived cut-offs (PPV: 40% - 80%; NPV: 66% - 100%). PLF, which combines several NITs with transient elastography, had the best diagnostic performance (AUROC 0.75, Sn 61%, Sp 90%, PPV 80%, NPV 78%). After treatment, none of the NITs resulted significantly associated with any of the histological features (activity grade, fibrosis stage, area of fibrosis). Conclusions The diagnostic estimates obtained using both viremic and derived cut-off values of NITs were suboptimal, indicating that none of these tests helps predicting residual fibrosis and that LB remains the gold standard for this purpose. PMID:27304619

  2. Cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miralles López, J C; López Andreu, F R; Sánchez-Gascón, F; López Rodríguez, C; Negro Alvarez, J M

    2005-01-01

    Cold urticaria is defined as a urticarial and/or angioedematous reaction of the skin to contact with cold objects, water or air. Types of urticaria associated with infectious diseases, such as mononucleosis, rubeola, varicella, syphilis, hepatitis, and HIV infection have been reported. We present the case of a patient who developed cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis. The patient was a 34-year-old man who for the previous 2 months had presented cutaneous pruritus accompanied by several papular lesions in parts of the skin exposed to cold as well as those in contact with cold water. The result of an "ice-cube test" was positive. Serologic tests for Toxoplasma gondii showed an IgG level of 68 UI/ml and were positive for IgM, while a test for cryoglobulins was positive. One month later cryoglobulins were negative and a serologic test for T. gondii showed an IgG concentration of 75 UI/ml and positive IgM. Three months later cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG for T. gondii was 84 UI/ml, and IgM was positive. After 6 months cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG level was 68 UI/ml and IgM was still slightly positive. In the final evaluation, 14 months later, IgG level was 32 UI/ml and IgM was negative. The patient continues to present clinical manifestations of cold urticaria, although he has experienced some improvement and his tolerance to cold has increased after treatment with cetirizine.

  3. The evaluation of possible false positives with detergents when performing amylase serological testing on clothing.

    PubMed

    Feia, Andrea; Novroski, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    For almost 40 years, detergent companies have been adding enzymes such as amylases to their products as an effective method of breaking down tough stains created by polysaccharides and proteins. The possibility that α-amylases present in common household laundry detergents may contribute to the positive detection of α-amylase on evidentiary samples during forensic presumptive screening procedures is a potential problem that has not yet been investigated. To determine whether α-amylase detection is possible following routine laundering, five different fabrics were laundered in a variety of detergents, and presumptive testing using RSID(™)-Saliva and Phadebas(®) Amylase Test was conducted. Our results demonstrate that clothing laundered in detergents known to contain enzymes does not retain any detectable levels of α-amylase following a typical wash cycle. We also show that, unlike laundered clothing, undiluted detergents do contain detectable levels of α-amylase; however, these findings were only observed using the Phadebas(®) Amylase Test.

  4. Implementing and expanding HIV testing in immigrant populations in Europe: Comparing guideline's recommendations and expert's opinions.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Del Arco, Débora; Monge, Susana; Rivero-Montesdeoca, Yaiza; Burns, Fiona; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Immigrant populations, especially those from endemic countries, living in the European Union (EU) suffer a disproportionate burden of HIV, delayed diagnosis and poorer access to antiretroviral treatment. While International Organisations are developing recommendations aimed at increasing the uptake of HIV testing, the feasibility and real outcomes of these measures remain unexplored. The aim of this review was, firstly to identify the recommendations of the main International Organisations (IO) on HIV testing in immigrants. Secondly, to describe the challenges for implementing and expanding HIV testing and counselling interventions targeting immigrants by interviewing key informants. The importance of HIV testing in immigrants is discussed, along with the appropriateness of universal HIV testing approaches vs most at risk targeted approaches. Also addressed is, pre- and post-HIV test counselling characteristics and community initiatives suitable to reach this population and, finally the legal issues regarding access to treatment for illegal immigrants.

  5. The Wide Range Achievement Test-4 Reading Subtest “Holds” in HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, K. B.; Cattie, J.; Franklin, D. R.; Moore, D. J.; Woods, S. P.; Grant, I.; Heaton, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to detect HIV-associated neurocognitive decline, it is important to accurately estimate individuals’ premorbid levels of cognitive functioning. Although previous studies have operated under the assumption that word reading tests are valid and stable indicators of premorbid abilities in HIV infection, studies of other populations have found this is not always the case. Therefore, it is important to empirically examine the validity of word reading tests as estimates of premorbid functioning specifically within the HIV population. Methods The Wide Range Achievement Test-4 Reading subtest (WRAT-4 Reading) was administered along with comprehensive neurocognitive assessments to 150 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 76 HIV seronegative (HIV-) age-, education-, and sex-matched participants at baseline; a subset of 48 HIV+ individuals completed a second study visit (M=14.4 months), in which the alternate version of the WRAT-4 was administered. Results Although HIV+ individuals evidenced worse current neurocognitive functioning than HIV- participants, WRAT-4 Reading performance was comparable between groups. Longitudinally, HIV+ participants evidenced improved disease and neuropsychological functioning, yet WRAT-4 Reading demonstrated strong test-retest reliability, no practice effect, and did not differ between the initial and follow-up assessments. Test-retest differences in reading performance were minor and not associated with changes in neurocognitive performance or changes in HIV disease. Conclusions We found no evidence of WRAT-4 Reading performance decline in HIV infection, despite HIV+/HIV- group differences in neurocognitive functioning. Additionally, reading performances among HIV+ individuals demonstrated consistency across study visits. These results begin to support the validity of the WRAT-4 Reading subtest as an indicator of premorbid cognitive functioning in HIV+ individuals. PMID:25283135

  6. Missed Opportunities for Concurrent HIV-STD Testing in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ian B.K.; Quinlivan, Evelyn B.; Gay, Cynthia L.; Leone, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated emergency department (ED) provider adherence to guidelines for concurrent HIV-sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing within an expanded HIV testing program and assessed demographic and clinical factors associated with concurrent HIV-STD testing. Methods We examined concurrent HIV-STD testing in a suburban academic ED with a targeted, expanded HIV testing program. Patients aged 18–64 years who were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, or chlamydia in 2009 were evaluated for concurrent HIV testing. We analyzed demographic and clinical factors associated with concurrent HIV-STD testing using multivariate logistic regression with a robust variance estimator or, where applicable, exact logistic regression. Results Only 28.3% of patients tested for syphilis, 3.8% tested for gonorrhea, and 3.8% tested for chlamydia were concurrently tested for HIV during an ED visit. Concurrent HIV-syphilis testing was more likely among younger patients aged 25–34 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78, 2.10) and patients with STD-related chief complaints at triage (AOR=11.47, 95% CI 5.49, 25.06). Concurrent HIV-gonorrhea/chlamydia testing was more likely among men (gonorrhea: AOR=3.98, 95% CI 2.25, 7.02; chlamydia: AOR=3.25, 95% CI 1.80, 5.86) and less likely among patients with STD-related chief complaints at triage (gonorrhea: AOR=0.31, 95% CI 0.13, 0.82; chlamydia: AOR=0.21, 95% CI 0.09, 0.50). Conclusions Concurrent HIV-STD testing in an academic ED remains low. Systematic interventions that remove the decision-making burden of ordering an HIV test from providers may increase HIV testing in this high-risk population of suspected STD patients. PMID:24385644

  7. Expanding provider-initiated HIV testing at STI clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Joseph D; Walensky, Rochelle P; Yang, Li-Gang; Yang, Bin; Bangsberg, David R; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Cohen, Myron S

    2012-01-01

    Despite expanding sexually transmitted epidemics in South China, the majority of patients presenting to sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics are not routinely screened for HIV infection. Identifying barriers to offering HIV testing among STI care providers is an important public health priority. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of offering HIV testing among STI care providers in South China and reported physician barriers to offering HIV testing. More detailed operational data regarding HIV test offer frequency and barriers to testing may enhance routine HIV testing at STI clinics. A sample of 62 STI care providers within the Pearl River Delta Region of South China completed a survey including socio-demographic and training background information (including sex, age, medical education, year of terminal medical degree, and HIV-specific training), reasons for not offering HIV testing routinely, and physical examination and sexual history taking practices. Frequency of offering HIV testing was calculated based on reports from research assistants and operational data. STI care providers offered HIV testing to 3011/10,592 (28.4%) of their patients. There was substantial variability across providers in the frequency of offering testing, ranging from 3 to 100%. None of the identified physician factors were associated with offering HIV testing 100% of the time in the multivariate model. The most commonly physician reported barriers to HIV testing included: (1) low perceived prevalence of disease and (2) not recommended by current guidelines. Forty-seven providers (76%) reported asking about same sex behaviors rarely or never. Further research on HIV screening practices of STI care providers may help scale up HIV provider-initiated testing and counseling programs.

  8. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  13. HIV Testing and HIV/AIDS Treatment Services in Rural Counties in 10 Southern States: Service Provider Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Madeline; Anthony, Monique-Nicole; Vila, Christie; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Weidle, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Forty percent of AIDS cases are reported in the southern United States, the region with the largest proportion of HIV/AIDS cases from rural areas. Data are limited regarding provider perspectives of the accessibility and availability of HIV testing and treatment services in southern rural counties. Purpose: We surveyed providers in the…

  14. Validation of a Leishmania infantum ELISA rapid test for serological diagnosis of Leishmania chagasi in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, M; Biondo, A W; Gomes, A A D; Silva, A R S; Vieira, R F C; Camacho, A A; Quinn, John; Chandrashekar, R

    2011-01-10

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites including L. donovani, Leishmania infantum and Leishmania chagasi. As some studies suggest that L. chagasi and L. infantum may be very similar or even the same species, the aim of the present study was to evaluate a commercial rapid ELISA test, originally designed for L. infantum, in the diagnosis of CVL in dogs naturally infected by L. chagasi. A total of 400 serum canine samples, including 283 positive dogs for CVL from an endemic area, 86 clinically healthy dogs from a non-endemic area and 31 dogs seropositive for confounding infectious agents (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis) were used for test validation. An overall sensitivity of 94.7% (95% CI=91.41-97.01%) and specificity of 90.6% (95% CI=83.80-95.21%) was found, with a high degree of agreement (k=0.8445) to the indirect ELISA. When confounding infectious diseases were excluded, specificity increased to 100% (95% CI=95.8-100%), with a higher degree of agreement (k=0.8928). In conclusion, the commercial kit designed for L. infantum was a highly sensitive and specific device for detection of L. chagasi infection in dogs, which indicates high immunoreactivity similarities between L. infantum and L. chagasi.

  15. [Inappropriate use of serological tests for hepatitis B virus in Evliya Celebi Education and Research Hospital of Dumlupinar University, Kütahya].

    PubMed

    Genç, Ozlem; Aksu, Evrim

    2014-10-01

    Since hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections may cause serious clinical symptoms and become chronic, the appropriate use and interpretation of laboratory tests in diagnosis is crucial. Implementation of serological tests for all HBV markers leads to high cost, labour force and time loss, so diagnostic algorithms are used for this purpose. The aims of this retrospective study were to detect the number of unnecessary test requests in HBV infection serology and financial burden as its consequence and to find out the reasons and ways of solutions. Three-years records of microbiology laboratory of Dumlupinar University Evliya Celebi Training and Research Hospital, Kutahya, Turkey, between 2011-2013 were analysed for the detection of unnecessary test requests and a total of 179.640 HBV serological test results were evaluated. Serological tests requested more than one on the same day and HBeAg, anti-HBe and anti-HBc IgM tests required from the patients with natural immunity or vaccinated ones were considered as unnecessary test requests. The main reasons of unnecessary test requests were detected as follows; unable to check the previous HBV test results in HIMS (Hospital Information Management System) owing to restricted of time, not being friendly user of HIMS, not trusting the test results, not knowing diagnostics algorithms, requiring of the tests by secretaries or other staff like nurses, not questioning HBV vaccination and requiring screening tests because of the defensive medicine. Survey questions prepared to search these reasons and awareness level of diagnostic algorithms were handed and asked to fill out 146 physicians working at clinics which made over 100 unnecessary requests in 3 years. Total numbers of unnecessary requested serological HBV tests were 5415 (3.01%) and total financial burden for our hospital in three years was 42.256 TL (18.373 USD) according to the notifications of Turkish Social Security Institution. It was determined that the most unnecessary

  16. Lay Counsellor-Based Risk Reduction Intervention with HIV Positive Diagnosed Patients at Public HIV Counselling and Testing Sites in Mpumalanga, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltzer, Karl; Tabane, Cily; Matseke, Gladys; Simbayi, Leickness

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, fidelity, and effect of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk reduction intervention delivered to HIV-infected patients by lay counsellors during routine HIV counselling and testing (HCT) public service in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Methods: A total of 488 HIV-infected patients, aged 18 years and older,…

  17. Interventions that increase the intention to seek voluntary HIV testing in young people: a review.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Kelly Feist; Pharr, Jennifer; Buttner, Mark; Ezeanolue, Echezona

    2017-03-01

    Young people 15-24 years old represent 39% of new HIV infections globally. However, they are the least likely age demographic to seek HIV testing and the most likely to be unaware of their HIV status. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to identify interventions that increase either rates of HIV testing or intentions to seek HIV testing in young people 10-24 years old. In total, 1601 manuscripts were systematically examined and five manuscripts were included in the final review. Two common themes identified in the interventions were education and test delivery methods. Educational programs were found to be effective when delivered in classroom or entertainment-based formats. Health providers offering testing and home testing increased the rate of testing. Additional research is needed on programs aimed at young people not enrolled in schools, interventions that measure testing rates, and educating healthcare providers about offering HIV tests to young people.

  18. Serology of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pappagianis, D; Zimmer, B L

    1990-01-01

    Serologic tests have assisted in the diagnosis and prognosis of coccidioidomycosis for a half-century. The causative agent, Coccidioides immitis, is a dimorphic fungus existing in a hyphal form with arthroconidia in nature and in the usual culture. The arthroconidia represent the inhaled infective forms which in vivo and under special laboratory conditions form spherules which endosporulate. The culture filtrate/autolysate (coccidioidin) from the hyphal phase has provided antigens of suitable reliability for currently used serologic tests. These tests are primarily to determine the two major antibody responses: the early immunoglobulin M (IgM) response is useful in the diagnosis of acute primary coccidioidomycosis. Later, IgG is produced and usually outlasts the IgM, persisting in chronic coccidioidomycosis. The IgM is detectable by tube precipitin, a corresponding immunodiffusion, or latex particle agglutination tests. The pertinent antigen(s) is heat stable and pronase resistant and appears to be largely carbohydrate, mainly mannose with some 3-O-methyl mannose. The IgG detectable in the serum and other body fluids by complement fixation and a corresponding immuno-diffusion is useful in diagnosis, and its quantitation provides an indicator of progression of disease (increasing titer) or regression (decreasing titer). The pertinent antigen appears to be a heat-labile, pronase-sensitive protein which in an unreduced form has a molecular weight of 110,000. A third very useful serologic procedure is the exoantigen test for identification of putative cultures of C. immitis. Images PMID:2200605

  19. Evaluation of the performance of cellular and serological diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) herd naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Bezos, Javier; Casal, Carmen; Alvarez, Julio; Díez-Guerrier, Alberto; Rodríguez-Bertos, Antonio; Romero, Beatriz; Rueda, Paloma; López, Lissette; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía

    2013-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in llamas and alpacas has gained importance in recent years since they are imported into the European Union mainly for serving as pets and for production of natural fibre. The intradermal tuberculin test has been widely used for diagnosis of TB in these species showing lack of sensitivity (Se) although little information has been previously reported evaluating the effect on its performance of different PPD inoculation sites and time of readings. Moreover, different cost-effective serological assays have been developed in the recent years for TB diagnosis in camelids obtaining a variety of results and, for this reason, new assays still being developed. The main objectives of this study were: (1) to evaluate the performance of the intradermal tuberculin test using different inoculation sites (axillary, prescapular and cervical) and times of reading (72 and 120 h) and (2) to test a novel serological assay based on MPB83 antigen in a Mycobacterium bovis naturally infected alpaca herd in Spain. In regards to skin test, single intradermal tuberculin (SIT) test at the prescapular site and reading at 72 h showed the highest proportion of test-positive-culture positive animals among all culture positive animals (T+/C+), ranging from 53.8% (95% CI, 37.2-69.9) to 80% (95% CI, 44.4-97.5) using a more stringent interpretation than typically prescribed although, in general, low T+/C+ was achieved using both SIT and single comparative intradermal tuberculin (SCIT) tests alone. T+/C+ of the serological assay increased using samples collected 15-30 days after PPD injection [76.9% (95% CI, 60.7-88.9) - 100% (95% CI, 69.2-100)]. The best results of T+/C+ were obtained applying in parallel the most sensitive SIT test and serology using samples collected 15-30 days after PPD inoculation [90% (95% CI, 55.5-99.7)-100% (95% CI, 69.2-100)]. Therefore implementation of serology in parallel with the most sensitive skin test could maximize the detection of infected animals.

  20. Interpretation of serological tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease: Anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies revisited.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Laure; Giusti, Delphine; Gatouillat, Grégory; Servettaz, Amélie; Tabary, Thierry; Barbe, Coralie; Pham, Bach-Nga

    2016-09-01

    Algorithms for celiac disease diagnosis provided by guidelines are based primarily on anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) antibodies and/or anti-endomysium antibodies. The place of anti-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) antibodies is less well established. This study was designed to assess the clinical relevance of anti-DGP antibodies. Two thousand and twenty-six consecutive unselected patients systematically tested for anti-TG2, endomysium, gliadin, DGP antibodies and IgA dosage were investigated. The serological interpretation was assessed by analyzing the medical records of patients. From the 1984 newly investigated patients suspected of celiac disease, 10% had at least one celiac marker. Anti-TG2, anti-endomysium, anti-gliadin and anti-DGP antibodies were found in 1.1%, 0.6%, 6.8% and 4.1% of cases respectively, with different combinations. The diagnosis of celiac disease was retained in 0.45% of patients. When using the duodenal biopsies as a gold standard, analysis of the anti-DGP diagnosis performance showed that the specificity and the predictive positive value (PPV) were lower than that of the anti-TG2 assay. The combined detection of anti-TG2 and anti-DGP antibodies had a lower PPV than that of anti-TG2 and anti-endomysium antibodies (p = 0.04). When analyzing the contribution of anti-DGP antibodies as an additional marker to both anti-TG2 and anti-endomysium antibodies, the PPV of the three associated antibodies was shown to be significantly lower than the PPV of the both anti-TG2 and anti-endomysium antibodies (p = 0.04). As a conclusion, anti-DGP antibodies may not have the diagnosis value required as an additional screening test to anti-TG2 antibodies for identifying celiac disease patients in medical centers where anti-endomysium detection is available.

  1. Evaluation of the automated ADVIA centaur® XP syphilis assay for serological testing.

    PubMed

    Saw, Sharon; Zhao, Huiqin; Tan, Phyllis; Saw, Betty; Sethi, Sunil

    2017-02-20

    We evaluated the performance of the ADVIA Centaur XP Syphilis assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA) using samples previously tested on the ARCHITECT i4000SR system (Abbott Diagnostics, Lake Forest, IL, USA) and confirmed by the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA) (SERODIA-TPPA, Fujirebio Diagnostics Inc., Malvern, PA, USA). Clinical patient information was included to aid resolution of discordant samples where available. Precision, interference, and cross-reactivity were also assessed. Relative to patient clinical status, the sensitivity of both the ADVIA Centaur XP and the ARCHITECT assays was 100% (95% CI, 93.9-100), and the specificity of the ADVIA Centaur XP assay was 95.5% (95% CI, 90.4-98.3), which was slightly higher than that of the ARCHITECT assay at 93.9% (95% CI, 88.4-97.3). Overall agreement relative to patient clinical status was 96.9% (95% CI, 93.3-98.8) for the ADVIA Centaur XP assay and 95.8% (95% CI, 91.9-98.2) for the ARCHITECT assay. Overall agreement between the two automated assays was 96.9% (95% CI, 93.3-98.8). ADVIA Centaur XP assay precision was <5% at all index values tested. No significant interference was observed for lipemia or hemolysis; a small effect was seen with some samples for bilirubin. The assay exhibited no significant cross-reactivity with a number of potential interfering factors. The ADVIA Centaur XP Syphilis assay can be considered a sensitive and accurate assay for identification of treponemal antibodies in screening populations as well as patients presenting with suspicion of syphilitic infection.

  2. Couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing provider training evaluation, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kathleen Y; Oppert, Marydale; Wall, Kristin M; Inambao, Mubiana; Simpungwe, Matildah K; Ahmed, Nurilign; Abdallah, Joseph F; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan A

    2017-01-23

    With the expansion of couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT) in urban Zambia, there is a growing need to evaluate CVCT provider trainings to ensure that couples are receiving quality counseling and care. We evaluated provider knowledge scores, pre- and post-training and predictors of pre- and post-training test scores. Providers operating in 67 government clinics in four Copperbelt Province cities were trained from 2008 to 2013 in three domains: counseling, rapid HIV laboratory testing and data management. Trainees received pre- and post-training tests on domain-specific topics. Pre- and post-training test scores were tabulated by provider demographics and training type, and paired t-tests evaluated differences in pre- and post-training test scores. Multivariable ANCOVA determined predictors of pre- and post-training test scores. We trained 1226 providers, and average test scores increased from 68.8% pre-training to 83.8% post-training (p < 0.001). Test scores increased significantly for every demographic group and training type (p < 0.001) with one exception-test scores did not significantly increase for those receiving counseling or data management training who had less than a high school education. In multivariable analysis, higher educational level and having a medical background were predictive of a higher pre-test score; higher pre-test scores and having a medical background were predictive of higher post-test scores. Pre- and post-test assessments are critical to ensure quality services, particularly as task-shifting from medical to lay staff becomes more common. Assessments showed that our CVCT trainings are successful at increasing knowledge, and that those with lower education may benefit from repeat trainings.

  3. Exploring Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High Risk for HIV Infection Recruited with Venue-based Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Gwadz, Marya; Cleland, Charles M.; Jenness, Samuel M.; Silverman, Elizabeth; Hagan, Holly; Ritchie, Amanda S.; Leonard, Noelle R.; McCright-Gill, Talaya; Martinez, Belkis; Swain, Quentin; Kutnick, Alexandra; Sherpa, Dawa

    2016-01-01

    Annual HIV testing is recommended for high-risk populations in the United States, to identify HIV infections early and provide timely linkage to treatment. However, heterosexuals at high risk for HIV, due to their residence in urban areas of high poverty and elevated HIV prevalence, test for HIV less frequently than other risk groups, and late diagnosis of HIV is common. Yet the factors impeding HIV testing in this group, which is predominantly African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic, are poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Using a systematic community-based sampling method, venue-based sampling (VBS), we estimate rates of lifetime and recent (past year) HIV testing among high-risk heterosexuals (HRH), and explore a set of putative multi-level barriers to and facilitators of recent testing, by gender. Participants were 338 HRH African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic adults recruited using VBS, who completed a computerized structured assessment battery guided by the Theory of Triadic Influence, comprised of reliable/valid measures on socio-demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and multi-level barriers to HIV testing. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with HIV testing within the past year. Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually. In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis. Thus VBS identified serious gaps in rates of annual HIV testing among HRH. Improvements in access to high-quality HIV testing and leveraging of STI testing are needed to increase the proportion of HRH testing annually for HIV. Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral

  4. Trends in HIV prevalence and HIV testing among young MSM: five United States cities, 1994-2011.

    PubMed

    Oster, Alexandra M; Johnson, Christopher H; Le, Binh C; Balaji, Alexandra B; Finlayson, Teresa J; Lansky, Amy; Mermin, Jonathan; Valleroy, Linda; Mackellar, Duncan; Behel, Stephanie; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2014-04-01

    We examined trends in cross-sectional HIV prevalence (a surrogate for incidence) and past 12 month testing behavior among young men who have sex with men (MSM). The Young Men's Survey and the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System conducted interviews and HIV testing among MSM recruited by venue-based sampling during 1994-2011. Using data from five cities, we determined whether interview year was associated with HIV prevalence and recent testing for MSM ages 18-22 and 23-29 years, after adjusting for city, race/ethnicity, and education. Multivariable analysis demonstrated an overall increase in prevalence among MSM ages 23-29 years, driven by an increase in Baltimore. There was no change in HIV prevalence among MSM ages 18-22 years overall, although prevalence increased in Baltimore. HIV testing increased significantly for both age groups. Gains in HIV testing are encouraging, but increasing prevalence among young MSM in Baltimore suggests increasing incidence and the need for additional efforts for this population.

