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Sample records for hiv therapeutic possibilities

  1. What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services HIV Overview What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine? (Last updated 10/17/2016; last reviewed 10/ ... from the body. What is a therapeutic HIV vaccine? A therapeutic HIV vaccine is a vaccine that’s ...

  2. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  3. Attacking HIV provirus: therapeutic strategies to disrupt persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Archin, Nancy M

    2006-12-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection continues to expand. New targets such as entry and integration have recently been successfully exploited. However, HIV-infected patients in need of treatment are currently committed to lifelong suppressive therapy. The persistence of integrated HIV DNA genomes capable of producing virus is a fundamental obstacle to the eradication or cure of HIV infection. Rational molecular or pharmacologic strategies to eliminate persistent HIV proviral genomes are an unaddressed therapeutic need. Coupled with potent antiretroviral therapy, treatments that could efficiently deplete the persistent DNA reservoir of HIV could radically alter treatment paradigms. Prior attempts to target persistent proviral infection deployed intensive antiretroviral therapy (ART) in combination with global inducers of T-cell activation. Initial trials of this approach were unsuccessful. Non-specific T-cell activation may induce high-level viral replication above a level that can be fully contained by ART, while increasing the susceptibility of uninfected cells. Selective targeting of HIV provirus via agents that induce the expression of quiescent HIV, but have limited effects on the uninfected host cell is an alternate approach to attack latent HIV. Recent studies define the role of repressive chromatin structure in maintaining HIV quiescence, and suggest that mechanisms that remodel chromatin about the HIV promoter are a possible therapeutic target. Other studies have uncovered specific factors that may act to induce or maintain latency by limiting the efficiency of HIV gene expression. Attempts to deplete latent HIV using drugs that alter chromatin structure have entered clinical study.

  4. Conotoxins that confer therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2012-06-01

    Cone snails produce a distinctive repertoire of venom peptides that are used both as a defense mechanism and also to facilitate the immobilization and digestion of prey. These peptides target a wide variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, which make them an invaluable resource for studying the properties of these ion channels in normal and diseased states, as well as being a collection of compounds of potential pharmacological use in their own right. Examples include the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pharmaceutical drug, Ziconotide (Prialt(®); Elan Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) that is the synthetic equivalent of the naturally occurring ω-conotoxin MVIIA, whilst several other conotoxins are currently being used as standard research tools and screened as potential therapeutic drugs in pre-clinical or clinical trials. These developments highlight the importance of driving conotoxin-related research. A PubMed query from 1 January 2007 to 31 August 2011 combined with hand-curation of the retrieved articles allowed for the collation of 98 recently identified conotoxins with therapeutic potential which are selectively discussed in this review. Protein sequence similarity analysis tentatively assigned uncharacterized conotoxins to predicted functional classes. Furthermore, conotoxin therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) was also inferred.

  5. Fragment screening and HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Joseph D; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target.

  6. Therapeutic vaccination reduces HIV sequence variability.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Seebach, Judith; Cosma, Antonio; Goebel, Frank D; Strimmer, Korbinian; Schätzl, Hermann M; Erfle, Volker

    2008-02-01

    With HIV persisting lifelong in infected persons, therapeutic vaccination is a novel alternative concept to control virus replication. Even though CD8 and CD4 cell responses to such immunizations have been demonstrated, their effects on virus replication are still unclear. In view of this fact, we studied the impact of a therapeutic vaccination with HIV nef delivered by a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara vector on viral diversity. We investigated HIV sequences derived from chronically infected persons before and after therapeutic vaccination. Before immunization the mean +/- se pairwise variability of patient-derived Nef protein sequences was 0.1527 +/- 0.0041. After vaccination the respective value was 0.1249 +/- 0.0042, resulting in a significant (P<0.0001) difference between the two time points. The genes vif and 5'gag tested in parallel and nef sequences in control persons yielded a constant amino acid sequence variation. The data presented suggest that Nef immunization induced a selective pressure, limiting HIV sequence variability. To our knowledge this is the first report directly linking therapeutic HIV vaccination to decreasing diversity in patient-derived virus isolates.

  7. Cell signaling pathways and HIV-1 therapeutics.

    PubMed

    He, Johnny J

    2011-06-01

    Host-virus interactions permeate every aspect of both virus life cycle and host response and involve host cell macromolecular machinery and viral elements. It is these intimate interactions that mandate the outcomes of the infection and pathogenesis. It is also these intimate interactions that lay the foundation for the development of pharmaceutical interventions. HIV-1 is no exception in these regards. In the first two decades, HIV/AIDS research has led to the successful development of a number of antiviral inhibitors and the landmark formulation of the suppressive therapy. It has become apparent that this therapy does not offer a complete solution to cure and eradicate the virus. Meanwhile, this therapy has changed the overall landscape of HIV-associated neurological disorders to a more common and prevalent form so-called minor cognitive motor disorder. Thus, there is an important and continued need for new anti-HIV therapeutics. We believe that this is an excellent opportunity to compile and present the latest works being done during the last few years in this exciting field of HIV-host interactions, particularly cell signaling pathways. We hope that this special issue composed of one brief report, eight thematic reviews, and two original articles will serve to foster the exchange of new scientific ideas on HIV-host interactions and anti-HIV therapy and eventually contribute to HIV/AIDS eradication.

  8. Candidate antibody-based therapeutics against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-06-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics have been successfully used for the treatment of various diseases and as research tools. Several well characterized, broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) targeting HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins or related host cell surface proteins show sterilizing protection of animals, but they are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection in humans. Recently, a number of novel bnmAbs, engineered antibody domains (eAds), and multifunctional fusion proteins have been reported which exhibit exceptionally potent and broad neutralizing activity against a wide range of HIV-1 isolates from diverse genetic subtypes. eAds could be more effective in vivo than conventional full-size antibodies generated by the human immune system. Because of their small size (12∼15 kD), they can better access sterically restricted epitopes and penetrate densely packed tissue where HIV-1 replicates than the larger full-size antibodies. HIV-1 possesses a number of mechanisms to escape neutralization by full-size antibodies but could be less likely to develop resistance to eAds. Here, we review the in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacies of existing HIV-1 bnmAbs, summarize the development of eAds and multispecific fusion proteins as novel types of HIV-1 inhibitors, and discuss possible strategies to generate more potent antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV-1, including some that could be used to eradicate the virus.

  9. Pharmacokinetic enhancers in HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kajal B; Wang, Kun; Delille, Cecile; Otofokun, Igho; Acosta, Edward P

    2014-10-01

    Maximal and durable viral load suppression is one of the most important goals of HIV therapy and is directly related to adequate drug exposure. Protease inhibitors (PIs), an important component of the antiretroviral armada, were historically associated with poor oral bioavailability and high pill burden. However, because the PIs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A enzymes, intentional inhibition of these enzymes leads to higher drug exposure, lower pill burden, and therefore simplified dosing schedules with this class of drug. This is the basis of pharmacokinetic enhancement. In HIV therapy, two pharmacokinetic enhancers or boosting agents are used: ritonavir and cobicistat. Both agents inhibit CYP3A4, with cobicistat being a more specific CYP inhibitor than ritonavir. Unlike ritonavir, cobicistat does not have antiretroviral activity. Cobicistat has been evaluated in clinical trials and was recently approved in the USA as a fixed-dose combination with the integrase inhibitor, elvitegravir and two nucleos(t)ide analogs. Additional studies are examining cobicistat in fixed-dose combinations with various PIs. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of these agents and clinically relevant drug regimens and ongoing trials. Studies with elvitegravir and the novel PI TMC319011 are also discussed.

  10. TB and HIV Therapeutics: Pharmacology Research Priorities.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kelly E; Kim, Peter S; Williams, Sharon D; Hafner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    An unprecedented number of investigational drugs are in the development pipeline for the treatment of tuberculosis. Among patients with tuberculosis, co-infection with HIV is common, and concurrent treatment of tuberculosis and HIV is now the standard of care. To ensure that combinations of anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals are safe and are tested at doses most likely to be effective, selected pharmacokinetic studies based on knowledge of their metabolic pathways and their capacity to induce or inhibit metabolizing enzymes of companion drugs must be conducted. Drug interaction studies should be followed up by evaluations in larger populations to evaluate safety and pharmacodynamics more fully. Involving patients with HIV in trials of TB drugs early in development enhances the knowledge gained from the trials and will ensure that promising new tuberculosis treatments are available to patients with HIV as early as possible. In this review, we summarize current and planned pharmacokinetic and drug interaction studies involving investigational and licensed tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals and suggest priorities for tuberculosis-HIV pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction studies for the future. Priority studies for children and pregnant women with HIV and tuberculosis co-infection are briefly discussed.

  11. [Splenic abscess: etiology, diagnosis and possible therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Burnier, C; Ribordy-Baudat, V; Lamy, O

    2007-10-31

    We report the case of a 28-year-old intravenous drug abuser under quadritherapy for stage C3 AIDS and with past history of infectious endocarditis. He was admitted with a diminished general condition, weight loss, progressive unbearable abdominal pain and vomiting, without fever. An inflammatory syndrome is noted and imaging reveals a voluminous splenic abscess. Conservative treatment is initiated with repetitive drainages and intravenous antibiotics. Aetiologies, diagnosis and possible therapeutics of splenic abscesses are discussed.

  12. Fighting HIV/AIDS: is success possible?

    PubMed Central

    Okware, S.; Opio, A.; Musinguzi, J.; Waibale, P.

    2001-01-01

    The fight against HIV/AIDS poses enormous challenges worldwide, generating fears that success may be too difficult or even impossible to attain. Uganda has demonstrated that an early, consistent and multisectoral control strategy can reduce both the prevalence and the incidence of HIV infection. From only two AIDS cases in 1982, the epidemic in Uganda grew to a cumulative 2 million HIV infections by the end of 2000. The AIDS Control Programme established in 1987 in the Ministry of Health mounted a national response that expanded over time to reach other relevant sectors under the coordinating role of the Uganda AIDS Commission. The national response was to bring in new policies, expanded partnerships, increased institutional capacity for care and research, public health education for behaviour change, strengthened sexually transmitted disease (STD) management, improved blood transfusion services, care and support services for persons with HIV/AIDS, and a surveillance system to monitor the epidemic. After a decade of fighting on these fronts, Uganda became, in October 1996, the first African nation to report declining trends in HIV infection. Further decline in prevalence has since been noted. The Medical Research Council (UK) and the Uganda Virus Research Institute have demonstrated declining HIV incidence rates in the general population in the Kyamulibwa in Masaka Districts. Repeat knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and practice studies have shown positive changes in the priority prevention indicators. The data suggest that a comprehensive national response supported by strong political commitment may be responsible for the observed decline. Other countries in sub-Saharan Africa can achieve similar results by these means. Since success is possible, anything less is unacceptable. PMID:11799443

  13. HIV Therapeutic Vaccines: Moving towards a Functional Cure

    PubMed Central

    Mylvaganam, Geetha H.; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-01-01

    Anti-viral T- and B- cell responses play a critical role in suppressing HIV and SIV replication during chronic infection. However, these infections are rarely controlled by the host immune response, and most infected individuals need lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent advances in our understanding of how anti-HIV immune responses are elicited and regulated prompted a surge of interest in harnessing these responses to reduce the HIV "residual disease" that is present in ART-treated HIV-infected individuals. Novel approaches that are currently explored include both conventional therapeutic vaccines (i.e., active immunization strategies using HIV-derived immunogens) as well as the use of checkpoint blockers such as anti-PD-1 antibodies. These approaches appear promising as key components of complex therapeutic strategies aimed at curing HIV infection. PMID:25996629

  14. HIV therapeutic vaccines: moving towards a functional cure.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, Geetha H; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-08-01

    Anti-viral T-cell and B-cell responses play a crucial role in suppressing HIV and SIV replication during chronic infection. However, these infections are rarely controlled by the host immune response, and most infected individuals need lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent advances in our understanding of how anti-HIV immune responses are elicited and regulated prompted a surge of interest in harnessing these responses to reduce the HIV 'residual disease' that is present in ART-treated HIV-infected individuals. Novel approaches that are currently explored include both conventional therapeutic vaccines (i.e., active immunization strategies using HIV-derived immunogens) as well as the use of checkpoint blockers such as anti-PD-1 antibodies. These approaches appear promising as key components of complex therapeutic strategies aimed at curing HIV infection.

  15. Gene therapy: a possible future standard for HIV care.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Enein, Mohamed; Bauer, Gerhard; Reinke, Petra

    2015-07-01

    Despite undeniable accomplishments in developing cell and gene therapeutic strategies to combat HIV infection, key social, economic, and policy-related challenges still need to be overcome for any future commercialization efforts of these novel therapies to be successful. Here, we address these challenges and structure a framework for eradicating HIV/AIDS using gene therapy.

  16. Prospects for the therapeutic application of lentivirus-based gene therapy to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2008-02-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy is not sufficient to fully control HIV replication and problems of side effects and escape mutation have emerged. Current prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine strategies appear to be unable to confer full protection. However, given the rapid recent progress made in RNA interference and lentivirus technologies, it may soon be possible to develop effective gene therapies against HIV infection. We describe here the recent progress made in the lentivirus-based HIV-1-targeting RNAi system and the possibility that this system can be used to generate an anti-HIV-1 gene therapy. We speculate that this system would be most useful if it would be used in a coordinated manner with vaccines that can initiate and maintain potent anti-HIV immunity.

  17. Healing Classrooms: Therapeutic Possibilities in Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batzer, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article asks us to consider what the process of healing and composition pedagogy have to learn from each other. More specifically, it identifies how the therapeutic potential of writing, which has been largely neglected in the academy in recent years, can influence the ways we teach transferable writing skills. The article considers how…

  18. Developments in HIV-1 immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Helen; Dalgleish, Angus

    2014-01-01

    Since the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) pandemic began, few prophylactic vaccines have reached phase III trials. Only one has shown partial efficacy in preventing HIV-1 infection. The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has had considerable success in controlling infection and reducing transmission but in so doing has changed the nature of HIV-1 infection for those with access to ART. Access, compliance, and toxicity alongside the emergence of serious non-AIDS morbidity and the sometimes poor immune reconstitution in ART-treated patients have emphasized the need for additional therapies. Such therapy is intended to contribute to control of HIV-1 infection, permit structured treatment interruptions, or even establish a functional cure of permanently suppressed and controlled infection. Both immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccination have the potential to reach these goals. In this review, the latest developments in immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccination are discussed. PMID:24991420

  19. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 replication might be one way to combat HIV-1 resistance to the currently available anti-viral agents. A specific inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression could be expected from the development of compounds targeting host cell factors that participate in the activation of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Here we will discuss how targeting the host can be accomplished either by using small molecules to alter the function of the host’s proteins such as p53 or cdk9, or by utilizing new advances in siRNA therapies to knock down essential host factors such as CCR5 and CXCR4. Finally, we will discuss how the viral protein interactomes should be performed to better design therapeutics against HIV-1. PMID:19732026

  20. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV based vector systems, and we will review our activities in this particular field. This includes the generation of a conditionally replicating HIV 1 variant as a safe live attenuated virus vaccine, the construction of mini HIV variants as cancer selective viruses for virotherapy against leukemia, and the use of a conditionally live anti HIV gene therapy vector. Although safety concerns will undoubtedly remain for the use of replication competent HIV based vector systems, some of the results in cell culture systems are very promising and warrant further testing in appropriate animal models. PMID:20582153

  1. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors.

    PubMed

    Das, Atze T; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV based vector systems, and we will review our activities in this particular field. This includes the generation of a conditionally replicating HIV 1 variant as a safe live attenuated virus vaccine, the construction of mini HIV variants as cancer selective viruses for virotherapy against leukemia, and the use of a conditionally live anti HIV gene therapy vector. Although safety concerns will undoubtedly remain for the use of replication competent HIV based vector systems, some of the results in cell culture systems are very promising and warrant further testing in appropriate animal models.

  2. Is there any room for therapeutic vaccination against the HIV-1/AIDS?

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    Any therapeutic vaccination approach against HIV-1 must induce CTL and Th1 cells. But, therapeutic vaccination is more than that. For extensive application of a therapeutic vaccine several questions need to be solved in advance to achieve a global impact. In this commentary some of them are addressed. We analyze the epidemiology, sociology, economy and immunopathology related to the HIV/AIDS disease. Also, important technical issues and real possibilities to overcome at least some of the major limitation of the antiretroviral treatments in the pursuit of an effective vaccine are considered. From the integration of previous analyses some conclusions are drawn. Because it is just a commentary some arguments are not unveiled into their full extension. At the end, we discuss some issues in relation to the development of the vaccine candidate TERAVAC-HIV-1 as a case study.

  3. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  4. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Candidate Therapeutics Against HIV Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:21827278

  5. Therapeutics for HIV-1 reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Sgarbanti, Marco; Battistini, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Intensive combined antiretroviral therapy successfully suppresses HIV-1 replication and AIDS disease progression making infection manageable, but it is unable to eradicate the virus that persists in long-lived, drug-insensitive and immune system-insensitive reservoirs thus asking for life-long treatments with problems of compliance, resistance, toxicity and cost. These limitations and recent insights into latency mechanisms have fueled a renewed effort in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Proposed eradication strategies involve reactivation of the latent reservoir upon induction of viral transcription followed by the elimination of reactivated virus-producing cells by viral cytopathic effect or host immune response. Several molecules identified by mechanism-directed approaches or in large-scale screenings have been proposed as latency reversing agents. Some of them have already entered clinical testing in humans but with mixed or unsatisfactory results.

  6. Nanotechnology as a New Therapeutic Approach to Prevent the HIV-Infection of Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Ruiz, Didiana; De La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 has proved to infect regulatory T cells (Treg) modifying their phenotype and impairing their suppressive capacity. As Treg cells are a crucial component in the preservation of the immune homeostasis, we researched that the antiviral capacity of carboxilan dendrimers prevents the HIV-1 infection of Treg and their effects. The phenotype and suppressive capacity of Treg treated or non-treated with carbosilane dendrimers were studied by flow cytometry. Treated and non-treated Treg from healthy donors were infected with HIV-1NL4.3. The infection of Treg cells by HIV-1, and protective effect of two dendrimers were determined by measuring antigen p24gag in the supernatant of the culture and intracellular. Results The Treg cells were treated with cationic and anionic carbosilane dendrimers. The results showed that both dendrimers did not modify the phenotype and functionality of Treg cells compared with non- treated Treg cells. Anionic dendrimers showed high biocompatibility with normal activity of the Treg cells and in antiviral assays. These dendrimers were highly active against HIV-1 preventing the infection of Treg, and were able to protect the Treg from the Foxp3 downregulation induced by the HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This is the first work showing that the in vitro use of anionic dendrimers prevent the HIV-1 replication and the infection of expanded Treg cells in culture, which raises the possibility to use Treg cells therapeutically in HIV-1-infected subjects. PMID:26785250

  7. A proposal to use iterative, small clinical trials to optimize therapeutic HIV vaccine immunogens to launch therapeutic HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Stuart Z

    2015-01-01

    The HIV cure agenda has rekindled interest in the development of a therapeutic HIV vaccine. An iterative clinical trial strategy that proved successful for the development of effective cancer chemotherapies in the 1960s may be applicable to the development of a CD8 T lymphocyte-based therapeutic HIV vaccine. However, while cancer chemotherapy development could begin with iterative clinical trials to improve the use of active drugs, the first step in therapeutic HIV vaccine design should be discovery of immunogen constructs with potential for activity and their optimization to meet the challenges of HIV-1 sequence diversity and human polymorphism in T cell antigen presentation. A strategy for doing this is discussed in this article. The proposed strategy relies on a major commitment by funding organizations to fund organized and coordinated manufacture and clinical testing of a series of first- and second-generation constructs to test basic concepts in product design. This is presented as an alternative to funding a more traditional competition among private manufacturers and product champions of individual, already designed products.

  8. CCR5 inhibitors: Emerging promising HIV therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Padmasri Kutikuppala Surya

    2009-01-01

    safety issues do not emerge, these compounds could be positioned for use from very early stage of HIV infection to salvage strategies that would be an emerging therapeutic novel strategy for HIV/AIDS patients.

  9. Putting an ‘End’ to HIV mRNAs: capping and polyadenylation as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Like most cellular mRNAs, the 5′ end of HIV mRNAs is capped and the 3′ end matured by the process of polyadenylation. There are, however, several rather unique and interesting aspects of these post-transcriptional processes on HIV transcripts. Capping of the highly structured 5′ end of HIV mRNAs is influenced by the viral TAT protein and a population of HIV mRNAs contains a trimethyl-G cap reminiscent of U snRNAs involved in splicing. HIV polyadenylation involves active repression of a promoter-proximal polyadenylation signal, auxiliary upstream regulatory elements and moonlighting polyadenylation factors that have additional impacts on HIV biology outside of the constraints of classical mRNA 3’ end formation. This review describes these post-transcriptional novelties of HIV gene expression as well as their implications in viral biology and as possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24330569

  10. Therapeutic targets for HIV-1 infection in the host proteome

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S; Maddukuri, Anil; Teslovich, Tanya M; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Agbottah, Emmanuel; Dadgar, Shabnam; Kehn, Kylene; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Pumfery, Anne; Stephan, Dietrich A; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2005-01-01

    Background Despite the success of HAART, patients often stop treatment due to the inception of side effects. Furthermore, viral resistance often develops, making one or more of the drugs ineffective. Identification of novel targets for therapy that may not develop resistance is sorely needed. Therefore, to identify cellular proteins that may be up-regulated in HIV infection and play a role in infection, we analyzed the effects of Tat on cellular gene expression during various phases of the cell cycle. Results SOM and k-means clustering analyses revealed a dramatic alteration in transcriptional activity at the G1/S checkpoint. Tat regulates the expression of a variety of gene ontologies, including DNA-binding proteins, receptors, and membrane proteins. Using siRNA to knock down expression of several gene targets, we show that an Oct1/2 binding protein, an HIV Rev binding protein, cyclin A, and PPGB, a cathepsin that binds NA, are important for viral replication following induction from latency and de novo infection of PBMCs. Conclusion Based on exhaustive and stringent data analysis, we have compiled a list of gene products that may serve as potential therapeutic targets for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Several genes have been established as important for HIV-1 infection and replication, including Pou2AF1 (OBF-1), complement factor H related 3, CD4 receptor, ICAM-1, NA, and cyclin A1. There were also several genes whose role in relation to HIV-1 infection have not been established and may also be novel and efficacious therapeutic targets and thus necessitate further study. Importantly, targeting certain cellular protein kinases, receptors, membrane proteins, and/or cytokines/chemokines may result in adverse effects. If there is the presence of two or more proteins with similar functions, where only one protein is critical for HIV-1 transcription, and thus, targeted, we may decrease the chance of developing treatments with negative side effects. PMID:15780141

  11. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  12. Intracellular defenses against HIV, viral evasion and novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Lever, Andrew M L

    2011-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS, is a retrovirus. It is estimated that, while in the cell, it interacts with almost 10% of cellular proteins. Several of these have evolved to protect the cell from infection with retroviruses and are known as "restriction factors". Restriction factors tell us much about how the virus functions and open up new paradigms for exploring novel antiviral therapeutics. This article gives an update on the three best studied restriction factors, their putative mechanisms of action and how the virus has overcome their effects, together with an indication of novel therapeutic approaches based on this knowledge.

  13. Parasitic infections in HIV infected individuals: Diagnostic & therapeutic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, parasites have been one of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) and one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-infected patients. Due to severe immunosuppression, enteric parasitic pathogens in general are emerging and are OIs capable of causing diarrhoeal disease associated with HIV. Of these, Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are the two most common intestinal protozoan parasites and pose a public health problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. These are the only two enteric protozoan parasites that remain in the case definition of AIDS till today. Leismaniasis, strongyloidiasis and toxoplasmosis are the three main opportunistic causes of systemic involvements reported in HIV-infected patients. Of these, toxoplasmosis is the most important parasitic infection associated with the central nervous system. Due to its complexity in nature, toxoplasmosis is the only parasitic disease capable of not only causing focal but also disseminated forms and it has been included in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADI) ever since. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), cryptosporidiosis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, and toxoplasmosis are among parasitic diseases reported in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). This review addresses various aspects of parasitic infections in term of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with HIV-infection. PMID:22310820

  14. Fairy tales as a trance experience: possible therapeutic uses.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Guille, M E; Boersma, F J

    1992-04-01

    The psychological literature contains little documentation of the therapeutic use of fairy tales. We suggest that fairy tales are uniquely suitable for hypnotherapy and for helping clients reframe existential issues. We propose that the structure of fairy tales allows the meaning of the story to be applied personally and that they also stimulate unconscious search. We examine the way in which hypnosis is achieved when fairy tales are read to children, as well as possible therapeutic uses of this learning set in therapy with both children and adults. We conclude by suggesting that fairy tales need to be given serious consideration as an alternative therapeutic trance procedure.

  15. Novel anti-HIV therapeutics targeting chemokine receptors and actin regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2013-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects helper CD4(+) T cells, and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion and immunodeficiency. In the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in antiretroviral therapy, and the disease has become manageable. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is still nowhere in sight, and a cure or a functional cure awaits discovery. Among possible curative therapies, traditional antiretroviral therapy, mostly targeting viral proteins, has been proven ineffective. It is possible that targeting HIV-dependent host cofactors may offer alternatives, both for preventing HIV transmission and for forestalling disease progression. Recently, the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators in blood CD4(+) T cells have emerged as major host cofactors that could be targeted. The novel concept that the cortical actin is a barrier to viral entry and early post-entry migration has led to the nascent model of virus-host interaction at the cortical actin layer. Deciphering the cellular regulatory pathways has manifested exciting prospects for future therapeutics. In this review, we describe the study of HIV interactions with actin cytoskeleton. We also examine potential pharmacological targets that emerge from this interaction. In addition, we briefly discuss several actin pathway-based anti-HIV drugs that are currently in development or testing.

  16. Novel anti-HIV therapeutics targeting chemokine receptors and actin regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Summary The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects helper CD4+ T cells, and causes CD4+ T-cell depletion and immunodeficiency. In the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in antiretroviral therapy, and the disease has become manageable. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is still nowhere in sight, and a cure or a functional cure awaits discovery. Among possible curative therapies, traditional antiretroviral therapy, mostly targeting viral proteins, has been proven ineffective. It is possible that targeting HIV-dependent host cofactors may offer alternatives, both for preventing HIV transmission and for forestalling disease progression. Recently, the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators in blood CD4+ T cells have emerged as major host cofactors that could be targeted. The novel concept that the cortical actin is a barrier to viral entry and early post-entry migration has led to the nascent model of virus-host interaction at the cortical actin layer. Deciphering the cellular regulatory pathways has manifested exciting prospects for future therapeutics. In this review, we describe the study of HIV interactions with actin cytoskeleton. We also examine potential pharmacological targets that emerge from this interaction. In addition, we briefly discuss several actin pathway-based anti-HIV drugs that are currently in development or testing. PMID:24117829

  17. Affect regulation and HIV risk among youth in therapeutic schools

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Larry K.; Houck, Christopher; Lescano, Celia; Donenberg, Geri; Tolou-Shams, Marina; Mello, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of affect regulation skills is often impaired or delayed in youth with mental health problems but the relationship between affect dysregulation and risk behaviors has not been well studied. Baseline data from adolescents (N =418; ages 13–19) recruited from therapeutic school settings examined the relationship between affect dysregulation, substance use, self-cutting, and sexual risk behavior. Analyses of covariance demonstrated that adolescents who did not use condoms at last sex, ever self-cut, attempted suicide, used alcohol and other drugs and reported less condom use self-efficacy when emotionally aroused were significantly more likely (p < .01) to report greater difficulty with affect regulation than peers who did not exhibit these behaviors. General patterns of difficulty with affect regulation may be linked to HIV risk behavior, including condom use at last sex. HIV prevention strategies for youth in mental health treatment should target affect regulation in relation to multiple risk behaviors. PMID:22669595

  18. HIV-1 gp41 fusion intermediate: a target for HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chungen; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is initiated by the binding of gp120 envelope glyco-protein to its cell receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5), followed by a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane subunit. These changes include insertion of fusion peptide into the target cell membrane and association of C-heptad repeat (CHR) peptide with the N-heptad repeat (NHR) trimer, a pre-hairpin fusion intermediate. A stable six-helix bundle core is then formed, bringing the viral envelope and target cell membrane into close proximity for fusion. Peptides derived from the CHR region, such as T20 and C34, inhibit HIV-1 fusion by interacting with the gp41 fusion intermediate. A number of anti-HIV-1 peptides and small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 NHR-trimer have been identified. By combining HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting different sites in the gp41 fusion intermediate, a potent synergistic effect takes place, resulting in a potential new therapeutic strategy for the HIV infection/AIDS. Here, we present an overview of the current development of anti-HIV drugs, particularly those targeting the gp41 fusion intermediate.

  19. Conjugation of a nonspecific antiviral sapogenin with a specific HIV fusion inhibitor: a promising strategy for discovering new antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Lu; Na, Heya; Li, Xiangpeng; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zheng, Baohua; Liang, Guodong; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2014-09-11

    Triterpene saponins are a major group of active components in natural products with nonspecific antiviral activities, while T20 peptide (enfuvirtide), which contains a helix zone-binding domain (HBD), is a gp41-specific HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a group of hybrid molecules in which bioactive triterpene sapogenins were covalently attached to the HBD-containing peptides via click chemistry. We found that either the triterpenes or peptide part alone showed weak activity against HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, while the hybrids generated a strong cooperative effect. Among them, P26-BApc exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity against both T20-sensitive and -resistant HIV-1 strains and improved pharmacokinetic properties. These results suggest that this scaffold design is a promising strategy for developing new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and possibly novel antiviral therapeutics against other viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  20. Activation of latent HIV-1 expression by protein kinase C agonists. A novel therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV-1 reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Vo, Minh Q; Pérez, Moisés; Calzado, Marco A; Moreno, Santiago; Appendino, Giovanni; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2011-03-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-infected cellular reservoirs represents the major hurdle to virus eradication in patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. The molecular mechanisms by which integrated HIV-1 is repressed during latency have been partially identified in different models of HIV-1 latency, and the involvement of multiple processes has been demonstrated. Therefore, several molecular targets amenable to pharmacological manipulation have emerged to antagonize HIV-1 latency in the viral reservoirs. In this context, it has been suggested that successful depletion of such latent reservoirs will require a combination of therapeutic agents that can specifically and efficiently act on cells harbouring latent HIV-1 provirus. HIV-1 reactivation therapy is a potential therapeutic option to purge the viral reservoirs. The goal of this therapy is to enhance the transcriptional activity of the latent HIV-1 without inducing the polyclonal activation of non-infected cells. In this sense natural or semisynthetic protein kinase C agonists lacking tumour-promoter activities clearly fulfil this criterion, thereby opening new research avenues to purge HIV-1 reservoirs. In this review article, we have succinctly summarized the known effects of "natural products", focusing on phorboids like prostratin and ingenols, macrolides like bryostatin 1, and macrocyclic polyesters like ingols and jatrophanes. A comprehensive view on the molecular mechanisms underlying the principle of HIV-1 reactivation from latency is provided, discussing the combination of "natural products" with other experimental or conventional therapeutics.

  1. HIV testing among teens attending therapeutic schools: Having a personal source of information about HIV/AIDS matters!

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Rebecca R.; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13 to 19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two U.S. cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends. PMID:25656380

  2. HIV Testing Among Teens Attending Therapeutic Schools: Having a Personal Source of Information About HIV/AIDS Matters!

    PubMed

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K

    2015-06-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13-19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two US cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends.

  3. [A new therapeutic strategy to control HIV? The PD1 molecule and its role in inhibiting cellular immune responses].

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Chiesa, María Candela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are crucial in protecting against viral infections by secreting antiviral factors and lysing infected cells. The loss of these functions is a hallmark of various chronic viral infections. In HIV chronic infection, CD8+ T cells develop this exhausted phenotype and their protection capacities diminish. Recently, it has been shown that a co-inhibitory molecule called PD-1 plays an important role on this exhausted phenotype. These findings open up the possibility of research targeted to develop therapeutic interventions that may restore CD8+ T cell function in chronic HIV infection.

  4. Comparison of the therapeutic dose of warfarin in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients: a study of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, B S; Mokoena, T

    2017-01-01

    Background People infected with HIV are prone to venous thrombosis. Treatment of thrombosis is primarily with warfarin. No studies have addressed the effects of HIV infection on warfarin dose. The aims of this study were to determine whether the therapeutic dose of warfarin and induction time to therapeutic dose in HIV-infected patients differ from that in HIV-uninfected patients. Methods A prospective and retrospective descriptive study of induction time to therapeutic warfarin dose, as well as of ambulant therapeutic warfarin dose, was performed. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients being treated after deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism were compared. Sex and use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) were also compared in the groups. Results 234 patients were entered into the study. Induction time to therapeutic warfarin dose did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean therapeutic dose of warfarin was higher in the HIV-infected than the HIV-uninfected group: 6.06 vs 5.72 mg/day, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.29). There was no difference in therapeutic warfarin dose between ARV-naïve groups—HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected patients not on ARVs. Conclusions There appears to be little effect of HIV infection on warfarin dosing. Warfarin therapy should be administered conventionally in HIV-infected patients. PMID:28179414

  5. Leveraging Cancer Therapeutics for the HIV Cure Agenda: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Polizzotto, Mark N; Chen, Grace; Tressler, Randall L; Godfrey, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and undetectable HIV RNA in the plasma, latent replication-competent HIV persists indefinitely in long-lived cells. Cessation of ART results in rebound of HIV from these persistent reservoirs. While this was thought to be an insurmountable obstacle to viral eradication, recent cases suggest otherwise. To date one patient has been "cured" of HIV and several others have been able to interrupt ART without viral rebound for prolonged periods. These events have sparked renewed interest in developing strategies that will allow eradication of HIV in infected individuals. We review the current knowledge of HIV latency and the viral reservoir, describe the potential utility of emerging cancer therapeutics in HIV cure research with an emphasis on pathways implicated in reservoir persistence, and outline opportunities and challenges in the context of the current clinical trial and regulatory environment.

  6. Leveraging Cancer Therapeutics for the HIV Cure Agenda: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Chen, Grace; Tressler, Randall L.; Godfrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and undetectable HIV RNA in the plasma, latent replication-competent HIV persists indefinitely in long-lived cells. Cessation of ART results in rebound of HIV from these persistent reservoirs. While this was thought to be an insurmountable obstacle to viral eradication, recent cases suggest otherwise. To date one patient has been “cured” of HIV and several others have been able to interrupt ART without viral rebound for prolonged periods. These events have sparked renewed interest in developing strategies that will allow eradication of HIV in infected individuals. We review the current knowledge of HIV latency and the viral reservoir, describe the potential utility of emerging cancer therapeutics in HIV cure research with an emphasis on pathways implicated in reservoir persistence, and outline opportunities and challenges in the context of the current clinical trial and regulatory environment. PMID:26224205

  7. HIV-1 gp120 as a therapeutic target: Navigating a moving labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The HIV-1 gp120 envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates attachment of virus to human target cells that display requisite receptors, CD4 and co-receptor, generally CCR5. Despite high affinity interactions with host receptors and proof-of-principle by the drug maraviroc that interference with CCR5 provides therapeutic benefit, no licensed drug currently targets gp120. Areas covered An overview of the role of gp120 in HIV-1 entry and of sites of potential gp120 vulnerability to therapeutic inhibition is presented. Viral defenses that protect these sites and turn gp120 into a moving labyrinth are discussed together with strategies for circumventing these defenses to allow therapeutic targeting of gp120 sites of vulnerability. Expert opinion The gp120 envelope glycoprotein interacts with host proteins through multiple interfaces and has conserved structural features at these interaction sites. In spite of this, targeting gp120 for therapeutic purposes is challenging. Env mechanisms evolved to evade the humoral immune response also shield it from potential therapeutics. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in understanding HIV-1 gp120 structure and its interactions with host receptors, and in developing therapeutic leads that potently neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Synergies between advances in understanding, needs for therapeutics against novel viral targets, and characteristics of breadth and potency for a number of gp120-targetting lead molecules bodes well for gp120 as a HIV-1 therapeutic target. PMID:25724219

  8. High-Throughput Humanized Mouse Models for Evaluation of HIV-1 Therapeutics and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tynisha; Seay, Kieran; Zheng, Jian Hua; Zhang, Cong; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Goldstein, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Mice cannot be used as a model to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics because they do not become infected by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 replication. This has limited their use for in vivo assessment of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics and the mechanism by which cofactors, such as illicit drug use accelerate HIV-1 replication and disease course in substance abusers. Here, we describe the development and application of two in vivo humanized mouse models that are highly sensitive and useful models for the in vivo evaluation of candidate anti-HIV therapeutics. The first model, hu-spl-PBMC-NSG mice, uses NOD-SCID IL2rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice intrasplenically injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) which develop productive splenic HIV-1 infection after intrasplenic inoculation with a replication-competent HIV-1 expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (HIV-LucR) and enables investigators to use bioluminescence to visualize and quantitate the temporal effects of therapeutics on HIV-1 infection. The second model, hCD4/R5/cT1 mice, consists of transgenic mice carrying human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes, which enables murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry, Tat-mediated LTR transcription and consequently develop productive infection. The hCD4/R5/cT1 mice develop disseminated infection of tissues including the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with HIV-1-LucR. Because these mice can be infected with HIV-LucR expressing transmitted/founder and clade A/E and C Envs, these mouse models can also be used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibodies induced by candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Furthermore, because hCD4/R5/cT1 mice can be infected by vaginal inoculation with replication-competent HIV-1 expressing NanoLuc (HIV-nLucR)-, this mouse model can be used to evaluate the mechanisms by which substance abuse and other factors

  9. Nonneutralizing Antibodies Induced by the HIV-1 gp41 NHR Domain Gain Neutralizing Activity in the Presence of the HIV Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide: a Potential Therapeutic Vaccine Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Bi, Wenwen; Zhu, Xiaojie; Li, Haoyang; Qi, Qianqian; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-07-01

    A key barrier against developing preventive and therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is the inability of viral envelope glycoproteins to elicit broad and potent neutralizing antibodies. However, in the presence of fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, we show that the nonneutralizing antibodies induced by the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain (N63) exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains, including the drug-resistant variants, and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes, suggesting the potential of developing gp41-targeted HIV therapeutic vaccines.

  10. Reflections on Therapeutic Recreation and Youth: Possibilities for Broadening Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Linda L.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a special issue on youth, discussing current youth-focused therapeutic recreation research and practice, comparing this issue with another theme journal on youth (emphasizing the roles of professional preparation and professional organizations), examining the role of therapeutic recreation and adventure therapy, and noting theoretical…

  11. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder: Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lindl, Kathryn A.; Marks, David R.; Kolson, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection presently affects more that 40 million people worldwide, and is associated with central nervous system (CNS) disruption in at least 30% of infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy has lessened the incidence, but not the prevalence of mild impairment of higher cognitive and cortical functions (HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders) as well as substantially reduced a more severe form dementia (HIV-associated dementia). Furthermore, improving neurological outcomes will require novel, adjunctive therapies that are targeted towards mechanisms of HIV-induced neurodegeneration. Identifying such molecular and pharmacological targets requires an understanding of the events preceding irreversible neuronal damage in the CNS, such as actions of neurotoxins (HIV proteins and cellular factors), disruption of ion channel properties, synaptic damage, and loss of adult neurogenesis. By considering the specific mechanisms and consequences of HIV neuropathogenesis, unified approaches for neuroprotection will likely emerge using a tailored, combined, and non-invasive approach. PMID:20396973

  12. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring in pediatric HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Burger, David M

    2010-06-01

    International guidelines do not recommend therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of HIV-infected children as a routine measurement as part of medical management. There are, however, several clinical scenarios in which TDM may be indicated. Underdosing may be one of the major risks, especially in younger children. No randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted to assess the added value of TDM in HIV-infected children, making recommendations for TDM in children with HIV/AIDS merely based on expert opinion. There is a need for more descriptive studies on the usefulness of TDM in HIV-infected children to convince pediatricians worldwide to let more children benefit from TDM.

  13. Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Therapeutic Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Chernyavsky, Andrey Yu.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Piradov, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS) has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation and long-term depression. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells, and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals). It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols. PMID:26136672

  14. Recent patents and emerging therapeutics for HIV infections: a focus on protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Mandava, Nanda K; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-07-01

    The inclusion of protease inhibitors (PIs) in highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved clinical outcomes in HIV-1-infected patients. To date, PIs are considered to be the most important therapeutic agents for the treatment of HIV infections. Despite high anti-HIV-1 potency, poor oral bioavailability of PIs has been a major concern. For achieving therapeutic concentrations, large doses of PIs are administered, which results in unacceptable systemic toxicities. Such severe and long-term toxicities necessitate the development of safer and potentially promising PIs. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the development of newer compounds capable of inhibiting wild-type and resistant HIV-1 protease. Some of these PIs have displayed potent HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to provide an overview on clinically approved and newly developing PIs, and related recent patents in the development of novel PIs.

  15. Ex vivo production of autologous whole inactivated HIV-1 for clinical use in therapeutic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gil, Cristina; Climent, Núria; García, Felipe; Hurtado, Carmen; Nieto-Márquez, Sara; León, Agathe; García, M Teresa; Rovira, Cristina; Miralles, Laia; Dalmau, Judith; Pumarola, Tomás; Almela, Manel; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Zamora, Laura; Miró, José M; Brander, Christian; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José M

    2011-08-05

    This study provides a detailed description and characterization of the preparation of individualized lots of autologous heat inactivated HIV-1 virions used as immunogen in a clinical trial designed to test an autologous dendritic-cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine (Clinical Trial DCV-2, NCT00402142). For each participant, ex vivo isolation and expansion of primary virus were performed by co-culturing CD4-enriched PBMCs from the HIV-1-infected patient with PBMC from HIV-seronegative unrelated healthy volunteer donors. The viral supernatants were heat-inactivated and concentrated to obtain 1 mL of autologous immunogen, which was used to load autologous dendritic cells of each patient. High sequence homology was found between the inactivated virus immunogen and the HIV-1 circulating in plasma at the time of HIV-1 isolation. Immunogens contained up to 10⁹ HIV-1 RNA copies/mL showed considerably reduced infectivity after heat inactivation (median of 5.6 log₁₀), and were free of specified adventitious agents. The production of individualized lots of immunogen based on autologous inactivated HIV-1 virus fulfilling clinical-grade good manufacturing practice proved to be feasible, consistent with predetermined specifications, and safe for use in a clinical trial designed to test autologous dendritic cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine.

  16. Affect Management for HIV Prevention with Adolescents in Therapeutic Schools: The immediate impact of Project Balance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Larry K.; Houck, Christopher; Donenberg, Geri; Emerson, Erin; Donahue, Kelly; Misbin, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents in therapeutic schools are at greater risk for HIV and other STIs than their peers due to earlier higher rates of sexual risk and difficulty managing strong emotions. HIV prevention programs that incorporate techniques for affect management during sexual situations may be beneficial. This paper determined the immediate impact of such an intervention, Affect Management (AM), compared to a standard, skills-based HIV prevention intervention (SB) and a general health promotion intervention (HP) for 377 youth, ages 13 to 19, in therapeutic schools in two cities. One month after the intervention, analyses that adjusted for the baseline scores found adolescents in AM were more likely to report condom use at last sex than those in HP (.89 vs. .67, p=.02) and that their HIV knowledge was significantly greater. These data suggest that affect management techniques might improve the impact of standard skills-based prevention programs for adolescents in therapeutic schools. PMID:23975475

  17. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  18. Advancements in nano-enabled therapeutics for neuroHIV management.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Nair, Madhavan

    This viewpoint is a global call to promote fundamental and applied research aiming toward designing smart nanocarriers of desired properties, novel noninvasive strategies to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), delivery/release of single/multiple therapeutic agents across the BBB to eradicate neurohuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV), strategies for on-demand site-specific release of antiretroviral therapy, developing novel nanoformulations capable to recognize and eradicate latently infected HIV reservoirs, and developing novel smart analytical diagnostic tools to detect and monitor HIV infection. Thus, investigation of novel nanoformulations, methodologies for site-specific delivery/release, analytical methods, and diagnostic tools would be of high significance to eradicate and monitor neuroacquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Overall, these developments will certainly help to develop personalized nanomedicines to cure HIV and to develop smart HIV-monitoring analytical systems for disease management.

  19. Soluble mediators of inflammation in HIV and their implications for therapeutics and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Keating, Sheila M; Jacobs, Evan S; Norris, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    From early in the HIV epidemic it was appreciated that many inflammatory markers such as neopterin and TNF-α were elevated in patients with AIDS. With the advent of modern technology able to measure a broad array of cytokines, we now know that from the earliest points of infection HIV induces a cytokine storm. This review will focus on how cytokines are disturbed in HIV infection and will explore potential therapeutic uses of cytokines. These factors can be used directly as therapy during HIV infection, either to suppress viral replication or prevent deleterious immune effects of infection, such as CD4+ T cell depletion. Cytokines also show great promise as adjuvants in the development of HIV vaccines, which would be critical for the eventual control of the epidemic.

  20. Advancements in nano-enabled therapeutics for neuroHIV management

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    This viewpoint is a global call to promote fundamental and applied research aiming toward designing smart nanocarriers of desired properties, novel noninvasive strategies to open the blood–brain barrier (BBB), delivery/release of single/multiple therapeutic agents across the BBB to eradicate neurohuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV), strategies for on-demand site-specific release of antiretroviral therapy, developing novel nanoformulations capable to recognize and eradicate latently infected HIV reservoirs, and developing novel smart analytical diagnostic tools to detect and monitor HIV infection. Thus, investigation of novel nanoformulations, methodologies for site-specific delivery/release, analytical methods, and diagnostic tools would be of high significance to eradicate and monitor neuroacquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Overall, these developments will certainly help to develop personalized nanomedicines to cure HIV and to develop smart HIV-monitoring analytical systems for disease management. PMID:27621624

  1. The iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin: a possible therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Luc; Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Guenancia, Charles; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The maintenance of stable extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations requires the coordinated regulation of iron transport into plasma. Iron is a fundamental cofactor for several enzymes involved in oxidation-reduction reactions. The redox ability of iron can lead to the production of oxygen free radicals, which can damage various cellular components. Therefore, the appropriate regulation of systemic iron homeostasis is decisive in vital processes. Hepcidin has emerged as the central regulatory molecule of systemic iron homeostasis. It is synthesized in hepatocytes and in other cells and released into the circulation. It inhibits the release of iron from enterocytes of the duodenum and from macrophages by binding to the iron exporter protein, ferroportin (FPN). FPN is a transmembrane protein responsible for iron export from cells into the plasma. Hepcidin is internalized with FPN and both are degraded in lysosomes. The hepcidin-FPN axis is the principal regulator of extracellular iron homeostasis in health and disease. Its manipulation via agonists and antagonists is an attractive and novel therapeutic strategy. Hepcidin agonists include compounds that mimic the activity of hepcidin and agents that increase the production of hepcidin by targeting hepcidin-regulatory molecules. The inhibition of hepcidin could be a potentially attractive therapeutic strategy in patients suffering from anaemia or chronic inflammation. In this review, we will summarize the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis and its contribution to the pathophysiology of inflammation and iron disorders. We will examine emerging new strategies that modulate hepcidin metabolism.

  2. Identification of Vimentin as a Potential Therapeutic Target against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ortega, Celia; Ramírez, Anna; Casillas, Dionne; Paneque, Taimi; Ubieta, Raimundo; Dubed, Marta; Navea, Leonor; Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Duarte, Carlos; Falcon, Viviana; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda; Silva, Eladio; Noa, Enrique; Ramos, Yassel; Besada, Vladimir; Betancourt, Lázaro

    2016-01-01

    A combination of antiviral drugs known as antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown effectiveness against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ART has markedly decreased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected patients, having even reduced HIV transmission. However, an important current disadvantage, resistance development, remains to be solved. Hope is focused on developing drugs against cellular targets. This strategy is expected to prevent the emergence of viral resistance. In this study, using a comparative proteomic approach in MT4 cells treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract, we identified vimentin, a molecule forming intermediate filaments in the cell, as a possible target against HIV infection. We demonstrated a strong reduction of an HIV-1 based lentivirus expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in vimentin knockdown cells, and a noteworthy decrease of HIV-1 capsid protein antigen (CAp24) in those cells using a multiround infectivity assay. Electron micrographs showed changes in the structure of intermediate filaments when MT4 cells were treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract. Changes in the structure of intermediate filaments were also observed in vimentin knockdown MT4 cells. A synthetic peptide derived from a cytoskeleton protein showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 infection, and low cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that vimentin can be a suitable target to inhibit HIV-1. PMID:27314381

  3. Identification of Vimentin as a Potential Therapeutic Target against HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ortega, Celia; Ramírez, Anna; Casillas, Dionne; Paneque, Taimi; Ubieta, Raimundo; Dubed, Marta; Navea, Leonor; Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Duarte, Carlos; Falcon, Viviana; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda; Silva, Eladio; Noa, Enrique; Ramos, Yassel; Besada, Vladimir; Betancourt, Lázaro

    2016-06-15

    A combination of antiviral drugs known as antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown effectiveness against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ART has markedly decreased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected patients, having even reduced HIV transmission. However, an important current disadvantage, resistance development, remains to be solved. Hope is focused on developing drugs against cellular targets. This strategy is expected to prevent the emergence of viral resistance. In this study, using a comparative proteomic approach in MT4 cells treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract, we identified vimentin, a molecule forming intermediate filaments in the cell, as a possible target against HIV infection. We demonstrated a strong reduction of an HIV-1 based lentivirus expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in vimentin knockdown cells, and a noteworthy decrease of HIV-1 capsid protein antigen (CAp24) in those cells using a multiround infectivity assay. Electron micrographs showed changes in the structure of intermediate filaments when MT4 cells were treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract. Changes in the structure of intermediate filaments were also observed in vimentin knockdown MT4 cells. A synthetic peptide derived from a cytoskeleton protein showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 infection, and low cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that vimentin can be a suitable target to inhibit HIV-1.

  4. Past experiences, current realities and future possibilities for HIV nursing education and care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Judy; Caine, Vera; Arneson, Cheryl; Maina, Geoffrey; De Padua, Anthony; Dykeman, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Nurses may have inadequate basic education and opportunities for continuing education in relation to HIV care. As well nurses may perpetuate and impose stigma. We developed, implemented and evaluated an educational intervention to reduce stigma and discrimination among nurses providing HIV care. The intervention used a mentorship model that brought experienced nurses in HIV care and people living with HIV together with nurses who wanted to learn more about HIV nursing care. We examined our findings in relation to past experiences, current realities and future possibilities for HIV nursing education and care in Canada. Our findings demonstrated that many nurses were interested in improving their HIV care, yet few opportunities existed for them to do so. We found that HIV nursing education and expertise were significantly different among participants and across clinical sites. This difference was visible in basic education, services offered for HIV and AIDS care, the collaborative and inter-professional nature of care, and opportunities for continuing education. Mentorship education is an effective strategy to not only address a critical void in knowledge, but also to promote a fundamental shift in attitudes. With the recent call by the World Health Organization to place nurses in key positions to provide HIV care, treatment and prevention, it is imperative to prepare nurses at both the undergraduate and graduate level, as well as those in practice, to fulfill this call. PMID:27152130

  5. HIV-infected People in Sudan Moving Toward Chronic Poverty: Possible Interventions.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Salwa Muddthir; Eisa, Ammar Abobakre; Ibrahim, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    We sought to identify the socioeconomic impact on people living with HIV (PLWH) in Sudan. Focus group discussions were used to collect data and identify the most outstanding domains of HIV impact on PLWH and the survival mechanisms that may be common to a group of diverse HIV-infected persons (n = 30). The findings indicated that the most striking financial and social impacts were due to stigma associated with HIV in the conservative Sudanese society, which led to loss of work with all its consequences (e.g., children's education and health care expenses were affected). The socioeconomic impacts of HIV on infected populations are discussed, and suggestions for possible interventions to mitigate harmful impacts and stigma within the society, the workplace, and health care settings are highlighted. We concluded that HIV has intensified the existing problems of infected people, contributing to their vulnerability to poverty.