  5. The control of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in sheep flocks: a mathematical model of the impact of vaccination, serological testing, clinical examination and lancing of abscesses.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K M; Medley, G F; Green, L E

    2010-06-01

    A mathematical model of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in sheep flocks was used to evaluate strategies for control and elimination of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA). Control strategies tested were vaccination, serological testing and removal of seropositives, clinical examination and removal of sheep with abscesses, lancing abscesses, and appropriate combinations. Three different infection rates with and without replacement of culled ewes were used to evaluate the control options. Controls were either implemented immediately after infection was detected in a flock or once CLA was at endemic equilibrium, and with different frequencies of examination or testing. Elimination of infection was defined as 99% confidence that no sheep were infected with C. pseudotuberculosis. The control strategies were evaluated by estimating the reduction in infection or probability of elimination and the number of ewes culled from the flock. Lancing abscesses reduced the prevalence of infection when the initial prevalence was <0.60, but elimination was unlikely. A vaccine efficacy of 0.79 or more led to elimination of infection from the flock, provided that the endemic prevalence of infection was <0.60. A combination of vaccination and clinical examination reduced the prevalence of infection at a faster rate than using clinical examination or vaccination alone where five rounds of clinical examination were done. Serological testing led to elimination of infection after five tests, but was highly dependent upon the diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity and management options used: a test sensitivity of 0.90 always resulted in elimination. A test specificity greater than 0.90 prevented removal of many false positive ewes and consequently prevented a large reduction in lamb production. Elimination was most likely using a serological test with sensitivity and specificity >0.90, but vaccination combined with clinical examination reduced infection rapidly with little impact

  6. HIV tests and new diagnoses declined after california budget cuts, but reallocating funds helped reduce impact.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Arleen A; Byrnes, Karen; Wynn, Adriane; Farrell, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Historically, California supplemented federal funding of HIV prevention and testing so that Californians with HIV could become aware of their infection and obtain lifesaving treatment. However, budget deficits in 2009 led the state to eliminate its supplemental funding for HIV prevention. We analyzed the impact of California's HIV resource allocation change between state fiscal years 2009 and 2011. We found that the number of HIV tests declined 19 percent, from 66,629 to 53,760, in local health jurisdictions with high HIV burden. In low-burden jurisdictions, the number of HIV tests declined 90 percent, from 20,302 to 2,116. New diagnoses fell from 2,434 in 2009 to 2,235 in 2011 (calendar years) in high-burden jurisdictions and from 346 to 327 in low-burden ones. California's budget crunch prompted state and local programs to redirect remaining HIV funds from risk reduction education to testing activities. Thus, the impact of the budget cuts on HIV tests and new HIV diagnoses was smaller than might have been expected given the size of the cuts. As California's fiscal outlook improves, we recommend that the state restore supplemental funding for HIV prevention and testing.

  7. Adolescents and HIV infection: the pediatrician's role in promoting routine testing.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Patricia J; Martinez, Jaime

    2011-11-01

    Pediatricians can play a key role in preventing and controlling HIV infection by promoting risk-reduction counseling and offering routine HIV testing to adolescent and young adult patients. Most sexually active youth do not feel that they are at risk of contracting HIV and have never been tested. Obtaining a sexual history and creating an atmosphere that promotes nonjudgmental risk counseling is a key component of the adolescent visit. In light of increasing numbers of people with HIV/AIDS and missed opportunities for HIV testing, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends universal and routine HIV testing for all patients seen in health care settings who are 13 to 64 years of age. There are advances in diagnostics and treatment that help support this recommendation. This policy statement reviews the epidemiologic data and recommends that routine screening be offered to all adolescents at least once by 16 to 18 years of age in health care settings when the prevalence of HIV in the patient population is more than 0.1%. In areas of lower community HIV prevalence, routine HIV testing is encouraged for all sexually active adolescents and those with other risk factors for HIV. This statement addresses many of the real and perceived barriers that pediatricians face in promoting routine HIV testing for their patients.

  8. Social Network Influence on HIV Testing Among Urban Men in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Yamanis, Thespina J; Dervisevic, Ervin; Mulawa, Marta; Conserve, Donaldson F; Barrington, Clare; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Men in sub-Saharan Africa have low HIV testing rates. Social networks exert an important influence on men's HIV-related behavior. We examined associations between network factors and HIV testing among men in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Data are from the baseline assessment of an HIV prevention trial with 48 primarily male networks. Among 923 sexually active men, 52 % had ever tested for HIV. In a random effects logistic regression model, men in the network core were 1.50 times more likely (p < .05) to test than those in the periphery. Percentage of women in the network was associated with men's increased HIV testing (AOR 4.24, p < .05). Perception of network HIV stigma was negatively associated with HIV testing (AOR 0.92, p < .01). Thinking at least one close friend tested for HIV was associated with increased testing (AOR 2.66, p < .001). Social network interventions are a promising approach for scaling up men's HIV testing.

  9. HIV testing behaviors among undocumented Central American immigrant women in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Jane R; Risser, Jan M; Selwyn, Beatrice J; Sabin, Keith; McCurdy, Sheryl A

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes HIV testing behaviors among undocumented Central American immigrant women living in Houston, Texas, USA. Respondent driven sampling was used to recruit participants for an HIV behavioral survey. HIV testing items included lifetime history of testing, date and location of the most recent test, and reason for testing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the demographic, behavioral, and structural characteristics associated with testing. The lifetime prevalence of HIV testing was 67%. Half of those who tested did so within the past 2 years and almost 80% received their most recent test in a healthcare setting. The primary reason for testing was pregnancy. Lifetime testing was associated with being from Honduras, having over a sixth grade education, having a regular healthcare provider, and having knowledge of available healthcare resources. Our results suggest that expanding access to healthcare services may increase the prevalence of HIV testing in this population.

  10. Can TasP Approaches Be Implemented in Correctional Settings?: A review of HIV testing and linkage to community HIV treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Elkington, Katherine S; Jaiswal, Jessica; Spector, Anya Y; Reukauf, Heidi; Tesoriero, James M; Nash, Denis; Remien, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    High rates of HIV in correctional populations makes evaluation of programs that increase HIV testing in correctional settings and linkage to HIV treatment upon release, and understanding key implementation issues of these programs, essential to reducing new HIV infection. We conducted a systematic search for studies of outcomes or implementation issues of programs that promote HIV testing or that promote linkage to community HIV treatment post-release. Thirty-five articles met inclusion criteria: nine HIV testing initiatives and four linkage programs. HIV testing uptake rates were between 22% and 98% and rates of linkage to community treatment were between 79% and 84%. Findings suggest that some programs may be effective at reducing HIV transmission within the communities to which inmates return. However, attention to implementation factors, such as organizational culture and staff collaborations, appears critical to the success of these programs. Future research using rigorous design and adequate comparison groups is needed.

  11. Trends in HIV testing, serial HIV prevalence and HIV incidence among people attending a Center for AIDS Prevention from 1988 to 2003

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, I; Alastrue, I; Ferreros, I; del Amo, J; Santos, C; Tasa, T; Hernández‐Aguado, I; Pérez‐Hoyos, S

    2007-01-01

    Aim To analyse trends in HIV testing, serial HIV prevalence and HIV incidence among people who underwent voluntary testing in a Center for AIDS Prevention in Valencia, Spain. Methods Open cohort study including all subjects who went to the Center for AIDS Prevention from 1988 to 2003. Information on sociodemographic variables and HIV test results was collected. Serial prevalence and incidence rates were calculated, and joinpoint regression was used to identify changes in trends over time. Results 21 241 subjects were analysed; 67% men, 27% injecting drug users (IDUs), 43% heterosexuals and 13% men who have sex with men (MSM). From 1988 to 1990, IDUs accounted for 57% of clinic attenders, decreasing to 14% by 1997–2003, accompanied by an increase in heterosexuals. Overall, HIV prevalence for the whole period was 15%, dropping from 35% to <10% after 1999 and to 3% by 2003, when HIV prevalence was 26% in IDUs, 6% in MSM and 2% in heterosexuals. Total HIV incidence was 2.5%. From 1988 to 1990, HIV incidence ranged from 6% to 8%, and a gradual and progressive decline observed from 1990 onwards. From 1995 onwards, HIV incidence was <2%. The highest incidence rate is seen in IDUs, 7–12% in the first period and 4–5% at the end. Among MSM, a change in the decreasing trend is seen by 1998, and increases in incidence are detected by 2002–3. Conclusions Serial HIV prevalence has markedly decreased from 1988 in all transmission categories, although it is still high. With regard to HIV incidence, the drop has been marked too, although a worrying increase, that requires further follow‐up, has been detected in MSM in the past 2 years. PMID:16757515

  12. A Review of Self-Testing for HIV: Research and Policy Priorities in a New Era of HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Napierala Mavedzenge, Sue; Baggaley, Rachel; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate uptake of testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a primary bottleneck toward universal access to treatment and care, and is an obstacle to realizing the potential of new interventions for preventing HIV infection, including treatment for prevention and preexposure prophylaxis. HIV self-testing offers an approach to scaling up testing that could be high impact, low cost, confidential, and empowering for users. Although HIV self-testing was first considered >20 years ago, it has not been widely implemented. We conducted a review of policy and research on HIV self-testing, which indicates that policy is shifting toward a more flexible approach with less emphasis on pretest counseling and that HIV self-testing has been adopted in a number of settings. Empirical research on self-testing is limited, resulting in a lack of an evidence base upon which to base policy recommendations. Relevant research and investment in programs are urgently needed to enable consideration of developing formalized self-testing programs. PMID:23487385

  13. Making sense of HIV testing: Social representations in young Africans’ HIV-related narratives from six countries

    PubMed Central

    Beres, Laura K.; Winskell, Kate; Neri, Elizabeth M.; Mbakwem, Benjamin; Obyerodhyambo, Oby

    2013-01-01

    HIV testing and counselling is a critical intervention to support treatment access and prevent new infections. Despite high rates of infection, few young Africans know their HIV status. With the aim of informing initiatives that encourage HIV testing and access to testing benefits, this study seeks to understand how young Africans make sense of HIV testing. We conducted thematic narrative-based analysis of a stratified random sample (n=586, ~5%) from 11,354 narratives written in 2005 by males and females aged 10-24 from 6 sub-Saharan African countries for the ‘Scenarios from Africa’ scriptwriting contest which invites young people to contribute ideas for short films about HIV. The factors represented by the young authors as influencing testing behaviour and outcomes are complex and interactive, indicating that interventions that are not contextually appropriate are unlikely to effect a shift towards increased testing or improved post-testing outcomes. The narratives point to opportunities to increase HIV testing in this demographic. PMID:24004339

  14. Making sense of HIV testing: social representations in young Africans' HIV-related narratives from six countries.

    PubMed

    Beres, Laura K; Winskell, Kate; Neri, Elizabeth M; Mbakwem, Benjamin; Obyerodhyambo, Oby

    2013-01-01

    HIV testing and counselling are a critical intervention to support treatment access and prevent new infections. Despite high rates of infection, few young Africans know their HIV status. With the aim of informing initiatives that encourage HIV testing and access to testing benefits, this study seeks to understand how young Africans make sense of HIV testing. We conducted thematic narrative-based analysis of a stratified random sample (n = 586, ≈ 5%) from 11,354 narratives written in 2005 by males and females aged 10-24 from six sub-Saharan African countries for the 'Scenarios from Africa' scriptwriting contest which invites young people to contribute ideas for short films about HIV. The factors represented by the young authors as influencing testing behaviour and outcomes are complex and interactive, indicating that interventions that are not contextually appropriate are unlikely to affect a shift towards increased testing or improved post-testing outcomes. The narratives point to opportunities to increase HIV testing in this demographic.

  15. Barriers to Bacterial STI Testing of HIV-Infected Men who have Sex with Men Engaged in HIV Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Barbee, Lindley A.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Tat, Susana A.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% of HIV-infected MSM engaged in HIV primary care have been diagnosed with an STI in the past year, yet STI testing frequency remains low. Methods We sought to quantify STI testing frequencies at a large, urban HIV care clinic, and to identify patient- and provider-related barriers to increased STI testing. We extracted laboratory data in aggregate from the electronic medical record to calculate STI testing frequencies (defined as the number of HIV-infected MSM engaged in care who were tested at least once over an 18-month period divided by the number of MSM engaged in care). We created anonymous surveys of patients and providers to elicit barriers. Results Extra-genital gonorrhea and chlamydia testing were low (29%–32%), but the frequency of syphilis testing was higher (72%). Patients frequently reported high-risk behaviors, including drug use (16.4%) and recent bacterial STI (25.5%), as well as substantial rates of recent testing (>60% in prior 6 months). Most (72%) reported testing for STI in HIV primary care, but one-third went elsewhere for “easier” (42%), anonymous (21%) or more frequent (16%) testing. HIV primary care providers lacked testing and treatment knowledge (25–32%), and cited lack of time (68%), discomfort with sexual history taking and genital exam (21%), and patient reluctance (39%) as barriers to increased STI testing. Conclusion STI testing in HIV care remains unacceptably low. Enhanced education of providers, along with strategies to decrease provider time and increase patient ease and frequency of STI testing, are needed. PMID:26372931

  16. Barriers to workplace HIV testing in South Africa: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weihs, Martin; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low workplace HIV testing uptake makes effective management of HIV and AIDS difficult for South African organisations. Identifying barriers to workplace HIV testing is therefore crucial to inform urgently needed interventions aimed at increasing workplace HIV testing. This study reviewed literature on workplace HIV testing barriers in South Africa. Pubmed, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo and SA Publications were systematically researched. Studies needed to include measures to assess perceived or real barriers to participate in HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) at the workplace or discuss perceived or real barriers of HIV testing at the workplace based on collected data, provide qualitative or quantitative evidence related to the research topic and needed to refer to workplaces in South Africa. Barriers were defined as any factor on economic, social, personal, environmental or organisational level preventing employees from participating in workplace HIV testing. Four peer-reviewed studies were included, two with quantitative and two with qualitative study designs. The overarching barriers across the studies were fear of compromised confidentiality, being stigmatised or discriminated in the event of testing HIV positive or being observed participating in HIV testing, and a low personal risk perception. Furthermore, it appeared that an awareness of an HIV-positive status hindered HIV testing at the workplace. Further research evidence of South African workplace barriers to HIV testing will enhance related interventions. This systematic review only found very little and contextualised evidence about workplace HCT barriers in South Africa, making it difficult to generalise, and not really sufficient to inform new interventions aimed at increasing workplace HCT uptake.

  17. Working outside of the box: how HIV counselors in Sub-Saharan Africa adapt Western HIV testing norms.

    PubMed

    Angotti, Nicole

    2010-09-01

    The delivery of HIV counseling and testing programs throughout Sub-Saharan Africa relies on the work performed by trained HIV counselors. These individuals occupy a critical position: they are intermediaries between the rule-making of international and national policymakers, and the norms of the communities in which they live and work. This paper explains when, how and why HIV counselors adapt Western testing guidelines (the "3Cs"--consent, confidentiality and counseling) to local concerns, attempting to maintain the fidelity of testing principles, while reducing the harm they perceive may arise as a consequence of strict adherence to them. Data for this study come from Malawi: a poor, largely rural African country, where HIV prevalence is ranked 9th highest in the world. The analysis is based on 25 interviews with HIV counselors and a unique set of field journals, and captures local experiences and the moral quandaries that counselors in rural Sub-Saharan Africa face. The findings of this inquiry provide new insights into the implementation of HIV testing in rural African settings, insights that may guide HIV prevention policy.

  18. Acceptability of Couples’ Voluntary HIV Testing Among HIV-infected Patients in Care and Their HIV-negative Partners in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Kristin M.; Canary, Lauren; Workowski, Kimberly; Lockard, Annie; Jones, Jeb; Sullivan, Patrick; Hills, Katherine; Fofana, Kadija; Stephenson, Rob; Allen, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Couples’ voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CHTC) is an HIV risk reduction strategy not widely available in the US. Methods: We assessed willingness to participate in CHTC among US HIV-infected clinic patients via tablet-based survey and among HIV-negative persons with HIV-infected partners in care via mixed-method phone interviews. Results: Most of the N=64 HIV-infected partners surveyed were men (89%), on antiretroviral treatment (ART) (92%), and many self-identified homosexual (62%). We observed high levels of willingness to participate in CHTC (64%) among HIV-infected partners. Reasons for not wanting to participate included perceived lack of need (26%), desire to self-disclose their status (26%), and fear of being asked sensitive questions with their partner present (17%). HIV-infected partners were interested in discussing ART (48%), other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (44%), and relationship agreements like monogamy (31%) during CHTC sessions. All N=15 HIV-negative partners interviewed were men, most identified as homosexual (73%), and about half (54%) reported consistent condom use with HIV-infected partners. We observed high levels of willingness to participate in CHTC (87%) among HIV-negative partners, who were also interested in discussing ART (47%), other STIs (47%), mental health services (40%), and relationship agreements (33%). Most negative partners (93%) indicated that they believed their HIV-infected partner was virally suppressed, but in the event that they were not, many (73%) were willing to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Conclusion: These results indicate that CHTC for serodiscordant couples is acceptable and should emphasize aspects most pertinent to these couples, such as discussion of ART/PrEP, STIs, and relationship agreements. PMID:27014393

  19. Testing the Sexually Abused Child for the HIV Antibody: Issues for the Social Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, George A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses identifying children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through sexual abuse. Reviews testing guidelines. Sees social workers contributing to test decision making when perinatal HIV transmissions is possibility, when assailant may be tested, and when parents/legal guardians insist on testing child. Discusses family…

  20. Course of Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection after Treatment Based on Parasitological and Serological Tests: A Systematic Review of Follow-Up Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sguassero, Yanina; Cuesta, Cristina B.; Roberts, Karen N.; Hicks, Elizabeth; Comandé, Daniel; Ciapponi, Agustín; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is endemic in Latin American countries outside the Caribbean. The current criterion for cure in the chronic phase of the disease is the negativization of at least two serological tests such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF) and indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA). The serological evolution of treated subjects with chronic T. cruzi infection is variable. Treatment failure is indicated by a positive parasitological and/or molecular test (persistence of parasitemia). Objectives To summarize the pattern of response to treatment of parasitological, molecular and serological tests performed during the follow-up of subjects with chronic T. cruzi infection. Methods Electronic searches in relevant databases and screening of citations of potentially eligible articles were accomplished. Organizations focusing on neglected infectious diseases were asked for help in identifying relevant studies. Included studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, and cohort studies involving adults and children with chronic infection who received trypanocidal treatment (benznidazole or nifurtimox) and were followed over time. The assessment of risk of bias was performed separately for each study design. The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool and the guidelines developed by Hayden et al. were used. Two reviewers extracted all data independently. A third review author was consulted in case of discordant opinion. Additional analyses were defined in ad-hoc basis. Scatter plots for percentage of positive parasitological and molecular tests and for negative serological tests were developed by using the lowess curve technique. Heterogeneity was measured by I2. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic review protocols (Registration Number CRD42012002162). Results Out of 2,136 citations

  1. Rapid HIV testing experience at Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System's Homeless Stand Downs.

    PubMed

    Hooshyar, Dina; Surís, Alina M; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Lepage, James P; Bedimo, Roger; North, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    In the USA, 21% of the estimated 1.1 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are unaware they are HIV-infected. In 2011, Veterans Health Administration (VHA)'s Office of Public Health in conjunction with VHA's Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program funded grants to support rapid HIV testing at homeless outreach events because homeless populations are more likely to obtain emergent rather than preventive care and have a higher HIV seroprevalence as compared to the general population. Because of a Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System (VANTHCS)'s laboratory testing requirement, VANTHCS partnered with community agencies to offer rapid HIV testing for the first time at VANTHCS' 2011 Homeless Stand Downs in Dallas, Fort Worth, and Texoma, Texas. Homeless Stand Downs are outreach events that connect Veterans with services. Veterans who declined testing were asked their reasons for declining. Comparisons by Homeless Stand Down site used Pearson χ², substituting Fisher's Exact tests for expected cell sizes <5. Of the 910 Veterans attending the Homeless Stand Downs, 261 Veterans reported reasons for declining HIV testing, and 133 Veterans were tested, where 92% of the tested Veterans obtained their test results at the events - all tested negative. Veterans' reported reasons for declining HIV testing included previous negative result (n=168), no time to test (n=49), no risk factors (n=36), testing is not a priority (n=11), uninterested in knowing serostatus (n=6), and HIV-infected (n=3). Only "no time to test" differed significantly by Homeless Stand Down site. Nonresponse rate was 54%. Offering rapid HIV testing at Homeless Stand Downs is a promising testing venue since 15% of Veterans attending VANTHCS' Homeless Stand Downs were tested for HIV, and majority obtained their HIV test results at point-of-care while further research is needed to determine how to improve these rates.

  2. HIV test-seeking before and after the restriction of anonymous testing in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Hertz-Picciotto, I; Lee, L W; Hoyo, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the impact on HIV test-seeking of North Carolina's restriction of anonymous testing to 18 of its 100 counties as of September 1, 1991. METHODS: Trends from 4 months prerestriction to the 16-month restriction period in counties retaining vs counties eliminating anonymous testing were compared. RESULTS: HIV testing increased throughout the state, but more rapidly where anonymous testing was retained than elsewhere: 64% vs 44%. These differences held for all sociodemographic subgroups and were most pronounced among adolescents and African Americans and other non-Whites. CONCLUSIONS: The data are consistent with a detrimental effect of elimination of anonymous testing, although confounding from differences in AIDS awareness or in repeat tests is possible. PMID:8876517

  3. Wisconsin statutes regarding HIV testing in primary care: frequent questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Vergeront, J M; Reiser, W J; Druckenmiller, J K; Krchnavek, K A; Davis, J P

    1998-12-01

    The authors review Wisconsin statutes related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in primary care, including the areas of written informed consent, documentation of consent, testing without consent, testing of minors, disclosure of test results without the consent of the test subject, reporting requirements, discrimination, access by insurance companies and third-party payors to HIV test results, and civil liabilities and criminal penalties associated with violation of HIV-related state statutes. During the course of the HIV epidemic in Wisconsin, many individuals (service providers, legislators, consumers and advocates) supported the enactment of HIV-related legislation. Today, Wisconsin has some of the nation's most comprehensive HIV legislation. These laws have set a legal framework that balances the rights of individuals with protection of public's health. The relatively low seroprevalence of HIV infection in Wisconsin can be attributed, in part, to the state's HIV-related legislation. While Wisconsin HIV legislation is broadly focused, much of it is concerned with HIV testing. This article examines common questions as they pertain to HIV testing in primary care and to the following areas addressed by state statutes: counseling and referral for health and support services [Wisconsin statute s. 252 14(3)] informed consent for testing or disclosure [Wisconsin statute s. 252.15(2)] written consent to disclose [Wisconsin statute s. 252.15(3) & (4)] testing without consent of the test subject [Wisconsin statute s. 252.15(2)] confidentiality of an HIV test [Wisconsin statute s. 252.15(5)] reporting of positive test results [Wisconsin statute s. 252.15(7)] discrimination [Wisconsin statute s. 252.14(2)] civil and criminal liabilities [Wisconsin statute s. 252.14(4); 252.15(8) & (9)].

  4. HIV/AIDS-related stigma in South African alcohol-serving venues and its potential impact on HIV disclosure, testing, and treatment-seeking behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Velloza, Jennifer; Watt, Melissa H.; Choi, Karmel W.; Abler, Laurie; Kalichman, Seth C.; Skinner, Donald; Pieterse, Desiree; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-serving venues in South Africa are sites for high-risk behaviours that may lead to HIV transmission. Prevention and treatment interventions are sorely needed in these settings, but HIV-related stigma may limit their effectiveness. This study explored expressions of stigma among alcohol-serving venue patrons in Cape Town and examined the potential impact of stigma on HIV disclosure, testing, and treatment-seeking behaviours. A total of 92 in-depth interviews with male and female, Black and Coloured patrons were conducted. Transcripts were analysed via memo-writing and diagramming techniques. Many participants mentioned knowing other patrons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH), and this visibility of HIV impacted expressions of HIV-related stigma. Participants discussed four forms of HIV-related stigma in the venues: fearing PLWH, fearing HIV acquisition, blaming others for spreading HIV, and isolating PLWH. HIV visibility and expressions of HIV-related stigma, particularly fear of isolation, influenced participants’ willingness to disclose their status. HIV-related stigma in the venues also appeared to indirectly influence testing and treatment-seeking behaviour outside the venue. Results suggest that efforts to change norms and reduce expressions of HIV-related stigma in alcohol-serving venues are necessary to successfully deliver tailored HIV prevention interventions and increase uptake of HIV testing and care in this important social setting. PMID:25630531

  5. Couple-level Motivations to Test for HIV for Gay Men in Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Beougher, Sean C.; Bircher, Anja E.; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Darbes, Lynae A.; Gómez Mandic, Carmen; Neilands, Torsten B.; Garcia, Carla C.; Hoff, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of HIV testing among gay men describe the motivations, facilitators and barriers, behaviors, and demographic characteristics of individuals who test. What little research focuses on HIV testing among gay men in relationships shows that they do not test regularly or, in some cases, at all – their motivations to test have not been investigated. With so little data on HIV testing for this population, and the continued privileging of individually-focused approaches, gay men in relationships fall into a blind spot of research and prevention efforts. This study examined motivations to test for HIV using qualitative data from both partners in 20 gay male couples. Analysis revealed that the partners’ motivations were either event-related (e.g., participants testing the beginning of their relationship or HIV-negative participants in an HIV-discordant relationship testing after risky episode with their discordant primary partner) or partner-related (e.g., participants testing in response to a request or suggestion to test from their primary partner or participants testing out of concern for their primary partner’s health and wellbeing). These data provide insight into relationship-oriented motivations to test for HIV for gay men in relationships and, in doing so, demonstrates their commitment to their primary partner and relationship. These motivations can be leveraged to increase HIV testing among gay men in relationships, a population that tests less often than single gay men, yet, until recently, has been underserved by prevention efforts. PMID:25550145

  6. Nomenclature and Definitions for Emergency Department Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing: Report from the 2007 Conference of the National Emergency Department HIV Testing Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michael S.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Almond, Gregory; Brown, Jeremy; Calderon, Yvette; Couture, Eileen; Merchant, Roland C.; White, Douglas A.E.; Rothman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Early diagnosis of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through diagnostic testing and screening is a critical priority for individual and public health. Emergency departments (EDs) have an important role in this effort. As EDs gain experience in HIV testing, it is increasingly apparent that implementing testing is conceptually and operationally complex. A wide variety of HIV testing practice and research models have emerged, each reflecting adaptations to site-specific factors and the needs of local populations. The diversity and complexity inherent in nascent ED HIV testing practice and research are associated with the risk that findings will not be described according to a common lexicon. This article presents a comprehensive set of terms and definitions that can be used to describe ED-based HIV testing programs, developed by consensus opinion from the inaugural meeting of the National ED HIV Testing Consortium. These definitions are designed to facilitate discussion, increase comparability of future reports, and potentially accelerate wider implementation of ED HIV testing. PMID:19076107

  7. HIV Testing and Health Care Utilization Behaviors Among Men in the United States: A Latent Class Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Derek T; Craddock, Jaih B; Bruce, Omar J; Gilreath, Tamika D

    2017-02-09

    Emphasis has been placed on HIV testing and health care engagement, but little is known about how testing and engagement intersect, especially for men. We used latent class analysis to explore underlying profiles of U.S. men regarding HIV testing and health care utilization using data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey. Multinomial regression was used to predict class membership in four classes: (a) Low HIV Testing/No Health Care Utilization, (b) Some HIV Testing/Low Health Care Utilization, (c) No HIV Testing/Some Health Care Utilization, and (d) High HIV Testing/High Health Care Utilization. Most men were in the No HIV Testing/Some Health Care Utilization class (46%), with a 0% chance of ever having had an HIV test but an 89% chance of seeing a general practitioner in the previous year. Research should include qualitative measures to capture information on facilitators and barriers to HIV testing for men who see general practitioners.

  8. Breaking HIV News to Clients: SPIKES Strategy in Post-Test Counseling Session.

    PubMed

    Emadi-Koochak, Hamid; Yazdi, Farhad; Haji Abdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Shadloo, Behrang; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin

    2016-05-01

    Breaking bad news is one of the most burdensome tasks physicians face in their everyday practice. It becomes even more challenging in the context of HIV+ patients because of stigma and discrimination. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the quality of giving HIV seroconversion news according to SPIKES protocol. Numbers of 154 consecutive HIV+ patients from Imam Khomeini Hospital testing and counseling center were enrolled in this study. Patients were inquired about how they were given the HIV news and whether or not they received pre- and post-test counseling sessions. Around 51% of them were men, 80% had high school education, and 56% were employed. Regarding marital status, 32% were single, and 52% were married at the time of the interview. Among them, 31% had received the HIV news in a counseling center, and only 29% had pre-test counseling. SPIKES criteria were significantly met when the HIV news was given in an HIV counseling and testing center (P.value<0.05). Low coverage of HIV counseling services was observed in the study. SPIKES criteria were significantly met when the HIV seroconversion news was given in a counseling center. The need to further train staff to deliver HIV news seems a priority in the field of HIV care and treatment.

  9. Self-reported HIV testing practice among physicians treating tuberculosis in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Emerson, C R; Goldberg, H; Vollmer-Conna, U; Post, J J

    2010-05-01

    Not all people with tuberculosis have their HIV status ascertained despite the interaction between these infections. We investigated the self-reported HIV testing practice among physicians treating tuberculosis in Australia and New Zealand and used logistic regression to assess factors associated with a routine offer of HIV testing in cases of tuberculosis. Of 290 subjects, 61% always recommended an HIV test for a 38-year-old married man with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. A lower proportion (40%) always tested a 78-year-old man or a female patient (58%), and more always HIV tested a South African case (85%), a patient with oral candidiasis (87%) or an unmarried male patient (66%). No scenario was associated with a universal offer of HIV testing. Clinician factors such as specialty (odds ratio [OR] 3.09), jurisdiction of practice (OR 4.09) and number of HIV tests requested in the past five years (OR 0.29) predicted the self-reported frequency of always HIV testing tuberculosis patients. At least 48% of respondents reported that epidemiological or clinical factors influenced their decision to offer testing. Strategies to increase HIV testing in cases of tuberculosis need to consider clinician factors.

  10. HIV testing, gay community involvement and internet use: social and behavioural correlates of HIV testing among Australian men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Holt, M; Rawstorne, P; Wilkinson, J; Worth, H; Bittman, M; Kippax, S

    2012-01-01

    A significant minority of Australian men who have sex with men (MSM) have never been tested for HIV and many men do not test as often as recommended. Using data from 1770 HIV-negative and untested MSM collected in a national, online survey, we compared men who had never tested for HIV with those who had tested over 12 months ago and men who had tested over 12 months ago with those that had tested in the past year. Two multivariate logistic regression models were constructed. Compared with men tested over 12 months ago, untested men were younger, less educated, less likely to have unprotected anal intercourse with a regular male partner, less likely to have sought advice from a doctor, nurse or community organisation, more likely to expect HIV-negative disclosure, had fewer gay friends and spent more time using social networking websites. Compared with men who had tested over 12 months ago, men who had tested within the last year were younger, more likely to expect HIV-negative disclosure and disclose to casual partners, more likely to have sought advice from a doctor or nurse, had attended gay pools, gyms or beaches and had more gay friends and more male sex partners. Our findings suggest that the Internet and sex education in schools are important ways to promote HIV testing to untested MSM. Testing reinforcement messages delivered through gay community outreach and primary care will reach previously tested MSM.

  11. Parallel rapid HIV testing in pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Viani, Rolando M; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Spector, Stephen A

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of parallel rapid HIV testing and the presence of HIV-associated risk factors in pregnant women with unknown HIV status in Baja California, Mexico. Pregnant women attending the delivery unit or the prenatal clinic at Tijuana General Hospital had blood drawn for parallel rapid HIV testing with Determine™ HIV-1/2 and Uni-Gold™ Recombigen(®) HIV. The parallel rapid HIV test performance was compared to the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and western blot. From September 2007 to July 2008, 1,383 (94%) of 1,464 women in labor and 1,992 (96%) of 2,075 women in prenatal care were enrolled. The HIV seroprevalence among women screened during labor (19/1,383, 1.37%, 95% CI: 0.85-2.18%) was significantly higher compared to those seeking prenatal care (5/1,992, 0.25%, 95% CI: 0.09-0.62%; p<0.001). Of 25 pregnant women testing positive by parallel rapid HIV testing 24 had a positive confirmatory western blot and one (0.03%) was confirmed as false positive. Additionally, two (0.06%) women had parallel rapid HIV discordant testing results; both tested negative by western blot. All women who tested negative by rapid testing had negative results on pooled EIA antibody testing. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of parallel rapid HIV testing were 100%, 99.9%, 96%, and 100%, respectively. These findings document a very high acceptance rate and an excellent performance of the parallel rapid HIV testing strategy during pregnancy.

  12. Comparison of point-of-care rapid HIV testing in three clinical venues.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Sabrina R; Kroc, Karen A; Couture, Eileen; Weinstein, Robert A

    2004-11-05

    Rapid HIV testing with same-visit results should increase the number of individuals who know they are HIV infected. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of point-of-care rapid testing in three public venues, a sexually transmitted disease clinic, a county jail, and an emergency department. Over 98% of all participants received their results, and 82% of newly identified HIV-positive participants entered care. Point-of-care rapid testing was feasible, acceptable, and may improve entry into care.

  13. [Detection of Bordetella pertussis infection by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction and serologic tests among children with prolonged cough].

    PubMed

    Gürsel, Derya; Aslan, Aslı; Sönmez, Cemile; Koturoğlu, Güldane; Cöplü, Nilay; Kurugöl, Zafer; Aydemir, Söhret

    2012-04-01

    Pertussis is a respiratory infection caused by Bordetella pertussis. It attacks all age groups. It has significantly higher mortality and morbidity among newborns and children. Adolescents and adults with symptomatic but unrecognized pertussis are often the source of the infection for pediatric cases. Therefore, it is suggested to perform laboratory diagnostic tests for B.pertussis infection in children and adolescents with prolonged cough of more than two weeks. In this study, it was aimed to identify B.pertussis infection by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) and serological methods among children with prolonged cough. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained from 51 children (19 female, 32 male; age between 2 months-14 years; median age: 7.0), who attended the outpatient clinic of Ege University Medical Faculty Department of Pediatrics, Izmir, Turkey with prolonged cough (≥ 14 days) during December 2009-August 2010. While pertussis vaccination had been completed in 48 (94%) of the cases, three cases had not been vaccinated. Previous antibiotic treatment was reported for 38 (75%) of the cases. Cultivation was done by using 7% horse blood and charcoal containing Bordetella Agar (Becton Dickinson, Germany) and Rt-PCR targeting IS481 sequence (Roche Applied Science, Germany) was used to detect B.pertussis. In addition, in house ELISA was performed to detect titers of anti-pertussis toxin (anti-PT) IgG and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin (anti-FHA) IgG antibodies in paired sera collected in 2-4 week intervals. Fourfold titer increase of antibodies or anti-PT IgG levels of at least 100 EU/ml in one serum were evaluated as serological confirmation of B.pertussis infection. In our study, B.pertussis was isolated from one nasopharyngeal swab samples culture among the 51 patients, and IS481 Rt-PCR yielded positive results for B.pertussis in 6 (11.8%) samples. Nine (17.6%) patients were diagnosed as B.pertussis infection by serological tests. Totally

  14. Effects of rapid versus standard HIV voluntary counselling and testing on receipt rate of HIV test results: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Lu, Wenli

    2015-03-01

    Rapid HIV voluntary counselling and testing (RVCT) is an alternative method of standard HIV voluntary counselling and testing (SVCT). Less is known about whether RVCT improves the receipt rate of HIV test results among clients who seek HIV counselling and testing. We aimed to evaluate effectiveness of RVCT on result receipt rate. We conducted a comprehensive search of databases containing Medline, EBSCO, Web of science, and Cochrane library to identify studies published up to August 2012. Reviewers extracted information independently. Risk of bias was evaluated with Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing study quality. Five randomised controlled trials were included and analysed for the result receipt rate using a random-effects model. The pooled receipt rate of HIV test results in the RVCT was significantly higher than in the SVCT (RR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.47-2.07). Our results suggest RVCT as a favourable method to increase the receipt of HIV test results. Only two included studies assessed the modification of risk behaviour after HIV-CT in a different manner; also, the sample size was small in the current meta-analysis. In future research, it is necessary to confirm the effect of RVCT on disinhibition of post-test risk behaviour.

  15. General practitioners' barriers and facilitators towards new provider-initiated HIV testing strategies: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Joore, Ivo K; van Roosmalen, Sanne Lc; van Bergen, Jan Eam; van Dijk, Nynke

    2017-04-01

    European guidelines recommend offering an HIV test to individuals who display HIV indicator conditions (ICs). UK guidelines recommend performing a 'routine offer of HIV testing' in primary care where HIV prevalence exceeds 2 in 1000. Implementation of new provider-initiated HIV testing strategies in general practice is limited, while the numbers of undiagnosed and late for care HIV patients remain high. We have explored Dutch general practitioners' barriers to and facilitators of both strategies. We combined semi-structured in-depth interviews with focus groups. Nine general practitioners - key informants of sexually transmitted infection/HIV prevention and control - were selected for the interviews. Additionally, we organised focus groups with a broad sample of general practitioners (n = 81). Framework analysis was used to analyse the data. Various barriers were found, related to (1) the content of the guidelines (testing the right group and competing priorities in general practice), (2) their organisational implementation (lack of time, unclear when to repeat the HIV test and overlong list of ICs) and (3) the patient population (creating fear among patients, stigmatising them and fear regarding financial costs). Multiple general practitioners stated that performing a sexual risk assessment of patients is important before applying either strategy. Also, they recommended implementing the IC-guided approach only in high-prevalence areas and combining HIV tests with other laboratory blood tests. General practitioners tend to cling to old patterns of risk-based testing. Promoting awareness of HIV testing and educating general practitioners about the benefits of new provider-initiated HIV testing strategies is important for the actual uptake of HIV testing.

  16. Factors associated with HIV testing and condom use in Mozambique: implications for programs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To identify predictors of HIV testing and condom use in Mozambique. Methods Nationally representative survey data collected in Mozambique in 2009 was analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was used for two outcomes: HIV testing and condom use. Results Women at a higher risk of HIV were less likely to be tested for HIV than women at a lower risk: compared to married women, HIV testing was lower among never married women (OR = 0.37, CI: 0.25-0.54); compared to women with one lifetime partner, HIV testing was lower among women with four or more lifetime partners (OR = 0.62, CI: 0.47-0.83). Large wealth differentials were observed: compared to the poorest women, HIV testing was higher among the wealthiest women (OR = 3.03, CI: 1.96-4.68). Perceived quality of health services was an important predictor of HIV testing: HIV testing was higher among women who rated health services as being of very good quality (OR = 2.12, CI: 1.49-3.00). Type of sexual partner was the strongest predictor of condom use: condom use was higher among men who reported last sex with a girlfriend (OR = 9.75, CI: 6.81-13.97) or a casual partner (OR = 11.05, CI: 7.21-16.94). Being tested for HIV during the last two years was the only programmatic variable that predicted condom use. Interestingly, being tested for HIV more than two years ago was not associated with condom use. Frequent mass media exposure was neither associated with HIV testing nor with condom use. Conclusions The focus of HIV testing should shift from married women (routinely tested during antenatal care visits) to unmarried women and women with multiple sexual partners. Financial barriers to HIV testing appear to be substantial. Since HIV testing is done without a fee being charged, these barriers are presumably related to the cost of transportation to static health facilities. Mechanisms should be developed to cover the cost of transportation to health facilities. Substantially increasing

  17. General practitioners’ barriers and facilitators towards new provider-initiated HIV testing strategies: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    van Roosmalen, Sanne LC; van Bergen, Jan EAM; van Dijk, Nynke

    2016-01-01

    European guidelines recommend offering an HIV test to individuals who display HIV indicator conditions (ICs). UK guidelines recommend performing a ‘routine offer of HIV testing’ in primary care where HIV prevalence exceeds 2 in 1000. Implementation of new provider-initiated HIV testing strategies in general practice is limited, while the numbers of undiagnosed and late for care HIV patients remain high. We have explored Dutch general practitioners’ barriers to and facilitators of both strategies. We combined semi-structured in-depth interviews with focus groups. Nine general practitioners – key informants of sexually transmitted infection/HIV prevention and control – were selected for the interviews. Additionally, we organised focus groups with a broad sample of general practitioners (n = 81). Framework analysis was used to analyse the data. Various barriers were found, related to (1) the content of the guidelines (testing the right group and competing priorities in general practice), (2) their organisational implementation (lack of time, unclear when to repeat the HIV test and overlong list of ICs) and (3) the patient population (creating fear among patients, stigmatising them and fear regarding financial costs). Multiple general practitioners stated that performing a sexual risk assessment of patients is important before applying either strategy. Also, they recommended implementing the IC-guided approach only in high-prevalence areas and combining HIV tests with other laboratory blood tests. General practitioners tend to cling to old patterns of risk-based testing. Promoting awareness of HIV testing and educating general practitioners about the benefits of new provider-initiated HIV testing strategies is important for the actual uptake of HIV testing. PMID:27207253

  18. Health Care and HIV Testing Experiences Among Black Men in the South: Implications for “Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain” HIV Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Malebranche, David; Bowleg, Lisa; Sangaramoorthy, Thurka

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have explored how overall general health care and HIV/STI testing experiences may influence receipt of “Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain” (STTR) HIV prevention approaches among Black men in the southern United States. Using in-depth qualitative interviews with 78 HIV-negative/unknown Black men in Georgia, we explored factors influencing their general health care and HIV/STI testing experiences. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization (Andersen model) offers a useful framework through which to examine the general health care experiences and HIV testing practices of Black men. It has four primary domains: Environment, Population characteristics, Health behavior, and Outcomes. Within the Andersen model framework, participants described four main themes that influenced HIV testing: access to insurance, patient–provider communication, quality of services, and personal belief systems. If STTR is to be successful among Black men, improving access and quality of general health care, integrating HIV testing into general health care, promoting health empowerment, and consumer satisfaction should be addressed. PMID:23268586

  19. A continuing HIV epidemic and differential patterns of HIV-STI risk among MSM in Quito, Ecuador: an urgent need to scale up HIV testing and prevention.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jerry O; Sánchez-Gómez, Amaya; Montoya, Orlando; Soria, Efrain; Tarupi, Wilmer; Chiriboga Urquizo, Marcelo; Champutiz Ortiz, Eliana; Miranda, Sonia Morales; Tobar, Rodrigo; Gómez, Bertha; Riera, Celia

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized the HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Quito, Ecuador and contrasted risk patterns with other STI's. 416 MSM ages 15 years and older were recruited using respondent-driven sampling in 2010-2011. Biological testing and a self-interview survey assessed HIV and STI infections and risk behaviors. Analysis incorporated recruiter-level variables and clustering adjustments to control for recruitment patterns. We identify high levels of HIV (11 %), HSV-2 (14 %) and active syphilis (5.5 %) infections, low levels of lifetime HIV testing (57 %), limited knowledge of HIV and STI's (<48 %) and limited consistent condom use independent of partner type (<40 %). Sex work was associated with all infections while associations with residential location, how casual partners are met and other variables, varied. Scale-up of behavioral prevention and HIV testing is urgently needed. Interventions should target male sex workers and exploit differential patterns of HIV-STI risk to stay ahead of the epidemic.

  20. Rates of testing for HIV in the presence of serodiscordant UAI among HIV-negative gay men in committed relationships.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Deepalika; Hoff, Colleen C; Neilands, Torsten B; Darbes, Lynae A

    2012-10-01

    We examined testing rates for HIV-negative men (N = 752) from a sample of gay male couples. Approximately half (52 %) tested in the past year. Among men who had engaged in sexual risk behavior in the past 3 months, 27 % tested within that period and 65 % within the past year. For men in concordant relationships these rates were 25 and 60 %, for men in serodiscordant relationships they were 34 and 72 %. MSM in primary relationships are testing at lower rates than the general MSM population, even after potential exposure to HIV. Testing and prevention messages for MSM should factor in relationship status.

  1. Intentions to seek and accept an HIV test among men of Mexican descent in the Midwestern USA.

    PubMed

    Glasman, Laura R; Weinhardt, Lance S; Difranceisco, Wayne; Hackl, Kristin L

    2010-06-01

    In the USA, a high proportion of men of Mexican descent (MMD) test for HIV late in the course of the infection and miss opportunities for prevention. Given the need to promote timely HIV testing among MMD, we studied how MMD's motivations and previous experiences with disease prevention influence their intentions to seek (i.e., client-initiated HIV testing) and accept (i.e., provider-initiated HIV testing) an HIV test. We conducted a survey (N=302) at a large Mexican festival in the Midwestern USA. We elicited MMD's sexual risk behavior, social norms and culturally supported HIV testing expectations, previous experiences with disease prevention, and their intentions to seek and accept a free HIV test. Forty-one percent of MMD intended to actively seek an HIV test and 70% said they would accept it from a provider. Multivariate analyses indicated that MMD's intentions to seek and intentions to accept an HIV test were stronger when they expected desirable outcomes of an HIV test, including benefits for their family and community. Whereas MMD's intentions to actively seek an HIV test were stronger when they had more previous experiences with disease prevention and normative support, their intentions to accept an HIV test from a provider were stronger when they expected less negative outcomes from testing for HIV (e.g., stigma). Provider-initiated HIV testing may improve HIV testing access, particularly among MMD with lower experience and support. However, efforts to promote provider-initiated HIV testing among MMD should challenge negative HIV testing expectations and associate HIV testing with positive outcomes.

  2. RAPID HOME-BASED HIV TESTING TO REDUCE COSTS IN A LARGE TUBERCULOSIS COHORT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Galea, Jerome T; Contreras, Carmen; Lecca, Leonid; Shin, Sonya; Lobatón, Raúl; Zhang, Zibiao; Calderón, Roger; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2013-06-21

    To reduce costs in a large tuberculosis household contact cohort study in Lima, Peru, we replaced laboratory-based HIV testing with home-based rapid testing. We developed a protocol and training course to prepare staff for the new strategy; these included role playing for home-based deployment of the Determine® HIV 1/2 Ag/Ac Combo HIV test. Though the rapid HIV test produced more false-positives, the overall cost per participant tested, refusal rate and time to confirmatory HIV testing were lower with the home-based rapid testing strategy compared to the original approach. Rapid testing could be used in similar research or routine care settings.

  3. Infrequent HIV Testing and Late HIV Diagnosis Are Common Among A Cohort of Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (BMSM) in Six US Cities

    PubMed Central

    Mannheimer, S.; Wang, L.; Wilton, L.; Tieu, H.V.; del Rio, C.; Buchbinder, S.; Fields, S.; Glick, S.; Cummings, V.; Eshleman, S.H.; Koblin, B.; Mayer, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective US guidelines recommend at least annual HIV testing for those at risk. This analysis assessed frequency and correlates of infrequent HIV testing and late diagnosis among black men who have sex with men (BMSM). Methods HIV testing history was collected at enrollment from participants in HPTN 061, an HIV prevention trial for at-risk US BMSM. Two definitions of late HIV diagnosis were assessed: CD4 cell count <200 cells/mm3 or <350 cells/mm3 at diagnosis. Results HPTN 061 enrolled 1553 BMSM. HIV testing questions were completed at enrollment by 1284 (98.7%) of 1301 participants with no prior HIV diagnosis; 272 (21.2%) reported no HIV test in prior 12 months (infrequent testing); 155 of whom (12.1% of the 1284 with testing data) reported never testing. Infrequent HIV testing was associated with: not seeing a medical provider in the prior 6 months (relative risk [RR]: 1.08, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.03–1.13), being unemployed (RR 1.04, CI: 1.01–1.07), and having high internalized HIV stigma (RR: 1.03, CI: 1.0–1.05). New HIV diagnoses were more likely among infrequent testers compared to men tested in the prior year (18.4% vs. 4.4%; OR: 4.8, 95% CI: 3.2–7.4). Among men with newly diagnosed HIV, 33 (39.3%) had a CD4 cell count <350 cells/mm;3 including 17 (20.2%) with CD4 <200 cells/mm.3 Conclusions Infrequent HIV testing, undiagnosed infection, and late diagnosis were common among BMSM in this study. New HIV diagnoses were more common among infrequent testers, underscoring the need for additional HIV testing and prevention efforts among US BMSM. PMID:25197830

  4. Impact of the introduction of rapid HIV testing in the Voluntary Counselling and Testing sites network of Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Lopez, L; Rifà, B; Pujol, F; Becerra, J; Pérez, M; Meroño, M; Zaragoza, K; Rafel, A; Díaz, O; Avellaneda, A; Casado, M J; Giménez, A; Casabona, J

    2010-06-01

    Rapid HIV antibody tests, which provide results within 15-60 minutes, can help reduce the number of unrecognized infections by improving access to testing facilities and increase the number of people tested who know their results. After an acceptability study, rapid HIV testing was first implemented in Catalonia in 2007 within the community-based Voluntary Counselling and Testing sites network. One year after implementation, an increase of 102.9% has been observed in the number of tests performed, ranging from 8.4% to 328.3% according to the site. Despite the important immediate impact of rapid HIV testing on the number of tests performed, there was no significant change in the proportion of tests that were positive. Rapid HIV testing can help increase access to testing, but it should be complemented with specific outreach programmes targeting the most vulnerable subgroups.