  6. Evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic HIV vaccines through analytical treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine that induces immunologic control of viral replication, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART), would be of great value. Besides the obvious challenges of developing a therapeutic vaccine that would generate effective, sustained anti-HIV immunity in infected individuals is the issue of how to best assess the efficacy of vaccine candidates. Discussion This review discusses the various outcome measures assessed in therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials involving individuals receiving suppressive ART, with a particular focus on the role of analytical treatment interruption (ATI) as a way to assess the virologic control induced by an immunotherapy. This strategy is critical given that there are otherwise no readily available measures to determine the ability of a vaccine-induced immune response to effectively control HIV replication. The various outcome measures that have been used to assess vaccine efficacy in published therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials will also be discussed. Outcome measures have included the kinetics of viral rebound, the new viral set point and changes in the size of the viral reservoir. Clinically relevant outcomes such as the CD4 decline, the time to resume therapy or the time to meet the criterion to resume therapy, the proportion of participants who resume therapy and/or the development of clinical symptoms such as acute retroviral syndrome are also measures of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions Given the lack of consistency between therapeutic HIV vaccine trials in how efficacy is assessed, comparing vaccines has been difficult. It would, therefore, be beneficial to determine the most clinically relevant measure for use in future studies. Other recommendations for future clinical trials also include studying compartments in addition to blood and replacing ATIs with single-copy assays in situations in which the use of an ATI is not ideal

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) derived vectors: safety considerations and controversy over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Tonini, Tiziana; Giordano, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The latest generation of lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 is one of the most efficient tools for gene transduction of mammalian cells. However, the possible employment of HIV-based vectors in clinical trials is a very controversial issue, mainly due to safety and ethical concerns. HIV-1 is a lethal pathogenic agent, which induces AIDS. Genetic vectors must derive either from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans, or that eventually just cause mild illnesses. Patients exposed to HIV-based vectors will test seropositive to certain components of HIV-1. In addition, there might be other possible adverse effects in patients that cannot be predicted, as many aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS have not been completely understood yet. On these grounds, it seems necessary to improve the design of other lentiviral vectors, which derive from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans and are distantly related to primate retroviridae.

  8. Angiotensin receptor blockers & endothelial dysfunction: Possible correlation & therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Radenković, Miroslav; Stojanović, Marko; Nešić, Ivana Milićević; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium is one of the most important constituents of vascular homeostasis, which is achieved through continual and balanced production of different relaxing and contractile factors. When there is a pathological disturbance in release of these products, endothelial dysfunction (ED) will probably occur. ED is considered to be the initial step in the development of atherosclerosis. This pathological activation and inadequate functioning of endothelial cells was shown to be to some extent a reversible process, which all together resulted in increased interest in investigation of different beneficial treatment options. To this point, the pharmacological approach, including for example, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or statins, was clearly shown to be effective in the improvement of ED. One of many critical issues underlying ED represents instability in the balance between nitric oxide and angiotensin II (Ang II) production. Considering that Ang II was confirmed to be important for the development of ED, the aim of this review article was to summarize the findings of up to date clinical studies associated with therapeutic application of angiotensin receptor blockers and improvement in ED. In addition, it was of interest to review the pleiotropic actions of angiotensin receptor blockers linked to the improvement of ED. The prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo or active-controlled clinical trials were identified and selected for the final evaluation. PMID:27934794

  9. Disorders of the circadian clock: etiology and possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Wisor, J P

    2002-12-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-hr rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, temperature, locomotor activity and virtually all other behavioral and physiological processes. In order for these cycles to be adaptive, they must be synchronized, or entrained, to the 24-hr light/dark cycle produced by the rotation of the Earth. The timing of circadian variables relative to the light/dark cycle, i.e., the phase angle of entrainment, is influenced by intrinsic circadian clock properties that are to an extent genetically determined, and thus varies between individuals. In extreme cases (advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome) or during shift work or jet lag, the phase angle of entrainment may be incompatible with work requirements or other social demands, resulting in negative consequences to health and productivity. This review describes the etiology of circadian disorders within the context of formal circadian clock properties and summarizes studies in humans and in other species which link specific genetic loci to circadian clock function and malfunction. The proteins encoded by these genetic loci play key roles in the intracellular feedback loop that generates circadian rhythms, and thus represent therapeutic targets for the treatment of both endogenous and exogenous circadian disorders.

  10. Indian Herbal Medicines: Possible Potent Therapeutic Agents for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Brijesh; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Nath Paul, Bhola; Narayan Saxena, Prabhu; Kumar Das, Siddharth

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology and is mainly characterized by the progressive erosion of cartilage leading to chronic polyarthritis and joint distortion. Although the exact pathogenesis of the disease has yet not been elucidated, however, studies suggest that cellular proliferation of synoviocytes result in pannus formation which damages the cartilage and bone. Recent reports also support the role of free radicals in its pathogenesis. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Alternative medicine provides another approach for treatment of RA and currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a novel drug. There is a dire need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential and adverse effects, if any, of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. In this review we have tried to explore various Indian ancient Ayurvedic, Unani and Tibbi, as also some Chinese and Korean, herbals for their potential to treat RA. PMID:18392103

  11. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neurotrophic factors and depression: possible therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Serafini, Gianluca; Hayley, Shawn; Pompili, Maurizio; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Brahmachari, Goutam; Girardi, Paolo; Amore, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Major depression is one of the leading causes of disability and psychosocial impairment worldwide. Although many advances have been made in the neurobiology of this complex disorder, the pathophysiological mechanisms are still unclear. Among the proposed theories, impaired neuroplasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis have received considerable attention. The possible association between hippocampal neurogenesis, neurotrophic factors, major depression, and antidepressant responses was critically analyzed using a comprehensive search of articles/book chapters in English language between 1980 and 2014. One common emerging theme was that chronic stress and major depression are associated with structural brain changes such as a loss of dendritic spines and synapses, as well as reduced dendritic arborisation, together with diminished glial cells in the hippocampus. Both central monoamines and neurotrophic factors were associated with a modulation of hippocampal progenitor proliferation and cell survival. Accordingly, antidepressants are generally suggested to reverse stress-induced structural changes augmenting dendritic arborisation and synaptogenesis. Such antidepressant consequences are supposed to stem from their stimulatory effects on neurotrophic factors, and possibly modulation of glial cells. Of course, accumulating evidence also suggested that glutamatergic systems are implicated in not only basic neuroplastic processes, but also in the core features of depression. Hence, it is critical that antidepressant strategies focus on links between the various neurotransmitter systems, neurotrophic processes of hippocampal neurogenesis, and neurotrophic factors with regards to depressive symptomology. The identification of novel alternative antidepressant medications that target these systems is discussed in this review.

  12. Role of CXCR4 in HIV infection and its potential as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2010-07-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the two major coreceptors for HIV entry. Numerous efforts have been made to develop a new class of anti-HIV agents that target these coreceptors as an additional or alternative therapy to standard HAART. Among the CCR5 inhibitors developed so far, maraviroc is the first drug that has been approved by the US FDA for treating patients with R5 HIV-1. Although many CXCR4 inhibitors, some of which are highly active and orally bioavailable, have also been studied, they are still at preclinical stages or have been suspended during development. Importantly, the interaction between CXCR4 and its ligand SDF-1 is involved in various disease conditions, such as cancer cell metastasis, leukemia cell proliferation, rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, CXCR4 inhibitors have potential as novel therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases as well as HIV infection.

  13. A Therapeutic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine for HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Núria; Assoumou, Lambert; Gil, Cristina; González, Nuria; Alcamí, José; León, Agathe; Romeu, Joan; Dalmau, Judith; Martínez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeff; Autran, Brigitte; Costagliola, Dominique; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gatell, Josep M; Plana, Montserrat; Gallart, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    A double-blinded, controlled study of vaccination of untreated patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with 3 doses of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) pulsed with heat inactivated autologous HIV-1 was performed. Therapeutic vaccinations were feasible, safe, and well tolerated. At week 24 after first vaccination (primary end point), a modest significant decrease in plasma viral load was observed in vaccine recipients, compared with control subjects (P = .03). In addition, the change in plasma viral load after vaccination tended to be inversely associated with the increase in HIV-specific T cell responses in vaccinated patients but tended to be directly correlated with HIV-specific T cell responses in control subjects. Clinical trial.gov NCT00402142 PMID:21233310

  14. [Developmental mechanism of low myopia and therapeutic possibilities. A review].

    PubMed

    Tokoro, T

    1998-12-01

    We studied the developmental mechanism of low myopia and the possibility of its drug treatment. I. Prevalence of myopia. According to surveys by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, the frequency of myopia in school children has gradually increased. We examined office workers from 20 to 60 years of age over a 3-year period. Myopia progression was observed in the thirties and fourties. Late-onset myopia is an important problem around the world. II. Developmental mechanism of low myopia. 1. Reduction of refraction after cycloplegia was statistically significant in adults after their twenties. We measured accommodative hysteresis after a close visual task. Accommodative hysteresis persisted for a long time in late-onset and adult-onset myopia. Continuous ciliary contraction seems to be related to late-onset myopia. 2. Bovine ciliary muscle strips were suspended in a Magnus double tube. The changes in isometric tension of the strips, when chemicals were added, were measured with a force-displacement transducer. After the addition of the cholinergic agonist carbachol, the strips of ciliary muscle produced a tonic contraction. When the muscarinic receptor antagonist cyclopentolate was added, relaxation was produced. After the addition of ET-1, a dual response occurred which consisted of a moderate relaxation and a long-lasting contraction. The mean contraction caused by ET-1 was weak but continuous compared to carbachol. The contractile response was inhibited by an ETA receptor antagonist. Also, when takusha, one component of gorei-san, a Chinese drug, was added to the ciliary muscle strips, contraction with ET-1 was attenuated. Contraction of the ciliary muscle with ET-1 was attenuated after addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor. This reaction suggests that NO causes relaxation of the bovine ciliary muscle through the activation of guanylyl cyclase and an increase in cyclic GMP. Currently, at least 5 muscarinic receptor subtypes

  15. HBV and HIV co-infection: Impact on liver pathobiology and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on progression of severe liver diseases is a serious public health issue, worldwide. In the co-infection cases, about 90% of HIV-infected population is seropositive for HBV where approximately 5%-40% individuals are chronically infected. In HIV co-infected individuals, liver-related mortality is estimated over 17 times higher than those with HBV mono-infection. The spectrum of HIV-induced liver diseases includes hepatitis, steatohepatitis, endothelialitis, necrosis, granulomatosis, cirrhosis and carcinoma. Moreover, HIV co-infection significantly alters the natural history of hepatitis B, and therefore complicates the disease management. Though several studies have demonstrated impact of HIV proteins on hepatocyte biology, only a few data is available on interactions between HBV and HIV proteins. Thus, the clinical spectrum as well as the complexity of the co-infection offers challenging fronts to study the underlying molecular mechanisms, and to design effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:25625003

  16. Intracellular signals of lung cancer cells as possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Kumano, Keiki; Ueno, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several molecularly targeted therapies have been developed as part of lung cancer treatment; they have produced dramatically good results. However, among the many oncogenes that have been identified to be involved in the development of lung cancers, a number of oncogenes are not covered by these advanced therapies. For the treatment of lung cancers, which is a group of heterogeneous diseases, persistent effort in developing individual therapies based on the respective causal genes is important. In addition, for the development of a novel therapy, identification of the lung epithelial stem cells and the origin cells of lung cancer, and understanding about candidate cancer stem cells in lung cancer tissues, their intracellular signaling pathways, and the mechanism of dysregulation of the pathways in cancer cells are extremely important. However, the development of drug resistance by cancer cells, despite the use of molecularly targeted drugs for the causal genes, thus obstructing treatment, is a well-known phenomenon. In this article, we discuss major causal genes of lung cancers and intracellular signaling pathways involving those genes, and review studies on origin and stem cells of lung cancers, as well as the possibility of developing molecularly targeted therapies based on these studies. PMID:25707772

  17. Therapeutic possibilities of techniques of extracorporeal blood circulation in oncology.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Sante Basso

    2012-01-01

    Malignant tumors in an advanced phase of diffusion have a very poor prognosis. However, there are conditions in the body which may impede, even if only partially, further spread of the disease. In addition to currently available treatments, other favorable conditions can help to improve the prognosis, even if only relatively, such as the presence of inhibitors of metalloproteinases, antiangiogenic factors, the absence of particular proteins that favor tumor development, and the possibility of positively activating the immune system. The authors believe that in cases where such conditions are concurrent, the addition of a new favorable condition could be very useful. On the other hand, cases of total spontaneous regression of malignancies, even if in metastatic diffusion, are well known. It was recently emphasized that the spread of metastasis of renal cell carcinoma, arising in patients on hemodialysis for a long time, is considerably reduced at the post-mortem examination compared to patients with renal cell carcinoma and not on hemodialysis. This may suggest a positive effect exerted by the dialytic membrane on metastatic spread. The authors hypothesize that extracorporeal circulation of the blood, used mainly for cardiovascular interventions and hemodialysis, could be used by applying filters suitable for cancer treatments, similar to those used in hemodialysis, even if without accomplishing the hemodialytic function, provided there are no objections to their biocompatibility. In this case, the block of metastatic cells could lead to a relative increase in the cellular elements of the immune system (NK cells and T lymphocytes) compared to cancer cells, or rather to the relative reduction in the number of cancer cells compared to NK cells and T lymphocytes. Such a block would prevent any feedback reactions, so frequent and damaging to the prognosis when using overall medical stimulation for the immune system.

  18. HIV-1 matrix protein p17: a candidate antigen for therapeutic vaccines against AIDS.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Simona; Giagulli, Cinzia; Caccuri, Francesca; Magiera, Anna K; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2010-12-01

    The success in the development of anti-retroviral therapies (HAART) that contain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is challenged by the cost of this lifelong therapy and by its toxicity. Immune-based therapeutic strategies that boost the immune response against HIV-1 proteins or protein subunits have been recently proposed to control virus replication in order to provide protection from disease development, reduce virus transmission, and help limit the use of anti-retroviral treatments. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 is a structural protein that is critically involved in most stages of the life cycle of the retrovirus. Besides its well established role in the virus life cycle, increasing evidence suggests that p17 may also be active extracellularly in deregulating biological activities of many different immune cells that are directly or indirectly involved in AIDS pathogenesis. Thus, p17 might represent a promising target for developing a therapeutic vaccine as a contribution to combating AIDS. In this article we review the biological characteristics of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 and we describe why a synthetic peptide representative of the p17 functional epitope may work as a vaccine molecule capable of inducing anti-p17 neutralizing response against p17 derived from divergent HIV-1 strains.

  19. Interactions of host APOBEC3 restriction factors with HIV-1 in vivo: implications for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Albin, John S; Harris, Reuben S

    2010-01-22

    Restriction factors are natural cellular proteins that defend individual cells from viral infection. These factors include the APOBEC3 family of DNA cytidine deaminases, which restrict the infectivity of HIV-1 by hypermutating viral cDNA and inhibiting reverse transcription and integration. HIV-1 thwarts this restriction activity through its accessory protein virion infectivity factor (Vif), which uses multiple mechanisms to prevent APOBEC3 proteins such as APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F from entering viral particles. Here, we review the basic biology of the interactions between human APOBEC3 proteins and HIV-1 Vif. We also summarise, for the first time, current clinical data on the in vivo effects of APOBEC3 proteins, and survey strategies and progress towards developing therapeutics aimed at the APOBEC3-Vif axis.

  20. Cytokine production and dysregulation in HIV pathogenesis: lessons for development of therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Morgan A; Pombo, Carolina; Betts, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have characterized the cytokine modulation observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals, from initial infection through chronic disease. Progressive and non-progressive HIV infection models show the cytokine milieu differs in terms of production and responsiveness in these two groups, suggesting an understanding of the role cytokines play during infection is necessary for directing the immune response toward viral control. This review will cover cytokine induction and dysfunction during HIV pathogenesis, with a focus on the interplay between cytokines and transcription factors, T cell activation, and exhaustion. We highlight cytokines that have either vaccine adjuvant or therapeutic potential and discuss the need to identify key factors required for prevention of progression, clearance of infection, or protection from acquisition.

  1. Exploring the potential of monoclonal antibody therapeutics for HIV-1 eradication.

    PubMed

    Euler, Zelda; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    The HIV field has seen an increased interest in novel cure strategies. In particular, new latency reversal agents are in development to reverse latency to flush the virus out of its hiding place. Combining these efforts with immunotherapeutic approaches may not only drive the virus out of latency, but allow for the rapid elimination of these infected cells in a "shock and kill" approach. Beyond cell-based approaches, growing interest lies in the potential use of functionally enhanced "killer" monoclonal therapeutics to purge the reservoir. Here we discuss prospects for a monoclonal therapeutic-based "shock and kill" strategy that may lead to the permanent elimination of replication-competent virus, making a functional cure a reality for all patients afflicted with HIV worldwide.

  2. Safe Thinking and Affect Regulation (STAR): HIV Prevention in Alternative/Therapeutic Schools

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Larry K.; Nugent, Nicole R.; Houck, Christopher D.; Lescano, Celia M.; Whiteley, Laura B.; Barker, David; Viau, Lisa; Zlotnick, Caron

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Safe Thinking and Affect Regulation (STAR), a 14-session HIV-prevention program for adolescents at alternative/therapeutic schools. Because these youth frequently have difficulties with emotions and cognitions, it was designed to improve sexuality specific affect management and cognitive monitoring, as well as HIV-related knowledge and attitudes. It was hypothesized that STAR would lead to a decrease in sexual risk and improved HIV knowledge and attitudes. Method Fourteen schools were randomly assigned by year either to the STAR intervention or a brief educational program. Schools received the alternate intervention the following year. 185 adolescents in 29 cohorts (groups) participated in the interventions. Assessment of sexual behavior, knowledge and attitudes with audio computer-assisted self-interviews occurred at three, six and nine months post intervention. Results Hierarchical Linear Model (HLM) analyses found that adolescents in the STAR intervention reported a significantly greater decrease (p < .05) in the Sexual Risk Index than youth in the control group over the six months post intervention and similar improvements in the HIV Knowledge Scale and the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale. There were no group differences between six and nine months post intervention. Conclusions This STAR intervention for youth in alternative schools was associated with decreased sexual risk for six months after the intervention. These data suggest that intervention strategies that target cognitions and affect within a sexual context might be usefully applied to improving sexual behavior but may need to be reinforced over time. PMID:21961780

  3. The therapeutic application of CRISPR/Cas9 technologies for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena; Ali, Stuart A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Weinberg, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Nevertheless gene-based therapies represent a promising therapeutic paradigm for HIV-1, as they have the potential for sustained viral inhibition and reduced treatment interventions. One new method amendable to a gene-based therapy is the clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 gene editing system. Areas covered CRISPR/Cas9 can be engineered to successfully modulate an array of disease-causing genetic elements. We discuss the diverse roles that CRISPR/Cas9 may play in targeting HIV and eradicating infection. The Cas9 nuclease coupled with one or more small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) can target the provirus to mediate excision of the integrated viral genome. Moreover, a modified nuclease deficient Cas9 fused to transcription activating domains may induce targeted activation of proviral gene expression allowing for the purging of the latent reservoirs. These technologies can also be exploited to target host dependency factors such as the co-receptor CCR5, thus preventing cellular entry of the virus. Expert opinion The diversity of the CRISPR/Cas9 technologies hold great promise for targeting different stages of the viral life cycle, and have the capacity for mediating an effective and sustained genetic therapy against HIV. PMID:25865334

  4. Lessons to be Learned from Natural Control of HIV – Future Directions, Therapeutic, and Preventive Implications

    PubMed Central

    Shasha, David; Walker, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating data generated from persons who naturally control HIV without the need for antiretroviral treatment has led to significant insights into the possible mechanisms of durable control of AIDS virus infection. At the center of this control is the HIV-specific CD8 T cell response, and the basis for this CD8-mediated control is gradually being revealed. Genome wide association studies coupled with HLA sequence data implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major genetic factor modulating durable control of HIV, but host genetic factors account for only around 20% of the variability in control. Other factors including specific functional characteristics of the TCR clonotypes generated in vivo, targeting of vulnerable regions of the virus that lead to fitness impairing mutations, immune exhaustion, and host restriction factors that limit HIV replication all have been shown to additionally contribute to control. Moreover, emerging data indicate that the CD8+ T cell response may be critical for attempts to purge virus infected cells following activation of the latent reservoir, and thus lessons learned from elite controllers (ECs) are likely to impact the eradication agenda. On-going efforts are also needed to understand and address the role of immune activation in disease progression, as it becomes increasingly clear that durable immune control in ECs comes at a cost. Taken together, the research achievements in the attempt to unlock the mechanisms behind natural control of HIV will continue to be an important source of insights and ideas in the continuous search after an effective HIV vaccine, and for the attempts to achieve a sterilizing or functional cure in HIV positive patients with progressive infection. PMID:23805139

  5. [Pathogenesis of AIDS: possible role of co-factors in HIV reactivation].

    PubMed

    Veronesi, R; Focaccia, R; Mazza, C C

    1989-01-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects concerning the pathogenesis of AIDS is the long period of latency of the HIV in human cells, not causing any cytopatic effect in some and, on the other hand, causing cell destruction, at short periods, in others. The various agents and the mechanisms they adopt to reactivate the latente HIV, were described. Also the frequent epidemiological observation on the presence of both such agents and the HIV in AIDS patients allowed the authors to speculate on the probable important role of a cohort of co-factors which determine the destiny of such individuals. Special considerations were made in respect to the hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus, herpesviruses (HHV-1, e and 6), EB virus, HTLV-1 and 2 retroviruses, group B arbovirus Maguary, malaria and other endemic infectious diseases which victimize millions of Brazilians. Accepting the importance of such co-factors acting on the viral gens that regulate the HIV expression in the host cell, it was speculated on the possible role of vaccines, such as the hepatitis B vaccine, and some antiviral drugs which could be useful in the indirect prevention of AIDS-disease in both HIV-carriers and those practising AIDS-high-risk-activities.

  6. RNA interference-based therapeutics for human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 treatment: synthetic siRNA or vector-based shRNA?

    PubMed Central

    Subramanya, Sandesh; Kim, Sang-Soo; Manjunath, N; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Importance of the field Despite the extraordinary clinical benefits of HAART, the prospect of life-long antiretroviral regimen poses significant practical problems, which has spurred an interest in developing new drugs and strategies to treat HIV infection and to eliminate persistent viral reservoirs. RNAi is a highly potent natural gene silencing mechanism that has emerged as a novel therapeutic possibility for HIV. Areas covered in this review Our aim is to discuss the recent progress in overcoming the hurdles for translating transient and stable RNAi enabling technologies towards clinical applications in HIV infection and the review covers literature from the past 2–3 years. What the reader will gain HIV inhibition can be achieved by transfection of chemically or enzymatically synthesized siRNAs or by DNA-based vector systems to express short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that are processed intracellularly into siRNA. This review compares the merits and shortcomings of the two approaches, focusing on technical and safety issues that will guide the choice of the appropriate strategy for clinical use. Take home message Introduction of synthetic siRNA into cells or its stable endogenous production using vector-driven shRNA have both been shown to effectively suppress HIV replication in vitro and in some instances in vivo. Each method has its own advantages and limitations in terms of ease of delivery, duration of silencing, emergence of escape mutants and potential toxicity. Thus, both methods appear to have potential as future therapeutics for HIV, once the technical and safety issues unique to each of the approaches are overcome. PMID:20088715

  7. Human monoclonal antibodies as candidate therapeutics against emerging viruses and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Broder, Christopher C; Gong, Rui; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2013-04-01

    More than 40 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for a number of disease indications with only one of these (Synagis) - for a viral disease, and not for therapy but for prevention. However, in the last decade novel potent mAbs have been discovered and characterized with potential as therapeutics against viruses of major importance for public health and biosecurity including Hendra virus (HeV), Nipah virus (NiV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus (EBOV), West Nile virus (WNV), influenza virus (IFV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we review such mAbs with an emphasis on antibodies of human origin, and highlight recent results as well as technologies and mechanisms related to their potential as therapeutics.

  8. Update and New Directions in Therapeutics for Neurological Complications of HIV Infections.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ronald; Letendre, Scott L

    2016-07-01

    The pace of therapeutic developments in HIV presents unique challenges to the neurologist caring for patients. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is remarkably effective in suppressing viral replication, preventing, and often even reversing disease progression. Still, not every patient benefits from cART for a variety of reasons, ranging from the cost of therapy and the burden of lifelong daily treatment to side effects and inadequate access to medical care. Treatment failure inevitably leads to disease progression and opportunistic complications. Many of these complications, even those that are treatable, produce permanent neurological disability. With ART, immune recovery itself may paradoxically lead to severe neurological disease; strategies for managing so-called immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome are beginning to show benefits. Effective cART may nevertheless leave in its wake persistent neurocognitive impairment. Treatments for persistent impairment despite virologic suppression and good immune recovery are being tested but are not yet proven. As we shall see, these treatments target several proposed mechanisms including cerebral small vessel disease, which is highly prevalent in HIV. Most recently, an ambitious initiative has been undertaken to develop interventions to eradicate HIV. This will require elimination of all infectious forms of viral nucleic acid throughout the body. The influence of these interventions on the brain remains to be characterized. Meanwhile, clinical investigators continue to develop antiretroviral treatments that optimize effectiveness, convenience, and tolerability, while minimizing long-term toxicities.

  9. Preventive and therapeutic applications of neutralizing antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    The development of a preventive vaccine to neutralize the highly variable and antigenically diverse human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been an indomitable goal. The recent discovery of a number of cross-neutralizing and potent monoclonal antibodies from elite neutralizers has provided important insights in this field. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are useful in identifying neutralizing epitopes of vaccine utility and for understanding the mechanism of potent and broad cross-neutralization thus providing a modality of preventive and therapeutic value. In this article we review the current understanding on the potential use of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in their full-length IgG structure, engineered domain antibody or bispecific versions towards preventive and therapeutic applications. The potential implications of NAbs are discussed in the light of the recent developments as key components in vaccination against HIV-1. The development of a vaccine immunogen which elicits bNAbs and confers protective immunity remains a real challenge. PMID:24757516

  10. Dose-response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Montefiori, David C; Lee, Benhur

    2015-09-29

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose-response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120-gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations.

  11. Cross-Learning: The Possibilities of a Learning Dialogue between the HIV and AIDS and Disability Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the region of the world most affected by HIV & AIDS, accounting for two-thirds of the global burden of the pandemic. People with disabilities are regarded as a high-risk group for HIV but have been largely neglected in programmes of education, treatment and support. This paper examines the possibilities for a learning…

  12. Roles for biological membranes in regulating human immunodeficiency virus replication and progress in the development of HIV therapeutics that target lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haughey, Norman J; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam

    2011-06-01

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) involves a number of important interactions with lipid components in host membranes that regulate binding, fusion, internalization, and viral assembly. Available data suggests that HIV actively modifies the sphingolipid content of cellular membranes to create focal environments that are favorable for infection. In this review, we summarize the roles that membrane lipids play in HIV infection and discuss the current status of therapeutics that attempt to modify biological membranes to inhibit HIV.

  13. Pharmacological properties and therapeutic possibilities for drugs acting upon endocannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    Clinical trial data are beginning to emerge with respect to the therapeutic efficacy of cannabis extracts for the treatment of chronic pain. Although there is some evidence of efficacy, a major issue concerns the narrow margin between doses producing therapeutic effects and those producing the "highs" associated with cannabis misuse. In addition, long-term use is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric illness. These negative aspects constrain the doses of cannabis extracts and psychoactive cannabinoids that can be given to patients, and raise the risk that properly conducted clinical trials with too low dosages will impact negatively on subsequent drug development in this field. However, recent research has opened up a number of avenues whereby compounds acting directly upon cannabinoid (CB) receptors may have therapeutic potential. In this review, two such areas are discussed, namely a) the possible use of peripherally acting CB agonists and CB2 receptor-selective agonists for the treatment of pain, and b) the possible utility of CB2 receptor agonists for the prevention of stress-induced exacerbations of skin disorders such as psoriasis. A second area of drug development at present is that of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, spearheaded by rimonabant, for the treatment of obesity and as an aid for smoking cessation. An important aspect of these compounds is their efficacy and selectivity, and this is discussed in detail in the present review.

  14. Treatment of HIV in the CNS: effects of antiretroviral therapy and the promise of non-antiretroviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Michael J; Spudich, Serena

    2014-09-01

    The growing recognition of the burden of neurologic disease associated with HIV infection in the last decade has led to renewed efforts to characterize the pathophysiology of the virus within the central nervous system (CNS). The concept of the AIDS-dementia complex is now better understood as a spectrum of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which range from asymptomatic disease to severe impairment. Recent work has shown that even optimally treated patients can experience not only persistent HAND, but also the development of new neurologic abnormalities despite viral suppression. This has thrown into question what the impact of antiretroviral therapy has been on the incidence and prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction. In this context, the last few years have seen a concentrated effort to identify the effects that antiretroviral therapy has on the neurologic manifestations of HIV and to develop therapeutic modalities that might specifically alter the trajectory of HIV within the CNS.

  15. Role of fever in infection: has induced fever any therapeutic potential in HIV infection?

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S; Rashid, S

    1997-01-01

    Ancient societies had no rational understanding of fever. The Greeks were the first to recognise that it may be part of nature's method of effecting cure in some diseases. How best to assist nature went through many trials and errors. Appreciation of the prognostic value of fever and how it may be controlled was slow to appear. That there was a place in the therapeutic arsenal for induced fever came only with the 20th century. Finding a suitable, safe, and satisfactory means came slowly. The curative power of well controlled and reproducible levels of fever was proved by the arrest of one deadly and incurable complication of a sexually transmitted disease in the first half of this century. The purpose of this review is to promote discussion and, hopefully, well ordered laboratory and clinical trials aimed at learning whether or not induced fevers have a place in the care of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images PMID:9306904

  16. Disease-modifying therapeutic concepts for HIV in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Butler, Scott L; Valdez, Hernan; Westby, Michael; Perros, Manos; June, Carl H; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Levy, Yves; Cooper, David A; Douek, Daniel; Lederman, Michael M; Tebas, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    Chronic HIV infection is associated with persistent immune activation and inflammation even among patients virologically suppressed on antiretroviral therapy for years. Chronic immune activation has been associated with poor outcomes--both AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining clinical events--and persistent CD4 T-cell depletion. The cause of chronic immune activation in well-controlled HIV infection is unknown. Proposed drivers include residual viral replication, microbial translocation, and coinfecting pathogens. Therapeutic interventions targeting immune activation are emerging, from approaches that interfere directly with activation and inflammatory pathways to those that prevent microbial translocation or decrease the availability of host target cells for the virus. In the context of the disappointing results of the interleukin-2 trials, the main challenges to developing these disease-modifying therapies include identifying an adequate target population and choosing surrogate endpoints that will provide positive proof-of-concept that the interventions will translate into long-term clinical benefit before embarking on large clinical endpoint trials.

  17. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

  18. Restoring HIV-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1999-02-12

    When HIV is controlled with antiretrovirals, immunity to other infections often returns. Sometimes patients can stop prophylactic treatment, and sometimes opportunistic infections can clear up without treatment. However, immunity to HIV itself does not return, or returns very slowly, even when HIV has been suppressed for years with drug therapy. Researchers do not know why HIV immunity reacts differently, but several possible approaches to restoring HIV-specific immunity are being researched. One approach involves a therapeutic vaccination while the virus is well suppressed with antiretrovirals. The other approach is beginning HIV treatment very early, before the virus begins destroying the cells that recognize it. Several studies are discussed.

  19. The Therapeutic Potentials of Ayahuasca: Possible Effects against Various Diseases of Civilization.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Bokor, Petra; Winkelman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychoactive brew of two main components. Its active agents are β-carboline and tryptamine derivatives. As a sacrament, ayahuasca is still a central element of many healing ceremonies in the Amazon Basin and its ritual consumption has become common among the mestizo populations of South America. Ayahuasca use amongst the indigenous people of the Amazon is a form of traditional medicine and cultural psychiatry. During the last two decades, the substance has become increasingly known among both scientists and laymen, and currently its use is spreading all over in the Western world. In the present paper we describe the chief characteristics of ayahuasca, discuss important questions raised about its use, and provide an overview of the scientific research supporting its potential therapeutic benefits. A growing number of studies indicate that the psychotherapeutic potential of ayahuasca is based mostly on the strong serotonergic effects, whereas the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonist effect of its active ingredient dimethyltryptamine raises the possibility that the ethnomedical observations on the diversity of treated conditions can be scientifically verified. Moreover, in the right therapeutic or ritual setting with proper preparation and mindset of the user, followed by subsequent integration of the experience, ayahuasca has proven effective in the treatment of substance dependence. This article has two important take-home messages: (1) the therapeutic effects of ayahuasca are best understood from a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual model, and (2) on the biological level ayahuasca may act against chronic low grade inflammation and oxidative stress via the Sig-1R which can explain its widespread therapeutic indications.

  20. The Therapeutic Potentials of Ayahuasca: Possible Effects against Various Diseases of Civilization

    PubMed Central

    Frecska, Ede; Bokor, Petra; Winkelman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychoactive brew of two main components. Its active agents are β-carboline and tryptamine derivatives. As a sacrament, ayahuasca is still a central element of many healing ceremonies in the Amazon Basin and its ritual consumption has become common among the mestizo populations of South America. Ayahuasca use amongst the indigenous people of the Amazon is a form of traditional medicine and cultural psychiatry. During the last two decades, the substance has become increasingly known among both scientists and laymen, and currently its use is spreading all over in the Western world. In the present paper we describe the chief characteristics of ayahuasca, discuss important questions raised about its use, and provide an overview of the scientific research supporting its potential therapeutic benefits. A growing number of studies indicate that the psychotherapeutic potential of ayahuasca is based mostly on the strong serotonergic effects, whereas the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonist effect of its active ingredient dimethyltryptamine raises the possibility that the ethnomedical observations on the diversity of treated conditions can be scientifically verified. Moreover, in the right therapeutic or ritual setting with proper preparation and mindset of the user, followed by subsequent integration of the experience, ayahuasca has proven effective in the treatment of substance dependence. This article has two important take-home messages: (1) the therapeutic effects of ayahuasca are best understood from a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual model, and (2) on the biological level ayahuasca may act against chronic low grade inflammation and oxidative stress via the Sig-1R which can explain its widespread therapeutic indications. PMID:26973523

  1. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  2. Electrochemical monitoring-on-chip (E-MoC) of HIV-infection in presence of cocaine and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Atluri, Venkata; Shah, Pratikkumar; Vashist, Arti; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Yandart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-12-15

    Electrochemical monitoring-on-chip (E-MoC)-based approach for rapid assessment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection in the presence of cocaine (Coc) and specific drugs namely i.e., tenofovir (Tef), rimcazole (RA) is demonstrated here, for the first time, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). An in-vitro primary human astrocytes (HA) model was developed using a cultureware chip (CC, used for E-MoC) for HIV-infection, Coc exposure and treatment with anti-HIV drug i.e., Tef, and Coc antagonist i.e., RA. The charge transfer resistance (Rct) value of each CC well varies with respect to infection and treatment demonstrated highly responsive sensitivity of developed chip. The results of E-MoC, a proof-of-the concept, suggested that HIV-infection progression due to Coc ingestion and therapeutic effects of highly specific drugs are measurable on the basis of cell electrophysiology. Though, this work needs various molecular biology-based optimizations to promote this technology as an analytical tool for the rapid assessment of HIV-infection in a patient to manage HIV diseases for timely diagnosis. The presented study is based on using CNS cells and efforts are being made to perform this method using peripheral cells such as monocytes derived dendritic cells.

  3. Identification of conserved subdominant HIV Type 1 CD8(+) T Cell epitopes restricted within common HLA Supertypes for therapeutic HIV Type 1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Kløverpris, Henrik; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Stryhn, Anette; Buus, Søren; Karlsson, Annika; Vinner, Lasse; Goulder, Philip; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2012-11-01

    The high HIV-1 prevalence, up to 4.6% in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, makes it a relevant location for testing of therapeutic vaccines. With the aim of performing a clinical study in Guinea-Bissau, after first testing the vaccine for safety in Denmark, Europe, we here describe the design of a universal epitope peptide-based T cell vaccine with relevance for any geographic locations. The two major obstacles when designing such a vaccine are the high diversities of the HIV-1 genome and of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. We selected 15 CD8-restricted epitopes predicted from conserved regions of HIV-1 that were subdominant (i.e., infrequently targeted) within natural infections. Moreover, the epitopes were predicted to be restricted to at least one of the five common HLA supertypes (HLA-A01, A02, A03, B07, and B44). Here, we validated the resulting peptide-specific, HLA-restricted T cell specificities using peptide-MHC class I tetramer labeling of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. The selected vaccine epitopes are infrequently targeted in HIV-1-infected individuals from both locations. Moreover, we HLA-typed HIV-1-infected individuals and demonstrated that the selected vaccine epitopes, when targeted, are restricted to the five most common HLA supertypes at both locations. Thus, the HLA supertype-directed approach achieved HLA coverage of 95% and 100% of the examined cohorts in Guinea-Bissau and Denmark, respectively. In conclusion, the selected vaccine epitopes match the host populations and HIV-1 strains of these two distant geographic regions, justifying clinical testing in both locations.

  4. Heart rate as a possible therapeutic guide for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Taku; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2013-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that an elevated heart rate (HR) is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Ivabradine, a pure HR-lowering agent, reduces CV events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and chronic heart failure, and indicate that an HR greater than 70 b.p.m. is hazardous. These findings demonstrate not only that an elevated HR is an epiphenomenon of CV risk status but also that an elevated HR itself should be a therapeutic target. In addition, recent epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that the in-treatment HR or HR change predicts subsequent all-cause and CV mortality, independent of the HR-lowering strategy. Characteristics of the in-treatment HR or HR change are also important as possible therapeutic guides for risk management. However, there have been concerns regarding deleterious effects on CV event prevention owing to β-blocker-derived pharmacologic HR reduction. The potential role of HR and its modulation should be considered in future guidance documents.

  5. Possible Biomarkers for the Early Detection of HIV-associated Heart Diseases: A Proteomics and Bioinformatics Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Suraiya; Hashim, Rahim; Yan, Jasper S.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of cardiovascular disorders is increasing in HIV-infected individuals despite a significant reduction in the viral load by antiretroviral therapies (ART). Since the CD4 + T-cells are responsible for the viral load as well as immunological responses, we hypothesized that chronic HIV-infection of T-cells produces novel proteins/enzymes that cause cardiac dysfunctions. To identify specific factors that might cause cardiac disorders without the influence of numerous cofactors produced by other pathogenic microorganisms that co-inhabit most HIV-infected individuals, we analyzed genome-wide proteomes of a CD4 + T-cell line at different stages of HIV replication and cell growth over > 6 months. Subtractive analyses of several hundred differentially regulated proteins from HIV-infected and uninfected counterpart cells and comparisons with proteins expressed from the same cells after treating with the antiviral drug Zidovudine/AZT and inhibiting virus replication, identified a well-coordinated network of 12 soluble/diffusible proteins in HIV-infected cells. Functional categorization, bioinformatics and statistical analyses of each protein predicted that the expression of cardiac-specific Ca2 + kinase together with multiple Ca2 + release channels causes a sustained overload of Ca2 + in the heart which induces fetal/cardiac myosin heavy chains (MYH6 and MYH7) and a myosin light-chain kinase. Each of these proteins has been shown to cause cardiac stress, arrhythmia, hypertrophic signaling, cardiomyopathy and heart failure (p = 8 × 10− 11). Translational studies using the newly discovered proteins produced by HIV infection alone would provide additional biomarkers that could be added to the conventional markers for an early diagnosis and/or development of specific therapeutic interventions for heart diseases in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:25750702

  6. Immune and genetic mechanisms in COPD: possible targets for therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Tzortzaki, Eleni G; Papi, Alberto; Neofytou, Eirini; Soulitzis, Nikolaos; Siafakas, Nikolaos M

    2013-02-01

    Genetic, immune and environmental interactions are key elements for the development of COPD. Cigarette smoking is considered the primary risk factor initiating inflammatory cascades in genetically susceptible individuals. The "danger signals" elicited by the injured cells of non-specific immunity induce the downstream activation of proinflammatory cascades and antigen-specific adaptive immune responses. The produced oxidative stress further damages the lung leading to acquired genetic changes (histone deacetylation, microsatellite DNA instability, DNA methylation, telomere shortening, miRNA alterations) due to an inefficient DNA repair machinery. On the other hand, augmented apoptosis, impaired efferocytosis and abnormal tissue remodeling contribute to the chronic inflammatory response and tissue destruction in COPD. This review focuses on the role of genetic, epigenetic and immune mechanisms in the development of COPD in order to put forward possible prognostic and therapeutic targets.

  7. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells.

  8. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  9. Protection of HIV neutralizing aptamers against rectal and vaginal nucleases: implications for RNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Cookson, Jonathan; Coventry, Veronica K; Sproat, Brian; Rabe, Lorna; Cranston, Ross D; McGowan, Ian; James, William

    2011-01-28

    RNA-based drugs are an emerging class of therapeutics. They have the potential to regulate proteins, chromatin, as well as bind to specific proteins of interest in the form of aptamers. These aptamers are protected from nuclease attack by chemical modifications that enhance their stability for in vivo usage. However, nucleases are ubiquitous, and as we have yet to characterize the entire human microbiome it is likely that many nucleases are yet to be identified. Any novel, unusual enzymes present in vivo might reduce the efficacy of RNA-based therapeutics, even when they are chemically modified. We have previously identified an RNA-based aptamer capable of neutralizing a broad spectrum of clinical HIV-1 isolates and are developing it as a vaginal and rectal microbicide candidate. As a first step we addressed aptamer stability in the milieu of proteins present in these environments. Here we uncover a number of different nucleases that are able to rapidly degrade 2'-F-modified RNA. We demonstrate that the aptamer can be protected from the nuclease(s) present in the vaginal setting, without affecting its antiviral activity, by replacement of key positions with 2'-O-Me-modified nucleotides. Finally, we show that the aptamer can be protected from all nucleases present in both vaginal and rectal compartments using Zn(2+) cations. In conclusion we have derived a stable, antiviral RNA-based aptamer that could form the basis of a pre-exposure microbicide or be a valuable addition to the current tenofovir-based microbicide candidate undergoing clinical trials.

  10. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy as a Possible Therapeutic Alternative in the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Deboli, Tommaso; Previgliano, Alberto; Broganelli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in individuals with fair skin type (I–II) and steadily increasing in incidence (70% of skin malignancy). It is locally invasive but metastasis is usually very rare, with an estimated incidence of 0.0028%–0.55%. Conventional therapy is surgery, especially for the H region of the face and infiltrative lesions; in case of inoperable tumors, radiotherapy is a valid option. Recently, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an effective treatment in the management of superficial and small nodular BCC. PDT is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of a photo-sensibilizing agent followed by irradiation at a pre-defined wavelength; this determines the creation of reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. The only major side effect is pain, reported by some patients during the irradiation. The high cure rate and excellent cosmetic outcome requires considering this possibility for the management of patients with both sporadic and hereditary BCC. In this article, an extensive review of the recent literature was made, in order to clarify the role of PDT as a possible alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of BCC. PMID:26426005

  11. Retrospective analysis of the associations and effectiveness of performing therapeutic drug monitoring in pregnant HIV-positive women in two large centres in Manchester.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Thomas; Dessain, Amabel; Taylor, Kelly; McQuillan, Orla; Kingston, Margaret; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    There is no proven benefit for the routine use of therapeutic drug monitoring in HIV-positive pregnant women either for improving viral control or preventing mother-to-child transmission. This analysis reviewed a cohort of 171 HIV-positive pregnant women delivering between 1 January 2008 and 28 May 2013 to first establish which baseline characteristics are associated with having therapeutic drug monitoring performed, and whether therapeutic drug monitoring was associated with improved HIV control during pregnancy or mother-to-child transmission. Therapeutic drug monitoring was performed in 39% ( n = 66) of patients; it was associated with baseline characteristics of poor adherence to therapy (therapeutic drug monitoring 23% versus non-therapeutic drug monitoring 10%, p = 0.025) and the use of protease inhibitors (therapeutic drug monitoring 94% versus non-therapeutic drug monitoring 77%, p = 0.005). By multivariate analysis therapeutic drug monitoring was associated with medication alterations during pregnancy (therapeutic drug monitoring 68% versus non-therapeutic drug monitoring 12%, p = < 0.001), but not associated with any difference in viral load breakthrough during pregnancy (therapeutic drug monitoring 12% versus non-therapeutic drug monitoring 7%, p = 0.456) and viral load detectable at birth (therapeutic drug monitoring 14% versus non-therapeutic drug monitoring 9%, p = 0.503). There were no instances of mother-to-child transmission. Therapeutic drug monitoring's association with medication changes is postulated as partially causal in this cohort. There was no evidence of any association with improved control or reduced transmission of HIV to advocate routine therapeutic drug monitoring use.

  12. NADPH oxidases, reactive oxygen species, and hypertension: clinical implications and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Paravicini, Tamara M; Touyz, Rhian M

    2008-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence many physiological processes including host defense, hormone biosynthesis, fertilization, and cellular signaling. Increased ROS production (termed "oxidative stress") has been implicated in various pathologies, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. A major source for vascular and renal ROS is a family of nonphagocytic NAD(P)H oxidases, including the prototypic Nox2 homolog-based NAD(P)H oxidase, as well as other NAD(P)H oxidases, such as Nox1 and Nox4. Other possible sources include mitochondrial electron transport enzymes, xanthine oxidase, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and uncoupled nitric oxide synthase. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS plays a physiological role in the regulation of endothelial function and vascular tone and a pathophysiological role in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and rarefaction, important processes underlying cardiovascular and renal remodeling in hypertension and diabetes. These findings have evoked considerable interest because of the possibilities that therapies against nonphagocytic NAD(P)H oxidase to decrease ROS generation and/or strategies to increase nitric oxide (NO) availability and antioxidants may be useful in minimizing vascular injury and renal dysfunction and thereby prevent or regress target organ damage associated with hypertension and diabetes. Here we highlight current developments in the field of reactive oxygen species and cardiovascular disease, focusing specifically on the recently identified novel Nox family of NAD(P)H oxidases in hypertension. We also discuss the potential role of targeting ROS as a therapeutic possibility in the management of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  13. Structure and possible function of a G-quadruplex in the long terminal repeat of the proviral HIV-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Beatrice; Lech, Christopher J.; Heddi, Brahim; Regmi, Sagar; Frasson, Ilaria; Perrone, Rosalba; Richter, Sara N.; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the proviral human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genome is integral to virus transcription and host cell infection. The guanine-rich U3 region within the LTR promoter, previously shown to form G-quadruplex structures, represents an attractive target to inhibit HIV transcription and replication. In this work, we report the structure of a biologically relevant G-quadruplex within the LTR promoter region of HIV-1. The guanine-rich sequence designated LTR-IV forms a well-defined structure in physiological cationic solution. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of this sequence reveals a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex containing a single-nucleotide thymine bulge, which participates in a conserved stacking interaction with a neighboring single-nucleotide adenine loop. Transcription analysis in a HIV-1 replication competent cell indicates that the LTR-IV region may act as a modulator of G-quadruplex formation in the LTR promoter. Consequently, the LTR-IV G-quadruplex structure presented within this work could represent a valuable target for the design of HIV therapeutics. PMID:27298260

  14. The Therapeutic Potential of Adenosine Triphosphate as an Immune Modulator in the Treatment of HIV/AIDS: A Combination Approach with HAART

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Marc C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) is a potent molecule that has the capacity to modulate various aspects of cell functions including gene expression. This element of modulation is essential to the role of ATP as a therapeutic agent. The hypothesis presented is that ATP can have an important impact on the treatment of HIV infection. This is supported in part by published research, although a much greater role for ATP is suggested than prior authors ever thought possible. ATP has the ability to enhance the immune system and could thus improve the host’s own defense mechanisms to eradicate the virus-infected cells and restore normal immune function. This could provide effective therapy when used in conjunction with highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) to eliminate the latently infected cells. The key lies in applying ATP through the methodology described. This article presents a strategy for using ATP therapeutically along with background evidence to substantiate the importance of using ATP in the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:21675943

  15. Systemic and Mucosal Differences in HIV Burden, Immune and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Sharon M.; Redford, Maryann; Christensen, Shawna; Mack, Wendy; Cohn, Jon; Janoff, Edward N.; Mestecky, Jiri; Jenson, Hal B.; Navazesh, Mahvash; Cohen, Mardge; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Kovacs, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal tissues represent major targets for HIV transmission, but differ in susceptibility and reservoir function by unknown mechanisms. Methods In a cross-sectional study, HIV RNA and infectious virus were compared between oral and genital compartments and blood in HIV-infected women, in association with clinical parameters, co-pathogens and putative innate and adaptive HIV inhibitors. Results HIV RNA was detectable in 24.5% of women from all 3 compartments, whereas 45% had RNA in only one or two sites. By comparison, infectious HIV, present in blood of the majority, was rare in mucosal sites. Innate mediators, SLPI and TSP, were highest in mucosae. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was associated with an 80% decreased probability of shedding. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that mucosal HIV RNA was associated with higher plasma RNA, infectious virus, and total mucosal IgA, but not IgG. There was a 37-fold increased probability of detecting RNA in both genital and oral specimens (P=0.008;P=0.02, respectively) among women in highest vs lowest IgA tertiles. Conclusions Mucosal sites exhibit distinct characteristics of infectious HIV, viral shedding and responses to therapy, dependent upon both systemic and local factors. Of the putative innate and adaptive mucosal defense factors examined, only IgA was associated with HIV RNA shedding. However, rather than being protective, there was a striking increase in probability of detectable HIV RNA shedding in women with highest total IgA. PMID:21239996

  16. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-05

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'.