  5. HIV Testing and Diagnosis Rates in Kiev, Ukraine: April 2013 - March 2014

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Ruth; Malyuta, Ruslan; Medoeva, Antonia; Kruglov, Yuri; Yurchenko, Alexander; Copas, Andrew; Porter, Kholoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective Data from Ukraine on risk factors for HIV acquisition are limited. We describe the characteristics of individuals testing for HIV in the main testing centres of the Ukrainian capital Kiev, including HIV risk factors, testing rates, and positivity rates. Methods As part of a larger study to estimate HIV incidence within Kiev City, we included questions on possible risk factors for HIV acquisition and testing history to existing systems in 4 infectious disease clinics. Data were provided by the person requesting an HIV test using a handheld electronic tablet. All persons (≥16yrs) presenting for an HIV test April 2013–March 2014 were included. Rates per 100,000 were calculated using region-specific denominators for Kiev. Results During the study period 6370 individuals tested for HIV, equivalent to a testing rate of 293.2 per 100,000. Of these, 467 (7.8%) were HIV-positive, with the highest proportion positive among 31–35 year olds (11.2%), males (9.4%), people who inject drugs (PWID) (17.9%) and men who have sex with men (MSM) (24.1%). Using published population size estimates of MSM, diagnosis rates for MSM ranged from 490.6to 1548.3/100,000. A higher proportion of heterosexual women compared to heterosexual men reported contact with PWID, (16% vs. 4.7%) suggesting a bridging in risk between PWID and their sexual partners. Conclusion Collection of HIV risk factor information in Kiev, essential for the purposes of developing effective HIV prevention and response tools, is feasible. The high percentage of MSM among those testing positive for HIV, may indicate a significant level of undisclosed sex between men in national figures. PMID:26322977

  6. HIV symptom distress and smoking outcome expectancies among HIV+ smokers: a pilot test.

    PubMed

    Grover, Kristin W; Gonzalez, Adam; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Smoking occurs at high rates among people with HIV/AIDS, but little attention has been paid to understanding the nature of tobacco use among HIV+ smokers, especially the role that HIV symptoms may play in cognitive smoking processes. Accordingly, the present investigation examined the relation between HIV symptom distress (i.e., the degree to which HIV symptoms are bothersome) and smoking outcome expectancies. Fifty-seven HIV+ adult smokers (82.50% male; M(age)=47.18; 45.6% White, 28.1% Black, 17.5% Hispanic) were recruited from AIDS service organizations and hospital-based clinics. On average, participants reported knowing their HIV+ status for 16 years and the majority of participants reported that they acquired HIV through unprotected sex (66.6%). Participants completed measures pertaining to HIV symptoms, smoking behavior, and smoking outcome expectancies. HIV symptom distress was positively related to negative reinforcement, negative consequences, and positive reinforcement smoking outcome expectancies after accounting for relevant covariates. The present research suggests that HIV symptom distress may play an important role in understanding smoking outcome expectancies for smokers with HIV/AIDS. Clinical implications for HIV+ smokers are discussed, including the importance of developing effective smoking cessation treatments that meet the unique needs of this group of smokers.

  7. Serological diagnosis of neurobrucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sousa, A; Torres, C; Campello, M G; Garcia, C; Parras, F; Cercenado, E; Baquero, F

    1990-01-01

    The presence of antibodies was determined in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid in six patients with neurobrucellosis using the Rose Bengal test, the microdilution agglutination test, and the Coombs' test. Four of the patients were followed up for more than three months. The Rose Bengal test and the microagglutination test were positive in cerebrospinal fluid in five of the six cases at some stage. The Coombs' test was positive in cerebrospinal fluid in every patient and in one was the only positive serological test. Cerebrospinal fluid positivity is not excluded by low titres or negative results of antibodies in the serum for any of the three methods. A Coombs' test or some equivalent must always be made on the cerebrospinal fluid to diagnose neurobrucellosis. PMID:2312754

  8. Field Evaluation of a Dual Rapid Immunodiagnostic Test for HIV and Syphilis infection in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Leon, Segundo R.; Huang, Emily; Ramos, Lourdes B.; Vargas, Silver K.; Flores, Juan A.; Konda, Kelika A.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated prevention for HIV and syphilis is warranted because both syphilis and HIV infections have evidence-based, scalable interventions using current health care mechanisms. The advent of dual rapid point-of-care tests, single devices that can detect multiple infections using the same specimen, provides the opportunity to integrate the screening of syphilis into HIV programs, potentially increasing the numbers of people tested and allowing for same-day testing and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MedMira Multiplo Rapid TP/HIV Antibody Test (MedMira Inc, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada), a qualitative, rapid immunoassay that detects antibodies to T. pallidum and HIV. Methods The reference standard test for comparison to the T. pallidum component of the Multiplo TP/HIV Test was Treponema Pallidum Particle Agglutination assay. For the HIV component, the reference test included a 4th-generation enzyme immunoassay with a confirmatory Western blot test. Results The sensitivity and specificity for the HIV antibody component were 93.8% (95% CI: 69.8%, 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI: 97.7%, 100%), respectively. The Treponema pallidum component of the test had a sensitivity of 81.0% (95% CI: 68.1%, 94.6%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 97.6%, 100%). Conclusions Our study showed excellent performance of the HIV antibody component of the test and very good performance for the Treponema pallidum antibody component of the MedMira Multiplo Rapid TP/HIV Antibody Test, which should be considered to improve screening coverage. Use of effective dual tests will create improved access to more comprehensive care by integrating the screening of syphilis into HIV prevention programs. PMID:26650998

  9. HIV risk behavior among HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sirivongrangson, Pachara; Lolekha, Rangsima; Charoenwatanachokchai, Angkana; Siangphoe, Umaporn; Fox, Kimberley K; Jirarojwattana, Naiyana; Bollen, Liesbeth; Yenyarsan, Naruemon; Lokpichat, Somchai; Suksripanich, Orapin; McConnell, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    We assessed prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STIs), sexual risk behaviors, and factors associated with risk behaviors among HIV-infected MSM attending a public STI clinic serving MSM in Bangkok, Thailand. Between October 2005-October 2007, 154 HIV-infected MSM attending the clinic were interviewed about sexual risk behaviors and evaluated for STIs. Patients were examined for genital ulcers and had serologic testing for syphilis and PCR testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Results showed that sexual intercourse in the last 3 months was reported by 131 men. Of these, 32% reported anal sex without a condom. STIs were diagnosed in 41%. Factors associated with having sex without a condom were having a steady male partner, having a female partner and awareness of HIV status <1 month. Sexual risk behaviors and STIs were common among HIV-infected MSM in this study. This highlights the need for increased HIV prevention strategies for HIV-infected MSM.

  10. African American church-based HIV testing and linkage to care: assets, challenges and needs.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jennifer M; Thompson, Keitra; Rogers, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The US National HIV AIDS strategy promotes the use of faith communities to lessen the burden of HIV in African American communities. One specific strategy presented is the use of these non-traditional venues for HIV testing and co-location of services. African American churches can be at the forefront of this endeavour through the provision of HIV testing and linkage to care. However, there are few interventions to promote the churches' involvement in both HIV testing and linkage to care. We conducted 4 focus groups (n = 39 participants), 4 interviews and 116 surveys in a mixed-methods study to examine the feasibility of a church-based HIV testing and linkage to care intervention in Philadelphia, PA, USA. Our objectives were to examine: (1) available assets, (2) challenges and barriers and (3) needs associated with church-based HIV testing and linkage to care. Analyses revealed several factors of importance, including the role of the church as an access point for testing in low-income neighbourhoods, challenges in openly discussing the relationship between sexuality and HIV, and buy-in among church leadership. These findings can support intervention development and necessitate situating African American church-based HIV testing and linkage to care interventions within a multi-level framework.

  11. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, B.J.; Pryke, K.; Rohan, L. C.; Yang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30 min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To demonstrate the toxicity of formulated products a new assay was developed for use with viscous and non-viscous samples that we have termed the Lactobacillus toxicity test. We found that the vortex mixing of vaginal Lactobacillus species can lead to reductions in bacterial viability. Lactobacillus can survive brief, about 2 sec, but viability declines with increased vortex mixing. The addition of heat inactivated serum or bovine serum albumin, but not glycerol, prevented the decrease in bacterial viability. Bacillus atrophaeus spores also demonstrated loss of viability upon extended mixing. We observed that many of the excipients used in film formulation and the films themselves also afford protection from the killing during vortex mixing. This method is of relevance for toxicity for cidal activities of viscous products. PMID:22226641

  12. HIV testing during the Canadian immigration medical examination: a national survey of designated medical practitioners.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jennifer M; Li, Alan; Owino, Maureen; English, Ken; Mascarenhas, Lyndon; Tan, Darrell H S

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing is mandatory for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada. Since the Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) who perform these tests may have varying experience in HIV and time constraints in their clinical practices, there may be variability in the quality of pre- and posttest counseling provided. We surveyed DMPs regarding HIV testing, counseling, and immigration inadmissibility. A 16-item survey was mailed to all DMPs across Canada (N = 203). The survey inquired about DMP characteristics, knowledge of HIV, attitudes and practices regarding inadmissibility and counseling, and interest in continuing medical education. There were a total of 83 respondents (41%). Participants frequently rated their knowledge of HIV diagnostics, cultural competency, and HIV/AIDS service organizations as "fair" (40%, 43%, and 44%, respectively). About 25%, 46%, and 11% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed with the statements "HIV infected individuals pose a danger to public health and safety," "HIV-positive immigrants cause excessive demand on the healthcare system," and "HIV seropositivity is a reasonable ground for denial into Canada," respectively. Language was cited as a barrier to counseling, which focused on transmission risks (46% discussed this as "always" or "often") more than coping and social support (37%). There was a high level of interest (47%) in continuing medical education in this area. There are areas for improvement regarding DMPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about HIV infection, counseling, and immigration criteria. Continuing medical education and support for DMPs to facilitate practice changes could benefit newcomers who test positive through the immigration process.

  13. Trends in HIV Testing among Adults in Georgia: Analysis of the 2011–2015 BRFSS Data

    PubMed Central

    Ansa, Benjamin E.; White, Sashia; Chung, Yunmi; Smith, Selina A.

    2016-01-01

    Georgia is ranked fifth highest among states for rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnosis. About 4% of persons living with HIV infection in the United States reside in Georgia, and almost 19% of these people do not know their HIV status. The present study examined the trends and associated factors of HIV testing among adults in Georgia between 2011 and 2015 by analyzing data of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). A total of 31,094 persons aged ≥18 years were identified who responded to the question “Have you ever been tested for HIV?” Overall, there were 11,286 (44.2%) respondents who had been tested for HIV, compared to 19,808 (55.8%) who had not. There was a slight decrease in the percentage of respondents who have ever tested for HIV, from 45.6% in 2011 to 43.7% in 2015 (APC (annual percent change) = −0.98, not significant). Factors associated with HIV testing were being female (p = 0.004), black (p < 0.001), younger than 55 years (p < 0.001), single (p < 0.001), attaining education level above high school (p < 0.001), and earning annual income of $50,000 or less (p = 0.028). Overall in Georgia, there has been a slight decline in the temporal trend of HIV testing, and more than half of adults have never been tested for HIV. For reducing HIV transmission in Georgia, enhancing access and utilization of HIV testing should be a public health priority. PMID:27845740

  14. Increasing HIV testing among African immigrants in ireland: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Adedimeji, Adebola A; Asibon, Aba; O'Connor, Gerard; Carson, Richard; Cowan, Ethan; McKinley, Philip; Leider, Jason; Mallon, Patrick; Calderon, Yvette

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, immigrants constitute 63% of new cases of heterosexually transmitted HIV among individuals born outside Ireland. Current strategies to encourage testing can be ineffective if immigrants perceive them as culturally insensitive. We obtained qualitative data to explore challenges to voluntary HIV-testing for immigrants in Ireland. Content analysis was undertaken to identify and describe pertinent themes. Widespread beliefs that HIV is primarily a disease of African immigrants were identified as challenges that constrain access to testing and care. The organization and location of testing services, attitude of health workers, and beliefs regarding mandatory HIV-testing for immigrants seeking access to welfare benefits were also identified. Immigrants in Ireland encounter a variety of structural, cultural and personal constraints to HIV testing. Opportunities exist in the Irish Health system to increase testing among immigrants through greater acknowledgement of cultural sensitivities of immigrant groups.

  15. Evaluation of a Community Health Worker Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Stigma and Increase HIV Testing Among Underserved Latinos in the Southwestern U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Davida; Espinoza, Lilia; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena; Diaz, Gaby; Carricchi, Ana; Galvez, Gino; Garcia, Melawhy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Latinos are at an elevated risk for HIV infection. Continued HIV/AIDS stigma presents barriers to HIV testing and affects the quality of life of HIV-positive individuals, yet few interventions addressing HIV/AIDS stigma have been developed for Latinos. Methods An intervention led by community health workers (promotores de salud, or promotores) targeting underserved Latinos in three southwestern U.S. communities was developed to decrease HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV knowledge and perception of risk. The intervention was led by HIV-positive and HIV-affected (i.e., those who have, or have had, a close family member or friend with HIV/AIDS) promotores, who delivered interactive group-based educational sessions to groups of Latinos in Spanish and English. To decrease stigma and motivate behavioral and attitudinal change, the educational sessions emphasized positive Latino cultural values and community assets. The participant pool comprised 579 Latino adults recruited in El Paso, Texas (n=204); San Ysidro, California (n=175); and Los Angeles, California (n=200). Results From pretest to posttest, HIV/AIDS stigma scores decreased significantly (p<0.001). Significant increases were observed in HIV/AIDS knowledge (p<0.001), willingness to discuss HIV/AIDS with one's sexual partner (p<0.001), and HIV risk perception (p=0.006). Willingness to test for HIV in the three months following the intervention did not increase. Women demonstrated a greater reduction in HIV/AIDS stigma scores when compared with their male counterparts, which may have been related to a greater increase in HIV/AIDS knowledge scores (p=0.016 and p=0.007, respectively). Conclusion Promotores interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV-related knowledge, perception of risk, and willingness to discuss sexual risk with partners show promise in reaching underserved Latino communities. PMID:26327724

  16. Caregivers’ Attitudes towards HIV Testing and Disclosure of HIV Status to At-Risk Children in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Rick; Grant, Eisha; Muyindike, Winnie; Maling, Samuel; Card, Claire; Henry, Carol; Nazarali, Adil J.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of HIV-positive children were interviewed in the Mbarara and Isingiro districts of Uganda to identify current trends in practices related to HIV testing and the disclosure of HIV status to the child. A total of 28 caregivers of at least one HIV-positive child participated in semi-structured interviews exploring when and why they tested the child for HIV, when the child was informed of their positive status, and what the caregiver did to prepare themselves and the child for status disclosure. For a majority (96%) of respondents, the decision to test the child for HIV was due to existing illness in either the child or a relative. Other common themes identified included the existence of stigma in the caregivers’ communities and doubt that the children truly understood what was being explained to them when their status was disclosed. Most (65%) children were informed of their HIV status between the ages of 5 and 9, with the mean age of disclosure occurring at the age of 7. General provision of HIV information typically began at the same age as disclosure, and as many as two thirds (64%) of the caregivers sought advice from an HIV counsellor prior to disclosure. How a caregiver chose to prepare themselves and the child did not affect the caregiver’s perception of whether the disclosure experience was beneficial or not. These findings suggest that the HIV disclosure experience in Mbarara and Isingiro districts differs from current guidelines, especially with respect to age of disclosure, how caregivers prepare themselves and the child, and approaching disclosure as an ongoing process. The doubts expressed by caregivers regarding the child’s level of HIV understanding following the disclosure experience suggest the children may be insufficiently prepared at the time of the initial disclosure event. The findings also suggest that examining the content of pre-disclosure counselling and HIV education, and how health care professionals are trained to

  17. Incorporating Acute HIV Screening into Routine HIV Testing at Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics, and HIV Testing and Counseling Centers in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Pettifor, Audrey E.; Phiri, Sam; Kamanga, Gift; Hoffman, Irving F.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Rosenberg, Nora E.; Nsona, Dominic; Pasquale, Dana; Tegha, Gerald; Powers, Kimberly A.; Phiri, Mcleod; Tembo, Bisweck; Chege, Wairimu; Miller, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Integrating acute HIV-infection (AHI) testing into clinical settings is critical to prevent transmission, and realize potential treatment-as-prevention benefits. We evaluated acceptability of AHI testing and compared AHI prevalence at sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics and HIV testing and counseling (HTC) clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods: We conducted HIV RNA testing for HIV-seronegative patients visiting STI and HTC clinics. AHI was defined as positive RNA and negative/discordant rapid antibody tests. We evaluated demographic, behavioral, and transmission-risk differences between STI and HTC patients and assessed performance of a risk-score for targeted screening. Results: Nearly two-thirds (62.8%, 9280/14,755) of eligible patients consented to AHI testing. We identified 59 persons with AHI (prevalence = 0.64%)–a 0.9% case-identification increase. Prevalence was higher at STI [1.03% (44/4255)] than at HTC clinics [0.3% (15/5025), P < 0.01], accounting for 2.3% of new diagnoses vs 0.3% at HTC clinic. Median viral load (VL) was 758,050 copies per milliliter; 25% (15/59) had VL ≥10,000,000 copies per milliliter. Median VL was higher at STI (1,000,000 copies/mL) compared with HTC (153,125 copies/mL, P = 0.2). Among persons with AHI, those tested at STI clinics were more likely to report genital sores compared with those tested at HTC clinics (54.6% vs 6.7%, P < 0.01). The risk score algorithm performed well in identifying persons with AHI at HTC clinics (sensitivity = 73%, specificity = 89%). Conclusions: The majority of patients consented to AHI testing. AHI prevalence was substantially higher in STI clinics than HTC clinics. Remarkably high VLs and concomitant genital scores demonstrate the potential for transmission. Universal AHI screening at STI clinics, and targeted screening at HTC centers, should be considered. PMID:26428231

  18. The influence of relationship power dynamics on HIV testing in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Amy A

    2015-01-01

    Using the theory of gender and power (TGP) and data from the Tsogolo la Thanzi (TLT) study, we examined how relationship power shapes young people's decisions to test for HIV in rural Malawi (N=932), a high-HIV prevalence setting undergoing rapid expansions in testing services. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine associations among five constructs of relationship power (socioeconomic inequalities, relationship dominance, relationship violence, relationship unity, and mistrust), perceived risk, and receiving an HIV test over a 16-month period. The results indicate that young Malawians are testing for HIV at relatively high rates, repeatedly, and not just during pregnancy. Over the study period, 47.3% of respondents received at least one HIV test outside of TLT (range: 0-4). The GEE analysis revealed that men and women with higher levels of relationship unity were less likely to test for HIV. For men, being a victim of sexual coercion was an additional barrier to testing. Women's testing decisions were more strongly influenced by perceptions of a partner's risk for HIV than their own, whereas men relied more on self-assessments. The results highlight that testing decisions are deeply embedded within the relationship context, which should be considered in future HIV testing interventions.

  19. Clinical diagnosis of cardiac involvement in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, L; Branzan, O; Nechita, O; Ardeleanu, C; Teodorescu, M; Geamai, A

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection is continuously raising, and different treatments did not manage to extend the patient's life. Clinical and morphopathological features of respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological and nervous system are well characterized in HIV infection, but cardiac involvement is not so well known. Cardiac involvement is extremely rare in HIV disease, but demonstrated by echocardiography and anatomo-pathologic methods, it is more frequently met than the clinical features are supposed to be, and it can be demonstrated by positive serologic tests. The main reason of this research is the necessity to obtain data from HIV infection concerning heart involvement. PMID:23049631

  20. Serological profile of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) female calves vaccinated with standard Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine using rose bengal, 2-mercaptoethanol and complement fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Nardi, G Júnior; Ribeiro, M G; Jorge, A M; Megid, J; Silva, L M P

    2012-03-01

    The serological profiles of 21 female buffaloes vaccinated between 3 and 8 months of age using Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) were evaluated by rose bengal (RBT), 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) and complement fixation (CFT) tests. The serum strains were collected in day zero, 15, 30, 45, 60th days and subsequently to each 30 months, until 720th day after vaccination. No animal showed reaction in day zero. In 15th day above 95% of animals revealed reaction in all tests. All the animals presented absence of reactions in CFT, RBT and 2ME tests at 270, 300 and 360 days after vaccination, respectively. Our finding highlighted early response in CFT compared than other conventional agglutination tests. None of animals presented oscillation of titers or reactions in any test after 360 day of study, which enables the use of these tests after this period without interference of antibodies from S19 vaccine origin between 3 and 8 months in buffalo heifers.

  1. Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

  2. A systematic review of qualitative findings on factors enabling and deterring uptake of HIV testing in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) being the epicenter of the HIV epidemic, uptake of HIV testing is not optimal. While qualitative studies have been undertaken to investigate factors influencing uptake of HIV testing, systematic reviews to provide a more comprehensive understanding are lacking. Methods Using Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnography method, we synthesised published qualitative research to understand factors enabling and deterring uptake of HIV testing in SSA. We identified 5,686 citations out of which 56 were selected for full text review and synthesised 42 papers from 13 countries using Malpass’ notion of first-, second-, and third-order constructs. Results The predominant factors enabling uptake of HIV testing are deterioration of physical health and/or death of sexual partner or child. The roll-out of various HIV testing initiatives such as ‘opt-out’ provider-initiated HIV testing and mobile HIV testing has improved uptake of HIV testing by being conveniently available and attenuating fear of HIV-related stigma and financial costs. Other enabling factors are availability of treatment and social network influence and support. Major barriers to uptake of HIV testing comprise perceived low risk of HIV infection, perceived health workers’ inability to maintain confidentiality and fear of HIV-related stigma. While the increasingly wider availability of life-saving treatment in SSA is an incentive to test, the perceived psychological burden of living with HIV inhibits uptake of HIV testing. Other barriers are direct and indirect financial costs of accessing HIV testing, and gender inequality which undermines women’s decision making autonomy about HIV testing. Despite differences across SSA, the findings suggest comparable factors influencing HIV testing. Conclusions Improving uptake of HIV testing requires addressing perception of low risk of HIV infection and perceived inability to live with HIV. There is also a need to continue

  3. Impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on HIV prevention practices among traditional birth attendants in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Alice; Pharr, Jennifer R; Nwokoro, Uche; Ike, Anulika; Ali, Christiana; Ejiro, Ogheneaga; Osuyali, John; Obiefune, Michael; Fiscella, Kevin; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2015-02-10

    Nigeria is second in the world for the number of people with HIV and has a high rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Over 60% of births in Nigeria occur outside of health care facilities, and because of this, Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) play a significant role in maternal and child health. It is important that TBAs be knowledgeable about HIV prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on the HIV prevention practices among TBAs in Nigeria. Five hundred TBAs were surveyed. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess differences in HIV prevention practices between TBAs with and without HTC knowledge. TBAs with HTC knowledge are significantly more likely to engage in HIV prevention practices than TBAs without HTC. Prevention practices included: wearing gloves during delivery (p < 0.01), sterilization of delivery equipment (p < 0.01), participation in blood safety training (p < 0.01), and disposal of sharps (p < 0.01). As long as a high percent of births occur outside health care facilities in Nigeria, there will be a need for TBAs. Providing TBAs with HTC training increases HIV prevention practices and can be a key to improve maternal and child health.

  4. Impact of HIV Testing and Counseling (HTC) Knowledge on HIV Prevention Practices Among Traditional Birth Attendants in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Osuji, Alice; Pharr, Jennifer R.; Nwokoro, Uche; Ike, Anulika; Ali, Christiana; Ejiro, Ogheneaga; Osuyali, John; Obiefune, Michael; Fiscella, Kevin; Ezeanolue, Echezona E.

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria is second in the world for the number of people with HIV and has a high rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Over 60% of births in Nigeria occur outside of health care facilities, and because of this, Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) play a significant role in maternal and child health. It is important that TBAs be knowledgeable about HIV prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on the HIV prevention practices among TBAs in Nigeria. Five hundred TBAs were surveyed. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess differences in HIV prevention practices between TBAs with and without HTC knowledge. TBAs with HTC knowledge are significantly more likely to engage in HIV prevention practices than TBAs without HTC. Prevention practices included: wearing gloves during delivery (p < 0.01), sterilization of delivery equipment (p < 0.01), participation in blood safety training (p < 0.01), and disposal of sharps (p < 0.01). As long as a high percent of births occur outside health care facilities in Nigeria, there will be a need for TBAs. Providing TBAs with HTC training increases HIV prevention practices and can be a key to improve maternal and child health. PMID:25674783

  5. Perspectives on the ethical concerns and justifications of the 2006 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV testing: HIV screening policy changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The 2006 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revised recommendations for HIV testing in clinical settings contained seven specific changes to how health care facilities should provide HIV testing. These seven elements have been both supported and challenged in the lay and medical literature. Our first paper in BMC Medical Ethics presented an analysis of the three HIV testing procedural changes included in the recommendations. In this paper, we address the four remaining elements that concern HIV screening policy changes: (1) nontargeted HIV screening, (2) making HIV screening similar to screening for other treatable conditions, (3) increasing HIV screening without assured additional funding for linkage to care, and (4) making patients bear the costs of increased HIV screening in health care settings. Methods We interviewed 25 members from the fields of US HIV advocacy, care, policy, and research about the ethical merits and demerits of the four changes to HIV screening policies. We performed a qualitative analysis of the participant responses in the interviews and summarized the major themes. Results Participants commented that nontargeted HIV screening and making HIV screening similar to screening for other treatable medical conditions was ethical when it broadened the scope of people being tested for HIV. However, they believed it was unethical when it did not respect the exceptional nature of HIV and HIV testing. Some participants favored more testing regardless if there was assured additional funding for linkage to care or if patients might bear the costs of testing because they believed that merely alerting patients of their status was beneficial and would lead to positive consequences. Other participants found ethical flaws with testing without assured linkage to care and patients bearing the costs of testing, as this could discriminate against those who could not pay. Conclusions Our findings suggest that there are fundamental ethical

  6. Expanded HIV Testing and Linkage to Care: Conventional vs. Point-of-Care Testing and Assignment of Patient Notification and Linkage to Care to an HIV Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Bares, Sara; Eavou, Rebecca; Bertozzi-Villa, Clara; Taylor, Michelle; Hyland, Heather; McFadden, Rachel; Shah, Sachin; Pho, Mai T.; Walter, James; Badlani, Sameer; Schneider, John; Prachand, Nik; Benbow, Nanette

    2016-01-01

    Objective The University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) led the Expanded Testing and Linkage to Care (X-TLC) program for disproportionately affected populations on the South Side of Chicago. The X-TLC program aimed to expand routine HIV testing to high-prevalence communities with disproportionately affected populations (i.e., minority men and women, men who have sex with men, and intravenous drug users) according to CDC guidelines at multiple clinical sites. Methods The X-TLC program used standard blood-based laboratory testing vs. point-of-care rapid testing or rapid laboratory testing with point-of-care results notification. Site coordinators and the linkage-to-care coordinator at UCM oversaw testing, test notification, and linkage to care. Results From February 1, 2011, through December 31, 2013, the X-TLC program completed 75,345 HIV tests on 67,153 unique patients. Of the total tests, 48,044 (63.8%) were performed on patients who self-identified as African American and 6,606 (8.8%) were performed on patients who self-identified as Hispanic. Of the 67,153 patients tested, 395 (0.6%) tested positive and 176 (0.3%) were previously unaware of their HIV-positive status. Seroprevalence was even higher for EDs, where 127 of 12,957 patients tested positive for HIV (1.0% seroprevalence), than for other patient care sites, including for new diagnoses, where 50 of 12,957 patients tested positive for HIV (0.4% seroprevalence). Of the 176 newly diagnosed patients, 166 of 173 (96.0%) patients who were still alive when testing was complete received their test results, and 148 of the 166 patients who were eligible for care (89.0%) were linked to care. Patients linked to X-TLC physicians did well with respect to the continuum of care: 77 of 123 (62.6%) patients achieved HIV viral load of <200 copies/milliliter. Conclusion Lead organizations such as UCM were able to assist and oversee HIV screening and linkage to care for HIV patients diagnosed at community sites. HIV screening and

  7. A social work plan to promote HIV testing: A social marketing approach.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Siebe, J P

    2017-03-01

    Many people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) do not know that they are infected. It is important for infected persons to get tested for HIV in order to be diagnosed and medically treated. HIV has no known cure, but it can be controlled and sometimes prevented with proper medical care. The social work profession has ideal positioning to be extraordinarily helpful in work that promotes HIV testing, leading to reducing then eliminating new HIV diagnoses. Social marketing interventions, along with audience segmenting are explained. Specific attention is given to two separate subjects-minority health disparities and impulsive and/or sensation seeking sex practices-to showcase the versatility of social marketing in the promotion of HIV testing. Further ideas about how social workers can participate in these interprofessional social marketing campaigns are provided.

  8. Field accuracy of fourth-generation rapid diagnostic tests for acute HIV-1: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Joseph M.; Macpherson, Peter; Adams, Emily R.; Ochodo, Eleanor; Sands, Anita; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fourth-generation HIV-1 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect HIV-1 p24 antigen to screen for acute HIV-1. However, diagnostic accuracy during clinical use may be suboptimal. Methods: Clinical sensitivity and specificity of fourth-generation RDTs for acute HIV-1 were collated from field evaluation studies in adults identified by a systematic literature search. Results: Four studies with 17 381 participants from Australia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom and Malawi were identified. All reported 0% sensitivity of the HIV-1 p24 component for acute HIV-1 diagnosis; 26 acute infections were missed. Specificity ranged from 98.3 to 99.9%. Conclusion: Fourth-generation RDTs are currently unsuitable for the detection of acute HIV-1. PMID:26558545

  9. A Multisite Study of the Prevalence of HIV With Rapid Testing in Mental Health Settings

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Michael B.; Himelhoch, Seth S.; Balaji, Alexandra B.; Metzger, David S.; Dixon, Lisa B.; Rose, Charles E.; Oraka, Emeka; Davis-Vogel, Annet; Thompson, William W.; Heffelfinger, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated HIV prevalence and risk factors among persons receiving mental health treatment in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland, January 2009 to August 2011. Methods. We used a multisite, cross-sectional design stratified by clinical setting. We tested 1061 individuals for HIV in university-based inpatient psychiatric units (n = 287), intensive case-management programs (n = 273), and community mental health centers (n = 501). Results. Fifty-one individuals (4.8%) were HIV-infected. Confirmed positive HIV tests were 5.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.7%, 9.4%) for inpatient units, 5.1% (95% CI = 3.1%, 8.5%) for intensive case-management programs, and 4.0% (95% CI = 2.6%, 6.1%) for community mental health centers. Characteristics associated with HIV included Black race, homosexual or bisexual identity, and HCV infection. Conclusions. HIV prevalence for individuals receiving mental health services was about 4 times as high as in the general population. We found a positive association between psychiatric symptom severity and HIV infection, indicating that engaging persons with mental illness in appropriate mental health treatment may be important to HIV prevention. These findings reinforce recommendations for routine HIV testing in all clinical settings to ensure that HIV-infected persons receiving mental health services are identified and referred to timely infectious disease care. PMID:24524493

  10. Prevalence of HIV Testing and Associated Risk Factors in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Olivia; Wu, Qishan; Ickes, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study documents the prevalence of HIV testing in a sample of college students and examines associated demographic and behavioral characteristics. Participants College students ages 18 or older were randomly selected to participate in a health behavior survey at a southeastern university in September 2011. Methods Only sexually active students were included (n = 905). Relationships between demographic and sexual behavior characteristics were explored using logistic regression and classification regression tree (p≤0.05). Results Only 36.2% reported having been tested for HIV. Age was the most significant factor associated with testing. Factors associated with those least likely to be tested were race and anal sexual activity. Unsafe sexual behaviors were also associated with lower rates of HIV testing. Conclusions Findings support the need for targeted HIV interventions on college campuses. Such interventions need to be tailored for at-risk students and take into consideration factors likely to contribute to HIV testing. PMID:24617577

  11. Risk factors for "late-to-test" HIV diagnosis in Riverside County, California.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Aaron T; Napier, Rachaline; Brown, Brandon

    2016-09-01

    Patients diagnosed late in the course of HIV infection are at an increased risk of negative health outcomes and are more likely to transmit HIV to others. Using the CDC's definition for AIDS, we analyzed case report data from persons diagnosed with AIDS within 12 months of an HIV diagnosis ("late-to-test") in Riverside County, CA, between 2009 and 2014. Of 1385 HIV cases, 422 (30.5%) were late-to-test. Factors associated with late-to-test were: having no insurance (P = 0.005), being Hispanic (P = 0.002) and being between 45 and 64 years of age (P < 0.001). Females (P = 0.013) and those in the eastern region of Riverside County (P = 0.002) were less likely to be late-to-test. In the absence of universal HIV testing, interventions to decrease late testing are needed.

  12. Attitudes to prenatal testing and notification for HIV infection in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Marjan, R S; Ruminjo, J K

    1996-10-01

    Four hundred antenatal clinic attendants were surveyed for their attitude to testing and notification for HIV infection test results. The participants were systematically sampled from the antenatal clinic at the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, and interviewed using a closed-ended structured questionnaire. All the attendants had heard of HIV, and only 5(1.3%) did not know how Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) presents. Fifty one percent of them had no objection to their blood being tested for HIV. In fact, 52.5% thought, wrongly, that blood was routinely tested for HIV at the hospital's antenatal clinic. More than one third (35.8%) of respondents wished their permission to be obtained before the testing and 95% wished to be informed of the test result. Acceptability of testing was 33.8%, for Named Voluntary Testing, 62.0% for Universal Testing and 1.0% for Anonymous Testing. All the women said they would want to use a method of contraception, principally tubal ligation, if found HIV seropositive and 63.7% would seek a termination of pregnancy. In this study population, acceptability and expressed willingness to know HIV test results and willingness to let a spouse/sexual partner know the result was high. This paper makes recommendations that HIV testing be made available at the ANC, together with competent pre and post-test counselling.

  13. What role can gender-transformative programming for men play in increasing men's HIV testing and engagement in HIV care and treatment in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Fleming, Paul J; Colvin, Chris; Peacock, Dean; Dworkin, Shari L

    2016-11-01

    Men are less likely than women to test for HIV and engage in HIV care and treatment. We conducted in-depth interviews with men participating in One Man Can (OMC) - a rights-based gender equality and health programme intervention conducted in rural Limpopo and Eastern Cape, South Africa - to explore masculinity-related barriers to HIV testing/care/treatment and how participation in OMC impacted on these. Men who participated in OMC reported an increased capability to overcome masculinity-related barriers to testing/care/treatment. They also reported increased ability to express vulnerability and discuss HIV openly with others, which led to greater willingness to be tested for HIV and receive HIV care and treatment for those who were living with HIV. Interventions that challenge masculine norms and promote gender equality (i.e. gender-transformative interventions) represent a promising new approach to address men's barriers to testing, care and treatment.

  14. Marketing the HIV Test to MSM: Ethnic Differences in Preferred Venues and Sources

    PubMed Central

    Lechuga, Julia; Owczarzak, Jill T.; Petroll, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Lack of awareness of HIV status is associated with an increased likelihood of HIV transmission. We surveyed 633 men who have sex with men (MSM) from diverse ethnic groups recruited from a variety of community venues in a U.S. Midwestern city with rising HIV infection rates. Our first aim was to describe patterns of sexual risk, annual HIV testing frequency, and venues where information about HIV and HIV testing could be disseminated to inner-city MSM. Our second aim was to identify preferred sources to receive information about HIV testing and determine whether these preferences differed by ethnic background. Results indicated that despite similar proportions of high–sexual risk behaviors, compared with African American and Latino MSM, smaller proportions of non-Hispanic White MSM had received an HIV test in the last 12 months. Despite ethnic differences in health care access, a physician's office was the most common HIV testing site. Overall, a majority conveyed a preference to see advertisements in mainstream media outlets. However, when preferences were stratified by ethnicity, African American MSM were the least likely to prefer receiving information from mainstream media and conveyed a stronger preference to receive information from authority figures than non-Hispanic White and Hispanic MSM. PMID:23091299

  15. High HIV Prevalence among Asylum Seekers Who Gave Birth in the Netherlands: A Nationwide Study Based on Antenatal HIV Tests

    PubMed Central

    Goosen, Simone; Waldhober, Quita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Asylum seekers are considered to be a particularly vulnerable group with respect to HIV. Data on the HIV prevalence among asylum seekers, however, are scarce. The aim of this study is to map the HIV prevalence among asylum seekers who gave birth in The Netherlands. Methods We used a nationwide electronic medical records database from the community health services for asylum seekers (MOA). The study population consisted of 4,854 women and girls who delivered in asylum reception between 2000 and 2008. A unique electronic health data base was used and case allocation was based on ICPC-codes. Results The number of women and girls that was HIV positive during their last pregnancy was 80, of which 79 originated from sub-Saharan Africa. The prevalence for women from this region of origin (3.4%) was high compared to women from all other regions of origin (0.04%; OR = 90.2; 95%CI 12.5–648.8). The highest HIV prevalence rates were found for women from Rwanda (17.0%) and Cameroon (13.2%). HIV prevalence rates were higher among women who arrived in reception without partner (OR = 1.82; 95%CI 0.75–4.44) and unaccompanied minors (OR = 2.59; 95%CI 0.79–8.49), compared to women who arrived in reception with partner. Conclusions We conclude that, among asylum-seeking women from sub-Saharan Africa giving birth in The Netherlands, the HIV prevalence is high compared to the host population. For women from other regions of origin, the prevalence is at the same level as in the host population. The high HIV prevalence underlines the importance of preventive interventions and voluntary HIV testing for sub-Saharan African asylum seekers as from shortly after arrival. PMID:26296093

  16. A Descriptive Analysis of Students Seeking HIV Antibody Testing at a University Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Marie-Christine; Sawyer, Robin G.; Pinciaro, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Investigated characteristics of students voluntarily seeking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing at a university health center. Data from student surveys indicated that: 59% were women; reported rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases were low; nearly one-third had had previous HIV testing; 40% reported…

  17. Total control: a critical analysis of mandatory HIV testing in U.S. prisons.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marilou; Jacob, Jean Daniel; Cormier, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the relationship between mandatory HIV testing and the institutional management of inmates in U.S. prisons. Mandatory HIV testing has been largely overlooked by the nursing community even though it has important human rights and ethical implications. Drawing on the work of Goffman (1990) on the inner workings of total institutions, the present article critically examines the deployment of mandatory HIV testing in U.S. prisons. To set the stage, we define mandatory HIV testing and describe the methods of HIV testing currently used in U.S. prison settings. Then, we provide a brief overview of the concept of total institution and the mortification process. Finally, we expand on the relationship between mandatory HIV testing and much larger institutional objectives of total control, total structuring, total isolation, and separation of inmates from society (as summarized by Farrington, 1992). And lastly, we provide a brief discussion on the implications of mandatory HIV testing (as a method of HIV testing) from a nursing perspective.

  18. HIV Rapid Testing in Substance Abuse Treatment: Implementation Following a Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, L. F.; Korte, J. E.; Holmes, B. E.; Gooden, L.; Matheson, T.; Feaster, D. J.; Leff, J. A.; Wilson, L.; Metsch, L. R.; Schackman, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration has promoted HIV testing and counseling as an evidence-based practice. Nevertheless, adoption of HIV testing in substance abuse treatment programs has been slow. This article describes the experience of a substance abuse treatment agency where, following participation in a clinical trial,…

  19. High-Risk Behaviors among Youth and Their Reasons for Not Getting Tested for HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Matthew B.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Lombardi, Emilia L.; Taylor, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    Concerned about reports of a 15% decline in HIV testing among high-risk youth in an earlier study in Pittsburgh, this study was initiated to explore reasons why young people are not getting tested for HIV, while gathering data on their respective level of risk taking behaviors. A total of 580 surveys were collected from youth aged between 14 and…

  20. How Patient Interactions with a Computer-Based Video Intervention Affect Decisions to Test for HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Ian David; Rajan, Sonali; Marsch, Lisa A.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines predictors of HIV test acceptance among emergency department patients who received an educational video intervention designed to increase HIV testing. A total of 202 patients in the main treatment areas of a high-volume, urban hospital emergency department used inexpensive netbook computers to watch brief educational…

  1. Heart rate variability and autonomic function tests in HIV positive individuals in India.

    PubMed

    Sakhuja, Ankit; Goyal, Ankur; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Wig, Naveet; Vajpayee, Madhu; Kumar, Ajay; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2007-06-01

    Supine heart rate variability (HRV) and autonomic tests were carried to determine whether autonomic activity was affected in HIV positive patients. The pressor response following handgrip and cold pressor test was blunted in HIV+ patients, and the degree of dysfunction correlated with CD4 cell counts. The extent of autonomic impairment was mild and subclinical.

  2. "It Is Not Easy": Challenges for Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling in Flanders, Belgium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manirankunda, Lazare; Loos, Jasna; Debackaere, Pieterjan; Nostlinger, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    This study identified physicians' HIV testing practices and their barriers toward implementing provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) for Sub-Saharan African migrants (SAM) in Flanders, Belgium. In-depth interviews were conducted on a purposive sample of 20 physicians (ten GPs and ten internists). GPs performed mainly…

  3. Acceptability of HIV/AIDS Counseling and Testing among Premarital Couples in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Zunyou; Rou, Keming; Xu, Chen; Lou, Wei; Detels, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Premarital counseling is required for couples wishing to be married in China. The counseling primarily provides information about contraception. We evaluated adding premarital HIV/AIDS counseling and voluntary HIV testing to the standard counseling. The test was offered free to one group and at the standard cost to the other. The proportion of…

  4. HIV seropositivity rates in outreach-based counseling and testing services: program evaluation.

    PubMed

    DiFranceisco, W; Holtgrave, D R; Hoxie, N; Reiser, W J; Resenhoeft, R; Pinkerton, S D; Vergeront, J

    1998-11-01

    A common assumption is that outreach-based HIV counseling and testing services reach a clientele with a higher HIV seroprevalence than clinic-based counseling and testing. To examine this assumption, we analyzed Wisconsin's anonymous counseling and testing client records for 62,299 contacts (testing episodes) from 1992 to 1995. Bivariate analysis of counseling and testing service setting (outreach-based or clinic-based) and HIV test results suggested that outreach contacts were 23% (odds ratio [OR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.0-1.5) more likely to test HIV-seropositive than clinic-based contacts. Relations between HIV test outcome and variables for client age, race, gender, previous testing history, mode of risk exposure, and region, as well as service setting, were examined by logistic regression. An inverted relation between service setting and seropositivity (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.5-0.8) indicated that, within some subpopulations, outreach contacts were significantly less likely to test HIV-positive than clinic-based contacts. Analysis of interactions among the covariates identified race as a critical codeterminant in the relation between service setting and test outcome. These results support retargeting outreach services to enhance their overall effectiveness. Specific recommendations include the need for aggressive strategies to better "market" HIV counseling and testing to nonwhite populations, and to focus resources more selectively on gay/bisexual men of all races.

  5. Changes in self-reported HIV testing during South Africa's 2010/2011 national testing campaign: gains and shortfalls

    PubMed Central

    Maughan-Brown, Brendan; Lloyd, Neil; Bor, Jacob; Venkataramani, Atheendar S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives HIV counselling and testing is critical to HIV prevention and treatment efforts. Mass campaigns may be an effective strategy to increase HIV testing in countries with generalized HIV epidemics. We assessed the self-reported uptake of HIV testing among individuals who had never previously tested for HIV, particularly those in high-risk populations, during the period of a national, multisector testing campaign in South Africa (April 2010 and June 2011). Design This study was a prospective cohort study. Methods We analyzed data from two waves (2010/2011, n=16,893; 2012, n=18,707) of the National Income Dynamics Study, a nationally representative cohort that enabled prospective identification of first-time testers. We quantified the number of adults (15 years and older) testing for the first time nationally. To assess whether the campaign reached previously underserved populations, we examined changes in HIV testing coverage by age, gender, race and province sub-groups. We also estimated multivariable logistic regression models to identify socio-economic and demographic predictors of first-time testing. Results Overall, the proportion of adults ever tested for HIV increased from 43.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 41.48, 45.96) to 65.2% (95% CI: 63.28, 67.10) over the study period, with approximately 7.6 million (95% CI: 6,387,910; 8,782,986) first-time testers. Among black South Africans, the country's highest HIV prevalence sub-group, HIV testing coverage improved among poorer and healthier individuals, thus reducing gradients in testing by wealth and health. In contrast, HIV testing coverage remained lower for men, younger individuals and the less educated, indicating persistent if not widening disparities by gender, age and education. Large geographic disparities in coverage also remained as of 2012. Conclusions Mass provision of HIV testing services can be effective in increasing population coverage of HIV testing. The geographic and socio

  6. HIV Self-Testing Could “Revolutionize Testing in South Africa, but It Has Got to Be Done Properly”: Perceptions of Key Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    South Africa bears the world’s largest burden of HIV with over 6.4 million people living with the virus. The South African government’s response to HIV has yielded remarkable results in recent years; over 13 million South Africans tested in a 2012 campaign and over 2 million people are on antiretroviral treatment. However, with an HIV & AIDS and STI National Strategic Plan aiming to get 80 percent of the population to know their HIV status by 2016, activists and public health policy makers argue that non-invasive HIV self-testing should be incorporated into the country HIV Counseling and Testing [HCT] portfolios. In-depth qualitative interviews (N = 12) with key stakeholders were conducted from June to July 2013 in South Africa. These included two government officials, four non-governmental stakeholders, two donors, three academic researchers, and one international stakeholder. All stakeholders were involved in HIV prevention and treatment and influenced HCT policy and research in South Africa and beyond. The interviews explored: interest in HIV self-testing; potential distribution channels for HIV self-tests to target groups; perception of requirements for diagnostic technologies that would be most amenable to HIV self-testing and opinions on barriers and opportunities for HIV-linkage to care after receiving positive test results. While there is currently no HIV self-testing policy in South Africa, and several barriers exist, participants in the study expressed enthusiasm and willingness for scale-up and urgent need for further research, planning, establishment of HIV Self-testing policy and programming to complement existing facility-based and community-based HIV testing systems. Introduction of HIV self-testing could have far-reaching positive effects on holistic HIV testing uptake, giving people autonomy to decide which approach they want to use for HIV testing, early diagnosis, treatment and care for HIV particularly among hard-to reach groups, including

  7. HIV self-testing could "revolutionize testing in South Africa, but it has got to be done properly": perceptions of key stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Makusha, Tawanda; Knight, Lucia; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Tulloch, Olivia; Davids, Adlai; Lim, Jeanette; Peck, Roger; van Rooyen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    South Africa bears the world's largest burden of HIV with over 6.4 million people living with the virus. The South African government's response to HIV has yielded remarkable results in recent years; over 13 million South Africans tested in a 2012 campaign and over 2 million people are on antiretroviral treatment. However, with an HIV & AIDS and STI National Strategic Plan aiming to get 80 percent of the population to know their HIV status by 2016, activists and public health policy makers argue that non-invasive HIV self-testing should be incorporated into the country HIV Counseling and Testing [HCT] portfolios. In-depth qualitative interviews (N = 12) with key stakeholders were conducted from June to July 2013 in South Africa. These included two government officials, four non-governmental stakeholders, two donors, three academic researchers, and one international stakeholder. All stakeholders were involved in HIV prevention and treatment and influenced HCT policy and research in South Africa and beyond. The interviews explored: interest in HIV self-testing; potential distribution channels for HIV self-tests to target groups; perception of requirements for diagnostic technologies that would be most amenable to HIV self-testing and opinions on barriers and opportunities for HIV-linkage to care after receiving positive test results. While there is currently no HIV self-testing policy in South Africa, and several barriers exist, participants in the study expressed enthusiasm and willingness for scale-up and urgent need for further research, planning, establishment of HIV Self-testing policy and programming to complement existing facility-based and community-based HIV testing systems. Introduction of HIV self-testing could have far-reaching positive effects on holistic HIV testing uptake, giving people autonomy to decide which approach they want to use for HIV testing, early diagnosis, treatment and care for HIV particularly among hard-to reach groups, including men.

  8. Clinic-based routine voluntary HIV testing in a refugee settlement in Uganda.

    PubMed

    OʼLaughlin, Kelli N; Kasozi, Julius; Walensky, Rochelle P; Parker, Robert A; Faustin, Zikama M; Doraiswamy, Sathyanarayanan; Owino, Chris Omara; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2014-12-01

    We implemented and evaluated a clinic-based routine voluntary HIV testing intervention in Nakivale Refugee Settlement in Uganda. Comparing the standard of care period (40 d) with the intervention period (168 d), the mean HIV-infected clients identified per week increased from 0.9 to 5.6, and there was no significant difference between the HIV prevalence in the 2 periods (standard of care: 3.3%; intervention: 4.5%; P > 0.5). Clinic-based routine HIV testing in a refugee settlement is effective and should be considered for implementation in refugee settlements in other high-prevalence regions in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. Contraceptive Use and Uptake of HIV-Testing among Sub-Saharan African Women.