  17. Nanoparticle-conjugated animal venom-toxins and their possible therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Archita; Gomes, Aparna; Sengupta, Jayeeta; Datta, Poulami; Singha, Santiswarup; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Gomes, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Nano-medical approaches to develop drugs have attracted much attention in different arenas to design nanoparticle conjugates for better efficacy of the potential bio-molecules. A group of promising candidates of this category would be venom-toxins of animal origin of potential medicinal value. Traditional systems of medicine as well as folklores mention the use of venom-toxins for the treatment of various diseases. Research has led to scientific validation of medicinal applications of venoms-toxins and many active constituents derived from venoms-toxins are already in clinical use or under clinical trial. Nanomedicine is an emerging field of medicine where nanotechnology is used to develop molecules of nano-scale dimension, so that these molecules can be taken up by the cells more easily and have better efficacy, as compared to large molecules that may tend to get eliminated. This review will focus on some of the potential venoms and toxins along with nanoparticle conjugated venom-toxins of snakes, amphibians, scorpions and bees, etc., for possible therapeutic clues against emerging diseases. PMID:23236583

  18. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  19. Involvement of Renin-Angiotensin System in Retinopathy of Prematurity - A Possible Target for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Madhu; Chandra, Parijat; Halder, Nabanita; Singh, Baskar; Deorari, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Atul; Azad, Rajvardhan; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Examining the Retinal Renin Angiotensin System (RRAS) in the ROP neonates and analyzing the possibility of modulating the RRAS to prevent the progression in Oxygen Induced Retinopathy (OIR) model. Method Vitreous of ROP patients (n = 44, median age 5.5 months) was quantified for RRAS components, VEGF, HIF-1α and compared with age matched control. The involvement of RRAS in ROP was tested in the rat model of OIR and compared with normoxia. Expressions of RAS components, VEGF and HIF-1α in retina were analyzed using qPCR and retinal structure and function was also analyzed. Effect of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI) and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker (ARB) was evaluated and compared with Bevacizumab which served as a positive control. Drug penetration into retina was confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled ESI-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). Results Multifold increase in the expression of RAS components in human vitreous and rat retina showed their involvement in ROP. ERG & fundus studies in OIR revealed the altered function of retina and were successfully prevented by ARB (telmisartan), ACEI (lisinopril) and bevacizumab. Retinal analysis revealed the presence of ACEI and ARB in their therapeutic levels. Conclusion This study for the first time demonstrates the upregulated level of RAS components in human ROP vitreous and further that the pharmacological intervention in RRAS can functionally and structurally preserve retina against the progression of ROP in the OIR model. PMID:28033392

  20. Possible therapeutic role of IgE blockade in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Chikovani, Tinatin

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the high-affinity type-I IgE Fc receptors on mast cells (MCs) and basophils, inhibiting the IgE immune pathway. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder, and dysregulation of the immune system likely contributes to its etiology and/or symptomatology. Colonic biopsies from patients with IBS demonstrate considerable increase in the number of degranulating MCs releasing histamine in proximity to nerves, and this event may underlie the common IBS symptom of abdominal pain. Pharmacologic control of MC activation and mediator release is a current area of active interest in the field of IBS research. Recently, we and Pearson et al described 2 cases of patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) showing positive clinical response to omalizumab. In both cases, the female patients had severe, long-lasting IBS-D and achieved an almost complete resolution of IBS symptoms. Both patients were also able to discontinue all IBS medications after commencing the anti-IgE therapy. For both patients, the omalizumab treatment showed a relatively rapid onset of action, resembling the efficacy observed in and previously reported for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria. In this Editorial, we discuss the possible biological mechanisms that may underlie the clinical efficacy of omalizumab in IBS. We suggest that there is a need for a well-designed prospective study to investigate the therapeutic effects of anti-IgE in IBS. PMID:27920467

  1. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  2. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2013-08-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level.

  3. "Because I was in pain, I just wanted to be treated": competing therapeutic goals in the performance of healing HIV/AIDS in rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tonya N

    2010-01-01

    Zimbabwe is experiencing one of the most severe AIDS epidemics in the world, with an estimated one out of seven people infected with HIV. For both palliative care and pragmatic treatment of HIV-related opportunistic infections, people turn to Un'anga (the traditional system of health and healing), not as a substitute for Western therapeutics but as an alternative explanatory model for the diagnosis and management of illness. Through the use of highly charged symbols and ritualized communication, n'angas (traditional healers) seek to transform patients' understandings and experiences of HIV-related illness. Using performance theory and discourse analysis, this article seeks to expand our understanding of how competing therapeutic goals in the performance of healing affect the structure and content of performance, its subsequent meaning, and the therapeutic effect on those afflicted with HIV.

  4. Exploring the Possibilities and Limitations of Service-Learning: A Critical Analysis of College Student Narratives about HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan Robb; LePeau, Lucy A.; Robbins, Claire K.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored the possibilities and limitations of service-learning by deconstructing the narratives about HIV/AIDS that emerged from five college students who participated in an alternative spring break program. Employing a critical (Rhoads, 1997) and anti-foundational (Butin, 2010) approach to inquiry,…

  5. Gene therapy for HIV/AIDS: the potential for a new therapeutic regimen.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Greg; Amado, Rafael; Symonds, Geoff

    2003-08-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the etiologic agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). HIV/AIDS is a disease that, compared with the not so distant past, is now better held in check by current antiretroviral drugs. However, it remains a disease not solved. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) generally uses two non-nucleoside and one nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor or two non-nucleoside RT and one protease inhibitor. HAART is far more effective than the mono- or duo-therapy of the past, which used compounds like the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor AZT or two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. However, even with the relatively potent drug cocktails that comprise HAART, there are the issues of (i). HIV escape mutants, (ii). an apparent need to take the drugs in an ongoing manner, and (iii). the drugs' side effects that are often severe. This review speaks to the potential addition to these potent regimens of another regimen, namely the genetic modification of target hematopoietic cells. Such a new treatment paradigm is conceptually attractive as it may yield the constant intracellular expression of an anti-HIV gene that acts to inhibit HIV replication and pathogenicity. A body of preclinical work exists showing the inhibition of HIV replication and decreased HIV pathogenicity by anti-HIV genetic agents. This preclinical work used hematopoietic cell lines and primary cells as the target tissue. More recently, several clinical trials have sought to test this concept in vivo.

  6. Role of PD-1 co-inhibitory pathway in HIV infection and potential therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Velu, Vijayakumar; Shetty, Ravi Dyavar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2015-02-08

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play an important role in controlling viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, during chronic HIV infection, virus-specific CD8+ T cells undergo functional exhaustion, lose effector functions and fail to control viral infection. HIV-specific CD8 T cells expressing high levels of co-inhibitory molecule programmed death-1 (PD-1) during the chronic infection and are characterized by lower proliferation, cytokine production, and cytotoxic abilities. Although, antiretroviral therapy has resulted in dramatic decline in HIV replication, there is no effective treatment currently available to eradicate viral reservoirs or restore virus-specific T or B-cell functions that may complement ART in order to eliminate the virus. In recent years, studies in mice and non-human primate models of HIV infection demonstrated the functional exhaustion of virus-specific T and B cells could be reversed by blockade of interaction between PD-1 and its cognate ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2). In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of PD-1 pathway in HIV/SIV infection and discuss the beneficial effects of PD-1 blockade during chronic HIV/SIV infection and its potential role as immunotherapy for HIV/AIDS.

  7. Traditional healers and the "Fast-Track" HIV response: is success possible without them?

    PubMed

    Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne; Green, Edward; Hallin, Mary

    2016-07-01

    The rapid scale-up of effective HIV prevention strategies is a central theme of the post-2015 health and development agenda. All major global HIV and AIDS funders have aligned their policies and plans to achieve sharp reductions in new HIV infections and reach epidemic control by 2030. In these "fast-track" plans, increased antiretroviral treatment coverage and the attainment of viral suppression are pivotal, and there is firm recognition of the need for countries to mobilise more domestic resources and build stronger community clinic systems. There is little in these bold plans, however, to suggest that the now 30-year-old call by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other organisations to establish systematic collaborations with the traditional health sector will finally be heeded. In the context of sub-Saharan Africa's HIV epidemic, a significant body of literature demonstrates the critical role that traditional healers can play in improving the success of health programmes, including those for HIV prevention. This paper provides a brief history of collaboration with traditional healers for HIV followed by a description of several successful collaborations and discussion of key elements for success. We argue that the traditional health sector is a major resource that has yet to be sufficiently mobilised against HIV. As we shift from a short-term HIV response to a longer-term and more sustainable response, there is an urgent need to accelerate efforts to leverage and partner with the hundreds of thousands of traditional health practitioners who are already providing health services in communities. Failure to better attune our work to the medical pluralism of communities affected by HIV will continue to hinder HIV programming success and help assure that ambitious post-2015 HIV prevention and control goals are not realised.

  8. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as a possible therapeutic target in peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rynne-Vidal, Angela; Au-Yeung, Chi Lam; Jiménez-Heffernan, José A; Pérez-Lozano, María Luisa; Cremades-Jimeno, Lucía; Bárcena, Carmen; Cristóbal-García, Ignacio; Fernández-Chacón, Concepción; Yeung, Tsz Lun; Mok, Samuel C; Sandoval, Pilar; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is the primary metastatic route of ovarian cancer (OvCa), and is often accompanied by the accumulation of ascitic fluid. The peritoneal cavity is lined by mesothelial cells (MCs), which can be converted into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) through mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT). Here, we demonstrate that MCs isolated from ascitic fluid (AFMCs) of OvCa patients with peritoneal implants also undergo MMT and promote subcutaneous tumour growth in mice. RNA sequencing of AFMCs revealed that MMT-related pathways - including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling - are differentially regulated, and a gene signature was verified in peritoneal implants from OvCa patients. In a mouse model, pre-induction of MMT resulted in increased peritoneal tumour growth, whereas interfering with the TGF-β receptor reduced metastasis. MC-derived CAFs showed activation of Smad-dependent TGF-β signalling, which was disrupted in OvCa cells, despite their elevated TGF-β production. Accordingly, targeting Smad-dependent signalling in the peritoneal pre-metastatic niche in mice reduced tumour colonization, suggesting that Smad-dependent MMT could be crucial in peritoneal carcinomatosis. Together, these results indicate that bidirectional communication between OvCa cells and MC-derived CAFs, via TGF-β-mediated MMT, seems to be crucial to form a suitable metastatic niche. We suggest MMT as a possible target for therapeutic intervention and a potential source of biomarkers for improving OvCa diagnosis and/or prognosis. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. A Future of Possibilities: Educating Children Living in HIV Impacted Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagotho, Njeri

    2012-01-01

    Close to one and a half million Kenyans reportedly live with HIV/AIDS. Using qualitative in-depth interviews this study explores the ways in which parents living with HIV/AIDS navigate their social and economic environment to provide educational opportunities for their children. Barriers identified include the economic costs of a free primary…

  10. Prompt initiation of ART With therapeutic food is associated with improved outcomes in HIV-infected Malawian children with malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Maria H; Cox, Carrie; Dave, Anjalee; Draper, Heather R; Kabue, Mark; Schutze, Gordon E; Ahmed, Saeed; Kazembe, Peter N; Kline, Mark W; Manary, Mark

    2012-02-01

    This retrospective observational study of 140 HIV-infected children with uncomplicated malnutrition in urban Malawi tested the hypothesis that initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 21 days of outpatient therapeutic feeding (prompt ART) improved clinical outcomes. Children receiving prompt ART were more likely to recover nutritionally (86% vs. 60%, P < 0.01) and had higher rates of weight gain (3.6 vs. 1.6 g/k/day; P = 0.02). Logistic regression modeling found prompt ART was associated with increased likelihood of nutritional recovery (odds ratio: 5.4, 95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 14.5). This suggests that prompt ART is associated with improved outcomes in HIV-infected Malawian children with uncomplicated malnutrition.

  11. An in silico approach for identification of novel inhibitors as a potential therapeutics targeting HIV-1 viral infectivity factor.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Chanda; Nischal, Anuradha; Bandaru, Srinivas; Kasera, Priyadarshani; Rajput, Ashish; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Khattri, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Currently available antiviral drugs target the pol-encoded retroviral enzymes or integrases, in addition, inhibitors that target HIV-1 envelope-receptor interactions have also been recently approved. Recent understanding of the interactions between HIV-1 and host restriction factors has provided fresh avenues for development of novel antiviral drugs. For example, viral infectivity factor (Vif) now surfaced as an important therapeutic target in treatment of HIV infection. Vif suppresses A3G antiviral activity by targeting these proteins for polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In the present study we analyzed the inhibitory potential of VEC5 and RN18 to inhibit the Vif-A3G interaction through protein- protein docking studies. Perusal of the study showed that, VEC5 and RN18 though inhibits the interaction however showed sub optimal potential. To overcome this set back, we identified 35 structural analogues of VEC5 and 18 analogues of RN18 through virtual screening approach. Analogue with PubCID 71624757 and 55358204 (AKOS006479723) -structurally akin to VEC5 and RN18 respectively showed much appreciable interaction than their respective parent compound. Evident from Vif-A3G; protein - protein docking studies, analogue PubCID 71624757 demonstrated 1.08 folds better inhibitory potential than its parent compound VEC5 while analogue PubCID 55358204 was 1.15 folds better than RN18. Further these analogues passed drug likeness filters and predicted to be non- toxic. We expect these analogues can be put to pharmacodynamic studies that can pave way the breakthrough in HIV therapeutics.

  12. HIV-1 gp120: A Target for Therapeutics and Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Claudia; Nawaz, Fatima; Jelicic, Katija; Arthos, James; Fauci, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Although extraordinary progress has been made in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection, the AIDS pandemic continues to rage globally with 2.1 million infections and 1.6 million AIDS-related deaths reported in 2013. Until an effective vaccine is developed, new strategies for treatment and prevention are needed. Regarding the prevention of HIV infection, a major focus of prevention research in general and vaccine research in particular involves the interaction of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 with cell-surface receptors, with the hope that a greater understanding of these interactions will lead to the development of novel strategies aimed at preventing and even treating HIV-1 infection. Particular attention has been directed toward gaining a more precise understanding of the early events in transmission focusing on that critical window of time when HIV first establishes infection in the host. Here we describe some of the recent findings involving HIV-1 envelope interactions with cell surface receptors that are relevant to transmission and which may represent new opportunities to develop strategies to prevent HIV infection.

  13. The impact of antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings and current HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kumarasamy, N

    2016-04-01

    Four million people of the global total of 35 million with HIV infection are from South-East Asia. ART is currently utilized by 15 million people and has led to a dramatic decline in the mortality rate, including those in low- and middle-income countries. A reduction in sexually transmitted HIV and in comorbidities including tuberculosis has also followed. Current recommendations for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in people who are HIV+ are essentially to initiate ART irrespective of CD4 cell count and clinical stage. The frequency of HIV testing should be culturally specific and based on the HIV incidence in different key populations but phasing in viral load technology in LMIC is an urgent priority and this needs resources and capacity. With the availability of simplified potent ART regimens, persons with HIV now live longer. The recent WHO treatment guidelines recommending routine HIV testing and earlier initiation of treatment should be the stepping stone for ending the AIDS epidemic and to meet the UNAIDS mission of 90*90*90.

  14. Current progress in the development of RNAi-based therapeutics for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Rossi, J J

    2011-12-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment for HIV has changed the course of AIDS in societies in which the drugs are readily available. Despite the great success of HAART, drug resistance and toxicity issues still remain a concern for some individuals. Thus, a number of investigators have been exploring other approaches for inhibiting HIV-1 replication. One of the most potent of these is the use of RNA interference (RNAi). This review will focus solely on the use of RNAi for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including the problems, progress and future prospects.

  15. Therapeutic strategies underpinning the development of novel techniques for the treatment of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jian J.; Cong, Xiao J.; Hu, Li M.; Wang, Cun X.; Jia, Lee; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2010-01-01

    The HIV replication cycle offers multiple targets for chemotherapeutic intervention, including the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120; viral co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5; transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41; integrase; reverse transcriptase; protease and so on. Most currently used anti-HIV drugs are reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors. The expanding application of simulation to drug design combined with experimental techniques have developed a large amount of novel inhibitors that interact specifically with targets besides transcriptase and protease. This review presents details of the anti-HIV inhibitors discovered with computer-aided approaches and provides an overview of the recent five-year achievements in the treatment of HIV infection and the application of computational methods to current drug design. PMID:20096804

  16. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  17. HIV-2 infection and chemokine receptors usage - clues to reduced virulence of HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina; Moniz-Pereira, José

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) are the causative agents of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Without therapeutic intervention, HIV-1 or HIV-2 infections in humans are characterized by a gradual and irreversible immunologic failure that ultimately leads to the onset of a severe immunodeficiency that constitutes the hallmark of AIDS. In the last two decades AIDS has evolved into a global epidemic affecting millions of persons worldwide. Although sharing several identical properties, HIV-1 and HIV-2 have shown some important differences in vivo. In fact, a significant amount of epidemiologic, clinical and virologic data suggest that HIV-2 is in general less virulent than HIV-1. This reduced virulence is revealed by the longer asymptomatic period and the smaller transmission rate that characteristically are observed in HIV-2 infection. In this context, studies using HIV-2 as a model of a naturally less pathogenic infection could bring important new insights to HIV pathogenesis opening to new strategies to vaccines or therapeutic design. The reasons underlying the reduced pathogenicity of HIV-2 are still essentially unknown and surely are the outcome of a combination of distinct factors. In this review we will discuss the importance and the possible implications in HIV-2 pathogenesis, particularly during the asymptomatic period, of a less fitted interaction between viral envelope glycoproteins and cellular receptors that have been described in the way HIV-2 and HIV-1 use these receptors.

  18. Epigraph: A Vaccine Design Tool Applied to an HIV Therapeutic Vaccine and a Pan-Filovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Theiler, James; Yoon, Hyejin; Yusim, Karina; Picker, Louis J.; Fruh, Klaus; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    Epigraph is an efficient graph-based algorithm for designing vaccine antigens to optimize potential T-cell epitope (PTE) coverage. Epigraph vaccine antigens are functionally similar to Mosaic vaccines, which have demonstrated effectiveness in preliminary HIV non-human primate studies. In contrast to the Mosaic algorithm, Epigraph is substantially faster, and in restricted cases, provides a mathematically optimal solution. Epigraph furthermore has new features that enable enhanced vaccine design flexibility. These features include the ability to exclude rare epitopes from a design, to optimize population coverage based on inexact epitope matches, and to apply the code to both aligned and unaligned input sequences. Epigraph was developed to provide practical design solutions for two outstanding vaccine problems. The first of these is a personalized approach to a therapeutic T-cell HIV vaccine that would provide antigens with an excellent match to an individual’s infecting strain, intended to contain or clear a chronic infection. The second is a pan-filovirus vaccine, with the potential to protect against all known viruses in the Filoviradae family, including ebolaviruses. A web-based interface to run the Epigraph tool suite is available (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/EPIGRAPH/epigraph.html). PMID:27703185

  19. The Framing and Fashioning of Therapeutic Citizenship Among People Living With HIV Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steve; Namukwaya, Stella; Zalwango, Flavia; Seeley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine how people living with HIV (PLWH) were able to reconceptualize or “reframe” their understanding of HIV and enhance their capacity to self-manage the condition. Two in-depth interviews were held with 38 PLWH (20 women, 18 men) selected from three government and nongovernment antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery sites in Wakiso District, and the narratives analyzed. ART providers played an important role in shaping participants’ HIV self-management processes. Health workers helped PLWH realize that they could control their condition, provided useful concepts and language for emotional coping, and gave advice about practical self-management tasks, although this could not always be put into practice. ART providers in this setting were spaces for the development of a collective identity and a particular form of therapeutic citizenship that encouraged self-management, including adherence to ART. Positive framing institutions are important for many PLWH in resource-limited settings and the success of ART programs. PMID:26246523

  20. Ebola Virus: New Insights into Disease Aetiopathology and Possible Therapeutic Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    induced damage to endothelial cells. For example, intracellular replication of Rickettsia rickettsii, the aetiological agent of Rocky Mountain spotted ...haemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates. This review summarises our current understanding of EBOV pathogenesis and discusses various approaches to therapeutic...modality successfully mitigated the effects of EBOV haemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates. This review summarises our current understanding of EBOV

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1)-Mediated Apoptosis: New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Mbita, Zukile; Hull, Rodney; Dlamini, Zodwa

    2014-01-01

    HIV has posed a significant challenge due to the ability of the virus to both impair and evade the host’s immune system. One of the most important mechanisms it has employed to do so is the modulation of the host’s native apoptotic pathways and mechanisms. Viral proteins alter normal apoptotic signaling resulting in increased viral load and the formation of viral reservoirs which ultimately increase infectivity. Both the host’s pro- and anti-apoptotic responses are regulated by the interactions of viral proteins with cell surface receptors or apoptotic pathway components. This dynamic has led to the development of therapies aimed at altering the ability of the virus to modulate apoptotic pathways. These therapies are aimed at preventing or inhibiting viral infection, or treating viral associated pathologies. These drugs target both the viral proteins and the apoptotic pathways of the host. This review will examine the cell types targeted by HIV, the surface receptors exploited by the virus and the mechanisms whereby HIV encoded proteins influence the apoptotic pathways. The viral manipulation of the hosts’ cell type to evade the immune system, establish viral reservoirs and enhance viral proliferation will be reviewed. The pathologies associated with the ability of HIV to alter apoptotic signaling and the drugs and therapies currently under development that target the ability of apoptotic signaling within HIV infection will also be discussed. PMID:25196285

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-mediated apoptosis: new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Mbita, Zukile; Hull, Rodney; Dlamini, Zodwa

    2014-08-19

    HIV has posed a significant challenge due to the ability of the virus to both impair and evade the host's immune system. One of the most important mechanisms it has employed to do so is the modulation of the host's native apoptotic pathways and mechanisms. Viral proteins alter normal apoptotic signaling resulting in increased viral load and the formation of viral reservoirs which ultimately increase infectivity. Both the host's pro- and anti-apoptotic responses are regulated by the interactions of viral proteins with cell surface receptors or apoptotic pathway components. This dynamic has led to the development of therapies aimed at altering the ability of the virus to modulate apoptotic pathways. These therapies are aimed at preventing or inhibiting viral infection, or treating viral associated pathologies. These drugs target both the viral proteins and the apoptotic pathways of the host. This review will examine the cell types targeted by HIV, the surface receptors exploited by the virus and the mechanisms whereby HIV encoded proteins influence the apoptotic pathways. The viral manipulation of the hosts' cell type to evade the immune system, establish viral reservoirs and enhance viral proliferation will be reviewed. The pathologies associated with the ability of HIV to alter apoptotic signaling and the drugs and therapies currently under development that target the ability of apoptotic signaling within HIV infection will also be discussed.

  3. Demographical, Viro-Immunological, Clinical and Therapeutical Characteristics of HIV-Infected Patients in an “Epidemiologically Unexplored” Region of Italy (Calabria Region): the CalabrHIV Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Postorino, Maria Concetta; Luciani, Filippo; Mangano, Carmelo; Carpentieri, Maria Stella; Scerbo, Paolo; Priamo, Armando; Berardelli, Giuseppina; Marino, Roberto; Vallone, Alfredo; Serrao, Nicola; Pisani, Vincenzo; Costa, Chiara; Terremoto, Albano; Foti, Giuseppe; Cosco, Lucio; Calderazzo, Massimo; Corigliano, Domenico; Scordo, Preziosa; Strazzulla, Alessio; Torti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives HIV epidemics may differ among epidemiological contexts. We aimed at constructing an HIV clinical cohort whose main epidemiological, clinical and therapeutical characteristics are described (the CalabrHIV cohort, Calabria Region, Southern Italy). Methods The CalabrHIV Cohort includes all HIV patients on active follow-up in all infectious disease centers in the Calabria Region as at October 2014. All information was recorded in a common electronic database. Not-infectious co-morbidities (such as cardiovascular diseases, bone fractures, diabetes, renal failure and hypertension) were also studied. Results 548 patients (68% males; 59% aged <50 years) were included in the CalabrHIV cohort. Major risk factors were: sexual transmission (49%) and intravenous drug use (34%). 39% patients had HCV and/or HBV co-infection. Amongst 404 patients who had a complete clinical history, 34% were AIDS presenters and 49.3% had CD4 count ≤350/mm3 at HIV diagnosis. 83% patients on HAART had undetectable HIV-RNA. Hypertension was the most frequent co-morbidity (21.5%). Multimorbidity was more frequent in >50 years old patients than in <50 years old ones (30% vs. 6%; p<0.0001). Co-morbidity was more frequent in HCV and/or HBV co-infected than in HIV mono-infected patients (46.6% vs. 31.7%: p=0.0006). Conclusion This cohort presentation study sheds light, for the first time, on HIV patients’ characteristics in the Calabria Region. We showed that HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis were affected by concomitant not-infectious co-morbidities more than the HIV mono-infected individuals. New HCV treatments are therefore to be implemented in the co-infected population. PMID:26543523

  4. Why are some HIV/AIDS patients reluctant to receive antiviral therapy as soon as possible in China?

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-06-01

    In more than 20 years of medical practice, a surprising phenomenon has often occurred: some patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) decide not to go to the hospital and they do not let others know that they are suffering from the disease unless they believe that they are dieing. Zhang Shan (a pseudonym) is one such patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS who was reluctant to receive antiviral therapy as soon as possible, and this paper shares Zhang's story as he related it. Clearly, there are numerous views as to why patients in China behave as Zhang did. Presented here are several reasons, including society, history, morality and ideology, family, and education. Although all of these reasons do play a role, the patient's mindset and behavior is the most significant reason for a patient's reluctance to seek treatment or disclose his/her status. If the individual patient's mindset and behavior are not dealt with effectively, then HIV/AIDS can continue to spread and threaten additional lives and even the fabric of society. This paper analyzes the reasons why patients are hesitant to receive antiviral therapy, but this paper also suggests steps healthcare personnel can take to encourage patients to seek treatment. Such steps can save the lives of current patients with HIV/AIDS. In addition, sound public health measures and a rational approach to treatment are important to helping potential patients with HIV/AIDS.

  5. Towards novel therapeutics for HIV through fragment-based screening and drug design.

    PubMed

    Tiefendbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C David

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has been applied with varying levels of success to a number of proteins involved in the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) life cycle. Fragment-based approaches have led to the discovery of novel binding sites within protease, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and gp41. Novel compounds that bind to known pockets within CCR5 have also been identified via fragment screening, and a fragment-based approach to target the TAR-Tat interaction was explored. In the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), fragment-based approaches have yielded fragment hits with mid-μM activity in an in vitro activity assay, as well as fragment hits that are active against drug-resistant variants of RT. Fragment-based drug discovery is a powerful method to elucidate novel binding sites within proteins, and the method has had significant success in the context of HIV proteins.

  6. The hippocampo-prefrontal pathway: a possible therapeutic target for negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Ayan; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampo-prefrontal (H-PFC) pathway has been linked to cognitive and emotional disturbances in several psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Preclinical evidence from the NMDA receptor antagonism rodent model of schizophrenia shows severe pathology selective to the H-PFC pathway. It is speculated that there is an increased excitatory drive from the hippocampus to the prefrontal cortex due to dysfunctions in the H-PFC plasticity, which may serve as the basis for the behavioral consequences observed in this rodent model. Thus, the H-PFC pathway is currently emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the negative and cognitive symptom clusters of schizophrenia. Here, we have reviewed the physiological, pharmacological and functional characteristics of the H-PFC pathway and we propose that allosteric activation of glutamatergic and cholinergic neurotransmission can serve as a plausible therapeutic approach. PMID:25825588

  7. Regulation of Posttranscriptional Modification as a Possible Therapeutic Approach for Retinal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yoko; Kurihara, Toshihide; Tsubota, Kazuo; Okano, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Understanding pathogenesis at the molecular level is the first step toward developing new therapeutic approaches. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of visual dysfunction in two common diseases, innate chorioretinal inflammation and diabetic retinopathy, and the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in both processes. In innate chorioretinal inflammation, interleukin-6 family ligands induce STAT3 activation in photoreceptors, which causes UPS-mediated excessive degradation of the visual substance, rhodopsin. In diabetic retinopathy, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling activates ERK in the inner layers of the retina, causing UPS-mediated excessive degradation of the synaptic vesicle protein, synaptophysin. This latter effect may decrease synaptic activity, in turn adversely affecting neuronal survival. Both mechanisms involve increased UPS activity and the subsequent excessive degradation of a protein required for visual function. Finally, we review the therapeutic potential of regulating the UPS to protect tissue function, citing examples from clinical applications in other medical fields. PMID:21076532

  8. H2S as a possible therapeutic alternative for the treatment of hypertensive kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, George J

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is the most common cause of cardiovascular morbidities and mortalities, and a major risk factor for renal dysfunction. It is considered one of the causes of chronic kidney disease, which progresses into end-stage renal disease and eventually loss of renal function. Yet, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of hypertension and its associated kidney injury is still poorly understood. Moreover, despite existing antihypertensive therapies, achievement of blood pressure control and preservation of renal function still remain a worldwide public health challenge in a subset of hypertensive patients. Therefore, novel modes of intervention are in demand. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signaling molecule, has been established to possess antihypertensive and renoprotective properties, which may represent an important therapeutic alternative for the treatment of hypertension and kidney injury. This review discusses recent findings about H2S in hypertension and kidney injury from both experimental and clinical studies. It also addresses future direction regarding therapeutic use of H2S.

  9. Degrasyn-like Symmetrical Compounds: Possible Therapeutic Agents for Multiple Myeloma (MM-I)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A.; Schuber, Paul T.; Pal, Ashutosh; Ying, Yunming; Han, Dongmei; Gao, Liwei; Wang, Shimei; Levitzki, Alexander; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Talpaz, Moshe; Young, Matthew; Showalter, Hollis D.; Donato, Nicholas J.; Bornmann, William. G.

    2014-01-01

    A series of degrasyn-like symmetrical compounds have been designed, synthesized, and screened against B cell malignancy (multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma) cell lines. The lead compounds T5165804 and CP2005 showed higher nanomolar potency against these tumor cells in comparison to degrasyn and inhibited Usp9x activity in vitro and in intact cells. These observations suggest that this new class of compounds holds promise as cancer therapeutic agents PMID:24457091

  10. Degrasyn-like symmetrical compounds: possible therapeutic agents for multiple myeloma (MM-I).

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David S; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A; Schuber, Paul T; Pal, Ashutosh; Ying, Yunming; Han, Dongmei; Gao, Liwei; Wang, Shimei; Levitzki, Alexander; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Talpaz, Moshe; Young, Matthew; Showalter, Hollis D; Donato, Nicholas J; Bornmann, William G

    2014-02-15

    A series of degrasyn-like symmetrical compounds have been designed, synthesized, and screened against B cell malignancy (multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma) cell lines. The lead compounds T5165804 and CP2005 showed higher nanomolar potency against these tumor cells in comparison to degrasyn and inhibited Usp9x activity in vitro and in intact cells. These observations suggest that this new class of compounds holds promise as cancer therapeutic agents.

  11. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  12. Sigma receptor ligands: possible application as therapeutic drugs and as radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2006-01-01

    Sigma receptors are classified into sigma(1) and sigma(2) subtypes. These subtypes display a different tissue distribution and a distinct physiological and pharmacological profile in the central and peripheral nervous system. The characterization of these subtypes and the discovery of new specific sigma receptor ligands demonstrated that sigma receptors are novel targets for the therapeutic treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases (schizophrenia, depression, and cognition), brain ischemia, and cocaine addiction. Furthermore, imaging of sigma(1) receptors in the human brain using specific PET radioligands has started. In addition, the two sigma receptor subtypes are also expressed on tumor cells, where they could be of prognostic relevance. The ability of sigma(2) receptor agonists to inhibit tumor cell proliferation through mechanisms that might involve apoptosis, intracellular Ca(2+), and sphingolipids has promoted the development of sigma(2) receptor agonists as novel therapeutic drugs for treating cancer. Consequently, sigma(2) receptor ligands have been demonstrated to be potentially useful tumor imaging ligands. In this article, we focus on the sigma receptor ligands as therapeutic agents and as radiopharmaceuticals.

  13. IL-23 in Infections, Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Cancer: Possible Role in HIV-1 and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Gutti, Tanuja

    2011-01-01

    The growing family of interleukin (IL)-12-like cytokines produced by activated macrophages and dendritic cells became the important players in the control of infections, development of inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. However, the role of one of them—heterodimer IL-23, which consists of IL12p40 and the unique p19 subunit in HIV-1 infection pathogenesis and progression to AIDS, represent special interest. We overviewed findings of IL-23 involvement in control of peripheral bacterial pathogens and opportunistic infection, central nervous system (CNS) viral infections and autoimmune disorders, and tumorogenesis, which potentially could be applicable to HIV-1 and AIDS. PMID:21947740

  14. Fluconazole and its place in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis--new therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Lilija G

    2006-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a subacute or chronic disease of the skin, affecting the seborrhea afflicted areas and presenting with erythema and desquamation. The inflammatory reaction towards the fungi Malassezia spp. is considered to have a basic etiologic connection with this disease. Taking into consideration the pathogenesis, treatment of the dermatitis should be directed towards eradication of Malassezia spp., reduction of the skin lipids, and suppression of the inflammatory response. A wide variety of agents presented in different forms--ointments, shampoos and drugs--can offer quick, safe and effective treatment alternatives. The purpose of the present study was to monitor the therapeutic effects of the anti-fungal drug fluconazole in patients with seborrheic dermatitis. We compared two study groups of patients: Group I--27 patients with seborrheic dermatitis stage I, II and III, treated with fluconazole, 50 mg/day for two weeks. As topical therapy we applied clobetasol propionate 0.05% ointment. After the completion of the therapeutic course, 85% of the patients in this group were clinically cured and their symptoms faded away. Fifteen percent of the subjects in this group--mainly stage III seborrheic dermatitis patients, showed partial but significant clinical improvement. The specific fungal test for Malassezia spp. on Dixon agar was negative in 93% of the cases in this group. Group II--eleven patients with similar clinical indexes were treated with fluconazole 50 mg/day only, for the same time period. The therapeutic results in this group were also satisfactory--31.5% of the patients were cured and 68.5% showed clinical improvement. In 74% of the patients the specific test for Malassezia spp. was negative after treatment. Fluconazole treatment in patients with seborrheic dermatitis proves to be successful, effective and safe.

  15. Possible Therapeutic Effects of Ozone Mixture on Hypoxia in Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Margherita; Brigida, Anna Lisa; Mascolo, Luigi; Gaudino, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    Recent literature highlights that ozone therapy could be considered a viable adjuvant therapy in oncological patients receiving radio-chemotherapy. The use of ozone therapy in these patients enhances the action of chemotherapy and at the same time reduces side-effects, such as nausea, vomiting, opportunistic infections, buccal ulcers, hair loss and fatigue. Such positive therapeutic effects of ozone therapy can cause a larger physical and mental wellbeing resulting in improved quality of life. This work reviews the recent acquisition of scientific knowledge regarding the ozone therapy and highlights the molecular and cellular pathways involved.

  16. The latest progress in research on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC): risk factors, possible therapeutic targets and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingli; Wu, Aiguo; Shao, Guoli; Peng, Haoyu; Wang, Mengchuan; Ji, Shufeng; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one type of breast cancer (BC), which is defined as negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2). Its origins and development seem to be elusive. And for now, drugs like tamoxifen or trastuzumab which specifically apply to ER, PR or Her2 positive BC seem unforeseeable in TNBC clinical treatment. Due to its extreme malignancy, high recurrence rate and poor prognosis, a lot of work on the research of TNBC is needed. This review aims to summarize the latest findings in TNBC in risk factors, possible therapeutic targets and possible prognostic makers.

  17. The Caspase Pathway as a Possible Therapeutic Target in Experimental Pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Tovar, Deyanira; López-Luna, Argelia; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis plays a role in pemphigus IgG-dependent acantholysis; theoretically, the blockade of the caspase pathway could prevent the blistering that is caused by pemphigus autoantibodies. Using this strategy, we attempted to block the pathogenic effect of pemphigus IgG in Balb/c mice by using the caspase inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK. This inhibitor was administrated before the injection of pemphigus IgG into neonatal mice. The main results of the present investigation are as follows: (1) pemphigus IgG induces intraepidermal blisters in Balb/c neonatal mice; (2) keratinocytes around the blister and acantholytic cells undergo apoptosis; (3) the caspases inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK prevents apoptosis; (4) the inhibition of the caspase pathway prevents blister formation. In conclusion, inhibition of the caspase pathway may be a promising therapeutic tool that can help in the treatment of pemphigus flare ups. PMID:21403857

  18. The caspase pathway as a possible therapeutic target in experimental pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Tovar, Deyanira; López-Luna, Argelia; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2011-03-02

    Apoptosis plays a role in pemphigus IgG-dependent acantholysis; theoretically, the blockade of the caspase pathway could prevent the blistering that is caused by pemphigus autoantibodies. Using this strategy, we attempted to block the pathogenic effect of pemphigus IgG in Balb/c mice by using the caspase inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK. This inhibitor was administrated before the injection of pemphigus IgG into neonatal mice. The main results of the present investigation are as follows: (1) pemphigus IgG induces intraepidermal blisters in Balb/c neonatal mice; (2) keratinocytes around the blister and acantholytic cells undergo apoptosis; (3) the caspases inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK prevents apoptosis; (4) the inhibition of the caspase pathway prevents blister formation. In conclusion, inhibition of the caspase pathway may be a promising therapeutic tool that can help in the treatment of pemphigus flare ups.

  19. [Experimental analysis of therapeutic properties of Rhodiola rosea L. and its possible application in medicine].

    PubMed

    Kucinskaite, Agne; Briedis, Vitalis; Savickas, Arūnas

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the scientific publications on Rhodiola rosea L. known for its adaptogenic characteristics. Biologically active substances salidroside, rosin, rosavin, rosarin and tyrosol, which are mainly found in plant rhizomes, demonstrate therapeutic effect. These active components effect the central nervous system by increasing the ability to concentrate, the mental and physical power; they are efficient in the asthenic states and improve general resistance of the cells and the organism against the harmful outer influence. They also prevent the heart system from stress and arrhythmias, and posses some antioxidant activity. Some data confirm that the Rhodiola rosea L. preparations stop the growth of the malignant tumors and metastases in the liver. Some preclinical and clinical data of the golden root preparations are discussed in the survey. The interaction of the herb with other medicines, its usage and effect, recommended doses, and its side effects are also reviewed in the paper.

  20. The possible therapeutic benefits of utilizing motion gaming systems on pediatric patients presenting autism.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Stephen A; Merritte, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects a growing number of children in the United States each year. It is characterized by substantive differences in brain structure and function that lead to long-term cognitive and social deficits. These differences, combined with the increasing prevalence of autism in children, warrant the need for development of innovative, cost-effective and widely available alternative and complementary therapies. Motion gaming has the potential to be highly efficacious as a therapeutic technique to aid in developing memory, facial recognition, motor skills and social integration in the pediatric autistic population. This paper outlines the major deficits in the brains of individuals with autism and describes how the use of motion gaming could capitalize on the individual strengths of each patient, leading to improvements in a variety of deficits.

  1. mTORC1 signaling and IL-17 expression: Defining pathways and possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Yang, Guan; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    IL-17 mediates immune responses against extracellular pathogens, and it is associated with the development and pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. The expression of IL-17 is regulated by various intracellular signaling cascades. Recently, it has been shown that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, comprised mainly of mTORC1 signaling, plays a critical role in IL-17 expression. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding mechanisms by which mTORC1 regulates IL-17 expression. mTORC1 positively modulates IL-17 expression through several pathways, i.e. STAT3, -HIF-1α, -S6K1, and -S6K2. Amino acids (AAs) also regulate IL-17 expression by being the energy source for Th17 cells, and by activating mTORC1 signaling. Altogether, the AA-mTORC1-IL-17 axis has broad therapeutic implications for IL-17-associated diseases, such as EAE, allergies, and colitis.

  2. Coagulopathy as a therapeutic target for TRALI: rationale and possible sites of action.

    PubMed

    Tuinman, Pieter R; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a subcategory of acute lung injury (ALI). As such, there are many similarities between the syndromes, both clinically and pathophysiologically. Pulmonary changes in fibrin turnover have emerged as a hallmark of ALI, thereby initiating studies investigating the potential of therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating this so-called pulmonary coagulopathy. Enhanced coagulation and impaired fibrinolysis are probably also important features of TRALI. In particular, platelets play an important role in mediating injury during a TRALI reaction. In this narrative review, the evidence of the role of coagulopathy and platelet activation in TRALI is discussed. Given that host risk factors for acquiring TRALI have been identified and that there is a time frame in which a preventive strategy in patients at risk for TRALI can be executed, preventive strategies are suggested. In this review, we discuss potential preventive anticoagulant interventions.

  3. Disrupted chronobiology of sleep and cytoprotection in obesity: possible therapeutic value of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Pagano, Eleonora S; Scacchi Bernasconi, Pablo A; Reynoso, Roxana; Scacchi, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    From a physiological perspective the sleep-wake cycle can be envisioned as a sequence of three physiological states (wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement, NREM, sleep and REM sleep) which are defined by a particular neuroendocrine-immune profile regulating the metabolic balance, body weight and inflammatory responses. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption in contemporary "24/7 Society" lead to the predominance of pro-orexic and proinflammatory mechanisms that contribute to a pandemic metabolic syndrome (MS) including obesity, diabetes and atherosclerotic disease. Thus, a successful management of MS may require a drug that besides antagonizing the trigger factors of MS could also correct a disturbed sleep-wake rhythm. This review deals with the analysis of the therapeutic validity of melatonin in MS. Melatonin is an effective chronobiotic agent changing the phase and amplitude of the sleep/wake rhythm and having cytoprotective and immunomodulatory properties useful to prevent a number of MS sequels. Several studies support that melatonin can prevent hyperadiposity in animal models of obesity. Melatonin at a low dose (2-5 mg/day) has been used for improving sleep in patients with insomnia and circadian rhythm sleep disorders. More recently, attention has been focused on the development of potent melatonin analogs with prolonged effects (ramelteon, agomelatine, tasimelteon, TK 301). In clinical trials these analogs were employed in doses considerably higher than those usually employed for melatonin. In view that the relative potencies of the analogs are higher than that of the natural compound, clinical trials employing melatonin doses in the range of 50-100 mg/day are needed to assess its therapeutic value in MS.

  4. HER-2/neu overexpression in uterine papillary serous cancers and its possible therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Villella, J A; Cohen, S; Smith, D H; Hibshoosh, H; Hershman, D

    2006-01-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a highly aggressive variant of endometrial cancer with features similar to high-grade ovarian cancer. Patients tend to be elderly, thin, have a high grade tumor with extensive extrauterine disease at the time of diagnosis. The transmembrane receptor encoded by the HER-2 cellular oncogene is amplified in several types of human carcinomas and provides an attractive therapeutic target. HER-2/neu, the transmembrane receptor encoded by the c-erbB2 gene, is overexpressed by immunohistochemistry in <25% of ovarian cancers and 20-30% of breast cancers, and <10% of endometrial cancer. There are prognostic and therapeutic implications associated with the overexpression of this transmembrane protein. Herceptin, a humanized murine monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of the HER-2/neu protein, is being used to treat breast cancer that overexpresses HER-2/neu. We reviewed all patients diagnosed with UPSC between 1999-2001. Twenty-six patients were identified, and 19 patients had specimens available for evaluation. We performed immunohistochemical analysis (Herceptest, Dako, Carpinteria, CA) on 19 paraffin embedded blocks of UPSC tumors looking for HER-2/neu over expression. Five out of 19 (26%) stained heavily (3+) for HER-2/neu receptor protein. Four of these five patients had advanced disease at diagnosis. Two of these patients were subsequently treated with Herceptin; one with complete response and one with stable disease based on CT scan and CA-125 findings. Targeting HER-2/neu may be beneficial for a select group of patients with UPSC. We are continuing to evaluate samples for HER-2/neu over expression by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

  5. Melatonin and Its Agonist Ramelteon in Alzheimer's Disease: Possible Therapeutic Value

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Kaur, Charanjit; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive function, loss of memory and insomnia, and abnormal behavioral signs and symptoms. Among the various theories that have been put forth to explain the pathophysiology of AD, the oxidative stress induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition has received great attention. Studies undertaken on postmortem brain samples of AD patients have consistently shown extensive lipid, protein, and DNA oxidation. Presence of abnormal tau protein, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein hyperphosphorylation all have been demonstrated in neural tissues of AD patients. Moreover, AD patients exhibit severe sleep/wake disturbances and insomnia and these are associated with more rapid cognitive decline and memory impairment. On this basis, the successful management of AD patients requires an ideal drug that besides antagonizing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity could also correct the disturbed sleep-wake rhythm and improve sleep quality. Melatonin is an effective chronobiotic agent and has significant neuroprotective properties preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxic effects in a number of animal experimental models. Since melatonin levels in AD patients are greatly reduced, melatonin replacement has the potential value to be used as a therapeutic agent for treating AD, particularly at the early phases of the disease and especially in those in whom the relevant melatonin receptors are intact. As sleep deprivation has been shown to produce oxidative damage, impaired mitochondrial function, neurodegenerative inflammation, and altered proteosomal processing with abnormal activation of enzymes, treatment of sleep disturbances may be a priority for arresting the progression of AD. In this context the newly introduced melatonin agonist ramelteon can be of much therapeutic value because of its highly selective action on melatonin MT1/MT2 receptors in promoting sleep. PMID:21197086

  6. Finasteride adverse effects in subjects with androgenic alopecia: A possible therapeutic approach according to the lateralization process of the brain.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L; Georgescu, Simona R; Tampa, Mircea; Baconi, Daniela; Stefanescu, Emil; Baleanu, Bogdan C; Balalau, Cristian; Constantin, Vlad; Paunica, Stana

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, finasteride is a relatively frequently prescribed drug in the therapeutic management of male androgenic alopecia. The reported adverse effects are notable in some patients, consisting in signs and symptoms that are encountered both during finasteride administration and after treatment cessation. Clinical and imagistic data show that cognition and sexuality are two distinct but interrelated environmental functions, most probable due to lateralization process of the brain. Specific for our topic, relatively recent published studies found that frequency and severity of finasteride adverse effects could be interrelated with hand preference and sexual orientation of the respective subjects. This paper tries to explain/support this interrelation through a psychophysiologic approach, to suggest how this premise could be further proved in dermatological practice, and to highlight its relevance in respect to therapeutic approach of male androgenic alopecia. As a possible therapeutic application, subjects having preference for a certain sexual orientation and/or predisposition for a given dominant hand could be advised before finasteride administration, that present an increased risk/sensitivity to develop adverse effects. Finally, even if finasteride and post-finasteride symptoms overlap to a large extent they should be, however, viewed as distinct physiopathologic entities, which could require perhaps different therapeutic approaches.

  7. The HIV-1 Vpr Protein: A Multifaceted Target for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    González, María Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein is an attractive target for antiretroviral drug development. The conservation both of the structure along virus evolution and the amino acid sequence in viral isolates from patients underlines the importance of Vpr for the establishment and progression of HIV-1 disease. While its contribution to virus replication in dividing and non-dividing cells and to the pathogenesis of HIV-1 in many different cell types, both extracellular and intracellular forms, have been extensively studied, its precise mechanism of action nevertheless remains enigmatic. The present review discusses how the apparently multifaceted interplay between Vpr and host cells may be due to the impairment of basic metabolic pathways. Vpr protein modifies host cell energy metabolism, oxidative status, and proteasome function, all of which are likely conditioned by the concentration and multimerization of the protein. The characterization of Vpr domains along with new laboratory tools for the assessment of their function has become increasingly relevant in recent years. With these advances, it is conceivable that drug discovery efforts involving Vpr-targeted antiretrovirals will experience substantial growth in the coming years. PMID:28075409

  8. Novel recombinant engineered gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat trimers and their potential as anti-HIV-1 therapeutics or microbicides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Lu, Lu; Qi, Zhi; Lu, Hong; Wang, Ji; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yinghua; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-08-13

    Peptides derived from N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of the HIV-1 gp41 are generally poor inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, because they tend to aggregate and do not form a trimeric coiled-coil. In this study, we have fused portions of gp41 NHR, e.g. N36 or N28, to the T4 fibritin trimerization domain, Foldon (Fd), thus constructing novel NHR trimers, designated N36Fd or N28Fd, which could be expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The purified N36Fd and N28Fd exhibited SDS-resistant trimeric coiled-coil conformation with improved alpha-helicity compared with the corresponding N-peptides. They could interact with a C-peptide (e.g. C34) to form stable six-helix bundle and possessed potent anti-HIV-1 activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains. N28Fd was effective against T20-resistant HIV-1 variants and more resistant to proteinase K compared with T20 (enfuvirtide), a C-peptide-based HIV fusion inhibitor. Therefore, N28Fd trimer has great potentials for further development as an affordable therapeutic or microbicide for treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  9. A Phase I Randomized Therapeutic MVA-B Vaccination Improves the Magnitude and Quality of the T Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carmen Elena; Perdiguero, Beatriz; García-Arriaza, Juan; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Mothe, Beatriz; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Gatell, Jose M.; López Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Brander, Christian; García, Felipe; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design Previous studies suggested that poxvirus-based vaccines might be instrumental in the therapeutic HIV field. A phase I clinical trial was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4 T cell counts above 450 cells/mm3 and undetectable viremia. Thirty participants were randomized (2:1) to receive either 3 intramuscular injections of MVA-B vaccine (coding for clade B HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) or placebo, followed by interruption of HAART. Methods The magnitude, breadth, quality and phenotype of the HIV-1-specific T cell response were assayed by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in 22 volunteers pre- and post-vaccination. Results MVA-B vaccine induced newly detected HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell responses and expanded pre-existing responses (mostly against Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) that were high in magnitude, broadly directed and showed an enhanced polyfunctionality with a T effector memory (TEM) phenotype, while maintaining the magnitude and quality of the pre-existing HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. In addition, vaccination also triggered preferential CD8+ T cell polyfunctional responses to the MVA vector antigens that increase in magnitude after two and three booster doses. Conclusion MVA-B vaccination represents a feasible strategy to improve T cell responses in individuals with pre-existing HIV-1-specific immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571466 PMID:26544853

  10. Association of Oxidative Stress to the Genesis of Anxiety: Implications for Possible Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Waseem; Silva, Carlos Eduardo Barroso; Mohammadzai, Imdad Ullah; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira; Landeira-Fernandez, J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by reactive species, including reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and unbound, adventitious metal ions (e.g., iron [Fe] and copper [Cu]), is an underlying cause of various neurodegenerative diseases. These reactive species are an inevitable by-product of cellular respiration or other metabolic processes that may cause the oxidation of lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Oxidative stress has recently been implicated in depression and anxiety-related disorders. Furthermore, the manifestation of anxiety in numerous psychiatric disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, depressive disorder, panic disorder, phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder, highlights the importance of studying the underlying biology of these disorders to gain a better understanding of the disease and to identify common biomarkers for these disorders. Most recently, the expression of glutathione reductase 1 and glyoxalase 1, which are genes involved in antioxidative metabolism, were reported to be correlated with anxiety-related phenotypes. This review focuses on direct and indirect evidence of the potential involvement of oxidative stress in the genesis of anxiety and discusses different opinions that exist in this field. Antioxidant therapeutic strategies are also discussed, highlighting the importance of oxidative stress in the etiology, incidence, progression, and prevention of psychiatric disorders. PMID:24669207

  11. Adhesion molecules in gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening follow-up: possible therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Dambra, P; Loria, M P; Moretti, B; D'Oronzio, L; Patella, V; Pannofino, A; Cavallo, E; Pesce, V; Dell'Osso, A; Simone, C

    2003-05-01

    The involvement of the synovium is common in phlogistic processes of various joint diseases. Apart from synoviocytes and the other cells in the synovial tissue, circulating cells recruited from peripheral blood also participate in the phlogistic process. The increased expression of adhesion molecules on both circulating and endothelial cell surface may further this recruitment. We studied 15 patients affected by serious gonarthrosis requiring a prosthetic implant (GPI) and 7 with knee prosthesis aseptic loosening (KPL) to evaluate adhesion molecule expression and phlogistic infiltration in the synovium using immunohistochemistry and microscopic analysis. As control we studied 10 subjects affected by degenerative meniscopathies undergoing a selective arthroscopic surgical meniscectomy. Analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test showed no statistical significant differences in the expression of CD54, CD11a, CD11b and CD18 in three groups examined. The model of variance analysis (Friedman test), showed that CD54 expression is greater in patients with GPI and KPL in comparison with the other molecules. Adhesion molecules and their functions are important in arthropathies not only because their evaluation can allow us to identify the degree of inflammation and to predict its evolution, but also because pharmacological control of their expression could have important therapeutic implications.

  12. Role of curcumin in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension treatment: a new therapeutic possibility.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Enrico; Coppola, Giuseppe; Di Miceli, Riccardo; Sucato, Vincenzo; Russo, Antonio; Novo, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    The idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is a complex disease that mainly affects pulmonary arterial circulation. This undergoes a remodeling with subsequent reduction of flow in the small pulmonary arteries. Because of this damage an increased vascular resistance gradually develops, and over time it carries out in heart failure. The inflammatory process is a key element in this condition, mediated by various cytokines. The inflammatory signal induces activation of NF-κB, and prompts TGF-β-related signaling pathway. Clinical evolution leads to progressive debilitation, greatly affecting the patient quality of life. The actual therapeutic approaches, are few and expensive, and include systemic drugs such as prostanoids, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and antagonists of endothelin-1 (ERBs). Some researchers have long investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin. It shows a role for inactivation of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. On the basis of these findings we propose a potential role of curcumin and its pharmacologically fit derivatives for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  13. Heteromers of μ-δ opioid receptors: new pharmacology and novel therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that heteromerization between μ (MOP) and δ (DOP) opioid receptors modulates the signalling properties of the individual receptors. For example, whereas activation of MOP receptors by an agonist induces G protein-mediated signalling, the same agonist induces β-arrestin-mediated signalling in the context of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer. Moreover, heteromer-mediated signalling is allosterically modulated by a combination of MOP and DOP receptor ligands. This has implications in analgesia given that morphine-induced antinociception can be potentiated by DOP receptor ligands. Recently reagents selectively targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer such as bivalent ligands, antibodies or membrane permeable peptides have been generated; these reagents are enabling studies to elucidate the contribution of endogenously expressed heteromers to analgesia as well as to the development of side-effects associated with chronic opioid use. Recent advances in drug screening technology have led to the identification of a MOP-DOP receptor heteromer-biased agonist that activates both G protein-mediated and β-arrestin-mediated signalling. Moreover, this heteromer-biased agonist exhibits potent antinociceptive activity but with reduced side-effects, suggesting that ligands targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer form a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. In this review, we summarize findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer and the in vitro and in vivo properties of heteromer-selective ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24571499

  14. Role of β-catenin/TCF-4 signaling in HIV replication and pathogenesis: insights to informing novel anti-HIV molecular therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Lisa J; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2011-06-01

    A greater understanding of the interaction between HIV and host signaling pathways that restrict virus production may lead to new methods to purge virus from latent reservoirs and enhance survival/function of cells targeted by HIV. This review highlights the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a host factor that represses HIV replication in multiple targets, especially those relevant to HIV in the central nervous system.

  15. Influence of naturally occurring antioxidants on magnetic nanoparticles: risks, benefits, and possible therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Durdík, Stefan; Vrbovská, Hanka; Olas, Adam; Babincová, Melánia

    2013-06-01

    We have studied interaction of well known antioxidant L-ascorbic acid with magnetic nanoparticles containing insoluble Fe(III) in their core. In analogy with ferritin, mobilization of iron in the form of water soluble Fe(II) was observed, especially pronounced at higher temperatures. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals are produced. These results suggest possible harmful effects of widely used magnetic nanoparticles as a MRI contrast agents in combination with overload of organism with ascorbic acid in some specific conditions, like fever of patient. On the other hand combination of magnetic nanoparticles and ascorbic acid may be used for a cancer therapy using alternating magnetic field for the release of Fe(II) via Néel relaxation of magnetic moment of used nanoparticles. We have further found that lipoic acid is an efficient antioxidant scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by Fenton reaction from Fe(II).

  16. [Sense of humour in schizophrenia--ability of humour reception and possibilities of its application in therapeutic interventions].

    PubMed

    Parnowska, Dorota; Braniecka, Anna; Radomska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The existing research on sense of humour in schizophrenia is focused on two main areas, mainly, assessment of patients' abilities to understand and appreciate humour and denoting the possibilities of its application in therapeutic programs concentrating on the improvement of patients' functionality and preventing illness relapses. The vast majority of the conclusions from the above mentioned research corroborate the opinion on the usefulness of developing and reinforcing sense of humour in schizophrenia, emphasizing its beneficial effect on the patients' quality of life, above all, in terms of reducing aggression, anxiety and depression as well as improving general life satisfaction and social functioning. At the same time numerous research indicate low reception of humour in schizophrenia which can negatively influence its effective usage in therapeutic interventions. Further constraint with regard to the therapy can constitute an intensified fear for being laughed at, which has been confirmed in numerous empirical reports. Therefore, it seems that addressing humorous therapeutic interventions to the above mentioned group of patients requires especially careful planning taking into consideration its cognitive and affective limitations in the perception of humour and intensified fear for being laughed at.

  17. New drugs from old natural compounds: scarcely investigated sesquiterpenes as new possible therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Suta, Stefania; Maggi, Filippo; Nicoletti, Marcello; Baldan, Valeria; Dall Acqua, Stefano

    2017-04-04

    Sesquiterpene are natural products that have been extensively studied for their bioactivities, evidencing their potentiality as useful scaffolds for the development of drugs. Considering the different derivatives, the sesquiterpene lactones have been evaluated, especially on cancer cell and antineoplastic efficacy in in vivo studies. Their bioactivity is strictly related to the presence of the reactive α-methylene-γ-lactone group (αMγL). Nevertheless, several other sesquiterpene lacking of the αMγL are known and have been studied for their biological effects and potential usefulness in the development of new drugs. In this review, we focused on several sesquiterpenes that are not presenting the αMγL moiety and may have future potential as scaffold for the development of new drugs, namely the bicyclic compounds belonging to the carotane type (daucanes) that present significant effect as antiproliferative and estrogenic agents. The monocyclic humulane derivatives correlated to zerumbone, and the bicyclic compound beta-caryophyllene and its derivatives that have been considered in the field of cancer and inflammation. It is noteworthy that published studies on sesquiterpenes, reported in this review, concern on pathologies of increasing importance, like estrogen, anti-proliferative, bone loos, immunity deficiency and anti-tumour activities. Some of the natural "old" sesquiterpenes can be considered for their possible role in drug discovery and in counteracting these "new" challenges.

  18. Functions, dysfunctions and possible therapeutic relevance of adenosine A2A receptors in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Blum, David; Martire, Alberto; Ledent, Catherine; Ceruti, Stefania; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize and critically discuss the complex role played by adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) in Huntington's disease (HD). Since A(2A)Rs are mainly localized on the neurons, which degenerate early in HD, and given their ability to stimulate glutamate outflow and inflammatory gliosis, it was hypothesized that they could be involved in the pathogenesis of HD, and that A(2A)R antagonists could be neuroprotective. This was further sustained by the demonstration that A(2A)Rs and underlying signaling systems undergo profound changes in cellular and animal models of HD. More recently, however, the equation A(2A) receptor blockade=neuroprotection has appeared too simplistic. First, it is now definitely clear that, besides mediating 'bad' responses (for example, stimulation of glutamate outflow and excessive glial activation), A(2A)Rs also promote 'good' responses (such as trophic and antinflammatory effects). This implies that A(2A)R blockade results either in pro-toxic or neuroprotective effects according to the mechanisms involved in a given experimental model. Second, since HD is a chronically progressive disease, the multiple mechanisms involving A(2A)Rs may play different relative roles along the degenerative process. Such different mechanisms can be influenced by A(2A)R activation or blockade in different ways, even leading to opposite outcomes depending on the time of agonist/antagonist administration. The number, and the complexity, of the possible scenarios is further increased by the influence of mutant Huntingtin on both the expression and functions of A(2A)Rs, and by the strikingly different effects mediated by A(2A)Rs expressed by different cell populations within the brain.

  19. JAM-A and ALCAM are therapeutic targets to inhibit diapedesis across the BBB of CD14+CD16+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dionna W; Anastos, Kathryn; Morgello, Susan; Berman, Joan W

    2015-02-01

    Monocyte transmigration across the BBB is a critical step in the development of cognitive deficits termed HAND that affect 40-70% of HIV-infected individuals, even with successful antiretroviral therapy. The monocyte subsets that enter the CNS during HIV infection are not fully characterized. We examined PBMC from HIV-positive individuals from 2 distinct cohorts and enumerated monocyte populations, characterized their transmigration properties across an in vitro human BBB model, and identified surface proteins critical for the entry of these cells into the CNS. We demonstrated that the frequency of peripheral blood CD14(+)CD16(+) and CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes was increased in HIV-seropositive compared with -seronegative individuals, despite virologic control. We showed that CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes selectively transmigrated across our BBB model as a result of their increased JAM-A and ALCAM expression. Antibody blocking of these proteins inhibited diapedesis of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes but not of T cells from the same HIV-infected people across the BBB. Our data indicate that JAM-A and ALCAM are therapeutic targets to decrease the entry of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes into the CNS of HIV-seropositive individuals, contributing to the eradication of neuroinflammation, HAND, and CNS viral reservoirs.

  20. Poly-S-Nitrosated Albumin as a Safe and Effective Multifunctional Antitumor Agent: Characterization, Biochemistry and Possible Future Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Yu; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous molecule involved in multiple cellular functions. Inappropriate production of NO may lead to disease states. To date, pharmacologically active compounds that release NO within the body, such as organic nitrates, have been used as therapeutic agents, but their efficacy is significantly limited by unwanted side effects. Therefore, novel NO donors with better pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties are highly desirable. The S-nitrosothiol fraction in plasma is largely composed of endogenous S-nitrosated human serum albumin (Mono-SNO-HSA), and that is why we are testing whether this albumin form can be therapeutically useful. Recently, we developed SNO-HSA analogs such as SNO-HSA with many conjugated SNO groups (Poly-SNO-HSA) which were prepared using chemical modification. Unexpectedly, we found striking inverse effects between Poly-SNO-HSA and Mono-SNO-HSA. Despite the fact that Mono-SNO-HSA inhibits apoptosis, Poly-SNO-HSA possesses very strong proapoptotic effects against tumor cells. Furthermore, Poly-SNO-HSA can reduce or perhaps completely eliminate the multidrug resistance often developed by cancer cells. In this review, we forward the possibility that Poly-SNO-HSA can be used as a safe and effective multifunctional antitumor agent. PMID:24490156

  1. Ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic in low- and middle-income countries by 2030: is it possible?

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Suthar, Amitabh B.; Takarinda, Kudakwashe C.; Tweya, Hannock; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony

    2016-01-01

    The international community has committed to ending the epidemics of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical infections by 2030, and this bold stance deserves universal support. In this paper, we discuss whether this ambitious goal is achievable for HIV/AIDS and what is needed to further accelerate progress. The joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 90-90-90 targets and the related strategy are built upon currently available health technologies that can diagnose HIV infection and suppress viral replication in all people with HIV. Nonetheless, there is much work to be done in ensuring equitable access to these HIV services for key populations and those who remain outside the rims of the traditional health services. Identifying a cure and a preventive vaccine would further help accelerate progress in ending the epidemic. Other disease control programmes could learn from the response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. PMID:27703672

  2. Immunological and pharmacological strategies to reactivate HIV-1 from latently infected cells: a possibility for HIV-1 paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, M; Clemente, M I; Serramía, M J; Moreno, S; Muñoz, E; Muñoz-Fernández, M A

    2015-07-01

    The limitations to establishing a viral reservoir facilitated by early cART in children could play a critical role in achieving natural control of viral replication upon discontinuation of cART, which could be defined as 'functional cure'. Viral reservoirs could provide a persistent source of recrudescent viraemia after withdrawal of cART, despite temporary remission of HIV-1 infection, as observed in the 'Mississippi baby'. Intensification of cART has been proposed as a strategy to control residual replication and to diminish the reservoirs. The effects of cART intensification with maraviroc persisted after discontinuation of the drug in HIV-1-infected adults. However, in HIV-1-infected children, the emergence of CXCR4-using variants occurs very early, and the use of CCR5 antagonists in these children as intensification therapy may not be the best alternative. New treatments to eradicate HIV-1 are focused on the activation of viral production from latently infected cells to purge and clear HIV-1 reservoirs. This strategy involves the use of a wide range of small molecules called latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as givinostat, belinostat and panobinostat, and class I-selective HDACis that include oxamflatin, NCH-51 and romidepsin, are the most advanced in clinical testing for HIV-1 LRAs. Panobinostat and romidepsin show an efficient reactivation profile in J89GFP cells, a lymphocyte HIV-1 latently infected cell line considered a relevant model to study post-integration HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Clinical trials with panobinostat and romidepsin have been performed in children with other pathologies and it could be reasonable to design a clinical trial using these drugs in combination with cART in HIV-1-infected children.

  3. The current status and challenges in the development of fusion inhibitors as therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian Jun; Ma, Xue Ting; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 membrane fusion as a part of the process of viral entry in the target cells is facilitated by gp41 and gp120, which are encoded by Env gene of HIV-1. Based on the structure and the mechanism researches, new treatment options targeting HIV-1 entry process have been proposed. Enfuvirtide, which mimics amino acid sequences of viral envelope glycoprotein gp41, is the first HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved by FDA. Although it fulfills vital functions by binding to gp41 and abolishing the membrane fusion reaction when used in combination, it could induce drug resistant virus variants. Currently, a number of design and modification schemes have been presented, a large number of prospective fusion peptides have emerged. For these fusion inhibitors, multiple mutations in gp41 have been associated with the loss of susceptibility to agents. This review reported the current developments and innovative designs of HIV-1 membrane fusion inhibitors.

  4. VS411 Reduced Immune Activation and HIV-1 RNA Levels in 28 Days: Randomized Proof-of-Concept Study for AntiViral-HyperActivation Limiting Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Franco; De Forni, Davide; Katabira, Elly; Baev, Denis; Maserati, Renato; Calarota, Sandra A.; Cahn, Pedro; Testori, Marco; Rakhmanova, Aza; Stevens, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background A new class of antiretrovirals, AntiViral-HyperActivation Limiting Therapeutics (AV-HALTs), has been proposed as a disease-modifying therapy to both reduce Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA levels and the excessive immune activation now recognized as the major driver of not only the continual loss of CD4+ T cells and progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), but also of the emergence of both AIDS-defining and non-AIDS events that negatively impact upon morbidity and mortality despite successful (ie, fully suppressive) therapy. VS411, the first-in-class AV-HALT, combined low-dose, slow-release didanosine with low-dose hydroxycarbamide to accomplish both objectives with a favorable toxicity profile during short-term administration. Five dose combinations were administered as VS411 to test the AV-HALT Proof-of-Concept in HIV-1-infected subjects. Methods Multinational, double-blind, 28-day Phase 2a dose-ranging Proof-of-Concept study of antiviral activity, immunological parameters, safety, and genotypic resistance in 58 evaluable antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected adults. Randomization and allocation to study arms were carried out by a central computer system. Results were analyzed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, ANCOVA, and two-tailed paired t tests. Results VS411 was well-tolerated, produced significant reductions of HIV-1 RNA levels, increased CD4+ T cell counts, and led to significant, rapid, unprecedented reductions of immune activation markers after 28 days despite incomplete viral suppression and without inhibiting HIV-1-specific immune responses. The didanosine 200 mg/HC 900 mg once-daily formulation demonstrated the greatest antiviral efficacy (HIV-1 RNA: −1.47 log10 copies/mL; CD4+ T cell count: +135 cells/mm3) and fewest adverse events. Conclusions VS411 successfully established the Proof-of-Concept that AV-HALTs can combine antiviral efficacy with rapid, potentially beneficial reductions in the excessive immune system

  5. Rhabdomyolysis: a case study exploring the possible side effect of lipid lowering medication by a HIV positive patient taking a protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, Diana; Citro, Mark; Tibbles, Anthony

    2008-12-01

    This case study explores the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in a HIV positive patient that was taking a lipid lowering drug and a protease inhibitor concurrently while under chiropractic treatment for generalized muscular soreness. Dyslipidemia is a very common problem both in the general and HIV population, with many patients being prescribed lipid lowering drugs. While extremely rare, adverse effects of lipid lowering drugs have been documented to include myopathy such as rhabdomyolysis. It is imperative that chiropractors are aware of the possible adverse side effect of lipid lowering drug therapy in their patients complaining of musculoskeletal pain. It is even more important that chiropractors treating the HIV population are aware of the potential interactions between these medications and protease inhibitors to cause myopathy.

  6. A low-molecular-weight compound K7174 represses hepcidin: possible therapeutic strategy against anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Ikeda, Takashi; Nagasaka, Yuki; Okitsu, Yoko; Katsuoka, Yuna; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Harigae, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is the principal iron regulatory hormone, controlling the systemic absorption and remobilization of iron from intracellular stores. The expression of the hepcidin gene, HAMP, is increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Previously, the synthetic compound K7174 was identified through chemical screening as a novel inhibitor of the adhesion of monocytes to cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. K7174 also ameliorated anemia induced by inflammatory cytokines in mice, which suggests a possible involvement of hepcidin regulation. The present study was performed to assess the impact of K7174 on hepcidin expression in a human hematoma cell line and in mice in vivo. We first demonstrated that K7174 treatment in HepG2 cells significantly decreased HAMP expression. Then, we conducted microarray analysis to determine the molecular mechanism by which K7174 inhibits HAMP expression. Transcriptional profiling confirmed the downregulation of HAMP. Surprisingly, we found that K7174 strongly induced GDF15, known as a negative regulator of HAMP expression. Western blotting analysis as well as ELISA confirmed the induction of GDF15 by K7174 treatment. Furthermore, K7174-mediated HAMP suppression was rescued by the silencing of GDF15 expression. Interestingly, we found that K7174 also upregulates CEBPB. Promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that CEBPB could contribute to K7174-mediated transcriptional activation of GDF15. Subsequently, we also examined whether K7174 inhibits hepcidin expression in mice. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis with liver samples from K7174-treated mice demonstrated significant upregulation of Gdf15 and downregulation of Hamp expression, as compared to control mice. Furthermore, serum hepcidin concentration was also significantly decreased in K7174-treated mice. In conclusion, K7174 inhibits hepcidin expression partly by inducing GDF15. K-7174 may be a potential therapeutic option to treat anemia of chronic

  7. Increased Risk of Group B Streptococcus Invasive Infection in HIV-Exposed but Uninfected Infants: A Review of the Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dauby, Nicolas; Chamekh, Mustapha; Melin, Pierrette; Slogrove, Amy L.; Goetghebuer, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of neonatal sepsis and mortality worldwide. Studies from both developed and developing countries have shown that HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) infants are at increased risk of infectious morbidity, as compared to HIV-unexposed uninfected infants (HUU). A higher susceptibility to GBS infections has been reported in HEU infants, particularly late-onset diseases and more severe manifestations of GBS diseases. We review here the possible explanations for increased susceptibility to GBS infection. Maternal GBS colonization during pregnancy is a major risk factor for early-onset GBS invasive disease, but colonization rates are not higher in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected pregnant women, while selective colonization with more virulent strains in HIV-infected women is suggested in some studies. Lower serotype-specific GBS maternal antibody transfer and quantitative and qualitative defects of innate immune responses in HEU infants may play a role in the increased risk of GBS invasive disease. The impact of maternal antiretroviral treatment and its consequences on immune activation in HEU newborns are important to study. Maternal immunization presents a promising intervention to reduce GBS burden in the growing HEU population. PMID:27899925

  8. Retention and Treatment Outcomes of an Undernutrition Program for HIV patients involving Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food at Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Dawson, Angela; Elnour, Asim Ahmed; Shehab, Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite global efforts to eradicate poverty and hunger, under-nutrition is still a major health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV/AIDS prevalence is also a serious burden. Aim To assess the retention and outcomes of under-nutrition treatment program in Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in HIV positive children and adults participating in the Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) treatment program at Gondar University Hospital ART clinic for one year from November 2012 to November 2013. Materials and Methods Six hundred and thirty six patient records were followed-up for one year. Outcome variables were Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) values measured as severe, moderate acute malnutrition, normal after treatment, non-respondent, relapsed and lost to follow-up using the hospital records of HIV positive children and adults eligible for the program. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to compute Crude Odds Ratio (COR) and Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR). Statistical significance was set at p-value<0.05. Results Among 636 clients, 44.2% achieved MUAC measures ≥ 125 mm for children and ≥ 21 cm for adults at 4 and 6 months. 70.1% of those were children while 29.9% of the 281 were adults. Moreover, a more positive initial response to ready-to-use therapeutic food was found among children as there was significant increase (p<0.05) in MUAC value after the second month of initiating treatment while adults achieved a significant (p<0.05, p<0.01) in MUAC at the 4th and 6th month respectively. There was a significant association between age, nutrition status and treatment outcome, while sex, HIV status, education and residency were not associated with treatment outcome. Conclusion Recovery and weight gain rates were below 50%. Defaulter rates were higher than the Sphere standards and recovery was better in children than adults. Integrated RUTF and

  9. Galectin-1 Reduces Neuroinflammation via Modulation of Nitric Oxide-Arginase Signaling in HIV-1 Transfected Microglia: a Gold Nanoparticle-Galectin-1 "Nanoplex" a Possible Neurotherapeutic?

    PubMed

    Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Mangum, Courtney S; Abou-Jaoude, Eliane; Reynolds, Jessica L; Liu, Maixian; Sundquist, Karin; Parikh, Neil U; Chaves, Lee D; Mammen, Manoj J; Schwartz, Stanley A; Mahajan, Supriya D

    2017-03-01

    Galectins are a family of β-galactoside-binding lectins that are important modulators of homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Galectin-1 is a pivotal regulator of microglia activation that alters the immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection and could have therapeutic relevance in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We have previously shown that galectin-1 treatment decreased oxidative stress in microglia and hypothesize that the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is the cross regulatory interactions between Nitric oxide (NO) and Arginase I activity in microglia. We induced microglial activation and examined the effect of galectin-1 on the expression of various M1/M2 microglial phenotypic markers. Since, TNF-α is associated with activation of microglial cells involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, we treated HIV transfected human microglial cell cultures (CHME-5/HIV) with TNF-α followed by treatment with galectin-1, to examine the galectin-1 mediated neuro-modulatory response. Our results show that treatment of CHME-5/HIV microglia with galectin-1 reduced TNF-α induced oxidative stress by ~40%, and also significantly reduced iNOS gene expression and NO production while correspondingly increasing arginase-1, cationic amino acid transporter (CAT-1) gene expression and arginase activity. Galectin-1 treatment results in shifting microglia polarization from M1 toward the beneficial M2 phenotype which may prevent neurodegeneration and promote neuroprotection. Thus, our data suggests that galectin-1 treatment reduces neuroinflammation in the CNS microenvironment via the modulation of the NO-arginase network in microglia and thus could play a neuroprotective role in HAND. Further, the therapeutic potential of galectin-1 could be enhanced by conjugation of galectin-1 onto gold nanoparticles (Au-NP), resulting in a nanogold-galectin-1 (Au-Gal-1) multivalent complex that will have more clinical translational

  10. A multi-scale mathematical modeling framework to investigate anti-viral therapeutic opportunities in targeting HIV-1 accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Gajendra W; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) employs accessory proteins to evade innate immune responses by neutralizing the anti-viral activity of host restriction factors. Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G, A3G) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2) are host resistance factors that potentially inhibit HIV-1 infection. BST2 reduces viral production by tethering budding HIV-1 particles to virus producing cells, while A3G inhibits the reverse transcription (RT) process and induces viral genome hypermutation through cytidine deamination, generating fewer replication competent progeny virus. Two HIV-1 proteins counter these cellular restriction factors: Vpu, which reduces surface BST2, and Vif, which degrades cellular A3G. The contest between these host and viral proteins influences whether HIV-1 infection is established and progresses towards AIDS. In this work, we present an age-structured multi-scale viral dynamics model of in vivo HIV-1 infection. We integrated the intracellular dynamics of anti-viral activity of the host factors and their neutralization by HIV-1 accessory proteins into the virus/cell population dynamics model. We calculate the basic reproductive ratio (Ro) as a function of host-viral protein interaction coefficients, and numerically simulated the multi-scale model to understand HIV-1 dynamics following host factor-induced perturbations. We found that reducing the influence of Vpu triggers a drop in Ro, revealing the impact of BST2 on viral infection control. Reducing Vif׳s effect reveals the restrictive efficacy of A3G in blocking RT and in inducing lethal hypermutations, however, neither of these factors alone is sufficient to fully restrict HIV-1 infection. Interestingly, our model further predicts that BST2 and A3G function synergistically, and delineates their relative contribution in limiting HIV-1 infection and disease progression. We provide a robust modeling framework for devising novel combination therapies that target

  11. Lipid interactions and angle of approach to the HIV-1 viral membrane of broadly neutralizing antibody 10E8: Insights for vaccine and therapeutic design

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Adriana; Sarkar, Anita; Schiffner, Torben; Tingle, Ryan; Adachi, Yumiko; Deller, Marc C.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2017-01-01

    Among broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV, 10E8 exhibits greater neutralizing breadth than most. Consequently, this antibody is the focus of prophylactic/therapeutic development. The 10E8 epitope has been identified as the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 subunit of the envelope (Env) viral glycoprotein and is a major vaccine target. However, the MPER is proximal to the viral membrane and may be laterally inserted into the membrane in the Env prefusion form. Nevertheless, 10E8 has not been reported to have significant lipid-binding reactivity. Here we report x-ray structures of lipid complexes with 10E8 and a scaffolded MPER construct and mutagenesis studies that provide evidence that the 10E8 epitope is composed of both MPER and lipid. 10E8 engages lipids through a specific lipid head group interaction site and a basic and polar surface on the light chain. In the model that we constructed, the MPER would then be essentially perpendicular to the virion membrane during 10E8 neutralization of HIV-1. As the viral membrane likely also plays a role in selecting for the germline antibody as well as size and residue composition of MPER antibody complementarity determining regions, the identification of lipid interaction sites and the MPER orientation with regard to the viral membrane surface during 10E8 engagement can be of great utility for immunogen and therapeutic design. PMID:28225819

  12. Why don't young adults protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV? Possible answers to a complex question.

    PubMed

    Keller, M L

    1993-01-01

    Using theories of health behavior, this study aimed to advance the understanding of risk-taking regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among young adults by describing: (a) their representation (i.e., schema) about HIV infection, (b) their problems with use of condoms and comfort with safe-sex practices, and (c) situations associated with risky sexual behavior and reported reasons for risk-taking. Participants were 272 young adult college students whose average age was 19.3 years (SD = 2.4). They completed an extensive questionnaire developed for the study. The representation of HIV infection in this sample lacked the specific and detailed information necessary to guide sexual behavior. For example, participants were aware of the causes of sexual transmission of HIV, but many persons indicated uncertainty about the effectiveness of various preventive strategies (e.g., latex condoms, birth control devices). A number of specific problems with using condoms were identified or expected by participants. These included inadequate lubrication, poor fit, and breaks or leaks during intercourse. The majority of the sample (85.3%) reported at least one occurrence of unprotected sexual intercourse. For 60% of them, the stated reason for the risk-taking was that the intercourse was unplanned or spontaneous; 50% reported that they "just knew" the partner was safe and not infected with HIV. Implications for health education programs are discussed.

  13. Development of HIV drug resistance and therapeutic failure in children and adolescents in rural Tanzania: an emerging public health concern

    PubMed Central

    Muri, Lukas; Gamell, Anna; Ntamatungiro, Alex J.; Glass, Tracy R.; Luwanda, Lameck B.; Battegay, Manuel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Hatz, Christoph; Tanner, Marcel; Felger, Ingrid; Klimkait, Thomas; Letang, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and determinants of virologic failure and acquired drug resistance-associated mutations (DRMs) in HIV-infected children and adolescents in rural Tanzania. Design: Prospective cohort study with cross-sectional analysis. Methods: All children 18 years or less attending the paediatric HIV Clinic of Ifakara and on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least 12 months were enrolled. Participants with virologic failure were tested for HIV-DRM. Pre-ART samples were used to discriminate acquired and transmitted resistances. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with virologic failure and the acquisition of HIV-DRM. Results: Among 213 children on ART for a median of 4.3 years, 25.4% failed virologically. ART-associated DRM were identified in 90%, with multiclass resistances in 79%. Pre-ART data suggested that more than 85% had acquired key mutations during treatment. Suboptimal adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 3.90; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11–13.68], female sex (aOR = 2.57; 95% CI 1.03–6.45), and current nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based ART (aOR = 7.32; 95% CI 1.51–35.46 compared with protease inhibitor-based) independently increased the odds of virologic failure. CD4+ T-cell percentage (aOR = 0.20; 0.10–0.40 per additional 10%) and older age at ART initiation (aOR = 0.84 per additional year of age; 95% CI 0.73–0.97) were protective (also in predicting acquired HIV-DRM). At the time of virologic failure, less than 5% of the children fulfilled the WHO criteria for immunologic failure. Conclusion: Virologic failure rates in children and adolescents were high, with the majority of ART-failing children harbouring HIV-DRM. The WHO criteria for immunologic treatment failure yielded an unacceptably low sensitivity. Viral load monitoring is urgently needed to maintain future treatment options for the millions of African children living with HIV. PMID:27677163

  14. A Case of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy with HIV Infection in Which HAART Possibly Influenced the Prognosis of Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Kitagaki, Takakuni; Sato, Takaki; Hirai, Junko; Kimura, Daisaku; Kakurai, Keigo; Fukumoto, Masanori; Tajiri, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Kida, Teruyo; Kojima, Shota; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Background We report on a patient with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who exhibited extremely active PDR followed by a rapid onset of blindness in the right eye. The progression of visual disturbance in the patient's left eye was slowed after starting highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), and vision in that eye was rescued after vitrectomy. Case Report A 72-year-old male developed pneumocystis carinii pneumonia stemming from an HIV infection and began HAART at the Department of Hematology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki City, Japan. Prior to HAART, the patient had shown rapidly progressing retinopathy in the right eye accompanied by vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, ultimately leading to early-onset blindness. After starting HAART, the progression of the retinopathy in the left eye became slower compared to the right eye, with corrected visual acuity improving to 0.6 after vitrectomy, despite being accompanied by vitreous hemorrhage. The patient's overall condition has remained stable following the operation, and the condition of the ocular fundus in the left eye has also settled. Conclusion Significant differences were found in the progression rate of PDR with HIV infection between before and after starting HAART. Our findings suggest that early administration of HAART to HIV patients with diabetic retinopathy is crucial for maintaining visual function. PMID:27990117

  15. Diabetes and vascular disease: basic concepts of nitric oxide physiology, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Capellini, Verena K; Celotto, Andrea C; Baldo, Caroline F; Olivon, Vania C; Viaro, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Alfredo J; Evora, Paulo R B

    2010-07-01

    The vascular manifestations associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) result from the dysfunction of several vascular physiology components mainly involving the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle and platelets. It is also known that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a role in the development of this dysfunction. This review considers the basic physiology of the endothelium, especially related to the synthesis and function of nitric oxide. We also discuss the pathophysiology of vascular disease associated with DM. This includes the role of hyperglycemia in the induction of oxidative stress and the role of advanced glycation end-products. We also consider therapeutic strategies.

  16. [Development of agonists/antagonists for protease-activated receptors (PARs) and the possible therapeutic application to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko

    2005-06-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-domain receptors, are activated by proteolytic unmasking of the N-terminal cryptic tethered ligand by certain serine proteases. Among four PAR family members cloned to date, PAR-1, PAR-2, and PAR-4 can also be activated through a non-enzymatic mechanism, which is achieved by direct binding of exogenously applied synthetic peptides based on the tethered ligand sequence, known as PARs-activating peptides, to the body of the receptor. Various peptide mimetics have been synthesized as agonists for PARs with improved potency, selectivity, and stability. Some peptide mimetics and/or nonpeptide compounds have also been developed as antagonists for PAR-1 and PAR-4. PARs are widely distributed in the mammalian body, especially throughout the alimentary systems, and play various roles in physiological/pathophysiological conditions, i.e., modulation of salivary, gastric, or pancreatic glandular exocrine secretion, gastrointestinal smooth muscle motility, gastric mucosal cytoprotection, suppression/facilitation of visceral pain and inflammation, etc. Thus PARs are now considered novel therapeutic targets, and development of selective agonists and/or antagonists for PARs might provide a novel strategy for the treatment of various diseases that are resistant to current therapeutics.

  17. Therapeutic roles of heme oxygenase-1 in metabolic diseases: curcumin and resveratrol analogues as possible inducers of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress), oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  18. Therapeutic Roles of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Metabolic Diseases: Curcumin and Resveratrol Analogues as Possible Inducers of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress), oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression. PMID:24101950

  19. Temozolomide analogs with improved brain/plasma ratios - Exploring the possibility of enhancing the therapeutic index of temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Rai, Roopa; Banerjee, Monali; Wong, Darren H; McCullagh, Emma; Gupta, Ashu; Tripathi, Shailendra; Riquelme, Eduardo; Jangir, Ramnivas; Yadav, Shyamraj; Raja, Mohd; Melkani, Pankaj; Dixit, Vikas; Patil, Umesh; Shrivastava, Ritesh; Middya, Sandip; Olivares, Felipe; Guerrero, Javier; Surya, Arjun; Pham, Son M; Bernales, Sebastián; Protter, Andrew A; Hung, David T; Chakravarty, Sarvajit

    2016-10-15

    Temozolomide is a chemotherapeutic agent that is used in the treatment of glioblastoma and other malignant gliomas. It acts through DNA alkylation, but treatment is limited by its systemic toxicity and neutralization of DNA alkylation by upregulation of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene. Both of these limiting factors can be addressed by achieving higher concentrations of TMZ in the brain. Our research has led to the discovery of new analogs of temozolomide with improved brain:plasma ratios when dosed in vivo in rats. These compounds are imidazotetrazine analogs, expected to act through the same mechanism as temozolomide. With reduced systemic exposure, these new agents have the potential to improve efficacy and therapeutic index in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  20. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  1. Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) as a possible therapeutic alternative for the management of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) - A case report.

    PubMed

    Assiri, Khalil; Alyami, Yagoub; Uyanik, James M; Romero-Reyes, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) is an alternative remedy used primarily for depression but also is used for rheumatism, gastroenteritis, headache and neuralgias. The mechanism of action of Hypericum perforatum comprehends a neurotransmitter inhibitory profile, and potential anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects suggesting a role for pain management. In this case report, we describe a 53-year-old Hispanic female patient who came to our orofacial pain clinical service presenting with a history of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The patient was not able to get an appointment soon enough and decided to take an over the counter homeopathic preparation of Hypericum perforatum since she found on the internet that it was effective for nerve pain. The patient responded dramatically to the Hypericum perforatum preparation. The use of this homeopathic preparation relieved completely the TN pain. The management of TN is often a challenge. Hypericum perforatum may be a promising therapeutic option for TN that deserves to be explored further to solidly support its use in the clinical setting.

  2. An Essential Role for Coagulase in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development Reveals New Therapeutic Possibilities for Device-Related Infections.

    PubMed

    Zapotoczna, Marta; McCarthy, Hannah; Rudkin, Justine K; O'Gara, James P; O'Neill, Eoghan

    2015-12-15

    High-level resistance to antimicrobial drugs is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated, medical device-related infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis revealed that biofilms grown for ≤ 24 hours on biomaterials conditioned with human plasma under venous shear in iron-free cell culture medium were significantly more susceptible to antistaphylococcal antibiotics. Biofilms formed under these physiologically relevant conditions were regulated by SaeRS and dependent on coagulase-catalyzed conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. In contrast, SarA-regulated biofilms formed on uncoated polystyrene in nutrient-rich bacteriological medium were mediated by the previously characterized biofilm factors poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, fibronectin-binding proteins, or autolytic activity and were antibiotic resistant. Coagulase-mediated biofilms exhibited increased antimicrobial resistance over time (>48 hours) but were always susceptible to dispersal by the fibrinolytic enzymes plasmin or nattokinase. Biofilms recovered from infected central venous catheters in a rat model of device-related infection were dispersed by nattokinase, supporting the important role of the biofilm phenotype and identifying a potentially new therapeutic approach with antimicrobials and fibrinolytic drugs, particularly during the early stages of device-related infection.

  3. Is it possible to diagnose the therapeutic adherence of patients with COPD in clinical practice? A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is poor. It is therefore necessary to determine the magnitude of non-adherence to develop strategies to correct this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to analyse the diagnostic validity of indirect adherence methods. Methods Sample: 195 COPD patients undergoing scheduled inhaled treatment attending 5 Primary Care Centres of Malaga, Spain. Variables: Sociodemographic profile, illness data, spirometry, quality of life (St. George Respiratory Questionnaire: SGRQ), and inhaled medication counting (count of dose/pill or electronic monitoring) were collected. The patient's knowledge of COPD (Batalla test:BT),their attitude towards treatment (Morisky-Green test: MGT) and their self-reported therapeutic adherence (Haynes-Sackett test: HST) were used as methods of evaluating adherence. The follow-up consisted four visits over one year (the recruitment visit: V0; and after 1 month:V1; 6 months:V2; and 1 year:V3). Results The mean age was 69.59 (95% CI, 68.29-70.89) years old and 93.8% were male. Other findings included: 85.4% had a low educational level, 23.6% were smokers, 71.5% mild-moderate COPD stage with a FEV1 = 56.86 (SD = 18.85); exacerbations per year = 1.41(95% CI, 1-1.8). The total SGRQ score was 44.96 (95% CI, 42.46-47.46), showing a mild self-perceived impairment in health. The prevalence of adherence (dose/pill count) was 68.1% (95% CI, 60.9-75.3) at V1, 80% (95% CI, 73-87) at V2 and 84% (95% CI, 77.9) at V3. The MGT showed a specificity of 67.34% at V1, 76.19% at V2 and 69.62% at V3. The sensitivity was 53.33% at V1, 66.66% at V2 and 33.33% at V3.The BT showed a specificity of 55.1% at V1, 70.23% at V2 and 67.09% at V3. The sensitivity was 68.88% at V1, 71.43% at V2 and 46.66% at V3. Considering both tests together, the specificity was 86.73% at V1, 94.04% at V2 and 92.49% at V3 and the sensitivity was 37.77% at V1, 47.62% at V2 and 13.3% at V3. Conclusions

  4. Changes in key constituents of clonally propagated Artemisia annua L. during preparation of compressed leaf tablets for possible therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Weathers, Pamela J.; Towler, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia annua L., long used as a tea infusion in traditional Chinese medicine, produces artemisinin. Although artemisinin is currently used as artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) against malaria, oral consumption of dried leaves from the plant showed efficacy and will be less costly than ACT. Many compounds in the plant have some antimalarial activity. Unknown, however, is how these plant components change as leaves are processed into tablets for oral consumption. Here we compared extracts from fresh and dried leaf biomass with compressed leaf tablets of A. annua. Using GC-MS, nineteen endogenous compounds, including artemisinin and several of its pathway metabolites, nine flavonoids, three monoterpenes, a coumarin, and two phenolic acids, were identified and quantified from solvent extracts to determine how levels of these compounds changed during processing. Results showed that compared to dried leaves, artemisinin, arteannuin B, artemisinic acid, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, chrysoplenetin, and quercetin increased or remained stable with powdering and compression into tablets. Dihydroartemisinic acid, monoterpenes, and chrysoplenol-D decreased with tablet formation. Five target compounds were not detectable in any of the extracts of this cultivar. In contrast to the individually measured aglycone flavonoids, using the AlCl3 method, total flavonoids increased nearly fivefold during the tablet formation. To our knowledge this is the first study documenting changes that occurred in processing dried leaves of A. annua into tablets. These results will improve our understanding of the potential use of not only this medicinal herb, but also others to afford better quality control of intact plant material for therapeutic use. PMID:25228784

  5. Toll-like receptor 4 as a possible therapeutic target for delayed brain injuries after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a well-recognized consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 may be an important therapeutic target for post-SAH neuroinflammation. Of the TLR family members, TLR4 is expressed in various cell types in the central nervous system, and is unique in that it can signal through both the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88-dependent and the toll receptor associated activator of interferon-dependent cascades to coordinate the maximal inflammatory response. TLR4 can be activated by many endogenous ligands having damage-associated molecular patterns including heme and fibrinogen at the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, and the resultant inflammatory reaction and thereby tissue damages may furthermore activate TLR4. It is widely accepted that the excreted products of TLR4 signaling alter neuronal functions. Previous studies have focused on the pathway through nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling among TLR4 signaling pathways as to the development of early brain injury (EBI) such as neuronal apoptosis and blood-brain barrier disruption, and cerebral vasospasm. However, many findings suggest that both pathways via NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases may be involved in EBI and cerebral vasospasm development. To overcome EBI and cerebral vasospasm is important to improve outcomes after SAH, because both EBI and vasopasm are responsible for delayed brain injuries or delayed cerebral ischemia, the most important preventable cause of poor outcomes after SAH. Increasing evidence has shown that TLR4 signaling plays an important role in SAH-induced brain injuries. Better understanding of the roles of TLR4 signaling in SAH will facilitate development of new treatments.

  6. Effect of dopamine receptor agonists on sensory nerve activity: possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A; Crispino, Natascia; Hele, David J; Patel, Hema J; Yacoub, Magdi H; Barnes, Peter J; Belvisi, Maria G

    2002-01-01

    Sensory nerves regulate central and local reflexes such as airway plasma leakage, and cough and their function may be enhanced during inflammation. Evidence suggests that dopamine receptor agonists may inhibit sensory nerve-mediated responses.In this study dopamine inhibited vagal sensory nerve induced microvascular leakage in the rat. In order to characterize the receptor involved rat vagus preparations were utilized. Quinagolide (D2/3 agonist), ropinirole (D2/3/4 agonist), SKF 38393 (D1/5 agonist), AR-C68397AA (Viozan™) (dual D2/B2 agonist) and dopamine inhibited hypertonic saline induced depolarization by approximately 50%. Data suggests that AR-C68397AA and quinagolide also inhibited depolarization of the human vagus.The quinagolide response was blocked by sulpiride (D2/3 antagonist) but not SCH 23390 (D1/5 antagonist); ropinirole was partially blocked by sulpiride, totally blocked by spiperone (at a concentration that blocks all dopamine receptors) but not by SCH 23390. The response to SKF 38393 was not blocked by sulpiride but was by SCH 23390. The inhibition evoked by AR-C68397AA was only partially blocked by SCH 23390 but not by sulpiride or spiperone whereas dopamine was blocked by spiperone. The effect of dopamine was not stimulus-specific as it inhibited capsaicin-induced depolarization of the rat vagus in a spiperone sensitive manner.In conclusion, dopamine receptor ligands inhibit depolarization of the rat and human vagus. These data suggest that dopamine receptor agonists may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of symptoms such as cough and mucus secretion which are evident in respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:12055141

  7. Effect of dopamine receptor agonists on sensory nerve activity: possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Birrell, Mark A; Crispino, Natascia; Hele, David J; Patel, Hema J; Yacoub, Magdi H; Barnes, Peter J; Belvisi, Maria G

    2002-06-01

    Sensory nerves regulate central and local reflexes such as airway plasma leakage, and cough and their function may be enhanced during inflammation. Evidence suggests that dopamine receptor agonists may inhibit sensory nerve-mediated responses. In this study dopamine inhibited vagal sensory nerve induced microvascular leakage in the rat. In order to characterize the receptor involved rat vagus preparations were utilized. Quinagolide (D(2/3) agonist), ropinirole (D(2/3/4) agonist), SKF 38393 (D(1/5) agonist), AR-C68397AA (Viozan) (dual D(2)/B(2) agonist) and dopamine inhibited hypertonic saline induced depolarization by approximately 50%. Data suggests that AR-C68397AA and quinagolide also inhibited depolarization of the human vagus. The quinagolide response was blocked by sulpiride (D(2/3) antagonist) but not SCH 23390 (D(1/5) antagonist); ropinirole was partially blocked by sulpiride, totally blocked by spiperone (at a concentration that blocks all dopamine receptors) but not by SCH 23390. The response to SKF 38393 was not blocked by sulpiride but was by SCH 23390. The inhibition evoked by AR-C68397AA was only partially blocked by SCH 23390 but not by sulpiride or spiperone whereas dopamine was blocked by spiperone. The effect of dopamine was not stimulus-specific as it inhibited capsaicin-induced depolarization of the rat vagus in a spiperone sensitive manner. In conclusion, dopamine receptor ligands inhibit depolarization of the rat and human vagus. These data suggest that dopamine receptor agonists may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of symptoms such as cough and mucus secretion which are evident in respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  8. S100A12 and the S100/Calgranulins - Emerging Biomarkers for Atherosclerosis and Possibly Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Oesterle, Adam; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is mediated by local and systematic inflammation. The multi-ligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been studied in animals and humans, and is an important mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on S100/calgranulin proteins (S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12) and their receptor RAGE in mediating vascular inflammation. Mice lack the gene for S100A12, which in humans is located on chromosome 3 between S100A8 and S100A9. Transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell targeted expression of S100A12 demonstrate increased coronary and aortic calcification as well as increased plaque vulnerability. Serum S100A12 has recently been shown to predict future cardiovascular events in a longitudinal population study, underscoring a role for S100A12 as a potential biomarker for coronary artery disease. Genetic ablation of S100A9 or RAGE in atherosclerosis susceptible Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) null mice results in reduced atherosclerosis. Importantly, S100A12 and the RAGE axis can be modified pharmacologically. For example, soluble RAGE reduces murine atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation. Additionally, a class of compounds currently in phase III clinical trials for multiple sclerosis and rheumatologic conditions, the Quinoline-3-carboxamides, reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and complexity in transgenic S100A12 ApoE null mice, but have not been tested with regards to human atherosclerosis. The RAGE axis is an important mediator for inflammation-induced atherosclerosis and S100A12 has emerged as biomarker for human atherosclerosis. Decreasing inflammation by inhibiting S100/calgranulin-mediated activation of RAGE attenuates murine atherosclerosis, and future studies in patients with coronary artery disease are warranted to confirm S100/RAGE as therapeutic target for atherosclerosis. PMID:26515415

  9. Enteric pathogens, immune status and therapeutic response in diarrhea in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from north India.

    PubMed

    Jha, Arun Kumar; Uppal, Beena; Chadha, Sanjim; Aggarwal, Prabhav; Ghosh, Roumi; Dewan, Richa

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal infection causing diarrheal disease is a dominant contributor to high morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This intervention study aimed to assess the response of specific anti-microbial and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on enteropathogens identified in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from northern India. Seventy five ART naive (group 1) and seventy five ART adherent (group 2) HIV/AIDS adult subjects with diarrhea were enrolled. Stool samples from all subjects were examined for enteropathogens by wet mount, staining methods, culture and ELISA. Subjects with enteropathogens were started on specific therapy as per National AIDS Control Organisation, Government of India's guidelines. Follow-up stool samples were examined after 2-4 weeks of completion of therapy for persistence/clearing of enteropathogens. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was done for all subjects. At enrollment, group 1 had 26.13% bacterial, 57.66% parasitic & 16.22% fungal pathogens while group 2 had 11.9%, 69.05% & 19.05% pathogens, respectively. Parasitic diarrhea was more common than bacterial diarrhea. The coccidian parasites (Cryptosporidium spp. & Isospora belli) were the common parasites identified. Clearance of enteric pathogens was significant after specific anti-microbial therapy (p = 0.0001). Persistence of enteropathogens was seen primarily for coccidian parasites. Clearance of enteropathogens after specific therapy and the diagnostic yield of stool specimens were influenced by the CD4+ counts. Immune competence coupled with specific anti-microbial therapy displays the best response against enteric pathogens.

  10. The potential of HIV-1 nanotherapeutics: from in vitro studies to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upal; Rodríguez, Jesse; Barber, Paul; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery almost three decades ago, HIV-1 has grown into the most aggressive pandemic of modern time. Following the implementation of combination antiretroviral therapy, the pathological outcome of HIV infection has substantially improved. However, combination antiretroviral therapy is limited by several factors including, long-term toxicity, serious side effects and complex dosing regimens, and so on. In this regard, researchers have directed their attention toward enhancing current treatment strategies and/or developing alternative HIV-1 therapeutics. In recent years, this attention has fixated on nanomedicine-based anti-HIV therapeutics (HIV-1 nanotherapeutics). In the present study, we have reviewed several HIV-1 nanotherapeutics that have shown success at the preclinical level and/or Phase I/II clinical trials. We also discuss the possible benefits of these nanomedicine-based approaches and their future outlook. PMID:26400459

  11. Benefit of therapeutic drug monitoring of protease inhibitors in HIV-infected patients depends on PI used in HAART regimen--ANRS 111 trial

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Xavier; Mentré, France; Rey, Elisabeth; Auleley, Solange; Peytavin, Gilles; Biour, Michel; Métro, Annie; Goujard, Cecile; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Lascoux, Cecile; Panhard, Xaviere; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Salmon-Céron, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Due to high inter-patient variability, and efficacy-concentration and toxicity-concentration relationships, optimization of HIV-protease inhibitor doses based on plasma concentrations could be beneficial. During a 48-week open prospective non-randomized interventional study of 115 protease inhibitor-naïve patients initiating an indinavir/ritonavir or lopinavir/ritonavir or nelfinavir containing therapy, protease inhibitor dose was modified when plasma trough concentrations (Ctrough) at week 2, 8, 16 and 24 were outside predefined optimal concentration ranges. Failure of the strategy was defined as the proportions of patients with HIV-RNA above 200 copies/ml from week 24 to 48 and/or experiencing grade 2, 3 or 4 PI-related adverse events during the study; proportion of patients with last Ctrough measurement outside the concentration range was determined at each visit. Virological failure and/or occurrence of adverse event were observed in 37/94 assessable patients (39% CI95%: 29.4–50.0). In the on-treatment analysis, failure of the strategy was noted in 16% of indinavir/r or lopinavir/r treated patients (8/51; CI95% 7.0–28.6; virological failure: 2; adverse event: 6) but in 44% of nelfinavir-treated patients (11/25; CI95%: 24.4–65.1; virological failure: 10; adverse event: 1); Ctrough concentrations outside the range were less frequent at the last measurement than at W2 (41% versus 66%; p < 0.05) with proportions of 35% for indinavir/r or lopinavir/r treated patients, but 57% for nelfinavir treated patients. The proposed strategy of therapeutic drug monitoring may be beneficial to indinavir/r and lopinavir/r-treated patients, but for nelfinavir failed to move concentrations into the predefined range and to produce the expected virological success. PMID:19709326

  12. Essential proteins and possible therapeutic targets of Wolbachia endosymbiont and development of FiloBase-a comprehensive drug target database for Lymphatic filariasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (Lf) is one of the oldest and most debilitating tropical diseases. Millions of people are suffering from this prevalent disease. It is estimated to infect over 120 million people in at least 80 nations of the world through the tropical and subtropical regions. More than one billion people are in danger of getting affected with this life-threatening disease. Several studies were suggested its emerging limitations and resistance towards the available drugs and therapeutic targets for Lf. Therefore, better medicine and drug targets are in demand. We took an initiative to identify the essential proteins of Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi, which are indispensable for their survival and non-homologous to human host proteins. In this current study, we have used proteome subtractive approach to screen the possible therapeutic targets for wBm. In addition, numerous literatures were mined in the hunt for potential drug targets, drugs, epitopes, crystal structures, and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences for filarial causing nematodes. Data obtained from our study were presented in a user friendly database named FiloBase. We hope that information stored in this database may be used for further research and drug development process against filariasis. URL: http://filobase.bicpu.edu.in.

  13. Essential proteins and possible therapeutic targets of Wolbachia endosymbiont and development of FiloBase-a comprehensive drug target database for Lymphatic filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (Lf) is one of the oldest and most debilitating tropical diseases. Millions of people are suffering from this prevalent disease. It is estimated to infect over 120 million people in at least 80 nations of the world through the tropical and subtropical regions. More than one billion people are in danger of getting affected with this life-threatening disease. Several studies were suggested its emerging limitations and resistance towards the available drugs and therapeutic targets for Lf. Therefore, better medicine and drug targets are in demand. We took an initiative to identify the essential proteins of Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi, which are indispensable for their survival and non-homologous to human host proteins. In this current study, we have used proteome subtractive approach to screen the possible therapeutic targets for wBm. In addition, numerous literatures were mined in the hunt for potential drug targets, drugs, epitopes, crystal structures, and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences for filarial causing nematodes. Data obtained from our study were presented in a user friendly database named FiloBase. We hope that information stored in this database may be used for further research and drug development process against filariasis. URL: http://filobase.bicpu.edu.in. PMID:26806463

  14. Structure-activity relationship of pyrrolyl diketo acid derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase and reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain.