    PubMed

    Center, Katherine E; Gunn, Jayleen K L; Asaolu, Ibitola O; Gibson, Steven J; Ehiri, John E

    2016-01-01

    Despite improved availability of simple, relatively inexpensive, and highly effective antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS, the disease remains a major public health challenge for women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Given the numerous barriers in access to care for women in this region, every health issue that brings them into contact with the health system should be optimized as an opportunity to integrate HIV/AIDS prevention. Because most non-condom forms of modern contraception require a clinical appointment for use, contraception appointments could provide a confidential opportunity for access to HIV counseling, testing, and referral to care. This study sought to investigate the relationship between contraceptive methods and HIV testing among women in SSA. Data from the Demographic and Health Survey from four African countries-Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, and Uganda-was used to examine whether modern (e.g., pills, condom) or traditional (e.g., periodic abstinence, withdrawal) forms of contraception were associated with uptake of HIV testing. Data for the current analyses were restricted to 35,748 women with complete information on the variables of interest. Chi-square tests and logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between uptake of HIV testing and respondents' baseline characteristics and contraceptive methods. In the total sample and in Mozambique, women who used modern forms of contraception were more likely to be tested for HIV compared to those who did not use contraception. This positive association was not demonstrated in Congo, Nigeria, or Uganda. That many women who access modern contraception are not tested for HIV in high HIV burden areas highlights a missed opportunity to deliver an important intervention to promote maternal and child health. Given the increasing popularity of hormonal contraception methods in low-income countries, there is an urgent need to integrate HIV counseling, testing, and treatment into family

  10. [HIV infection in pregnant women in Dakar (Senegal)].

    PubMed

    Diouf, A; Kebe, F; Faye, E O; Diallo, D; Ndour Sarr, A; Mboup, S; Diadhiou, F

    1996-01-01

    The epidemiologic and sociodemographic characteristics of human deficiency virus (HIV) infection vary from one country to another. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in pregnant women in Dakar and associated factors. Systematic anonymous screening was performed in pregnant women admitted to the maternity ward. Women whose seropositivity was confirmed by Western blot retroviral serology were included. One woman out of four was assigned by simple random selection to the case control group. Over a 24 month period, 12,498 women were tested. 104 were seropositive (44 HIV1, 58HIV2, and 2 HIV1-HIV2 giving a prevalence of 0.8%. Factors associated with HIV1 and HIV2 were different: mean age 21.7 years for HIV1 versus 30.6 for HIV 2 (p = 0.05); origin in Guinea-Bissau for HIV2 (p = 0.001); mean number of pregnancies 2.6 for HIV1 versus 5.9 for HIV2 (p = 0.001); mean parity 1.5 for HIV1 versus 4.5 for HIV2 (p < 0.01); vitality of the conception product in 85.1% for HIV2 versus 67.5% for HIV1 (p = 0.0001). These data confirm the low prevalence of HIV infection in pregnant women, with a predominance for HIV2. The factors identified in associated with virus type suggest a different mode of transmission and/or reduced virulence or HIV2 compared with HIV1. Knowledge of these factors helps orient management strategies, especially in pregnant women.

  11. Feasibility of a Computer-Based Intervention Addressing Barriers to HIV Testing Among Young Patients Who Decline Tests at Triage.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Ian David; Cleland, Charles M; Perlman, David C; Rajan, Sonali; Sun, Wendy; Bania, Theodore C

    2016-09-01

    Young people face greatly increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk and high rates of undiagnosed HIV, yet are unlikely to test. Many also have limited or inconsistent access to health care, including HIV testing and prevention education, and prior research has documented that youth lack knowledge necessary to understand the HIV test process and to interpret test results. Computer-based interventions have been used to increase HIV test rates and knowledge among emergency department (ED) patients, including those who decline tests offered at triage. However, patients aged 18-24 years have been less likely to test, even after completing an intervention, compared to older patients in the same ED setting. The current pilot study sought to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new tablet-based video intervention designed to address established barriers to testing among ED patients aged 18-24 years. In particular, we examined whether young ED patients would: agree to receive the intervention; complete it quickly enough to avoid disrupting clinical workflows; accept HIV tests offered by the intervention; demonstrate increased postintervention knowledge; and report they found the intervention acceptable. Over 4 weeks, we recruited 100 patients aged 18-24 in a high-volume urban ED; all of them declined HIV tests offered at triage. Almost all (98%) completed the intervention (mean time <9 mins), 30% accepted HIV tests offered by the tablets. Knowledge was significantly higher after than before the intervention (t = -6.67, p < .001) and patients reported generally high acceptability. Additional research appears warranted to increase postintervention HIV testing.

  12. Patient Perception of Whether an HIV Test Was Provided during the Emergency Department Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Khakoo, Naushad M.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Ruffner, Andrew H.; Wayne, D. Beth; Lyons, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study approached emergency department (ED) patients after the treating physician’s disposition decision to measure patient understanding of whether or not they had received an HIV test during their ED encounter. Of the 300 respondents, 24 were excluded due to missing data or because they had received an ED HIV test. Mean age was 41 years, 51% were men, 61% were black, and 29% had no high school degree. There were 5.8% (95% confidence interval: 3.5%–9.4%) who erroneously reported HIV test delivery during their ED course. Our results suggest a small but significant minority of patients falsely assume that they have been tested for HIV during their ED visit. This misperception could have broad implications, leading to less frequent subsequent testing, false reassurance of HIV-negative status, and inaccuracies in surveillance estimates or surveys that depend on self-report. PMID:24522763

  13. HIV testing among MSM in Bogotá, Colombia: The role of structural and individual characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Carol A.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Poppen, Paul J.; del Río González, Ana Maria; Romero, Rodrigo A. Aguayo; Pérez, Carolin

    2014-01-01

    This study used mixed methods to examine characteristics related to HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Bogotá, Colombia. A sample of 890 MSM responded to a computerized quantitative survey. Follow-up qualitative data included 20 in-depth interviews with MSM and 12 key informant interviews. Hierarchical logistic set regression indicated that sequential sets of variables reflecting demographic characteristics, insurance coverage, risk appraisal, and social context each added to the explanation of HIV testing. Follow-up logistic regression showed that individuals who were older, had higher income, paid for their own insurance, had had a sexually transmitted infection, knew more people living with HIV, and had greater social support were more likely to have been tested for HIV at least once. Qualitative findings provided details of personal and structural barriers to testing, as well as interrelationships among these factors. Recommendations to increase HIV testing among Colombian MSM are offered. PMID:25068180

  14. “Inside These Fences is Our Own Little World”: Prison-Based HIV Testing and HIV-Related Stigma Among Incarcerated Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Rosen, David L.; Farel, Claire E.; White, Becky L.; Filene, Eliza J.; Wohl, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Correctional facilities offer opportunities to provide comprehensive HIV services including education, testing, treatment, and coordination of post-release care. However, these services may be undermined by unaddressed HIV stigma. As part of a prison-based HIV testing study, we interviewed 76 incarcerated men and women from the North Carolina State prison system. The sample was 72% men, median age 31.5 years (range: 19 to 60). Thematic analysis revealed high levels of HIV-related fear and stigma, homophobia, incomplete HIV transmission knowledge, beliefs that HIV is highly contagious within prisons (“HIV miasma”), and the view of HIV testing as protective. Interviewees described social distancing behaviors and coping mechanisms they perceived to be protective, including knowing their HIV status and avoiding contact with others and shared objects. Interviewees endorsed universal testing, public HIV status disclosure, and segregation of HIV-positive inmates. Intensified education and counseling efforts are needed to ameliorate entrenched HIV-transmission fears and stigmatizing beliefs. PMID:27459162

  15. Barriers to and acceptability of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling and adopting HIV-prevention behaviours in rural Uganda: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Susan M; Sileo, Katelyn; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Lule, Haruna; Bateganya, Moses H; Jasperse, Joseph; Nantaba, Harriet; Jayaratne, Kia

    2015-02-01

    In Uganda, a nationwide scale-up of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling presents an opportunity to deliver HIV-prevention services to large numbers of people. In a rural Ugandan hospital, focus group discussions and key informant interviews were conducted with outpatients receiving provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling and staff to explore the HIV-prevention information, motivation and behavioural skills strengths and weaknesses, and community-level and structural barriers to provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling acceptability and HIV prevention among this population. Strengths and weakness occurred at all levels, and results suggest brief client-centred interventions during provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling may be an effective approach to increase prevention behaviours in outpatient settings.

  16. HIV testing among pregnant women living with HIV in India: are private healthcare providers routinely violating women’s human rights?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In India, approximately 49,000 women living with HIV become pregnant and deliver each year. While the government of India has made progress increasing the availability of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) services, only about one quarter of pregnant women received an HIV test in 2010, and about one-in-five that were found positive for HIV received interventions to prevent vertical transmission of HIV. Methods Between February 2012 to March 2013, 14 HIV-positive women who had recently delivered a baby were recruited from HIV positive women support groups, Government of India Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers, and nongovernmental organizations in Mysore and Pune, India. In-depth interviews were conducted to examine their general experiences with antenatal healthcare; specific experiences around HIV counseling and testing; and perceptions about their care and follow-up treatment. Data were analyzed thematically using the human rights framework for HIV testing adopted by the United Nations and India’s National AIDS Control Organization. Results While all of the HIV-positive women in the study received HIV and PMTCT services at a government hospital or antiretroviral therapy center, almost all reported attending a private clinic or hospital at some point in their pregnancy. According to the participants, HIV testing often occurred without consent; there was little privacy; breaches of confidentiality were commonplace; and denial of medical treatment occurred routinely. Among women living with HIV in this study, violations of their human rights occurred more commonly in private rather than public healthcare settings. Conclusions There is an urgent need for capacity building among private healthcare providers to improve standards of practice with regard to informed consent process, HIV testing, patient confidentiality, treatment, and referral of pregnant women living with HIV. PMID:24656059

  17. Routine HIV testing in dental practice: can we cross the Rubicon?

    PubMed

    Vernillo, Anthony T; Caplan, Arthur L

    2007-12-01

    The latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommend routine HIV screening for a large segment of the population, given that the individual understands that an HIV test will be performed unless he or she declines testing (opt-out testing). The CDC recommendation calls for the elimination of formalized requirements for written consent and pretest counseling to encourage more Americans to voluntarily accept testing. Knowledge of HIV infection can increase early access to care and treatment and reduce further transmission. A rapid non-invasive test for HIV infection (OraQuick Advance) from oral fluid has recently become available. It offers two distinct advantages: 1) results are available within twenty minutes, thereby eliminating a long waiting period; and 2) it has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to blood testing. A preliminary positive test result must be confirmed with a Western Blot by an outside laboratory or physician. Important ethical and legal issues must be resolved before the successful implementation of HIV testing in the dental setting. An educational emphasis on broader coverage of HIV testing is also needed within the dental school curriculum. The integration of HIV testing into dental practice is discussed as well. A policy of screening patients in dental offices will contribute to a major advance in public health.

  18. Determinants for refusal of HIV testing among women attending for antenatal care in Gambella Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Gambella region, inhabitants owe socio-cultural factors that might favor refusal for HIV testing service utilization among Antenatal Care attendees. Objective To assess determinants for refusal of HIV testing service utilization among ANC attendees in Gambella Region. Methods A comparative cross sectional study was conducted among ANC attendees from March 2008 to May 2008 in four selected health facilities of Gambella region. Sample size of 332 participants (83 who refused HIV testing and 249 who accepted HIV testing) were taken for the study. The study was supplemented with four focus group discussions. Multivariate binary logistic regression was employed to control for confounding factors. Results When adjusted with other factors pregnant women with 2–3 live births in the past; who claimed divorce as a perceived response of their husband following HIV positive test result; who had not sought agreement from their husband for testing; disclosure of test for husband and being from certain ethnic group (E.g. Mejenger) were independent predictors for refusal of HIV testing among ANC attendees. Conclusion and recommendation Based on the findings, the following recommendations were forwarded: Provision of innovative information and education on the pre-test session for those pregnant women having two or more children; community involvement to tackle stigma; women empowerment; designing couple friendly counseling service; and fighting harmful traditional practices related with decision of HIV testing. PMID:22834566

  19. The feasibility of implementing the HIV seek, test, and treat strategy in jails.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Curt; Bazerman, Lauri; Gillani, Fizza; Tran, Liem; Larson, Brita; Rivard, Saul; Flanigan, Timothy; Rich, Josiah

    2014-04-01

    To successfully implement the Seek, Test, and Treat (STT) strategy to curb the HIV epidemic, the criminal justice system must be a key partner. Increasing HIV testing and treatment among incarcerated persons has the potential to decrease HIV transmission in the broader community, but whether it is feasible to consider the implementation of the STT within jail facilities is not known. We conducted a retrospective review of Rhode Island Department of Corrections (RIDOC) medical records to assess whether persons newly diagnosed in the jail were able to start ART and be linked to community HIV care after release. From 2001 to 2007, 64 RIDOC detainees were newly diagnosed with HIV. During their index incarcerations, 64% were informed of positive confirmatory HIV test results, 50% completed baseline evaluations, and 9% began ART. Linkage to community care was confirmed for 58% of subjects. Subjects incarcerated for >14 days were significantly more likely to receive HIV test results and complete baseline evaluation (p<0.001). A similar association was not observed for ART initiation until incarceration length reached 60 days (p<0.001). There was no association between incarceration length and linkage to care. This comprehensive analysis demonstrates that length of incarceration impacts HIV test result delivery, baseline evaluation, and ART initiation in the RIDOC. Jails are an important venue to "Seek" and "Test"; however, completing the "Treat" part of the STT strategy is hindered by the transient nature of this criminal justice population and may require new strategies to improve linkage to care.

  20. An HIV Testing Intervention in African American Churches: Pilot Study Findings

    PubMed Central

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Thompson, Carole Bowe; Moore, Erin; Hawes, Starlyn; Simon, Stephen; Goggin, Kathy; Martinez, David; Berman, Marcie; Booker, Alexandria

    2016-01-01

    Background African Americans are disproportionately burdened by HIV. The African American church is an influential institution with potential to increase reach of HIV prevention interventions in Black communities. Purpose This study examined HIV testing rates in African American churches in the Taking It to the Pews pilot project. Using a community-engaged approach, church leaders delivered religiously-tailored HIV education and testing materials/activities (e.g., sermons, brochures/bulletins, testimonials) to church and community members. Methods Four African American churches (N=543 participants) located in the Kansas City metropolitan area were randomized to intervention and comparison groups. Receipt of an HIV test was assessed at baseline and 6 months. Results Findings indicated intervention participants were 2.2 times more likely to receive an HIV test than comparisons at 6 months. Church leaders delivered about 2 tools per month. Conclusions Church-based HIV testing interventions are feasible and have potential to increase HIV testing rates in African American communities. PMID:26821712

  1. HIV testing in national population-based surveys: experience from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod; Vaessen, Martin; Boerma, J. Ties; Arnold, Fred; Way, Ann; Barrere, Bernard; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth; Sangha, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the methods used in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to collect nationally representative data on the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and assess the value of such data to country HIV surveillance systems. METHODS: During 2001-04, national samples of adult women and men in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mali, Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia were tested for HIV. Dried blood spot samples were collected for HIV testing, following internationally accepted ethical standards. The results for each country are presented by age, sex, and urban versus rural residence. To estimate the effects of non-response, HIV prevalence among non-responding males and females was predicted using multivariate statistical models for those who were tested, with a common set of predictor variables. RESULTS: Rates of HIV testing varied from 70% among Kenyan men to 92% among women in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Despite large differences in HIV prevalence between the surveys (1-16%), fairly consistent patterns of HIV infection were observed by age, sex and urban versus rural residence, with considerably higher rates in urban areas and in women, especially at younger ages. Analysis of non-response bias indicates that although predicted HIV prevalence tended to be higher in non-tested males and females than in those tested, the overall effects of non-response on the observed national estimates of HIV prevalence are insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based surveys can provide reliable, direct estimates of national and regional HIV seroprevalence among men and women irrespective of pregnancy status. Survey data greatly enhance surveillance systems and the accuracy of national estimates in generalized epidemics. PMID:16878227

  2. Determinants of never having tested for HIV among MSM in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    den Daas, Chantal; Doppen, Martine; Schmidt, Axel J; Op de Coul, Eline

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Men who have sex with men (MSM) who are unaware of their HIV infection are more likely to infect others, and unable to receive treatment. Therefore, we aimed to identify the proportion and characteristics of Dutch MSM who never tested for HIV. Methods In 2010, the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) recruited 174 209 men from 38 countries through an anonymous online questionnaire in 25 languages. We analysed data from participants living in the Netherlands (N=3787). The outcome we investigated was having never (lifetime) been tested for HIV. Results A total of 770 MSM (20.4%) had never been tested for HIV. In multivariate regression analyses, not being from Amsterdam (adjusted OR, aOR 1.54, CI 1.17 to 2.03), with low education (aOR 1.28, CI 1.04 to 1.57) and low knowledge on HIV-testing (aOR 2.23, CI 1.37 to 3.64) were significantly associated with never having tested. Lower sexual risk (including having fewer sexual partners (aOR 2.19, CI 1.57 to 3.04) and no anal intercourse (aOR 5.99, CI 3.04 to 11.77)), and less social engagement (including being less out (aOR 1.93, CI 1.55 to 2.40)) were also associated with having never been tested. Additionally, 36.1% of MSM who never tested for HIV reported high-risk sexual behaviour that may have put them at HIV risk. Conclusions MSM make their own risk assessments that inform their choices about HIV-testing. Nevertheless, MSM who were never tested may have been at risk for HIV, and remain important to target for HIV interventions. PMID:26758261

  3. Assessment of HIV testing among young methamphetamine users in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use has a strong correlation with risky sexual behaviors, and thus may be triggering the growing HIV epidemic in Myanmar. Although methamphetamine use is a serious public health concern, only a few studies have examined HIV testing among young drug users. This study aimed to examine how predisposing, enabling and need factors affect HIV testing among young MA users. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to March 2013 in Muse city in the Northern Shan State of Myanmar. Using a respondent-driven sampling method, 776 MA users aged 18-24 years were recruited. The main outcome of interest was whether participants had ever been tested for HIV. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were applied in this study. Results Approximately 14.7% of young MA users had ever been tested for HIV. Significant positive predictors of HIV testing included predisposing factors such as being a female MA user, having had higher education, and currently living with one’s spouse/sexual partner. Significant enabling factors included being employed and having ever visited NGO clinics or met NGO workers. Significant need factors were having ever been diagnosed with an STI and having ever wanted to receive help to stop drug use. Conclusions Predisposing, enabling and need factors were significant contributors affecting uptake of HIV testing among young MA users. Integrating HIV testing into STI treatment programs, alongside general expansion of HIV testing services may be effective in increasing HIV testing uptake among young MA users. PMID:25042697

  4. When to start paediatric testing of the adult HIV cure research agenda?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema K

    2017-01-01

    Ethical guidelines recommend that experimental interventions should be tested in adults first before they are tested and approved in children. Some challenge this paradigm, however, and recommend initiating paediatric testing after preliminary safety testing in adults in certain cases. For instance, commentators have argued for accelerated testing of HIV vaccines in children. Additionally, HIV cure research on the use of very early therapy (VET) in infants, prompted in part by the Mississippi baby case, is one example of a strategy that is currently being tested in infants before it has been well tested in adults. Because infants’ immune systems are still developing, the timing of HIV transmission is easier to identify in infants than in adults, and infants who receive VET might never develop the viral reservoirs that make HIV so difficult to eradicate, infants may be uniquely situated to achieve HIV cure or sustained viral remission. Several commentators have now argued for earlier initiation of HIV cure interventions other than (or in addition to) VET in children. HIV cure research is therefore a good case for re-examining the important question of when to initiate paediatric research. I will argue that, despite the potential for HIV cure research to benefit children and the scientific value of involving children in this research, the HIV cure agenda should not accelerate the involvement of children for the following reasons: HIV cure research is highly speculative, risky, aimed at combination approaches and does not compare favourably with the available alternatives. I conclude by drawing general implications for the initiation of paediatric testing, including that interventions that have to be used in combination with others and cures for chronic diseases may not be valuable enough to justify early paediatric testing. PMID:27259546

  5. HIV Testing and Engagement in Care among Highly Vulnerable Female Sex Workers: Implications for Treatment as Prevention Models

    PubMed Central

    Surratt, Hilary L.; O’Grady, Catherine; Kurtz, Steven P.; Buttram, Mance E.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although emerging Treatment as Prevention models can be effective in reducing HIV incidence among high-risk populations, many HIV infected individuals remain undiagnosed or fail to engage in HIV care. Methods This study examined the factors associated with HIV testing and care among a population of substance using female sex workers. Results Recent HIV testing was associated with higher education level, having a regular health care provider or clinic, recent crack use, and higher sexual risk behaviors; HIV treatment utilization was associated with higher levels of social support, having a regular health care provider or clinic, housing stability and insurance coverage. Qualitative data revealed HIV-related stigma, denial, social isolation, and substance use as barriers to HIV testing and treatment; social support and accessibility of services were key enablers. Conclusions Improving HIV testing and linkage to treatment among female sex workers will require structural initiatives to reduce stigma and increase service seeking support. PMID:25130245

  6. Criminal law and HIV testing: empirical analysis of how at-risk individuals respond to the law.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Goo

    2014-01-01

    This Note assesses the effect of laws that specifically criminalize behaviors that expose others to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This Note examines the relationship between HIV testing decisions by high-risk individuals and the existence of these HIV-specific statutes, as well as the amount of media coverage related to them. One of the main reasons public health experts criticize criminalization of HIV-exposing behavior is that it may discourage at-risk individuals from undergoing HIV testing. This argument, however, remains empirically untested to date. This study quantitatively examines whether at-risk individuals living in jurisdictions with HIV-specific statutes are less likely to report having been tested for HIV in the past year compared to those living in jurisdictions without HIV-specific statutes. Regression analysis is conducted using data collected in the United States over a seven-year span. The results show that at-risk individuals residing in states with HIV-specific statutes are no less likely to report having been tested for HIV than those who live in other states. However, the number of people who reported that they had been tested for HIV is inversely correlated with the frequency of newspaper coverage of criminalization of HIV-exposing behavior. These findings imply that at-risk individuals' HIV testing is associated with media coverage of criminalizing HIV-exposing behavior. The negative impact that criminal law has on HIV testing rates could be a serious public health threat. Testing is often the initial step in public health interventions that most effectively modify the risky behavior of HIV-positive individuals. The adverse consequence of criminalization should weigh heavily in the design and application of criminal sanctions for HIV-exposing behavior. In addition, future research should further explore the relationships between criminalization, media coverage of criminalization, and HIV testing decisions for a more nuanced

  7. Serological response of patients suffering from primary and recrudescent typhus: comparison of complement fixation reaction, Weil-Felix test, microimmunofluorescence, and immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Eremeeva, M E; Balayeva, N M; Raoult, D

    1994-01-01

    Microimmunofluorescence and Western immunoblotting were compared with the classical complement fixation reaction and the Weil-Felix test to study the serological responses of patients to Rickettsia prowazekii and both Proteus vulgaris OX19 and OX2 during primary and recrudescent typhus infections. The serological response to R. prowazekii was found to be similar during primary and recrudescent typhus, and all sera examined contained antibodies to the same R. prowazekii cell structures. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM were found to be the dominant anti-R. prowazekii immunoglobulins in all sera tested and were found to be directed against the 100-kDa protein and the lipopolysaccharide. IgA antibodies, when present, were mainly against the 100-kDa protein. For P. vulgaris, IgG antibodies recognized the proteins and lipopolysaccharides of both OX19 and OX2 serotypes; IgM antibodies were directed against the P. vulgaris OX2 lipopolysaccharide. In addition, donor blood sera, which were negative by microimmunofluorescence, were found to contain IgG immunoglobulins reacting with R. prowazekii protein antigens of 135, 60, and 47 kDa by western immunoblotting. Images PMID:7496969

  8. Flavivirus cross-reactivity in serological tests and Guillain-Barré syndrome in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia M; Bonfim, Carmem; Almeida, Bernardo M; Zanluca, Camila; Koishi, Andrea C; Rodrigues, Paula R V P; Kay, Claudia K; Ribeiro, Lisandro L; Scola, Rosana H; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia N

    2017-03-17

    Serological diagnosis of flavivirus infection is a challenge, particularly in the context of a disease associated with immune response enhancement in a transplant patient, where aspects such as previous flavivirus infections may be involved with the outcome. We report a case of a pediatric patient who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) after matched-unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The patient lives in a Brazilian region that is experiencing an epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) and dengue virus (DENV). Because an increasing number of cases of GBS, likely triggered by ZIKV infection, are being reported in Brazil, samples from the patient were tested for both ZIKV and DENV infection. Serological assays strongly suggested a recent ZIKV infection, although infection by DENV or co-infection with both viruses cannot be ruled out. The presence of anti-DENV immunoglobulin-G in donor serum led to the hypothesis that antibodies from the donor could have enhanced the severity of the ZIKV infection. This hypothesis is in agreement with the recent findings that DENV sero-cross-reactivity drives antibody-dependent enhancement of ZIKV infection. These findings highlight the need for discussion of the indication to perform previous flavivirus tests in HSCT donors, especially in areas where ZIKV and other flaviviruses co-circulate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Information Regarding the OraQuick In-Home HIV Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test? Information on the OraQuick In-Home HIV Test can be found on FDA’s website . Additionally, information can be obtained from the manufacturer, OraSure Technologies. back to top More in Premarket Approvals (PMAs) ...