    PubMed

    Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pescatori, Luca; Messore, Antonella; Madia, Valentina Noemi; Pupo, Giovanni; Saccoliti, Francesco; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Esposito, Francesca; Corona, Angela; Cadeddu, Marta; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Tramontano, Enzo; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto

    2015-02-26

    The development of HIV-1 dual inhibitors is a highly innovative approach aimed at reducing drug toxic side effects as well as therapeutic costs. HIV-1 integrase (IN) and reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) are both selective targets for HIV-1 chemotherapy, and the identification of dual IN/RNase H inhibitors is an attractive strategy for new drug development. We newly synthesized pyrrolyl derivatives that exhibited good potency against IN and a moderate inhibition of the RNase H function of RT, confirming the possibility of developing dual HIV-1 IN/RNase H inhibitors and obtaining new information for the further development of more effective dual HIV-1 inhibitors.

  15. Repositioning HIV-1 integrase inhibitors for cancer therapeutics: 1,6-naphthyridine-7-carboxamide as a promising scaffold with drug-like properties.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Wang, Yong; Kazemi, Roza; Xu, Shili; Xu, Zhong-Liang; Sanchez, Tino W; Yang, Liu-Meng; Debnath, Bikash; Odde, Srinivas; Xie, Hua; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Ding, Jian; Neamati, Nouri; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2012-11-26

    Among a large number of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, the 8-hydroxy-[1,6]naphthyridines (i.e., L-870,810) were one of the promising class of antiretroviral drugs developed by Merck Laboratories. In spite of its remarkable potency and efficacy, unfortunately upon completion of phase I clinical studies, development of L-870,810 was halted. Because of its desirable pharmacological and pharmaceutical properties we were intrigued to design novel analogues of L-870,810 with goals to (1) improve upon limitations of naphthyridine-7-carboxamides as antiviral agents and (2) to reposition their use as innovative cytotoxic agents for cancer therapeutics. Herein, we report on the design and synthesis of a series of 1,6-naphthyridine-7-carboxamides with various substitutions at the 5- and 8-positions. All the new 5-substituted-8-hydroxy-[1,6]naphthyridines were potent IN inhibitors and the 5-substituted-8-amino-[1,6]naphthyridines were significantly cytotoxic. Further optimization of the 5,8-disubstituted-[1,6]naphthyridines with structural variation on 7-carboxamide delivered novel compounds with significant cytotoxicity in a panel of cancer cell lines and effective inhibition against select oncogenic kinases.

  16. Potentiation of cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in combination with Cl-IB-MECA in human C32 metastatic melanoma cells: A new possible therapeutic strategy for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana S; Costa, Vera M; Diniz, Carmen; Fresco, Paula

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma monotherapies with drugs such as dacarbazine, cisplatin or paclitaxel (PXT) are associated with significant toxicity and low efficacy rates. These facts reinforce the need for development of novel agents or combinatory strategies. Cl-IB-MECA is a small molecule, orally bioavailable, well tolerated and currently under clinical trials as an anticancer agent. Our aim was to investigate a possible combinatory therapeutic strategy using PXT and Cl-IB-MECA on human C32 melanoma cells and its underlying mechanisms. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using MTT reduction, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and neutral red uptake assays, for different concentrations and combinations of both agents, at 24 and 48 h. Apoptosis was also assessed using fluorescence microscopy and through the evaluation of caspases 8, 9, and 3 activities. We demonstrated, for the first time, that combination of PXT and Cl-IB-MECA significantly increases cytotoxicity for clinically relevant concentrations. This combination seems to act synergistically in disrupting membrane integrity, but also causing lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunction. When using the lowest PTX concentration (10 ng/mL), co-incubation with CI-IB-MECA (micromolar concentrations) potentiated overall cytotoxic effects and morphological signs of apoptosis. All combinations studied enhanced caspase 8, 9, and 3 activities, suggesting the involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. The possibility that cytotoxicity elicited by Cl-IB-MECA, alone or in combination with PXT, involves adenosine receptor activation was discarded and results confirmed that oxidative stress is only involved in cytotoxicity after treatment with PXT, alone. Being melanoma a very apoptosis-resistance cancer, this combination seems to hold promise as a new therapeutic strategy for melanoma.

  17. A Regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee-led Intervention to Reduce the Hospital Costs of Expensive HIV Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Camilla Munk; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee (DTC) began a series of meetings with lead specialists in infectious diseases. The role of the DTC was to engage clinicians and ensure commitment to prescribing the least expensive drugs among the clinically equivalent HAARTs (highly active antiretroviral therapy). DTC also led implementation of a national guideline. This study analyses the impact of this process on HAART consumption and expenditure. The HAART consumption and expenditure (2009-2013) was compared to forecasts produced by exponential smoothing (2004-2009). Abrupt switches between drug regimens coincided with the DTC-led meetings. Overall, HAART consumption rose 16%, while price per defined daily dose (DDD) fell 11% and the 2013 expenditure decreased 23%. The consumption of drugs addressed by the guideline rose 48%. Still, the 2013 expenditure was 41.5 million DKK (5.5 million €) (27%) lower than expected, reflecting a fall in price per DDD that coincided with the intervention. The consumption of drugs not addressed by the guideline rose 8.3%, while price per DDD fell 8.5% and the 2013 expenditure was 26.8 million DKK (3.6 million €) (19%) lower than expected. Despite a steadily increasing consumption, significant cost savings followed this DTC-led intervention. This multifaceted approach might be applicable to changing the prescribing of other expensive drug classes.

  18. Progress in HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: A Review of their Chemical Structure Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahdi, Zahra; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme, one of the three main enzymes of HIV-1, catalyzed the insertion of the viral DNA into the genome of host cells. Because of the lack of its homologue in human cells and its essential role in HIV-1 replication, IN inhibition represents an attractive therapeutic target for HIV-1 treatment. Since identification of IN as a promising therapeutic target, a major progress has been made, which has facilitated and led to the approval of three drugs. This review focused on the structural features of the most important IN inhibitors and categorized them structurally in 10 scaffolds. We also briefly discussed the structural and functional properties of HIV-1 IN and binding modes of IN inhibitors. The SAR analysis of the known IN inhibitors provides some useful clues to the possible future discovery of novel IN inhibitors. PMID:28243261

  19. A possible therapeutic potential of quercetin through inhibition of μ-calpain in hypoxia induced neuronal injury: a molecular dynamics simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anand Kumar; Shukla, Swet Chand; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2016-01-01

    The neuroprotective property of quercetin is well reported against hypoxia and ischemia in past studies. This property of quercetin lies in its antioxidant property with blood-brain barrier permeability and anti-inflammatory capabilities. µ-Calpain, a calcium ion activated intracellular cysteine protease causes serious cellular insult, leading to cell death in various pathological conditions including hypoxia and ischemic stroke. Hence, it may be considered as a potential drug target for the treatment of hypoxia induced neuronal injury. As the inhibitory property of µ-calpain is yet to be explored in details, hence, in the present study, we investigated the interaction of quercetin with µ-calpain through a molecular dynamics simulation study as a tool through clarifying the molecular mechanism of such inhibition and determining the probable sites and modes of quercetin interaction with the µ-calpain catalytic domain. In addition, we also investigated the structure-activity relationship of quercetin with μ-calpain. Affinity binding of quercetin with µ-calpain had a value of –28.73 kJ/mol and a Ki value of 35.87 µM that may be a probable reason to lead to altered functioning of µ-calpain. Hence, quercetin was found to be an inhibitor of µ-calpain which might have a possible therapeutic role in hypoxic injury. PMID:27651771

  20. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    PubMed

    Vanti, Manuela; Gallastegui, Edurne; Respaldiza, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Jordan, Albert; Chávez, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR), which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  1. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed.

  2. Possible Footprints of APOBEC3F and/or Other APOBEC3 Deaminases, but Not APOBEC3G, on HIV-1 from Patients with Acute/Early and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Andrew E.; Deforche, Koen; Welch, John J.; Van Laethem, Kristel; Camacho, Ricardo; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like-3 (APOBEC3) innate cellular cytidine deaminase family, particularly APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G, can cause extensive and lethal G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 plus-strand DNA (termed hypermutation). It is unclear if APOBEC3-induced mutations in vivo are always lethal or can occur at sublethal levels that increase HIV-1 diversification and viral adaptation to the host. The viral accessory protein Vif counteracts APOBEC3 activity by binding to APOBEC3 and promoting proteasome degradation; however, the efficiency of this interaction varies, since a range of hypermutation frequencies are observed in HIV-1 patient DNA. Therefore, we examined “footprints” of APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F activity in longitudinal HIV-1 RNA pol sequences from approximately 3,000 chronically infected patients by determining whether G-to-A mutations occurred in motifs that were favored or disfavored by these deaminases. G-to-A mutations were more frequent in APOBEC3G-disfavored than in APOBEC3G-favored contexts. In contrast, mutations in APOBEC3F-disfavored contexts were relatively rare, whereas mutations in contexts favoring APOBEC3F (and possibly other deaminases) occurred 16% more often than average G-to-A mutations. These results were supported by analyses of >500 HIV-1 env sequences from acute/early infection. IMPORTANCE Collectively, our results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis is lethal to HIV-1, whereas mutagenesis caused by APOBEC3F and/or other deaminases may result in sublethal mutations that might facilitate viral diversification. Therefore, Vif-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and drugs that manipulate the interplay between Vif and APOBEC3 may have beneficial or detrimental clinical effects depending on how they affect the binding of Vif to various members of the APOBEC3 family. PMID:25165112

  3. [The issue of HIV/AIDS--present overview and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Stanková, Marie; Skokanová, Venuse

    2004-04-01

    Many outstanding discoveries accompany the existence of HIV infections. International teams of scientists cooperate and in their work they use a great many methods from haematology and immunology to methods of molecular biology that pass into methods of molecular virology. These, in turn, open new prospects for methods of molecular epidemiology. The development of sensitive and specific antibody tests made possible the testing of blood intended for transfusions and helped map the epidemilogical situation, describe the clinical course of the disease and, in particular, diagnose the asymptomaic stage of infection. Gradually, the jigsaw puzzle of the pathogenesis of HIV infections was completed. The tremendous advances in antiretrovirus treament meant a turning point in the mortality and morbidity of HIV infection. Clinical trials of therapeutic vaccines are in progress. Yet despite all the advances and prevention efforts the HIV/AIDS pandemic continues.

  4. Eggshell membrane: A possible new natural therapeutic for joint and connective tissue disorders. Results from two open-label human clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Kevin J; DeVore, Dale P; Leu, Michael D; Robinson, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Natural Eggshell Membrane (NEM®) is a novel dietary supplement that contains naturally occurring glycosaminoglycans and proteins essential for maintaining healthy joint and connective tissues. Two single center, open-label human clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of NEM® as a treatment for pain and inflexibility associated with joint and connective tissue disorders. Methods: Eleven (single-arm trial) and 28 (double-arm trial) patients received oral NEM® 500 mg once daily for four weeks. The primary outcome measure was to evaluate the change in general pain associated with the treatment joints/areas (both studies). In the single-arm trial, range of motion (ROM) and related ROM-associated pain was also evaluated. The primary treatment response endpoints were at seven and 30 days. Both clinical assessments were performed on the intent-to-treat (ITT) population within each study. Results: Single-arm trial: Supplementation with NEM® produced a significant treatment response at seven days for flexibility (27.8% increase; P = 0.038) and at 30 days for general pain (72.5% reduction; P = 0.007), flexibility (43.7% increase; P = 0.006), and ROM-associated pain (75.9% reduction; P = 0.021). Double-arm trial: Supplementation with NEM® produced a significant treatment response for pain at seven days for both treatment arms (X: 18.4% reduction; P = 0.021. Y: 31.3% reduction; P = 0.014). There was no clinically meaningful difference between treatment arms at seven days, so the Y arm crossed over to the X formulation for the remainder of the study. The significant treatment response continued through 30 days for pain (30.2% reduction; P = 0.0001). There were no adverse events reported during either study and the treatment was reported to be well tolerated by study participants. Conclusions: Natural Eggshell Membrane (NEM®) is a possible new effective and safe therapeutic option for the treatment of pain and inflexibility

  5. Quasispecies tropism and compartmentalization in gut and peripheral blood during early and chronic phases of HIV-1 infection: possible correlation with immune activation markers.

    PubMed

    Rozera, G; Abbate, I; Vlassi, C; Giombini, E; Lionetti, R; Selleri, M; Zaccaro, P; Bartolini, B; Corpolongo, A; D'Offizi, G; Baiocchini, A; Del Nonno, F; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2014-03-01

    HIV quasispecies was analysed in plasma and proviral genomes hosted by duodenal mucosa and peripheral blood cells (PBMC) from patients with early or chronic infection, with respect to viral heterogeneity, tropism compartmentalization and extent of immune activation. Seventeen HIV-1-infected combined antiretroviral therapy naive patients were enrolled (11 early infection and six chronic infection). V3 and nef genomic regions were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Sequences were used to infer co-receptor usage and to construct phylogenetic trees. As markers of immune activation, plasma sCD14 and soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor II (sTNFRII) levels were measured. Median diversity of HIV RNA was lower in patients with early infection versus chronic infection patients. Overall, direct correlation was observed between V3 diversity and X4 frequency; V3 diversity of HIV RNA was inversely correlated with CD4 T-cell count; median sCD14 and sTNFRII values were similar in early and chronic patients, but X4 frequency of HIV RNA was directly correlated with plasma sCD14. The proportion of patients harbouring X4 variants and median intra-patient X4 frequency of proviral genomes tended to be higher in chronic infection than early infection patients. More pronounced compartmentalization of proviral quasispecies in gut compared with PBMC samples was observed in patients with early infection compared with chronic patients. The loss of gut/PBMC compartmentalization in more advanced stages of HIV infection was confirmed by longitudinal observation. More studies are needed to understand the pathogenetic significance of early HIV quasispecies compartmentalization and progressive intermixing of viral variants in subsequent phases of the infection, as well as the role of immune activation in tropism switch.

  6. Creating genetic resistance to HIV.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John C; Zaia, John A; Rossi, John J

    2012-10-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a chronic and incurable disease, in spite of the notable successes of combination antiretroviral therapy. Gene therapy offers the prospect of creating genetic resistance to HIV that supplants the need for antiviral drugs. In sight of this goal, a variety of anti-HIV genes have reached clinical testing, including gene-editing enzymes, protein-based inhibitors, and RNA-based therapeutics. Combinations of therapeutic genes against viral and host targets are designed to improve the overall antiviral potency and reduce the likelihood of viral resistance. In cell-based therapies, therapeutic genes are expressed in gene modified T lymphocytes or in hematopoietic stem cells that generate an HIV-resistant immune system. Such strategies must promote the selective proliferation of the transplanted cells and the prolonged expression of therapeutic genes. This review focuses on the current advances and limitations in genetic therapies against HIV, including the status of several recent and ongoing clinical studies.

  7. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English Transmisión del VIH Recommend on ...

  8. A systematic review of the effects of different types of therapeutic exercise on physiologic and functional measurements in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Neto, Mansueto; Conceição, Cristiano Sena; Oliveira Carvalho, Vitor; Brites, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported the benefits of exercise training for adults with HIV, although there is no consensus regarding the most efficient modalities. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different types of exercise on physiologic and functional measurements in patients with HIV using a systematic strategy for searching randomized controlled trials. The sources used in this review were the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PEDro from 1950 to August 2012. We selected randomized controlled trials examining the effects of exercise on body composition, muscle strength, aerobic capacity, and/or quality of life in adults with HIV. Two independent reviewers screened the abstracts using the Cochrane Collaboration's protocol. The PEDro score was used to evaluate methodological quality. In total, 29 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Individual studies suggested that exercise training contributed to improvement of physiologic and functional parameters, but that the gains were specific to the type of exercise performed. Resistance exercise training improved outcomes related to body composition and muscle strength, with little impact on quality of life. Aerobic exercise training improved body composition and aerobic capacity. Concurrent training produced significant gains in all outcomes evaluated, although moderate intensity and a long duration were necessary. We concluded that exercise training was shown to be a safe and beneficial intervention in the treatment of patients with HIV.

  9. Are major reductions in new HIV infections possible with people who inject drugs? The case for low dead-space syringes in highly affected countries.

    PubMed

    Zule, William A; Cross, Harry E; Stover, John; Pretorius, Carel

    2013-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence from laboratory studies, mathematical models, ecological studies and bio behavioural surveys, suggests that injection-related HIV epidemics may be averted or reversed if people who inject drugs (PWID) switch from using high dead-space to using low dead-space syringes. In laboratory experiments that simulated the injection process and rinsing with water, low dead space syringes retained 1000 times less blood than high dead space syringes. In mathematical models, switching PWID from high dead space to low dead space syringes prevents or reverses injection-related HIV epidemics. No one knows if such an intervention is feasible or what effect it would have on HIV transmission among PWID. Feasibility studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be needed to answer these questions definitively, but these studies will be very expensive and take years to complete. Rather than waiting for them to be completed, we argue for an approach similar to that used with needle and syringe programs (NSP), which were promoted and implemented before being tested more rigorously. Before implementation, rapid assessments that involve PWID will need to be conducted to ensure buy-in from PWID and other local stakeholders. This commentary summarizes the existing evidence regarding the protective effects of low dead space syringes and estimates potential impacts on HIV transmission; it describes potential barriers to transitioning PWID from high dead space to low dead space needles and syringes; and it presents strategies for overcoming these barriers.

  10. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin HIV/AIDS HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the virus ... HIV/AIDS. Why Is the Study of HIV/AIDS a Priority for NIAID? Nearly 37 million people ...

  11. Cross-Reactivity, Epitope Spreading, and De Novo Immune Stimulation Are Possible Mechanisms of Cross-Protection of Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Recipients of HPV Therapeutic Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Mayumi; Greenfield, William; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Coleman, Hannah N

    2015-07-01

    Numerous versions of human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccines designed to treat individuals with established HPV infection, including those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are in development because approved prophylactic vaccines are not effective once HPV infection is established. As human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) is the most commonly detected type worldwide, all versions of HPV therapeutic vaccines contain HPV-16, and some also contain HPV-18. While these two HPV types are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, there are other high-risk HPV types known to cause malignancy. Therefore, it would be of interest to assess whether these HPV therapeutic vaccines may confer cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types. Data available from a few clinical trials that enrolled subjects with CINs regardless of the HPV type(s) present demonstrated clinical responses, as measured by CIN regression, in subjects with both vaccine-matched and nonvaccine HPV types. The currently available evidence demonstrating cross-reactivity, epitope spreading, and de novo immune stimulation as possible mechanisms of cross-protection conferred by investigational HPV therapeutic vaccines is discussed.

  12. FAITH – Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    SciTech Connect

    Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš

    2015-12-15

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. - Highlights: • Allows screening of assembly inhibitors of both mature and immature HIV-1 particles. • Based on Gag-derived proteins with CA in mature or immature conformation. • Simple and sensitive method suitable for high-throughput screening of inhibitors. • Unlike in other HIV assembly methods, works under physiological conditions. • No washing steps are necessary.

  13. [Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutics' data of HIV-infected patients placed on ART in the Segou hospital in Mali (2004-2011)].

    PubMed

    Koné, M C; Cissoko, Y; Diallo, M S; Traoré, B A; Mallé, K K

    2013-08-01

    This is a retrospective study on a cohort of 811 adult patients placed on ART between January 2004 and December 2011 at the hospital Nianankoro Fomba Segou in Mali, to describe their epidemiological, clinical and developmental profile for 48 months. The average age of patients was 35.2±9.4 years. The sex-ratio was 0.6. Approximately 58.3% of the patients were from rural areas. HIV1 represented 95.8%. Prolonged fever, weight loss and chronic diarrhea were the main reasons for testing. The majority of patients (64.5%) had stage III WHO. The mean CD4 cell count was 144±135.8/mm³ at screening. The evolution was favorable under immunological antiretroviral therapy. The survival rate at 48 months follow-up was 78% [64.1%-81.3%]. Patients followed in the structure are predominantly rural, female and young aged. They are diagnosed with advanced HIV infection. Antiretroviral therapy has led to the strengthening of the immune system and improved the clinical outcomes with a survival rate of 78%.

  14. Evaluation of spiramycin as a therapeutic agent for elimination of nasopharyngeal pathogens. Possible use of spiramycin for middle ear infections and for gonococcal and meningococcal nasopharyngeal carriage.

    PubMed

    Kamme, C; Kahlmeter, G; Melander, A

    1978-01-01

    Varying doses of spiramycin were administered orally to healthy volunteers, and concentrations in serum and saliva were determined. The absorption of the drug was not significantly influenced by concomitant food intake. Saliva peak concentrations were 1.3--4.8 times higher than peak concentrations in serum. The elimination half life was 2--3 h in serum, and 4--8 h in saliva. Accumulation of the drug was seen in saliva but not in serum. The possible effect of spiramycin in eliminating bacteria from the nasopharynx was evaluated in vitro by comparing the spiramycin saliva concentrations with the MICs of bacteria known to establish themselves in the nasopharynx. At a concentration of 1.2 microgram/ml, spiramycin inhibited all investigated strains of group A streptococci, pneumococci and Branhamella catarrhalis, and at 2.4 microgram/ml all investigated gonococci. Concentrations of 19 and 38 microgram/ml, respectively, were required to inhibit all meningococci and Haemophilus influenzae. Following administration of 1.5 g spiramycin as a single daily dose for 3 days, the mean concentration in saliva reached or surpassed the MIC values of streptococci, pneumococci and Branhamella for 45 h, and of gonococci for 25 h. The possible use of spiramycin for prevention of relapses in acute otitis media and in treatment of serous otitis media is discussed, as well as the possible use of the drug in gonococcal and meningococcal nasopharyngeal carriage.

  15. HIV reservoirs as obstacles and opportunities for an HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-06-01

    The persistence of HIV reservoirs remains a formidable obstacle to achieving sustained virologic remission in HIV-infected individuals after antiretroviral therapy (ART) is discontinued, even if plasma viremia has been successfully suppressed for prolonged periods of time. Numerous approaches aimed at eradicating the virus, as well as maintaining its prolonged suppression in the absence of ART, have had little success. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic nature of HIV reservoirs and the impact of various interventions on their persistence is essential for the development of successful therapeutic strategies against HIV or the long-term control of infection. Here, we discuss the persistent HIV reservoir as a barrier to cure as well as the current therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating or controlling the virus in the absence of ART.

  16. Nigella sativa concoction induced sustained seroreversion in HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Onifade, Abdulfatah Adekunle; Jewell, Andrew Paul; Adedeji, Waheed Adeola

    2013-01-01

    Nigella sativa had been documented to possess many therapeutic functions in medicine but the least expected is sero-reversion in HIV infection which is very rare despite extensive therapy with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). This case presentation is to highlight the complete recovery and sero-reversion of adult HIV patient after treatment with Nigella sativa concoction for the period of six months. The patient presented to the herbal therapist with history of chronic fever, diarrhoea, weight loss and multiple papular pruritic lesions of 3 months duration. Examination revealed moderate weight loss, and the laboratory tests of ELISA (Genscreen) and western blot (new blot 1 & 2) confirmed sero-positivity to HIV infection with pre-treatment viral (HIV-RNA) load and CD4 count of 27,000 copies/ml and CD4 count of 250 cells/ mm(3) respectively. The patient was commenced on Nigella sativa concoction 10 mls twice daily for 6 months.. He was contacted daily to monitor side-effects and drug efficacy. Fever, diarrhoea and multiple pruritic lesions disappeared on 5th, 7th and 20th day respectively on Nigella sativa therapy. The CD4 count decreased to 160 cells/ mm3 despite significant reduction in viral load (≤1000 copies/ml) on 30th day on N. sativa. Repeated EIA and Western blot tests on 187th day on Nigella sativa therapy was sero-negative. The post therapy CD4 count was 650 cells/ mm(3) with undetectable viral (HIV-RNA) load. Several repeats of the HIV tests remained sero-negative, aviraemia and normal CD4 count since 24 months without herbal therapy. This case report reflects the fact that there are possible therapeutic agents in Nigella sativa that may effectively control HIV infection.

  17. HIV Interaction With Human Host: HIV-2 As a Model of a Less Virulent Infection.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 are the causal agents of AIDS. While similar in many ways, a significant amount of data suggests that HIV-2 is less virulent than HIV-1. In fact, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a longer asymptomatic stage and lower transmission rate, and the majority of HIV-2-infected patients can be classified as long-term non-progressors or elite controllers. The mechanisms underlying the ability of human host to naturally control HIV-2 infection are far from being completely understood. The identification of the differences between HIV-1 and HIV-2 interactions with human host cells could provide important insights into several aspects of retroviral pathogenesis that remain elusive, with significant implications for HIV vaccine development and therapy. In this review, we delve into some of the differences that notably distinguish HIV-2 from HIV-1, highlighting possible consequences in the pathogenesis and natural history of both infections.

  18. Prison Therapeutic Community Treatment for Female Offenders: Profiles and Preliminary Findings for Mental Health and Other Variables (Crime, Substance Use and HIV Risk)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Joann Y.; Sacks, Stanley; Mckendrick, Karen; Banks, Steven; Schoeneberger, Marlies; Hamilton, Zachary; Stommel, Joseph; Shoemaker, Joanie

    2008-01-01

    This random assignment study compared women in a prison Therapeutic Community (TC) program with those in a cognitive-behavioral intervention. Over two thirds of study subjects received a lifetime diagnosis of severe mental disorder, nearly one-half received a diagnosis of PTSD, and virtually all reported exposure to trauma. Preliminary analysis (n…

  19. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  20. Bioactivation to an aldehyde metabolite--possible role in the onset of toxicity induced by the anti-HIV drug abacavir.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Nádia M; Charneira, Catarina; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Marques, M Matilde; Antunes, Alexandra M M

    2014-01-30

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules, which can be generated during numerous physiological processes, including the biotransformation of drugs. Several non-P450 enzymes participate in their metabolism albeit alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase are the ones most frequently involved in this process. Endogenous and exogenous aldehydes have been strongly implicated in multiple human pathologies. Their ability to react with biomacromolecules (e.g. proteins) yielding covalent adducts is suggested to be the common primary mechanism underlying the toxicity of these reactive species. Abacavir is one of the options for combined anti-HIV therapy. Although individual susceptibilities to adverse effects differ among patients, abacavir is associated with idiosyncratic hypersensitivity drug reactions and an increased risk of cardiac dysfunction. This review highlights the current knowledge on abacavir metabolism and discusses the potential role of bioactivation to an aldehyde metabolite, capable of forming protein adducts, in the onset of abacavir-induced toxic outcomes.

  1. Inhibition of HIV replication in vitro by clinical immunosuppressants and chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that a functional cure for HIV-1 infection, purportedly resultant from allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, may be possible. Additionally, the first such patient was treated with whole-body irradiation, immunosuppressants, and the chemotherapeutic, cytarabine. However, the precise role of the coinciding medical interventions in diminishing detectable HIV reservoirs remains unstudied. Findings In this article, we demonstrate that the immunosuppressants, mycophenolic acid and cyclosporine, and the chemotherapeutic, cytarabine, are potent antiretroviral agents at clinically relevant dosages. These drugs strongly inhibit HIV-1 replication in a GFP indicator T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Conclusions Our study suggests that certain clinical immunosuppressants and chemotherapeutic agents may act combinatorially to inhibit HIV infection. Additionally, chemotherapy-mediated cytotoxicity may also affect the stability of viral reservoirs. Thus, further study is needed to examine potential therapeutic value of these interventions in patients. PMID:23672887

  2. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... How do you get HIV? How do you get tested for HIV? Is there are cure for HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. A person with HIV is called HIV positive (HIV+). HIV ...

  3. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields stimulation modulates autoimmunity and immune responses: a possible immuno-modulatory therapeutic effect in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Ricevuti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) stimulation is able to exert a certain action on autoimmunity and immune cells. In the past, the efficacy of pulsed ELF-EMFs in alleviating the symptoms and the progression of multiple sclerosis has been supported through their action on neurotransmission and on the autoimmune mechanisms responsible for demyelination. Regarding the immune system, ELF-EMF exposure contributes to a general activation of macrophages, resulting in changes of autoimmunity and several immunological reactions, such as increased reactive oxygen species-formation, enhanced phagocytic activity and increased production of chemokines. Transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation is a non-invasive novel technique used recently to treat different neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease. Despite its proven value, the mechanisms through which EMF brain-stimulation exerts its beneficial action on neuronal function remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that its beneficial effects may be due to a neuroprotective effect on oxidative cell damage. On the basis of in vitro and clinical studies on brain activity, modulation by ELF-EMFs could possibly counteract the aberrant pro-inflammatory responses present in neurodegenerative disorders reducing their severity and their onset. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of the published literature on EMFs and outline the most promising effects of ELF-EMFs in developing treatments of neurodegenerative disorders. In this regard, we review data supporting the role of ELF-EMF in generating immune-modulatory responses, neuromodulation, and potential neuroprotective benefits. Nonetheless, we reckon that the underlying mechanisms of interaction between EMF and the immune system are still to be completely understood and need further studies at a molecular level. PMID:28197174

  4. Reduction of painful area as new possible therapeutic target in post-herpetic neuropathic pain treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Roberto; Di Matteo, Maria; Minella, Cristina E; Fanelli, Guido; Allegri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is neuropathic pain persisting after an acute episode of herpes zoster, and is associated with severe pain and sensory abnormalities that adversely affect the patient’s quality of life and increase health care costs. Up to 83% of patients with PHN describe localized neuropathic pain, defined as “a type of neuropathic pain characterized by consistent and circumscribed area(s) of maximum pain”. Topical treatments have been suggested as a first-line treatment for localized neuropathic pain. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster could reduce abnormal nervous peripheral discharge and via the plaster could have a “protective” function in the affected area. It has been suggested that use of this plaster could reduce pain as well as the size of the painful area. To evaluate this possible outcome, we retrospectively reviewed eight patients with PHN, treated using 5% lidocaine medicated plaster. During a follow-up period of 3 months, we observed good pain relief, which was associated with a 46% reduction in size of the painful area after one month (from 236.38±140.34 cm2 to 128.80±95.7 cm2) and a 66% reduction after 3 months (81.38±59.19 cm2). Our study cohort was composed mainly of elderly patients taking multiple drugs to treat comorbidities, who have a high risk of drug–drug interactions. Such patients benefit greatly from topical treatment of PHN. Our observations confirm the effectiveness of lidocaine plasters in the treatment of PHN, indicating that 5% lidocaine medicated plaster could reduce the size of the painful area. This last observation has to be confirmed and the mechanisms clarified in appropriate larger randomized controlled trials. PMID:25018649

  5. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields stimulation modulates autoimmunity and immune responses: a possible immuno-modulatory therapeutic effect in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Fabio; Ricevuti, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Increasing evidence shows that extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) stimulation is able to exert a certain action on autoimmunity and immune cells. In the past, the efficacy of pulsed ELF-EMFs in alleviating the symptoms and the progression of multiple sclerosis has been supported through their action on neurotransmission and on the autoimmune mechanisms responsible for demyelination. Regarding the immune system, ELF-EMF exposure contributes to a general activation of macrophages, resulting in changes of autoimmunity and several immunological reactions, such as increased reactive oxygen species-formation, enhanced phagocytic activity and increased production of chemokines. Transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation is a non-invasive novel technique used recently to treat different neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease. Despite its proven value, the mechanisms through which EMF brain-stimulation exerts its beneficial action on neuronal function remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that its beneficial effects may be due to a neuroprotective effect on oxidative cell damage. On the basis of in vitro and clinical studies on brain activity, modulation by ELF-EMFs could possibly counteract the aberrant pro-inflammatory responses present in neurodegenerative disorders reducing their severity and their onset. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of the published literature on EMFs and outline the most promising effects of ELF-EMFs in developing treatments of neurodegenerative disorders. In this regard, we review data supporting the role of ELF-EMF in generating immune-modulatory responses, neuromodulation, and potential neuroprotective benefits. Nonetheless, we reckon that the underlying mechanisms of interaction between EMF and the immune system are still to be completely understood and need further studies at a molecular level.

  6. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  7. Addressing Ebola-related Stigma: Lessons Learned from HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Mariam; Brown, Brandon; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS and Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are contemporary epidemics associated with significant social stigma in which communities affected suffer from social rejection, violence, and diminished quality of life. Objective To compare and contrast stigma related to HIV/AIDS and EVD, and strategically think how lessons learned from HIV stigma can be applied to the current EVD epidemic. Methods To identify relevant articles about HIV/AIDS and EVD-related stigma, we conducted an extensive literature review using multiple search engines. PubMed was used to search for relevant peer-reviewed journal articles and Google for online sources. We also consulted the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Institutes of Health to retrieve up-to-date information about EVD and HIV/AIDS. Results Many stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors directed towards those with EVD are strikingly similar to those with HIV/AIDS but there are significant differences worthy of discussion. Both diseases are life-threatening and there is no medical cure. Additionally misinformation about affected groups and modes of transmission runs rampant. Unlike in persons with EVD, historically criminalized and marginalized populations carry a disproportionately higher risk for HIV infection. Moreover, mortality due to EVD occurs within a shorter time span as compared to HIV/AIDS. Conclusions Stigma disrupts quality of life, whether it is associated with HIV infection or EVD. When addressing EVD, we must think beyond the immediate clinical therapeutic response, to possible HIV implications of serum treatment. There are emerging social concerns of stigma associated with EVD infection and double stigma associated with EVD and HIV infection. Drawing upon lessons learned from HIV, we must work to empower and mobilize prominent members of the community, those who recovered from the disease, and organizations working at the grassroots

  8. Nanoformulated antiretroviral drug combinations extend drug release and antiretroviral responses in HIV-1-infected macrophages: implications for neuroAIDS therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nowacek, Ari S; McMillan, JoEllyn; Miller, Reagan; Anderson, Alec; Rabinow, Barrett; Gendelman, Howard E

    2010-12-01

    We posit that improvements in pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of antiretroviral therapies (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus type one-infected people can be achieved through nanoformulationed drug delivery systems. To this end, we manufactured nanoparticles of atazanavir, efavirenz, and ritonavir (termed nanoART) and treated human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in combination therapies to assess antiretroviral responses. This resulted in improved drug uptake, release, and antiretroviral efficacy over monotherapy. MDM rapidly, within minutes, ingested nanoART combinations, at equal or similar rates, as individual formulations. Combination nanoART ingested by MDM facilitated individual drug release from 15 to >20 days. These findings are noteworthy as a nanoART cell-mediated drug delivery provides a means to deliver therapeutics to viral sanctuaries, such as the central nervous system during progressive human immunodeficiency virus type one infection. The work brings us yet another step closer to realizing the utility of nanoART for virus-infected people.

  9. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Saksena, Nitin K.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is associated with the development of neurocognitive disorders in many infected individuals, including a broad spectrum of motor impairments and cognitive deficits. Despite extensive research, the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is still not clear. This review provides a comprehensive view of HAND, including HIV neuroinvasion, HAND diagnosis and different level of disturbances, influence of highly-active antiretroviral therapy to HIV-associated dementia (HAD), possible pathogenesis of HAD, etc. Together, this review will give a thorough and clear understanding of HAND, especially HAD, which will be vital for future research, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24470972

  10. Treatment for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Treatment » Treatment Decisions and HIV HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... here Enter ZIP code here Treatment Decisions and HIV for Veterans and the Public Treatment for HIV: ...

  11. Neurological Complications in Controlled HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kate M; Brew, Bruce J

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there have been great advances in therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that have allowed suppression of the virus and its effects on the body. Despite this progress, neurological complications persist in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we consider the possible ways that HIV might cause neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. We discuss the spectrum of neurological disorders caused by HIV and its treatment, with a particular focus on both HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and peripheral neuropathies. Since there has been a shift to HIV being a chronic illness, we also review the increasing prevalence of cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Psychotherapeutic process of cognitive-behavioral intervention in HIV-infected persons: results from a controlled, randomized prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Znoj, Hans-Jörg; Messerli-Burgy, Nadine; Tschopp, Simone; Weber, Rainer; Christen, Lisanne; Christen, Stephan; Grawe, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to examine the possible mechanisms of behavioral change in a cognitive-behavioral intervention supporting medication adherence in HIV-infected persons. A total of 60 persons currently under medical treatment were randomized to psychotherapy or usual care and were compared with a sociodemographically matched group of general psychotherapy clients. Outcome measures included therapy adherence using medication event-monitoring system psychotherapeutic processes and changes of experience and behavior. The general psychotherapy group was initially more distressed than HIV psychotherapy patients and reached higher levels of psychotherapeutic effect. In the HIV psychotherapy patients, a significant effect was found for maintaining adherence to medical treatment (Weber et al., 2004). These findings show that psychotherapy is a beneficial intervention for HIV-infected persons, and therapeutic alliance and activation of resources do not differ from a general psychotherapy treatment. Differential effects were detected for specific process variables, namely problem actuation.

  13. Interactive Effects of Morphine on HIV Infection: Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pichili Vijaya Bhaskar; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Saxena, Shailendra K; Saiyed, Zainulabedin; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2012-01-01

    HIV epidemic continues to be a severe public health problem and concern within USA and across the globe with about 33 million people infected with HIV. The frequency of drug abuse among HIV infected patients is rapidly increasing and is another major issue since injection drug users are at a greater risk of developing HIV associated neurocognitive dysfunctions compared to non-drug users infected with HIV. Brain is a major target for many of the recreational drugs and HIV. Evidences suggest that opiate drug abuse is a risk factor in HIV infection, neural dysfunction and progression to AIDS. The information available on the role of morphine as a cofactor in the neuropathogenesis of HIV is scanty. This review summarizes the results that help in understanding the role of morphine use in HIV infection and neural dysfunction. Studies show that morphine enhances HIV-1 infection by suppressing IL-8, downregulating chemokines with reciprocal upregulation of HIV coreceptors. Morphine also activates MAPK signaling and downregulates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Better understanding on the role of morphine in HIV infection and mechanisms through which morphine mediates its effects may help in devising novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in opiate using HIV-infected population.

  14. Picking the Survivor! CRISPR Reveals HIV Dependency Factors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Kerstin; König, Renate

    2017-02-20

    A new study employs genome-wide loss-of-function CRISPR/Cas9 screening to identify three novel factors for HIV-1 entry. The factors represent promising targets for therapeutics as they are essential for HIV-1 infection, but dispensable for cell survival. The involved pathways were validated in primary CD4(+) T cells, target cells for HIV-1.

  15. HIV, HPV, and microbiota: partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Vásquez-Domínguez, Emilia; Pérez-Molina, José Antonio; Sainz, Talía; de Benito, Amparo; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Gosalbes, María José; Moreno, Santiago

    2017-02-20

    Altered interplay between gut mucosa and dysbiotic bacteria during HIV infection seems to fuel chronic immune dysfunction and might explain the excess rates of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal cancer in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we show in HIV-infected MSM undergoing screening for HPV-related cancer that specific fecal and mucosal bacteria are able to predict the existence of precancerous anal lesions. If confirmed, these bacterial biomarkers could be exploited either as diagnostic tools or therapeutic targets.

  16. [Human defensins: prophylaxis and therapy against HIV?].

    PubMed

    Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    Human defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides with prophylactic and therapeutic potential against HIV. The ability of defensins to bind the HIV envelope could be exploited to design topic agents that block viral entry into exposed mucosa. Additionally, their capacity to inhibit viral replication, complement system activation, dendritic and memory T cells chemoattraction, together with peptide engineering could bring about new and better antiretroviral drugs. Clinical trials could be demonstrated the efficacy of defensins against HIV in clinical practice.

  17. Novel findings for the development of drug therapy for various liver diseases: Liver microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activator may be a possible therapeutic agent in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koji; Imajo, Kento; Shinohara, Yoshiyasu; Nozaki, Yuichi; Wada, Koichiro; Yoneda, Masato; Endo, Hiroki; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Abe, Yasunobu; Inamori, Masahiko; Shimamura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kirikoshi, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Kensuke; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    The factors involved in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are not fully understood and thus it is urgently needed to elucidate these factors. Steatosis is not causal in the development of NASH, but rather it sensitizes the liver to the damaging effects of second hits such that stressors innocuous to a healthy liver lead to the development of NASH in the steatotic liver. In the previous study, most of the hepatic lipid metabolite profiles were similar in the NAFL and NASH groups. However, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) synthesis, especially hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) mRNA expression, was impaired in the NASH group. Moreover, NASH showed significantly higher incidence of minor alley appearance compared with NAFL, indicating the possibility of association between NASH pathogenesis and decreased congenital MTP activity. MTP is one of the enzymes that transfer triglycerides to nascent apolipoprotein B, producing VLDL and removing lipid from the hepatocyte. A growing body of literature suggests that the measurement of hepatic MTP expression may be helpful for diagnosis; and moreover, hepatic MTP activator may be a possible therapeutic agent for the treatment of NASH.

  18. "Fusion and binding inhibition" key target for HIV-1 treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis: targets, drug delivery and nanotechnology approaches.

    PubMed

    Malik, Tanushree; Chauhan, Gaurav; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2017-11-01

    More than 35 million people are living with HIV worldwide with approximately 2.3 million new infections per year. Cascade of events (cell entry, virus replication, assembly and release of newly formed virions) is involved in the HIV-1 transmission process. Every single step offers a potential therapeutic strategy to halt this progression and HIV fusion into the human host cell is one such stage. Controlling the initial event of HIV-1 transmission is the best way to control its dissemination especially when prophylaxis is concerned. Action is required either on the HIV's or host's cell surface which is logically more rational when compared with other intracellular acting moieties. Aim of this manuscript is to detail the significance and current strategies to halt this initial step, thus blocking the entry of HIV-1 for further infection. Both HIV-1 and the possible host cell's receptors/co-receptors are under focus while specifying the targets available for inhibiting this fusion. Current and under investigation moieties are categorized based on their versatile mechanisms. Advanced drug delivery and nanotechnology approaches present a key tool to exploit the therapeutic potential in a boosted way. Current drug delivery and the impact of nanotechnology in potentiating this strategy are detailed.

  19. Finding host targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsui, C Kimberly; Gupta, Amita; Bassik, Michael C

    2017-01-31

    A CRISPR screen conducted in a CD4(+) T cell leukemia line has identified host factors required for HIV infection but dispensable for cellular survival. The results highlight sulfation on the HIV co-receptor CCR5 and cellular aggregation as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  20. The Potential of the CNS as a Reservoir for HIV-1 Infection: Implications for HIV Eradication.

    PubMed

    Fois, Alessandro F; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-06-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to establish latent infection is a key obstacle to its eradication despite the existence of effective antiretroviral drugs. The brain has been postulated as a reservoir for latent infection, but its role in HIV persistence remains unclear. In this review, we discuss the evidence surrounding the role of the central nervous system (CNS) as a viral reservoir and the potential challenges this might present in eradicating HIV. The strategies for eradication of HIV and their application to latent CNS infection are explored. Finally, we outline new developments in drug delivery and new therapeutic modalities designed to target HIV infection in the CNS.

  1. HIV Integrase Inhibitors with Nucleobase Scaffolds: Discovery of a Highly Potent anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vasu; Chi, Guochen; Ptak, Roger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-01-01

    HIV integrase is essential for HIV replication. However, there are currently no integrase inhibitors in clinical use for AIDS. We have discovered a conceptually new β-diketo acid that is a powerful inhibitor of both the 3′-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 integrase. The in vitro anti-HIV data of this inhibitor were remarkable as exemplified by its highly potent antiviral therapeutic efficacy against HIVTEKI and HIV-1NL4-3 replication in PBMC (TI >4,000 and >10,000, respectively). PMID:16420027

  2. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some HIV/AIDS medicines may harm your baby. Your health care ...

  3. Unraveling the mystery of HIV medications.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2006-01-01

    Today, millions of people around the globe are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This retrovirus attacks and renders ineffective the human immune system and leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which leaves those with AIDS open to a variety of fatal infections. HIV knows no racial, gender, or age distinctions, and there is, as yet, no cure for HIV. However, after 25 years of research, there are three classes of medication that in various combinations may significantly slow the progress of HIV, thus improving and prolonging the life of infected individuals. Nurses in any practice arena will inevitably care for patients who are infected with HIV. With an understanding of HIV and the therapeutic benefits of antiretroviral medications, informed nurses have the opportunity and responsibility to educate infected persons in the appropriate use of antiretroviral drugs and the importance of preventing transmission of HIV to uninfected persons.

  4. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  5. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines to treat HIV (called antiretroviral therapy, or ART) the right way, every day. They can keep ... to treat HIV infection (called antiretroviral therapy, or ART) the right way, every day and his or ...

  6. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  7. Immunotherapeutic strategies in the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Birx, D L; Redfield, R R

    1993-08-01

    The immune response against HIV does not result in complete viral clearance. Recent interventions have focused on novel strategies to modify human anti-HIV immunity. Active vaccination of patients with HIV infection (vaccine therapy) safely alters the immune repertoire against HIV. This unique approach will provide insight into the immunoregulatory consequences of HIV-specific innate and adaptive immune responses, and hopefully define the immunological Achilles heel of HIV. Once defined, researchers, aided by current biotechnological techniques, can rationally design future vaccines and immune based therapeutic products.

  8. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  9. The impact of unprotected T cells in RNAi-based gene therapy for HIV-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Liu, Ying Poi; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is highly effective in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in stably transduced T-cell lines. For the development of a durable gene therapy that prevents viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The future in vivo application of such a gene therapy protocol will reach only a fraction of the T cells, such that HIV-1 replication will continue in the unmodified T cells, thereby possibly frustrating the therapy by generation of HIV-1 variants that escape from the inhibition imposed by the protected cells. We studied virus inhibition and evolution in pure cultures of shRNA-expressing cells versus mixed cell cultures of protected and unprotected T cells. The addition of the unprotected T cells indeed seems to accelerate HIV-1 evolution and escape from a single shRNA inhibitor. However, expression of three antiviral shRNAs from a single lentiviral vector prevents virus escape even in the presence of unprotected cells. These results support the idea to validate the therapeutic potential of this anti-HIV approach in appropriate in vivo models.

  10. [Coreceptors of HIV infection and the development of HIV entry inhibitors: overview and targets].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2002-01-01

    In 1996 CXCR4 was identified as a coreceptor for HIV-1. This finding has lead to further identification of more than ten G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as coreceptors for HIV/SIV. Cell tropisms and coreceptor uses of HIV during the course of HIV infection are summarized. Promiscuous properties of correlations between chemokines and their chemokine receptor uses and also between variable amino acid sequences in the V3 region of HIV gp120 Env and HIV coreceptor uses are discussed. This promiscuous property of HIV-1 is claimed to be a possible cause of a difficulty in developing highly effective entry inhibitors and in addition to allow rapid appearance of immune escape HIV mutants. Representative agents that inhibit HIV entry with a special reference to inhibitors of coreceptor use and gp41 function are summarized. gp41 is discussed as a promising target for the development of effective entry inhibitors.

  11. Progress in RNAi-based antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the conserved sequence-specific degradation of message RNA mediated by small interfering (si)RNA duplexes 21-25 nucleotides in length. Given the ability to specifically silence any gene of interest, siRNAs offers several advantages over conventional drugs as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of human maladies including cancers, genetic disorders, and infectious diseases. Antiviral RNAi strategies have received much attention and several compounds are currently being tested in clinical trials. In particular, the development of siRNA-based HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) therapeutics has progressed rapidly and many recent studies have shown that the use of RNAi could inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting a number of viral or cellular genes. Therefore, the present chapter mainly focuses on the recent progress of RNAi-based anti-HIV gene therapeutics, with particular attention to molecular targets and delivery strategies of the siRNAs.

  12. Population pharmacokinetic analysis and pharmacogenetics of raltegravir in HIV-positive and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Arab-Alameddine, Mona; Fayet-Mello, Aurélie; Lubomirov, Rubin; Neely, Michael; di Iulio, Julia; Owen, Andrew; Boffito, Marta; Cavassini, Matthias; Günthard, Huldrych F; Rentsch, Katharina; Buclin, Thierry; Aouri, Manel; Telenti, Amalio; Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Rotger, Margalida; Csajka, Chantal

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize raltegravir (RAL) population pharmacokinetics in HIV-positive (HIV(+)) and healthy individuals, identify influential factors, and search for new candidate genes involved in UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-mediated glucuronidation. The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with NONMEM. Genetic association analysis was performed with PLINK using the relative bioavailability as the phenotype. Simulations were performed to compare once- and twice-daily regimens. A 2-compartment model with first-order absorption adequately described the data. Atazanavir, gender, and bilirubin levels influenced RAL relative bioavailability, which was 30% lower in HIV(+) than in healthy individuals. UGT1A9*3 was the only genetic variant possibly influencing RAL pharmacokinetics. The majority of RAL pharmacokinetic variability remains unexplained by genetic and nongenetic factors. Owing to the very large variability, trough drug levels might be very low under the standard dosing regimen, raising the question of a potential relevance of therapeutic drug monitoring of RAL in some situations.

  13. [Role of pharmacists in medical team on HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Ido, Keiko

    2006-06-01

    Medical staff, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, nutritionists, laboratory medical technologists, social workers, and case managers, should act as a team to support patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The therapeutic purpose of a potent cocktail of anti-HIV drugs is to maintain undetectable plasma levels of HIV over the long term. To achieve this, it is necessary to maintain treatment compliance. However, noncompliance frequently occurs because of a poor understanding of HIV therapy or difficulty in taking anti-HIV drugs. Thus pharmacists should contribute as HIV medical team members by providing medication counseling to ensure treatment compliance or delivering drug information to achieve successful HIV therapy. We describe the roles of pharmacists on HIV medical teams at Ehime University Hospital in examples of nutritional disorder or pregnant women with HIV.

  14. Eliminating the latent HIV reservoir by reactivation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Tolstrup, Martin; Winckelmann, Anni; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has transformed HIV from a deadly to a chronic disease, but HIV patients are still burdened with excess morbidity and mortality, long-term toxicities from cART, stigmatization, and insufficient access to cART worldwide. Thus, a cure for HIV would have enormous impact on society as well as the individual. As the complexity and mechanisms of HIV persistence during therapy are being unraveled, new therapeutic targets for HIV eradication are discovered. Substances that activate HIV production in the latently infected cells have recently received much attention. By turning on expression of latent HIV proviruses, reactivation strategies could contribute to the eradication HIV infection. Compounds that are currently being or soon to be tested in clinical trials are emphasized. The results from these trials will provide important clues as to whether or not reactivating strategies could become significant components of a cure for HIV. PMID:23563519

  15. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  16. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina; Brander, Christian; Barouch, Dan; de Boer, Rob; Haynes, Barton F.; Koup, Richard; Moore, John P.; Walker, Bruce D.; Watkins, David

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  17. CD25 preselective anti-HIV vectors for improved HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Lawson, Je'tai; Chen, Rachel X; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A; Anderson, Joseph S

    2012-12-01

    As HIV continues to be a global public health problem with no effective vaccine available, new and innovative therapies, including HIV gene therapies, need to be developed. Due to low transduction efficiencies that lead to low in vivo gene marking, therapeutically relevant efficacy of HIV gene therapy has been difficult to achieve in a clinical setting. Methods to improve the transplantation of enriched populations of anti-HIV vector-transduced cells may greatly increase the in vivo efficacy of HIV gene therapies. Here we describe the development of preselective anti-HIV lentiviral vectors that allow for the purification of vector-transduced cells to achieve an enriched population of HIV-resistant cells. A selectable protein, human CD25, not normally found on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), was incorporated into a triple combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector. Upon purification of cells transduced with the preselective anti-HIV vector, safety was demonstrated in CD34+ HPCs and in HPC-derived macrophages in vitro. Upon challenge with HIV-1, improved efficacy was observed in purified preselective anti-HIV vector-transduced macrophages compared to unpurified cells. These proof-of-concept results highlight the potential use of this method to improve HIV stem cell gene therapy for future clinical applications.

  18. Bone disease and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Valerianna; Tebas, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of bone demineralization among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in the current therapeutic era has been described in multiple studies, sounding the alarm that we may expect an epidemic of fragility fractures in the future. However, despite noting high overall prevalences of osteopenia and osteoporosis, recent longitudinal studies that we review here have generally not observed accelerated bone loss during antiretroviral therapy beyond the initial period after treatment initiation. We discuss the continued progress toward understanding the mechanisms of HIV-associated bone loss, particularly the effects of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, and host immune factors on bone turnover. We summarize results of clinical trials published in the past year that studied the safety and efficacy of treatment of bone loss in HIV-infected patients and provide provisional opinions about who should be considered for bone disease screening and treatment.

  19. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  20. Human Microbiome and HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of “crosstalk” between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection. PMID:22193889

  1. Human microbiome and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Deepak; Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of "crosstalk" between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection.

  2. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  3. Therapeutic Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks and Recreation, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Graphic profiles of (1) the professional membership of the National Therapeutic Recreation Society, (2) state-level employment opportunities in the field, and (3) educational opportunities at U.S. colleges and universities. (MB)

  4. Early and complete detection of HIV exposure.

    PubMed

    Jehuda-Cohen, T

    1993-10-01

    Currently, HIV diagnosis relies on serology. Yet in groups at high risk for HIV serology is not sufficient because of the window period between infection and seroconversion. There is a growing body of reports on HIV-infected yet seronegative individuals. Some tests have been developed to identify exposure to HIV by its effect on the cells of the immune system that would differentiate following exposure to the foreign antigens. Detection, in vitro, of HIV-specific B and T cells in seronegative, at risk individuals has been reported. In only some of these individuals was an HIV infection confirmed by other methods. These new assays to detect HIV immunity enable us to identify two new groups among seronegative, at risk individuals; namely those with immunity to HIV and a detectable HIV infection (silent carriers), and those with immunity and no proof of infection. Both groups have been exposed to HIV yet are not being detected by serology. Both might hold information on other forms of HIV immunity, possibly a protective one. Thus there could be an important role for other immunological assays in early detection of HIV exposure.

  5. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 variants circulating among injecting drug users in Mashhad-Iran.

    PubMed

    Naderi, H R; Tagliamonte, M; Tornesello, M L; Ciccozzi, M; Rezza, G; Farid, R; Buonaguro, F M; Buonaguro, L

    2006-09-19

    Genetic and phylogenetic information on the HIV-1 epidemic in Middle-East Countries, and in particular in Iran, are extremely limited. By March 2004, the Iranian Ministry of Health officially reported a cumulative number of 6'532 HIV positive individuals and 214 AIDS cases in the Iranian HIV-1 epidemic. The intra-venous drug users (IDUs) represent the group at highest risk for HIV-1 infection in Iran, accounting for almost 63% of all HIV-infected population. In this regards, a molecular phylogenetic study has been performed on a sentinel cohort of HIV-1 seropositive IDUs enrolled at the end of 2005 at the University of Mashhad, the largest city North East of Tehran. The study has been performed on both gag and env subgenomic regions amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and characterized by direct DNA sequence analysis. The results reported here show that the HIV-1 subtype A is circulating in this IDUs sentinel cohort. Moreover, the single phylogenetic cluster as well as the intra-group low nucleotide divergence is indicative of a recent outbreak. Unexpectedly, the Iranian samples appear to be phylogenetically derived from African Sub-Saharan subtype A viruses, raising stirring speculations on HIV-1 introduction into the IDUs epidemic in Mashhad. This sentinel study could represent the starting point for a wider molecular survey of the HIV-1 epidemics in Iran to evaluate in detail the distribution of genetic subtypes and possible natural drug-resistant variants, which are extremely helpful information to design diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  6. T-Cell surface CCR5 density is not correlated with hepatitis severity in hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected individuals: implications for the therapeutic use of CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Thierry; Portales, Pierre; Baillat, Vincent; de Boever, Corinne Merle; Le Moing, Vincent; Vidal, Michèle; Ducos, Jacques; Clot, Jacques; Reynes, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    CCR5 antagonists represent promising anti-HIV agents. Yet, if the CCR5 chemokine receptor plays a positive role in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, CCR5 antagonists might be contraindicated in HCV/HIV-coinfected subjects. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the level of T-cell surface CCR5 expression, which might determine the intensity of HCV-specific T-cell recruitment into the liver, and thereby the efficiency of the anti-HCV response, could determine HCV disease evolution. For this purpose, we compared CCR5 density, measured by quantitative flow cytometry at the surface of nonactivated (human leukocyte antigen-D-related [HLA-DR]-) T cells of 51 HCV/HIV patients, with HCV load, serum aminotransferase levels, and liver histology (inflammatory activity, fibrosis, and rate of fibrosis progression). DR-CD4+ T-cell surface CCR5 density, which correlated with DR-CD8+ T-cell surface CCR5 density and was stable over time in HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals, did not correlate with any of the biologic parameters of HCV infection analyzed and was not linked to the capacity to clear the virus. In conclusion, we failed to demonstrate any impact of interindividual variability in T-cell surface CCR5 density on HCV infection, which would have argued against the use of CCR5 antagonists in HIV/HCV-coinfected subjects.

  7. Conserved stem-loop structures in the HIV-1 RNA region containing the A3 3' splice site and its cis-regulatory element: possible involvement in RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Jacquenet, S; Ropers, D; Bilodeau, P S; Damier, L; Mougin, A; Stoltzfus, C M; Branlant, C

    2001-01-15

    The HIV-1 transcript is alternatively spliced to over 30 different mRNAs. Whether RNA secondary structure can influence HIV-1 RNA alternative splicing has not previously been examined. Here we have determined the secondary structure of the HIV-1/BRU RNA segment, containing the alternative A3, A4a, A4b, A4c and A5 3' splice sites. Site A3, required for tat mRNA production, is contained in the terminal loop of a stem-loop structure (SLS2), which is highly conserved in HIV-1 and related SIVcpz strains. The exon splicing silencer (ESS2) acting on site A3 is located in a long irregular stem-loop structure (SLS3). Two SLS3 domains were protected by nuclear components under splicing condition assays. One contains the A4c branch points and a putative SR protein binding site. The other one is adjacent to ESS2. Unexpectedly, only the 3' A residue of ESS2 was protected. The suboptimal A3 polypyrimidine tract (PPT) is base paired. Using site-directed mutagenesis and transfection of a mini-HIV-1 cDNA into HeLa cells, we found that, in a wild-type PPT context, a mutation of the A3 downstream sequence that reinforced SLS2 stability decreased site A3 utilization. This was not the case with an optimized PPT. Hence, sequence and secondary structure of the PPT may cooperate in limiting site A3 utilization.

  8. [Care for women with HIV: gender perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ko, Nai-Ying

    2011-12-01

    When women face social and cultural inequality they inevitably bear increased HIV infection risks. The success of antiretroviral therapies in suppressing HIV's viral load and prolonging patient lives has made HIV a treatable chronic disease. Given the same follow-up treatments, research shows no significant differences between men and women in terms of either clinical, immunological or virological parameters at baseline or mortality after one year of antiretroviral therapy. Also, advances in assisted reproductive technologies now makes having HIV-free children possible for HIV couples. Gender equality and human right are essential to effective HIV prevention. Nurses must take all appropriate measures to eliminate discrimination against women in HIV prevention, treatment and care programs in order to ensure equal gender access to critical healthcare services.

  9. Advertising HIV.

    PubMed

    Mougenez, Stephane; Chad, N'Djamena; Howe, John

    1995-04-05

    Think of advertising and what comes to mind, soap powders, motor cars, baked beans? All of these, of course, are heavily advertised, but what about HIV? Among the most durable of the government's advertisement campaigns have been the ones concerning HIV. Tens of millions of pounds have been spent telling the public of the presence and dangers of the virus.

  10. Ribonucleases in HIV type 1 inhibition: effect of recombinant RNases on infection of primary T cells and immune activation-induced RNase gene and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Victoria I; Boasso, Adriano; Hardy, Andrew W; Rybak, Susanna; Shearer, Gene M; Rugeles, Maria T

    2006-09-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) have therapeutic potential against cancer and viral diseases and have been reported to inhibit replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in chronically infected cell lines. The ribonuclease eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) is responsible for the anti-HIV-1 activity of a soluble factor produced in response to human alloantigens (ASF). Four recombinant RNases (EDN; a four amino acid extension of the N-terminus EDN, -4EDN; RNase A; and angiogenin) were tested for inhibition of HIV-1 replication in PHA blasts. All RNases showed anti-HIV-1 activity, irrespective of whether the RNases were added before, during, or 2 h after infection. Polyclonal antibodies against the four RNases blocked the antiviral activity. ASF inhibited HIV-1 replication in vitro if added up to 4 h after infection. We demonstrated that allostimulation induced EDN, RNase A, and angiogenin mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), although only EDN protein was detected. We identified monocytes and dendritic cells, but not macrophages or T cells, as EDN-producing cells. These findings raise the possibilities that multiple naturally occurring RNases may contribute to protection against HIV-1 infection and could be considered for utilization in HIV-1 therapy.

  11. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  12. Tuberculosis surveillance in a therapeutic community.

    PubMed

    Foley, M E; Ehr, A P; Raza, B; Devlin, C J

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a chronic communicable bacterial infection of epidemic proportions in the United States, is more common among debilitated and immunocompromised persons, for example, alcoholics, drug abusers, and HIV/AIDS patients, than among the general population. Daytop Village Inc., a drug free therapeutic community for chemical dependency treatment, initiated a program of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance and prevention education with grant support. Continuous educational sessions for staff and residents have raised awareness of the threat of TB. From March 1991 until September 1992, 2,932 clients screened for TB found 272 (9.2%) PPD positive. Of these 272, 125 also tested for HIV found 28 (22.4%) HIV positive. The TB screening program had no negative impact on the retention rate of Daytop residents. With sufficient fiscal and personnel support, tuberculosis education, screening, and treatment has been naturally integrated into the primary care agenda within the therapeutic community model of drug abuse rehabilitation.

  13. MACROMOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines – (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. PMID:24747162

  14. Macromolecular therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-09-28

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines - (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated.

  15. Strategies for universalistic and targeted HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Padian, N

    1997-10-01

    The controversy over "targeted" versus "universalistic" programs for HIV prevention has persisted throughout the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States and in some European countries. Building on previous analyses, we outline methods for integrating universalistic and targeted HIV prevention programming. The outline considers possible synergy between targeted and universalistic programs, rather than a forced choice between the two. Components within this framework include a continuum of the intensity of targeted programs, specification of local risk behavior populations, categories of risk behavior, and HIV seroprevalence within local risk-behavior populations. Given the scarce resources currently available, preventing all new HIV infections is not a realistic public health goal, but with better use of current scientific knowledge, it should be possible to greatly reduce the rate of new HIV infections.

  16. The pharmacoeconomics of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Lynn, L A; Schulman, K A; Eisenberg, J M

    1992-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a major public health problem in all parts of the world. For the United States, federal spending on HIV disease for 1982 to 1989 was $US5.5 billion. Projections indicate that AIDS spending may reach 1.6% of total health expenditures in 1992, while the indirect costs of HIV infection may be 5 times as great as the direct costs. In the developing world, the cost per person with HIV infection may be 0.8- to 9-fold greater than the per capita gross national product (GNP). Pharmacoeconomic analysis has been used to assess 2 important therapeutic options in caring for HIV patients: zidovudine therapy for asymptomatic illness, and prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). The cost-effectiveness ratio for zidovudine therapy, $US6553 to $US70 526 per year of life saved, compares favourably with ratios for other medical therapies. Prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia has been shown to be most efficient using oral dapsone or cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Pharmacological therapy for HIV is costly, however, and may limit the access to new therapies for patients in the developing world. Concurrent economic assessment of therapies during phase III trials may serve as an essential part of the research that will advance international efforts to combat this disease.

  17. HIV Antigens for Disease Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the transmembrane protein gp41 . HIV-1 vaccine development efforts conducted in this contract include developing strategies of modifying the...antigenicity of HIV envelope protein. The approaches adopted involve analysis of the possible function for N-linked glycosylation sites of gp 120 and gp41 ... gp41 . The role of N-linked sugars. a leucine zipper structure motif and the long cytoplasmic domain of gp4l in virus assembly, virus infectivity and

  18. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen C.; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip D.; Smith, Bryan R.; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'etre of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multi-step work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  19. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  20. Children and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Latinx AIDS ... who have lived with HIV since they were born are living productive and healthy lives. Can HIV ...

  1. HIV Diagnosis and Treatment through Advanced Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Zulfiqar, Hafiza Fizzah; Javed, Aneeqa; Sumbal; Afroze, Bakht; Ali, Qurban; Akbar, Khadija; Nadeem, Tariq; Rana, Muhammad Adeel; Nazar, Zaheer Ahmad; Nasir, Idrees Ahmad; Husnain, Tayyab

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the chief contributor to global burden of disease. In 2010, HIV was the fifth leading cause of disability-adjusted life years in people of all ages and leading cause for people aged 30–44 years. It is classified as a member of the family Retroviridae and genus Lentivirus based on the biological, morphological, and genetic properties. It infects different cells of the immune system, such as CD4+ T cells (T-helper cells), dendritic cells, and macrophages. HIV has two subtypes: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Among these strains, HIV-1 is the most virulent and pathogenic. Advanced diagnostic methods are exploring new ways of treatment and contributing in the reduction of HIV cases. The diagnostic techniques like PCR, rapid test, EIA, p24 antigen, and western blot have markedly upgraded the diagnosis of HIV. Antiretroviral therapy and vaccines are promising candidates in providing therapeutic and preventive regimes, respectively. Invention of CRISPR/Cas9 is a breakthrough in the field of HIV disease management. PMID:28326304

  2. Therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-01-01

    Protein-based therapeutics are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential. More than 100 genuine and similar number of modified therapeutic proteins are approved for clinical use in the European Union and the USA with 2010 sales of US$108 bln; monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) accounted for almost half (48%) of the sales. Based on their pharmacological activity, they can be divided into five groups: (a) replacing a protein that is deficient or abnormal; (b) augmenting an existing pathway; (c) providing a novel function or activity; (d) interfering with a molecule or organism; and (e) delivering other compounds or proteins, such as a radionuclide, cytotoxic drug, or effector proteins. Therapeutic proteins can also be grouped based on their molecular types that include antibody-based drugs, Fc fusion proteins, anticoagulants, blood factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, engineered protein scaffolds, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, interferons, interleukins, and thrombolytics. They can also be classified based on their molecular mechanism of activity as (a) binding non-covalently to target, e.g., mAbs; (b) affecting covalent bonds, e.g., enzymes; and (c) exerting activity without specific interactions, e.g., serum albumin. Most protein therapeutics currently on the market are recombinant and hundreds of them are in clinical trials for therapy of cancers, immune disorders, infections, and other diseases. New engineered proteins, including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs, and proteins with optimized pharmacokinetics, are currently under development. However, in the last several decades, there are no conceptually new methodological developments comparable, e.g., to genetic engineering leading to the development of recombinant therapeutic proteins. It appears that a paradigm change in methodologies and understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major

  3. Broadly neutralizing antibodies: An approach to control HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mahmoud Mohammad; Yaseen, Mohammad Mahmoud; Alqudah, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-02

    Although available antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection to a non-fatal chronic disease, the economic burden of lifelong therapy, severe adverse ART effects, daily ART adherence, and emergence of ART-resistant HIV-1 mutants require prospecting for alternative therapeutic modalities. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies (BNAbs) may offer one such feasible alternative. To evaluate their therapeutic potential in established HIV-1 infection, we sought to address recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical investigations in this area of HIV-1 research. In addition, we addressed the obstacles that may impede the success of such immunotherapeutic approach, suggested strategic solutions, and briefly compared this approach with the currently used ART to open new insights for potential future passive immunotherapy for HIV-1 infection.

  4. HIV Stigma and Social Capital in Women Living With HIV.

    PubMed

    Cuca, Yvette P; Asher, Alice; Okonsky, Jennifer; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Webel, Allison

    Women living with HIV (WLWH) continue to experience HIV-related stigma. Social capital is one resource that could mitigate HIV stigma. Our cross-sectional study examined associations between social capital and HIV-related stigma in 135 WLWH in the San Francisco Bay Area. The mean age of study participants was 48 years; 60% were African American; 29% had less than a high school education; and 19% were employed. Age was significantly associated with perceived HIV stigma (p = .001), but total social capital was not. Women with lower Value of Life social capital scores had significantly higher total stigma scores (p = .010) and higher Negative Self-image stigma scores (p = .001). Women who felt less valued in their social worlds may have been more likely to perceive HIV stigma, which could have negative health consequences. This work begins to elucidate the possible relationships between social capital and perceived HIV stigma.

  5. Living with HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  6. HIV Among Asians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Asians Format: Select One File [143K] Recommend ...

  7. Infection with human retroviruses other than HIV-1: HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, David; Ambrosioni, Juan; Paredes, Roger; Marcos, M Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Moreno, Asunción; Miró, José M

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 is the most prevalent retrovirus, with over 30 million people infected worldwide. Nevertheless, infection caused by other human retroviruses like HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 is gaining importance. Initially confined to specific geographical areas, HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are becoming a major concern in non-endemic countries due to international migration flows. Clinical manifestations of retroviruses range from asymptomatic carriers to life-threatening conditions, such as AIDS in HIV-2 infection or adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis in HTLV-1 infection. HIV-2 is naturally resistant to some antiretrovirals frequently used to treat HIV-1 infection, but it does have effective antiretroviral therapy options. Unfortunately, HTLV still has limited therapeutic options. In this article, we will review the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, pathogenic and therapeutic aspects of infections caused by these human retroviruses.

  8. T-cell therapies for HIV: Preclinical successes and current clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Jones, R Brad; Nixon, Douglas F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been successful in controlling HIV infection, it does not provide a permanent cure, requires lifelong treatment, and HIV-positive individuals are left with social concerns such as stigma. The recent application of T cells to treat cancer and viral reactivations post-transplant offers a potential strategy to control HIV infection. It is known that naturally occurring HIV-specific T cells can inhibit HIV initially, but this response is not sustained in the majority of people living with HIV. Genetically modifying T cells to target HIV, resist infection, and persist in the immunosuppressive environment found in chronically infected HIV-positive individuals might provide a therapeutic solution for HIV. This review focuses on successful preclinical studies and current clinical strategies using T-cell therapy to control HIV infection and mediate a functional cure solution.

  9. HIV Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right way, every day. If you have health insurance, your insurer is required to cover some medicines ... to treat HIV. If you don’t have health insurance, or you’re unable to afford your co- ...

  10. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  11. The Pharmacology of TUG-891, a Potent and Selective Agonist of the Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120), Demonstrates Both Potential Opportunity and Possible Challenges to Therapeutic Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Butcher, Adrian J.; Pediani, John D.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Heathcote, Helen; Tobin, Andrew B.; Ulven, Trond

    2013-01-01

    TUG-891 [3-(4-((4-fluoro-4′-methyl-[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy)phenyl)propanoic acid] was recently described as a potent and selective agonist for the long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) receptor 4 (FFA4; previously G protein–coupled receptor 120, or GPR120). Herein, we have used TUG-891 to further define the function of FFA4 and used this compound in proof of principle studies to indicate the therapeutic potential of this receptor. TUG-891 displayed similar signaling properties to the LCFA α-linolenic acid at human FFA4 across various assay end points, including stimulation of Ca2+ mobilization, β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 recruitment, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Activation of human FFA4 by TUG-891 also resulted in rapid phosphorylation and internalization of the receptor. While these latter events were associated with desensitization of the FFA4 signaling response, removal of TUG-891 allowed both rapid recycling of FFA4 back to the cell surface and resensitization of the FFA4 Ca2+ signaling response. TUG-891 was also a potent agonist of mouse FFA4, but it showed only limited selectivity over mouse FFA1, complicating its use in vivo in this species. Pharmacologic dissection of responses to TUG-891 in model murine cell systems indicated that activation of FFA4 was able to mimic many potentially beneficial therapeutic properties previously reported for LCFAs, including stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells, enhancing glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and inhibiting release of proinflammatory mediators from RAW264.7 macrophages, which suggests promise for FFA4 as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Together, these results demonstrate both potential but also significant challenges that still need to be overcome to therapeutically target FFA4. PMID:23979972

  12. Stem cell based anti-HIV Gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Scott G.; Shimizu, Saki; An, Dong Sung

    2011-01-01

    Human stem cell-based therapeutic intervention strategies for treating HIV infection have recently undergone a renaissance as a major focus of investigation. Unlike most conventional antiviral therapies, genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells possess the capacity for prolonged self-renewal that would continuously produce protected immune cells to fight against HIV. A successful strategy therefore has the potential to stably control and ultimately eradicate HIV from patients by a single or minimal treatment. Recent progress in the development of new technologies and clinical trials sets the stage for the current generation of gene therapy approaches to combat HIV infection. In this review, we will discuss two major approaches that are currently underway in the development of stem cell-based gene therapy to target HIV: One that focuses on the protection of cells from productive infection with HIV, and the other that focuses on targeting immune cells to directly combat HIV infection. PMID:21247612

  13. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  14. Newer gene editing technologies toward HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, N; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-11-14

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called "Berlin patient" who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  15. Long-acting injectable antiretrovirals for HIV treatment and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Spreen, William R.; Margolis, David A.; Pottage, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Long-acting antiretroviral (ARV) drugs may improve adherence to therapy and extend opportunities for therapeutic or prophylactic intervention to underserved patient populations. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of small molecule long-acting injectable ARV agents. Recent findings The need for combination ART and physicochemical and dosing limitations of current ARV drugs impede attempts to redevelop them as long-acting injectable formulations. However, the intrinsic properties of rilpivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and GSK1265744, an HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor, have enabled crystalline nanoparticle formulations to progress to clinical trials. Summary Investigational long-acting injectable nanoformulations of rilpivirine and GSK1265744 are clinical-stage development candidates. Complementary pharmacologic properties of both agents – different mechanisms of action, resistance profiles, metabolic pathways, lack of drug interactions and low daily oral doses – offer the potential for combination use. Phase I studies of the pharmacokinetics and safety of each long-acting formulation alone and in combination indicate that a monthly dosing regimen is possible for HIV treatment. An ongoing phase IIb trial of oral GSK1265744 and oral rilpivirine is evaluating this two-drug regimen for maintenance of virologic suppression; results will inform future studies using the injectable formulations. Additional preclinical and clinical studies indicate a potential use of each agent for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:24100877

  16. Stem cell-based therapies for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Olivier; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-08-01

    One of the current focuses in HIV/AIDS research is to develop a novel therapeutic strategy that can provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS without daily drug treatment and, ultimately, a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy aims to reconstitute the patient immune system by transplantation of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells with anti-HIV genes. Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into mature immune cells. In theory, anti-HIV gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells can continuously provide HIV-resistant immune cells throughout the life of a patient. Therefore, hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy has a great potential to provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS by a single treatment. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent progress of developing anti-HIV genes, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells, engraftment and reconstitution of anti-HIV gene-modified immune cells, HIV inhibition in in vitro and in vivo animal models, and in human clinical trials.

  17. Relative resistance of HIV-1 founder viruses to control by interferon-alpha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    relatively IFNα-resistant founder viruses lends strong support to the hypothesis that IFNα plays an important role in the control of HIV-1 replication during the earliest stages of infection, prior to systemic viral spread. These findings suggest that it may be possible to harness the antiviral activity of type 1 IFNs in prophylactic and potentially also therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 infection. PMID:24299076

  18. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  19. Immigration and HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Oppenheim, S

    1994-02-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine areas in which additional education regarding the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed by the undocumented and recently immigrated HIV-infected population, and to obtain preliminary information on the ability of this community to access medical treatment for HIV. Information regarding health status, immigration status, and the use of medical services was obtained from all HIV-infected undocumented and recently immigrated individuals who sought services from a Southern California nonprofit agency between July 1, 1990 and December 31, 1990. A total of 54 such individuals presented for services. Thirteen individuals reported participating in shared needle usage for the administration of medication or vitamins, in addition to other known risk factors for HIV. Only one of these 13 individuals had access to nonemergency medical care. Additional research is necessary to determine the reasons for these needle sharing behaviors. Educational outreach is needed to address these behaviors as a possible risk factor for HIV transmission.

  20. Macro-level Implicit HIV Prejudice and the Health of Community Residents with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Carol T.; Varni, Susan E.; Solomon, Sondra E.; DeSarno, Michael J.; Bunn, Janice Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined how community levels of implicit HIV prejudice are associated with the psychological and physical well-being of people with HIV living in those same communities. It also examined whether community motivation to control prejudice and/or explicit HIV prejudice moderates the relationship of implicit prejudice and well-being. Methods Participants were 206 people with HIV living in 42 different communities in New England who completed measures that assessed psychological distress, thriving, and physical well-being. Telephone surveys of 347 residents of these same communities (selected via random digit dialing) were used to assess community explicit HIV prejudice and motivation to control HIV prejudice. These community residents then completed an on-line measure of implicit prejudice toward people with HIV, the Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald et al., 1998). Results Multilevel analyses showed that higher community implicit HIV prejudice was associated with greater psychological distress among residents with HIV living in that community. The physical well-being of participants with HIV was negatively related to community implicit HIV prejudice in communities in which residents were unmotivated to control HIV prejudice or had high levels of explicit HIV prejudice. Conclusions These findings indicate that implicit prejudice of residents of real-world communities may create an environment that may impair the well-being of stigmatized people. Implicit prejudice can therefore be considered an element of macro-level or structural stigma. The discussion considered the possible role of implicit HIV prejudice on a community’s social capital as one pathway by which it compromises the well-being of residents with HIV. PMID:27505199

  1. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  2. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  3. Heterosexual transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Laga, M

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments concerning heterosexual transmission of HIV (review of 1988 literature only) suggest improved understanding of the pattern of spread and role of risk behaviors and biological cofactors in its transmission. 3 distinct patterns if HIV infection are known: heterosexual spread in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, spread primarily among homosexuals and injecting drug users in Europe, North American and much of Latin America and Australia, and both homosexual and heterosexual transmission in Asia, the Pacific, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, where prevalence is low. In Africa an estimated 80% of cases are acquired heterosexually. Important risk factors are number of sex partners, sex with prostitutes, being a prostitute, being a sex partner of an infected person, and having a history of other sexually transmitted diseases. Prevalence rates have risen rapidly in Zaire and Kenya. In Africa, acquisition of HIV is related to sexual activity only. In contrast, in the U.S., heterosexual cases make up only 4% of all cases, and in Europe only 6%. Data on types of sexual transmission of HIV are mounting, in aggregate suggestive of a marked heterogeneity in infectivity and possibly susceptibility between individuals. Among couples where the man is positive, in some places individuals appear to be highly infective, notably those from Kinshasa, Zaire and Haiti, while other series of discordant couples the receptive partner remained seronegative for several years. Transmission from women to men appears to be less efficient than from men to women, as has been observed with other STDs such as gonorrhea. Biological cofactors implicated in enhanced HIV transmission appear to be advanced CDC Stage IV AIDS disease, with low T-helper lymphocyte counts and high antigenemia; concomitant STDS, especially those with genital ulceration; lack of circumcision; oral contraceptive use; practice of anal intercourse; inconsistent or no use of condoms. Theoretical models for

  4. Ex vivo gene therapy for HIV-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Lisa J; Rossi, John J

    2011-04-15

    Until recently, progress in ex vivo gene therapy (GT) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) treatment has been incremental. Long-term HIV-1 remission in a patient who received a heterologous stem cell transplant for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma from a CCR5(-/-) donor, even after discontinuation of conventional therapy, has energized the field. We review the status of current approaches as well as future directions in the areas of therapeutic targets, combinatorial strategies, vector design, introduction of therapeutics into stem cells and enrichment/expansion of gene-modified cells. Finally, we discuss recent advances towards clinical application of HIV-1 GT.

  5. HIV envelope: challenges and opportunities for development of entry inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The HIV envelope proteins gp120 and gp41 play critical roles in HIV entry and thus are of extreme interest for the development of novel therapeutics. Study by diverse methods, including structural biology and mutagenesis, has resulted in a detailed model for envelope-mediated entry, which consists of multiple conformations, each a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the challenges, strategies and progress to date for developing novel entry inhibitors directed at disrupting HIV gp120 and gp41 function. PMID:21377881

  6. HIV Life Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/13/2016; last reviewed 9/8/2016) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  7. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to develop novel therapies for HIV.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R K; Burgener, A; Klatt, N R

    2015-10-01

    Despite the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which delays and/or prevents AIDS pathogenesis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals continue to face increased morbidities and mortality rates compared with uninfected individuals. Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal dysfunction is a key feature of HIV infection, and is associated with mortality. In this study, we review current knowledge about mucosal dysfunction in HIV infection, and describe potential avenues for therapeutic targets to enhance mucosal function and decrease morbidities and mortalities in HIV-infected individuals.

  8. Short Communication: High Cellular Iron Levels Are Associated with Increased HIV Infection and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Bayeva, Marina; Taiwo, Babafemi; Palella, Frank J.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HIV is a pandemic disease, and many cellular and systemic factors are known to alter its infectivity and replication. Earlier studies had suggested that anemia is common in HIV-infected patients; however, higher iron was also observed in AIDS patients prior to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therefore, the relationship between iron and viral infection is not well delineated. To address this issue, we altered the levels of cellular iron in primary CD4+ T cells and showed that higher iron is associated with increased HIV infection and replication. In addition, HIV infection alone leads to increased cellular iron, and several ART drugs increase cellular iron independent of HIV infection. Finally, HIV infection is associated with increased serum iron in HIV-positive patients regardless of treatment with ART. These results establish a relationship between iron and HIV infection and suggest that iron homeostasis may be a viable therapeutic target for HIV. PMID:25291189

  9. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  10. Short communication: high cellular iron levels are associated with increased HIV infection and replication.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Bayeva, Marina; Taiwo, Babafemi; Palella, Frank J; Hope, Thomas J; Ardehali, Hossein

    2015-03-01

    HIV is a pandemic disease, and many cellular and systemic factors are known to alter its infectivity and replication. Earlier studies had suggested that anemia is common in HIV-infected patients; however, higher iron was also observed in AIDS patients prior to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therefore, the relationship between iron and viral infection is not well delineated. To address this issue, we altered the levels of cellular iron in primary CD4(+) T cells and showed that higher iron is associated with increased HIV infection and replication. In addition, HIV infection alone leads to increased cellular iron, and several ART drugs increase cellular iron independent of HIV infection. Finally, HIV infection is associated with increased serum iron in HIV-positive patients regardless of treatment with ART. These results establish a relationship between iron and HIV infection and suggest that iron homeostasis may be a viable therapeutic target for HIV.

  11. HIV-1 Capsid: The Multifaceted Key Player in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Edward M.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a mature, infectious HIV-1 virion, the viral genome is housed within a conical capsid core comprised of the viral capsid (CA) protein. The CA protein, and the structure into which it assembles, facilitate virtually every step of infection through a series of interactions with multiple host cell factors. This review describes our understanding of the interactions between the viral capsid core and several cellular factors that enable efficient HIV-1 genome replication, timely core disassembly, nuclear import and the integration of the viral genome into the genome of the target cell. We then discuss how elucidating these interactions can reveal new targets for therapeutic interactions against HIV-1. PMID:26179359

  12. Treatment Options for Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Monge-Maillo, Begoña; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania and HIV coinfection is a major health problem in more than 35 countries worldwide. The impaired immune function of visceral leishmaniasis/HIV-coinfected patients may: (i) favor the reactivation of latent Leishmania infection; (ii) induce a more severe presentation of visceral leishmaniasis; (iii) cause a poorer therapeutic response; and (iv) increase the risk of relapse after treatment. One of the major challenges in the management of visceral leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection is developing an effective drug therapy that not only resolves the first episode of visceral leishmaniasis but also prevents relapse. However, scarce evidence and data are available on the optimal therapy for visceral leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection. In our study we reviewed the efficacy of several drugs currently employed for visceral leishmaniasis in HIV patients and current knowledge of secondary prophylaxis. Additionally, we reviewed a set of ongoing clinical trials that are being performed to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic regimens for visceral leishmaniasis in patients with and without HIV. Finally, other therapeutic strategies based on immunotherapy, vaccination, or screening for latent leishmaniasis infection in HIV patients are reviewed. Apart from being potentially useful in clinical practice, the results obtained in our study highlight the need for further research on the management of visceral leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection.

  13. Applications and limitations of inflammatory biomarkers for studies on neurocognitive impairment in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Morgello, Susan; Gabuzda, Dana

    2013-12-01

    Despite reduced prevalence of severe forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) on current antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, milder forms of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remain prevalent in HIV-infected populations. These mild forms of HAND consist of subtypes, probably reflecting distinct, though possibly overlapping, pathophysiological mechanisms. Factors associated with HAND in HIV patients with prolonged viral suppression on ART include older age, low nadir CD4, active HCV co-infection, and cardiovascular risk factors, but underlying mechanisms and their relationship to innate immune activation, chronic inflammation, and other features of systemic disease are poorly understood. In this article, we discuss applications and limitations of plasma inflammatory biomarkers for studies on HAND in HIV patients on ART and describe an analysis pipeline to reduce common sources of noise and increase likelihood of identifying relevant inflammatory biomarkers. Clinical covariates and comorbidities that influence inflammatory biomarkers, such as aging, obesity, metabolic abnormalities, HCV co-infection, and substance abuse, are also reviewed. As an example for using this analytic pipeline, we present an exploratory study of 22 plasma inflammatory biomarkers (IFN-α 2b and -γ, 16 cytokines/chemokines, sIL-2R, sCD14, HA, and YKL-40) in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with advanced disease, frequent HCV co-infection, and viral suppression on ART. The identification of inflammatory biomarkers associated with HAND in HIV+ patients on ART may be useful to distinguish between HAND subtypes with distinct pathophysiology, and is important for achieving a systems-level understanding of the biology of these disorders, developing effective therapies, and evaluating therapeutic outcomes.

  14. Nanotechnology: a magic bullet for HIV AIDS treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Verma, Shivani; Prasad, Deo Nandan; Bhardwaj, Ankur; Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Jain, Amit Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become devastating in last a few years. Nearly 7400 new infection cases are coming every day. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which involves combination of at least three antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, has been used to extend the life span of the HIV-infected patients. HAART has played an important role to reduce mortality rate in the developed countries but in the developing countries condition is still worst with millions of people being infected by this disease. For the improvement of the situation, nanotechnology-based drug system has been explored for the HIV therapeutics. Nanosystems used for HIV therapeutics offer some unique advantage like enhancement of bioavailability, water solubility, stability, and targeting ability of ARV drugs. Main nanotechnology-based systems explored for HIV therapeutics are liposomes, nanoparticles, niosomes, polymeric micelles, and dendrimers. Present manuscript reviews conventional method of HIV therapeutics and recent advances in the field of nanotechnology-based systems for treatment of HIV-AIDS.

  15. TALEN gene editing takes aim on HIV.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ronald; Berges, Bradford K; Solis-Leal, Antonio; Igbinedion, Omoyemwen; Strong, Christy L; Schiller, Martin R

    2016-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are one of several types of programmable, engineered nucleases that bind and cleave specific DNA sequences. Cellular machinery repairs the cleaved DNA by introducing indels. In this review, we emphasize the potential, explore progress, and identify challenges in using TALENs as a therapeutic tool to treat HIV infection. TALENs have less off-target editing and can be more effective at tolerating HIV escape mutations than CRISPR/Cas-9. Scientists have explored TALEN-mediated editing of host genes such as viral entry receptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) and a protein involved in proviral integration (LEDGF/p75). Viral targets include the proviral DNA, particularly focused on the long terminal repeats. Major challenges with translating gene therapy from bench to bedside are improving cleavage efficiency and delivery, while minimizing off-target editing, cytotoxicity, and immunogenicity. However, rapid improvements in TALEN technology are enhancing cleavage efficiency and specificity. Therapeutic testing in animal models of HIV infection will help determine whether TALENs are a viable HIV treatment therapy. TALENs or other engineered nucleases could shift the therapeutic paradigm from life-long antiretroviral therapy toward eradication of HIV infection.

  16. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people with HIV live longer, healthier lives. Sometimes HIV medicines can also cause side effects. Most side effects from HIV medicines are manageable, ...

  17. Current developments in anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Alexander Y

    2009-02-01

    Since the introduction of highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, dramatic improvements in therapeutic treatment modalities for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection have occurred. Potent drug combinations in HAART regimens efficiently block HIV-1 replication in most patients; however, multiple shortcomings of HAART are apparent and require novel treatments that can be utilized in combination with HAART or as stand-alone therapies. Gene therapy of HIV-1 represents one such treatment and several strategies are currently under development. This review focuses on advancements in the gene therapy of HIV/AIDS by highlighting the progress made in selecting new therapeutic targets and developing novel tools to exert an effect on these targets. In addition, new trends emerging from this progress are summarized. This review is based primarily on literature published between 2006 and 2008.

  18. Attacking HIV-1 RNA versus DNA by sequence-specific approaches: RNAi versus CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be effectively controlled by potent antiviral drugs, but this never results in a cure. The patient should therefore take these drugs for the rest of his/her life, which can cause drug-resistance and adverse effects. Therefore, more durable therapeutic strategies should be considered, such as a stable gene therapy to protect the target T cells against HIV-1 infection. The development of potent therapeutic regimens based on the RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) mechanisms will be described, which can be delivered by lentiviral vectors. These mechanisms attack different forms of the viral genome, the RNA and DNA, respectively, but both mechanisms act in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Early RNAi experiments demonstrated profound virus inhibition, but also indicated that viral escape is possible. Such therapy failure can be prevented by the design of a combinatorial RNAi attack on the virus and this gene therapy is currently being tested in a preclinical humanized mouse model. Recent CRISPR-Cas studies also document robust virus inhibition, but suggest a novel viral escape route that is induced by the cellular nonhomologous end joining DNA repair pathway, which is activated by CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA breaks. We will compare these two approaches for durable HIV-1 suppression and discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages. The potential for future clinical applications will be described.

  19. HIV-related stigma and health-related quality of life among children living with HIV in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rydström, Lise-Lott; Wiklander, Maria; Navér, Lars; Ygge, Britt-Marie; Eriksson, Lars E

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between HIV-related stigma and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among children living with HIV infection is unknown. The objectives of this study were to describe HIV-related stigma and HRQoL among children with perinatal HIV living in Sweden, and to investigate the relationship between these two factors in the same infection group. In a cross-sectional nationwide survey, HIV-related stigma was measured with the 8-item HIV Stigma Scale for Children. HRQoL was measured with the 37-item DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Module. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship between HIV-related stigma and HRQoL. Fifty-eight children participated, age 9-18 years (mean = 13.9). The HIV stigma general scale showed a mean score of 17.6 (SD = 5.0; possible range 8-32). DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Module general scale showed a mean score of 80.7 (SD = 14.1; possible range 0-100). HIV-related stigma was negatively associated with HRQoL (standardized β = -0.790, p = .017). The results indicate that children's concerns related to disclosure of their HIV infection seem to be common (i.e. 75% agreed) which, together with the negative association between ratings of HIV-relatively stigma and HRQoL, might indicate that disclosure concerns would be a relevant target for interventions to decrease HIV-related stigma and increase HRQoL.

  20. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  1. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  2. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  3. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGENT HIV, a single-stranded, positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus in the genus Lentivirus. TRANSMISSION HIV can ... be diagnosed is approximately 9 days, when HIV RNA becomes detectable in blood; however, tests needed to ...

  4. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is performed that detects the genetic material ( RNA ) of the virus. An HIV RNA test will detect HIV in most people by ... next test to perform is an HIV-1 RNA test (nucleic acid amplification test, NAAT). If the ...

  5. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code or city Follow Act Against AIDS Act Against AIDS @talkHIV Act Against AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV/ ...

  6. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  7. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... yeast infection (thrush) Shingles (herpes zoster) Progression to AIDS If you receive no treatment for your HIV ... childbirth or breast-feeding. How does HIV become AIDS? HIV destroys CD4 cells — a specific type of ...

  8. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS Print A ... serious infection. continue How Many People Have HIV/AIDS? Since the discovery of the virus in 1983, ...

  9. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  10. Innate immunity in resistance to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Biasin, Mara; Clerici, Mario; Piacentini, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in subjects who do not seroconvert despite multiple exposures to the virus and to the progression to AIDS in HIV‐infected individuals depends on multiple factors involving both the innate and the adaptive immune system. The contribution of natural immunity in preventing HIV infection has so far received little attention, but many recently published articles suggest a key role for Toll‐like receptors, natural killer cells, interleukin‐22, acute‐phase amyloid A protein, and APOBEC3G in conferring resistance to HIV infection. The study of these factors will shed light on HIV pathogenesis and contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to this elusive disease.

  11. Prime, Shock, and Kill: Priming CD4 T Cells from HIV Patients with a BCL-2 Antagonist before HIV Reactivation Reduces HIV Reservoir Size

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Sainski, Amy M.; Dai, Haiming; Natesampillai, Sekar; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Bren, Gary D.; de Araujo Correia, Maria Cristina Miranda; Sampath, Rahul; Rizza, Stacey A.; O'Brien, Daniel; Yao, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding how some HIV-infected cells resist the cytotoxicity of HIV replication is crucial to enabling HIV cure efforts. HIV killing of CD4 T cells that replicate HIV can involve HIV protease-mediated cleavage of procaspase 8 to generate a fragment (Casp8p41) that directly binds and activates the mitochondrial proapoptotic protein BAK. Here, we demonstrate that Casp8p41 also binds with nanomolar affinity to the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, which sequesters Casp8p41 and prevents apoptosis. Further, we show that central memory CD4 T cells (TCM) from HIV-infected individuals have heightened expression of BCL-2 relative to procaspase 8, possibly explaining the persistence of HIV-infected TCM despite generation of Casp8p41. Consistent with this hypothesis, the selective BCL-2 antagonist venetoclax induced minimal killing of uninfected CD4 T cells but markedly increased the death of CD4 T cells and diminished cell-associated HIV DNA when CD4 T cells from antiretroviral therapy (ART)-suppressed HIV patients were induced with αCD3/αCD28 to reactivate HIV ex vivo. Thus, priming CD4 T cells from ART suppressed HIV patients with a BCL-2 antagonist, followed by HIV reactivation, achieves reductions in cell-associated HIV DNA, whereas HIV reactivation alone does not. IMPORTANCE HIV infection is incurable due to a long-lived reservoir of HIV+ memory CD4 T cells, and no clinically relevant interventions have been identified that reduce the number of these HIV DNA-containing cells. Since postintegration HIV replication can result in HIV protease generation of Casp8p41, which activates BAK, causing infected CD4 T cell death, we sought to determine whether this occurs in memory CD4 T cells. Here, we demonstrate that memory CD4 T cells can generate Casp8p41 and yet are intrinsically resistant to death induced by diverse stimuli, including Casp8p41. Furthermore, BCL-2 expression is relatively increased in these cells and directly binds and inhibits Casp8p41's

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-02-08

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist, GS-9620, induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5-2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are underway to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs.IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  13. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is

  14. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  15. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers.

  16. Laser palliation of the HIV+ patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convissar, Robert A.

    2003-12-01

    Many oral manifestations of HIV infection can be used as markers for degree of immunosupression. These manifestations may be treated with antibiotics, analgesics, and antineoplastics, which may interact and interfere with antiviral agents used to treat the disease, and possibly exacerbate it. Dentists will see more HIV-infected patients as medical research transforms this disease into a chronic illness. Lasers have been shown to be effective instruments in palliation of oral manifestations of HIV infection. The use of lasers to palliate the painful symptoms of three oral manifestations of HIV infection is described. The advantages and benefits to both patient and dentist will be discussed. The paper does not address the use of lasers as a modality to treat or cure HIV infection -- only to palliate some of its symptoms.

  17. Gut Microbiota Linked to Sexual Preference and HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noguera-Julian, Marc; Rocafort, Muntsa; Guillén, Yolanda; Rivera, Javier; Casadellà, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Hildebrand, Falk; Zeller, Georg; Parera, Mariona; Bellido, Rocío; Rodríguez, Cristina; Carrillo, Jorge; Mothe, Beatriz; Coll, Josep; Bravo, Isabel; Estany, Carla; Herrero, Cristina; Saz, Jorge; Sirera, Guillem; Torrela, Ariadna; Navarro, Jordi; Crespo, Manel; Brander, Christian; Negredo, Eugènia; Blanco, Julià; Guarner, Francisco; Calle, Maria Luz; Bork, Peer; Sönnerborg, Anders; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The precise effects of HIV-1 on the gut microbiome are unclear. Initial cross-sectional studies provided contradictory associations between microbial richness and HIV serostatus and suggested shifts from Bacteroides to Prevotella predominance following HIV-1 infection, which have not been found in animal models or in studies matched for HIV-1 transmission groups. In two independent cohorts of HIV-1-infected subjects and HIV-1-negative controls in Barcelona (n = 156) and Stockholm (n = 84), men who have sex with men (MSM) predominantly belonged to the Prevotella-rich enterotype whereas most non-MSM subjects were enriched in Bacteroides, independently of HIV-1 status, and with only a limited contribution of diet effects. Moreover, MSM had a significantly richer and more diverse fecal microbiota than non-MSM individuals. After stratifying for sexual orientation, there was no solid evidence of an HIV-specific dysbiosis. However, HIV-1 infection remained consistently associated with reduced bacterial richness, the lowest bacterial richness being observed in subjects with a virological-immune discordant response to antiretroviral therapy. Our findings indicate that HIV gut microbiome studies must control for HIV risk factors and suggest interventions on gut bacterial richness as possible novel avenues to improve HIV-1-associated immune dysfunction. PMID:27077120

  18. Antioxidant therapeutics for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ravinder; Reddy, Rajiv

    2011-10-01

    Pharmaceutical treatment for millions worldwide who have schizophrenia is limited to a handful of antipsychotics. Despite the proven efficacy of these drugs, the overall outcome for schizophrenia remains suboptimal. Thus, alternative treatment options are urgently needed. One possible approach may be antioxidant therapy. The extant evidence for the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia offers a hypothesis-derived therapeutic approach in the form of antioxidants. Vitamins C and E, for example, are suitable for human clinical trials because they are readily available, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Research into the therapeutic use of antioxidants in schizophrenia can be grouped into two main clusters: for psychopathology and for side effects. Of these studies, some have been carefully conducted, but majority are open label. Use of antioxidants for treatment-related side effects has been more extensively investigated. The totality of the evidence to date suggests that specific antioxidants, such as N-acetyl cysteine, may offer tangible benefits for the clinical syndrome of schizophrenia, and vitamin E may offer salutary effects on glycemic effects of antipsychotics. However, a great deal of fundamental clinical research remains to be done before antioxidants can be routinely used therapeutically for schizophrenia and treatment-related complications.

  19. Dendritic cell based vaccines for HIV infection: the way ahead.

    PubMed

    García, Felipe; Plana, Montserrat; Climent, Nuria; León, Agathe; Gatell, Jose M; Gallart, Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic cells have a central role in HIV infection. On one hand, they are essential to induce strong HIV-specific CD4⁺ helper T-cell responses that are crucial to achieve a sustained and effective HIV-specific CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte able to control HIV replication. On the other hand, DCs contribute to virus dissemination and HIV itself could avoid a correct antigen presentation. As the efficacy of immune therapy and therapeutic vaccines against HIV infection has been modest in the best of cases, it has been hypothesized that ex vivo generated DC therapeutic vaccines aimed to induce effective specific HIV immune responses might overcome some of these problems. In fact, DC-based vaccine clinical trials have yielded the best results in this field. However, despite these encouraging results, functional cure has not been reached with this strategy in any patient. In this Commentary, we discuss new approaches to improve the efficacy and feasibility of this type of therapeutic vaccine.

  20. IFN-λ Inhibits Drug-Resistant HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, He; Liu, Man-Qing; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Run-Hong; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated to inhibit a number of viruses, including HIV. Here, we further examined the anti-HIV effect of IFN-λs in macrophages. We found that IFN-λs synergistically enhanced anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals [azidothymidine (AZT), efavirenz, indinavir, and enfuvirtide] in infected macrophages. Importantly, IFN-λs could suppress HIV infection of macrophages with the drug-resistant strains, including AZT-resistant virus (A012) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant virus (TC49). Mechanistically, IFN-λs were able to induce the expression of several important anti-HIV cellular factors, including myxovirus resistance 2 (Mx2), a newly identified HIV post-entry inhibitor and tetherin, a restriction factor that blocks HIV release from infected cells. These observations provide additional evidence to support the potential use of IFN-λs as therapeutics agents for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:28321215

  1. A review of nanotechnological approaches for the prophylaxis of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Date, Abhijit A.; Destache, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment and control of HIV/AIDS is one of the biggest challenges of 21st century. More than 33 million individuals are infected with HIV worldwide and more than 2 million new cases of HIV infection have been reported. The situation demands development of effective prevention strategies to control the pandemic of AIDS. Due to lack of availability of an effective HIV vaccine, antiretroviral drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics like siRNA have been explored for HIV prophylaxis. Clinical trials shave shown that antiretroviral drugs, tenofovir and emtricitabine can offer some degree of HIV prevention. However, complete prevention of HIV infection has not been achieved yet. Nanotechnology has brought a paradigm shift in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many diseases. The current review discusses potential of various nanocarriers such as dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, lipid nanocarriers, drug nanocrystals, inorganic nanocarriers and nanofibers in improving efficacy of various modalities available for HIV prophylaxis. PMID:23726227

  2. HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nunn, P

    1991-11-01

    The problems of diagnosis, treatment and management of tuberculosis associated with HIV infection in Africa are placed in perspective by the former director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Tuberculosis (TB) has increased as much as 3-fold in many African countries due to heightened susceptibility of HIV patients. HIV infection may both re-activate latent TB, which virtually all Africans harbor, or increase the likelihood of exogenous infection or re-infection by TB. In most of Africa diagnosis by stained sputum smear is standard: in late AIDS, this method may yield false negatives due to non-pulmonary TB, or pulmonary TB with a negative smear. Chest x-rays are also atypical, since cavitation of the upper zones is not as common, but lobar consolidation and lower zone involvement, and various unusual findings are likely. There is no evidence that mycobacterium avium intracellular has occurred in Africa. Treatment in Africa often centers on long-term thiazina (thiacetazone and isoniazid combined). HIV+ patients are more prone to skin rashes or even lethal epidermal neurolysis as a complication of treatment. Treated patients should be monitored for other symptoms such as diarrhea, recurrent fevers, other chest infections, cerebral space occupying lesions, urinary infections. Many can be treated with broad spectrum antibiotics such as chloramphenicol. Nursing HIV-infected young adults is an expensive and burdensome prospect for overworked and underpaid staff, but curing TB in AIDS patients is possible and worthwhile because of the public health advantages.