  10. Community Influences on Married Men's Uptake of HIV Testing in Eight African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rob; Elfstrom, K. Miriam; Winter, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Despite efforts to increase HIV testing in the African region, the proportion of men who report ever having been tested for HIV remains low. Research has focused on individual level determinants of women's testing however little is known about factors associated with men's testing behavior. This analysis investigates community influences on HIV testing among men ages 15–54, using Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Chad, Ghana, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Multilevel models were fitted in each country for the outcome of ever receiving an HIV test. After controlling for individual and household level factors, community level factors of demographics, economics, and behavior and knowledge remain significantly associated with HIV testing among men. The results of this analysis highlight the need to recognize the impact of community influences on men's HIV test seeking behavior, and to harness these community factors in the design of programs aimed at encouraging the uptake of HIV testing among men in Africa. PMID:22677974

  11. Use of a Chagas Urine Nanoparticle Test (Chunap) to Correlate with Parasitemia Levels in T. cruzi/HIV Co-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Clark, Daniel E.; Choi, Jeong; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J.; Castro, Rosario; Valencia-Ayala, Edward; Flores, Jorge; Bowman, Natalie; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Torrico, Faustino; Liotta, Lance; Bern, Caryn; Luchini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of reactivated Chagas disease in HIV patients could be lifesaving. In Latin America, the diagnosis is made by microscopical detection of the T. cruzi parasite in the blood; a diagnostic test that lacks sensitivity. This study evaluates if levels of T. cruzi antigens in urine, determined by Chunap (Chagas urine nanoparticle test), are correlated with parasitemia levels in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. Methodology/Principal Findings T. cruzi antigens in urine of HIV patients (N = 55: 31 T. cruzi infected and 24 T. cruzi serology negative) were concentrated using hydrogel particles and quantified by Western Blot and a calibration curve. Reactivation of Chagas disease was defined by the observation of parasites in blood by microscopy. Parasitemia levels in patients with serology positive for Chagas disease were classified as follows: High parasitemia or reactivation of Chagas disease (detectable parasitemia by microscopy), moderate parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy but detectable by qPCR), and negative parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy and qPCR). The percentage of positive results detected by Chunap was: 100% (7/7) in cases of reactivation, 91.7% (11/12) in cases of moderate parasitemia, and 41.7% (5/12) in cases of negative parasitemia. Chunap specificity was found to be 91.7%. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a direct relationship between parasitemia levels and urine T. cruzi antigen concentrations (p<0.001). A cut-off of > 105 pg was chosen to determine patients with reactivation of Chagas disease (7/7). Antigenuria levels were 36.08 times (95% CI: 7.28 to 64.88) higher in patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts below 200/mL (p = 0.016). No significant differences were found in HIV loads and CD8+ lymphocyte counts. Conclusion Chunap shows potential for early detection of Chagas reactivation. With appropriate adaptation, this diagnostic test can be used to monitor Chagas disease status in T. cruzi/HIV co

  12. HIV Testing Practices among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Balán, Iván C.; Dolezal, Curtis; Pando, María A.; Marone, Rubén; Barreda, Victoria; Ávila, María Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to explore HIV-testing practices among MSM in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in light of current international health guidelines that recommend frequent HIV testing for MSM who engage in high-risk behavior. Participants, who were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS), were 500 mostly young, non-gay-identified MSM of low socioeconomic status, high levels of unemployment, living mainly in the less affluent areas surrounding Buenos Aires, and lacking health insurance. They provided blood samples for HIV testing and responded to a Computer Assisted Self Interview. Fifty-two percent had never been tested for HIV, and 20% had been tested only once; 17% were found to be HIV infected, of whom almost half were unaware of their status. Main reasons for never having tested previously were: not feeling at risk, fear of finding out results, and not knowing where to get tested. Among those previously tested, men had been tested a median of 2 times with their most recent test having occurred a median of 2.7 years prior to study enrollment. Of those who had not tested positive before entering the study, only 41% returned for their results. HIV testing was infrequent and insufficient for early detection of infection, entry into treatment, and protection of sexual partners. This was particularly the case among non-gay-identified MSM. Testing campaigns should aim to help MSM become aware of their risk behavior, decrease fear of testing by explaining available treatment resources and decreasing the stigma associated with HIV, and by publicizing information about free and confidential testing locations. Rapid HIV testing should be made available to eliminate the need for a return visit and make results immediately available to individuals who are tested. PMID:23659314

  13. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing, Product Disposition, and Donor Deferral... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NAT, on...

  14. Increases in HIV Testing among Men Who Have Sex with Men — National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, 20 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 2008 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Laura A.; Oster, Alexandra M.; Rose, Charles E.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Le, Binh C.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, 62% of estimated new HIV diagnoses in the United States were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact (men who have sex with men, MSM); 39% of these MSM were black or African American. HIV testing, recommended at least annually by CDC for sexually active MSM, is an essential first step in HIV care and treatment for HIV-positive individuals. A variety of HIV testing initiatives, designed to reach populations disproportionately affected by HIV, have been developed at both national and local levels. We assessed changes in HIV testing behavior among MSM participating in the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System in 2008 and 2011. We compared the percentages tested in the previous 12 months in 2008 and 2011, overall and by race/ethnicity and age group. In unadjusted analyses, recent HIV testing increased from 63% in 2008 to 67% in 2011 overall (P<0.001), from 63% to 71% among black MSM (P<0.001), and from 63% to 75% among MSM of other/multiple races (P<0.001); testing did not increase significantly for white or Hispanic/Latino MSM. Multivariable model results indicated an overall increase in recent HIV testing (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 1.07, P<0.001). Increases were largest for black MSM (aPR = 1.12, P<0.001) and MSM of other/multiple races (aPR = 1.20, P<0.001). Among MSM aged 18–19 years, recent HIV testing was shown to increase significantly among black MSM (aPR = 1.20, P = 0.007), but not among MSM of other racial/ethnic groups. Increases in recent HIV testing among populations most affected by HIV are encouraging, but despite these increases, improved testing coverage is needed to meet CDC recommendations. PMID:25180514

  15. Home-based HIV counseling and testing: Client experiences and perceptions in Eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Though prevention and treatment depend on individuals knowing their HIV status, the uptake of testing remains low in Sub-Saharan Africa. One initiative to encourage HIV testing involves delivering services at home. However, doubts have been cast about the ability of Home-Based HIV Counseling and Testing (HBHCT) to adhere to ethical practices including consent, confidentiality, and access to HIV care post-test. This study explored client experiences in relation these ethical issues. Methods We conducted 395 individual interviews in Kumi district, Uganda, where teams providing HBHCT had visited 6–12 months prior to the interviews. Semi-structured questionnaires elicited information on clients’ experiences, from initial community mobilization up to receipt of results and access to HIV services post-test. Results We found that 95% of our respondents had ever tested (average for Uganda was 38%). Among those who were approached by HBHCT providers, 98% were informed of their right to decline HIV testing. Most respondents were counseled individually, but 69% of the married/cohabiting were counseled as couples. The majority of respondents (94%) were satisfied with the information given to them and the interaction with the HBHCT providers. Most respondents considered their own homes as more private than health facilities. Twelve respondents reported that they tested positive, 11 were referred for follow-up care, seven actually went for care, and only 5 knew their CD4 counts. All HIV infected individuals who were married or cohabiting had disclosed their status to their partners. Conclusion These findings show a very high uptake of HIV testing and satisfaction with HBHCT, a large proportion of married respondents tested as couples, and high disclosure rates. HBHCT can play a major role in expanding access to testing and overcoming disclosure challenges. However, access to HIV services post-test may require attention. PMID:23146071

  16. HIV testing and risk behaviors among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men - United States.

    PubMed

    2013-11-29

    The burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is high among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). High HIV prevalence, lack of awareness of HIV-positive status, unprotected anal sex, and increased viral load among HIV-positive MSM not on antiretroviral treatment contribute substantially to new infections among this population. CDC analyzed data from the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) to estimate the percentage of HIV diagnoses among MSM by area of residence and data from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) to estimate unprotected anal sex in the past 12 months among MSM in 2005, 2008, and 2011; unprotected discordant anal sex at last sex (i.e., with a partner of opposite or unknown HIV status) in 2008 and 2011; and HIV testing history and the percentage HIV-positive but unaware of their HIV status by the time since their last HIV test in 2011. This report describes the results of these analyses. In all but two states, the majority of new HIV diagnoses were among MSM in 2011. Unprotected anal sex at least once in the past 12 months increased from 48% in 2005 to 57% in 2011 (p<0.001). The percentage engaging in unprotected discordant anal sex was 13% in 2008 and 2011. In 2011, 33% of HIV-positive but unaware MSM reported unprotected discordant anal sex. Among MSM with negative or unknown HIV status, 67% had an HIV test in the past 12 months. Among those tested recently, the percentage HIV-positive but unaware of their infection was 4%, 5%, and 7% among those tested in the past ≤3, 4-6, and 7-12 months, respectively. Expanded efforts are needed to reduce HIV risk behaviors and to promote at least annual HIV testing among MSM.

  17. HIV testing practices of South African township MSM in the era of expanded access to ART

    PubMed Central

    Sandfort, Theo G. M.; Knox, Justin; Collier, Kate L.; Lane, Tim; Reddy, Vasu

    2014-01-01

    While men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa are at high risk for HIV infection, few of those already infected know their status. Effectively promoting frequent HIV testing—of increasing importance with the expanding accessibility of antiretroviral treatment—requires an understanding of the testing practices in this population. To understand men’s HIV testing practices, including their behavior, experiences, and perceptions, we conducted in-depth interviews with 81 black South African MSM (ages 20–39), purposively recruited from four townships. Many men in the sample had tested for HIV. While ever having tested seemed to facilitate repeat testing, men still expressed a high level of discomfort with testing. It was common to test after having engaged in risky behavior, thus increasing anxiety about testing that was already present. Fear that they might test HIV positive caused some men to avoid testing until they were clearly sick, and others to avoid testing completely. HIV testing may increase in this population if it becomes a routine practice, instead of being driven by anxiety-inducing incidents. Mobilization through social support might facilitate frequent testing while education about current treatment options is needed. PMID:25103866

  18. The role of social support on HIV testing and treatment adherence: A qualitative study of HIV-infected refugees in southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Shada A; O'Laughlin, Kelli N; Faustin, Zikama M; Tsai, Alexander C; Kasozi, Julius; Ware, Norma C

    2016-01-19

    Little is known about the factors that encourage or discourage refugees to test for HIV, or to access and adhere to HIV care. In non-refugee populations, social support has been shown to influence HIV testing and utilisation of services. The present study enrolled HIV-infected refugees on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda, who participated in qualitative interviews on HIV testing, treatment, and adherence. Interviews were analysed for themes about four types of social support: emotional, informational, instrumental, and appraisal support. A total of 61 interviews were analysed. Four roles for these types of social support were identified: (1) informational support encouraged refugees to test for HIV; (2) emotional support helped refugees cope with a diagnosis of HIV; (3) instrumental support facilitated adherence to ART and (4) after diagnosis, HIV-infected refugees provided informational and emotional support to encourage other refugees to test for HIV. These results suggest that social support influences HIV testing and treatment among refugees. Future interventions should capitalise on social support within a refugee settlement to facilitate testing and treatment.

  19. Exploring the linkage between exposure to mass media and HIV testing among married women and men in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yujiro; Sedziafa, Alice P; Amoyaw, Jonathan A; Boateng, Godfred O; Kuuire, Vincent Z; Boamah, Sheila; Kwon, Eugena

    2016-01-01

    Although HIV testing is critical to the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS, utilization rate of HIV testing services among married women and men remains low in Ghana. Mass media, as a tool to increase overall HIV testing turnouts, has been considered one of the important strategies in promoting and enhancing behavioural changes related to HIV/AIDS prevention. Using the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey, the current study examines the relationship between levels of exposure to print media, radio, and television and the uptake of HIV testing among married women and men in Ghana. Results show that HIV testing is more prevalent among married women than their male counterparts. We also find that higher levels of exposure to radio is associated with HIV testing among women, while higher levels of exposure to print media and television are associated with HIV testing among men. Implications of these findings are discussed for Ghana's HIV/AIDS strategic framework, which aims to expanding efforts at dealing with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Specifically, it is important for health educators and programme planners to deliver HIV-related messages through television, radio, and print media to increase the uptake of HIV testing particularly among married women and men in Ghana.

  20. HIV rapid testing in a Veterans Affairs hospital ED setting: a 5-year sustainability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Herschel; Hagedorn, Hildi; Anaya, Henry D

    2014-08-01

    Routine HIV testing in primary care settings is now recommended in the United States. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has increased the number of patients tested for HIV, but overall HIV testing rates in VA remain low. A proven strategy for increasing such testing involves nurse-initiated HIV rapid testing (HIV RT). The purpose of this work was to use a mixed methodology approach to evaluate the 5-year sustainability of an intervention that implemented HIV RT in a VA emergency department setting in a large, urban VA medical center to reduce missed diagnostic and treatment opportunities in this vulnerable patient population. In-person semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and stakeholders. Interview notes were qualitatively coded for emerging themes. Quarterly testing rates were evaluated for a 5-year time span starting from the launch in July 2008. Findings indicate that HIV RT was sustained by the enthusiasm of 2 clinical champions who oversaw the registered nurses responsible for conducting the testing. The departure of the clinical champions was correlated with a substantial drop-off in testing. Findings also indicate potential strategies for improving sustainability including engaging senior leadership in the project, engaging line staff in the implementation planning from the start to increase ownership over the innovation, incorporating information into initial training explaining the importance of the innovation to quality patient care, providing ongoing training to maintain skills, and providing routine progress reports to staff to demonstrate the ongoing impact of their efforts.

  1. The Impact of Homophobia and HIV Stigma on HIV Testing Uptake among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chongyi; Cheung, Doug H.; Yan, Hongjing; Li, Jianjun; Shi, Ling-en; Raymond, H. Fisher

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gay and HIV-related stigma and discrimination are major barriers to accessing HIV prevention services among MSM worldwide. We aimed to identify modifiable factors that mediate the relationships between gay and HIV-related stigma and discrimination and HIV testing uptake among Chinese MSM. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional survey study of 523 HIV-uninfected or unknown MSM in Jiangsu Province, China between November 2013 and January 2014. Multivariable analyses were conducted to examine the associations among experienced homophobia, HIV stigma, and recent HIV testing. Causal mediation parametric analyses were conducted to assess whether depression and social norms mediated hypothesized associations. RESULTS Stronger subjective norms toward testing was associated with higher odds of recent HIV testing (AOR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.21) while increasing levels of depression and HIV stigma were both associated with lower odds of recent testing (AOR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92, 0.99; and AOR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99, respectively). There was an indirect relationship (natural indirect effect) of experienced homophobia on recent testing (ORNIE: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93, 0.98) mediated (35.0%) through depression. Furthermore, there was an indirect relationship of HIV stigma on recent testing (ORNIE: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99) mediated (19.2%) through subjective norms. CONCLUSIONS Depression and social norms are important mediators of HIV testing uptake among stigmatized Chinese MSM. Therefore, in addition to advocacy efforts and policies that address social-level stigma and discrimination, HIV prevention programs should also address mental health issues and incorporate community-based approaches to changing social norms toward HIV testing. PMID:26334742

  2. HIV risk, partner violence, and relationship power among Filipino young women: testing a structural model.

    PubMed

    Lucea, Marguerite B; Hindin, Michelle J; Kub, Joan; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2012-01-01

    A person's ability to minimize HIV risk is embedded in a complex, multidimensional context. In this study, we tested a model of how relationship power impacts IPV victimization, which in turn impacts HIV risk behaviors. We analyzed data from 474 young adult women (aged 15-31) in Cebu Province, Philippines, using structural equation modeling, and demonstrated good fit for the models. High relationship power is directly associated with increased IPV victimization, and IPV victimization is positively associated with increased HIV risk. We highlight in this article the complex dynamics to consider in HIV risk prevention among these young women.

  3. Ethical implications of HIV self-testing: the game is far from being over

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Luchuo Engelbert; Ditah, Chobufo Muchi; Awah, Paschal Kum; Ekukwe, Nkoke Clovis

    2016-01-01

    The use of combined Anti-Retroviral Therapy (cART) has been revolutionary in the history of the fight against HIV-AIDS, with remarkable reductions in HIV associated morbidity and mortality. Knowing one's HIV status early, not only increases chances of early initiation of effective, affordable and available treatment, but has lately been associated with an important potential to reduce disease transmission. A public health priority lately has been to lay emphasis on early and wide spread HIV screening. With many countries having already in the market over the counter self-testing kits, the ethical question whether self-testing in HIV with such kits is acceptable remains unanswered. Many Western authors have been firm on the fact that this approach enhances patient autonomy and is ethically grounded. We argue that the notion of patient autonomy as proposed by most ethicists assumes perfect understanding of information around HIV, neglects HIV associated stigma as well as proper identification of risky situations that warrant an HIV test. Putting traditional clinic based HIV screening practice into the shadows might be too early, especially for developing countries and potentially very dangerous. Encouraging self-testing as a measure to accompany clinic based testing in our opinion stands as main precondition for public health to invest in HIV self-testing. We agree with most authors that hard to reach risky groups like men and Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) are easily reached with the self-testing approach. However, linking self-testers to the medical services they need remains a key challenge, and an understudied indispensable obstacle in making this approach to obtain its desired goals. PMID:28292077

  4. HIV/AIDS among youth in urban informal (slum) settlements in Kenya: What are the correlates of and motivations for HIV testing?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although HIV counseling and testing (HCT) is widely considered an integral component of HIV prevention and treatment strategies, few studies have examined HCT behavior among youth in sub-Saharan Africa-a group at substantial risk for HIV infection. In this paper we examine: the correlates of HIV testing, including whether associations differ based on the context under which a person gets tested; and the motivations for getting (or not getting) an HIV test. Methods Drawing on data collected in 2007 from 4028 (51% male) youth (12-22 years) living in Korogocho and Viwandani slum settlements in Nairobi (Kenya), we explored the correlates of and motivations for HIV testing using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses were employed to examine correlates of HIV testing. Bivariate analyses were employed to assess reasons for or against testing. Results Nineteen percent of males and 35% of females had been tested. Among tested youth, 74% of males and 43% of females had requested for their most recent HIV test while 7% of males and 32% of females reported that they were required to take their most recent HIV test (i.e., the test was mandatory). About 60% of females who had ever had sex received an HIV test because they were pregnant. We found modest support for the HBM in explaining variation in testing behavior. In particular, we found that perceived risk for HIV infection may drive HIV testing among youth. For example, about half of youth who had ever had sex but had never been tested reported that they had not been tested because they were not at risk. Conclusions Targeted interventions to help young people correctly assess their level of risk and to increase awareness of the potential value of HIV testing may help enhance uptake of testing services. Given the relative success of Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) services in increasing HIV testing rates among females

  5. Exploring repeat HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Aaron J.; Sullivan, Patrick S.; de Voux, Alex; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Baral, Stefan D.; Winskell, Kate; Kose, Zamakayise; Wirtz, Andrea L.; Brown, Ben; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) – and the general adult population – in South Africa, there is little data regarding the extent to which MSM seek repeat testing for HIV. This study explores reported histories of HIV testing, and the rationales for test seeking, among a purposive sample of 34 MSM in two urban areas of South Africa. MSM participated in activity-based in-depth interviews that included a timeline element to facilitate discussion. Repeat HIV testing was limited among participants, with three-quarters having two or fewer lifetime HIV tests, and over one-third of the sample having one or fewer lifetime tests. For most repeat-testers, the time gap between their HIV tests was greater than the one-year interval recommended by national guidelines. Analysis of the reasons for seeking HIV testing revealed several types of rationale. The reasons for a first HIV test were frequently one-time occurrences, such as a requirement prior to circumcision, or were motivations likely satisfied by a single HIV test. For MSM who reported repeat testing at more timely intervals, the most common rationale was seeking test results with a sex partner. Results indicate a need to shift HIV test promotion messaging and programming for MSM in South Africa away from a one-off model to one that frames HIV testing as a repeated, routine health maintenance behavior. PMID:25134823

  6. Exploring repeat HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Aaron J; Sullivan, Patrick S; de Voux, Alex; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Baral, Stefan D; Winskell, Kate; Kose, Zamakayise; Wirtz, Andrea L; Brown, Ben; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) - and the general adult population - in South Africa, there is little data regarding the extent to which MSM seek repeat testing for HIV. This study explores reported histories of HIV testing, and the rationales for test seeking, among a purposive sample of 34 MSM in two urban areas of South Africa. MSM participated in activity-based in-depth interviews that included a timeline element to facilitate discussion. Repeat HIV testing was limited among participants, with three-quarters having two or fewer lifetime HIV tests, and over one-third of the sample having one or fewer lifetime tests. For most repeat testers, the time gap between their HIV tests was greater than the one-year interval recommended by national guidelines. Analysis of the reasons for seeking HIV testing revealed several types of rationale. The reasons for a first HIV test were frequently one-time occurrences, such as a requirement prior to circumcision, or motivations likely satisfied by a single HIV test. For MSM who reported repeat testing at more timely intervals, the most common rationale was seeking test results with a sex partner. Results indicate a need to shift HIV test promotion messaging and programming for MSM in South Africa away from a one-off model to one that frames HIV testing as a repeated, routine health maintenance behavior.

  7. HIV Testing Among Black and Hispanic Immigrants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ojikutu, Bisola O; Mazzola, Emanuele; Fullem, Andrew; Vega, Rodolfo; Landers, Stewart; Gelman, Rebecca S; Bogart, Laura M

    2016-07-01

    Late presentation is common among black and Hispanic US immigrants living with HIV. Little is known about HIV testing in this population because data are aggregated into racial and ethnic categories without regard to nativity. This study was undertaken to determine HIV testing patterns in these populations. We used data from the National Health Interview Survey (2007-2010), a nationally representative source of HIV testing data disaggregated by nativity. The sample consisted of 10,397 immigrants (83.9% Hispanic white, 13.1% non-Hispanic black, and 3.0% Hispanic black). The majority of participants were from the Caribbean, Central America, and Mexico (81.5%). Hispanic white immigrants were least likely to have undergone testing compared with non-Hispanic and Hispanic black immigrants (46.7% vs. 70.5% and 65.8%). Among immigrants with known risk factors or prior STDs, 59.2% and 74.8% reported previous HIV testing. Immigrants who had not recently talked to a healthcare provider were less likely to report testing: Hispanic white (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.58-0.72), non-Hispanic black (AOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.85), and Hispanic black (AOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14-0.48). Only 17.2% of all immigrants intended to undergo HIV testing in the 12 months following participation in the survey. Among all three racial and ethnic groups, immigrants who reported a history of prior STDs were more likely to intend to test for HIV in the future. Many black and Hispanic immigrants to the United States have not undergone HIV testing. Interventions to increase access to HIV testing and awareness of transmission risk should be developed.

  8. HIV Testing among Adolescents in Ndola, Zambia: How Individual, Relational, and Environmental Factors Relate to Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Julie A.; McCauley, Ann P.; Dunnett-Dagg, Wendy A.; Lungu, Nalakwanji; Sweat, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how individual, relational and environmental factors related to adolescent demand for HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT). A cross-sectional survey among randomly selected 16-19-year-olds in Ndola, Zambia, covered individual (e.g., HIV knowledge), environmental (e.g., distance), and relational factors (e.g., discussed…

  9. Commentary: Ethical Considerations in Testing Victims of Sexual Abuse for HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fost, Norman

    1990-01-01

    Ethical issues in screening of victims of sexual abuse for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are raised in response to Gellert (EC 222 881). It is concluded that widescale HIV testing of child victims of sexual abuse is not justified by the available information. (DB)

  10. Should we look for Strongyloides stercoralis in foreign-born HIV-infected persons?

    PubMed

    Llenas-García, Jara; Fiorante, Silvana; Salto, Efrén; Maseda, Diego; Rodríguez, Violeta; Matarranz, Mariano; Hernando, Asunción; Rubio, Rafael; Pulido, Federico

    2013-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the implementation of a systematic Strongyloides stercoralis screening programme in HIV infected immigrants attending an HIV Unit in Spain. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to assess the presence of Strongyloides IgG. Patients with a positive serology were treated with ivermectin; serologic follow-up testing was performed. 237 patients were screened (65.4 % men). Origin: 64.1 % came from Latin America, 16.5 % from Sub-Saharan Africa, 9.7 % from the Caribbean, 9.7 % from other areas. Strongyloides stercolaris IgG was positive in 13 cases (5.5 %). In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with a positive Strongyloides serology were illiteracy (OR: 23.31; p = 0.009) and eosinophilia (OR: 15.44; p < 0.0001). Nine of the 13 patients positive for S. stercoralis IgG and treated with ivermectin had a follow up serologic test: 77.8 % achieved a serologic response (55.5 % seroreversion). Screening of HIV-positive immigrants may be desirable, at least in those with higher risk of hyperinfection syndrome. Serologic testing seems a useful tool in both diagnosis and follow-up of these patients.