  3. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  4. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment. PMID:27869733

  5. HIV and aging: effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, Silvia; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J

    2014-02-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, many human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) individuals are reaching advanced age. The proportion of people living with HIV older than 50 years already exceeds 50% in many communities, and is expected to reach this level nationally by 2015. HIV and aging are independently associated with neuropathological changes, but their concurrence may have a more deleterious effect on the central nervous system (CNS). Published data about neurocognitive and neuroimaging markers of HIV and aging are reviewed. Putative factors contributing to neurocognitive impairment and neuroimaging changes in the aging HIV+ brain, such as metabolic disturbances, cardiovascular risk factors, immune senescence, and neuroinflammation, are described. The possible relationship between HIV and some markers of Alzheimer's disease is presented. Current research findings emphasize multiple mechanisms related to HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy that compromise CNS structure and function with advancing age.

  6. HIV and Aging: Effects on the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Cañizares, Silvia; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, many human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) individuals are reaching advanced age. The proportion of people living with HIV older than 50 years already exceeds 50% in many communities, and is expected to reach this level nationally by 2015. HIV and aging are independently associated with neuropathological changes, but their concurrence may have a more deleterious effect on the central nervous system (CNS). Published data about neurocognitive and neuroimaging markers of HIV and aging are reviewed. Putative factors contributing to neurocognitive impairment and neuroimaging changes in the aging HIV+ brain, such as metabolic disturbances, cardiovascular risk factors, immune senescence, and neuroinflammation, are described. The possible relationship between HIV and some markers of Alzheimer’s disease is presented. Current research findings emphasize multiple mechanisms related to HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy that compromise CNS structure and function with advancing age. PMID:24715486

  7. HIV and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs decrease the amount of HIV in the body. Are there any side effects of HIV drugs? Drugs used to treat HIV infection may cause ... diarrhea, headaches, and muscle aches. Less common side effects include anemia ... HIV that you have in your body. Why is it important for my viral load ...

  8. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  9. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which there are no symptoms of HIV ...

  10. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A What's in this article? ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  11. Infections in solid organ transplantation in special situations: HIV-infection and immigration.

    PubMed

    Miró, José M; Blanes, Marino; Norman, Francesca; Martín-Dávila, Pilar

    2012-03-01

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, patients infected with HIV are now living longer and are dying from illnesses other than acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Liver disease due to chronic hepatitis C is now a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients in the developed world. The prevalence of end-stage kidney or heart disease is also increasing among HIV-infected patients. For these patients, solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the only therapeutic option and HIV infection alone is not a contraindication. Accumulated experience in North America and Europe in the last few years indicates that 3- to 5-year survival in liver recipients coinfected with HIV and HCV is lower than that of HCV-monoinfected recipients. Conversely, 3- to 5-year survival of non-HCV-coinfected liver recipients and kidney recipients was similar to that of HIV-negative patients. Infections in the post-transplant period in HIV-infected recipients are similar to those seen in HIV-negative patients, although the incidence of some of them (e.g. tuberculosis and fungal infections) is higher. In the USA and Europe the number of immigrants from areas with endemic geographically-restricted infections has increased significantly in recent years. These changes in the population profile have led to an increase in the percentage of foreign-born transplant candidates and donors. Organ transplant recipients may develop endemic diseases in four ways: Transmission through the graft; de novo infection; reactivation of dormant infection; and reinfection/reactivation in a healthy graft. In foreign-born recipients, there is the possibility of endemic infections manifesting in the post-transplant period as a consequence of immunosuppression. These issues are modifying the criteria for donor selection and have also expanded pre-transplant screening for infectious diseases in both donors and transplant recipients. Some infectious diseases such as Chagas disease

  12. The role of enacted stigma in parental HIV disclosure among HIV-infected parents in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies have delineated that HIV-infected parents face numerous challenges in disclosing their HIV infection to the children (“parental HIV disclosure”), and practices of parental HIV disclosure vary with individual characteristics, family contexts, and social environment. Using cross-sectional data from 1254 HIV-infected parents who had children aged 5–16 years in southwest China, the current study examined the association of parental HIV disclosure with mental health and medication adherence among parents and explored the possible effect of enacted stigma on such association. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that parents who had experienced disclosure to children reported higher level enacted stigma, worse mental health conditions, and poorer medication adherence. Enacted stigma partially mediated the associations between disclosure and both mental health and medication adherence after controlling basic background characteristics. Our findings highlight the importance of providing appropriate disclosure-related training and counseling service among HIV-infected parents. In a social setting where HIV-related stigma is still persistent, disclosure intervention should address and reduce stigma and discrimination in the practice of parental HIV disclosure. PMID:26616123

  13. A parallel genome-wide mRNA and microRNA profiling of the frontal cortex of HIV patients with and without HIV-associated dementia shows the role of axon guidance and downstream pathways in HIV-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is the most common dementia type in young adults less than 40 years of age. Although the neurotoxins, oxidative/metabolic stress and impaired activity of neurotrophic factors are believed to be underlying reasons for the development of HAD, the genomic basis, which ultimately defines the virus-host interaction and leads to neurologic manifestation of HIV disease is lacking. Therefore, identifying HIV fingerprints on the host gene machinery and its regulation by microRNA holds a great promise and potential for improving our understanding of HAD pathogenesis, its diagnosis and therapy. Results A parallel profiling of mRNA and miRNA of the frontal cortex autopsies from HIV positive patients with and without dementia was performed using Illumina Human-6 BeadChip and Affymetrix version 1.0 miRNA array, respectively. The gene ontology and pathway analysis of the two data sets showed high concordance between miRNA and mRNAs, revealing significant interference with the host axon guidance and its downstream signalling pathways in HAD brains. Moreover, the differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs identified in this study, in particular miR-137, 153 and 218, based on which most correlations were built cumulatively targeted neurodegeneration related pathways, implying their future potential in diagnosis, prognosis and possible therapies for HIV-mediated and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, this relationship between DE miRNAs and DE mRNAs was also reflected in correlation analysis using Bayesian networks by splitting-averaging strategy (SA-BNs), which revealed 195 statistically significant correlated miRNA-mRNA pairs according to Pearson’s correlation test (P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provides the first evidence on unambiguous support for intrinsic functional relationship between mRNA and miRNA in the context of HIV-mediated neurodegeneration, which shows that neurologic manifestation in HIV patients possibly

  14. New drug regimens for HIV in pregnancy and a national strategic plan to manage HIV: A South African perspective.

    PubMed

    Ngene, Nnabuike C; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-10-01

    In South Africa, new drug regimens (WHO treatment Option B) used to manage HIV infection in pregnancy and the national strategic plan on HIV have resulted in improved health outcomes. Among these outcomes are reductions in the following: mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV to 2.4%; maternal deaths attributable to HIV; and adverse reactions due to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The present article describes these new drug regimens and the national strategic HIV management plan, as well as their challenges and the implications of improved health outcomes. Such outcomes imply that further decreases in MTCT of HIV, and HIV attributable maternal deaths are possible if potential challenges are addressed and treatment option B+ offered. A confidential enquiry into each case of MTCT is advocated to reduce vertical transmission rates to zero levels.

  15. Determining protein biomarkers for DLBCL using FFPE tissues from HIV negative and HIV positive patients.

    PubMed

    Magangane, Pumza; Sookhayi, Raveendra; Govender, Dhirendra; Naidoo, Richard

    2016-12-01

    DLBCL is the most common lymphoma subtype occurring in older populations as well as in younger HIV infected patients. The current treatment options for DLBCL are effective for most patients yet the relapse rate is high. While many biomarkers for DLBCL exist, they are not in clinical use due to low sensitivity and specificity. In addition, these biomarkers have not been studied in the HIV context. Therefore, the identification of new biomarkers for HIV negative and HIV positive DLBCL, may lead to a better understanding of the disease pathology and better therapeutic design. Protein biomarkers for DLBCL were determined using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and characterised using LC-MS. The expression of one of the biomarkers, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, was confirmed on a separate cohort of samples using immunohistochemistry. The biomarkers identified in the study consisted of four protein clusters including glycolytic enzymes, ribosomal proteins, histones and collagen. These proteins could differentiate between control and tumour tissue, and the DLBCL immunohistochemical subtypes in both cohorts. The majority (41/52) of samples in the confirmation cohort were negative for Hsp70 expression. The HIV positive DLBCL cases had a higher percentage of cases expressing Hsp70 than their HIV negative counterparts. The non-GC subtype also frequently overexpressed Hsp70, confirming MALDI IMS data. The expression of Hsp70 did not correlate with survival in both the HIV negative and HIV positive cohort. This study identified potential biomarkers for HIV negative and HIV positive DLBCL from FFPE tissue sections. These may be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers complementary to current clinical management programmes for DLBCL.

  16. [HIV infection and AIDS in urology].

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Miller, J; Gahr, M; Ringert, R H

    1994-05-01

    Up to December 1993, a total of 10858 AIDS cases were reported to the central AIDS registry at the Federal Health Office. Human immunodeficiency virus is acquired through needle sharing (i.v. drug users), contaminated blood transfusions, intercourse with infected persons and transplacentally by fetuses. In Germany, about seven people a day are estimated to acquire the HIV infection. Half the patients will develop systemic manifestations of AIDS within 12-13 years. Only a small percentage of these patients suffer from urological manifestations, e.g. urinary tract infection, prostatism or HIV-associated nephropathy. Nevertheless, knowledge of genitourinary pathology caused by HIV makes early diagnosis of AIDS possible.

  17. A BLUEPRINT FOR HIV VACCINE DISCOVERY

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Dennis R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Barouch, Dan H.; Butera, Salvatore T.; Crotty, Shane; Godzik, Adam; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Pulendran, Bali; Scanlan, Chris N.; Schief, William R.; Silvestri, Guido; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Walker, Laura M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Wyatt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous attempts over many years to develop an HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. A number of approaches are being pursued in the field, including building upon possible efficacy indicated by the recent RV144 clinical trial, which combined two HIV vaccines. Here, we argue for an approach based, in part, on understanding the HIV envelope spike and its interaction with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) at the molecular level and using this understanding to design immunogens as possible vaccines. BnAbs can protect against virus challenge in animal models and many such antibodies have been isolated recently. We further propose that studies focused on how best to provide T cell help to B cells that produce bnAbs are crucial for optimal immunization strategies. The synthesis of rational immunogen design and immunization strategies, together with iterative improvements, offers great promise for advancing toward an HIV vaccine. PMID:23084910

  18. Measurement error robustness of a closed-loop minimal sampling method for HIV therapy switching.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, E Fabian; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    We test the robustness of a closed-loop treatment scheduling method to realistic HIV viral load measurement error. The purpose of the algorithm is to allow the accurate detection of an induced viral load minimum with a reduced number of samples. Therapy must be switched at or near the viral-load minimum to achieve optimal therapeutic benefit; therapeutic benefit decreases logarithmically with increased viral load at the switching time. The performance of the algorithm is characterized using a number of metrics. These include the number of samples saved vs. fixed-rate sampling, the risk-reduction achieved vs. the risk-reduction possible with frequent sampling, and the difference between the switching time vs. the theoretical optimal switching time. The algorithm is applied to simulated patient data generated from a family of data-driven patient models and corrupted by experimentally confirmed levels of log-normal noise.

  19. Evolution of HIV treatment guidelines in high- and low-income countries: converging recommendations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Eugene T; Grant, Philip M; Zolopa, Andrew R

    2014-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, antiretroviral treatment guidelines for HIV infection have evolved significantly, reflecting the major advances in this therapeutic area. Evidenced-based recommendations have largely replaced expert opinion, while diagnostic monitoring and therapeutic interventions have become more sophisticated and effective. Just 10 years ago, there was a marked difference in access to antiretroviral therapy for patients in wealthy and impoverished countries. The increasing availability of therapy across the globe, however, has made it possible for international guidelines to resemble more closely those in high-income countries. This article compares the evolution of antiretroviral therapy treatment guidelines from the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization, focusing on when to initiate ART in asymptomatic patients and in those with an opportunistic infection; initial regimens in the general population and in special populations; when to change and what to change; and laboratory monitoring.

  20. HIV-1 Tat Induces Unfolded Protein Response and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Astrocytes and Causes Neurotoxicity through Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Activation and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; He, Johnny J

    2016-10-21

    HIV-1 Tat is a major culprit for HIV/neuroAIDS. One of the consistent hallmarks of HIV/neuroAIDS is reactive astrocytes or astrocytosis, characterized by increased cytoplasmic accumulation of the intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). We have shown that that Tat induces GFAP expression in astrocytes and that GFAP activation is indispensable for astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. In this study, we showed that Tat expression or GFAP expression led to formation of GFAP aggregates and induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes. In addition, we demonstrated that GFAP up-regulation and aggregation in astrocytes were necessary but also sufficient for UPR/ER stress induction in Tat-expressing astrocytes and for astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. Importantly, we demonstrated that inhibition of Tat- or GFAP-induced UPR/ER stress by the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate significantly alleviated astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity in vitro and in the brain of Tat-expressing mice. Taken together, these results show that HIV-1 Tat expression leads to UPR/ER stress in astrocytes, which in turn contributes to astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity, and raise the possibility of developing HIV/neuroAIDS therapeutics targeted at UPR/ER stress.

  1. Two concepts of therapeutic optimism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers and ethicists have long been concerned about the expectations for direct medical benefit expressed by participants in early phase clinical trials. Early work on the issue considered the possibility that participants misunderstand the purpose of clinical research or that they are misinformed about the prospects for medical benefit from these trials. Recently, however, attention has turned to the possibility that research participants are simply expressing optimism or hope about their participation in these trials. The ethical significance of this therapeutic optimism remains unclear. This paper argues that there are two distinct phenomena that can be associated with the term ‘therapeutic optimism’—one is ethically benign and the other is potentially worrisome. Distinguishing these two phenomena is crucial for understanding the nature and ethical significance of therapeutic optimism. The failure to draw a distinction between these phenomena also helps to explain why different writers on the topic often speak past one another. PMID:21551464

  2. Management of Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in HIV and Non-HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Pearce, William A; Yeh, Steven; Fine, Howard F

    2016-02-01

    As CMVR continues to affect HIV-positive and non-HIV immunosuppressed patients, ophthalmologists must continue to tailor diagnostics and therapeutics to individual cases. In HIV-related disease, ocular fluid sampling and intravitreal drug delivery are considerations, but systemic antiviral therapy is paramount in the initial management from both ophthalmic and systemic morbidity standpoints. Non-HIV-related disease should be approached with a multidisciplinary team, including an ophthalmologist/vitreoretinal/uveitis specialist for consideration of intravitreal antiviral therapy with qualitative and quantitative aqueous PCR monitoring, and consideration of PCR genome sequencing for CMV strains that may become resistant to antiviral therapies from long-term antiviral prophylactic exposure. Hematologists or oncologists may help with patients who remain bone marrow-suppressed following transplantation or systemic chemotherapy. Because of related toxicities of the anti-CMV medications and immunosuppressive medications (eg, bone marrow suppression and cytopenias), infectious disease consultation can help in the treatment and monitoring of side effects.

  3. [Cytomegalovirus-induced colitis in HIV infection. Considerations on its diagnosis, treatment and complications].

    PubMed

    Sousa, A E; Lucas, M; Palhano, M J; de Deus, J; Damião, J; Victorino, R M

    1995-04-01

    The diagnosis of cytomegalovirus intestinal disease in patients with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection frequently raises diagnostic problems in view of the absence of definite pathological, serological or virological markers of active CMV infection. We describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a CMV colitis which illustrates several diagnostic and therapeutic problems and that was complicated by an intestinal perforation. We emphasize that in HIV+ patients with chronic diarrhea, the presence of abdominal pain should suggest the possibility of a CMV colitis and that in such cases a colonoscopy with biopsies of the right colon should be performed, in view of the higher frequency of the typical histopathological changes at this level. On the other hand, this case presented a marked thickening of the colon wall, simulating pseudotumoral images on CAT scans, as recently described in literature. The therapeutic possibilities as well as the complications of CMV colitis are discussed in the context of the occurrence of an ileal perforation, which represents the first report of this complication in Portuguese literature and which had the particularity of having a long survival after surgery in comparison with the previous cases described in international literature.

  4. Identification of Host Micro RNAs That Differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infection Using Genome Expression Profiling Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Wang, Xue; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) share many similar traits, major differences in pathogenesis and clinical outcomes exist between the two viruses. The differential expression of host factors like microRNAs (miRNAs) in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections are thought to influence the clinical outcomes presented by the two viruses. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which function in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. MiRNAs play a critical role in many key biological processes and could serve as putative biomarker(s) for infection. Identification of miRNAs that modulate viral life cycle, disease progression, and cellular responses to infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2 could reveal important insights into viral pathogenesis and provide new tools that could serve as prognostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential expression profiles of host miRNAs in cells infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2 in order to identify potential differences in virus-host interactions between HIV-1 and HIV-2. Differential expression of host miRNA expression profiles was analyzed using the miRNA profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and their putative functional targets identified. The results indicate that hsa-miR 541-3p, hsa-miR 518f-3p, and hsa-miR 195-3p were consistently up-regulated only in HIV-1 infected cells. The expression of hsa-miR 1225-5p, hsa-miR 18a* and hsa-miR 335 were down modulated in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Putative functional targets of these miRNAs include genes involved in signal transduction, metabolism, development and cell death. PMID:27144577

  5. Identification of Host Micro RNAs That Differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infection Using Genome Expression Profiling Techniques.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Wang, Xue; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-05-02

    While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) share many similar traits, major differences in pathogenesis and clinical outcomes exist between the two viruses. The differential expression of host factors like microRNAs (miRNAs) in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections are thought to influence the clinical outcomes presented by the two viruses. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which function in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. MiRNAs play a critical role in many key biological processes and could serve as putative biomarker(s) for infection. Identification of miRNAs that modulate viral life cycle, disease progression, and cellular responses to infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2 could reveal important insights into viral pathogenesis and provide new tools that could serve as prognostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential expression profiles of host miRNAs in cells infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2 in order to identify potential differences in virus-host interactions between HIV-1 and HIV-2. Differential expression of host miRNA expression profiles was analyzed using the miRNA profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and their putative functional targets identified. The results indicate that hsa-miR 541-3p, hsa-miR 518f-3p, and hsa-miR 195-3p were consistently up-regulated only in HIV-1 infected cells. The expression of hsa-miR 1225-5p, hsa-miR 18a* and hsa-miR 335 were down modulated in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Putative functional targets of these miRNAs include genes involved in signal transduction, metabolism, development and cell death.

  6. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  7. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  8. HIV infection en route to endogenization: two cases

    PubMed Central

    Colson, P; Ravaux, I; Tamalet, C; Glazunova, O; Baptiste, E; Chabriere, E; Wiedemann, A; Lacabaratz, C; Chefrour, M; Picard, C; Stein, A; Levy, Y; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    The long-term spontaneous evolution of humans and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not well characterized; many vertebrate species, including humans, exhibit remnants of other retroviruses in their genomes that question such possible endogenization of HIV. We investigated two HIV-infected patients with no HIV-related disease and no detection with routine tests of plasma HIV RNA or cell-associated HIV DNA. We used Sanger and deep sequencing to retrieve HIV DNA sequences integrated in the human genome and tested the host humoral and cellular immune responses. We noticed that viruses from both patients were inactivated by the high prevalence of the transformation of tryptophan codons into stop codons (25% overall (3–100% per gene) and 24% overall (0–50% per gene)). In contrast, the humoral and/or cellular responses were strong for one patient and moderate for the other, indicating that a productive infection occurred at one stage of the infection. We speculate that the stimulation of APOBEC, the enzyme group that exchanges G for A in viral nucleic acids and is usually inhibited by the HIV protein Vif, has been amplified and made effective from the initial stage of the infection. Furthermore, we propose that a cure for HIV may occur through HIV endogenization in humans, as observed for many other retroviruses in mammals, rather than clearance of all traces of HIV from human cells, which defines viral eradication. PMID:25366539

  9. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment FDA-Approved HIV Medicines (Last updated 2/27/2017; last reviewed 2/27/2017) Treatment with ... 2007 Pharmacokinetic Enhancers Pharmacokinetic enhancers are used in HIV treatment to increase the effectiveness of an HIV medicine ...

  10. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Subscribe Translate Text Size Print What Is HIV/AIDS? Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) HIV stands for human ... use the HIV Testing & Care Services Locator. GO Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. AIDS ...

  11. HIV screening practices for living organ donors, New York State, 2010: need for standard policies.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Candice K; Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Smith, Lou C; Sabharwal, Charulata J; Valente, Kim A; Torian, Lucia V; McMurdo, Lisa M; Shepard, Colin W; Brooks, John T; Kuehnert, Matthew J

    2012-10-01

    Our survey of kidney and liver transplant centers in New York State found a wide variation among transplant centers in evaluation and screening for HIV risk and infection among prospective living donors. Survey results underscore the need to standardize practices. A recent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from a living donor to a kidney recipient revealed a possible limitation in existing screening protocols for HIV infection in living donors. We surveyed kidney and liver transplant centers (N = 18) in New York State to assess HIV screening protocols for living donors. Although most transplant centers evaluated HIV risk behaviors in living donors, evaluation practices varied widely, as did the extent of HIV testing and prevention counseling. All centers screened living donors for serologic evidence of HIV infection, either during initial evaluation or ≥1 month before surgery; however, only 50% of transplant centers repeated HIV testing within 14 days before surgery for all donors or donors with specific risk behaviors. Forty-four percent of transplant centers used HIV nucleic acid testing (NAT) to screen either all donors or donors with recognized risk behaviors, and 55% never performed HIV NAT. Results suggest the need to standardize evaluation of HIV risk behaviors and prevention counseling in New York State to prevent acquisition of HIV by prospective living organ donors, and to conduct HIV antibody testing and NAT as close to the time of donation as possible to prevent HIV transmission to recipients.

  12. A Challenge for the Future: Aging and HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rickabaugh, Tammy M.; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2010-01-01

    Older individuals (≥ 50 years of age) are increasingly becoming a new at-risk group for HIV-1 infection and, together with those surviving longer due to the introduction of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is predicted that more than half of all HIV-1-infected individuals in the U.S. will be greater than 50 years of age in the year 2015. Older individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 are prone to faster disease progression and reduced T-cell reconstitution despite successful virologic control with anti-retroviral therapy (ART). There is also growing evidence that the T-cell compartment in HIV-1+ adults displays an aged phenotype and HIV-1-infected individuals are increasingly diagnosed with clinical conditions more commonly seen in older uninfected persons. As aging in the absence of HIV infection is associated with alterations in T-cell function and immunosenescence, the combined impact of both HIV-1 infection and aging may provide an explanation for poorer clinical outcomes observed in older HIV-1-infected individuals. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics to stimulate immune function and delay immunosenescence is critical and would be beneficial to both the elderly and HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:20734158

  13. The mTOR Complex Controls HIV Latency.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Emilie; Hakre, Shweta; Kampmann, Martin; Lim, Hyung W; Hosmane, Nina N; Martin, Alyssa; Bassik, Michael C; Verschueren, Erik; Battivelli, Emilie; Chan, Jonathan; Svensson, J Peter; Gramatica, Andrea; Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie; Greene, Warner C; Krogan, Nevan J; Siliciano, Robert F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Verdin, Eric

    2016-12-14

    A population of CD4 T lymphocytes harboring latent HIV genomes can persist in patients on antiretroviral therapy, posing a barrier to HIV eradication. To examine cellular complexes controlling HIV latency, we conducted a genome-wide screen with a pooled ultracomplex shRNA library and in vitro system modeling HIV latency and identified the mTOR complex as a modulator of HIV latency. Knockdown of mTOR complex subunits or pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity suppresses reversal of latency in various HIV-1 latency models and HIV-infected patient cells. mTOR inhibitors suppress HIV transcription both through the viral transactivator Tat and via Tat-independent mechanisms. This inhibition occurs at least in part via blocking the phosphorylation of CDK9, a p-TEFb complex member that serves as a cofactor for Tat-mediated transcription. The control of HIV latency by mTOR signaling identifies a pathway that may have significant therapeutic opportunities.

  14. Neuromodulatory activities of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in a murine model of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianuo; Gong, Nan; Huang, Xiuyan; Reynolds, Ashley D.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 associated neurocognitive impairments are intrinsically linked to microglial immune activation, persistent viral infection, and inflammation. In the era of antiretroviral therapy more subtle cognitive impairments occur without adaptive immune compromise. We posit that adaptive immunity is neuroprotective serving both in eliminating infected cells through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell activities and by regulating the neuroinflammatory responses of activated microglia. For the latter, little is known. Thus, we studied the neuromodulatory effects of CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+, Treg) or effector T cells (Teff) in HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration. A newly developed HIV-1 encephalitis mouse model system was employed wherein murine bone marrow-derived macrophages are infected with a full length HIV-1YU2/vesicular stomatitis viral pseudotype and injected into basal ganglia of syngeneic immunocompetent mice. Adoptive transfer of CD3-activated Treg attenuated astrogliosis and microglia inflammation with concomitant neuroprotection. Moreover, Treg-mediated anti-inflammatory activities and neuroprotection were associated with upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor expression and downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, and viral replication. Teff showed contrary effects. These results, taken together, demonstrate the importance of Treg in disease control and raise the possibility of their utility for therapeutic strategies. PMID:19265165

  15. Novel two-round phenotypic assay for protease inhibitor susceptibility testing of recombinant and primary HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Maria C; Buzón, Maria J; Ballestero, Mònica; Van Den Eede, Peter; Clotet, Bonaventura; Prado, Julia G; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Antiretroviral drug susceptibility tests facilitate therapeutic management of HIV-1-infected patients. Although genotyping systems are affordable, inaccuracy in the interpretation of complex mutational patterns may limit their usefulness. Currently available HIV-1 phenotypic assays are based on the generation of recombinant viruses in which the specific viral gene of interest, derived from a patient plasma sample, is cloned into a susceptible genetic viral backbone prior to in vitro drug susceptibility evaluation. Nevertheless, in the case of protease inhibitors, not only are mutations in the HIV-1 protease-coding region involved in resistance, but the role of Gag in drug susceptibility has also recently been reported. In order to avoid the inherent limitations resulting from partial cloning of the viral genome, we designed and evaluated a new experimental strategy to test the in vitro susceptibility of primary viral isolates to protease inhibitors. Our protocol, which is based on a two-round infection protocol using the reporter TZM-bl cell line, showed a good correlation with genotypic resistance prediction and with the Antivirogram phenotypic assay, in both protease-recombinant viruses and primary viral isolates. The protocol is suitable for any HIV-1 subtype and enables rapid in-house measurement of protease inhibitor susceptibility, thus making it possible to evaluate the concomitant effects of both patient-derived gag and protease-coding regions.

  16. Beyond the 90-90-90: refocusing HIV prevention as part of the global HIV response

    PubMed Central

    Baggaley, Rachel; Dalal, Shona; Johnson, Cheryl; Macdonald, Virginia; Mameletzis, Ioannis; Rodolph, Michelle; Figueroa, Carmen; Samuelson, Julia; Verster, Annette; Doherty, Meg; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The remarkable expansion in availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) over the past two decades has transformed HIV infection into a manageable chronic condition. People with HIV infection now live long and healthy lives on treatment that is simpler, safer and cheaper. According to UNAIDS estimates, the global coverage of ART reached 46% in 2015, resulting in a 26% decrease in annual HIV-related deaths since 2010. Such success has positioned treatment access at the centre of the global HIV response as a way to prevent mortality, morbidity and HIV transmission through a “Treat All” approach. Continuing expansion of treatment is needed to further reduce HIV-related mortality. This progress with treatment, however, masks a stagnation in the estimated annual number of new HIV infections. Continuing levels of HIV incidence despite treatment scale-up stem from several factors, which should be addressed in order to prevent new infections and decrease the numbers of people requiring treatment in the future. Discussion ART can only reach those already diagnosed, and although it is unclear what proportion of new infections occur during acute and early infection prior to treatment initiation, phylogenetic studies suggest that it might be substantial. Thus, better testing approaches to reach the 40% of people with undiagnosed HIV infection as early as possible are critical. New approaches to reach men, young people and key populations, where HIV risk is highest and HIV prevention, testing and treatment coverage is lowest, are also needed. Overall coverage of effective prevention interventions remains low, enabling HIV transmission to occur, or time is required to show population-level effects. For example, the full impact of the medical male circumcision intervention will be seen once a larger proportion of men in age cohorts with high incidence are circumcised. Finally, strategically focused pre-exposure prophylaxis interventions have the potential to

  17. Sentinel surveillance for HIV-2 infection in high-risk US populations.

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, I M; O'Brien, T R; Schable, C A; Spruill, C; Holmberg, S D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. We conducted sentinel surveillance in persons practicing behaviors known to transmit retroviruses to determine the US presence and extent of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2). METHODS. Sentinel surveillance for HIV-2 was conducted by testing 31,533 anonymous blood specimens from patients at sexually transmitted disease clinics, injecting drug users at treatment centers, and clients at HIV counseling and testing sites in 14 US cities where West African immigrants often settle. Specimens were tested by HIV-1 and HIV-2 whole virus and synthetic peptide enzyme immunoassay and confirmed by HIV-1 and HIV-2 Western blots. RESULTS. Nearly 10% of 31,533 sera were positive for HIV-1. Two heterosexual Black male sexually transmitted disease patients were infected with HIV-2. One of the HIV-2 positive specimens did not cross-react on HIV-1 enzyme immunoassay screening. One client had antibodies consistent with malarial infection in West Africa; the other, who had syphilis, did not have antibodies to malaria or to any of 20 arboviruses present in Africa. CONCLUSIONS. Clinics serving clients from HIV-2 endemic areas should test persons practicing risk behaviors for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. Sentinel surveillance for HIV-2 serves as an early warning system for the possible spread of this virus in the United States. PMID:8460726

  18. HIV infection duration, social support and the level of trauma symptoms in a sample of HIV-positive Polish individuals.

    PubMed

    Rzeszutek, Marcin; Oniszczenko, Włodzimierz; Żebrowska, Magdalena; Firląg-Burkacka, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the average HIV infection duration and the level of quantitatively rated post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and social support dimensions in a sample of 562 Polish HIV+ adults. Possible moderating effects of social support on the relationship between the average HIV infection duration and the level of PTSD symptoms were also analysed. The results of this study suggest that the average HIV infection duration may intensify PTSD symptoms and deteriorate the perceived availability of social support in HIV+ individuals. However, a positive relationship between HIV infection duration and the level of trauma symptoms was observed only in the group of HIV+ individuals with low perceived available social support, but not in the group of HIV-infected individuals with high perceived available social support. This research provided some new insight into the psychological and social aspects of living with HIV. In particular, our results suggest that although HIV infection duration may intensify trauma symptoms and deteriorate social support, perceived available social support may act as a buffer against HIV-related trauma symptoms.

  19. Quality of life assessment in HIV-infection: validation of the European Portuguese version of WHOQOL-HIV.

    PubMed

    Canavarro, Maria C; Pereira, Marco; Simoes, Mario R; Pintassilgo, Ana L

    2011-02-01

    The assessment of quality of life (QOL) in HIV infection has emerged as being vital to research and clinical practice. This assessment is also a challenge due to the specific characteristics of the infection, the increased availability of therapeutics, as well as the epidemiological variability inherent to HIV infection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the World Health Organization's QOL Instrument in HIV Infection (WHOQOL-HIV) and to test its performance in a sample of HIV-infected patients. The European Portuguese version of WHOQOL-HIV was administered in a sample of 200 HIV-positive patients. The patients also completed the Portuguese versions of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). The WHOQOL-HIV showed quite an acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α ranged from 0.86 to 0.95 across domains). Convergent validity with BDI and BSI was satisfactory for all domains (all r>0.50; p<0.001). Moreover, correlations between domains and between domains and overall QOL were all statistically significant (p<0.001). The reliability and validity studies of the European Portuguese version of the WHOQOL-HIV revealed good psychometric characteristics, which allows for the use of this version of WHOQOL in our country, and cross-cultural comparability.

  20. Increasing trend of HIV seropositivity in a sexually transmitted diseases centre and epidemiology of HIV seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Ray, K; Ramesh, V; Karmakar, S N; Misra, R S

    1996-01-01

    11,539 STD clinic attenders and 20,897 antenatal clinic (ANC) attenders at a New Delhi hospital were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA over a 3-year period. Results were confirmed by Western Blot. A low HIV seropositivity rate (1 per 1000) with an increasing trend in 1993 (4 per 1000) was observed in the STD attenders as against 0.1 per 1000 in the normal control populations. Most of the STD attenders including all the HIV seropositives had heterosexual contact with female sex workers. Both the HIV seropositive ANC attenders acquired the infection through blood transfusion. Thirteen of 23 HIV positive STD attenders had genital lesions, 5 having ulcerative and 8 having nonulcerative STD. Their clinical presentation did not differ from the HIV negative cases but the therapeutic response in 4 was altered. None had signs of symptoms of ARC/AIDS. Two out of 6 spouses and a 2-year-old child of HIV seropositive patients were seropositive. Increasing HIV seropositivity observed in this study reflects the changing situation in the country and highlights the importance of improvement of surveillance, early diagnosis and combined approaches to the management and control of STDs and HIV.

  1. Intestinal and hepatobiliary diseases in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J D; Winter, H S

    1995-03-01

    Children with HIV disease and gastrointestinal disease should be evaluated for enteric pathogens. Bacterial, protozoal, and viral agents can cause chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and contribute to growth retardation. This article presents an approach to the evaluation of the HIV-infected child with gastrointestinal symptoms. Therapeutic and nutritional interventions are discussed with emphasis on the multidisciplinary approach required to initiate successful management.

  2. Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of criminal law

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona; Tyndall, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy; Montaner, Julio SG; Kaul, Rupert; Hankins, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A poor appreciation of the science related to HIV contributes to an overly broad use of the criminal law against individuals living with HIV in cases of HIV nondisclosure. METHOD: To promote an evidence-informed application of the law in Canada, a team of six Canadian medical experts on HIV and transmission led the development of a consensus statement on HIV sexual transmission, HIV transmission associated with biting and spitting, and the natural history of HIV infection. The statement is based on a literature review of the most recent and relevant scientific evidence (current as of December 2013) regarding HIV and its transmission. It has been endorsed by >70 additional Canadian HIV experts and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada. RESULTS: Scientific and medical evidence clearly indicate that HIV is difficult to transmit during sex. For the purpose of informing the justice system, the per-act possibility of HIV transmission through sex, biting or spitting is described along a continuum from low possibility, to negligible possibility, to no possibility of transmission. This possibility takes into account the impact of factors such as the type of sexual acts, condom use, antiretroviral therapy and viral load. Dramatic advances in HIV therapy have transformed HIV infection into a chronic manageable condition. DISCUSSION: HIV physicians and scientists have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret the science regarding HIV. This is critical to prevent miscarriage of justice and to remove unnecessary barriers to evidence-based HIV prevention strategies. PMID:25285108

  3. Development of TNFSF as molecular adjuvants for ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Ostrowski, Mario

    2010-04-01

    A phase III clinical trial finished in Thailand recently showed that an ALVAC HIV-1 vaccine prime-gp120 protein boost vaccination regimen could modestly protect persons from HIV-1 infection, demonstrating that development of an effective and safe HIV-1 preventive vaccine is possible. ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines are candidate HIV-1 vaccines based on canarypox vectors. Previous clinical trials proved that ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines were safe but weak in immunogenicity when used in human subjects. We have been exploring to use tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members as adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of ALVAC HIV-1 vaccines. In this commentary, we will summarize our findings in using two TNFSF molecules, CD40L and OX40L, as adjuvants for an ALVAC HIV-1 vaccine in mouse model. We will also briefly discuss the challenges and prospects of using TNFSF molecules as adjuvants for HIV-1 vaccines in humans.

  4. Role of Natural Killer Cells in HIV-Associated Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Fabio E.; Premeaux, Thomas A.; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.

    2017-01-01

    Now in its fourth decade, the burden of HIV disease still persists, despite significant milestone achievements in HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care, and support. Even with long-term use of currently available antiretroviral therapies (ARTs), eradication of HIV remains elusive and now poses a unique set of challenges for the HIV-infected individual. The occurrence of HIV-associated non-AIDS-related comorbidities outside the scope of AIDS-defining illnesses, in particular non-AIDS-defining cancers, is much greater than the age-matched uninfected population. The underlying mechanism is now recognized in part to be related to the immune dysregulated and inflammatory status characteristic of HIV infection that persists despite ART. Natural killer (NK) cells are multifunctional effector immune cells that play a critical role in shaping the innate immune responses to viral infections and cancer. NK cells can modulate the adaptive immune response via their role in dendritic cell (DC) maturation, removal of immature tolerogenic DCs, and their ability to produce immunoregulatory cytokines. NK cells are therefore poised as attractive therapeutic targets that can be harnessed to control or clear both HIV and HIV-associated malignancies. To date, features of the tumor microenvironment and the evolution of NK-cell function among individuals with HIV-related malignancies remain unclear and may be distinct from malignancies observed in uninfected persons. This review intends to uncouple anti-HIV and antitumor NK-cell features that can be manipulated to halt the evolution of HIV disease and HIV-associated malignancies and serve as potential preventative and curative immunotherapeutic options. PMID:28377768

  5. Cell-based gene therapy against HIV.

    PubMed

    Dey, R; Pillai, B

    2015-11-01

    The ability to integrate inside the host genome lays a strong foundation for HIV to play hide and seek with the host's immune surveillance mechanisms. Present anti-viral therapies, although successful in suppressing the virus to a certain level, fail to wipe it out completely. However, recent approaches in modifying stem cells and enabling them to give rise to potent/resistant T-cells against HIV holds immense hope for eradication of the virus from the host. In this review, we will briefly discuss previous landmark studies on engineering stem cells or T-cells that have been explored for therapeutic efficacy against HIV. We will also analyze potential benefits and pitfalls of some studies done recently and will share our opinion on emerging trends.

  6. Using Art in Narrative Therapy: Enhancing Therapeutic Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    Shows how applying art-therapy techniques to the basic principles of narrative therapy enhances the potential for therapists and families to open the door to externalizing conversations that lead to a new life. (Author/MKA)

  7. Possible anti-obesity therapeutics from nature--a review.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jong Won

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with many diseases, particularly diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and heart disease. The obesity incidence has increased at an alarming rate in recent years, becoming a worldwide health problem, with incalculable social costs. Two different obesity-treatment drugs are currently on the market: orlistat, which reduces intestinal fat absorption via inhibiting pancreatic lipase; and sibutramine, an anorectic or appetite suppressant. Both drugs have hazardous side-effects, including increased blood pressure, dry mouth, constipation, headache, and insomnia. For this reason, a wide variety of natural materials have been explored for their obesity treatment potential. These are mainly complex products having several components with different chemical and pharmacological features. This review aimed to survey the literature covering natural products with anti-obesity activity and to review the scientific data, including experimental methodologies, active components, and mechanisms of action against obesity.

  8. Dietary Phytochemicals in Neuroimmunoaging: A New Therapeutic Possibility for Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Conti, Valeria; Davinelli, Sergio; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Although several efforts have been made in the search for genetic and epigenetic patterns linked to diseases, a comprehensive explanation of the mechanisms underlying pathological phenotypic plasticity is still far from being clarified. Oxidative stress and inflammation are two of the major triggers of the epigenetic alterations occurring in chronic pathologies, such as neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, over the last decade, remarkable progress has been made to realize that chronic, low-grade inflammation is one of the major risk factor underlying brain aging. Accumulated data strongly suggest that phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices may exert relevant immunomodulatory and/or anti-inflammatory activities in the context of brain aging. Starting by the evidence that a common denominator of aging and chronic degenerative diseases is represented by inflammation, and that several dietary phytochemicals are able to potentially interfere with and regulate the normal function of cells, in particular neuronal components, aim of this review is to summarize recent studies on neuroinflammaging processes and proofs indicating that specific phytochemicals may act as positive modulators of neuroinflammatory events. In addition, critical pathways involved in mediating phytochemicals effects on neuroinflammaging were discussed, exploring the real impact of these compounds in preserving brain health before the onset of symptoms leading to inflammatory neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. PMID:27790141

  9. Therapeutic approach to Crohn disease: possible parallels with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    González Lama, Y; Marín-Jiménez, I

    2016-09-01

    The current controversy in the setting of dermatology surrounding the treatment of inflammatory diseases, and specifically hidradenitis suppurativa, bears strong similarities with the debate concerning inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that took place several years ago. That debate led to new perspectives on this disease and, in particular, its treatment after the development of biological agents.

  10. Possible therapeutic potential of berberine in diabetic osteopathy.

    PubMed

    Rahigude, A B; Kaulaskar, S V; Bhutada, P S

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic osteopathy is a complication that leads to decreased bone mineral density, bone formation and having high risk of fractures that heals slowly. Diabetic osteopathy is a result of increase in osteoclastogenesis and decrease in osteoblastogenesis. Various factors viz., oxidative stress, increased inflammatory markers, PPAR-γ activation in osteoblast, activation of apoptotic pathway, increased glucose levels and inhibitory effect on parathyroid hormone etc. are mainly responsible for decreased bone mineral density. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in Asian countries as a traditional medicine. Berberine is extensively reported to be an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and having potential to treat diabetic complications and glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis. The osteoclastogenesis decreasing property of berberine can be hypothesized for inhibiting diabetic osteopathy. In addition, chronic treatment of berberine will be helpful for increasing the osteoblastic activity and expression of the modulators that affect osteoblastic differentiation. The apoptotic pathways stimulated due to increased inflammatory markers and nucleic acid damages could be reduced due to berberine. Another important consideration that berberine is having stimulatory effect on glucagon like peptide release and insulin sensitization that will be helpful for decreasing glucose levels and therefore, may exerts osteogenesis. Thiazolidinediones show bone loss due to activation of PPAR-γ in osteoblasts, whereas berberine stimulates PPAR-γ only in adipocytes and not in osteoblasts, and therefore the decreased bone loss due to use of thiazolidinediones may not be observed in berberine treatment conditions. Berberine decreases the advanced glycation end-products (AGE) formation in diabetic condition which will be ultimately helpful to decrease the stiffness of collagen fibers due to AGE-induced cross linking. Lastly, it is also reported that berberine has inhibitory effect on parathyroid hormone and enhances marker genes like osteocalcin, which are responsible for the osteoblastic activity. From these evidences, we hypothesized that berberine may have potential in the treatment of diabetic osteopathy.

  11. [Therapeutic possibilities in refractory epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex].

    PubMed

    Puertas-Martin, Verónica; Carreras-Saez, Inmaculada; Marana, Ana; Ruiz-Falco Rojas, M Luz; Cantarin-Extremera, Verónica; Calleja-Gero, M Lourdes

    2014-06-16

    Introduccion. El complejo esclerosis tuberosa (CET) cursa frecuentemente con epilepsia de dificil control, lo que condiciona la calidad de vida y el nivel cognitivo de estos pacientes. Objetivo. Describir las caracteristicas epidemiologicas, clinicas y el tratamiento de los pacientes afectos de CET con epilepsia. Pacientes y metodos. Se han revisado retrospectivamente las historias clinicas de 30 pacientes menores de 18 años, diagnosticados de CET y epilepsia registrados en nuestra base de datos. Resultados. La edad de inicio de la epilepsia en los pacientes con CET en nuestra serie esta comprendida entre el primer mes de vida y los 4 años. Todos comenzaron con crisis parciales. Dos presentaron sindrome de West y cuatro, espasmos infantiles sin hipsarritmia. En 19 de los pacientes, la epilepsia se comporto como farmacorresistente. Respecto al tratamiento con farmacos antiepilepticos, 11 estan en monoterapia, 10 en biterapia, siete en triterapia y uno con cuatro farmacos. Dos recibieron ACTH, dos tienen implantado un estimulador del nervio vago, cuatro reciben tratamiento con everolimus y ocho han sido sometidos a cirugia. Conclusiones. La epilepsia es un problema muy frecuente y de inicio en los primeros años de vida en el CET. Las opciones terapeuticas actuales son muchas, sin embargo el 63,3% de los pacientes tiene una epilepsia no controlada y la mayoria de ellos presenta crisis diarias. El mal control de las crisis se correlaciona con retraso mental y trastorno del espectro autista. Señalar la respuesta positiva obtenida con otras posibilidades terapeuticas: inhibidores de la via mTOR, cirugia y el estimulador del nervio vago.

  12. [Acute life threatening catatonia--clinical significance and therapeutic possibilities].

    PubMed

    Bridler, R; Hell, D

    1997-09-13

    Malignant catatonia, associated with different somatic and psychiatric disorders, is a rare, life-threatening syndrome. Immediate recognition and adequate treatment are essential and may be life-saving. We describe a case of malignant catatonia and discuss the clinical implications. Additionally, we review the recent literature regarding epidemiology, nosology, current pathophysiological concepts, differential diagnosis, and treatment recommendations.

  13. HIV-Positive Athletes. When Medicine Meets the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitten, Matthew, J.

    1994-01-01

    Though the risk of HIV transmission in sports is slight, physicians who treat active patients can encounter weighty legal issues. Mandatory testing, exclusion of HIV-positive athletes, and breaching of patient confidentiality can lead to lawsuits. Knowing the possible consequences can help physicians in setting effective, legal prevention…

  14. Pseudomonas DING proteins as human transcriptional regulators and HIV-1 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-HIV-1 therapy depends upon multiple agents that target different phases of the viral replication cycle. Recent reports indicate that plant and human DING proteins are unique in targeting viral gene transcription as the basis of their anti-HIV-1 therapy. Methods Two cloned DING genes from Pseudomonas were transiently expressed in human cells, and effects on NFκB-mediated transcription, HIV-1 transcription, and HIV-1 production were measured. Results Both DING proteins elevated NFκB-mediated transcription. In microglial cells, one protein, from P. aeruginosa PA14, suppressed HIV-1 transcription; the other protein, from P. fluorescens SBW25, was inactive. The PA14DING protein also reduces HIV-1 production in microglial cells. Conclusions Structural differences between the two DING proteins highlight regions of the PA14DING protein essential to the anti-HIV-1 activity, and may guide the design of therapeutic agents. PMID:23855931

  15. Diagnosing and treating HIV-associated sensory neuropathy: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Catherine L; Wadley, Antonia L; Kamerman, Peter R

    2016-04-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a common complication of HIV and remains highly prevalent even with modern HIV management strategies, causing debilitating pain in millions globally. We review HIV-SN diagnosis and management. We suggest most HIV-SN cases are easily recognized using clinical screening tools, with physician assessment and/or specialized testing prioritized for atypical cases. Management aims to prevent further nerve damage and optimize symptom control. Symptom relief is difficult and rarely complete, with a lack of proven pharmacological strategies. Work is needed to clarify optimal use of available medications. This includes understanding the marked placebo effect in HIV-SN analgesic trials and exploring 'responder phenotypes'. Limited data support nondrug strategies including hypnosis, meditation, psychology, physical activity and a positive therapeutic relationship.

  16. Antiretroviral prophylaxis of perinatal HIV-1 transmission and the potential impact of antiretroviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Monica; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2002-06-01

    Since 1994, trials of zidovudine, zidovudine and lamivudine, and nevirapine have demonstrated that these antiretroviral drugs can substantially reduce the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. With reductions in drug price, identification of simple, effective antiretroviral regimens to prevent perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and an increasing international commitment to support health care infrastructure, antiretrovirals for both perinatal HIV-1 prevention and HIV-1 treatment will likely become more widely available to HIV-1-infected persons in resource-limited countries. In the United States, widespread antiretroviral usage has been associated with increased antiretroviral drug resistance. This raises concern that drug resistance may reduce the effectiveness of perinatal antiretroviral prophylaxis as well as therapeutic intervention strategies. The purpose of this article is to review what is known about resistance and risk of perinatal HIV transmission, assess the interaction between antiretroviral resistance and the prevention of perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and discuss implications for current global prevention and treatment strategies.

  17. Microbial translocation and microbiome dsybiosis in HIV-associated immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Zevin, Alexander S.; McKinnon, Lyle; Burgener, Adam; Klatt, Nichole R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review To describe the mechanisms and consequences of both microbial translocation and microbial dysbiosis in HIV infection. Recent Findings Microbes in HIV are likely playing a large role in contributing to HIV pathogenesis, morbidities and mortality. Two major disruptions to microbial systems in HIV infection include microbial translocation and microbiome dysbiosis. Microbial translocation occurs when the bacteria (or bacterial products) that should be in the lumen of the intestine translocate across the tight epithelial barrier into systemic circulation, where they contribute to inflammation and pathogenesis. This is associated with poorer health outcomes in HIV infected individuals. In addition, microbial populations in the GI tract are also altered after HIV infection, resulting in microbiome dysbiosis, which further exacerbates microbial translocation, epithelial barrier disruption, inflammation, and mucosal immune functioning. Summary Altered microbial regulation in HIV infection can lead to poor health outcomes, and understanding the mechanisms underlying microbial dysbiosis and translocation may result in novel pathways for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26679414

  18. Prospects for engineering HIV-specific antibodies for enhanced effector function and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Austin W.; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review A wealth of recent animal model data suggests that as exciting possibilities for the use of antibodies in passive immunotherapy strategies continue to develop, it will be important to broadly consider how antibodies achieve anti-HIV-1 effect in vivo. Recent findings Beyond neutralization breadth and potency, substantial evidence from natural infection, vaccination, and studies in animal models points to a critical role for antibody Fc receptor (FcR) engagement in reducing risk of infection, decreasing postinfection viremia, and delaying viral rebound. Supporting these findings in the setting of HIV, the clinical maturation of recombinant antibody therapeutics has reinforced the importance of Fc-driven activity in vivo across many disease settings, as well as opportunely resulted in the development and exploration of a number of engineered Fc sequence and glycosylation variants that possess differential binding to FcRs. Exploiting these variants as tools, the individual and concerted effects of antibody effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition, phagocytosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody half-life, and compartmentalization are now being explored. As exciting molecular therapies are advanced, these studies promise to provide insight into optimal in-vivo antibody activity profiles. Summary Careful consideration of recent progress in understanding protective antibody activities in vivo can point toward how tailoring antibody activity via Fc domain modification may enable optimization of HIV prevention and eradication strategies. PMID:25700208

  19. Antiretroviral Therapy as HIV Prevention: Status and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection has become increasingly accessible, attention has focused on whether these drugs can used for prevention because of increased tolerability of newer medications, decreased cost, and the limitations of other approaches. We review the status of antiretroviral HIV prevention, including chemoprophylaxis, as well as the effects of treatment of infected individuals on prevention. It is possible that the life-saving agents that have transformed the natural history of AIDS can be a critical component of HIV prevention efforts, but their ultimate role in affecting HIV transmission dynamics remains to be defined. PMID:20724682

  20. Activation of HIV-1 with Nanoparticle-Packaged Small-Molecule Protein Phosphatase-1-Targeting Compound

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kahli A.; Lin, Xionghao; Bolshakov, Oleg; Griffin, James; Niu, Xiaomei; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Taylor, Robert E.; Akala, Emmanuel; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in which the integrated HIV-1 provirus is transcriptionally inactive. Activation of HIV-1 transcription requires the viral Tat protein and host cell factors, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). We previously developed a library of small compounds that targeted PP1 and identified a compound, SMAPP1, which induced HIV-1 transcription. However, this compound has a limited bioavailability in vivo and may not be able to reach HIV-1-infected cells and induce HIV-1 transcription in patients. We packaged SMAPP1 in polymeric polyethylene glycol polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles and analyzed its release and the effect on HIV-1 transcription in a cell culture. SMAPP1 was efficiently packaged in the nanoparticles and released during a 120-hr period. Treatment of the HIV-1-infected cells with the SMAPP1-loaded nanoparticles induced HIV-1 transcription. Thus, nanoparticles loaded with HIV-1-targeting compounds might be useful for future anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:26839837

  1. Mechanisms and Modifications of Naturally Occurring Host Defense Peptides for Anti-HIV Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Eade, Colleen R.; Wood, Matthew P.; Cole, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of HIV infection, heterosexual transmission of HIV remains high, and vaccines to prevent HIV acquisition have been unfruitful. Vaginal microbicides, on the other hand, have demonstrated considerable potential for HIV prevention, and a variety of compounds have been screened for their activity and safety as anti-HIV microbicides. Among these are the naturally occurring host defense peptides, small peptides from diverse lineages with intrinsic antiviral activity. Naturally occurring host defense peptides with anti-HIV activity are promising candidates for vaginal microbicide development. Their structural variance and accompanying mechanistic diversity provide a wide range of inhibitors whose antiviral activity can be exerted at nearly every stage of the HIV lifecycle. Additionally, peptide modification has been explored as a method for improving the anti-HIV activity of host defense peptides. Structure- and sequence-based alterations have achieved varying success in improving the potency and specificity of anti-HIV peptides. Overall, peptides have been discovered or engineered to inhibit HIV with therapeutic indices of >1000, encouraging their advancement toward clinical trials. Here we review the naturally occurring anti-HIV host defense peptides, demonstrating their breadth of mechanistic diversity, and exploring approaches to enhance and optimize their activity in order to expedite their development as safe and effective anti-HIV vaginal microbicides. PMID:22264047

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Greenspan, J S

    2006-09-01

    HIV transmission in the health-care setting is of concern. To assess the current position in dentistry, we have reviewed the evidence to November 1, 2005. Transmission is evidently rare in the industrialized nations and can be significantly reduced or prevented by the use of standard infection control measures, appropriate clinical and instrument-handling procedures, and the use of safety equipment and safety needles. We hope that breaches in standard infection control will become vanishingly small. When occupational exposure to HIV is suspected, the application of post-exposure protocols for investigating the incident and protecting those involved from possible HIV infection further reduces the likelihood of HIV disease, and also stress and anxiety.

  3. HIV infection and HERV expression: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The human genome contains multiple copies of retrovirus genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) that have entered the germ-line at some point in evolution. Several of these proviruses have retained (partial) coding capacity, so that a number of viral proteins or even virus particles are expressed under various conditions. Human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the beta-, gamma-, or spuma- retrovirus groups. Endogenous delta- and lenti- viruses are notably absent in humans, although endogenous lentivirus genomes have been found in lower primates. Exogenous retroviruses that currently form a health threat to humans intriguingly belong to those absent groups. The best studied of the two infectious human retroviruses is the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which has an overwhelming influence on its host by infecting cells of the immune system. One HIV-induced change is the induction of HERV transcription, often leading to induced HERV protein expression. This review will discuss the potential HIV-HERV interactions. Several studies have suggested that HERV proteins are unlikely to complement defective HIV virions, nor is HIV able to package HERV transcripts, probably due to low levels of sequence similarity. It is unclear whether the expression of HERVs has a negative, neutral, or positive influence on HIV-AIDS disease progression. A positive effect was recently reported by the specific expression of HERVs in chronically HIV-infected patients, which results in the presentation of HERV-derived peptides to CD8+ T-cells. These cytotoxic T-cells were not tolerant to HERV peptides, as would be expected for self-antigens, and consequently lysed the HIV-infected, HERV-presenting cells. This novel mechanism could control HIV replication and result in a low plasma viral load. The possibility of developing a vaccination strategy based on these HERV peptides will be discussed. PMID:22248111

  4. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of levetiracetam].

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Bouquié, Régis; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant drug used to treat partial seizures, myoclonic seizures of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A review of the literature with an evidence-based medicine method highlighted parameters (age, renal failure, pregnancy, combination with other anticonvulsant drugs) which affect levetiracetam pharmacokinetics but no significant relationship between plasma concentration of levetiracetam and efficacy or toxicity. Concentrations usually observed in therapeutics is from 6 to 18 mg/L. However, the determination of an individual therapeutic concentration, associated with an effective and well tolerated therapy, could be recommended particularly before pregnancy. Consequently, therapeutic drug monitoring of levetiracetam which is not currently recommended could be possibly useful in specific clinical situations.

  5. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of oxcarbazepine].

    PubMed

    Bouquié, Régis; Dailly, Eric; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an analogue of carbamazepine, used for the treatment of partial seizure with or without secondary generalization. The two forms R and S of the mono-hydroxylated derivatives (MHD) are responsible for most of the anti-convulsant activity and it is the concentrations of MHD that are relevant in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Analysis of currently literature provides no well-established relationship between plasma concentration of MHD and efficiency or toxicity. Although there is not a validated therapeutic range, the residual concentrations of usually observed therapeutic MHD are situated between 12 and 30 mg/L. In certain pathological or physiological circumstances, the pharmacokinetic variability of the oxcarbazepine can be considerable, but this strong unpredictability does not nevertheless justify the TDM of the MHD. Based on the available evidence, TDM of MHD is not routinely warranted but may be possibly useful in specific situations such as pregnancy or renal insufficiency.

  6. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake machanisms and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23883124

  7. Therapeutic and recreational methadone cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Several classes of drugs have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and occurrence of arrhythmias potentially involved in sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic doses. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to methadone use. 60 cases were included in the study in total and were divided into three groups (therapeutic methadone users: 20 cases, recreational methadone users: 20 cases, and sudden death group in subjects who had never taken methadone: 20 cases). Autopsies, histology, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Macroscopic and microscopic investigation results in therapeutic methadone users were similar to those observed in sudden, unexpected deaths in non-methadone users. In recreational methadone consumers, macroscopic and microscopic examination of the heart failed to provide results consistent with acute or chronic myocardial or coronary damage, thereby corroborating the hypothesis of death most likely following respiratory depression.

  8. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake mechanisms and pharmacokinetic properties.

  9. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  10. HIV among Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Counseling and Services (CRCS) Condom Distribution as a Structural Level Intervention HIV Cost-effectiveness Program Planning Comprehensive ... 2017. Moreno CL. The relationship between culture, gender, structural factors, abuse, trauma, and HIV/AIDS for Latinas. ...

  11. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  12. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type of defense cell in the body called a CD4 helper ... are part of the body's immune system , the defense system that fights infections. When HIV destroys these ...

  13. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hospitalization and Palliative Care Friends & Family Dating and Marriage Family Planning Mixed-Status Couples Discrimination Legal Issues ... National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Latinx AIDS ...

  14. HIV/AIDS Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV/AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find a Funding Opportunity Opportunities & Announcements ... related co-infections, such as hepatitis, malaria, and tuberculosis. Treatment of HIV Infection In the early 1980s ...

  15. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV positive have been tested ... to everyone in the world. When the person's immune system has weakened and more of the blood's T ...

  16. Reproductive concerns of women at risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, A B

    1990-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory study investigated knowledge about perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and perceptions of the childbearing role among women at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) through injection drug use. Content analysis was used to analyze the results of 21 face-to-face, semistructured interviews with women who had a personal history of injection drug use or who were the sexual partners of men who injected drugs. Contextual variables influencing women at risk for HIV infection that were identified included fear of HIV antibody testing, a belief that perinatal HIV transmission is inevitable, support for pregnancy termination in the event of HIV-associated pregnancy, a strong desire for children, pride in mothering behavior, and guilt about the possibility of transmitting HIV to unborn children. AIDS education and counseling for these women will be most effective if these variables are considered.

  17. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  18. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R.; Ray, Patricio E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-10-25

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  19. HIV eradication: combinatorial approaches to activate latent viruses.

    PubMed

    De Crignis, Elisa; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2014-11-21

    The concept of eradication of the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV) from infected patients has gained much attention in the last few years. While combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (c-ART) has been extremely effective in suppressing viral replication, it is not curative. This is due to the presence of a reservoir of latent HIV infected cells, which persist in the presence of c-ART. Recently, pharmaceutical approaches have focused on the development of molecules able to induce HIV-1 replication from latently infected cells in order to render them susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and host immune responses. Alternative pathways and transcription complexes function to regulate the activity of the HIV promoter and might serve as molecular targets for compounds to activate latent HIV. A combined therapy coupling various depressors and activators will likely be the most effective in promoting HIV replication while avoiding pleiotropic effects at the cellular level. Moreover, in light of differences among HIV subtypes and variability in integration sites, the combination of multiple agents targeting multiple pathways will increase likelihood of therapeutic effectiveness and prevent mutational escape. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms that can be targeted to induce HIV activation focusing on potential combinatorial approaches.

  20. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking firmly to ... Before and After Starting HIV Medicines . What is medication adherence? Adherence means “to stick firmly.” So for ...

  1. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  2. Neoflavonoids as Inhibitors of HIV-1 Replication by Targeting the Tat and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Dionisio A; López-Pérez, José Luis; Del Olmo, Esther; Bedoya, Luis M; Sancho, Rocío; Alcamí, José; Muñoz, Eduardo; Feliciano, Arturo San; Gupta, Mahabir P

    2017-02-19

    Twenty-eight neoflavonoids have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against HIV-1. Antiviral activity was assessed on MT-2 cells infected with viral clones carrying the luciferase reporter gene. Inhibition of HIV transcription and Tat function were tested on cells stably transfected with the HIV-LTR and Tat protein. Seven 4-phenylchromen-2-one derivatives showed HIV transcriptional inhibitory activity but only the phenylchrome-2-one 10 inhibited NF-κB and displayed anti-Tat activity simultaneously. Compounds 10, 14, and 25, inhibited HIV replication in both targets at concentrations <25 μM. The assays of these synthetic 4-phenylchromen-2-ones may aid in the investigation of some aspects of the anti-HIV activity of such compounds and could serve as a scaffold for designing better anti-HIV compounds, which may lead to a potential anti-HIV therapeutic drug.

  3. [Evidence-based therapeutic drug monitoring for saquinavir].

    PubMed

    Muret, Patrice; Solas, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor saquinavir displays a large inter-individual variability in its pharmacokinetic parameters, related to a low absorption rate and an important hepatic metabolism. Based on literature, is the saquinavir therapeutic drug monitoring relevant? In naïve HIV-infected patients, the probability of achieving an undetectable HIV viral load at W48 was significantly associated with a saquinavir plasma trough concentration >100 ng/mL. Two studies in HIV-infected pre-treated patients reported that the genotypic inhibitory quotient was a predictive factor of virologic response with a threshold value around 40 ng/mL/mutation. Concerning the exposure-toxicity relationship, the risk of occurrence of grade 3-4 abdominal pains was more frequently associated with high concentrations of saquinavir, but without threshold value determination. Several studies, one of which was randomized, have reported the interest of saquinavir therapeutic drug monitoring to optimize the virologic response. Therefore, the level of evidence of the interest of saquinavir therapeutic drug monitoring is "recommended".

  4. [Evidence-based therapeutic drug monitoring of atazanavir].

    PubMed

    Solas, Caroline; Muret, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    The HIV protease inhibitor atazanavir presents a wide inter-individual variability related to an intense hepatic metabolism. Dose-dependent elevations of bilirubin have been frequently reported with atazanavir. Relative to literature, the atazanavir therapeutic drug monitoring can it be proposed? In naïve HIV-infected patients, the probability of achieving an undetectable HIV viral load at W48 was significantly associated with a plasma trough concentration (C(min)) of atazanavir >200 ng/mL. Studies in HIV-infected pre-treated patients reported that the genotypic inhibitory quotient was a predictive factor of the virologic response with a threshold value around 200 ng/mL/mutation. Concerning the exposure-toxicity relationship, the risk of occurrence of grade 3-4 hyperbilirubinemia was more frequently associated with C(min) > 750-800 ng/mL. Non-randomized studies have reported the interest of atazanavir therapeutic drug monitoring to optimize the virologic response and prevent severe bilirubin elevations. Therefore, the level of evidence of the interest of atazanavir therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended.

  5. Anticardiolipin antibodies in HIV infection: association with cerebral perfusion defects as detected by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT.

    PubMed Central

    Rubbert, A; Bock, E; Schwab, J; Marienhagen, J; Nüsslein, H; Wolf, F; Kalden, J R

    1994-01-01

    Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) belong to a heterogeneous group of antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. In patients with rheumatic disorders, their presence has been correlated to the occurrence of thromboembolic complications, thrombocytopenia, abortions and other disease manifestations. Several studies have revealed the detection of mostly high-titre ACA in a significant proportion of HIV-infected patients without any known clinical relationship. In our study, ACA were detected in 17/34 HIV-infected patients, and their presence was significantly associated with the detection of cerebral perfusion abnormalities by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT. SPECT scans were classified as normal or as focal or diffuse defects in uptake. Most patients (13/16) with cerebral perfusion defects had elevated ACA titres in contrast to 4/18 patients with normal SPECT findings (P = 0.002). Focal uptake defects were always associated with the presence of ACA. No correlation to clinical features or other laboratory parameters was evident. Our results suggest a possible implication of autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of cerebral perfusion abnormalities detected by SPECT scanning in HIV-infected patients. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance and to develop possible therapeutic consequences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7994900

  6. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangdi; De Clercq, Erik

    2016-09-01

    The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle.

  7. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Lewin, Sharon R.; O’Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Yukl, Steven A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the “reservoir”). We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR); integrated DNA (Alu PCR); unspliced RNA (rtPCR), multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA), residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR), and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay). We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR). Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables. Results Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years), the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004) and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003). However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV

  8. Selective elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by Env-directed, HIV-1-based virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Peretti, Silvia; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pugliese, Katherina; Federico, Maurizio . E-mail: federico@iss.it

    2006-02-05

    We recently showed that both replicating and resting cells cultivated with ganciclovir (GCV) were killed when challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped HIV-1-based virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the Nef7 (i.e., an HIV-1 Nef mutant incorporating in virions at high levels)/herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) fusion product. On this basis, a novel anti-HIV therapeutic approach based on Nef7/TK VLPs expressing X4 or R5 HIV cell receptor complexes has been attempted. We here report that (CD4-CXCR4) and (CD4-CCR5) Nef7-based VLPs efficiently enter cells infected by X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. Importantly, the delivery of the VLP-associated Nef7/TK led to cell death upon GCV treatment. Of interest, VLPs were effective also against non-replicating, HIV-1-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV-targeted VLPs represent a promising candidate for the treatment of persistently HIV-1-infected cells that are part of virus reservoirs resistant to HAART therapies.

  9. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S.; Fitzgerald, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection. PMID:26126533

  10. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  11. Vorinostat positively regulates synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in HIV infected neurons: role of nicotine in progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occurs in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. In the United States, the prevalence of cigarette smoking ranges from 35-70% in HIV-infected individuals compared to 20% in general population. Cognitive impairment in heavy cigarette smokers has been well reported. However, the synergistic effects of nicotine and HIV infection and the underlying mechanisms in the development of HAND are unknown. Results In this study, we explored the role of nicotine in the progression of HAND using SK-N-MC, a neuronal cell line. SK-N-MC cells were infected with HIV-1 in the presence or absence of nicotine for 7 days. We observed significant increase in HIV infectivity in SK-N-MC treated with nicotine compared to untreated HIV-infected neuronal cells. HIV and nicotine synergize to significantly dysregulate the expression of synaptic plasticity genes and spine density; with a concomitant increase of HDAC2 levels in SK-N-MC cells. In addition, inhibition of HDAC2 up-regulation with the use of vorinostat resulted in HIV latency breakdown and recovery of synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in nicotine/HIV alone and in co-treated SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, increased eIF2 alpha phosphorylation, which negatively regulates eukaryotic translational process, was observed in HIV alone and in co-treatment with nicotine compared to untreated control and nicotine alone treated SK-N-MC cells. Conclusions These results suggest that nicotine and HIV synergize to negatively regulate the synaptic plasticity gene expression and spine density and this may contribute to the increased risk of HAND in HIV infected smokers. Apart from disrupting latency, vorinostat may be a useful therapeutic to inhibit the negative regulatory effects on synaptic plasticity in HIV infected nicotine abusers. PMID:24886748

  12. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Johannes S.; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y.; Becerra, Juan C.; Anderson, Chase T. M.; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L.; Forthal, Donald N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Casazza, Joseph P.; Koup, Richard A.; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L.; Achenbach, Chad J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir. PMID:27500639

  13. Toll gates: An emerging therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Sivasankar, Kiruthika; Subbarayan, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against microbial infections, as it exerts an immediate response. Innate immunity works through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which functions as primary sensors of pathogens. TLR activates multiple signaling cascades leading to the induction of genes responsible for the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon. Thus, they induce antimicrobial responses and also have an instructive role in adaptive immunity. However, TLR-mediated inflammation is said to be responsible for many of the destructive host responses in inflammatory diseases like periodontitis. Hence, therapeutics targeting TLRs are being used to treat disease such as HIV, Hepatitis B, asthma etc. Recently, synthetic TLR agonists are tried as novel vaccine adjuvant in treating periodontal diseases. This paper reviews the scope of TLR-based therapeutics in treating periodontitis. PMID:25624622

  14. Peptide and protein-based inhibitors of HIV-1 co-receptors

    PubMed Central

    von Recum, Horst A; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) afflicts an estimated 30 million people globally, making it a continuing pandemic. Despite major research efforts, the rate of new infections has remained relatively static over time. This article reviews an emerging strategy for the treatment of HIV, the inhibition of the co-receptors necessary for HIV entry, CCR5 and CXCR4. The aim of this article is to highlight potential therapeutics derived from peptides and proteins that show particular promise in HIV treatment. Molecules that act on CCR5, CXCR4 or on both receptors will be discussed herein. PMID:23856897

  15. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Achenbach, Jenna; Shen, Yue; Palaia, Jana; Rahkola, Jeremy T; Nick, Heidi J; Smythies, Lesley E; McConnell, Michelle; Fowler, Mary G; Smith, Phillip D; Janoff, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT). Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs) and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  16. County-Level Correlates of CDC-Funded HIV Testing Events, United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Samah; Heitgerd, Janet L; Williams, Weston O; Krueger, Amy L; Dietz, Patricia M

    2015-10-01

    HIV prevalence and socio-demographic data were analyzed to assess the alignment of CDC-funded HIV testing activity in 2012 with its high-impact prevention approach. CDC-funded HIV-testing was conducted in counties with high HIV prevalence and in places potentially more affected by HIV as measured by urbanicity, percent black, percent poverty, and percent uninsured. The percent Hispanic/Latino was associated with a lower probability of HIV testing activity. Higher percentages of black and Hispanic/Latino in the population was positively associated with new HIV diagnoses. Analyzing county-level data confirmed the appropriateness of CDC-funded HIV testing activities under a high-impact prevention approach but also suggested areas for possible improvement.

  17. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  18. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chaves Valadão, Ana Luiza; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Dias, Juliana Zanatta; Arantes, Pablo; Verli, Hugo; Tanuri, Amilcar; de Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2015-06-22

    Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine's potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT) to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V). Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  19. Towards Combination HIV Prevention for Injection Drug Users: Addressing Addictophobia, Apathy and Inattention

    PubMed Central

    Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Shoptaw, Steven; Dyer, Typhanye Penniman; Quan, Vu Minh; Aramrattana, Apinun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review Recent breakthroughs in HIV-prevention science led us to evaluate the current state of combination HIV-prevention for injection drug users (IDUs). We review the recent literature focusing on possible reasons why coverage of prevention interventions for HIV, HCV and tuberculosis among IDUs remains dismal. We make recommendations for future HIV research and policy. Recent findings IDUs disproportionately under-utilize VCT, primary care and ART, especially in countries that have the largest burden of HIV among IDUs. IDUs present later in the course of HIV infection and experience greater morbidity and mortality. Why are IDUs under-represented in HIV-prevention research, access to treatment for both HIV and addiction, and access to HIV combination prevention? Possible explanations include addictophobia, apathy, and inattention, which we describe in the context of recent literature and events. Summary This commentary discusses the current state of HIV-prevention interventions for IDUs including, VCT, NSP, OST, ART and PrEP, and discusses ways to work towards true combination HIV-prevention for IDU populations. Communities need to overcome tacit assumptions that IDUs can navigate through systems that are maintained as separate silos, and take a rights-based approach to HIV-prevention to ensure that IDUs have equitable access to life-saving prevention and treatments. PMID:22498479

  20. Differential signaling mechanism for HIV-1 Nef-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Kumar, Anil

    2015-06-15

    Variety of HIV-1 viral proteins including HIV-1 Nef are known to activate astrocytes and microglia in the brain and cause the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which is thought to be one of the mechanisms leading to HIV-1- mediated neurotoxicity. IL-6 and IL-8 have been found in the CSF of patients with HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD), suggesting that they might play important roles in HIV-1 neuropathology. In the present study we examined the effects of HIV-1 Nef on IL-6 and IL-8 induction in astrocytes. The results demonstrate that both IL-6 and IL-8 are significantly induced in HIV-1 Nef-transfected SVGA astrocytes and HIV-1 Nef-treated primary fetal astrocytes. We also determined the molecular mechanisms responsible for the HIV-1 Nef-induced increased IL-6 and IL-8 by using chemical inhibitors and siRNAs against PI3K/Akt/PKC, p38 MAPK, NF-κB, CEBP and AP-1. Our results clearly demonstrate that the PI3K/PKC, p38 MAPK, NF-κB and AP-1 pathways are involved in HIV-1 Nef-induced IL-6 production in astrocytes, while PI3K/PKC and NF-κB pathways are involved in HIV-1 Nef-induced IL-8 production. These results offer new potential targets to develop therapeutic strategy for treatment of HIV-1 associated neurological disorders, prevalent in > 40% of individuals infected with HIV-1.

  1. Naf1 Regulates HIV-1 Latency by Suppressing Viral Promoter-Driven Gene Expression in Primary CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Wang, Hai-Bo; Kuang, Wen-Dong; Ren, Xiao-Xin; Song, Shu-Ting; Zhu, Huan-Zhang; Li, Qiang; Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-Jun; Wu, Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 latency is characterized by reversible silencing of viral transcription driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter of HIV-1. Cellular and viral factors regulating LTR activity contribute to HIV-1 latency, and certain repressive cellular factors modulate viral transcription silencing. Nef-associated factor 1 (Naf1) is a host nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that regulates multiple cellular signaling pathways and HIV-1 production. We recently reported that nuclear Naf1 promoted nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA, leading to increased Gag production. Here we demonstrate new functions of Naf1 in regulating HIV-1 persistence. We found that Naf1 contributes to the maintenance of HIV-1 latency by inhibiting LTR-driven HIV-1 gene transcription in a nuclear factor kappa B-dependent manner. Interestingly, Naf1 knockdown significantly enhanced viral reactivation in both latently HIV-1-infected Jurkat T cells and primary central memory CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, Naf1 knockdown in resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy significantly increased viral reactivation upon T-cell activation, suggesting an important role of Naf1 in modulating HIV-1 latency in vivo Our findings provide new insights for a better understanding of HIV-1 latency and suggest that inhibition of Naf1 activity to activate latently HIV-1-infected cells may be a potential therapeutic strategy.

  2. Multilevel stigma as a barrier to HIV testing in Central Asia: a context quantified.

    PubMed

    Smolak, Alex; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2013-10-01

    Central Asia is experiencing one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in the world, with some areas' infection rates doubling yearly since 2000. This study examines the impact of multilevel stigma (individual, family, and community) on uptake of HIV testing and receipt of HIV testing results among women in Central Asia. The sample consists of 38,884 ever-married, Central Asian women between the ages of 15 and 49. Using multilevel modeling (MLM), HIV stigma variables at the individual, family, and community levels were used to assess the significance of differences in HIV testing and receipt of HIV test results among participants while adjusting for possible confounding factors, such as age, wealth, and education. MLM results indicate that HIV stigma is significantly associated with decreased HIV testing uptake at the individual, family, and community levels and with a decrease in receipt at the community level. A one standard deviation increase in individual, family, and community level composite stigma score was associated with a respective 49 %, 59 %, and 94 % (p < 0.001) decrease in the odds of having been tested for HIV. A one standard deviation increase in community composite stigma score was associated with a 99 % (p < 0.001) decrease in the odds of test receipt. HIV stigma operates on the individual, family, and community levels to hinder HIV testing uptake and at the community level to hinder receipt. These findings have important interventions implications to improve uptake of HIV testing and receipt of HIV test results.

  3. Sustained attention deficits among HIV-positive individuals with comorbid bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Posada, Carolina; Moore, David J; Deutsch, Reena; Rooney, Alexandra; Gouaux, Ben; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton

    2012-01-01

    Difficulties with sustained attention have been found among both persons with HIV infection (HIV+) and bipolar disorder (BD). The authors examined sustained attention among 39 HIV+ individuals with BD (HIV+/BD+) and 33 HIV-infected individuals without BD (HIV+/BD-), using the Conners' Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). A Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score was also assigned to each participant as an overall indicator of daily functioning abilities. HIV+/BD+ participants had significantly worse performance on CPT-II omission errors, hit reaction time SE (Hit RT SE), variability of SE, and perseverations than HIV+/BD- participants. When examining CPT-II performance over the six study blocks, both HIV+/BD+ and HIV+/BD- participants evidenced worse performance on scores of commission errors and reaction times as the test progressed. The authors also examined the effect of current mood state (i.e., manic, depressive, euthymic) on CPT-II performance, but no significant differences were observed across the various mood states. HIV+/BD+ participants had significantly worse GAF scores than HIV+/BD- participants, which indicates poorer overall functioning in the dually-affected group; among HIV+/BD+ persons, significant negative correlations were found between GAF scores and CPT-II omission and commission errors, detectability, and perseverations, indicating a possible relationship between decrements in sustained attention and worse daily-functioning outcomes.

  4. Aptamer-targeted RNAi for HIV-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    The highly specific mechanism of RNA (RNAi) that inhibits the expression of disease genes is increasingly being harnessed to develop a new class of therapeutics for a wide variety of human maladies. The successful use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for therapeutic purposes requires safe and efficient delivery to specific cells and tissues. Herein, we demonstrate novel cell type-specific dual inhibitory function anti-gp120 aptamer-siRNA delivery systems for HIV-1 therapy, in which both the aptamer and the siRNA portions have potent anti-HIV activities. The envelope glycoprotein is expressed on the surface of HIV-1 infected cells, allowing binding and internalization of the aptamer-siRNA chimeric molecules. The Dicer substrate siRNA delivered by the aptamers is functionally processed by Dicer, resulting in specific inhibition of HIV-1 replication and infectivity in cultured CEM T-cells and primary blood mononuclear cells. Our results provide a set of novel aptamer-targeted RNAi therapeutics to combat HIV and further validate the use of anti-gp120 aptamers for delivery of Dicer substrate siRNAs.

  5. What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services HIV Overview What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine? (Last updated 2/20/2017; last reviewed 2/ ... preventive HIV vaccine. What is a preventive HIV vaccine? A preventive HIV vaccine is given to people ...

  6. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS ... with men—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 20 U.S. cities, 2014 . HIV Surveillance Special Report 2016;15. CDC. ...

  7. Review of HIV Testing Efforts in Historically Black Churches

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Latrice Crystal; Powell, Terrinieka Williams

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to critically assess the state of HIV testing in African American churches. A comprehensive review of peer-reviewed publications on HIV testing in church-based settings was conducted by two independent coders. Twenty-six papers published between 1991 and 2015, representing 24 unique projects, were identified addressing at least one dimension of HIV testing. Thirteen faith-based projects have implemented HIV testing events or had clergy promote the importance of testing and knowing one’s HIV status, but empirical data and rigorous study designs were limited. Only eight papers reported onsite HIV testing in churches. Less than 5% of the studies reported the percentage of congregants who returned for their test results. Finally, no study has examined at baseline or post-intervention behavioral intentions to be screened for HIV. Future research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of HIV testing in churches and to explore the possibilities of the role of the church and leadership structure in the promotion of HIV treatment and care. PMID:26030470

  8. Elevated Rates of Mild Cognitive Impairment in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, David P.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Bondi, Mark W.; Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Massman, Paul J.; Gilbert, Paul E.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    With the rising number of individuals in their 50s and 60s who are infected with HIV, concerns have emerged about possible increases in the rates of non-HIV-associated dementias. The current study examined the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older HIV-infected adults, since MCI is an intermediate state between typical cognitive aging and dementia that emerges in this age range. Participants included 75 adults with HIV disease aged 50 years and older who were on cART and had undetectable plasma viral loads and 80 demographically similar HIV seronegative comparison subjects. Participants completed a research neuropsychological evaluation that was used to classify MCI according to the comprehensive diagnostic scheme described by Bondi et al. (2014). HIV-infected persons were over seven times more likely to have an MCI designation (16%) than their seronegative counterparts (2.5%). Within the HIV+ cohort, MCI had minimal overlap with diagnoses of Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment and was significantly associated with older age, lower Karnofsky Scale of Performance Scores, and mild difficulties performing instrumental activities of daily living (iADLs). HIV infection in older adults is associated with a notably elevated concurrent risk of MCI, which may increase the likelihood of developing non-HIV-associated dementias as this population ages further. PMID:26139019

  9. Antiviral agents and HIV prevention: controversies, conflicts, and consensus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Smith, M. Kumi; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral agents can be used to prevent HIV transmission before exposure as preexpo-sure prophylaxis (PrEP), after exposure as postexposure prophylaxis, and as treatment of infected people for secondary prevention. Considerable research has shed new light on antiviral agents for PrEP and for prevention of secondary HIV transmission. While promising results have emerged from several PrEP trials, the challenges of poor adherence among HIV-negative clients and possible increase in sexual risk behaviors remain a concern. In addition, a broader pipeline of antiviral agents for PrEP that focuses on genital tract pharmacology and safety and resistance issues must be developed. Antiretroviral drugs have also been used to prevent HIV transmission from HIV-infected patients to their HIV-discordant sexual partners. The HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial demonstrated nearly complete prevention of HIV transmission by early treatment of infection, but the generalizability of the results to other risk groups – including intravenous drug users and MSM – has not been determined. Most importantly, the best strategy for use of antiretroviral agents to reduce the spread of HIV at either the individual level or the population level has not been developed, and remains the ultimate goal of this area of investigation. PMID:22507927

  10. Enhancing HIV Treatment Access and Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Children and Adolescents in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Goga, Ameena Ebrahim; Singh, Yagespari; Singh, Michelle; Noveve, Nobuntu; Magasana, Vuyolwethu; Ramraj, Trisha; Abdullah, Fareed; Coovadia, Ashraf H; Bhardwaj, Sanjana; Sherman, Gayle G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Increasing access to HIV-related care and treatment for children aged 0-18 years in resource-limited settings is an urgent global priority. In 2011-2012 the percentage increase in children accessing antiretroviral therapy was approximately half that of adults (11 vs. 21 %). We propose a model for increasing access to, and retention in, paediatric HIV care and treatment in resource-limited settings. Methods Following a rapid appraisal of recent literature seven main challenges in paediatric HIV-related care and treatment were identified: (1) lack of regular, integrated, ongoing HIV-related diagnosis; (2) weak facility-based systems for tracking and retention in care; (3) interrupted availability of dried blood spot cards (expiration/stock outs); (4) poor quality control of rapid HIV testing; (5) supply-related gaps at health facility-laboratory interface; (6) poor uptake of HIV testing, possibly relating to a fatalistic belief about HIV infection; (7) community-associated reasons e.g. non-disclosure and weak systems for social support, resulting in poor retention in care. Results To increase sustained access to paediatric HIV-related care and treatment, regular updating of Policies, review of inter-sectoral Plans (at facility and community levels) and evaluation of Programme implementation and impact (at national, subnational, facility and community levels) are non-negotiable critical elements. Additionally we recommend the intensified implementation of seven main interventions: (1) update or refresher messaging for health care staff and simple messaging for key staff at early childhood development centres and schools; (2) contact tracing, disclosure and retention monitoring; (3) paying particular attention to infant dried blood spot (DBS) stock control; (4) regular quality assurance of rapid HIV testing procedures; (5) workshops/meetings/dialogues between health facilities and laboratories to resolve transport-related gaps and to facilitate return of

  11. A lymphomagenic role for HIV beyond immune suppression?

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Riccardo; Gloghini, Annunziata; Caruso, Arnaldo; Carbone, Antonino

    2016-03-17

    Despite the immune reconstitution promoted by combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), lymphomas still represent the most common type of cancer in HIV-infected individuals. Cofactors related to immunodeficiency such as oncogenic viruses, chronic antigenic stimulation, and cytokine overproduction are thought to be the main drivers of HIV lymphomagenesis, although the current scenario does not convincingly explain the still-high incidence of lymphomas and the occurrence of peculiar lymphoma histotypes in HIV-infected patients under cART. Recent findings are challenging the current view of a mainly indirect role of HIV in lymphoma development and support the possibility that HIV may directly contribute to lymphomagenesis. In fact, mechanisms other than immune suppression involve biologic effects mediated by HIV products that are secreted and accumulate in lymphoid tissues, mainly within lymph node germinal centers. Notably, HIV-infected patients with lymphomas, but not those not affected by these tumors, were recently shown to carry HIV p17 protein variants with enhanced B-cell clonogenic activity. HIV p17 protein variants were characterized by the presence of distinct insertions at the C-terminal region of the protein responsible for a structural destabilization and the acquisition of novel biologic properties. These data are changing the current paradigm assuming that HIV is only indirectly related to lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, these recent findings are consistent with a role of HIV as a critical microenvironmental factor promoting lymphoma development and pave the way for further studies that may lead to the design of more effective strategies for an early identification and improved control of lymphomas in the HIV setting.

  12. HIV and chronic methamphetamine dependence affect cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Vaida, Florin; Cherner, Mariana; Yeh, Melinda J; Liang, Christine L; Gardner, Carly; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J; Buxton, Richard B

    2011-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and methamphetamine (METH) dependence are independently associated with neuronal dysfunction. The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neuronal activity is the basis of many task-based functional neuroimaging techniques. We examined the interaction between HIV infection and a previous history of METH dependence on CBF within the lenticular nuclei (LN). Twenty-four HIV-/METH-, eight HIV-/METH+, 24 HIV+/METH-, and 15 HIV+/METH+ participants performed a finger tapping paradigm. A multiple regression analysis of covariance assessed associations and two-way interactions between CBF and HIV serostatus and/or previous history of METH dependence. HIV+ individuals had a trend towards a lower baseline CBF (-10%, p = 0.07) and greater CBF changes for the functional task (+32%, p = 0.01) than HIV- subjects. Individuals with a previous history of METH dependence had a lower baseline CBF (-16%, p = 0.007) and greater CBF changes for a functional task (+33%, p = 0.02). However, no interaction existed between HIV serostatus and previous history of METH dependence for either baseline CBF (p = 0.53) or CBF changes for a functional task (p = 0.10). In addition, CBF and volume in the LN were not correlated. A possible additive relationship could exist between HIV infection and a history of METH dependence on CBF with a previous history of METH dependence having a larger contribution. Abnormalities in CBF could serve as a surrogate measure for assessing the chronic effects of HIV and previous METH dependence on brain function.

  13. Sociocultural and epidemiological aspects of HIV/AIDS in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A legacy of colonial rule coupled with a devastating 16-year civil war through 1992 left Mozambique economically impoverished just as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic swept over southern Africa in the late 1980s. The crumbling Mozambican health care system was wholly inadequate to support the need for new chronic disease services for people with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods To review the unique challenges faced by Mozambique as they have attempted to stem the HIV epidemic, we undertook a systematic literature review through multiple search engines (PubMed, Google Scholar™, SSRN, AnthropologyPlus, AnthroSource) using Mozambique as a required keyword. We searched for any articles that included the required keyword as well as the terms 'HIV' and/or 'AIDS', 'prevalence', 'behaviors', 'knowledge', 'attitudes', 'perceptions', 'prevention', 'gender', drugs, alcohol, and/or 'health care infrastructure'. Results UNAIDS 2008 prevalence estimates ranked Mozambique as the 8th most HIV-afflicted nation globally. In 2007, measured HIV prevalence in 36 antenatal clinic sites ranged from 3% to 35%; the national estimate of was 16%. Evidence suggests that the Mozambican HIV epidemic is characterized by a preponderance of heterosexual infections, among the world's most severe health worker shortages, relatively poor knowledge of HIV/AIDS in the general population, and lagging access to HIV preventive and therapeutic services compared to counterpart nations in southern Africa. Poor education systems, high levels of poverty and gender inequality further exacerbate HIV incidence. Conclusions Recommendations to reduce HIV incidence and AIDS mortality rates in Mozambique include: health system strengthening, rural outreach to increase testing and linkage to care, education about risk reduction and drug adherence, and partnerships with traditional healers and midwives to effect a lessening of stigma. PMID:20529358

  14. A Case-Controlled Study of Successful Aging in Older Adults with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Raeanne C.; Moore, David J.; Thompson, Wesley; Vahia, Ipsit V.; Grant, Igor; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There is a growing public health interest in the aging HIV-infected (HIV+) population, although there is a dearth of research on successful aging with HIV. This study aimed to understand the risk and protective factors associated with self-rated successful aging (SRSA) with HIV. DESIGN Cross-sectional, case-controlled. SETTING HIV Neurobehavioral Research Program and the Stein Institute for Research on Aging at University of California, San Diego. PARTICIPANTS Eighty-three community-dwelling HIV+ and 83 demographically matched HIV-uninfected (HIV−) individuals, enrolled between 12/1/11 and 5/10/12, mean age of 59 years, primarily Caucasian males, 69% with AIDS, who had been living with an HIV diagnosis for 16 years. Diagnostic criteria for HIV/AIDS was obtained through a blood draw. MEASUREMENTS Participants provided ratings of SRSA as part of a comprehensive survey which included measures of physical and emotional functioning and positive psychological traits. Relationships between how the different variables related to SRSA were explored. RESULTS While SRSA was lower in the HIV+ individuals than their HIV− counterparts, 66% of adults with HIV reported scores of 5 or higher on a 10-point scale of SRSA. Despite worse physical and mental functioning and greater psychosocial stress among the HIV+ participants, the two groups had comparable levels of optimism, personal mastery, and social support. SRSA in HIV+ individuals was associated with better physical and emotional functioning and positive psychological factors, but not HIV disease status or negative life events. CONCLUSION Successful psychosocial aging is possible in older HIV+ individuals. Positive psychological traits such as resilience, optimism, and sense of personal mastery have stronger relationship with SRSA than duration or severity of HIV disease. Research on interventions to enhance these positive traits in HIV+ adults is warranted. PMID:23759460

  15. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS email updates Enter email Submit HIV and AIDS The human immunodeficiency (IH-myoo-noh-di-FISH- ... health Pregnancy and HIV View more HIV and AIDS resources Related information Birth control methods Sexually transmitted ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved June 2012 How are Drug Abuse and HIV Related? Drug abuse and addiction ...

  17. HIV/AIDS in Women

    MedlinePlus

    HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. The most advanced stage of infection with HIV is AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV often ...

  18. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

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    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Victoria Cargill talks to students about HIV and AIDS at the opening of a National Library of ...

  19. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

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    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  20. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  1. Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV Coinfection in the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Norman, Francesca F.; Cruz, Israel; Alvar, Jorge; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is hypoendemic in Mediterranean countries, where it is caused by the flagellate protozoan Leishmania infantum. VL cases in this area account for 5%–6% of the global burden. Cases of Leishmania/HIV coinfection have been reported in the Mediterranean region, mainly in France, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. Since highly active antiretroviral therapy was introduced in 1997, a marked decrease in the number of coinfected cases in this region has been reported. The development of new diagnostic methods to accurately identify level of parasitemia and the risk of relapse is one of the main challenges in improving the treatment of coinfected patients. Clinical trials in the Mediterranean region are needed to determine the most adequate therapeutic options for Leishmania/HIV patients as well as the indications and regimes for secondary prophylaxis. This article reviews the epidemiological, diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of Leishmania/HIV coinfection in the Mediterranean region. PMID:25144380

  2. HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk and challenges to elimination of breast-feeding transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Van de Perre, Philippe; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Viljoen, Johannes; Nagot, Nicolas; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Lepage, Philippe; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2012-07-18

    By compensating for the relative immaturity of the neonatal immune system, breast milk and breast-feeding prevent deaths in children. Nevertheless, transmission of HIV-1 through breast-feeding is responsible for more than half of new pediatric HIV infections. Recent studies of possible HIV-1 reservoirs in breast milk shed new light on features that influence HIV-1 transmission through breast-feeding. The particular characteristics of breast milk CD4(+) T cells that distinguish them from circulating blood lymphocytes (high frequency of cell activation and expression of memory and mucosal homing markers) facilitate the establishment of HIV-1 replication. Breast milk also contains a plethora of factors with anti-infectious, immunomodulatory, or anti-inflammatory properties that can regulate both viral replication and infant susceptibility. In addition, CD8(+) T lymphocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells in breast milk can alter the dynamics of HIV-1 transmission. Even during efficient antiretroviral therapy, a residual stable, CD4(+) T cell-associated reservoir of HIV-1 is persistently present in breast milk, a likely source of infection. Only prophylactic treatment in infants--ideally with a long-acting drug, administered for the entire duration of breast-feeding--is likely to protect HIV-exposed babies against all forms of HIV transmission from breast milk, including cell-to-cell viral transfer.

  3. Barriers and Facilitators of HIV Disclosure: Perspectives from HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Jeffrey R; Salomon, Elizabeth; Mayer, Kenneth; Capistrant, Benjamin; Safren, Steven

    2008-01-01

    HIV disclosure among sexually active HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) is a complex phenomenon. To better understand factors that impact the decision-making process regarding HIV disclosure among HIV-infected MSM, the present study analyzed content from previously conducted counseling sessions where HIV disclosure was selected as the primary focus of the session. The counselor/participant dialogue was audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively using content analysis. Factors identified as barriers that deter HIV-infected MSM from disclosing include rejection, issues of confidentiality, possible missed sexual opportunities, partner's HIV status, deferred responsibility, sexual partner type, and public sex environments. Participants identified ethical obligation, the potential for a dating relationship, timing of disclosure, and bidirectional communication as facilitators of disclosure. Findings can be used for policy development as well as to guide social workers and other healthcare providers' assessment and development of clinical interventions addressing sexual health among HIV-infected MSM as it relates to HIV disclosure.

  4. Future directions in the treatment of HIV-HBV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Iser, David M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2009-07-01

    Liver disease is a major cause of mortality in individuals with HIV-HBV coinfection. The pathogenesis of liver disease in this setting is unknown, but is likely to involve drug toxicity, infection of hepatic cells with both HIV and HBV, and an altered immune response to HBV. The availability of therapeutic agents that target both HIV and HBV replication enable dual viral suppression, and assessment of chronic hepatitis B is important prior to commencement of antiretroviral therapy. Greater importance is now placed on HBV DNA levels and staging of liver fibrosis, either by liver biopsy or noninvasive measurement, such as transient elastography, since significant liver fibrosis may exist in the presence of normal liver function tests. Earlier treatment of both HIV and HBV is now generally advocated and treatment is usually lifelong.

  5. Towards HIV-1 remission: potential roles for broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    Current antiretroviral drug therapies do not cure HIV-1 because they do not eliminate a pool of long-lived cells harboring immunologically silent but replication-competent proviruses — termed the latent reservoir. Eliminating this reservoir and stimulating the immune response to control infection in the absence of therapy remain important but unsolved goals of HIV-1 cure research. Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) exhibit remarkable breadth and potency in their ability to neutralize HIV-1 in vitro, and recent studies have demonstrated new therapeutic applications for passively administered bNAbs in vivo. This Review discusses the roles bNAbs might play in HIV-1 treatment regimens, including prevention, therapy, and cure. PMID:26752643

  6. Molecular Characterization of Mexican HIV-1 Vif Sequences.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Palomares, Sandra E; Hernandez-Sanchez, Pedro G; Esparza-Perez, Mario A; Arguello, J Rafael; Noyola, Daniel E; Garcia-Sepulveda, Christian A

    2016-03-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is an HIV accessory protein that counteracts host antiviral proteins of the APOBEC3 family. Accumulating evidence highlights the pivotal role that accessory HIV proteins have on disease pathogenesis, a fact that has made them targets of interest for novel therapeutic and preventive strategies. Little is known about Vif sequence diversity outside of African or white populations. Mexico is home to Americas' third largest HIV-affected population and Mexican Hispanics represent an ever-increasing U.S. minority. This study provides a detailed analysis of the diversity seen in 77 Mexican Vif protein sequences. Phylogenetic analysis shows that most sequences cluster with HIV-1 subtype B, while less than 10% exhibit greater similarity to subtype D and A subtypes. Although most functional motifs are conserved among the Mexican sequences, substantial diversity was seen in some APOBEC binding sites, the nuclear localization inhibitory signal, and the CBFβ interaction sites.

  7. Development of new RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Wong-Staal, F; Li, Q-X

    2007-02-01

    RNAi-mediated gene inactivation has become a cornerstone of the present day gene function studies that are the foundation of mechanism and target based drug discovery and development, which could potentially shorten the otherwise long process of drug development. In particular, the coming of age of "RNAi drug" could provide new promising therapeutics bypassing traditional approaches. However, there are technological hurdles need to overcome and the biological limitations need to consider for achieving effective therapeutics. Major hurdles include the intrinsic poor pharmacokinetic property of siRNA and major biological restrictions include off-target effects, interferon response and the interference with endogenous miRNA. Recent innovations in nucleic acid chemistry, formulations and delivery methods have gradually rendered it possible to develop effective RNAi-based therapeutics. Careful design based on the newest RNAi/miRNA biology can also help to minimize the potential tissue toxicity. If successful with systemic application, RNAi drug will no doubt revolutionize the whole drug development process. This review attempts to describe the progress in this area, including applications in preclinical models and recent favorable experience in a number of human trials of local diseases, along with the discussion on the potential limitations of RNAi therapeutics.

  8. Therapeutic Devices for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic devices provide new options for treating drug-resistant epilepsy. These devices act by a variety of mechanisms to modulate neuronal activity. Only vagus nerve stimulation, which continues to develop new technology, is approved for use in the United States. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of anterior thalamus for partial epilepsy recently was approved in Europe and several other countries. Responsive neurostimulation, which delivers stimuli to one or two seizure foci in response to a detected seizure, recently completed a successful multicenter trial. Several other trials of brain stimulation are in planning or underway. Transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (TMS) may provide a noninvasive method to stimulate cortex. Controlled studies of TMS split on efficacy, and may depend on whether a seizure focus is near a possible region for stimulation. Seizure detection devices in the form of “shake” detectors via portable accelerometers can provide notification of an ongoing tonic-clonic seizure, or peace of mind in the absence of notification. Prediction of seizures from various aspects of EEG is in early stages. Prediction appears to be possible in a subpopulation of people with refractory seizures and a clinical trial of an implantable prediction device is underway. Cooling of neocortex or hippocampus reversibly can attenuate epileptiform EEG activity and seizures, but engineering problems remain in its implementation. Optogenetics is a new technique that can control excitability of specific populations of neurons with light. Inhibition of epileptiform activity has been demonstrated in hippocampal slices, but use in humans will require more work. In general, devices provide useful palliation for otherwise uncontrollable seizures, but with a different risk profile than with most drugs. Optimizing the place of devices in therapy for epilepsy will require further development and clinical experience. PMID:22367987

  9. Interactive effects of cocaine on HIV infection: implication in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Santosh; Chitti, Sai V. P.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.; Saxena, Shailendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial epidemiological studies suggest that not only, being one of the reasons for the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but drug abuse also serves its role in determining the disease progression and severity among the HIV infected population. This article focuses on the drug cocaine, and its role in facilitating entry of HIV into the CNS and mechanisms of development of neurologic complications in infected individuals. Cocaine is a powerfully addictive central nervous system stimulating drug, which increases the level of neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in the brain, by blocking the dopamine transporters (DAT) which is critical for DA homeostasis and neurocognitive function. Tat protein of HIV acts as an allosteric modulator of DAT, where as cocaine acts as reuptake inhibitor. When macrophages in the CNS are exposed to DA, their number increases. These macrophages release inflammatory mediators and neurotoxins, causing chronic neuroinflammation. Cocaine abuse during HIV infection enhances the production of platelet monocyte complexes (PMCs), which may cross transendothelial barrier, and result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). HAND is characterized by neuroinflammation, including astrogliosis, multinucleated giant cells, and neuronal apoptosis that is linked to progressive virus infection and immune deterioration. Cocaine and viral proteins are capable of eliciting signaling transduction pathways in neurons, involving in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, oxidative stress, activation of JNK, p38, and ERK/MAPK pathways, and results in downstream activation of NF-κB that leads to HAND. Tat-induced inflammation provokes permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in the platelet dependent manner, which can potentially be the reason for progression to HAND during HIV infection. A better understanding on the role of cocaine in HIV infection can give a clue in developing novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection

  10. [Use of darunavir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Afonina, L Iu; Voronin, E E

    2013-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVDs) in a mother and a child can reduce the risk of vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to less than 1%; therefore, highly active antiretroviral therapy is used in all pregnant women regardless of indications for HIV-infection treatment. The major requirements for choosing an ARVD to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission are its high safety for a pregnant woman, a fetus, and a baby and its high therapeutic efficacy. Clinical trials of darunavir (DRV) in adults and children have shown a high virologic response, good tolerance, and safety. Trials and observations have demonstrated the high efficacy and safety of a DRV when used in pregnant women. Pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women have indicated the effective and well-tolerated concentration of a DRV when it is co-administered with low-dose ritonavir, which permits the use of a DRV for both the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission and the treatment of pregnant women who require antiretroviral therapy. The Russian clinical protocol "Use of ARVDs in the package of measures for the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission" approved by the National Scientific Society of Infectiologists in 2013 recommends DRV as an alternative drug in antiretroviral therapy regimens for pregnant women to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission and to treat maternal HIV infection.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Claudio M; Lichtner, Miriam; Mascia, Claudia; Zuccalà, Paola; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-26

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in people coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Several studies have shown that HIV infection promotes accelerated HCV hepatic fibrosis progression, even with HIV replication under full antiretroviral control. The pathogenesis of accelerated hepatic fibrosis among HIV/HCV coinfected individuals is complex and multifactorial. The most relevant mechanisms involved include direct viral effects, immune/cytokine dysregulation, altered levels of matrix metalloproteinases and fibrosis biomarkers, increased oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis, HIV-associated gut depletion of CD4 cells, and microbial translocation. In addition, metabolic alterations, heavy alcohol use, as well drug use, may have a potential role in liver disease progression. Understanding the pathophysiology and regulation of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infection may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the management of all patients with ongoing liver disease. In this review, we therefore discuss the evidence and potential molecular mechanisms involved in the accelerated liver fibrosis seen in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV.

  12. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  13. Comparison of the Cepheid GeneXpert and Abbott M2000 HIV-1 real time molecular assays for monitoring HIV-1 viral load and detecting HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ceffa, Susanna; Luhanga, Richard; Andreotti, Mauro; Brambilla, Davide; Erba, Fulvio; Jere, Haswel; Mancinelli, Sandro; Giuliano, Marina; Palombi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Assessing treatment efficacy and early infant diagnosis (EID) are critical issues in HIV disease management. Point-of-care assays may greatly increase the possibility to access laboratory monitoring also in rural areas. Recently two new laboratory tests have been developed by Cepheid (Sunnyvale, California) the Xpert HIV-1 Viral Load for viral load determination and the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative for early infant diagnosis. We conducted a study in Blantyre, Malawi, comparing the 2 methods versus the Abbott real time quantitative and qualitative assays, for viral load and EID respectively. We tested 300 plasma samples for viral load determination and 200 samples for infant diagnosis. HIV-1 RNA values of the 274 samples quantified by both assays were highly correlated (Pearson r=0.95, R(2)=0.90). In 90.9% of the cases the two methods were concordant in defining the HIV-1 RNA levels as detectable or undetectable. For EID, the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative assay yielded the same identical results as the Abbott assay. Both the quantitative and the qualitative Xpert assays are promising tools to monitor treatment efficac