  11. Molecular evidence for infection by HTLV-2 among individuals with negative serological screening tests for HTLV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Vallinoto, A C R; Azevedo, V N; Vicente, A C P; Hall, W W; Ishak, M O G

    2007-05-01

    Previous serological studies on the Arara do Laranjal Indian group revealed extensive HTLV-2 infections. A collection of 97 new samples from the Arara were found repeatedly negative using three different commercial enzyme immunoassays. Eight samples that exhibited optical density readings close to the cut-off value were re-evaluated using Western blot (GeneLab 2.4, Singapore) assay. One sample was found to be non-reactive, five exhibited indeterminate patterns, one was classified as HTLV, and one was confirmed as HTLV-2. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA of the eight samples were subjected to nested PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the pX and env regions, and nucleotide sequencing of the 5'-LTR region. All produced amplification products of pX, but env could be amplified in only one sample with the commonly used primers. RFLP analysis of the pX region using TaqI confirmed HTLV-2 infection. Nucleotide sequencing of the 5'-LTR region was performed in three samples (HTLV-2, HTLV and indeterminate based on Western blot pattern). Phylogenetic analysis of a 449-nt fragment using the Neighbour-Joining method clearly demonstrated that the three samples clustered within the HTLV-2c molecular subtype. The present study confirms the wide dissemination of the HTLV-2c subtype among linguistically and culturally distinct Amazonian Indian groups, and emphasizes the unique occurrence of infection by this subtype in Brazil. Moreover, it emphasizes the limitation of employing the present serological screening assays in blood banks, epidemiological studies, and the importance of molecular assays in the confirmatory procedures for the primary detection of HTLV-2 infections.

  12. HIV Testing, Perceived Vulnerability and Correlates of HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors of Latino and African American Young Male Gang Members

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Ronald A.; Lee, Sung-Jae; Stover, Gabriel N.; Barkley, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This study examined HIV testing behaviors, perceived vulnerability to HIV, and correlates of sexual risk behaviors of young adult Latino and African American male gang members in Los Angeles, California. Data were collected from 249 gang members ages 18–26 years old. The majority (59%) of gang members reported unprotected vaginal intercourse (UVI) in the past 12 months. Only one-third (33.2%) of gang members had ever been tested for HIV. In our multivariate analysis, gang members who reported UVI were more likely to have engaged in the following behaviors: had sex with someone they just met (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 4.51), had sex with someone they think or know had an STD (AOR = 4.67), or had sex while incarcerated (AOR = 8.92). In addition, gang members with a higher perceived vulnerability to HIV were less likely to report UVI in the previous 12 months (AOR= 0.75). These findings offer implications for development of an HIV prevention intervention for young Latino and African American male gang members. PMID:21364062

  13. HIV testing, perceived vulnerability and correlates of HIV sexual risk behaviours of Latino and African American young male gang members.

    PubMed

    Brooks, R A; Lee, S-J; Stover, G N; Barkley, T W

    2011-01-01

    This study examined HIV testing behaviours, perceived vulnerability to HIV and correlates of sexual risk behaviours of young adult Latino and African American male gang members in Los Angeles, California. Data were collected from 249 gang members aged 18-26 years. The majority (59%) of gang members reported unprotected vaginal intercourse (UVI) in the past 12 months. Only one-third (33.2%) of gang members had ever been tested for HIV. In our multivariate analysis, gang members who reported UVI were more likely to have engaged in the following behaviours: had sex with someone they just met (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.51), had sex with someone they think or know had a sexually transmitted infection (STI; AOR = 4.67) or had sex while incarcerated (AOR = 8.92). In addition, gang members with a higher perceived vulnerability to HIV were less likely to report UVI in the previous 12 months (AOR = 0.75). These findings offer implications for development of an HIV prevention intervention for young Latino and African American male gang members.

  14. Associations of HIV testing and late diagnosis at a Japanese university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Tetsuya; Sato, Fumiya; Kato, Tetsuro; Hosaka, Yumiko; Shimizu, Akihiro; Kawano, Shinji; Hoshina, Tokio; Nakaharai, Kazuhiko; Nakazawa, Yasushi; Yoshikawa, Koji; Yoshida, Masaki; Hori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to clarify the rate of late diagnosis of HIV infection and to identify relationships between the reasons for HIV testing and a late diagnosis. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was conducted among HIV-positive patients at the Jikei University Hospital between 2001 and 2014. Patient characteristics from medical records, including age, sex, sexuality, the reason for HIV testing and the number of CD4-positive lymphocytes at HIV diagnosis, were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 459 patients (men, n=437; 95.2%) were included in this study and the median age at HIV diagnosis was 36 years (range, 18–71 years). Late (CD4 cell count <350/mm3) and very late (CD4 cell count <200/mm3) diagnoses were observed in 61.4% (282/459) and 36.6% (168/459) of patients, respectively. The most common reason for HIV diagnosis was voluntary testing (38.6%, 177/459 patients), followed by AIDS-defining illness (18.3%, 84/459 patients). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association of voluntary HIV testing with non-late and non-very-late diagnoses and there was a high proportion of AIDS-defining illness in the late and very late diagnosis groups compared with other groups. Men who have sex with men was a relative factor for non-late diagnosis, whereas nonspecific abnormal blood test results, such as hypergammaglobulinemia and thrombocytopenia, were risk factors for very late diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Voluntary HIV testing should be encouraged and physicians should screen all patients who have symptoms or signs and particularly hypergammaglobulinemia and thrombocytopenia, that may nonspecifically indicate HIV infection. PMID:26934235

  15. Distance to testing sites and its association with timing of HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cope, Anna B; Powers, Kimberly A; Serre, Marc L; Escamilla, Veronica; Emch, Michael E; Leone, Peter A; Mobley, Victoria L; Miller, William C

    2016-11-01

    Early HIV diagnosis enables prompt treatment initiation, thereby contributing to decreased morbidity, mortality, and transmission. We aimed to describe the association between distance from residence to testing sites and HIV disease stage at diagnosis. Using HIV surveillance data, we identified all new HIV diagnoses made at publicly funded testing sites in central North Carolina during 2005-2013. Early-stage HIV was defined as acute HIV (antibody-negative test with a positive HIV RNA) or recent HIV (normalized optical density <0.8 on the BED assay for non-AIDS cases); remaining diagnoses were considered post-early-stage HIV. Street distance between residence at diagnosis and (1) the closest testing site and (2) the diagnosis site was dichotomized at 5 miles. We fit log-binomial models using generalized estimating equations to estimate prevalence ratios (PR) and robust 95% confidence intervals (CI) for post-early-stage diagnoses by distance. Models were adjusted for race/ethnicity and testing period. Most of the 3028 new diagnoses were black (N = 2144; 70.8%), men who have sex with men (N = 1685; 55.7%), and post-early-stage HIV diagnoses (N = 2010; 66.4%). Overall, 1145 (37.8%) cases traveled <5 miles for a diagnosis. Among cases traveling ≥5 miles for a diagnosis, 1273 (67.6%) lived <5 miles from a different site. Residing ≥5 miles from a testing site was not associated with post-early-stage HIV (adjusted PR, 95% CI: 0.98, 0.92-1.04), but traveling ≥5 miles for a diagnosis was associated with higher post-early HIV prevalence (1.07, 1.02-1.13). Most of the elevated prevalence observed in cases traveling ≥5 miles for a diagnosis occurred among those living <5 miles from a different site (1.09, 1.03-1.16). Modest increases in post-early-stage HIV diagnosis were apparent among persons living near a site, but choosing to travel longer distances to test. Understanding reasons for increased travel distances could improve accessibility and

  16. Point-of-care testing for HIV in an Irish prison setting: results from three major Irish prisons.

    PubMed

    Bannan, Ciaran L; Lynch, Pamela A; Conroy, Emmett P; O'Dea, Siobhan; Surah, Saloni; Betts-Symonds, Graham; Lyons, Fiona E

    2016-10-01

    HIV is more prevalent in the prison population compared to the general population. Prison inmates are at an increased risk of blood-borne infections. Considerable stigma has been documented amongst inmates with HIV infection. In collaboration with the schools, healthcare facilities, prison authorities and inmate Irish Red Cross groups in Wheatfield, Cloverhill and Mountjoy prisons in Dublin, Ireland, the Department of Genito Urinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases at St James' Hospital in Dublin developed a campaign for raising awareness of HIV, educating inmates about HIV and tackling HIV stigma. Following this campaign, large-scale point-of-care testing for HIV was offered over a short period. In total, 741 inmates were screened for HIV. One inmate tested positive for HIV. We experienced a large number of invalid test results, requiring formal laboratory serum testing, and a small number of false positive results. Large-scale point-of-care testing in the Irish prison setting is acceptable and achievable.

  17. Stress and coping in HIV-positive former plasma/blood donors in China: a test of cognitive appraisal theory.

    PubMed

    Meade, Christina S; Wang, Jianping; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Hao; Poppen, Paul J

    2010-04-01

    Throughout the 1990s, many villagers in rural China were infected with HIV through commercial plasma/blood donation. These former plasma/blood donors (FPDs) experienced many HIV-related stressors. This study tested a cognitive appraisal model of stress and coping in a sample of HIV-positive adult FPDs. Participants (N = 207) from multiple villages completed a battery of questionnaires assessing HIV-related stress, HIV symptoms, cognitive appraisal, coping behaviors, and psychological distress. Participants reported high levels of HIV-related stress, depression, and anxiety. In a structural equation model, greater HIV-related stress, HIV symptoms, and threat appraisal were directly associated with psychological distress. HIV-related stress was also indirectly associated with psychological distress through threat appraisal. In a second model, coping was found to mediate the relationship between challenge appraisal and psychological distress. Results support the utility of cognitive appraisal theory. Stress management interventions targeting HIV-positive FPDs in China are indicated.

  18. Factors Associated With Receiving Rapid HIV Testing Among Individuals on Probation or Parole.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Carswell, Steven B; Wilson, Monique; Kinlock, Timothy W; Restivo, Lauren; McKenzie, Michelle; Rich, Josiah D

    2016-10-01

    Despite the strong correlation between HIV and corrections, testing and prevention efforts have largely been ignored among community corrections populations. The current study is a secondary analysis to compare characteristics of individuals under community corrections supervision who completed rapid HIV testing with those who refused such testing (N = 2,382) in Baltimore, Maryland, and Providence, Rhode Island. Results indicate that the following variables were significantly associated with the receipt of rapid HIV testing: being female (p = .024), Black race (p = .004), homeless (p = .016), early age of crime onset (p = .001), more drug use during the past 90 days (p = .033), and previously tested for hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus (p = .024). Such findings make it especially important that individuals under community supervision be linked with services in the community to ensure that HIV testing and health care planning occur simultaneously.

  19. Risk profile and HIV testing outcomes of women undergoing community-based testing in San Diego 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Graves, Susannah K; Little, Susan J; Hoenigl, Martin

    2017-02-06

    Women comprised 19% of new HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2014, with significant racial and ethnic disparities in infection rates. This cross-sectional analysis of women enrolled in a cohort study compares demographics, risk behaviour, and sexually transmitted infections (STI) in those undergoing HIV testing in San Diego County. Data from the most recent screening visit of women undergoing voluntary HIV screening April 2008 -July 2014 was used. HIV diagnosis, risk behaviour and self-reported STIs were compared among women aged ≤24, 25-49, and ≥50, as well as between HIV-infected and uninfected women and between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. Among the 2535 women included, Hispanic women were less likely than other women to report unprotected vaginal intercourse (p = 0.026) or stimulant drug use (p = 0.026), and more likely to report one or fewer partners (p < 0.0001), but also more likely to report sex with an HIV-infected individual (p = 0.027). New HIV infection was significantly more prevalent among Hispanic women (1.6% vs. 0.2%; p < 0.001). Hispanic women were more likely than other women to be diagnosed with HIV despite significantly lower rates of risk behaviour. Culturally specific risk reduction interventions for Hispanic women should focus on awareness of partner risk and appropriate testing.

  20. Risk profile and HIV testing outcomes of women undergoing community-based testing in San Diego 2008–2014

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Susannah K.; Little, Susan J.; Hoenigl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Women comprised 19% of new HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2014, with significant racial and ethnic disparities in infection rates. This cross-sectional analysis of women enrolled in a cohort study compares demographics, risk behaviour, and sexually transmitted infections (STI) in those undergoing HIV testing in San Diego County. Data from the most recent screening visit of women undergoing voluntary HIV screening April 2008 –July 2014 was used. HIV diagnosis, risk behaviour and self-reported STIs were compared among women aged ≤24, 25–49, and ≥50, as well as between HIV-infected and uninfected women and between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. Among the 2535 women included, Hispanic women were less likely than other women to report unprotected vaginal intercourse (p = 0.026) or stimulant drug use (p = 0.026), and more likely to report one or fewer partners (p < 0.0001), but also more likely to report sex with an HIV-infected individual (p = 0.027). New HIV infection was significantly more prevalent among Hispanic women (1.6% vs. 0.2%; p < 0.001). Hispanic women were more likely than other women to be diagnosed with HIV despite significantly lower rates of risk behaviour. Culturally specific risk reduction interventions for Hispanic women should focus on awareness of partner risk and appropriate testing. PMID:28165056

  1. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vibrio cholerae serological reagents. 866.3930... cholerae serological reagents. (a) Identification. Vibrio cholerae serological reagents are devices that are used in the agglutination (an antigen-antibody clumping reaction) test to identify Vibrio...

  2. HIV-testing behavior among young migrant men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Liying; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Liu, Yinjie; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies suggested a rapid increase of HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China in recent years, from 0.4% in 2004 to 5.8% in 2006. However, some MSM had never been tested for HIV. In order to expand the accessibility to HIV testing, understanding HIV-testing behavior and barriers among MSM is important. Using data collected from 307 young migrant MSM (aged 18-29 years) in 2009 in Beijing, we aimed to identify psychological and structural barriers to HIV testing. MSM were recruited through peer outreach, informal social networks, Internet outreach, and venue-based outreach. Participants completed a confidential self-administered questionnaire. Results show that about 72% of MSM ever had an HIV test. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the HIV-testing behavior was associated with sexual risk behaviors (e.g., multiple sexual partners and inconsistent condom use for anal sex) and history of sexually transmitted diseases. Eighty four MSM (28%) who never had an HIV test reported that the psychological barriers mainly were perceived low risk of HIV infection and fears of being stigmatized. The structural barriers reported inconvenience of doing test and lack of confidentiality. Future HIV prevention programs should be strengthened among MSM to increase their awareness of HIV risk. Efforts are needed to increase access to quality and confidential HIV testing among MSM and reduce stigma against MSM.

  3. HIV screening practices for living organ donors, New York State, 2010: need for standard policies.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Candice K; Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Smith, Lou C; Sabharwal, Charulata J; Valente, Kim A; Torian, Lucia V; McMurdo, Lisa M; Shepard, Colin W; Brooks, John T; Kuehnert, Matthew J

    2012-10-01

    Our survey of kidney and liver transplant centers in New York State found a wide variation among transplant centers in evaluation and screening for HIV risk and infection among prospective living donors. Survey results underscore the need to standardize practices. A recent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from a living donor to a kidney recipient revealed a possible limitation in existing screening protocols for HIV infection in living donors. We surveyed kidney and liver transplant centers (N = 18) in New York State to assess HIV screening protocols for living donors. Although most transplant centers evaluated HIV risk behaviors in living donors, evaluation practices varied widely, as did the extent of HIV testing and prevention counseling. All centers screened living donors for serologic evidence of HIV infection, either during initial evaluation or ≥1 month before surgery; however, only 50% of transplant centers repeated HIV testing within 14 days before surgery for all donors or donors with specific risk behaviors. Forty-four percent of transplant centers used HIV nucleic acid testing (NAT) to screen either all donors or donors with recognized risk behaviors, and 55% never performed HIV NAT. Results suggest the need to standardize evaluation of HIV risk behaviors and prevention counseling in New York State to prevent acquisition of HIV by prospective living organ donors, and to conduct HIV antibody testing and NAT as close to the time of donation as possible to prevent HIV transmission to recipients.

  4. To Test or Not to Test: Barriers and Solutions to Testing African American College Students for HIV at a Historically Black College/University.

    PubMed

    Hall, Naomi M; Peterson, Jennifer; Johnson, Malynnda

    2014-01-01

    Young African Americans are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. The purpose was to identify reasons that African American college students at a historically Black college/university (HBCU) identified as barriers to HIV testing, and how these barriers can be removed. Fifty-seven heterosexual-identified undergraduate students (ages 18-25) attending an HBCU in the southeastern US participated in a mixed method study. Latent content analytic techniques were used to code the transcripts for themes and categories, and representative quotations were used in the findings. Quantitative data indicates high levels of perceived knowledge about HIV transmission, low perception of risk and concern of contracting HIV, yet continued sexual risk behavior. Qualitative data indicates three main themes used to avoid testing and three themes to encourage testing. Students were forthcoming in discussing the themes around avoidance of HIV testing (being scared to know, preferring not to know, and lack of discussion about HIV) and encouraging testing (group testing, increasing basic knowledge, and showing the reality of HIV). It is important for college healthcare professionals, researchers, and officials to identify appropriate ways to encourage HIV testing, and promote testing as part of overall health.

  5. Intimate Partner Violence after Disclosure of HIV Test Results among Pregnant Women in Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Shamu, Simukai; Zarowsky, Christina; Shefer, Tamara; Temmerman, Marleen; Abrahams, Naeemah

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV status disclosure is a central strategy in HIV prevention and treatment but in high prevalence settings women test disproportionately and most often during pregnancy. This study reports intimate partner violence (IPV) following disclosure of HIV test results by pregnant women. Methods In this cross sectional study we interviewed 1951 postnatal women who tested positive and negative for HIV about IPV experiences following HIV test disclosure, using an adapted WHO questionnaire. Multivariate regression models assessed factors associated with IPV after disclosure and controlled for factors such as previous IPV and other known behavioural factors associated with IPV. Results Over 93% (1817) disclosed the HIV results to their partners (96.5% HIV− vs. 89.3% HIV+, p<0.0001). Overall HIV prevalence was 15.3%, (95%CI:13.7–16.9), 35.2% among non-disclosers and 14.3% among disclosers. Overall 32.8% reported IPV (40.5% HIV+; 31.5% HIV− women, p = 0.004). HIV status was associated with IPV (partially adjusted 1.43: (95%CI:1.00–2.05 as well as reporting negative reactions by male partners immediately after disclosure (adjusted OR 5.83, 95%CI:4.31–7.80). Factors associated with IPV were gender inequity, past IPV, risky sexual behaviours and living with relatives. IPV after HIV disclosure in pregnancy is high but lower than and is strongly related with IPV before pregnancy (adjusted OR 6.18, 95%CI: 3.84–9.93). Conclusion The study demonstrates the interconnectedness of IPV, HIV status and its disclosure with IPV which was a common experience post disclosure of both an HIV positive and HIV negative result. Health services must give attention to the gendered nature and consequences of HIV disclosure such as enskilling women on how to determine and respond to the risks associated with disclosure. Efforts to involve men in antenatal care must also be strengthened. PMID:25350001

  6. Performance of Determine Combo and other Point-of-Care HIV Tests Among Seattle MSM

    PubMed Central

    Stekler, Joanne D.; Ure, George; O’Neal, Joshua D.; Lane, Aric; Swanson, Fred; Maenza, Janine; Stevens, Claire; Coombs, Robert W.; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul D.; Golden, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The Rapid Test Study was a real-time comparison of point-of-care (POC) HIV tests to determine their abilities to detect early HIV infection. Study Design Men and transgender persons reporting sex with men in the prior year were recruited at the Public Health – Seattle & King County STD Clinic, Gay City Health Project, and University of Washington Primary Infection Clinic. Study tests included the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test performed on oral fluids and tests performed on fingerstick whole blood specimens including OraQuick, Uni-Gold Recombigen HIV Test, Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo, and INSTI HIV-1 Rapid Antibody Test. Specimens from subjects with negative results were sent for EIA and nucleic acid amplification testing. McNemar's exact tests compared the numbers of HIV-infected subjects detected. Results Between February 2010 and August 2014, there were 3438 study visits. Twenty-four subjects had discordant POC results with at least one reactive and one non-reactive test, including one subject with a reactive Determine p24 antigen. OraQuick performed on oral fluids identified fewer persons compared to all fingerstick tests. OraQuick performed on fingerstick whole blood detected fewer persons compared to the Determine Combo antibody component (p=.008) and Combo overall (p=.004), and there was a trend when compared to INSTI (p=.06). The Determine Combo specificity was 98.99%. Conclusions As reported by others, Determine Combo underperforms compared to laboratory-based testing, but it did detect one acute infection. If these results are validated, the specificity of Determine Combo may limit its usefulness in populations with lower HIV incidence. PMID:26774543

  7. HIV Testing Among Internet-Using MSM in the United States: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Noble, Meredith; Jones, Amanda M; Bowles, Kristina; DiNenno, Elizabeth A; Tregear, Stephen J

    2017-02-01

    Regular HIV testing enables early identification and treatment of HIV among at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM). Characterizing HIV testing needs for Internet-using MSM informs development of Internet-facilitated testing interventions. In this systematic review we analyze HIV testing patterns among Internet-using MSM in the United States who report, through participation in an online study or survey, their HIV status as negative or unknown and identify demographic or behavioral risk factors associated with testing. We systematically searched multiple electronic databases for relevant English-language articles published between January 1, 2005 and December 16, 2014. Using meta-analysis, we summarized the proportion of Internet-using MSM who had ever tested for HIV and the proportion who tested in the 12 months preceding participation in the online study or survey. We also identified factors predictive of these outcomes using meta-regression and narrative synthesis. Thirty-two studies that enrolled 83,186 MSM met our inclusion criteria. Among the studies reporting data for each outcome, 85 % (95 % CI 82-87 %) of participants had ever tested, and 58 % (95 % CI 53-63 %) had tested in the year preceding enrollment in the study, among those for whom those data were reported. Age over 30 years, at least a college education, use of drugs, and self-identification as being homosexual or gay were associated with ever having tested for HIV. A large majority of Internet-using MSM indicated they had been tested for HIV at some point in the past. A smaller proportion-but still a majority-reported they had been tested within the year preceding study or survey participation. MSM who self-identify as heterosexual or bisexual, are younger, or who use drugs (including non-injection drugs) may be less likely to have ever tested for HIV. The overall findings of our systematic review are encouraging; however, a subpopulation of MSM may benefit from targeted outreach. These

  8. Decreasing cost effectiveness of testing for latent TB in HIV in a low TB incidence area.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Santino; Smith, Colette; Morris, Stephen; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Johnson, Margaret; Lipman, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons in low tuberculosis (TB) incidence areas is often recommended. Using contemporary, clinical data, we report the yield and cost-effectiveness of testing all HIV attendees, two current UK strategies and no LTBI testing. Economic modelling was performed utilising 10-year follow up data from a large HIV clinical cohort. Outcomes were numbers of cases of active TB and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Between 2000 and 2010, 256 people were treated for TB/HIV co-infection. 72 (28%) occurred ≥3 months after HIV diagnosis and may have been prevented by LTBI testing. Between 2000 and 2005, the incremental cost per QALY gained for the British HIV Association (BHIVA) and UK National Institute of Care Excellence (NICE) strategies, and testing all clinic attendees was €6270, €6998 and €33,473, respectively. These rose to €9332, €32,564 and €74,067, respectively, between 2005 and 2010. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis suggested that at a threshold of €24,000 per additional QALY, the most cost-effective strategies would be NICE or testing all in 2000-2005 and BHIVA during 2005-2010. Both UK testing regimens missed cases but are cost-effective compared with no testing. Using recent data, they all became more expensive, suggesting that alternative or more targeted TB testing strategies must be considered.

  9. From Their Voices: Barriers to HIV Testing among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Remain

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Thomas Alex; D’Anna, Laura; Meyer-Adams, Nancy; Malotte, C. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background: HIV testing continues to be a major priority for addressing the epidemic among young Black men who have sex with men (BMSM). Methods: This study explored barriers to HIV testing uptake, and recommendations for motivating HIV testing uptake